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Sample records for can-derem decontamination solution

  1. Processing of waste solutions from electrochemical decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlot, L.A.; Allen, R.P.; Arrowsmith, H.W.; Hooper, J.L.

    1979-09-01

    The use of electropolishing as a decontamination technique will be effective only if we can minimize the amount of secondary waste requiring disposal and economically recycle part of the decontamination electrolyte. Consequently, a solution purification method is needed to remove the dissolved contamination and metal in the electrolyte. This report describes the selection of a purification method for a phosphoric acid electrolyte from the following possible acid reclamation processes: ion exchange, solvent extraction, precipitation, distillation, electrolysis, and membrane separation.

  2. Aquatic toxicity of the decontamination agent: Multipurpose (DAM) decontamination solution. Final report, May-December 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, M.V.; Kurnas, C.W.; Chester, N.A.; Muse, W.T.

    1994-05-01

    A new formulation, Decontaminating Agent: Multipurpose (DAM) Decontamination Solution, is being considered as a replacement to the DS-2 decontaminating solution. The new formulation is composed of calcium hypochlorite and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone. Since this is a new formulation little environmental data exists. To estimate potential impact to an aquatic environment, Daphnia magna and Photobacterium phosphoreum (a luminescent marine bacterium) were exposed to the DAM solution and to the individual components (Calcium hypochlorite and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone). The toxicity of the DAM solution to D. magna and P. phosphoreum was 5000 and 0.00053, respectively (highly toxic). The toxicity of calcium hypochlorite' and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidinone to daphnia was 0.04 mg/L (highly toxic) and 107 mg/L (moderately toxic), respectively.

  3. Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Oh, W. Z.; Won, H. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2007-11-15

    Through the project of 'Decomposition Technology Development of Organic Component in a Decontamination Waste Solution', the followings were studied. 1. Investigation of decontamination characteristics of chemical decontamination process 2. Analysis of COD, ferrous ion concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration 3. Decomposition tests of hardly decomposable organic compounds 4. Improvement of organic acid decomposition process by ultrasonic wave and UV light 5. Optimization of decomposition process using a surrogate decontamination waste solution.

  4. Bioremediation of {sup 60}Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashmi, K.; Naga Sowjanya, T.; Maruthi Mohan, P.; Balaji, V.; Venkateswaran, G

    2004-07-26

    Bioremediation of {sup 60}Co from simulated spent decontamination solutions by utilizing different biomass of (Neurospora crassa, Trichoderma viridae, Mucor recemosus, Rhizopus chinensis, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus niger and, Aspergillus flavus) fungi is reported. Various fungal species were screened to evaluate their potential for removing cobalt from very low concentrations (0.03-0.16 {mu}M) in presence of a high background of iron (9.33 mM) and nickel (0.93 mM) complexed with EDTA (10.3 mM). The different fungal isolates employed in this study showed a pickup of cobalt in the range 8-500 ng/g of dry biomass. The [Fe]/[Co] and [Ni]/[Co] ratios in the solutions before and after exposure to the fungi were also determined. At micromolar level the cobalt pickup by many fungi especially the mutants of N. crassa is seen to be proportional to the initial cobalt concentration taken in the solution. However, R. chinensis exhibits a low but iron concentration dependent cobalt pickup. Prior saturating the fungi with excess of iron during their growth showed the presence of selective cobalt pickup sites. The existence of cobalt specific sorption sites is shown by a model experiment with R. chinensis wherein at a constant cobalt concentration (0.034 {mu}M) and varying iron concentrations so as to yield [Fe/Co]{sub initial} ratios in solution of 10, 100, 1000 and 287 000 have all yielded a definite Co pickup capacity in the range 8-47 ng/g. The presence of Cr(III)EDTA (3 mM) in solution along with complexed Fe and Ni has not influenced the cobalt removal. The significant feature of this study is that even when cobalt is present in trace level (sub-micromolar) in a matrix of high concentration (millimolar levels) of iron, nickel and chromium, a situation typically encountered in spent decontamination solutions arising from stainless steel based primary systems of nuclear reactors, a number of fungi studied in this work showed a good sensitivity for cobalt pickup.

  5. A decontamination system for chemical weapons agents using a liquid solution on a solid sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waysbort, Daniel [Israel Institute for Biological Research, PO Box 19, Ness-Ziona 74100 (Israel); McGarvey, David J. [R and T Directorate, Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edgewood Area, MD 21010 (United States)], E-mail: david.mcgarvey@us.army.mil; Creasy, William R.; Morrissey, Kevin M.; Hendrickson, David M. [SAIC, P.O. Box 68, Gunpowder Branch, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); Durst, H. Dupont [R and T Directorate, Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground-Edgewood Area, MD 21010 (United States)

    2009-01-30

    A decontamination system for chemical warfare agents was developed and tested that combines a liquid decontamination reagent solution with solid sorbent particles. The components have fewer safety and environmental concerns than traditional chlorine bleach-based products or highly caustic solutions. The liquid solution, based on Decon Green{sup TM}, has hydrogen peroxide and a carbonate buffer as active ingredients. The best solid sorbents were found to be a copolymer of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and n-lauryl methacrylate (Polytrap 6603 Adsorber); or an allyl methacrylate cross-linked polymer (Poly-Pore E200 Adsorber). These solids are human and environmentally friendly and are commonly used in cosmetics. The decontaminant system was tested for reactivity with pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (Soman, GD), bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (Mustard, HD), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) by using NMR Spectroscopy. Molybdate ion (MoO{sub 4}{sup -2}) was added to the decontaminant to catalyze the oxidation of HD. The molybdate ion provided a color change from pink to white when the oxidizing capacity of the system was exhausted. The decontaminant was effective for ratios of agent to decontaminant of up to 1:50 for VX (t{sub 1/2} {<=} 4 min), 1:10 for HD (t{sub 1/2} < 2 min with molybdate), and 1:10 for GD (t{sub 1/2} < 2 min). The vapor concentrations of GD above the dry sorbent and the sorbent with decontamination solution were measured to show that the sorbent decreased the vapor concentration of GD. The E200 sorbent had the additional advantage of absorbing aqueous decontamination solution without the addition of an organic co-solvent such as isopropanol, but the rate depended strongly on mixing for HD.

  6. A decontamination system for chemical weapons agents using a liquid solution on a solid sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waysbort, Daniel; McGarvey, David J; Creasy, William R; Morrissey, Kevin M; Hendrickson, David M; Durst, H Dupont

    2009-01-30

    A decontamination system for chemical warfare agents was developed and tested that combines a liquid decontamination reagent solution with solid sorbent particles. The components have fewer safety and environmental concerns than traditional chlorine bleach-based products or highly caustic solutions. The liquid solution, based on Decon Greentrade mark, has hydrogen peroxide and a carbonate buffer as active ingredients. The best solid sorbents were found to be a copolymer of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and n-lauryl methacrylate (Polytrap 6603 Adsorber); or an allyl methacrylate cross-linked polymer (Poly-Pore E200 Adsorber). These solids are human and environmentally friendly and are commonly used in cosmetics. The decontaminant system was tested for reactivity with pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate (Soman, GD), bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (Mustard, HD), and S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) by using NMR Spectroscopy. Molybdate ion (MoO(4)(-2)) was added to the decontaminant to catalyze the oxidation of HD. The molybdate ion provided a color change from pink to white when the oxidizing capacity of the system was exhausted. The decontaminant was effective for ratios of agent to decontaminant of up to 1:50 for VX (t(1/2) < or = 4 min), 1:10 for HD (t(1/2) < 2 min with molybdate), and 1:10 for GD (t(1/2) < 2 min). The vapor concentrations of GD above the dry sorbent and the sorbent with decontamination solution were measured to show that the sorbent decreased the vapor concentration of GD. The E200 sorbent had the additional advantage of absorbing aqueous decontamination solution without the addition of an organic co-solvent such as isopropanol, but the rate depended strongly on mixing for HD.

  7. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions. This dataset is associated with the following...

  8. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunsu, Cristian; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-02-01

    With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent's concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I2/KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5M I2/KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe4BTBP showed good removal of mercury, with an extraction efficiency of 97.5 ± 0.7% being achieved in a single stage. Better removal of mercury was achieved in a single stage using the extractants Cyanex 302 and Cyanex 923 in kerosene, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Precipitation-filtering technology for uranium waste solution generated on washing-electrokinetic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam, E-mail: kimsum@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2015-05-15

    Graphical abstract: A recycling process diagram for the volume reduction of waste solution generated from washing-electrokinetic decontamination. - Highlights: • A process for recycling a waste solution generated was developed. • The total metal precipitation rate by NaOH in a supernatant after precipitation was the highest at pH 9. • The uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum was lower. • After drying, the volume of sludge was reduced to 35% of the initial sludge volume. - Abstract: Large volumes of uranium waste solution are generated during the operation of washing-electrokinetic decontamination equipment used to remove uranium from radioactive soil. A treatment technology for uranium waste solution generated upon washing-electrokinetic decontamination for soil contaminated with uranium has been developed. The results of laboratory-size precipitation experiments were as follows. The total amount of metal precipitation by NaOH for waste solution was highest at pH 11. Ca(II), K(I), and Al(III) ions in the supernatant partially remained after precipitation, whereas the concentration of uranium in the supernatant was below 0.2 ppm. Also, when NaOH was used as a precipitant, the majority of the K(I) ions in the treated solution remained. The problem of CaO is to need a long dissolution time in the precipitation tank, while Ca(OH){sub 2} can save a dissolution time. However, the volume of the waste solution generated when using Ca(OH){sub 2} increased by 8 mL/100 mL (waste solution) compared to that generated when using CaO. NaOH precipitant required lower an injection volume lower than that required for Ca(OH){sub 2} or CaO. When CaO was used as a precipitant, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution at pH 11 reached its lowest value, compared to values of uranium radioactivity at pH 9 and pH 5. Also, the uranium radioactivity in the treated solution upon injection of 0.2 g of alum with CaO or Ca(OH){sub 2} was

  10. Investigations regarding the wet decontamination of fluorescent lamp waste using iodine in potassium iodide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunsu, Cristian, E-mail: tunsu@chalmers.se; Ekberg, Christian; Foreman, Mark; Retegan, Teodora

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • A wet-based decontamination process for fluorescent lamp waste is proposed. • Mercury can be leached using iodine in potassium iodide solution. • The efficiency of the process increases with an increase in leachant concentration. • Selective leaching of mercury from rare earth elements is achieved. • Mercury is furthered recovered using ion exchange, reduction or solvent extraction. - Abstract: With the rising popularity of fluorescent lighting, simple and efficient methods for the decontamination of discarded lamps are needed. Due to their mercury content end-of-life fluorescent lamps are classified as hazardous waste, requiring special treatment for disposal. A simple wet-based decontamination process is required, especially for streams where thermal desorption, a commonly used but energy demanding method, cannot be applied. In this study the potential of a wet-based process using iodine in potassium iodide solution was studied for the recovery of mercury from fluorescent lamp waste. The influence of the leaching agent’s concentration and solid/liquid ratio on the decontamination efficiency was investigated. The leaching behaviour of mercury was studied over time, as well as its recovery from the obtained leachates by means of anion exchange, reduction, and solvent extraction. Dissolution of more than 90% of the contained mercury was achieved using 0.025/0.05 M I{sub 2}/KI solution at 21 °C for two hours. The efficiency of the process increased with an increase in leachant concentration. 97.3 ± 0.6% of the mercury contained was dissolved at 21 °C, in two hours, using a 0.25/0.5 M I{sub 2}/KI solution and a solid to liquid ratio of 10% w/v. Iodine and mercury can be efficiently removed from the leachates using Dowex 1X8 anion exchange resin or reducing agents such as sodium hydrosulphite, allowing the disposal of the obtained solution as non-hazardous industrial wastewater. The extractant CyMe{sub 4}BTBP showed good removal of mercury

  11. Optical coherence tomography analysis of hydrofluoric acid decontamination of human cornea by mannitol solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosé, Ricardo M; Daga, Fabio B; Nosé, Walton; Kasahara, Niro

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of mannitol solution as a decontamination agent on the chemical burn of the human corneas. Eight donor corneas from an eye bank were exposed to 25μl of 2.5% hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution on a filter paper for 20s. Three eyes were rinsed with 1000ml of mannitol 20% for 15min immediately after removal of the filter paper, 3 other were rinsed with sodium chloride (NaCl) 0.9% (1000ml for 15min) and two eyes were not rinsed. Microstructural changes were monitored in the time domain by optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for 75min. NaCl reduced the penetration depth to approximately half the thickness of the cornea at 15min; scattering within the anterior cornea was higher than that for the unrinsed eye. With mannitol, no increased scattering was observed in the posterior part of the corneal stroma within a time period of 1h after rinsing. OCT images revealed low-scattering intensity within the anterior stroma at the end of the rinsing period. In eye bank human corneas, mannitol proved to be an efficient agent to decontaminate HF burn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of decontamination solution chelating agents using ion selective coated-wire electrodes

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    Banks, Mark Lavior [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This thesis explores feasibility of using coated-wire electrodes to measure chelating agent concentration. Chelating agents are often found in radioactive decontamination solutions because they aid in the removal of radionuclides from contaminated surfaces by increasing their solubility. However, this characteristic will also enhance the mobility of the radionuclide and thus its transport out of a waste disposal site. Coated-wire ion selective electrodes, based on a polyvinylchloride membrane using dioctylphthalate as a plasticizer and dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid as a counterion, were constructed for five commonly utilized chelating agents (ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), citric acid, oxalic acid and tartaric add). The EDTA and NTA electrodes` calibration characteristics exhibited acceptable behavior in pure standard solutions. From data obtained while using the EDTA and NTA electrodes in a cement environment, further research needs to be done in the area of ion interference.

  13. Efficacy of Two Cleaning Solutions for the Decontamination of 10 Antineoplastic Agents in the Biosafety Cabinets of a Hospital Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Marco; Rudaz, Serge; Queruau Lamerie, Thomas; Odou, Pascal; Bonnabry, Pascal; Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate two cleaning solutions for the chemical decontamination of antineoplastic agents on the surfaces of two biosafety cabinets routinely used for chemotherapy preparation in a hospital pharmacy. For almost 1 year (49 weeks), two different solutions were used for the weekly cleaning of two biosafety cabinets in a hospital pharmacy's centralized cytotoxic preparation unit. The solutions evaluated were a commercial solution of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and water (70:30, vol:vol), and a detergent solution constituted by 10(-2)M of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with 20% IPA. Seven areas in each biosafety cabinet were wiped 14 times throughout the year, before and after the weekly cleaning process, according to a validated procedure. Samples were analyzed using a validated method of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. The decontamination efficacy of these two solutions was tested for 10 antineoplastic agents: cytarabine, gemcitabine, methotrexate, etoposide phosphate, irinotecan, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, doxorubicin, epirubicin, and vincristine. Overall decontamination efficacies observed were 82±6% and 49±11% for SDS solution and IPA, respectively. Higher contamination levels were distributed on areas frequently touched by the pharmacy technicians-such as sleeves and airlock handles-than on scale plates, gravimetric control hardware, and work benches. Detected contaminations of cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, gemcitabine, and cytarabine were higher than those of the others agents. SDS solution was almost 20% more efficient than IPA on eight of the antineoplastic agents. Both cleaning solutions were able to reduce contamination levels in the biosafety cabinets. The efficacy of the solution containing an anionic detergent agent (SDS) was shown to be generally higher than that of IPA and, after the SDS cleaning procedure, biosafety cabinets demonstrated acceptable contamination levels. © The Author 2015

  14. Environmental decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, G.A.; Jernigan, H.C. (eds.)

    1981-02-01

    The record of the proceedings of the workshop on environmental decontamination contains twenty-seven presentations. Emphasis is placed upon soil and surface decontamination, the decommissioning of nuclear facilities, and assessments of instrumentation and equipment used in decontamination. (DLS)

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning of laboratory solutions enriched uranium (IR-01 b); Descontaminacion y desmantelamiento del laboratorio de soluciones de uranio enriquecido (IR-01b)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Arocas, P. P.; Sama Colao, J.; Garcia Diaz, A.; Torre Rodriguez, J.; Martinez, A.; Argiles, E.; Garrido Delgado, C.

    2010-07-01

    Completed actions decontamination and decommissioning of the Laboratory of Enriched Uranium Solutions, attached to the Radioactivity lR-0l CIEMAT, was carried out final radiological control of the laboratory. From the documentation generated proceeded to request modification of the IR-01 installation by closing its laboratory IR-01 b.

  16. Decontamination of cesium, strontium, and cobalt from aqueous solutions by bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M.A. [Univ. of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, S.A. [Government F.C. College, Lahore (Pakistan)

    1996-12-31

    Sorption studies of cesium, strontium, and cobalt (Cs, Sr, and Co) on bentonite under various experimental conditions, such as contact time, pH, sorbent and sorbate concentration, and temperature, have been performed. The sorption data for all these metals have been interpreted in terms of Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. Thermodynamics parameters, such as heat of sorption {Delta}H{degrees}, free energy change {Delta}G{degrees}, and entropy change {Delta}S{degrees}, for the sorption of these metals on bentonite have been calculated. The value of {Delta}H{degrees} shows that the sorption of Cs was exothermic, while the sorption of Sr and Co on bentonite were endothermic in nature. The value of {Delta}G{degrees} for their sorption was negative, showing the spontaneity of the process. The maximum loading capacity of Cs, Sr, and Co were 75.5, 22, and 27.5 meq, respectively, for 100 g of bentonite. The mean free energy E of Cs, Sr, and Co sorption on bentonite was 14.5, 9, and 7.7 kJ/mol, respectively. The value of E indicates that ion exchange may be the predominant mode of sorption for these radionuclides. The desorption studies with 0.01 M CaCl{sub 2} and groundwater at low-metal loading on bentonite showed that about 95% of Cs, 85-90% of Sr, and 97% of Co were irreversibly sorbed. Bentonite could be effectively used for the decontamination of wastewater effluent containing low concentrations of radioactive nuclides of Cs, Sr, and Co. 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effect of the temperature of the dipping solution on the antimicrobial effectiveness of various chemical decontaminants against pathogenic and spoilage bacteria on poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Hernando, Alicia; Guevara-Franco, José Alfredo; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2013-05-01

    The influence of the temperature of the dipping solution on the antimicrobial effectiveness of several chemical poultry decontaminants was assessed. A total of 765 poultry legs were inoculated with gram-positive bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, or Brochothrix thermosphacta) or gram-negative bacteria (Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, or Pseudomonas fluorescens). Samples were dipped for 15 min in solutions (wt/vol) of trisodium phosphate (12%), acidified sodium chlorite (1,200 ppm), citric acid (2%), peroxyacids (220 ppm), chlorine dioxide (50 ppm), or tap water or were left untreated (control). The temperatures of the dipping solutions were 4, 20, or 50°C. Microbiological analyses and pH determinations were carried out after 0, 1, 3, and 5 days of storage at 4°C. In comparison with the control samples, all chemical solutions were effective for reducing microbial loads. The temperature of treatment affected the microbial reductions caused by all chemicals (P peroxyacids were observed at 4°C, all sampling days and microbial groups being considered simultaneously. The highest and the lowest effectiveness for chlorine dioxide were observed at 4 and 50°C, respectively. These results may be of use to meat processors for selecting the best conditions for decontamination treatments and may help the European Regulatory Authorities make their decisions for authorization of poultry decontamination treatments.

  18. Results of Hg speciation testing on MCU strip effluent hold tank (SEHT) and decontaminated salt solution hold tank (DSSHT) materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The tenth shipment of samples was designated to include Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and MCU Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) materials from processing Salt Batch 7b. The MCU SEHT (MCU-15-722) and DSSHT (MCU-15-709) samples were pulled on June 15, 2015. All MCU samples were received at SRNL on June 16, 2015. The DSSHT sample was moved the same day to refrigeration, while the SEHT sample was placed in the Shielded Cells. On July 9, 2015 it was opened and an aliquot diluted 1:100 with Eurofins deionized water and a portion of the diluted sample transferred to a Teflon® bottle prior to moving it to refrigeration that same day. All samples were kept in the dark and refrigerated until final dilutions were prepared for shipment to Eurofins.

  19. CONCENTRATION AND DECONTAMINATION OF SOLUTIONS CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES BY BISMUTH PHOSPHATE CARRIER PRECIPITATION METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborg, G.T.; Thompson, S.G.

    1960-08-23

    A process is given for isolating plutonium present in the tetravalent state in an aqueous solution together with fission products. First, the plutonium and fission products are coprecipitated on a bismuth phosphate carrier. The precipitate obtained is dissolved, and the plutonium in the solution is oxidized to the hexavalent state (with ceric nitrate, potassium dichromate, Pb/ sub 3/O/sub 4/, sodium bismuthate and/or potassium dichromate). Thereafter a carrier for fission products is added (bismuth phosphate, lanthanum fluoride, ceric phosphate, bismuth oxalate, thorium iodate, or thorium oxalate), and the fission-product precipitation can be repeated with one other of these carriers. After removal of the fission-product-containing precipitate or precipitates. the plutonium in the supernatant is reduced to the tetravalent state (with sulfur dioxide, hydrogen peroxide. or sodium nitrate), and a carrier for tetravalent plutonium is added (lanthanum fluoride, lanthanum hydroxide, lanthanum phosphate, ceric phosphate, thorium iodate, thorium oxalate, bismuth oxalate, or niobium pentoxide). The plutonium-containing precipitate is then dissolved in a relatively small volume of liquid so as to obtain a concentrated solution. Prior to dissolution, the bismuth phosphate precipitates first formed can be metathesized with a mixture of sodium hydroxide and potassium carbonate and plutonium-containing lanthanum fluorides with alkali-metal hydroxide. In the solutions formed from a plutonium-containing lanthanum fluoride carrier the plutonium can be selectively precipitated with a peroxide after the pH was adjusted preferably to a value of between 1 and 2. Various combinations of second, third, and fourth carriers are discussed.

  20. Enzymatic decontamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Prusińska-Kurstak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper is devoted to the methods of decontamination of weapons of mass destruction (biological and chemical, based on the use of protein catalysts of chemical reactions — enzymes. This paper presents the possibility of using enzymes to neutralize the harmful and destructive to the environment and human chemicals used in weapons of mass destruction. The mechanism of the enzymatic reaction is showed. These are the possibilities of using lysozyme as destructor dangerous bacteria (E. coli, anthrax Bacillus anthracis and their spores. The advantages and disadvantages of chemical and enzymatic methods of decontamination have been compared. It was found that under certain conditions the enzymes can be an alternative to chemical methods of decontamination of weapons of mass destruction.[b]Keywords[/b]: decontamination, weapons of mass destruction, enzymes

  1. Randomized controlled trial and meta-analysis of oral decontamination with 2% chlorhexidine solution for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantipong, Hutsaya; Morkchareonpong, Chantana; Jaiyindee, Songyod; Thamlikitkul, Visanu

    2008-02-01

    To determine the effectiveness of oral decontamination with 2% chlorhexidine solution for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Randomized controlled trial and meta-analysis. A tertiary care university hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. Adult patients who received mechanical ventilation and who were hospitalized in intensive care units and general medical wards. The patients were randomized to receive oral decontamination with 2% chlorhexidine solution or normal saline solution 4 times per day until their endotracheal tubes were removed. The outcome measures were the development of VAP and oropharyngeal colonization with gram-negative bacilli. Meta-analysis was performed by combining the results of the present study with those from another randomized controlled trial that also used a 2% chlorhexidine formulation for oral decontamination. The characteristics of the patients in the chlorhexidine group (n=102) and the normal saline group (n=105) were not significantly different. The incidence of VAP in the chlorhexidine group was 4.9% (5 of 102), and the incidence in the normal saline group was 11.4% (12 of 105) (P=.08). The rate of VAP in the chlorhexidine group was 7 episodes per 1,000 ventilator-days, and the rate in the normal saline group was 21 episodes per 1,000 ventilator-days (P=.04). Irritation of the oral mucosa was observed in 10 (9.8%) of the patients in the chlorhexidine group and in 1 (0.9%) of the patients in the normal saline group (P=.001). Oropharyngeal colonization with gram-negative bacilli was either reduced or delayed in the chlorhexidine group. Overall mortality of the patients did not differ significantly between the groups. Meta-analysis of 2 randomized controlled trials revealed an overall relative risk of VAP for patients in the chlorhexidine group of 0.53 (95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.90; P=.02). Oral decontamination with 2% chlorhexidine solution is an effective and safe method for preventing VAP in patients who receive

  2. Influence of antimicrobial solutions in the decontamination and adhesion of glass-fiber posts to root canals

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARAGUSHIKU, Gisele Aihara; BACK, Eduardo Donato Eing Engelke; TOMAZINHO, Paulo Henrique; BARATTO, Flares; FURUSE, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the effect of root canal disinfectants on the elimination of bacteria from the root canals, as well as their effect on glass-fiber posts bond strength. Material and Methods Fifty-three endodontically treated root canals had post spaces of 11 mm in length prepared and contaminated with E. faecalis. For CFU/ml analysis, eight teeth were contaminated for 1 h or 30 days (n=4). Teeth were decontaminated with 5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or distilled water. As control, no decontamination was conducted. After decontamination, sterile paper points were used to collect samples, and CFU/ml were counted. For push-out, three groups were evaluated (n=15): irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or sterile distilled water. A bonding agent was applied to root canal dentin, and a glass-fiber post was cemented with a dual-cured cement. After 24 h, 1-mm-thick slices of the middle portion of root canals were obtained and submitted to the push-out evaluation. Three specimens of each group were evaluated in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Dunnett’s T3 test (α=0.05). Results The number of CFU/ml increased from 1 h to 30 days of contamination in control and sterile distilled water groups. Decontamination with NaOCl was effective only when teeth were contaminated for 1 h. CHX was effective at both contamination times. NaOCl did not influence the bond strength (p>0.05). Higher values were observed with CHX (pfiber post bonding. PMID:26398518

  3. Influence of antimicrobial solutions in the decontamination and adhesion of glass-fiber posts to root canals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haragushiku, Gisele Aihara; Back, Eduardo Donato Eing Engelke; Tomazinho, Paulo Henrique; Baratto Filho, Flares; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of root canal disinfectants on the elimination of bacteria from the root canals, as well as their effect on glass-fiber posts bond strength. Fifty-three endodontically treated root canals had post spaces of 11 mm in length prepared and contaminated with E. faecalis. For CFU/ml analysis, eight teeth were contaminated for 1 h or 30 days (n=4). Teeth were decontaminated with 5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or distilled water. As control, no decontamination was conducted. After decontamination, sterile paper points were used to collect samples, and CFU/ml were counted. For push-out, three groups were evaluated (n=15): irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or sterile distilled water. A bonding agent was applied to root canal dentin, and a glass-fiber post was cemented with a dual-cured cement. After 24 h, 1-mm-thick slices of the middle portion of root canals were obtained and submitted to the push-out evaluation. Three specimens of each group were evaluated in scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Dunnett's T3 test (α=0.05). The number of CFU/ml increased from 1 h to 30 days of contamination in control and sterile distilled water groups. Decontamination with NaOCl was effective only when teeth were contaminated for 1 h. CHX was effective at both contamination times. NaOCl did not influence the bond strength (p>0.05). Higher values were observed with CHX (pglass-fiber post bonding.

  4. Influence of antimicrobial solutions in the decontamination and adhesion of glass-fiber posts to root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Aihara HARAGUSHIKU

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective This study evaluated the effect of root canal disinfectants on the elimination of bacteria from the root canals, as well as their effect on glass-fiber posts bond strength.Material and Methods Fifty-three endodontically treated root canals had post spaces of 11 mm in length prepared and contaminated with E. faecalis. For CFU/ml analysis, eight teeth were contaminated for 1 h or 30 days (n=4. Teeth were decontaminated with 5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or distilled water. As control, no decontamination was conducted. After decontamination, sterile paper points were used to collect samples, and CFU/ml were counted. For push-out, three groups were evaluated (n=15: irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl, 2% CHX, or sterile distilled water. A bonding agent was applied to root canal dentin, and a glass-fiber post was cemented with a dual-cured cement. After 24 h, 1-mm-thick slices of the middle portion of root canals were obtained and submitted to the push-out evaluation. Three specimens of each group were evaluated in scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Dunnett’s T3 test (α=0.05.Results The number of CFU/ml increased from 1 h to 30 days of contamination in control and sterile distilled water groups. Decontamination with NaOCl was effective only when teeth were contaminated for 1 h. CHX was effective at both contamination times. NaOCl did not influence the bond strength (p>0.05. Higher values were observed with CHX (p<0.05. SEM showed formation of resin tags in all groups.Conclusion CHX showed better results for the irrigation of contaminated root canals both in reducing the bacterial contamination and in improving the glass-fiber post bonding.

  5. Engineered Deinococcus radiodurans R1 with NiCoT genes for bioremoval of trace cobalt from spent decontamination solutions of nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogada, Raghu; Singh, Surya Satyanarayana; Lunavat, Shanti Kumari; Pamarthi, Maruthi Mohan; Rodrigue, Agnes; Vadivelu, Balaji; Phanithi, Prakash-Babu; Gopala, Venkateswaran; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to engineer bacteria for the removal of Co in contaminated effluents. Radioactive cobalt ((60)Co) is known as a major contributor for person-sievert budgetary because of its long half-life and high γ-energy values. Some bacterial Ni/Co transporter (NiCoT) genes were described to have preferential uptake for cobalt. In this study, the NiCoT genes nxiA and nvoA from Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA009 (RP) and Novosphingobium aromaticivorans F-199 (NA), respectively, were cloned under the control of the groESL promoter. These genes were expressed in Deinococcus radiodurans in reason of its high resistance to radiation as compared to other bacterial strains. Using qualitative real time-PCR, we showed that the expression of NiCoT-RP and NiCoT-NA is induced by cobalt and nickel. The functional expression of these genes in bioengineered D. radiodurans R1 strains resulted in >60 % removal of (60)Co (≥5.1 nM) within 90 min from simulated spent decontamination solution containing 8.5 nM of Co, even in the presence of >10 mM of Fe, Cr, and Ni. D. radiodurans R1 (DR-RP and DR-NA) showed superior survival to recombinant E. coli (ARY023) expressing NiCoT-RP and NA and efficiency in Co remediation up to 6.4 kGy. Thus, the present study reports a remarkable reduction in biomass requirements (2 kg) compared to previous studies using wild-type bacteria (50 kg) or ion-exchanger resins (8000 kg) for treatment of ~10(5)-l spent decontamination solutions (SDS).

  6. A study on the decontamination of insoles colonized by Trichophyton rubrum: effect of terbinafine spray powder 1% and terbinafine spray solution 1%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuilhade de Chauvin, M

    2012-07-01

    Shoes worn with bare feet function as a fungal reservoir and lead to persistent dermatophytosis. This study was designed to evaluate two formulations of terbinafine (1% spray powder or solution) to treat the insoles of shoes colonized by skin scales infected with Trichophyton rubrum and to determine the contact time necessary to achieve decontamination. Infected skin scales weighing 0.5 g, taken from the feet of patients with confirmed T. rubrum infection, was dispersed onto insoles pre-moistened with sterile saline solution (to mimic perspiration). Three types of insole were tested (felt, latex, leather). After inoculation, insoles were placed separately in new cardboard boxes at ambient temperature, and re-humidified with sterile normal saline solution for 48 h before being treated; untreated insoles served as controls. Scales were scraped off at 48 h or 96 h, and dropped into tubes of Sabouraud agar, incubated at 27°C and examined at 3 and 6 weeks. Cultures from all control insoles showed numerous T. rubrum colonies. In contrast, cultures from all insoles treated with a single application of terbinafine 1% spray solution or powder, and taken after 48 h or 96 h contact with the product, remained sterile at 3 weeks and 6 weeks. This study demonstrated the successful treatment of insoles colonized by T. rubrum-infected skin scales. Terbinafine 1% spray solution and powder showed good efficacy; the dermatophyte could no longer be cultured 48 h after a single application of terbinafine. © 2011 The Author. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  7. A study on dry decontamination using ion exchange polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Jung; Ahn, Byung Gil

    1997-12-01

    Through the project of {sup A} study on dry decontamination using ion exchange polymer{sup ,} the followings were investigated. 1. Highly probable decontamination technologies for the decontamination were investigated. 2. Development of gel type decontamination agent using ion-exchange resin powder (mixed type) as an ion exchanger. 3. Manufacturing of contaminated specimens (5 kinds) with Cs-137 solution and dust / Cs-137 solution. 4. Decontamination performance evaluation of the manufactured agent. 5. Analysis of composition (XRF) and the structure of surface of specimens (optic micrography). (author). 20 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Comparison of skin decontamination efficacy of commercial decontamination products following exposure to VX on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, L; Koch, M; Wigenstam, E; Koch, B; Hägglund, L; Bucht, A

    2017-08-01

    The decontamination efficacy of four commercially available skin decontamination products following exposure to the nerve agent VX was evaluated in vitro utilizing a diffusion cell and dermatomed human skin. The products included were Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL), the Swedish decontamination powder 104 (PS104), the absorbent Fuller's Earth and the aqueous solution alldecontMED. In addition, various decontamination procedures were assessed to further investigate important mechanisms involved in the specific products, e.g. decontamination removal from skin, physical removal by sponge swabbing and activation of degradation mechanisms. The efficacy of each decontamination product was evaluated 5 or 30 min after dermal application of VX (neat or diluted to 20% in water). The RSDL-lotion was superior in reducing the penetration of VX through human skin, both when exposed as neat agent and when diluted to 20% in water. Swabbing with the RSDL-sponge during 2 min revealed decreased efficacy compared to applying the RSDL-lotion directly on the skin for 30 min. Decontamination with Fuller's Earth and alldecontMED significantly reduced the penetration of neat concentration of VX through human skin. PS104-powder was insufficient for decontamination of VX at both time-points, independently of the skin contact time of PS104. The PS104-slurry (a mixture of PS104-powder and water), slightly improved the decontamination efficacy. Comparing the time-points for initiated decontamination revealed less penetrated VX for RSDL and Fuller's Earth when decontamination was initiated after 5 min compared to 30 min post-exposure, while alldecontMED displayed similar efficacy at both time-points. Decontamination by washing with water only resulted in a significant reduction of penetrated VX when washing was performed 5 min after exposure, but not when decontamination was delayed to 30 min post-exposure of neat VX. In conclusion, early initiated decontamination with the

  9. Mobile decontamination units-room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribordy, Pascale; Rocksén, David; Dellgar, Uno; Persson, Sven-Åke; Arnoldsson, Kristina; Ekåsen, Hans; Häggbom, Sune; Nerf, Ola; Ljungqvist, Asa; Gryth, Dan; Claesson, Ola

    2012-10-01

    Mobile decontamination units are intended to be used at the accident site to decontaminate persons contaminated by toxic substances. A test program was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of mobile decontamination units. The tests included functionality, methodology, inside environment, effects of wind direction, and decontamination efficacy. Three different types of units were tested during summer and winter conditions. Up to 15 test-persons per trial were contaminated with the imitation substances Purasolve ethyl lactate (PEL) and methyl salicylate (MES). Decontamination was carried out according to standardized procedures. During the decontamination trials, the concentrations of the substances inside the units were measured. After decontamination, substances evaporating from test-persons and blankets as well as remaining amounts in the units were measured. The air concentrations of PEL and MES inside the units during decontamination in some cases exceeded short-term exposure limits for most toxic industrial chemicals. This was a problem, especially during harmful wind conditions, i.e., wind blowing in the same direction as persons moving through the decontamination units. Although decontamination removed a greater part of the substances from the skin, the concentrations evaporating from some test-persons occasionally were high and potentially harmful if the substances had been toxic. The study also showed that blankets placed in the units absorbed chemicals and that the units still were contaminated five hours after the end of operations. After decontamination, the imitation substances still were present and evaporating from the contaminated persons, blankets, and units. These results indicate a need for improvements in technical solutions, procedures, and training.

  10. Effect of Chemical Reagents in Foam Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Beom; Yoonm Inho; Jung, Chonghun; Choi, Wangkyu [Korea Atomic Energy research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. This paper deals with understanding the effects of chemical reagents involved in foam decontamination efficiency, evaluation of side effect on foam stability and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. Basic experiments using the nanoparticle-based complex fluid decontamination foam have been performed in order to development of decontamination foam technology. Results show that in the case of coexistence of chemical reagents, for the purpose of the good foam ability and foam stability, it is necessary to increase the concentration of surfactant. In corrosion test, metal materials including carbon steel, stainless steel 304, aluminum, inconel 600 and cupper, generally corrosion solubility percent in nitric acid solution were higher than in phosphoric acid solution. Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of three decontamination formulations on contaminant carbon steel component of dry oven. The results shows decontamination factor was in the range of 6.1∼13.4. Results suggest that our foam formulations have a feasibility potential to removal of about 83∼93% total radioactivity in contaminant.

  11. Decontamination of the site of the former Darmstadt gas works. Hydrogeological investigations and technical solutions. Sanierung des Darmstaedter Gaswerkgelaendes. Hydrogeologische Untersuchungen und verfahrenstechnische Loesungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, P. (Suedhessische Gas und Wasser AG, Darmstadt (Germany))

    1993-02-01

    By the example of Darmstadt the different steps of the decontamination of an extended gaswork-area are demonstrated. The first step is the exploration-phase including the first measurings of groundwater, followed by step two, the realization of the gradually evolved sampling-strategy, according to the contaminated field concerning the compartiments earth, water and air. Finally decontamination- methodes specially for the difficult tar-storage tanks are discussed. (orig.).

  12. Chemical Decontamination for Self-Disposal of Metal Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Wangkyu; Yoon, Inho; Choi, Hyemin; Lee, Kunewoo; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    There are needs in metal waste volume reduction and self-disposal technology for enhancing the safety and economy in the management of large scale metal wastes such as retired SGs and RHs. In order to remove radionuclide contamination from the surface of materials, the variety of decontamination technologies have been developed in many countries. Chemical decontamination processes were originally designed to remove the radioactive deposit in order to reduce the radiation exposure to workers while operating the nuclear facilities. Diluted chemical solutions have been used to avoid damaging the system materials. On the other hand, in cases of the decontamination processes for decommissioning or recycling large components, it is greatly important to remove radioactive contamination completely by using a more aggressive solution. In this study, the effectiveness of metal surface decontamination using inorganic acid solutions such as HF/HNO{sub 3} and HF/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was investigated to evaluate the applicability of these processes to the decontamination of retired SGs. The chemical decontamination process using inorganic acid containing fluoride was investigated as a metal surface decontamination process for decommissioning and self-disposal of metal wastes. The HF/NaNO{sub 3} decontamination process that improves the existing HF/HNO{sub 3} decontamination process has been suggested as a decontamination process for retired SGs consisting of different types of system materials such as stainless steel and Inconel.

  13. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  14. URANIUM DECONTAMINATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, J.S.; Carroll, J.L.

    1959-12-22

    A process is described for reducing the extractability of ruthenium, zirconium, and niobium values into hexone contained in an aqueous nitric acid uranium-containing solution. The solution is made acid-deficient, heated to between 55 and 70 deg C, and at that temperature a water-soluble inorganic thiosulfate is added. By this, a precipitate is formed which carries the bulk of the ruthenium, and the remainder of the ruthenium as well as the zirconium and niobium are converted to a hexone-nonextractable form. The rutheniumcontaining precipitate can either be removed from the solu tion or it can be dissolved as a hexone-non-extractable compound by the addition of sodium dichromate prior to hexone extraction.

  15. Decontamination Efficacy and Skin Toxicity of Two Decontaminants against Bacillus anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratilo, Chad W.; Crichton, Melissa K. F.; Sawyer, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    Decontamination of bacterial endospores such as Bacillus anthracis has traditionally required the use of harsh or caustic chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a chlorine dioxide decontaminant in killing Bacillus anthracis spores in solution and on a human skin simulant (porcine cadaver skin), compared to that of commonly used sodium hypochlorite or soapy water decontamination procedures. In addition, the relative toxicities of these decontaminants were compared in human skin keratinocyte primary cultures. The chlorine dioxide decontaminant was similarly effective to sodium hypochlorite in reducing spore numbers of Bacillus anthracis Ames in liquid suspension after a 10 minute exposure. After five minutes, the chlorine dioxide product was significantly more efficacious. Decontamination of isolated swine skin contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Sterne with the chlorine dioxide product resulted in no viable spores sampled. The toxicity of the chlorine dioxide decontaminant was up to two orders of magnitude less than that of sodium hypochlorite in human skin keratinocyte cultures. In summary, the chlorine dioxide based decontaminant efficiently killed Bacillus anthracis spores in liquid suspension, as well as on isolated swine skin, and was less toxic than sodium hypochlorite in cultures of human skin keratinocytes. PMID:26394165

  16. Decontamination Efficacy and Skin Toxicity of Two Decontaminants against Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad W Stratilo

    Full Text Available Decontamination of bacterial endospores such as Bacillus anthracis has traditionally required the use of harsh or caustic chemicals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a chlorine dioxide decontaminant in killing Bacillus anthracis spores in solution and on a human skin simulant (porcine cadaver skin, compared to that of commonly used sodium hypochlorite or soapy water decontamination procedures. In addition, the relative toxicities of these decontaminants were compared in human skin keratinocyte primary cultures. The chlorine dioxide decontaminant was similarly effective to sodium hypochlorite in reducing spore numbers of Bacillus anthracis Ames in liquid suspension after a 10 minute exposure. After five minutes, the chlorine dioxide product was significantly more efficacious. Decontamination of isolated swine skin contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Sterne with the chlorine dioxide product resulted in no viable spores sampled. The toxicity of the chlorine dioxide decontaminant was up to two orders of magnitude less than that of sodium hypochlorite in human skin keratinocyte cultures. In summary, the chlorine dioxide based decontaminant efficiently killed Bacillus anthracis spores in liquid suspension, as well as on isolated swine skin, and was less toxic than sodium hypochlorite in cultures of human skin keratinocytes.

  17. Gross decontamination experiment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.; Kinney, K.; Dettorre, J.; Gilbert, V.

    1983-07-01

    A Gross Decontamination Experiment was conducted on various levels and surfaces of the TMI - Unit 2 reactor building in March 1982. The polar crane, D-rings, missile shields, refueling canals, refueling bridges, equipment, and elevations 305' and 347'-6'' were flushed with low pressure water. Additionally, floor surfaces on elevation 305' and floor surfaces and major pieces of equipment on elevation 347'-6'' were sprayed with high pressure water. Selective surfaces were decontaminated with a mechanical scrubber and chemicals. Strippable coating was tested and evaluated on equipment and floor surfaces. The effectiveness, efficiency, and safety of several decontamination techniques were established for the large, complex decontamination effort. Various decontamination equipment was evaluated and its effectiveness was documented. Decontamination training and procedures were documented and evaluated, as were the support system and organization for the experiment.

  18. Reaction-diffusion models of decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    A contaminant, which also contains a polymer is in the form of droplets on a solid surface. It is to be removed by the action of a decontaminant, which is applied in aqueous solution. The contaminant is only sparingly soluble in water, so the reaction mechanism is that it slowly dissolves...... in the aqueous solution and then is oxidized by the decontaminant. The polymer is insoluble in water, and so builds up near the interface, where its presence can impede the transport of contaminant. In these circumstances, Dstl wish to have mathematical models that give an understanding of the process, and can...

  19. Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

    1997-09-01

    The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

  20. Long lasting decontamination foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  1. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  2. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  3. Facility decontamination technology workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    Purpose of the meeting was to provide a record of experience at nuclear facilities, other than TMI-2, of events and incidents which have required decontamination and dose reduction activities, and to furnish GPU and others involved in the TMI-2 cleanup with the results of that decontamination and dose reduction technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for 24 of the 25 papers; the remaining paper had been previously abstracted. (DLC)

  4. Lessons Learned from Decontamination Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, JH

    2000-11-16

    This interim report describes a DOE project currently underway to establish what is known about decontamination of buildings and people and the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  5. Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation and Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith [ORNL; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Munro, Nancy B [ORNL; King, J. [U.S. Army Environmental Center

    2007-02-01

    The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) from structures, environmental media, and even personnel has become an area of particular interest in recent years due to increased homeland security concerns. In addition to terrorist attacks, scenarios such as accidental releases of CWA from U.S. stockpile sites or from historic, buried munitions are also subjects for response planning. To facilitate rapid identification of practical and effective decontamination approaches, this paper reviews pathways of CWA degradation by natural means as well as those resulting from deliberately applied solutions and technologies; these pathways and technologies are compared and contrasted. We then review various technologies, both traditional and recent, with some emphasis on decontamination materials used for surfaces that are difficult to clean. Discussion is limited to the major threat CWA, namely sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate), and the G-series nerve agents. The principal G-agents are GA (tabun, ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), GB (sarin, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and GD (soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate). The chemical decontamination pathways of each agent are outlined, with some discussion of intermediate and final degradation product toxicity. In all cases, and regardless of the CWA degradation pathway chosen for decontamination, it will be necessary to collect and analyze pertinent environmental samples during the treatment phase to confirm attainment of clearance levels.

  6. Evaluation of N-Reactor piping decontamination procedure for effectiveness and materials corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, W.K.

    1967-08-01

    The effectiveness and corrosion characteristics of Turco 4512-A, an inhibited phosphoric acid, are being evaluated for N-Reactor primary system carbon steel decontamination by in-reactor decontamination tests, full scale component evaluations, and laboratory corrosion tests. To date these tests have showed that the decontamination procedure is effective for carbon steel decontamination and safe for all primary system materials that will be contacted by the solution. A few materials, namely, 17-4 pH SS, 416 SS, 420 SS, and Easy-Flo 45 braze alloy have not yet been completely tested. Results of their performance will be reported prior to full reactor decontamination.

  7. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomasney, H. [ISOTRON Corp., New Orleans, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  8. Effect of Cerium(IV)-Surfactant Reaction in Foam Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Han Beom; Jung, Chong-Hun; Yoon, In-Ho; Kim, Chorong; Choi, Wang-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Using foams allows the decommissioning of complex shaped facilities. The decontamination foam comprises at least one surfactant to generate the foam and one or more chemical reactants to achieve the dissolution of the contaminants at the solid surface. In order to improve the efficiency of decontamination foam, the present study attempts to find the optimum condition of chemical reagents to the foaming solution. The corrosion rate of radioactive nuclides contaminated stainless steel metal is very important factor for the foam decontamination process. The goal of this study is to develop the decontamination process for contaminated stainless steel in medium of nitric acid. Stainless steel needs a strong oxidizing agent such as Ce(IV) ion and the effects of cerium(IV). Surfactant interaction involved in foam decontamination and finally the improvement brought by formulation science. The formulation of foams loaded with strong oxidizing reagents such as Ce(IV) is an important factor. The enhanced decontamination properties of nitric acid with Ce(IV) additive on stainless steel is well known in liquid mediums. stainless steel metal is an important aspect in the foam decontamination process.

  9. Method for electrochemical decontamination of radioactive metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekechukwu, Amy A [Augusta, GA

    2008-06-10

    A decontamination method for stripping radionuclides from the surface of stainless steel or aluminum material comprising the steps of contacting the metal with a moderately acidic carbonate/bicarbonate electrolyte solution containing sodium or potassium ions and thereafter electrolytically removing the radionuclides from the surface of the metal whereby radionuclides are caused to be stripped off of the material without corrosion or etching of the material surface.

  10. Development of laser decontamination technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Fukui, Yasutaka; Tanimoto, Kenichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2002-06-01

    For decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities, a laser decontamination technique has been developed. The technique was expected to decontaminate high-level radioactive waste to back ground levels, keep the amount of secondary waste low, and be operated by remote control. In the development, a decontamination experiment was executed. Type and operation mode of the laser oscillator, Type and flow rate of the assist gas, repetition rate of the laser pulse, moving velocity of the laser nozzle and irradiation energy were parameters in the experiment. Hot radioactive waste could be decontaminated to background levels uniformly with optimized parameters, which were determined by comparative evaluation. (author)

  11. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-component DNAPLS with surfactant solutions. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Laboratory studies were conducted at the State University of New York at Buffalo (SUNY) while numerical simulation and field work were undertaken by INTERA Inc. in collaboration with Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) in Kentucky. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). Ten of these were capable of solubilizing TCE to concentrations greater than 15,000 mg/L, compared to its aqueous solubility of 1,100 mg/L. Four surfactants were identified as good solubilizers of all three chlorinated solvents. Of these, a secondary alcohol ethoxylate was the first choice for in situ testing because of its excellent solubilizing ability and its low propensity to sorb. However, this surfactant did not meet the Commonwealth of Kentucky`s acceptance criteria. Consequently, it was decided to use a surfactant approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration as a food-grade additive. As a 1% micellar-surfactant solution, this sorbitan monooleate has a solubilization capacity of 16,000 mg TCE/L, but has a higher propensity to sorb to clays than has the alcohol ethoxylate.

  12. Bacterial survival rate on toothbrushes and their decontamination with antimicrobial solutions Taxa de sobrevivência bacteriana em escovas dentais e sua descontaminação com soluções antimicrobianas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Sato

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate bacterial survival rate on toothbrushes after brushing and the efficacy of their decontamination by spraying antimicrobial solutions. Thirty subjects were instructed to spray the solutions on toothbrush bristles after brushing. Each volunteer tested three sprays, one solution per week; the sprays were labeled spray 1 (cetylpyridinium chloride - CPC - and basic formulation, 2 (basic formulation only and 3 (control - sterile tap water. At the end of each week, the brushes were collected and sonicated in Letheen Broth®; the suspensions were ten-fold diluted and the dilutions were plated on various culture media. Anaerobic bacteria, evaluated by colony count of black pigment producing organisms on Ask medium, were recovered from 83.3% of the samples, Streptococci from 80% and aerobic Gram-negative bacilli from 46.7% of them in the control tests. There was a significant decrease in toothbrush contamination with antimicrobial sprays 1 and 2, the first showing the greatest decrease on bacterial counts.O propósito deste estudo foi avaliar a taxa de sobrevivência bacteriana em escovas dentais após a escovação e a eficácia na sua descontaminação pelo borrifamento de soluções antimicrobianas. Trinta indivíduos foram instruídos a borrifar as soluções nas cerdas das escovas após a escovação. Cada voluntário testou três sprays, uma solução por semana; os sprays foram rotulados spray 1 (cloreto de cetilpiridínio - CCP - e formulação básica, 2 (formulação básica apenas e 3 (controle - água de torneira esterilizada. Ao final de cada semana, as escovas eram recolhidas e introduzidas no caldo Letheen®, submetidas a ultra-som, à diluição decimal seriada e as suspensões semeadas em vários meios de cultura. As bactérias anaeróbias, avaliadas pela contagem de colônias de microrganismos produtores de pigmento negro no meio Ask, foram recuperadas em 83,3% das amostras, estreptococos em 80

  13. Large-bore pipe decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of 1200 buildings within the US Department of Energy-Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Complex will require the disposition of miles of pipe. The disposition of large-bore pipe, in particular, presents difficulties in the area of decontamination and characterization. The pipe is potentially contaminated internally as well as externally. This situation requires a system capable of decontaminating and characterizing both the inside and outside of the pipe. Current decontamination and characterization systems are not designed for application to this geometry, making the direct disposal of piping systems necessary in many cases. The pipe often creates voids in the disposal cell, which requires the pipe to be cut in half or filled with a grout material. These methods are labor intensive and costly to perform on large volumes of pipe. Direct disposal does not take advantage of recycling, which could provide monetary dividends. To facilitate the decontamination and characterization of large-bore piping and thereby reduce the volume of piping required for disposal, a detailed analysis will be conducted to document the pipe remediation problem set; determine potential technologies to solve this remediation problem set; design and laboratory test potential decontamination and characterization technologies; fabricate a prototype system; provide a cost-benefit analysis of the proposed system; and transfer the technology to industry. This report summarizes the activities performed during fiscal year 1997 and describes the planned activities for fiscal year 1998. Accomplishments for FY97 include the development of the applicable and relevant and appropriate regulations, the screening of decontamination and characterization technologies, and the selection and initial design of the decontamination system.

  14. RSDL decontamination of human skin contaminated with the nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thors, L; Lindberg, S; Johansson, S; Koch, B; Koch, M; Hägglund, L; Bucht, A

    2017-03-05

    Dermal exposure to low volatile organophosphorus compounds (OPC) may lead to penetration through the skin and uptake in the blood circulation. Skin decontamination of toxic OPCs, such as pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents, might therefore be crucial for mitigating the systemic toxicity following dermal exposure. Reactive skin decontamination lotion (RSDL) has been shown to reduce toxic effects in animals dermally exposed to the nerve agent VX. In the present study, an in vitro flow-through diffusion cell was utilized to evaluate the efficacy of RSDL for decontamination of VX exposed to human epidermis. In particular, the impact of timing in the initiation of decontamination and agent dilution in water was studied. The impact of the lipophilic properties of VX in the RSDL decontamination was additionally addressed by comparing chemical degradation in RSDL and decontamination efficacy between the VX and the hydrophilic OPC triethyl phosphonoacetate (TEPA). The epidermal membrane was exposed to 20, 75 or 90% OPC diluted in deionized water and the decontamination was initiated 5, 10, 30, 60 or 120min post-exposure. Early decontamination of VX with RSDL, initiated 5-10min after skin exposure, was very effective. Delayed decontamination initiated 30-60min post-exposure was less effective but still the amount of penetrated agent was significantly reduced, while further delayed start of decontamination to 120min resulted in very low efficacy. Comparing RSDL decontamination of VX with that of TEPA showed that the decontamination efficacy at high agent concentrations was higher for VX. The degradation mechanism of VX and TEPA during decontamination was dissected by 31 P NMR spectroscopy of the OPCs following reactions with RSDL and its three nucleophile components. The degradation rate was clearly associated with the high pH of the specific solution investigated; i.e. increased pH resulted in a more rapid degradation. In addition, the solubility of the OPC in RSDL

  15. Electrolytic decontamination of conductive materials for hazardous waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedman, D.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolytic removal of plutonium and americium from stainless steel and uranium surfaces has been demonstrated. Preliminary experiments were performed on the electrochemically based decontamination of type 304L stainless steel in sodium nitrate solutions to better understand the metal removal effects of varying cur-rent density, pH, and nitrate concentration parameters. Material removal rates and changes in surface morphology under these varying conditions are reported. Experimental results indicate that an electropolishing step before contamination removes surface roughness, thereby simplifying later electrolytic decontamination. Sodium nitrate based electrolytic decontamination produced the most uniform stripping of material at low to intermediate pH and at sodium nitrate concentrations of 200 g L{sup -1} and higher. Stirring was also observed to increase the uniformity of the stripping process.

  16. Nuclear decontamination of personnel and material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehleisen, R. [Alfred Kaercher Gmbh and Co., Winnenden (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Nuclear decontamination of personnel and material has to be carried out immediately after any contaminating incident. A safe decontamination will only be successful when a suitable decontamination system and effective decontamination agent are used. The aim hereby is, that personnel will not suffer from any acute somatic or late somatic effect and that material can be re-used again without any protective devices. Test results have shown, that personnel decontamination is more effective today due to new technologies. Also material decontamination, nowadays carried out with hot foam and high pressure units improves the deradiation result.

  17. A Simple Decontamination Approach Using Hydrogen ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal article To evaluate the use of relatively low levels of hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) for the inactivation of Bacillus anthracis spores within an indoor environment. Methods and Results: Laboratory-scale decontamination tests were conducted using bacterial spores of both B. anthracis Ames and Bacillus atrophaeus inoculated onto several types of materials. Pilot-scale tests were also conducted using a larger chamber furnished as an indoor office. Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) humidifiers filled with aqueous solutions of 3% or 8% hydrogen peroxide were used to generate the HPV inside the mock office. The spores were exposed to the HPV for periods ranging from 8 hours up to one week. Conclusions: Four to seven day exposures to low levels of HPV (average air concentrations of approximately 5-10 parts per million) were effective in inactivating B. anthracis spores on multiple materials. The HPV can be generated with COTS humidifiers and household H2O2 solutions. With the exception of one test/material, B. atrophaeus spores were equally or more resistant to HPV inactivation compared to those from B. anthracis Ames. Significance and Impact of Study: This simple and effective decontamination method is another option that could be widely applied in the event of a B. anthracis spore release.

  18. Skin decontamination of G, V, H L agents by Canadian reactive skin decontaminant lotion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bide, R.W.; Sawyer, T.W.; DiNinno, V.L.; Armour, S.J.; Risk, D.J.

    1993-05-13

    The Canadian Reactive Skin Decontaminant Lotion (RSDL) is a reactive solution designed to be applied directly to skin for the decontamination and destruction of the classical chemical warfare agents. The solvent of the RSDL is very effective in dissolving liquid agents from the skin surface and the differential solubility of agents in the RSDL and the skin strongly favors retention of agents in the lotion. The active ingredient in the RSDL reacts rapidly and completely with G-agents, V-agents, mustard Lewisite producing relatively nontoxic products. The RSDL will dissolve and destroy agent thickened with acrylate polymers. The lotion is water soluble and readily removed from the skin. Since the RSDL is water soluble, it is active against water soluble agents even at high dilutions. For water insoluble agents, the activity is reduced as the water content rises above abrasive 50% due to insolubility of the agents. Skin and eye irritancy trials indicate that the RSDL is only a mild irritant to the eyes (equivalent to a chlorinated swimming pool) and to abraded skin. Acute toxicity trials showed that large oral and intraperitoneal doses were essentially non-toxic. The RSDL was fielded by the Canadian Forces for the Gulf Conflict. The RSDL may be used in open wounds for short periods. Wound decontamination and irrigation with RSDL diluted 1:1 with isotonic saline was recommended for the Gulf conflict.

  19. DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR FACILITY REUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, Steven J.; Blair, Danielle M.

    2003-02-27

    As nuclear research and production facilities across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex are slated for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), there is a need to decontaminate some facilities for reuse for another mission or continued use for the same mission. Improved technologies available in the commercial sector and tested by the DOE can help solve the DOE's decontamination problems. Decontamination technologies include mechanical methods, such as shaving, scabbling, and blasting; application of chemicals; biological methods; and electrochemical techniques. Materials to be decontaminated are primarily concrete or metal. Concrete materials include walls, floors, ceilings, bio-shields, and fuel pools. Metallic materials include structural steel, valves, pipes, gloveboxes, reactors, and other equipment. Porous materials such as concrete can be contaminated throughout their structure, although contamination in concrete normally resides in the top quarter-inch below the surface. Metals are normally only contaminated on the surface. Contamination includes a variety of alpha, beta, and gamma-emitting radionuclides and can sometimes include heavy metals and organic contamination regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This paper describes several advanced mechanical, chemical, and other methods to decontaminate structures, equipment, and materials.

  20. Selective decontamination and antibiotic resistance in ICUs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Nienke L.; Bonten, Marc J. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2015-01-01

    Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) have been associated with reduced mortality and lower ICU-acquired bacteremia and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates in areas with low levels of antibiotic resistance. However, the effect of selective

  1. Decontamination of Subway Railcar and Related Materials ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report In the event of a biological incident in a transportation hub such as a subway system, effective remediation of railcars, subway tunnels and stations will require the use of various decontamination approaches. One potential decontamination tool that could be used in such an event is the fogging of sporicidal liquids. The study described in this report builds on previous fogging decontamination research, but with a focus on decontaminating subway railcars and related materials.

  2. 46 CFR 154.1410 - Decontamination shower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Decontamination shower. 154.1410 Section 154.1410... Equipment § 154.1410 Decontamination shower. When Table 4 references this section, a vessel carrying the listed cargo must have a decontamination shower and an eye wash that: (a) Are on the weatherdeck; and (b...

  3. 40 CFR 170.250 - Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination. 170.250 Section 170... PROTECTION STANDARD Standard for Pesticide Handlers § 170.250 Decontamination. (a) Requirement. During any..., decontamination supplies for washing off pesticides and pesticide residues. (b) General conditions. (1) The...

  4. 40 CFR 170.150 - Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination. 170.150 Section 170... PROTECTION STANDARD Standard for Workers § 170.150 Decontamination. (a)(1) Requirement. The agricultural employer must provide decontamination supplies for workers in accordance with this section whenever: (i...

  5. Decontamination Options for Drinking Water Contaminated with Bacillus anthracis Spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raber, E; Burklund, A

    2010-02-16

    Five parameters were evaluated with surrogates of Bacillus anthracis spores to determine effective decontamination options for use in a contaminated drinking water supply. The parameters were: (1) type of Bacillus spore surrogate (B. thuringiensis or B. atrophaeus); (2) spore concentration in suspension (10{sup 2} to 10{sup 6} spores/ml); (3) chemical characteristics of decontaminant [sodium dicholor-s-triazinetrione dihydrate (Dichlor), hydrogen peroxide, potassium peroxymonosulfate (Oxone), sodium hypochlorite, and VirkonS{reg_sign}]; (4) decontaminant concentration (0.01% to 5%); and (5) decontaminant exposure time (10 min to 24 hr). Results from 162 suspension tests with appropriate controls are reported. Hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 5%, and Dichlor and sodium hypochlorite at a concentration of 2%, were effective at spore inactivation regardless of spore type tested, spore exposure time, or spore concentration evaluated. This is the first reported study of Dichlor as an effective decontaminant for B. anthracis spore surrogates. Dichlor's desirable characteristics of high oxidation potential, high level of free chlorine, and more neutral pH than that of other oxidizers evaluated appear to make it an excellent alternative. All three oxidizers were effective against B. atrophaeus spores in meeting EPA's biocide standard of greater than a 6 log kill after a 10-minute exposure time and at lower concentrations than typically reported for biocide use. Solutions of 5% VirkonS{reg_sign} and Oxone were less effective decontaminants than other options evaluated in this study and did not meet the EPA's efficacy standard for biocides. Differences in methods and procedures reported by other investigators make quantitative comparisons among studies difficult.

  6. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, C.L.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Barkovsky, A.N.

    1999-01-01

    Decontamination was carried out in an area with three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Bryansk region, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a controlled cleaning is undertaken....... This paper describes the decontamination work carried out and the results obtained, The roofs of the houses were swept and cleaned by special roof cleaning equipment. The soil around the houses was removed by hand while carefully monitoring the ground for residual contamination, By monitoring the decline...

  7. Project n.4: local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Ph. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Ramzaev, V. [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Karchovka, Bryandk (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G. [Chernobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, (Belarus); Sobotovich, E. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L. [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, and a return from experience from the area contaminated by the Chernobyl accident allowed to assess radiological efficiencies and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimisation of decontamination strategies. Results are presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with the contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined. (authors). 23 refs.

  8. The influence of rifamycin decontamination on incorporation of autologous onlay bone grafts in rats: A histometric and immunohistochemical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Ufuk; Özeç, İlker; Esen, Haci Hasan; Avunduk, M Cihat

    2015-05-01

    Although it has been shown that rifamycin is an effective agent for bone graft decontamination, no information exists on the effects of rifamycin decontamination on bone graft incorporation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of rifamycin decontamination on the incorporation of autologous onlay bone grafts quantitatively. In 30 rats, a standardized 5.0-mm-diameter bone graft was harvested from the right mandibular angle, contaminated with saliva, decontaminated with rifamycin solution, and augmented to the left as an onlay graft. Ten animals were sacrificed at 7, 14, and 21 days after surgery. In the control group (10 rats), the onlay grafts were neither contaminated nor decontaminated, and the rats were sacrificed at 21 days after surgery. Histological slides were prepared from each grafted site for both immunohistochemistry analysis (bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies) and histometric analysis. Images obtained from the graft incorporation area with the light microscope were transferred to a PC, and they were evaluated using Clemex PE 3.5 image analysis software. The grafts were fully incorporated in all specimens. The results showed that rifamycin decontamination has no detrimental effect on graft incorporation and the findings revealed a tendency for earlier revascularization and osteogenesis in the decontamination group. Data were analyzed using variance analysis and Tukey's test. Rifamycin decontamination has no detrimental effect on autogenous graft incorporation, and it can be used for graft decontamination with confidence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Decontaminating soil organic pollutants with manufactured nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Xijuan; Zhuang, Jie; Chen, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Organic pollutants in soils might threaten the environmental and human health. Manufactured nanoparticles are capable to reduce this risk efficiently due to their relatively large capacity of sorption and degradation of organic pollutants. Stability, mobility, and reactivity of nanoparticles are prerequisites for their efficacy in soil remediation. On the basis of a brief introduction of these issues, this review provides a comprehensive summary of the application and effectiveness of various types of manufactured nanoparticles for removing organic pollutants from soil. The main categories of nanoparticles include iron (oxides), titanium dioxide, carbonaceous, palladium, and amphiphilic polymeric nanoparticles. Their advantages (e.g., unique properties and high sorption capacity) and disadvantages (e.g., high cost and low recovery) for soil remediation are discussed with respect to the characteristics of organic pollutants. The factors that influence the decontamination effects, such as properties, surfactants, solution chemistry, and soil organic matter, are addressed.

  10. Mass Casualty Decontamination Guidance and Psychosocial Aspects of CBRN Incident Management: A Review and Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Holly; Amlôt, Richard

    2016-01-01

    decontamination is completed quickly and effectively.  We identify a number of areas requiring further research including: identifying effective methods for communicating in an emergency; better understanding of the needs of vulnerable groups during decontamination; effective training for emergency responders on psychosocial issues, and pre-incident public education for incidents involving emergency decontamination.  It is essential that the psychosocial aspects of mass decontamination are not neglected in the pursuit of solely technical solutions. PMID:27790383

  11. Decontamination in a Russian settlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roed, J.; Lange, C.; Andersson, K.G. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Decontamination was carried out in and around three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Russia, in the autumn of 1995. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.34) and outdoor (DRF = 0.20) can be achieved when a careful cleaning is undertaken. This report describes the decontamination work carried out and the results obtained. The roofs of the houses were swept and cleaned by special roof cleaning equipment. The soil around the houses was removed by hand while carefully monitoring the ground for residual contamination. By monitoring the decline in the dose rate during the different stages of the work the dose reducing effect of each action has been estimated. This report also describes a test of a triple digging method that reduces the dose rate without generating waste. In the appendices of the report the measurement data are available for further analysis. (au) 16 tabs., 15 ills.

  12. Pickering emulsions for skin decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alicia; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Rolland, Pauline; Chevalier, Yves; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed at developing innovative systems for skin decontamination. Pickering emulsions, i.e. solid-stabilized emulsions, containing silica (S-PE) or Fuller's earth (FE-PE) were formulated. Their efficiency for skin decontamination was evaluated, in vitro, 45min after an exposure to VX, one of the most highly toxic chemical warfare agents. Pickering emulsions were compared to FE (FE-W) and silica (S-W) aqueous suspensions. PE containing an oil with a similar hydrophobicity to VX should promote its extraction. All the formulations reduced significantly the amount of VX quantified on and into the skin compared to the control. Wiping the skin surface with a pad already allowed removing more than half of VX. FE-W was the less efficient (85% of VX removed). The other formulations (FE-PE, S-PE and S-W) resulted in more than 90% of the quantity of VX removed. The charge of particles was the most influential factor. The low pH of formulations containing silica favored electrostatic interactions of VX with particles explaining the better elimination from the skin surface. Formulations containing FE had basic pH, and weak interactions with VX did not improve the skin decontamination. However, these low interactions between VX and FE promote the transfer of VX into the oil droplets in the FE-PE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Decontamination of Drinking Water Infrastructure ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Brief This study examines the effectiveness of decontaminating corroded iron and cement-mortar coupons that have been contaminated with spores of Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii (B. globigii), which is often used as a surrogate for pathogenic B. anthracis (anthrax) in disinfection studies. Bacillus spores are persistent on common drinking water material surfaces like corroded iron, requiring physical or chemical methods to decontaminate the infrastructure. In the United States, free chlorine and monochloramine are the primary chemical disinfectants used by the drinking water industry to inactivate microorganisms. Flushing is also a common, easily implemented practice in drinking water distribution systems, although large volumes of contaminated water needing treatment could be generated. Identifying readily available alternative disinfectant formulations for infrastructure decontamination could give water utilities options for responding to specific types of contamination events. In addition to presenting data on flushing alone, which demonstrated the persistence of spores on water infrastructure in the absence of high levels of disinfectants, data on acidified nitrite, chlorine dioxide, free chlorine, monochloramine, ozone, peracetic acid, and followed by flushing are provided.

  14. Evaluation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination for alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevremović, Milutin; Milošević, Bratislav; Lazarević, Nataša

    2010-01-01

    This article presents experimental results obtained by the investigation of the efficiency of radioactive decontamination of a metal surface with alkyd and epoxy-urethane coating systems, which are used for the painting of military equipment. During the evaluation of the efficiency of decontamination, the impact of contaminants on the coating was not examined but the amount of contaminants residual after decontamination was, and was determined by activity measurements of the surface. The samples for testing were painted aluminum plates contaminated by liquid solutions of radioactive isotopes 60Co, 133Ba, 152Eu and 241Am (A=12297.91 Bq/ml). Decontamination of contaminated samples was performed with 0.5% detergent solution on the basis of synthetic surfactants. The activity measurements of samples were conducted using gamma spectroscopy system with a high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector of relative efficiency of 50% at 60Co (1.33 MeV). The degree of removal of the radioactivity on the samples was observed as an indicator of the efficiency of decontamination. A comparison of the results is presented in relation to the retention time of the contamination on the surface coating, which is an important factor for the efficiency of decontamination. The samples with an alkyd coating system showed better efficiency of decontamination than the samples with the epoxy-urethane coating system, although the coatings based on epoxy and urethane resin were superior in relation to the alkyd in terms of protection, decorative characteristics and chemical resistance. The difference in the efficiency of decontamination for the examined coatings increases almost linearly in relation to the retention time of the contaminants in the coating.

  15. Proceedings of the concrete decontamination workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halter, J.M.; Sullivan, R.G.; Currier, A.J.

    1980-05-28

    Fourteen papers were presented. These papers describe concrete surface removal methods and equipment, as well as experiences in decontaminating and removing both power and experimental nuclear reactors.

  16. Electrochemical analysis of ion-exchange membranes with respect to a possible use in electrodialytic decontamination of soil polluted with heavy metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Laursen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    experiments taken as a simplified simulation of the electrokinetic decontamination method showed that it was possible to remove all ions in the simulated soil volume, with a sharp increase in the potential difference over the soil volume as a result, and that it was possible to control the metal content...... in the different solutions in the electrodialytic decontamination method....

  17. Recent developments in chemical decontamination technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, C.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Chemical decontamination of parts of reactor coolant systems is a mature technology, used routinely in many BWR plants, but less frequently in PWRs. This paper reviews recent developments in the technology - corrosion minimization, waste processing and full system decontamination, including the fuel. Earlier work was described in an extensive review published in 1990.

  18. Evaluation of Hydrogel Technologies for the Decontamination ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report This current research effort was developed to evaluate intermediate level (between bench-scale and large-scale or wide-area implementation) decontamination procedures, materials, technologies, and techniques used to remove radioactive material from different surfaces. In the event of such an incident, application of this technology would primarily be intended for decontamination of high-value buildings, important infrastructure, and landmarks.

  19. INTEGRATED VERTICAL AND OVERHEAD DECONTAMINATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities performed during FY98 and describes the planned activities for FY99. Accomplishments for FY98 include identifying and selecting decontamination, the screening of potential characterization technologies, development of minimum performance factors for the decontamination technology, and development and identification of Applicable, Relevant and Appropriate Regulations (ARARs).

  20. Efficacy Assessment of Nucleic Acid Decontamination Reagents Used in Molecular Diagnostic Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Melina; Renevey, Nathalie; Thür, Barbara; Hoffmann, Donata; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of nucleic acid cross contamination in the laboratory resulting in false positive results of diagnostic samples is seriously problematic. Despite precautions to minimize or even avoid nucleic acid cross contaminations, it may appear anyway. Until now, no standardized strategy is available to evaluate the efficacy of commercially offered decontamination reagents. Therefore, a protocol for the reliable determination of nucleic acid decontamination efficacy using highly standardized solution and surface tests was established and validated. All tested sodium hypochlorite-based reagents proved to be highly efficient in nucleic acid decontamination even after short reaction times. For DNA Away, a sodium hydroxide-based decontamination product, dose- and time-dependent effectiveness was ascertained. For two other commercial decontamination reagents, the phosphoric acid-based DNA Remover and the non-enzymatic reagent DNA-ExitusPlus™ IF, no reduction of amplifiable DNA/RNA was observed. In conclusion, a simple test procedure for evaluation of the elimination efficacy of decontamination reagents against amplifiable nucleic acid is presented.

  1. The separation of silica nanoparticle by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide from decontamination foam waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Man Soo; Yoon, In Ho; Jung, Chong Hun; Moon, Jei Kwon; Choi, Wang Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Decontamination foam has been considered as a potential application for the cleaning of radioactive contaminant in the field of metallic walls, overhead surfaces, and complex components. Moreover, foam decontamination could generate the low secondary waste amount owing to its volume expansion. In order to increase the decontamination efficiency, it is essential to improve the foam stability with low amount of chemical decontamination agent. Yoon et al. reported that the silica nanoparticle containing surfactant increased the foam stability compared to only surfactant solution[3]. Nanoparticle has been used with surfactant, which they adsorb at fluid/fluid interface, to stabilize emulsions or bubbles in foams. Despite of improving foam stability, they still used the surfactant, silica nanoparticle (1 wt%), and viscosifier. In addition, it is difficult to separate silica nanoparticle from decontamination solution. Because nanoparticles differ from classical solid particles due to smaller particle size and their specific properties. Thus, the separation method for nanoparticle should be also developed with high recovery rates. The flocculation of silica nanoparticle added by CTAB could be quickly achieved for only 30 min. The particle size of SiO{sub 2} was larger as CTAB amount increased, and SiO{sub 2} contents in the top solution were decreased after centrifugation.

  2. Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, David Shane; Webber, Frank Laverne

    2001-07-01

    This report is a compilation of summary descriptions of Deactivation, Decontamination and Decommissioning, and Surveillance and Maintenance projects planned for inactive facilities and sites at the INEEL from FY-2002 through FY-2010. Deactivations of contaminated facilities will produce safe and stable facilities requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance pending further decontamination and decommissioning. Decontamination and decommissioning actions remove contaminated facilities, thus eliminating long-term surveillance and maintenance. The projects are prioritized based on risk to DOE-ID, the public, and the environment, and the reduction of DOE-ID mortgage costs and liability at the INEEL.

  3. Radiation decontamination of poultry viscera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamdar, S.N. [Food Technology Division, FIPLY, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)], E-mail: snjam2@yahoo.com; Harikumar, P. [Food Technology Division, FIPLY, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2008-04-15

    Application of gamma radiation for decontamination of poultry viscera was examined. Exposure to a dose of 20 kGy rendered the viscera sterile (<1 CFU/10 g tissue), while 5 and 10 kGy reduced the total bacterial count by 4 and 6 log{sub 10} cycles, respectively, eliminating the coliforms to <1 CFU/g of tissue. Analysis of organoleptic and biochemical parameters [proximate composition, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVBN), lipid peroxidation (TBARS value), and levels of TCA soluble peptides and proteolytic enzyme] showed that gamma irradiation (20 kGy) followed by storage at 4 deg. C for 62 days induced no significant change (except lipid peroxidation) in the acceptability of poultry viscera. However, storage at ambient temperature (26 {sup o}C) produced enhanced levels of TVBN and TCA soluble products accompanied by higher drip loss. Activities of proteolytic enzymes, except acid protease, did not show any significant change during post-irradiation storage at either temperature.

  4. Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) is a trace contaminant control device based on non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma technology. Compared to...

  5. Degradation and Decontamination of VX in Concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, G. W; O'Connor, Richard J; Edwards, Jennifer L; Brevett, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    .... Water added to concrete samples containing sorbed VX to mimic precipitation and/or a potential decontamination strategy resulted in the desorption of copious amounts of VX into the water along...

  6. Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Plasma Air Decontamination System (PADS) is a trace contaminant control device based on non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma technology that operates...

  7. Decontamination Supplies Under the Worker Protection Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employers at agricultural establishments must make sure that decontamination supplies for washing off pesticides and pesticide residues are available to workers and handlers. Learn about specific requirements for the type and location of these supplies.

  8. IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTERIA DECONTAMINATING ELEME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    DECONTAMINATING ELEME PETRO. USING 16S. USING 16S rDNA PCR DENATURING. DNA PCR DENATURING. DNA PCR DENATURING. DNA PCR DENATURING. 1DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES. 2DEPARTMENT OF MICROBIOLOGY. E-mail addresses: mail addresses: ABSTRACT. Identification.

  9. Degradation And Decontamination of VX in Concrete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, George W; O'Connor, Richard J; Edwards, Jennifer L; Brevett, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    ... than 0.2 L drops. Water added to concrete samples containing sorbed VX to mimic precipitation and/or a potential decontamination strategy resulted in the desorption of copious amounts of VX into the water along...

  10. Decontamination of graphite by chemical treatment; Descontaminacion de grafito por tratamiento quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascon, J. L.; Pina, G.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a study of decontamination of i-graphite by means of chemical treatment has been carried out within the project CARBOWASTE belonging to the 7th program of the EU (2007-2013). Decontamination through chemical treatment for i-graphite with aqueous solutions depends on the composition of the lixiviation, the temperature or the physical state in which is located the i-graphite, powder or block. In the first place was studied the influence of these factors using i-graphite powder and later graphite block.

  11. Report of decontamination at Tominari Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumi, S

    2016-12-01

    On 19 April 2011, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology designated 13 elementary schools, including Tominari Elementary School in Date city, as high-dose schools that needed to restrict outdoor activities due to the effects of the accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Approximately 1 week later, the municipal government took action to remove the topsoil from the school grounds, and the prohibition of outdoor activities at Tominari Elementary School was lifted. The school staff continued to work on decontaminating the surrounding areas using high-pressure washers and brushes. There were certain positive outcomes, but a more effective decontamination method was required. In July 2011, the municipal government started an environmental remediation project, both inside and outside the school buildings, with researchers and decontamination workers at Tominari Elementary School, involving members of the Parent-Teacher Association (PTA), local communities, and volunteers using various effective and specialised forms of decontamination. As a result, Tominari Elementary School was able to recommence swimming lessons at the end of the first semester, which had been thought to be impossible. This article will provide information about the importance of 'dialogue' for decontamination, how engagement of the experts gave members of the PTA and the local community a feeling of 'security and safety', and how the decontamination work was an ever-expanding collaborative work of a large number of people.

  12. A comparative study of infrared and microwave heating for microbial decontamination of paprika powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovisa eEliasson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is currently a need in developing new decontamination technologies for spices due to limitations of existing technologies, mainly regarding their effects on spices’ sensory quality. In the search of new decontamination solutions, it is of interest to compare different technologies, to provide the industry with knowledge for taking decisions concerning appropriate decontamination technologies for spices. The present study compares infrared and microwave decontamination of naturally contaminated paprika powder after adjustment of water activity to 0.88. Infrared respectively microwave heating was applied to quickly heat up paprika powder to 98°C, after which the paprika sample was transferred to a conventional oven set at 98°C to keep the temperature constant during a holding time up to 20 min. In the present experimental set-up microwave treatment at 98°C for 20 min resulted in a reduction of 4.8 log units of the total number of mesophilic bacteria, while the infrared treatment showed a 1 log unit lower reduction for the corresponding temperature and treatment time. Microwave and infrared heating created different temperature profiles and moisture distribution within the paprika sample during the heating up part of the process, which is likely to have influenced the decontamination efficiency. The results of this study are used to discuss the difficulties in comparing two thermal technologies on equal conditions due to differences in their heating mechanisms.

  13. Decontamination of Surfaces Exposed to Carbon-Based Nanotubes and Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of surfaces by nanomaterials can happen due to accidental spillage and release or gradual accumulation during processing or handling. Considering the increasingly wide use of nanomaterials in industry and research labs and also taking into account the diversity of physical and chemical properties of different nanomaterials (such as solubility, aggregation/agglomeration, and surface reactivity, there is a pressing need to define reliable nanomaterial-specific decontamination guidelines. In this paper, we propose and investigate a potential method for surface decontamination of carbon-based nanomaterials using solvent cleaning and wipes. The results show that the removal efficiency for single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes from silicon wafers sprayed with water-surfactant solutions prior to mechanical wiping is greater than 90% and 95%, respectively. The need for further studies to understand the mechanisms of nanomaterial removal from surfaces and development of standard techniques for surface decontamination of nanomaterials is highlighted.

  14. Decontamination around the site of Chernobylsk; Decontamination autour du site de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manesse, D.; Rzepka, J.P.; Maubert, H.

    1990-12-01

    This report describes the decontamination of the site around the nuclear plant of Chernobylsk after the reactor accident of 1986. The work of decontamination in urban areas, buildings, fields and vegetation are detailed. The interventions to reduce the contamination of surface waters and to protect ground waters are also given. (N.C.).

  15. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  16. Comparison of four decontamination treatments on porcine renal decellularized extracellular matrix structure, composition, and support of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornejad, Nafiseh; Nielsen, Jeffery J; Morris, Ryan J; Gassman, Jason R; Reynolds, Paul R; Roeder, Beverly L; Cook, Alonzo D

    2016-03-01

    Engineering whole organs from porcine decellularized extracellular matrix and human cells may lead to a plentiful source of implantable organs. Decontaminating the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix scaffolds is an essential step prior to introducing human cells. However, decontamination of whole porcine kidneys is a major challenge because the decontamination agent or irradiation needs to diffuse deep into the structure to eliminate all microbial contamination while minimizing damage to the structure and composition of the decellularized extracellular matrix. In this study, we compared four decontamination treatments that could be applicable to whole porcine kidneys: 70% ethanol, 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl, 0.2% peracetic acid in 4% ethanol, and gamma (γ)-irradiation. Porcine kidneys were decellularized by perfusion of 0.5% (w/v) aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate and the four decontamination treatments were optimized using segments (n = 60) of renal tissue to ensure a consistent comparison. Although all four methods were successful in decontamination, γ-irradiation was very damaging to collagen fibers and glycosaminoglycans, leading to less proliferation of human renal cortical tubular epithelium cells within the porcine decellularized extracellular matrix. The effectiveness of the other three optimized solution treatments were then all confirmed using whole decellularized porcine kidneys (n = 3). An aqueous solution of 0.2% peracetic acid in 1 M NaCl was determined to be the best method for decontamination of porcine decellularized extracellular matrix. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Bioinspired Surface Treatments for Improved Decontamination: Commercial Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-28

    Improved Decontamination : Commercial Products Brandy J. White, Anthony P. Malanoski, and Martin H. Moore Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6930 4555...application to identify those technologies that may improve decontamination capabilities for painted surfaces. This report details results for

  18. Decontamination trade study for the Light Duty Utility Arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1994-09-29

    Various methods were evaluated for decontaminating the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). Physical capabilities of each method were compared with the constraints and requirements for the LDUA Decontamination System. Costs were compared and a referred alternative was chosen.

  19. Development of laser decontamination. 5. Decontamination test of the hot samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Ryuichirou; Ishijima, Noboru; Tanimoto, Kenichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-08-01

    Process of laser decontamination system is as follows. As the material is irradiated by laser beam, its surface is instantaneously heated and ablated. Laser decontamination system is able to decontaminate thoroughly. In this work, the characteristics of laser beam transmission by optical fibers, and decontamination effect of laser beam irradiation to test pieces which are cut down of pipe in the hot facility, are experimented for apply laser decontamination technique to radioactive wastes treatment and decommissioning of nuclear fuel facilities. The results are as follows. (1) Beam transmission: Transmission of Q switch pulse YAG laser's beam by optical fibers are examined. Transmission energy is in proportion to incident energy to fiber. Transmission energy of bundled fiber is 168mJ to 406mJ of incident energy. In the case of incident energy was 425mJ, transmission energy was decrease, because some fibers of bundled fiber were damaged by laser beam. (2) Decontamination test of the hot samples: Counting rate of pipe test piece were decreased more than 90% by first irradiation of Q switch pulse YAG laser. Counting rate of pipe test piece were decreased no more than 4% by on and after second irradiation of Q switch pulse YAG laser. To move the test piece slowly, and to raise the density of irradiation energy, and to use the helium gas for auxiliary gas are effective to increase decontamination effect. (author)

  20. Developments in Decontamination Technologies of Military Personnel and Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Utkarsh R.; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Individual protection is important for warfighters, first responders and civilians to meet the current threat of toxic chemicals and chemical warfare (CW) agents. Within the realm of individual protection, decontamination of warfare agents is not only required on the battlefield but also in laboratory, pilot plants, production and agent destruction sites. It is of high importance to evaluate various decontaminants and decontamination techniques for implementing the best practices in varying scenarios such as decontamination of personnel, sites and sensitive equipment.

  1. Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Liquid Metal Processing Lab.

    1996-04-01

    Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material`s decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting.

  2. α-Conotoxin Decontamination Protocol Evaluation: What Works and What Doesn’t

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Matthew; Cort, John; McDougal, Owen

    2017-09-01

    Nine publically available biosafety protocols for safely handling conotoxin peptides were tested to evaluate their decontamination efficacy. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to assess the effect of each chemical treatment on the secondary and primary structure of α-CTx MII [L10V, E11A]. Of the nine decontamination methods tested, treatment with 1% (m/v) solution of the enzymatic detergent Contrex™ EZ resulted in a 76.8% decrease in α-helical content as assessed by the mean residue ellipticity at 222 nm, and partial peptide digestion was demonstrated using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Additionally, treatment with 6% sodium hypochlorite (m/v) resulted in 80.5% decrease in α-helical content and complete digestion of the peptide. The Contrex™ EZ treatment was repeated with three additional α-conotoxins (α-CTxs), α-CTxs LvIA, ImI and PeIA, which verified the decontamination method was reasonably robust. These results support the use of either 1% Contrex™ EZ solution or 6% sodium hypochlorite in biosafety protocols for the decontamination of α- CTxs in research laboratories.

  3. 40 CFR 761.79 - Decontamination standards and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination standards and..., AND USE PROHIBITIONS Storage and Disposal § 761.79 Decontamination standards and procedures. (a) Applicability. This section establishes decontamination standards and procedures for removing PCBs, which are...

  4. 41 CFR 101-45.001 - Demilitarization and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... decontamination. 101-45.001 Section 101-45.001 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property..., ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.001 Demilitarization and decontamination. (a... characteristics, or otherwise making it unfit for further use. (b) Demilitarization or decontamination of property...

  5. NITROJET: decontamination, cutting and concrete scabbling by nitrogen technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerval, Frederique [AREVA NC - Clean-Up BU, 1 route de la Noue, 91196 Gif sur Yvette, Cedex (France); Varet, Thierry [AREVA NC, Nuclear Site Value Development BU (France); Debionne, Thierry [NCE, NITROCISION (Luxembourg); Richard, Frederic [AIR LIQUIDE C.T.A.S. (France)

    2009-06-15

    STMI, subsidiary company of the AREVA Group with over 40 years in the D and D business, has been continuously innovating and developing new, decontamination, cleaning and cutting techniques, with the objectives of achieving more efficient decontaminations and cuttings on a growing spectrum of media. In the past years, it has partnered with AIR LIQUIDE, world leader in industrial and medical gases and NITROCISION, a US based company, to develop and commercialize in the nuclear field a revolutionary D and D technology 'NITROJET' patented by NITROCISION and based on pressurized cryogenic nitrogen. This technology uses nitrogen at low temperature (-140 deg. C) and extreme pressure (3 500 bar) to decontaminate or scrabble all types of surfaces: metals, polymers, concrete. Cutting operations can also be carried out by addition of abrasive materials. Liquid nitrogen is collected from a tank to be pressurized in a specific skid which includes a combination of pumps and heat exchangers. The nitrogen stream can then be applied on the substrate. A combination of phenomenon can be distinguished when applying the nitrogen jet: mechanical effect thanks to the high kinetics energy of the stream, thermal impact, blast impact due to the vaporization of the nitrogen and finally solvent power. Advantages of the technology are plentiful; indeed no secondary waste are produced because liquid nitrogen quickly converts to a gas, there is no hot spot, nitrogen is an inert/non-flammable gas providing a safe environment, this is a dry technology (no effluents) and further more the process can be deployed manually with hand held tools, or remotely with the use of robotics. Finally the operating rate is high compared to other mechanical techniques (concrete scabbling) or classic decontamination processes (gels, foams..) which implies a cutback in the operation durations. For example, for concrete, the system is able to scrabble up to 25 mm of concrete in one pass. A vacuum capture

  6. LASL experience in decontamination of the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlquist, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Since 1972 the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has been actively involved in land area surveys for radioactive contamination and has gained considerable experience in cleanup of lands considered to have unacceptable levels of radioactive contamination. Experience and means of arriving at recommendations for decontamination at levels as low as reasonably achievable.

  7. Effectiveness of Vinegar, Lime, and Salt Water as Potential Household Decontaminants for Toothbrushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vethakkan Bijivin Raj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Toothbrushes play an essential role in oral hygiene. However, toothbrushes can become contaminated through contact with the environment, from the oral cavity, and by toothbrush storage containers. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness of vinegar, lime, and salt water as potential household decontaminants for toothbrushes. Materials and Methods: In an in vitro study, 120 used toothbrushes were collected and divided into four groups comprising 30 samples each. Group I was treated with plain water alone after use. Group II was treated with salt water. Group III was treated with a solution which contained lime juice. Group IV was treated with vinegar. Treatment duration for the groups was set to be 12 h. After the treatment, the brush heads of the four groups were incubated in brain-heart infusion agar at 37°C for 24 h. Statistical analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0 software. One-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc analysis were performed for multiple comparisons. Results: Vinegar group showed statistically significant result for decontamination of toothbrushes when compared to other test and control agents. Conclusion: Commonly used household materials can be potential decontaminants for toothbrushes. The results of this study showed that vinegar was the most effective decontamination agent followed by lime and salt water.

  8. Decontamination effects of detergents on the market for radioactive surface contamination. Their comparative test (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Kenjiro; Takasaki, Koji; Horiuchi, N. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Yasunaka, Hideo; Izumi, Yuichi [Japan Environment Research Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    There happens frequently radioactive surface contamination on human body and skin under radiation works in controlled area. The surface contamination should be removed from the body and the skin as soon as possible for radiation control and exposure management. Titanium oxide paste, which is reserved as detergent for radioactive surface contamination, has satisfactory results and reliability for decontamination effects. The titanium oxide paste, however, has a short preservation period, and must be exchanged and supplied every several months. Decontamination tests for 22 kinds of detergents on the market were carried out with swine skin and radiation materials, Cs-137 and Ru-106. Radiation solution of Cs-137 or Ru-106 was dropped on the swine skin sample, which was left for 5 min or 40 min as it is. Radioactivity of the sample was measured before and after washing of the detergents. Decontamination effects of the detergents for Cs-137 were similar to those for Ge-144 which were tested in the previous year. The decontamination effects for Ru-106, however, were remarkably lower than those for both cases of Cs-137 and Ge-144. (M. Suetake)

  9. Decontamination factor of the commercial detergents for the skin (part 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Kenjiro; Takasaki, Koji [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Yasunaka, Hideo; Izumi, Yuichi [Japan Environment Research Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    The commercial detergents, which are cleansing cream, shampoo, neutral detergent, etc., were examined in order to select the body cleaners that are substitutes for the titanium dioxide paste. JNC entrusted Japan Environment Research Corporation Limited with these examinations since 1997. In 1997 and 1998, the commercial detergents were examined for Ce-144, Cs-137 and Ru-106. In 1999, 22 detergents were examined for Co-60 from the result of the past examinations. In this examination, the radioactive solution of Co-60 was dropped on the pig-skin samples. These samples were washed with each detergent after 5 minutes and 40 minutes. The decontamination factors of detergents were estimated by the radioactive ratio of the samples before and after washing. As a result of this examination, the decontamination factors for Co-60 was the same as the decontamination factors for Ce-144 and Cs-137, and 11 detergents were nominated as the cleaner that have the decontamination factor more than that of titanium dioxide paste. (author)

  10. Aptamers as the Agent in Decontamination Assays (Apta-Decontamination Assays: From the Environment to the Potential Application In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawethu Pascoe Bilibana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The binding specificity and affinity of aptamers have long been harnessed as the key elements in the development of aptamer-based assays, particularly aptasensing application. One promising avenue that is currently explored based on the specificity and affinity of aptamers is the application of aptamers in the decontamination assays. Aptamers have been successfully harnessed as the decontamination agents to remove contaminants from the environment and to decontaminate infectious elements. The reversible denaturation property inherent in aptamers enables the repeated usage of aptamers, which can immensely save the cost of decontamination. Analogous to the point-of-care diagnostics, there is no doubt that aptamers can also be deployed in the point-of-care aptamer-based decontamination assay, whereby decontamination can be performed anywhere and anytime for instantaneous decision-making. It is also prophesied that aptamers can also serve more than as a decontaminant, probably as a tool to capture and kill hazardous elements, particularly pathogenic agents.

  11. Decontamination of Uranium-Contaminated Soil in Various Particle Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Kim, I. G.; Jeong, J. W.; Choi, J. W. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The decontamination of soil by washing alone without the electrokinetic treatment is preferable if it is possible. In the treatment of heavy metals-contaminated soil, fine soil particles were separated from coarse particles through a 100 mesh sieve because the high concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, etc. is generally existed in the fine particles. Therefore the separation of fine particles after washing was performed in this work, and the radioactivity of remained coarse soil was measured. When U-contaminated soil was washed twice by a sulfuric acid solution with NaClO{sub 3} at 65 .deg. and the fine particles such as silt and clay were removed, the radioactivity for the remained coarse soil with size of larger than 0.1 mm can reach to below clearance level for the self-disposal.

  12. Evaluation of Expedient Decontamination Options with Activated Peroxide-based Liquid Sporicides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    Activated Peroxide Characterization Measurements 15 4.3.1 Measurements of pH and Temperature of AHP 15 4.3.2 Measurements of H2O2 Concentration in AHP 15...Combined Results for Ten Batches of Decontamination Solution) 20 Figure 5-4. Concentration of H2O2 in AHP over Time (Combined Results for Ten...International System of Units STS Sodium Thiosulfate TSA Tryptic Soy Agar TSP Trisodium Phosphate UV Ultraviolet (light) VHP Vaporized Hydrogen

  13. Implant decontamination with 2% chlorhexidine during surgical peri-implantitis treatment : a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, Y. C. M.; Raghoebar, G. M.; Meijer, H. J. A.; Winkel, E. G.; van Winkelhoff, A. J.

    ObjectiveThe objective of this randomized, double-blind, controlled trial was to evaluate the clinical, radiographic, and microbiological effects of implant surface decontamination with a 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) solution in comparison with a 0.12% chlorhexidine+0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC)

  14. Decontaminant solution on in vitro growth of Byrsonima intermedia seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Coutinho Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Byrsonima intermedia A. Juss. é uma planta medicinal e frutífera do Cerrado, cuja propagação convencional é difícil, devido à presença do endocarpo extremamente lignificado. Embora o hipoclorito de sódio (NaOCl seja amplamente utilizado para a desinfestação superficial, existem poucos relatos de seus efeitos sobre o crescimento do explante. Neste trabalho, o objetivo foi estudar o efeito de diferentes pHs e períodos de exposição de sementes de B. intermedia em uma solução de NaOCl. As sementes foram submetidas a diferentes tempos de exposição (1, 5 e 10 minutos numa solução de NaOCl com diferentes pHs (5, 7, 10 e 12 e, após o tratamento com hipoclorito de sódio, os embriões foram inoculados em meio WPM com a concentração de 50% de sais sem sacarose, ágar a 0,5% e pH 5,8 e, depois de 75 dias de cultivo, o crescimento das plântulas foi avaliado. A utilização de NaOCl é eficaz na desinfestação de sementes de B. intermedia, independente da variação do pH ou dos períodos de exposição. A porcentagem de plântulas normais, o comprimento da parte aérea e o número de folhas são positivamente afetados pela utilização de solução de NaOCl a pH de 8,5-8,9 ou pelo aumento do período de exposição, enquanto o número de raízes é afetado apenas pelo aumento do período de exposição na solução NaOCl

  15. Chemical Warfare Agent Decontaminant Solution Using Quaternary Ammonium Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-11

    warfare agents, which include a variety of organophosphorus and organosulfur compounds, are known in the art. 15 However, these known methods use...chemical warfare agents, and works particularly well for neutralization of organosulfur agents such as mustard gas (HD), and organophosphorus agents such...detoxifying/neutralizing a variety of chemical warfare agents, including organosulfur agents such as mustard gas (HD), and organophosphorus agents such as

  16. [Decontamination of organophosphorus compounds: Towards new alternatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, L; Jacquet, P; Elias, M; Daudé, D; Chabrière, E

    2017-05-01

    Organophosphorus coumpounds (OP) are toxic chemicals mainly used for agricultural purpose such as insecticides and were also developed and used as warfare nerve agents. OP are inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase, a key enzyme involved in the regulation of the central nervous system. Chemical, physical and biological approaches have been considered to decontaminate OP. This review summarizes the current and emerging strategies that are investigated to tackle this issue with a special emphasis on enzymatic remediation methods. During the last decade, many studies have been dedicated to the development of biocatalysts for OP removal. Among these, recent reports have pointed out the promising enzyme SsoPox isolated from the archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus. Considering both its intrinsic stability and activity, this hyperthermostable enzyme is highly appealing for the decontamination of OP. Copyright © 2017 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. All rights reserved.

  17. Conceptual design for a land decontamination robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, G.P.

    1989-11-01

    This study investigates the development of a machine for the cleanup and/or treatment of land areas contaminated by a nuclear accident. This system of hardware components could remove radioactive, fallout-type contamination from rolling terrain, such as agricultural farm. This mobile system is remotely operable. This system could be referred to as a land decontamination robot.'' A survey of vendors has identified a set of hardware components which are commercially available and not special development items. These components include a large vacuum loader unit, a vehicle for moving the unit around the contaminated area, an industrial robot arm for moving the vacuum nozzle over the contaminated surface, an electronic remote control system, and a position determination system to assist with steering the vehicle on subsequent passes around the contaminated area. Cost estimates were developed for each component. Two versions of the decontamination robot'' were considered: (1) a truck-mounted vacuum loader unit, and (2) a trailer-mounted unit pulled by a bulldozer-type crawler. The costs of the hardware components for the truck-mounted unit are about $450,000; the trailer-mounted unit is about 10% more expensive. These costs are only the hardware costs; the costs associated with integrating this hardware into an operating decontamination system have not been included. Also not included are the costs of programming the sweeping motion of the robot arm and of any computer equipment or software necessary to process and display information relating to the vehicle's position within the contaminated area. It is assumed that these costs will at least equal the cost of the hardware and will thus move the total cost for the complete land decontamination robot system to a minimum of $1,000,000. 25 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Implant decontamination with 2% chlorhexidine during surgical peri-implantitis treatment: a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Y C M; Raghoebar, G M; Meijer, H J A; Winkel, E G; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this randomized, double-blind, controlled trial was to evaluate the clinical, radiographic, and microbiological effects of implant surface decontamination with a 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) solution in comparison with a 0.12% chlorhexidine + 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) solution during resective surgical peri-implantitis treatment. Forty-four patients (108 implants) with peri-implantitis were treated with resective surgical treatment consisting of bone re-contouring, surface debridement and chemical decontamination, and apically repositioned flap. Patients were randomly allocated to decontamination with a 2% CHX solution (test group) or 0.12% CHX + 0.05% CPC (control group). Clinical and radiographic parameters were recorded before treatment (baseline), and at 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. Microbiological parameters were recorded during surgery. Multilevel analysis showed no significant differences in bleeding, suppuration, probing pocket depth, and radiographic bone loss between control and test group over three follow-up measurements (3, 6, and 12 months) from baseline. Both decontamination procedures resulted in significant reductions in anaerobic bacterial counts on the implant surface, but no significant difference was noted between control and test group (mean log 3.37 ± 2.34 vs. 3.65 ± 2.87, P = 0.99). The use of a 2% CHX solution for implant surface decontamination during resective peri-implantitis therapy does not lead to improved clinical, radiographic, or microbiological results compared with a 0.12% CHX + 0.05% CPC solution. Overall, the additional use of CHX reduces anaerobic bacterial load on the implant surface better than mechanical debridement alone, but does not seem to enhance clinical treatment outcomes (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01852253). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Biodegradation of concrete intended for their decontamination; Biodegradation de matrices cimentaires en vue de leur decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jestin, A

    2005-05-15

    The decontamination of sub-structural materials represents a stake of high importance because of the high volume generated. It is agreed then to propose efficient and effective processes. The process of bio-decontamination of the hydraulic binders leans on the mechanisms of biodegradation of concretes, phenomenon characterized in the 40's by an indirect attack of the material by acids stem from the microbial metabolism: sulphuric acid (produced by Thiobacillus), nitric acid (produced by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter) and organic acids (produced by fungi). The principle of the bio-decontamination process is to apply those microorganisms on the surface of the contaminated material, in order to damage its surface and to retrieve the radionuclides. One of the multiple approaches of the process is the use of a bio-gel that makes possible the micro-organisms application. (author)

  20. Personal protective equipment and decontamination of adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Michael G; Cawthon, David

    2015-02-01

    Accurate identification of the hazardous material is essential for proper care. Efficient hospital security and triage must prevent contaminated victims from entering the emergency department (ED) and causing secondary contamination. The decontamination area should be located outside the ambulance entrance. Decontamination priorities are protection of the health care worker, utilization of Level C personal protective equipment, and proper decontamination of the exposed patient. Decontamination proceeds in a head-to-toe sequence. Run-off water is a hazardous waste. Hospital and Community Management Planning for these emergencies is essential for proper preparation and effective response to the hazardous materials incident. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The dissolution of metal decontamination sludges stored in tanks and their management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopowicz, R.A.; Phillips, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The decontamination of stainless steel components is accomplished by the use of alkaline permanganate solutions, followed by an application of solutions of complexing agents such as citric acid or oxalic acid. Spent decontamination solutions comprising residues from both steps were combined in several waste storage tanks, where they have been in storage for several years. In those tanks, a reaction between residual permanganate and unreacted complexing agents produced sludges, consisting mainly of manganese dioxide, that reside in the tanks along with supernatant liquid. In a campaign that was conducted a few years ago, the accumulated waste solution was partially treated and disposed. This treatment consisted of decanting only the supernatant liquid and transporting it to a liquid waste treatment facility that employed a Thin Film Evaporator (TFE) to concentrate the liquid and ultimately produce a bitumen-encapsulated solidified waste form for storage. A study of treatment options for the remaining sludge is reported here. The requirement was to determine a simple means of treating the sludge using existing routine processes and equipment. This will be a significant step toward the decommissioning of the decontamination waste storage tanks. The available equipment at the liquid waste treatment facility was not designed to process sludge or slurries containing a large volume fraction of solids. Laboratory testing was carried out to find a means of dissolving the decontamination waste sludges, preferably in situ, and filtering undissolved solids to meet the feed requirements of the TFE in the liquid waste treatment facility. A concentrated citric acid solution was applied to sludge samples, without the use of externally applied mixing of the reagent and sludge. In all of the samples of actual decontamination waste sludge that were tested, a quantity of undissolved material remained after treatment with citric acid. The quantities were relatively small in volume, and

  2. Fate of the chemical warfare agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX) on soil following accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravett, M R; Hopkins, F B; Self, A J; Webb, A J; Timperley, C M; Riches, J R

    2014-08-01

    In the event of alleged use of organophosphorus nerve agents, all kinds of environmental samples can be received for analysis. These might include decontaminated and charred matter collected from the site of a suspected chemical attack. In other scenarios, such matter might be sampled to confirm the site of a chemical weapon test or clandestine laboratory decontaminated and burned to prevent discovery. To provide an analytical capability for these contingencies, we present a preliminary investigation of the effect of accelerant-based fire and liquid decontamination on soil contaminated with the nerve agent O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX). The objectives were (a) to determine if VX or its degradation products were detectable in soil after an accelerant-based fire promoted by aviation fuel, including following decontamination with Decontamination Solution 2 (DS2) or aqueous sodium hypochlorite, (b) to develop analytical methods to support forensic analysis of accelerant-soaked, decontaminated and charred soil and (c) to inform the design of future experiments of this type to improve analytical fidelity. Our results show for the first time that modern analytical techniques can be used to identify residual VX and its degradation products in contaminated soil after an accelerant-based fire and after chemical decontamination and then fire. Comparison of the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) profiles of VX and its impurities/degradation products from contaminated burnt soil, and burnt soil spiked with VX, indicated that the fire resulted in the production of diethyl methylphosphonate and O,S-diethyl methylphosphonothiolate (by an unknown mechanism). Other products identified were indicative of chemical decontamination, and some of these provided evidence of the decontaminant used, for example, ethyl 2-methoxyethyl methylphosphonate and bis(2-methoxyethyl) methylphosphonate following decontamination with DS2. Sample preparation

  3. Contaminated concrete: Occurrence and emerging technologies for DOE decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, K.S.; Wilson-Nichols, M.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Morris, M.I. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The goals of the Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition Focus Area, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development, are to select, demonstrate, test, and evaluate an integrated set of technologies tailored to provide a complete solution to specific problems posed by deactivation, decontamination, and decommissioning, (D&D). In response to these goals, technical task plan (TTP) OR152002, entitled Accelerated Testing of Concrete Decontamination Methods, was submitted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report describes the results from the initial project tasks, which focused on the nature and extent of contaminated concrete, emerging candidate technologies, and matching of emerging technologies to concrete problems. Existing information was used to describe the nature and extent of contamination (technology logic diagrams, data bases, and the open literature). To supplement this information, personnel at various DOE sites were interviewed, providing a broad perspective of concrete contamination. Because characterization is in the initial stage at many sites, complete information is not available. Assimilation of available information into one location is helpful in identifying potential areas of concern in the future. The most frequently occurring radiological contaminants within the DOE complex are {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}U (and it daughters), and {sup 60}Co, followed closely by {sup 90}Sr and tritium, which account for {minus}30% of the total occurrence. Twenty-four percent of the contaminants were listed as unknown, indicating a lack of characterization information, and 24% were listed as other contaminants (over 100 isotopes) with less than 1% occurrence per isotope.

  4. Hair decontamination procedure prior to multi-class pesticide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duca, Radu-Corneliu; Hardy, Emilie; Salquèbre, Guillaume; Appenzeller, Brice M R

    2014-06-01

    Although increasing interest is being observed in hair analysis for the biomonitoring of human exposure to pesticides, some limitations still have to be addressed for optimum use of this matrix in that specific context. One main possible issue concerns the need to differentiate chemicals biologically incorporated into hair from those externally deposited on hair surface from contaminated air or dust. The present study focuses on the development of a washing procedure for the decontamination of hair before analysis of pesticides from different chemical classes. For this purpose, three different procedures of artificial contamination (with silica, cellulose, and aqueous solution) were used to simulate pesticides deposition on hair surface. Several washing solvents (four organic: acetone, dichloromethane, methanol, acetonitrile; and four aqueous: water, phosphate buffer, shampoo, sodium dodecylsulfate) were evaluated for their capacity to remove artificially deposited pesticides from hair surface. The most effective washing solvents were sodium dodecylsulfate and methanol for aqueous and organic solvents, respectively. Moreover, after a first washing with sodium dodecylsulfate or methanol, the majority of externally deposited pesticides was removed and a steady-state was reached since significantly lower amounts were removed by additional second and third washings. Finally, the effectiveness of a decontamination procedure comprising washing with sodium dodecylsulfate and methanol was successively demonstrated. In parallel, it was determined that the final procedure did not affect the chemicals biologically incorporated, as hair strands naturally containing pesticides were used. Such a procedure appears to remove in one-shot the fraction of chemicals located on hair surface and does not require repeated washing steps. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. DNA decontamination of fingerprint brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szkuta, Bianca; Oorschot, Roland A H van; Ballantyne, Kaye N

    2017-08-01

    Genetic profiling of DNA collected from fingerprints that have been exposed to various enhancement techniques is routine in many forensic laboratories. As a result of direct contact with fingermark residues during treatment, there is concern around the DNA contamination risk of dusting fingermarks with fingerprint brushes. Previous studies have demonstrated the potential for cross-contamination between evidentiary items through various mechanisms, highlighting the risk of using the same fingerprint brush to powder multiple surfaces within and between crime-scenes. Experiments were performed to assess the contamination risk of reused fingerprint brushes through the transfer of dried saliva and skin deposits from and to glass surfaces with new unused squirrel hair and fiberglass brushes. Additional new unused brushes and brushes previously used in casework were also tested for their ability to contaminate samples. In addition, the ability to eradicate DNA from used squirrel hair and fiberglass fingerprint brushes was assessed using a 1% sodium hypochlorite solution and a 5% solution of a commercially available alternative, Virkon. DNA profiling results from surfaces contacted by treated and untreated brushes were compared to determine the effectiveness of the devised cleaning protocol. Brush durability was also assessed over multiple wash/rinse/dry cycles with both agents. Varying amounts of DNA-containing material were collected and transferred by squirrel hair and fiberglass brushes, with detectability on the secondary surface dependent on the biological nature of the material being transferred. The impact of DNA contamination from dirty fingerprint brushes was most apparent in simulations involving the transfer of dried saliva and brushes previously used in casework, while minimal transfer of touch DNA was observed. Alarmingly, large quantities of DNA were found to reside on new unused squirrel hair brushes, while no DNA was detected on new unused fiberglass

  6. Evidence based decontamination protocols for the removal of external Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) from contaminated hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvivier, Wilco F; Peeters, Ruth J P; van Beek, Teris A; Nielen, Michel W F

    2016-02-01

    External contamination can cause false positive results in forensic hair testing for drugs of abuse and is therefore a major concern when hair evidence is used in court. Current literature about decontamination strategies is mainly focused on external cocaine contamination and no consensus on the best decontamination procedure for hair samples containing cannabinoids has been reached so far. In this study, different protocols with solvents, both organic as well as aqueous, were tested on blank and drug user hair for their performance on removing external cannabis contamination originating from either smoke or indirect contact with cannabis plant material. Smoke contamination was mimicked by exposing hair samples to smoke from a cannabis cigarette and indirect contact contamination by handling hair with cannabis contaminated gloves or hands. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels in the hair samples and wash solvents were determined using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Aqueous surfactant solutions removed more THC contamination compared to water, but much less than organic solvents. Methanol, dichloromethane and chloroform were most efficient in removing THC contamination. Due to its lower environmental impact, methanol was chosen as the preferred decontamination solvent. After testing of different sequential wash steps on externally contaminated blank hair, three protocols performed equally well, removing all normal level and more than 99% of unrealistically high levels of external cannabis contamination. Thorough testing on cannabis users' hair, both as such and after deliberate contamination, showed that using these protocols all contamination could be washed from the hair while no incorporated THC was removed from truly positive samples. The present study provides detailed scientific evidence in support of the recommendations of the Society of Hair Testing: a protocol using a single methanol wash followed by a single aqueous

  7. Contactless decontamination of hair samples: cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restolho, José; Barroso, Mário; Saramago, Benilde; Dias, Mário; Afonso, Carlos A M

    2017-02-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) have already been shown to provide efficient extraction media for several systems, and to capture volatile compounds, namely opiates. In this work, a novel, contactless, artefact-free extraction procedure for the removal of Δ 9 -tetrahrydrocannabinol (THC) from the surface of human hair is presented. To prepare in vitro cannabinoids-contaminated hair, samples were flushed with hashish smoke for 7 h. The decontamination experiments were carried at 100 °C for 24 h, according to the procedure previously described. Fifty-three ILs were screened and presented decontamination efficiencies ranging from 0 to 96 %. Although the majority of the ILs presented efficiencies above 90%, the 1-ethanol-3-methyl tetrafluoroborate (96%) was chosen for further process optimization. The Design of Experiments results demonstrated that all studied variables were significant for the process and the obtained optimum conditions were: 100 °C, 13 h and 175 mg of IL. In the work of Perrotin-Brunel et al. (J. Mol. Struct. 2011, 987, 67), it is demonstrated that, at 100 °C, full conversion of tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) into THC is obtained after 60 min. Since our decontamination takes place over 13 h at 100 °C, full conversion of THCA into THC is expected. Additionally, our method was compared with the method proposed by Cairns et al. (Forensic Sci. Int. 2004, 145, 97), through the analysis of 15 in vitro contaminated hair samples. The results demonstrated that with our method a mean extraction efficiency of 11 % higher was obtained. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Jik; Kwon, H. S.; Kim, G. N. and others

    1999-03-01

    Through the project of 'Development of decontamination, decommissioning and environmental restoration technology', the followings were studied. 1. Development of decontamination and repair technology for nuclear fuel cycle facilities 2. Development of dismantling technology 3. Development of environmental restoration technology. (author)

  9. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Brian H.; Kurtiz,Tanya

    1999-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  10. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Brian H.

    2002-04-30

    The proposed research aimed to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government. We proposed to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) was to be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  11. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Brian H.; Kuritz, Tanya

    2000-06-01

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: (1) decreased exposure hazards for workers; (2) decreased secondary waste generation; (3) increased efficiency of decontamination; (4) positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and (5) lower cost of cleanup to the government. We propose to use aqueous biopolymer solutions to coat a contaminated metal surface (i.e., steel), solubilize the heavy metals (e.g., uranium) from the surface, and bind the heavy metals into the biopolymer. The biopolymer coating (containing the immobilized hazardous metal contaminants) will then be removed as a viscous film, as a dry powder, or by washing. This ''apply, wait, and remove'' procedure will reduce the amount of worker time spent in decontamination activities.

  12. Decontamination formulations for disinfection and sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Engler, Daniel E.

    2007-09-18

    Aqueous decontamination formulations that neutralize biological pathogens for disinfection and sterilization applications. Examples of suitable applications include disinfection of food processing equipment, disinfection of areas containing livestock, mold remediation, sterilization of medical instruments and direct disinfection of food surfaces, such as beef carcasses. The formulations include at least one reactive compound, bleaching activator, inorganic base, and water. The formulations can be packaged as a two-part kit system, and can have a pH value in the range of 7-8.

  13. Microwave-Based Water Decontamination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Byerly, Diane (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite (Inventor); Dusl, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system for decontaminating a medium. The system can include a medium having one or more contaminants disposed therein. The contaminants can be or include bacteria, fungi, parasites, viruses, and combinations thereof. A microwave energy radiation device can be positioned proximate the medium. The microwave energy radiation device can be adapted to generate a signal having a frequency from about 10 GHz to about 100 GHz. The signal can be adapted to kill one or more of the contaminants disposed within the medium while increasing a temperature of the medium by less than about 10 C.

  14. Hospital Decontamination: What Nurses Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brent

    2016-12-01

    Incidents involving the release of hazardous materials challenge medical providers with safely, quickly, and correctly removing contaminants from the victim. While doing so, the safety of the first receiver, current patients, bystanders, as well as the victim all have to be considered. Key challenges with hospital decontamination include, but are not limited to, selection of team members, training protocols, employee turnover, and funding. Best practices, based on the available literature and evidence, include administration buy-in and support; strong policy and procedure documentation; equipment maintenance programs; and team member recruitment, retention, and education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Automated Single Cell Data Decontamination Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennessen, Kristin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Recent technological advancements in single-cell genomics have encouraged the classification and functional assessment of microorganisms from a wide span of the biospheres phylogeny.1,2 Environmental processes of interest to the DOE, such as bioremediation and carbon cycling, can be elucidated through the genomic lens of these unculturable microbes. However, contamination can occur at various stages of the single-cell sequencing process. Contaminated data can lead to wasted time and effort on meaningless analyses, inaccurate or erroneous conclusions, and pollution of public databases. A fully automated decontamination tool is necessary to prevent these instances and increase the throughput of the single-cell sequencing process

  16. Studies of radioactive deposition on farm buildings and testing of some methods for decontamination; Studier av radioaktiv belaeggning paa lantbruksbyggnader och utprovning av laempliga dekontamineringsmetoder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Inger [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Nutrition and Management; Erlandsson, B. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear Physics; Hansson, J.; Dolby, C.M. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Farm Buildings

    1993-12-31

    Studies were made of radioactive fallout on roofs of farm buildings and of some methods of decontamination. The aim was to find ways of reducing the external radiation dose to farmers working and farm animals housed in stables in a fallout situation. The roof material studied was steel plate (A) and tile (B,C, D), each with four sample areas of ca. 1 m{sup 2}. The roof samples were collected at three places and from totally four building in regions which in 1986 (after the Chernobyl fallout) has a {sup 137}Cs ground depositions of 3040 kBq/m{sup 2} (A, B, C) and > 100 kBq/m{sup 2} (D). Four different decontamination methods were tested: 1. High pressure washing with water. 2. Repeated high pressure washing with water. 3. Application of foam of a sanitizing chemical for livestock buildings followed by high pressure washing with water. 4. Application of a solution of KCl followed by high pressure washing with water. In C, the effect of decontamination expressed as the percentage decrease of the {sup 137}Cs activity was on average for all methods, 55%. This material was coated before the decontamination by a marked growth of algae or moss, which was effectively washed off during the sanitizing procedure. In B, the average activity decontamination effect was 25%, while in D (with the highest original activity, but without growth of organic material) the effect was very small, 3%. In A, the activity level before decontamination was so low that measurements after decontamination were considered unnecessary. Method number 4 was the most effective in B and C, 32% and 64%, respectively, while method number 3 was the most effective in D, 5.7%. The results indicate that good effects can be achieved in radioactivity decontamination of roof material with equipment and chemicals which are normally available on farms.

  17. Evaluation of five decontamination methods for filtering facepiece respirators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscusi, Dennis J; Bergman, Michael S; Eimer, Benjamin C; Shaffer, Ronald E

    2009-11-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the availability of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) during an influenza pandemic. One possible strategy to mitigate a respirator shortage is to reuse FFRs following a biological decontamination process to render infectious material on the FFR inactive. However, little data exist on the effects of decontamination methods on respirator integrity and performance. This study evaluated five decontamination methods [ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI), ethylene oxide, vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP), microwave oven irradiation, and bleach] using nine models of NIOSH-certified respirators (three models each of N95 FFRs, surgical N95 respirators, and P100 FFRs) to determine which methods should be considered for future research studies. Following treatment by each decontamination method, the FFRs were evaluated for changes in physical appearance, odor, and laboratory performance (filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance). Additional experiments (dry heat laboratory oven exposures, off-gassing, and FFR hydrophobicity) were subsequently conducted to better understand material properties and possible health risks to the respirator user following decontamination. However, this study did not assess the efficiency of the decontamination methods to inactivate viable microorganisms. Microwave oven irradiation melted samples from two FFR models. The remainder of the FFR samples that had been decontaminated had expected levels of filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance. The scent of bleach remained noticeable following overnight drying and low levels of chlorine gas were found to off-gas from bleach-decontaminated FFRs when rehydrated with deionized water. UVGI, ethylene oxide (EtO), and VHP were found to be the most promising decontamination methods; however, concerns remain about the throughput capabilities for EtO and VHP

  18. Evaluation of Five Decontamination Methods for Filtering Facepiece Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Michael S.; Eimer, Benjamin C.; Shaffer, Ronald E.

    2009-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the availability of National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-certified N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) during an influenza pandemic. One possible strategy to mitigate a respirator shortage is to reuse FFRs following a biological decontamination process to render infectious material on the FFR inactive. However, little data exist on the effects of decontamination methods on respirator integrity and performance. This study evaluated five decontamination methods [ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI), ethylene oxide, vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP), microwave oven irradiation, and bleach] using nine models of NIOSH-certified respirators (three models each of N95 FFRs, surgical N95 respirators, and P100 FFRs) to determine which methods should be considered for future research studies. Following treatment by each decontamination method, the FFRs were evaluated for changes in physical appearance, odor, and laboratory performance (filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance). Additional experiments (dry heat laboratory oven exposures, off-gassing, and FFR hydrophobicity) were subsequently conducted to better understand material properties and possible health risks to the respirator user following decontamination. However, this study did not assess the efficiency of the decontamination methods to inactivate viable microorganisms. Microwave oven irradiation melted samples from two FFR models. The remainder of the FFR samples that had been decontaminated had expected levels of filter aerosol penetration and filter airflow resistance. The scent of bleach remained noticeable following overnight drying and low levels of chlorine gas were found to off-gas from bleach-decontaminated FFRs when rehydrated with deionized water. UVGI, ethylene oxide (EtO), and VHP were found to be the most promising decontamination methods; however, concerns remain about the throughput capabilities for EtO and VHP

  19. ''Green'' Biopolymers for Improved Decontamination of Metals from Surfaces: Sorptive Characterization and Coating Properties.. Annual report to be submitted to DOE Program Managers for posting on web page.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, BH

    2001-06-15

    The proposed research aims to develop a fundamental understanding of important biological and physical chemical parameters for effective decontamination of metal surfaces using environmentally benign aqueous-based biopolymer solutions. Understanding how heavy metal-chelating biopolymers coat and interact with contaminated surfaces will benefit the development of novel, safe, easy-to-apply decontamination methodologies for removal of radionuclides and heavy metals. The benefits of these methodologies will include the following: decreased exposure hazards for workers; decreased secondary waste generation; increased efficiency of decontamination; positive public appeal and development of novel, nature-friendly business opportunities; and lower cost of cleanup to the government.

  20. Removal of Uranium in Soil Using Large-scale Electrokinetic Decontamination Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye Nam; Kim, Il gook; Jeong, Jung Whan; Kim, Seung Soo; Choi, Jong Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    A method to remediate a large volume of radioactive soil should be developed. Until now the soil washing method has been studied to remediate soil contaminated with uranium, cobalt, cesium, and so on. However, it has a lower removal efficiency of nuclide from soils and generated a large volume of waste-solution. In addition, its application to the soil composed of fine particle is impossible. Thus, the electrokinetic method has been studied as a new technology for soil remediation recently. In this study, for a reduction of the waste electrolyte volume, the reuse period of waste electrolyte in the electrokinetic decontamination experiment through several experiments with the manufactured 1.2 ton electrokinetic decontamination equipment. In addition, the time required to reach below the clearance concentration level for self- disposal was estimated through several experiments using the manufactured electrokinetic decontamination equipment. When the initial uranium concentrations in the soils were 7.0-20.0 Bq/g, the times required to reach below the clearance concentration level for self-disposal were 25-40 days with the waste and reclaimed electrolytes.

  1. Application of gamma irradiation in ginseng for both photodegradation of pesticide pentachloronitrobenzene and microbial decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Hsiao-Wei [Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, 250, Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Ming-Fa [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, 200, Chung Pei Road, Chungli 320, Taiwan (China); Wang, Ya-Ting; Chung, Hsiao-Ping [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Po-Chow; Lin, I-Hsin [Committee on Chinese Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Health, Executive Yuan, Taipei 104, Taiwan (China); Chou, Fong-In, E-mail: fichou@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Section 2, Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2010-04-15

    This study investigates the feasibility of using gamma irradiation for photodegradation of a common residual fungicide, pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB), in ginseng, and for microbial decontamination. American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius, was subjected to gamma irradiation. PCNB residues were analyzed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection and mass spectrometry. Eighty percent of PCNB (100 ppm) in a methanol aqueous solution was degraded by 5 kGy irradiation, and the primary degradation product was pentachloroaniline. Furthermore, contaminated PCNB (3.7 ppm) in ginseng were reduced to 0.2 ppm after 20 kGy irradiation. The IC{sub 50} for treatment of Sclerotium rolfsii with 20 kGy irradiated PCNB was about 2.7 times higher than that for treatment with unirradiated PCNB. The survival rate of mouse fibroblast L929 cells treated with 20 kGy irradiated PCNB was about 12.9% higher than that of L929 cells treated with unirradiated PCNB. Additionally, after 20 kGy irradiation, less than 5% reduction of contents of ginsenoside Rb1 and Re were observed, and amounts of ginsenosides Rc, Rd, and Rg1 were not reduced significantly. The minimal gamma dose for microbial decontamination was 10 kGy. Therefore, gamma irradiation can be used for both PCNB photodegradation and microbial decontamination of ginseng without obvious loses of ginsenoside contents.

  2. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Kerr-McGee Cimarron Plutonium Fuel Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This final report is a summary of the events that completes the decontamination and decommissioning of the Cimarron Corporation`s Mixed Oxides Fuel Plant (formally Sequoyah Fuels Corporation and formerly Kerr-McGee Nuclear Corporation - all three wholly owned subsidiaries of the Kerr-McGee Corporation). Included are details dealing with tooling and procedures for performing the unique tasks of disassembly decontamination and/or disposal. That material which could not be economically decontaminated was volume reduced by disassembly and/or compacted for disposal. The contaminated waste cleaning solutions were processed through filtration and ion exchange for release or solidified with cement for L.S.A. waste disposal. The L.S.A. waste was compacted, and stabilized as required in drums for burial in an approved burial facility. T.R.U. waste packaging and shipping was completed by the end of July 1987. This material was shipped to the Hanford, Washington site for disposal. The personnel protection and monitoring measures and procedures are discussed along with the results of exposure data of operating personnel. The shipping containers for both T.R.U. and L.S.A. waste are described. The results of the decommissioning operations are reported in six reports. The personnel protection and monitoring measures and procedures are contained and discussed along with the results of exposure data of operating personnel in this final report.

  3. 40 CFR 761.378 - Decontamination, reuse, and disposal of solvents, cleaners, and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decontamination, reuse, and disposal...-Porous Surfaces § 761.378 Decontamination, reuse, and disposal of solvents, cleaners, and equipment. (a) Decontamination. Decontaminate solvents and non-porous surfaces on equipment in accordance with the standards and...

  4. Long-term decontamination engineering study. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geuther, W.J.

    1995-04-03

    This report was prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) with technical and cost estimating support from Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) and Parsons Environmental Services, Inc. (Parsons). This engineering study evaluates the requirements and alternatives for decontamination/treatment of contaminated equipment at the Hanford Site. The purpose of this study is to determine the decontamination/treatment strategy that best supports the Hanford Site environmental restoration mission. It describes the potential waste streams requiring treatment or decontamination, develops the alternatives under consideration establishes the criteria for comparison, evaluates the alternatives, and draws conclusions (i.e., the optimum strategy for decontamination). Although two primary alternatives are discussed, this study does identify other alternatives that may warrant additional study. hanford Site solid waste management program activities include storage, special processing, decontamination/treatment, and disposal facilities. This study focuses on the decontamination/treatment processes (e.g., waste decontamination, size reduction, immobilization, and packaging) that support the environmental restoration mission at the Hanford Site.

  5. Evaluation of three different decontamination techniques on biofilm formation, and on physical and chemical properties of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Carolina Bosso; Dos Santos, Andressa; Pfeifer, Carmem Silvia; Giannini, Marcelo; Girotto, Emerson Marcelo; Ferracane, Jack Liborio

    2017-04-25

    This study evaluated three different sterilization/disinfection techniques for resin composites on bacterial growth and surface modification after decontamination. Two resin composites were sterilized/disinfected with three different techniques: UV light, 1% chloramine T, and 70% ethanol. Four different times were used for each technique to determine the shortest time that the solution or UV light was effective. The influence of sterilization/disinfection technique on bacterial growth was evaluated by analyzing the metabolic activity, using the AlamarBlue™ assay, bacterial viability, and SEM images from biofilms of Streptococcus mutans. The surface change, after the process, was analyzed with ATR/FTIR and SEM images. The solutions used for decontamination (1% chloramine-T and 70% ethanol) were analyzed with 1 H-NMR to identify any resin compounds leached during the process. One minute of decontamination was efficient for all three methods tested. Chloramine-T increased the surface porosity on resin composites, no changes were observed for UV light and 70% ethanol, however, 1 H-NMR identified leached monomers only when 70% ethanol was used. No chemical change of the materials was found under ATR/FTIR analyses after the decontamination process. Chloramine-T, with no previous wash, increased the bacterial viability for both resin composites and increased the bacterial metabolism for the resin composite without fluoride. UV light had no interference on the resin composites properties tested using 1 min of exposure compared to the other decontamination methods. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Decontamination Efficacy Testing of COTS SteriFx Prodcuts for Mass Personnel and Casualty Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    J.R. 2002. Wound Healing in an Equine Model with SteriFx Technology. Final report, DARPA SBIR Office, contract # DAAH01‐02‐C‐R173. McKillip, J...field spray decontamination unit was previously demonstrated in 2003 at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (Dankert, 2003), and for wound healing with repeated...loads in contaminated wounds . Determine effect of CleanseFx/DeconFx on animal model tissues. Measure the effect of Fx Technology on common

  7. A Survey and Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent-Decontaminants and Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-15

    APD) is also an all purpose decontaminant. It consists of 551 (V/V) of monoethanol- amine, 45% (V/V) of 2-hydroxyl-l-propylamine, 25% (Wt/V) of lithium ...storable formulations are lithium hydroxide in MEA and sodium hydroxide and diethylenetriamine in methyl cellosolve (28). However, their effectiveness...hydroxides, potassium superoxide , potassium tert-butoxide, potassium dichromate and potassium acetate has been made. Agent destruction levels exceeding 80

  8. External decontamination of wild leeches with hypochloric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Atakan; Nazik, Hasan; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Gurler, Nezahat; Ongen, Betigul; Tuncer, Serdar; Hocaoglu, Emre; Kesim, Sinan Nur

    2004-01-01

    Background Medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, has been used in plastic and reconstructive surgery, to relieve venous congestion and to improve the microrevascularization of flaps. In many countries, wild leeches are still provided from local markets and utilised with antibiotic prophylaxies. In this research, results of identification of bacteria in the transport fluid is reported, oral and intestinal floras and the antibiograms of the identified microorganisms are investigated. Also, to avoid possible infections, the ability of hypochloric acid, a disinfectant, to suppress the relevant microorganisms without changing the life style and behavior of leeches in terms of sucking function, is investigated. Methods Bacterial identifications and antibiograms of oral and intestinal flora and transport medium were performed for 10 leeches. The optimum concentration of hypochloric acid which eliminated microorganisms without affecting the viability and sucking function of the leeches were determined by dilution of hypochloric acid to 100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 ppm concentrations in different groups of 25 leeches. Finally, 20 leeches were applied atraumatically to the bleeding areas of rats, the duration of suction was determined and compared statistically between the leeches treated and not treated with hypochloric acid solution. Results Aeromonas hydrophilia was the most commonly identified microorganism and found to be resistant to first generation cephalosporins, frequently used in prophylaxis at surgical wards. In the next stages of the study, the leeches were subjected to a series of diluted hypochloric acid solutions. Although disinfection of the transport material and suppression of the oral flora of hirudo medicinalis were successful in 100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 ppm concentrations; 12.5 ppm solution was the greatest concentration in which hirudo medicinalis could survive and sucking function was not affected significantly. Conclusions External decontamination of wild

  9. External decontamination of wild leeches with hypochloric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncer Serdar

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, has been used in plastic and reconstructive surgery, to relieve venous congestion and to improve the microrevascularization of flaps. In many countries, wild leeches are still provided from local markets and utilised with antibiotic prophylaxies. In this research, results of identification of bacteria in the transport fluid is reported, oral and intestinal floras and the antibiograms of the identified microorganisms are investigated. Also, to avoid possible infections, the ability of hypochloric acid, a disinfectant, to suppress the relevant microorganisms without changing the life style and behavior of leeches in terms of sucking function, is investigated. Methods Bacterial identifications and antibiograms of oral and intestinal flora and transport medium were performed for 10 leeches. The optimum concentration of hypochloric acid which eliminated microorganisms without affecting the viability and sucking function of the leeches were determined by dilution of hypochloric acid to 100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 ppm concentrations in different groups of 25 leeches. Finally, 20 leeches were applied atraumatically to the bleeding areas of rats, the duration of suction was determined and compared statistically between the leeches treated and not treated with hypochloric acid solution. Results Aeromonas hydrophilia was the most commonly identified microorganism and found to be resistant to first generation cephalosporins, frequently used in prophylaxis at surgical wards. In the next stages of the study, the leeches were subjected to a series of diluted hypochloric acid solutions. Although disinfection of the transport material and suppression of the oral flora of hirudo medicinalis were successful in 100, 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 ppm concentrations; 12.5 ppm solution was the greatest concentration in which hirudo medicinalis could survive and sucking function was not affected significantly. Conclusions

  10. Decision Analysis System for Selection of Appropriate Decontamination Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Boudreaux, J.F.; Chinta, S.; Zanakis, S.H.

    1998-01-01

    The principal objective for designing Decision Analysis System for Decontamination (DASD) is to support DOE-EM's endeavor to employ the most efficient and effective technologies for treating radiologically contaminated surfaces while minimizing personnel and environmental risks. DASD will provide a tool for environmental decision makers to improve the quality, consistency, and efficacy of their technology selection decisions. The system will facilitate methodical comparisons between innovative and baseline decontamination technologies and aid in identifying the most suitable technologies for performing surface decontamination at DOE environmental restoration sites.

  11. Understanding Mechanism of Photocatalytic Microbial Decontamination of Environmental Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabilal Regmi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Several photocatalytic nanoparticles are synthesized and studied for potential application for the degradation of organic and biological wastes. Although these materials degrade organic compounds by advance oxidation process, the exact mechanisms of microbial decontamination remains partially known. Understanding the real mechanisms of these materials for microbial cell death and growth inhibition helps to fabricate more efficient semiconductor photocatalyst for large-scale decontamination of environmental wastewater or industries and hospitals/biomedical labs generating highly pathogenic bacteria and toxic molecules containing liquid waste by designing a reactor. Recent studies on microbial decontamination by photocatalytic nanoparticles and their possible mechanisms of action is highlighted with examples in this mini review.

  12. Decontamination Technologies, Task 3, Urban Remediation and Response Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser,J.; Sullivan, T.

    2009-06-30

    In the aftermath of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD, also known as a dirty bomb) it will be necessary to remediate the site including building exteriors and interiors, equipment, pavement, vehicles, personal items etc. Remediation will remove or reduce radioactive contamination from the area using a combination of removing and disposing of many assets (including possible demolition of buildings), decontaminating and returning to service other assets, and fixing in place or leaving in place contamination that is deemed 'acceptable'. The later will require setting acceptable dose standards, which will require negotiation with all involved parties and a balance of risk and cost to benefit. To accomplish the first two, disposal or decontamination, a combination of technologies will be deployed that can be loosely classified as: Decontamination; Equipment removal and size reduction; and Demolition. This report will deal only with the decontamination technologies that will be used to return assets to service or to reduce waste disposal. It will not discuss demolition, size reduction or removal technologies or equipment (e.g., backhoe mounted rams, rock splitter, paving breakers and chipping hammers, etc.). As defined by the DOE (1994), decontamination is removal of radiological contamination from the surfaces of facilities and equipment. Expertise in this field comes primarily from the operation and decommissioning of DOE and commercial nuclear facilities as well as a small amount of ongoing research and development closely related to RDD decontamination. Information related to decontamination of fields, buildings, and public spaces resulting from the Goiania and Chernobyl incidents were also reviewed and provide some meaningful insight into decontamination at major urban areas. In order to proceed with decontamination, the item being processed needs to have an intrinsic value that exceeds the cost of the cleaning and justifies the exposure of any workers

  13. Transplantation of human fetal tissue for neurodegenerative diseases: validation of a new protocol for microbiological analysis and bacterial decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piroth, Tobias; Pauly, Marie-Christin; Schneider, Christian; Wittmer, Annette; Möllers, Sven; Döbrössy, Máté; Winkler, Christian; Nikkhah, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Restorative cell therapy concepts in neurodegenerative diseases are aimed at replacing lost neurons. Despite advances in research on pluripotent stem cells, fetal tissue from routine elective abortions is still regarded as the only safe cell source. Progenitor cells isolated from distinct first-trimester fetal CNS regions have already been used in clinical trials and will be used again in a new multicenter trial funded by the European Union (TRANSEURO). Bacterial contamination of human fetal tissue poses a potential risk of causing infections in the brain of the recipient. Thus, effective methods of microbial decontamination and validation of these methods are required prior to approval of a neurorestorative cell therapy trial. We have developed a protocol consisting of subsequent washing steps at different stages of tissue processing. Efficacy of microbial decontamination was assessed on rat embryonic tissue incubated with high concentrations of defined microbe solutions including representative bacterial and fungal species. Experimental microbial contamination was reduced by several log ranks. Subsequently, we have analyzed the spectrum of microbial contamination and the effect of subsequent washing steps on aborted human fetal tissue; 47.7% of the samples taken during human fetal tissue processing were positive for a microbial contamination, but after washing, no sample exhibited bacterial growth. Our data suggest that human fetal tissue for neural repair can carry microbes of various species, highlighting the need for decontamination procedures. The decontamination protocol described in this report has been shown to be effective as no microbes could be detected at the end of the procedure.

  14. Shutting down a working vivarium for decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczynski, Jori; Wallace, Michelle; Tackett, Jamie; Jiron, Ursula; Collins, Jan; Warder, Char; Richardson, Laura; Bell, Lorraine; Russell, Carolyn

    2014-08-01

    Handling a rodent disease outbreak in a facility can be a challenge. After the University of Colorado Denver Office of Laboratory Animal Resources enhanced its sentinel monitoring program, > 90% of the animal colonies housed in a vivarium at the Anschutz Medical Campus (with an area of 50,000 net ft(2)), serving the labs of > 250 principal investigators, tested positive for multiple infective agents including mouse parvovirus, fur mites, pinworms and epizootic diarrhea of infant mice. The authors detail the process by which they planned and executed a shutdown and a decontamination of the facility, which involved the rederivation or cryopreservation of > 400 unique genetically modified mouse lines. The authors discuss the aspects of the project that were successful as well as those that could have been improved.

  15. Critical evaluation of ninhydrin for monitoring surgical instrument decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayuni, N K; Cloutman-Green, E; Hollis, M; Hartley, J; Martin, S; Perrett, D

    2013-06-01

    New Department of Health (England) Choice Framework for Local Policies and Procedures guidance (CFPP 0101) still states that ninhydrin can be used to check for efficient protein removal from surgical instruments processed in sterile services departments (SSDs). With the potential transfer of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) via surgical procedures it is necessary to re-evaluate recommended methods for protein detection. This paper reports studies on the sensitivity and applicability of ninhydrin for detecting proteins in laboratories and SSDs. The efficiency of protein removal by swabbing was also evaluated. Ninhydrin showed poor sensitivity toward proteins. Limits of detection for bovine serum albumin (BSA) in solution were 205 μg/mL compared with arginine 6 μg/mL. A commercial kit could detect neither rat brain homogenate nor BSA at Ninhydrin kits, currently used in SSDs, are ineffective at detecting residual proteins due not only to the insensitivity of ninhydrin towards proteins but also to the poor desorption of adhered proteins by swabbing. Overall ninhydrin, either as a laboratory reagent or as supplied in protein detection kits, does not provide sensitive detection of proteins and generates high numbers of false negatives when used in decontamination practices. Copyright © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. ONLINE MEASUREMENT OF THE PROGRESS OF DECONTAMINATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    In order to determine if the sensor technology and the decontamination technology will face problems once integrated, a feasibility study (see Appendix B) was produced in which the effect of motion on the efficiency of a radiation sensor was measured. It was found that the effect is not negligible; however, it is not catastrophic, and if the sensors are properly calibrated, this obstacle can be overcome. During the first year of this project, many important tasks have been accomplished. The search for radiation sensors provided knowledge on the technologies commercially available. This, in turn, allowed for a proper assessment of the properties, limitations, different methods of measurement, and requirements of a large number of sensors. The best possible characterization and data collection instrument and decontamination technologies were chosen using the requirement information in Appendix A. There are technical problems with installing sensors within the blasting head, such as steel shot and dust interference. Therefore, the sensor array is placed so that it will measure the radioactivity after the blasting. Sensors are rather sensitive, and therefore it is not feasible to place the sensor windows in such an abrasive environment. Other factors, such as the need for radiation hardening in extreme cases, and the possible interference of gamma rays with the radio frequency modem, have been considered. These factors are expected to be negligible and can be revisited at the time of prototype production. Factors that need to be addressed are the vibrations of the blasting unit and how to isolate the sensor array from these. In addition, an electromagnetic survey must be performed to ensure there will be no interference with the electronic component that will be integrated. The integration design is shown in section 4.0.

  17. Advance in radioactive decontamination; Avances en descontaminacion radiactiva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basteris M, J. A. [Universidad Autonoma de Yucatan, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Diagnostico por Laboratorio y Gabinete, Av. Cupules No. 232, Col. Garcia Gineres, 97070 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Farrera V, R., E-mail: basteris@prodigy.net.m [Hospital de Especialidades de la UMAE, Centro Medico Nacional Ignacio Garcia Tellez, Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Calle 34 x 41, Exterrenos el Fenix s/n, Col. Industrial, 91750 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    The objective of the present work was to determine if the application of the Na hypochlorite has some utility in the radioactive decontamination, in comparison with the water, detergent and alcohol. Several methods were compared for decontaminate the iodine 131 and technetium 99, the work table and the skin it was carried out an initial count with the Geiger Muller. Later on, in a single occasion, the areas were washed with abundant water, alcohol, clothes detergent and sodium hypochlorite (used commercially as domestic bleacher) without diluting. Observing that the percentage in the decrease of the counted radioactivity by the Geiger Muller, decreased in the following way: It was demonstrated that the Na hypochlorite presents the highest index of radioactive decontamination with 100% of effectiveness. The Na hypochlorite is an excellent substance that can be used with effectiveness and efficiency like decontamination element in the accident cases of radioactive contamination in the clinical laboratories of nuclear medicine. (Author)

  18. System decontamination as a tool to control radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Bertholdt, H.O. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Since chemical decontamination of the Reactor Coolant Systems (RCS) and subsystems has the highest potential to reduce radiation fields in a short term this technology has gained an increasing importance. The available decontamination process at Siemens, i.e., the CORD processes, will be described. It is characterized by using permanganic acid for preoxidation and diluted organic acid for the decontamination step. It is a regenerative process resulting in very low waste volumes. This technology has been used frequently in Europe and Japan in both RCS and subsystems. An overview will be given i.e. on the 1993 applications. This overview will include plant, scope, date of performance, system volume specal features of the process removed activities, decon factor time, waste volumes, and personnel dose during decontamination. This overview will be followed by an outlook on future developments in this area.

  19. Improvement in ultraviolet based decontamination rate using meta-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enaki, Nicolae A.; Bazgan, Sergiu; Ciobanu, Nellu; Turcan, Marina; Paslari, Tatiana; Ristoscu, Carmen; Vaseashta, Ashok; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2017-09-01

    We propose a method of decontamination using photon-crystals consisting of microspheres and fiber optics structures with various geometries. The efficient decontamination using the surface of the evanescent zone of meta-materials opens a new perspective in the decontamination procedures. We propose different topological structures of meta-materials to increase the contact surface of UV radiation with contaminated liquid. Recent observation of the trapping of dielectric particles along the fibers help us propose a new perspective on the new possibilities to trap the viruses, bacteria and other microorganisms from liquids, in this special zone, where the effective UV coherent Raman decontamination becomes possible. The nonlinear theory of the excitation of vibration modes of bio-molecule of viruses and bacteria is revised, taking into consideration the bimodal coherent states in coherent Raman excitation of biomolecules.

  20. Planetary protection protocol using multi-jet cold plasma decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konesky, Gregory A.

    2010-09-01

    The detection of extraterrestrial life in-situ assumes that a positive indication is the result of an indigenous life form, and not the result of forward contamination from Earth. Atmospheric discharge cold plasma jets have proven effective in the decontamination of a wide range of microorganisms, including Deinococcus radiodurans, through multiple modes of action, yet the effect is relatively gentle on surfaces being decontaminated. An individual plasma jet may have a beam diameter of only a few millimeters, requiring extensive decontamination time for a given surface area. Techniques are discussed for assembling large area multi-jet arrays, and their mechanisms of decontamination. Application to back contamination in sample return missions is also considered.

  1. Steam Generator Group Project. Task 6. Channel head decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, R.P.; Clark, R.L.; Reece, W.D.

    1984-08-01

    The Steam Generator Group Project utilizes a retired-from-service pressurized-water-reactor steam generator as a test bed and source of specimens for research. An important preparatory step to primary side research activities was reduction of the radiation field in the steam generator channel head. This task report describes the channel head decontamination activities. Though not a programmatic research objective it was judged beneficial to explore the use of dilute reagent chemical decontamination techniques. These techniques presented potential for reduced personnel exposure and reduced secondary radwaste generation, over currently used abrasive blasting techniques. Two techniques with extensive laboratory research and vendors prepared to offer commercial application were tested, one on either side of the channel head. As indicated in the report, both techniques accomplished similar decontamination objectives. Neither technique damaged the generator channel head or tubing materials, as applied. This report provides details of the decontamination operations. Application system and operating conditions are described.

  2. Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betty, Rita G [Rio Rancho, NM; Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM; Brockmann, John E [Albuquerque, NM; Lucero, Daniel A [Albuquerque, NM; Levin, Bruce L [Tijeras, NM; Leonard, Jonathan [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-06

    Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

  3. Hand decontamination in clinical practice: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Ruth; Pegram, Anne; Woodward, Sue

    2017-04-27

    Hand decontamination is known to significantly reduce the spread of hospital-acquired infections but, despite a wealth of guidelines and education campaigns, evidence suggests that many healthcare workers are non-compliant with hand decontamination. The behaviours that prevent hand decontamination are complex. Studies look at attitudes towards dirt, disgust, self-protective hand washing and familiarity with patients. Self-protection behaviours manifest themselves in washing hands more often after certain tasks. Professional issues are also reported to have an impact on hand decontamination, mainly lack of time, heavy workloads, understaffing and frequency of admissions to the clinical area. Further research needs to be undertaken to include comparison between self-reported studies and observational studies, as it has been shown that healthcare workers may rationalise their behaviour and that self-reporting can be unreliable.

  4. Biophysical Evaluation of Food Decontamination Effects on Tissue and Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Duelund, Lars; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, the effects and efficiency of food surface decontamination processes, such as chlorine washing, radiation, or heating, have been evaluated by sensoric analysis and colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of surface swabs or carcass rinses. These methods suffice when determining probable...... in both food surface and bacteria upon surface decontamination by SonoSteam®. SonoSteam® is a recently developed method of food surface decontamination, which employs steam and ultrasound for effective heat transfer and short treatment times, resulting in significant reduction in surface bacteria. We...... that there are no contradictions between data obtained by either approach. However, the biophysical methods draw a much more nuanced picture of the effects and efficiency of the investigated decontamination method, revealing, e.g., an exponential dose/response relationship between SonoSteam® treatment time and changes in collagen...

  5. Decontamination of radioactively polluted game by means of pickling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, H.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of pickling on the decontamination of game polluted by radioactive cesium isotopes has been investigated in the study reported. The best decontamination degree has been achieved with a vinegar marinade, the ratio between game and marinade being 1:3, pickling temperature being maintained at 12/sup 0/C for a period of 4 days. By this procedure, 90 p.c. of the cesium isotopes have been taken up by the marinade. Buttermilk marinade also is a successful means of decontamination, but with clearly lower effects, and at the same temperature of 12/sup 0/C does not remain microbiologically stable. Spices added to the marinade have shown to reduce the decontamination effet. Also, the ratio between game and marinade has been found to be decisive, the best ratio being 1:3.

  6. Effects of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) on the gut resistome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buelow, E.; Bello Gonzalez, T.D.G.; Versluis, D.; Oostdijk, E.A.N.; Ogilvie, L.A.; Mourik, van M.S.M.; Oosterink, L.; Passel, van M.W.J.; Smidt, H.; D’Andrea, M.M.; Been, de M.; Jones, B.V.; Willems, R.J.L.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Schaik, W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) is an infection prevention measure for critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) that aims to eradicate opportunistic pathogens from the oropharynx and intestines, while sparing the anaerobic flora, by the application of

  7. Application of Prussian blue nanoparticles for the radioactive Cs decontamination in Fukushima region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Durga; Kitajima, Akiko; Takahashi, Akira; Tanaka, Hisashi; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Hakuta, Yukiya; Yoshino, Kazunori; Funahashi, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Osada, Mitsuo; Kawamoto, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Cs decontamination efficiencies of the composites of iron hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles were investigated in comparison with commercial Prussian blue and natural zeolite. In pure water solution, the adsorption rate varied with sizes. In ash extract, where Cs adsorbing ability of zeolite was sharply dropped due to its poor selectivity, the impact of coexisting ions was negligible for FeHCF. FeHCF-n11, having the finest primary and secondary particle size, resulted the highest distribution coefficient, which was comparable to the high efficiency analogues, CoHCF or NiHCF. This observation suggested the possibility of preparing the high performance FeHCF by particle size and composition adjustment. FeHCF nanoparticle in bead form was tested for the removal of radioactive Cs in pilot scale. Due to larger secondary particle size, pronounced effect of solution temperature on the Cs adsorption kinetics on FeHCF bead was observed. Adjusting the mass of the adsorbent for the given solution temperature is recommended for achieving high decontamination rate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chlorhexidine decontamination of sputum for culturing Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmar, Shady; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-08-05

    Culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the gold standard method for the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, after effective decontamination. We evaluated squalamine and chlorhexidine to decontaminate sputum specimens for the culture of mycobacteria. Eight sputum specimens were artificially infected with 10(5) colony-forming units (cfu)/mL Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans as contaminants. In the second step, we tested chlorhexidine-based decontamination on 191 clinical specimens, (Chlorhexidine, 0.1, 0.5 and 0.7 %). In a last step, growth of contaminants and mycobacteria was measured in 75 consecutive sputum specimens using the routine NALC-NaOH decontamination protocol or with 0.7 % chlorhexidine decontamination and an inoculation on Coletsos medium. In the artificially model, contaminants grew in 100 % of the artificially infected sputum specimens decontaminated using 100 mg/mL squalamine, in 62.5 % of specimens decontaminated using N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine-Sodium Hydroxide (NALC-NaOH), and in 0 % of specimens decontaminated using 0.1 %, 0.35 %, or 1 % chlorhexidine (P  1.4.10(2) cfu M. tuberculosis when any concentration of chlorhexidine was used (P decontamination method, 8/75 (10.7 %) specimens yielded M. tuberculosis colonies with a time to detection of 17.5 ± 3 days and an 8 % contamination rate. Additionally, 14 specimens yielded mycobacteria colonies (12 M. tuberculosis, and 2 Mycobacterium bolletii) (18.7 %) (P = 0.25), which has yielded a 100 % sensitivity for the chlorhexidine protocol. Time to detection was of 15.86 ± 4.7 days (P = 0.39) and a 0 % contamination rate (P decontamination is superior to the standard NALC-NaOH method in the isolation of M. tuberculosis from sputum specimens. We currently use 0.7 %-chlorhexidine for the routine decontamination of sputum specimens for the isolation of M. tuberculosis and non

  9. Decontamination of process equipment using recyclable chelating solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevec, J.; Lenore, C.; Ulbricht, S. [Babcock & Wilcox, Co., R& DD, Alliance, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. This report describes the results of the performance testing of chelates and solvents for the dissolution of uranium.

  10. Reducing Risk of Salmonellosis through Egg Decontamination Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthirathne, Thilini Piushani; Ross, Kirstin; Fallowfield, Howard; Whiley, Harriet

    2017-03-22

    Eggs have a high nutritional value and are an important ingredient in many food products. Worldwide foodborne illnesses, such as salmonellosis linked to the consumption of eggs and raw egg products, are a major public health concern. This review focuses on previous studies that have investigated the procedures for the production of microbiologically safe eggs. Studies exploring pasteurization and decontamination methods were investigated. Gamma irradiation, freeze drying, hot air, hot water, infra-red, atmospheric steam, microwave heating and radiofrequency heating are all different decontamination methods currently considered for the production of microbiologically safe eggs. However, each decontamination procedure has different effects on the properties and constituents of the egg. The pasteurization processes are the most widely used and best understood; however, they influence the coagulation, foaming and emulsifying properties of the egg. Future studies are needed to explore combinations of different decontamination methods to produce safe eggs without impacting the protein structure and usability. Currently, eggs which have undergone decontamination processes are primarily used in food prepared for vulnerable populations. However, the development of a decontamination method that does not affect egg properties and functionality could be used in food prepared for the general population to provide greater public health protection.

  11. Foam decontamination containing silica nanoparticles of various structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Inho; Kim, Chorong; Jung, Chonghun; Yang, Hanbeom; Park, Sang Yoon; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Wangkyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Suk Bon [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    A process is needed to decrease the amounts of chemical reagents and secondary waste produced during the decontamination process. Decontamination foam is a non-stable, two-phase fluid with aqueous and gas phases representing not more than 10% and 90% of the total volume, respectively. The application of foam allows for remote decontamination processing using only an injection nozzle and the equipment to generate the decontamination foam, which reduces operator exposure to high radioactivity. Solid colloidal particles increase the foam stability in the foam formulation. These particles can be specifically hydrophobized for optimal adsorption at the liquid/gas interface, which creates armor for the bubbles and prevents coalescence by reducing the internal gas transfer. Conversely, hydrophilic particles remain confined in the liquid phase, and to enhance the foam stability. In addition, the silica nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized with various structures and used for the stabilizer of decontamination foam. In this study, we aimed to synthesize silica nanoparticles (NPs) with various structures such as porous, core-shell, and non-porous using methods proposed in previous literatures. We also investigated the effect of silica NPs with various structures for the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate with chemical reagents. This study showed the effect of the silica NPs with various structures on the decontamination foam. The result indicates that porous NPs have a significant effect on the foam stability and oxide dissolution rate because of lower density and smaller size owing to high specific surface area, large pore volume, and porosity.

  12. Reducing Risk of Salmonellosis through Egg Decontamination Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilini Piushani Keerthirathne

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Eggs have a high nutritional value and are an important ingredient in many food products. Worldwide foodborne illnesses, such as salmonellosis linked to the consumption of eggs and raw egg products, are a major public health concern. This review focuses on previous studies that have investigated the procedures for the production of microbiologically safe eggs. Studies exploring pasteurization and decontamination methods were investigated. Gamma irradiation, freeze drying, hot air, hot water, infra-red, atmospheric steam, microwave heating and radiofrequency heating are all different decontamination methods currently considered for the production of microbiologically safe eggs. However, each decontamination procedure has different effects on the properties and constituents of the egg. The pasteurization processes are the most widely used and best understood; however, they influence the coagulation, foaming and emulsifying properties of the egg. Future studies are needed to explore combinations of different decontamination methods to produce safe eggs without impacting the protein structure and usability. Currently, eggs which have undergone decontamination processes are primarily used in food prepared for vulnerable populations. However, the development of a decontamination method that does not affect egg properties and functionality could be used in food prepared for the general population to provide greater public health protection.

  13. A survey of decontamination processes applicable to DOE nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Conner, C.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1997-05-01

    The objective of this survey was to select an appropriate technology for in situ decontamination of equipment interiors as part of the decommissioning of U.S. Department of Energy nuclear facilities. This selection depends on knowledge of existing chemical decontamination methods. This report provides an up-to-date review of chemical decontamination methods. According to available information, aqueous systems are probably the most universally used method for decontaminating and cleaning metal surfaces. We have subdivided the technologies, on the basis of the types of chemical solvents, into acid, alkaline permanganate, highly oxidizing, peroxide, and miscellaneous systems. Two miscellaneous chemical decontamination methods (electrochemical processes and foam and gel systems) are also described. A concise technical description of various processes is given, and the report also outlines technical considerations in the choice of technologies, including decontamination effectiveness, waste handing, fields of application, and the advantages and limitations in application. On the basis of this survey, six processes were identified for further evaluation. 144 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Phillip N.; Hamachi, Kristina; McWilliams, Jennifer; Sohn, Michael D.

    2008-09-12

    The goal of this project was to answer the following questions concerning response to a future anthrax release (or suspected release) in a building: 1. Based on past experience, what rules of thumb can be determined concerning: (a) the amount of sampling that may be needed to determine the extent of contamination within a given building; (b) what portions of a building should be sampled; (c) the cost per square foot to decontaminate a given type of building using a given method; (d) the time required to prepare for, and perform, decontamination; (e) the effectiveness of a given decontamination method in a given type of building? 2. Based on past experience, what resources will be spent on evaluating the extent of contamination, performing decontamination, and assessing the effectiveness of the decontamination in abuilding of a given type and size? 3. What are the trade-offs between cost, time, and effectiveness for the various sampling plans, sampling methods, and decontamination methods that have been used in the past?

  15. Experience Practices on Decontamination Activity in NPP Decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Bon; Kim, Jeongju; Sohn, Wook [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Decommissioning of a nuclear power plant (NPP) involves various technical and administrative activities for a utility to terminate its license, which allows the plant site to be released from the regulatory control (site release). Decontamination activity in NPP decommissioning is one of the main technical activities to be performed during the decommissioning. The decontamination at decommissioning sites is usually performed due to several reasons such as reducing personnel dose and disposal costs, and cleanup to meet license termination requirements by using physical or chemical removal techniques proven through the previous experience practices. This paper introduces the best and worst practices for the decontamination activities collected from the decommissioning operational experiences through the implementation of nuclear decommissioning projects around the world. Review of the experiences of decontamination shows that it is important to conduct an advanced planning for optimized implementation of decontamination taking into considering site specific conditions such as operating time, reactor type, system, and so on. Also, a review of newer decontamination methods is necessary to safely and economically decommission the nuclear facility.

  16. The impact of inducing germination of Bacillus anthracis and Bacillus thuringiensis spores on potential secondary decontamination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotade, T O; Bernhards, R C; Klimko, C P; Matthews, M E; Hill, A J; Hunter, M S; Webster, W M; Bozue, J A; Welkos, S L; Cote, C K

    2014-12-01

    Decontamination and remediation of a site contaminated by the accidental or intentional release of fully virulent Bacillus anthracis spores are difficult, costly and potentially damaging to the environment. Development of novel decontamination strategies that have minimal environmental impacts remains a high priority. Although ungerminated spores are amongst the most resilient organisms known, once exposed to germinants, the germinating spores, in some cases, become susceptible to antimicrobial environments. We evaluated the concept that once germinated, B. anthracis spores would be less hazardous and significantly easier to remediate than ungerminated dormant spores. Through in vitro germination and sensitivity assays, we demonstrated that upon germination, B. anthracis Ames spores and Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam spores (serving as a surrogate for B. anthracis) become susceptible to environmental stressors. The majority of these germinated B. anthracis and B. thuringiensis spores were nonviable after exposure to a defined minimal germination-inducing solution for prolonged periods of time. Additionally, we examined the impact of potential secondary disinfectant strategies including bleach, hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde and artificial UV-A, UV-B and UV-C radiation, employed after a 60-min germination-induction step. Each secondary disinfectant employs a unique mechanism of killing; as a result, germination-induction strategies are better suited for some secondary disinfectants than others. These results provide evidence that the deployment of an optimal combination strategy of germination-induction/secondary disinfection may be a promising aspect of wide-area decontamination following a B. anthracis contamination event. By inducing spores to germinate, our data confirm that the resulting cells exhibit sensitivities that can be leveraged when paired with certain decontamination measures. This increased susceptibility could be exploited to devise more

  17. Effect of a preoperative decontamination protocol on surgical site infections in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, Serge P; Green, David M; Awad, Samir S

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs), commonly caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, specifically when hardware is implanted in the patient. Previously, we have demonstrated that a preoperative decontamination protocol using chlorhexidine gluconate washcloths and intranasal antiseptic ointment is effective in eradicating MRSA in the nose and on the skin of patients. To examine the effect of a decontamination protocol on SSIs in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation. A prospective database of patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, Texas, was analyzed from October 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. Cohort groups before and after the intervention were compared. Starting in May 2013, during their preoperative visit, all of the patients watched an educational video about MRSA decontamination and were given chlorhexidine washcloths and oral rinse and nasal povidone-iodine solution to be used the night before and the morning of scheduled surgery. Thirty-day SSI rates were collected according to the definitions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance. Data on demographics, comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary artery disease, tobacco use, alcohol use, and body mass index were also collected. Univariate analysis was performed between the 2 groups of patients. Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent predictors of SSI. A total of 709 patients were analyzed (344 controls and 365 patients who were decolonized). Both groups were well matched with no significant differences in age, body mass index, sex, or comorbidities. All of the patients (100%) completed the MRSA decontamination protocol. The SSI rate in the intervention group was significantly lower (1.1%; 4 of

  18. Slightly acidic electrolyzed water combined with chemical and physical treatments to decontaminate bacteria on fresh fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Charles Nkufi; Khan, Imran; Ngnitcho Kounkeu, Paul-François; Momna, Rubab; Hussain, Mohammad Shakhawat; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2017-10-01

    Effect of sequential combination of slightly acidic electrolyzed water (SAEW) with chemical and physical treatments on bacterial decontamination on fruits was investigated in this study. Effect of treatments on microbial and sensory quality was also analyzed after subsequent storage at 4 °C and room temperature (RT, 23 ± 0.15 °C). Whole apple and tomato fruits were inoculated with cocktail strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. Uninoculated and inoculated fruits were washed first with distilled water (DW), calcium oxide (CaO), fumaric acid (FA), and SAEW at RT for 3 min. Combinations were performed by adding treatment one at a time to SAEW as following FA + SAEW, CaO + FA + SAEW, and CaO + FA + SAEW + ultrasonication (US) or microbubbles (MB). All the sanitizer treatments resulted in significant (p < 0.05) bacterial reduction compared to DW used as control. Increasing the treatments in combination from FA + SAEW to CaO + FA + SAEW + US resulted in an increased bacterial decontamination. The cavitation induced by ultrasonication in FA + SAEW solution resulted in a higher additive effect in decontamination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes compare to the agitation generated by microbubble generator in FA + SAEW solution. CaO + FA + SAEW and CaO + FA + SAEW + US were effective in improving the microbial safety and quality of apple fruits. However, additional treatment of US impacted on the quality of tomato fruits during storage at RT. Therefore, a combination of SAEW with sanitizers (CaO and FA) and mechanical force (Ultrasonication) has the potential to be used in postharvest sanitation processing in the fresh fruit industry. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Comparison of Four Skin Decontamination Procedures Using Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) Following Cutaneous VX Exposure in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    RSDL) Following Cutaneous VX Exposure in Guinea Pigs Irwin Koplovitz Susan Schulz Julia Morgan Robert Reed Edward Clarkson C. Gary Hurst...accordance with the principles stated in the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and the Animal Welfare Act of 1966 (P.L. 89-544), as amended...Decontamination Procedures Using Reactive Skin 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) Following Cutaneous VX Exposure in Guinea Pigs 5b

  20. Decontaminating agents and decontamination processes for nuclear industry and for plant demolition; Dekontaminationsmittel und Dekontaminationsverfahren fuer die Kernindustrie und den Anlagenrueckbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, Klaus; Gojowczyk, Peter [HAKA Kunz GmbH, Waldenbuch (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Decontamination of surfaces of materials in nuclear facilities or in nuclear power plants under demolition can be carried out successfully if surface treatment is performed by dipping or in an ultrasonic bath by alternating between alkaline and acid baths with intermediate rinsing in demineralized water. Decontaminating aluminium surfaces sensitive to corrosion requires further treatment in an ultrasonic bath, after the first 2 ultrasonic baths, with a weak alkaline decontaminating agent. This applies alike to components to be decontaminated for re-use and parts of materials to be disposed of. The decontamination action depends on the surfaces either being free from corrosion or else showing pronounced corrosion. (orig.)

  1. A Comparison of Electrokinetic Method and Electrokinetic-electrodialytic Method for Soil Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyenam; Kim, Seungsoo; Park, Ukrang; Han, Gyuseong; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The electrokinetic decontamination equipment and electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment were manufactured to decontaminate the contaminated soil. The removal efficiency according to the lapsed time by the electrokinetic decontamination equipment and the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination equipment was investigated through several experiments. The difference between the removal efficiency of the electrokinetic-elctrodialytic decontamination without anion exchange membrane and that of with anion exchange membrane was investigated through several experiments. In addition, the removal efficiency trend according to different cesium radioactivity of soil was drawn out through several experiments.

  2. Impact of Decontamination Therapy on Ultrasound Visualization of Ingested Pills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Bothwell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute toxic ingestion is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Emergency physicians (EP caring for overdose (OD patients are often required to make critical decisions with incomplete information. Point of care ultrasound (POCUS may have a role in assisting EPs manage OD patients. We evaluated the impact of different liquid adjuncts used for gastric decontamination on examiners’ ability to identify the presence of tablets using POCUS, and assessed examiners’ ability to quantify the numbers of tablets in a simulated massive OD. Methods: This prospective, blinded, pilot study was performed at an academic emergency department. Study participants were volunteer resident and staff EPs trained in POCUS. Five non-transparent, sealed bags were prepared with the following contents: 1 liter (L of water, 1 L of water with 50 regular aspirin (ASA tablets, 1 L of water with 50 enteric-coated aspirin tablets (ECA, 1 L of polyethylene glycol (PEG with 50 ECA, and 1 L of activated charcoal (AC with 50 ECA. After performing POCUS on each of the bags using a 10-5 MHz linear array transducer, participants completed a standardized questionnaire composed of the following questions: (1 Were pills present? YES/NO; (2 If tablets were identified, estimate the number (1-10, 11-25, >25. We used a single test on proportions using the binomial distribution to determine if the number of EPs who identified tablets differed from 50% chance. For those tablets identified in the different solutions, another test on proportions was used to determine whether the type of solution made a difference. Since 3 options were available, we used a probability of 33.3%. Results: Thirty-seven EPs completed the study. All (37/37 EP’s correctly identified the absence of tablets in the bag containing only water, and the presence of ECA in the bags containing water and PEG. For Part 2 of the study, most participants - 25/37 (67.5% using water, 23/37 (62.1% using PEG, and

  3. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and dismantlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bares, L.C.; Thompson, B.R. [RedZone Robotics, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE nuclear facilities have aged beyond their useful lifetimes. They need to be decommissioned in order to be safe for human presence in the short term, to eventually recover valuable materials they contain, and ultimately to be transitioned to alternative uses or green field conditions. Decontamination and dismantlement are broad classes of activities that will enable these changes to occur. Most of these facilities - uranium enrichment plants, weapons assembly plants, research and production reactors, and fuel recycling facilities - are dormant, though periodic inspection, surveillance and maintenance activities within them are on-going. DOE estimates that there are over 5000 buildings that require deactivation to reduce the costs of performing such work with manual labor. In the long term, 1200 buildings will be decommissioned, and millions of metric tons of metal and concrete will have to be recycled or disposed of. The magnitude of the problem calls for new approaches that are far more cost effective than currently available techniques. This paper describes a mobile workstation termed ROSIE, which provides remote work capabilities for D&D activities.

  4. Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

    1993-10-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

  5. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Decontamination Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demmer, Ricky Lynn [Idaho National Laboratory; Reese, Stephen Joseph [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-03-01

    On February 14, 2014, americium and plutonium contamination was released in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt caverns. Several practical, easily deployable methods of decontaminating WIPP salt, using a surrogate contaminant and americium (241Am), were developed and tested. The effectiveness of the methods is evaluated qualitatively, and to the extent practical, quantitatively. Of the methods tested (dry brushing, vacuum cleaning, water washing, mechanical grinding, strippable coatings, and fixative barriers), the most practical seems to be water washing. Effectiveness is very high, and water washing is easy and rapid to deploy. The amount of wastewater produced (~2 L/m2) would be substantial and may not be easy to manage, but the method is the clear winner from a usability perspective. Removable surface contamination levels (smear results) from water washed coupons found no residual removable contamination. Thus, whatever contamination is left is likely adhered to (or trapped within) the salt. The other option that shows promise is the use of a fixative barrier. Bartlett Nuclear, Inc.’s Polymeric Barrier System proved the most durable of the coatings tested. The coatings were not tested for contaminant entrapment, only for coating integrity and durability.

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Salt Decontamination Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer; Stephen Reese

    2014-09-01

    On February 14, 2014, americium and plutonium contamination was released in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) salt caverns. At the request of WIPP’s operations contractor, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) personnel developed several methods of decontaminating WIPP salt, using surrogate contaminants and also americium (241Am). The effectiveness of the methods is evaluated qualitatively, and to the extent possible, quantitatively. One of the requirements of this effort was delivering initial results and recommendations within a few weeks. That requirement, in combination with the limited scope of the project, made in-depth analysis impractical in some instances. Of the methods tested (dry brushing, vacuum cleaning, water washing, strippable coatings, and mechanical grinding), the most practical seems to be water washing. Effectiveness is very high, and it is very easy and rapid to deploy. The amount of wastewater produced (2 L/m2) would be substantial and may not be easy to manage, but the method is the clear winner from a usability perspective. Removable surface contamination levels (smear results) from the strippable coating and water washing coupons found no residual removable contamination. Thus, whatever is left is likely adhered to (or trapped within) the salt. The other option that shows promise is the use of a fixative barrier. Bartlett Nuclear, Inc.’s Polymeric Barrier System (PBS) proved the most durable of the coatings tested. The coatings were not tested for contaminant entrapment, only for coating integrity and durability.

  7. Bacillus anthracis spore decontamination in food grease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Santiago-Mateo, Kristina; Shields, Michael J; Rohonczy, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores were analyzed for their resistance against five disinfectants: commercial sodium hypochlorite, Spor-Klenz Ready-to-Use Cold Sterilant, accelerated hydrogen peroxide (AHP), Virkon, and surface decontamination foam (SDF). The aim of this study was to find an effective disinfectant that would reduce the viability of B. anthracis Sterne spores at ≥6 log in the presence of variables such as animal grease and fat, stainless steel, and temperature (room temperature and 4 °C). SDF and 10% sodium hypochlorite consistently reduced the growth of viable B. anthracis Sterne spores after 5 min in the presence of stainless steel at room temperature. It took at least 10 min of contact time for AHP to consistently reduce spore growth by ≥6 log, while it took at least 20 min for 5% bleach and Spor-Klenz to consistently inactivate ≥6 log spores in the presence of stainless steel at room temperature. AHP was the only disinfectant that reduced the viability of B. anthracis Sterne spores at ≥6 log in the presence of stainless steel and animal grease, both at room temperature and 4 °C after 24 h of contact time.

  8. Kit systems for granulated decontamination formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2010-07-06

    A decontamination formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a sorbent additive, and water. A highly adsorbent sorbent additive (e.g., amorphous silica, sorbitol, mannitol, etc.) is used to "dry out" one or more liquid ingredients into a dry, free-flowing powder that has an extended shelf life, and is more convenient to handle and mix in the field. The formulation can be pre-mixed and pre-packaged as a multi-part kit system, where one or more of the parts are packaged in a powdered, granulated form for ease of handling and mixing in the field.

  9. Decontamination and decommissioning of Shippingport commercial reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, J. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1989-11-01

    To a certain degree, the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Shippingport reactor was a joint venture with Duquesne Light Company. The structures that were to be decommissioned were to be removed to at least three feet below grade. Since the land had been leased from Duquesne Light, there was an agreement with them to return the land to them in a radiologically safe condition. The total enclosure volume for the steam and nuclear containment systems was about 1.3 million cubic feet, more than 80% of which was below ground. Engineering plans for the project were started in July of 1980 and the final environmental impact statement (EIS) was published in May of 1982. The plant itself was shut down in October of 1982 for end-of-life testing and defueling. The engineering services portion of the decommissioning plans was completed in September of 1983. DOE moved onto the site and took over from the Navy in September of 1984. Actual physical decommissioning began after about a year of preparation and was completed about 44 months later in July of 1989. This paper describes the main parts of D and D.

  10. Decontamination of pesticide packing using ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, C.L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Lineu Prestes 2.242, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: clduarte@ipen.br; Mori, M.N.; Kodama, Yasko; Oikawa, H.; Sampa, M.H.O. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares-IPEN-CNEN/SP Av. Lineu Prestes 2.242, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    The Brazilian agriculture activities have consumed about 288,000 tons of pesticides per year conditioned in about 107,000,000 packing with weight of approximately 23,000 tons. The discharge of empty plastic packing of pesticides can be an environmental concern causing problems to human health, animals, and plants if done without inspection and monitoring. The objective of this work is to study the ionizing radiation effect in the main pesticides used in Brazil for plastic packing decontamination. Among the commercial pesticides, chlorpyrifos has significant importance because of its wide distribution and extensive use and persistence. The radiation-induced degradation of chlorpyrifos in liquid samples and in polyethylene pack was studied by gamma radiolysis. Packing of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) three layer coextruded, named COEX, contaminated with chlorpyrifos, were irradiated using both a multipurpose Co-60 gamma irradiator and a gamma source with 5000 Ci total activity Gamma cell type. The chemical analysis of the chlorpyrifos was made using a gas chromatography associated to the Mass Spectrometry-GCMS from Shimadzu Model QP 5000. Gamma radiation was efficient for removing chlorpyrifos from the plastic packing, in all studied cases.

  11. Oxidation of Ce(III) in Foam Decontaminant by Ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Chong Hun; Yoon, I. H.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K.; Yang, H. B. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. S. [Gachon University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant is composed of a surfactant and nanoparticles for the generation and maintenance of foam, and a chemical decontamination agent made of Ce(IV) dissolved in nitric acid. Ce(IV) will be reduced to Ce(III) through the decontamination process. Oxidizing cerium(III) can be reused as a decontamination agent, Ce(IV). Oxidation treatment technology by ozone uses its strong oxidizing power. It can be regarded as an environmentally friendly process, because ozone cannot be stored and transported like other industrial gases (because it quickly decays into diatomic oxygen) and must therefore be produced on site, and used ozone can decompose immediately. The ozonation treatment of Ce(III) in foam decontaminant containing a surfactant is necessary for the effective regeneration of Ce(III). Thus, the present study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) into Ce(IV) in the nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing surfactant. This study was undertaken to determine the optimal conditions for ozonation treatment in the regeneration of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in nanoparticle-based foam decontaminant containing a TBS surfactant. The oxidation conversion rate of Ce(III) was increased with an increase in the flow rate of the gas mixture and ozone injection amount. The oxidation time required for the 100% oxidation conversion of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) at a specific ozone injection amount can be predicted from these experimental data.

  12. A simplified model of decontamination by BWR steam suppression pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A.

    1997-05-01

    Phenomena that can decontaminate aerosol-laden gases sparging through steam suppression pools of boiling water reactors during reactor accidents are described. Uncertainties in aerosol properties, aerosol behavior within gas bubbles, and bubble behavior in plumes affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools. Uncertainties in the boundary and initial conditions that are dictated by the progression of severe reactor accidents and that will affect predictions of decontamination by steam suppression pools are discussed. Ten parameters that characterize boundary and initial condition uncertainties, nine parameters that characterize aerosol property and behavior uncertainties, and eleven parameters that characterize uncertainties in the behavior of bubbles in steam suppression pools are identified. Ranges for the values of these parameters and subjective probability distributions for parametric values within the ranges are defined. These uncertain parameters are used in Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses to develop uncertainty distributions for the decontamination that can be achieved by steam suppression pools and the size distribution of aerosols that do emerge from such pools. A simplified model of decontamination by steam suppression pools is developed by correlating features of the uncertainty distributions for total decontamination factor, DF(total), mean size of emerging aerosol particles, d{sub p}, and the standard deviation of the emerging aerosol size distribution, {sigma}, with pool depth, H. Correlations of the median values of the uncertainty distributions are suggested as the best estimate of decontamination by suppression pools. Correlations of the 10 percentile and 90 percentile values of the uncertainty distributions characterize the uncertainty in the best estimates. 295 refs., 121 figs., 113 tabs.

  13. Pathogens Contamination Level Reduction on Beef Using Organic Acids Decontamination Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Daniel DAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we aimed to assess the efficiency of organic acids in different concentrations regarding pathogens as Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia on beef, which can cause food borne illness in humans. The samples were sterilized using UV radiation for 30 minutes, afterwards being contaminated with 1 ml of microbial suspension (0.5 MacFarland. We used reference bacterial strains for Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes. The samples were subjected to decontamination procedure by introducing 25mL of solution of lactic, acetic or citric acid in concentration of 1%, 2% and 3%. The results showed a reduction of initial pathogen load, ranging from 0.32 to 7.78 log CFU/g, depending on the type of acid, concentration and pathogen sensitivity. After decontamination, standardized methods have been used for the isolation of pathogenic germs. Based on statistical analysis we conclude that pathogens have a different sensitivity to the action of acid solutions, their sensitivity in ascending order being: Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli. Among the organic acids, the most efficient was lactic acid, followed by acetic acid and less efficient citric acid. The greatest reduction of germs was determined by the concentration of 3%.

  14. In Situ Generation of Chlorine Dioxide for Surface Decontamination of Produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheng-An; Huang, Lihan; Wu, Vivian Chi-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are frequently contaminated with bacterial pathogens and implicated in foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to develop a unique surface decontamination method for produce using sodium chlorite and an acid in a sequential treatment. The surfaces of cantaloupe rinds, peels of cucumbers, stem scars of grape tomatoes, and leaves of baby spinach were inoculated with Salmonella or Listeria monocytogenes at 5 to 6 log CFU/g, submerged in 1.6 to 4% sodium chlorite solutions for 10 or 30 min, dried for 20 min, and then soaked in 6 mM hydrogen chloride (HCl) for 10 or 30 min and dried for 20 min. Control samples were treated with deionized water, sodium chlorite, HCl, or a premixed solution of sodium chlorite and HCl for comparison. The control treatments reduced the levels of both pathogens on the samples by only 0.3 to 2.9 log CFU/g, whereas the sequential treatment caused significantly higher reductions (P decontamination resulting from the sequential treatment was attributed to the in situ formation of chlorine dioxide within the plant tissues under the surface by the reaction between sodium chlorite absorbed by the produce and HCl. These results suggest that the sequential use of sodium chlorite and acid is a potentially effective treatment for elimination of foodborne pathogens on produce.

  15. Mass Casualty Decontamination in the United States: An Online Survey of Current Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Sarah; Symons, Charles; Carter, Holly; Jones, Emma; Amlôt, Richard; Larner, Joanne; Matar, Hazem; Chilcott, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Mass casualty decontamination is a public health intervention that would be employed by emergency responders following a chemical, biological, or radiological incident. The decontamination of large numbers of casualties is currently most often performed with water to remove contaminants from the skin surface. An online survey was conducted to explore US fire departments' decontamination practices and their preparedness for responding to incidents involving mass casualty decontamination. Survey respondents were asked to provide details of various aspects of their decontamination procedures, including expected response times to reach casualties, disrobing procedures, approaches to decontamination, characteristics of the decontamination showering process, provision for special populations, and any actions taken following decontamination. The aim of the survey was to identify any differences in the way in which decontamination guidance is implemented across US states. Results revealed that, in line with current guidance, many US fire departments routinely use the "ladder-pipe system" for conducting rapid, gross decontamination of casualties. The survey revealed significant variability in ladder-pipe construction, such as the position and number of fire hoses used. There was also variability in decontamination characteristics, such as water temperature and water pressure, detergent use, and shower duration. The results presented here provide important insights into the ways in which implementation of decontamination guidance can vary between US states. These inconsistencies are thought to reflect established perceived best practices and local adaptation of response plans to address practical and logistical constraints. These outcomes highlight the need for evidence-based national guidelines for conducting mass casualty decontamination.

  16. Decontamination in the Aftermath of a Radiological Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassif, Jaime

    2004-05-01

    Much of the damage caused by a radiological weapon would result from long-term contamination, yet the U.S. lacks a coherent plan for cleanup in the aftermath of an attack. A rapidly implemented decontamination strategy could minimize economic damage by restoring normal activity, when possible, and could ease the cleanup process, which can become more difficult as time passes. Loose dust particles can become trapped under layers of oxidized metal and organic materials or penetrate deeper into porous surfaces, and reactive elements, such as cesium-137, chemically bind to components of glass, asphalt and concrete. Decontamination planning requires identification of appropriate existing technologies that are transferable from small-scale tasks, such as nuclear facility decommissioning, and adaptable to urban-scale operations. Applicable technologies should effectively contain and remove fixed and loose contamination with α-, β- and γ-emitters without generating large quantities of secondary waste. Development of new technologies is also necessary, particularly to improve α-detection, as is research to test existing technologies for their effectiveness in large-scale operations. These techniques will be most effective if integrated into a broad strategy that identifies appropriate exposure limits, prioritizes decontamination tasks and assigns authority and responsibility for performing these tasks. This talk will address existing decontamination thresholds and suggest ways to modify them and will discuss appropriate, existing technologies that can decontaminate to the required levels.

  17. MERCURY CONTAMINATED MATERIAL DECONTAMINATION METHODS: INVESTIGATION AND ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Over the years mercury has been recognized as having serious impacts on human health and the environment. This recognition has led to numerous studies that deal with the properties of various mercury forms, the development of methods to quantify and speciate the forms, fate and transport, toxicology studies, and the development of site remediation and decontamination technologies. This report reviews several critical areas that will be used in developing technologies for cleaning mercury from mercury-contaminated surfaces of metals and porous materials found in many DOE facilities. The technologies used for decontamination of water and mixed wastes (solid) are specifically discussed. Many technologies that have recently appeared in the literature are included in the report. Current surface decontamination processes have been reviewed, and the limitations of these technologies for mercury decontamination are discussed. Based on the currently available technologies and the processes published recently in the literature, several processes, including strippable coatings, chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, chemisorbing surface wipes with forager sponge and grafted cotton, and surface/pore fixation through amalgamation or stabilization, have been identified as potential techniques for decontamination of mercury-contaminated metal and porous surfaces. Their potential merits and applicability are discussed. Finally, two processes, strippable coatings and chemical cleaning with iodine/iodide lixiviant, were experimentally investigated in Phase II of this project.

  18. A review of plant decontamination methods: 1988 Update: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remark, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    This document updates the state-of-the-art in decontamination technology since the publication of the previous review (EPRI NP- 1128) in May 1981. A brief description of the corrosion-film characteristics is presented as well as corrosion film differences between a BWR and PWR. The generation transportation, activation, and deposition of the radioisotopes found throughout the reactor coolant system is also discussed. Successful, well executed, decontamination campaigns are always preceded by meticulous planning and careful procedure preparation which include contingency operations. The Decontamination Planning and Preparation Section describes the technical planning steps as well as the methodology that should be followed in order to select the optimum decontamination technique for a specific application. A review of a number of the decontamination methods commercialized since 1980 is presented. The basic mechanism for each process is described as well as specific applications of the technology in the fields. Where possible, results obtained in the field are presented. The information was obtained from industry vendors as well as personnel at the plant locations that have utilized the technology. 72 refs., 5 tabs.

  19. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Amlôt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS. The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit.

  20. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  1. New trends and findings of development of chemical decontamination technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rado, K.; Baja, B.; Kadar, P.; Nemeth, Z.; Varga, K. [Pannonia Univ., Institute of Radiochemistry and Radioecology (Hungary); Schunk, J.; Patek, G.; Baradlai, P. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd. (Hungary); Petrik, M.; Nyitrai, K. [HEPENIX Ltd., Petofi (Hungary)

    2009-07-01

    During the period of 1993-2001 chemical decontaminations of 24 steam generators (SGs) of units 1-3 at Paks NPP were carried out by a non-regenerative version of AP-CITROX technology. The analysis of the typical operation data and the comprehensive study of the corrosion effects of the technology have revealed that the non-regenerative version of the AP-CITROX technology is not an adequate method for the chemical decontamination of any reactor equipments having large steel surfaces (e.g. SGs). An R and D project focused on the elaboration of new technologies has been initiated in 2005. In the year of 2007 an engineering review covering main issues of the so called decontamination 'base-technology' has been supplied to the Paks NPP. The experimental results confirm that the new chemical decontamination technologies elaborated in our laboratory are effective for the dissolution (thereby for the decontamination) of the surface oxide layer formed on stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) (or on steels having similar composition). (authors)

  2. Conditioning of pretreated LLW generated by the decontamination of VVR-S nuclear research reactor primary circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicu, Mihaela I.; Ionascu, Laura A.; Dragolici, Felicia N.; Turcanu, Corneliu N.; Rotarescu, Gheorghe Gh.; Dogaru, Gheorghe C. [' Horia Hulubei' National Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering Magurele, Ilfov (Romania)

    2013-07-01

    Concentration of complexing acids solutions (oxalic acid, tartaric acid and citric acid) used in radioactive decontamination by chemical method affects both the mechanical stability and the chemical stability of cement matrix. The paper presents the works performed related to the chemical pretreatment of these organic acids solutions using as neutralizing agent Ca(OH){sub 2}. In this way it was possible to increase the concentration of organic acids solutions used and the soluble complex radionuclides passing in chemical precipitates, these affecting in a smaller manner the mechanical stability of the cement matrix. The chemical pretreatment the effluents improve the precipitation and conditioning performances by cementation. Were prepared compositions with complexing agents and compositions for oxidative degradation tests to simulate the concentrations of secondary radioactive waste obtained from the primary circuit decontamination of the VVR-S research reactor. It has been studied the influence of chemical pretreatment of complexing acids solutions of different concentrations on the setting time. Also it was determined the compressive strength of mortar samples in which were embedded these solutions of chemically pretreated organic acids. The results shown that an optimum cement - solution ratio doesn't have a significant impact on the setting time or on the mechanical properties. (authors)

  3. Bioinspired Surface Treatments for Improved Decontamination: Slippery Omniphobic Covalently Attached Liquid (SOCAL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-13

    Bioinspired Surface Treatments for Improved Decontamination : Slippery Omniphobic Covalently Attached Liquid (SOCAL) Brandy J. White, Brian J. Melde, Anthony... decontamination capabilities for painted surfaces. This report details results for evaluation of a slippery omniphobic covalently attached liquid (SOCAL) and

  4. Gastrointestinal decontamination of dogs treated with total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Heidt, P.J.; Zurcher, C.

    1981-01-01

    Procedures for total and selective gastrointestinal decontamination of dogs are described. The selective procedure removed only Gram negative aerobic bacteria, yeast and fungi. Dogs receiving total decontamination were less susceptible to the GI syndrome following total body irradiation (TBI) than

  5. Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfliegler, Walter P; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2015-07-01

    The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Human microbial ecology: lactobacilli, probiotics, selective decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikelsaar, Marika

    2011-12-01

    Health care-associated infections are closely associated with different medical interventions which interrupt the balance of human microbiota. The occasional predominance of opportunistic pathogens may lead to their translocation into the lymph nodes and bloodstream, causing endogenous (primary or secondary) hospital infections. The question is raised as to if there is a possibility for prevention of the imbalance of GI microbiota during medical interventions in critically ill patients. Prophylactic selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) simultaneously applies three to four different antimicrobials for the suppression of enteric aerobic microbes, which are potentially pathogenic microorganisms. However, there is no convincing evidence that the indigenous beneficial intestinal microbiota are preserved, resulting in reduced mortality of high-risk patients. In this overview, we have evaluated the antimicrobial treatment guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) for intra-abdominal infections in adults and seniors according to their safety for different Lactobacillus spp. The data from our group and in the literature have shown that all tested lactobacilli strains (nearly one hundred) were insusceptible to metronidazole while different species of lactobacilli of the three fermentation groups expressed particular antibiotic susceptibility to vancomycin, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin and some new tetracyclines. We have relied on microbial ecology data showing that the GI tracts of adults and the elderly are simultaneously colonised at least with several (four to a maximum of 12) Lactobacillus species expressing variable intrinsic insusceptibility to the aforementioned antimicrobials, according to the provided data in table. This finding offers the possibility of preserving the colonisation of the intestine with some beneficial lactobacilli during antimicrobial treatment in critically ill patients with health care-associated infections

  7. Decontamination Systems Information and Reseach Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Echol E

    1998-04-01

    The following paragraphs comprise the research efforts during the first quarter of 1998 (January 1 - March 31). These tasks have been granted a continuation from the 1997 work and will all end in June 1998. This report represents the last technical quarterly report deliverable for the WVU Cooperative Agreement - Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Final reports for all of the 1997 projects will be submitted afterwards as one document. During this period, groundwater extraction operations were completed on Task 1.6 - Pilot Scale Demonstration of TCE Flushing Through PVDs at the DOE/RMI Extrusion Plant. The data have been evaluated and graphs are presented. The plot of TCE Concentration versus Time shows that the up-gradient groundwater monitoring well produced consistent levels of TCE contamination. A similar trend was observed for the down-gradient wells via grab samples tested. Groundwater samples from the PVD test pad Zone of Influence showed consistent reductions in TCE concentrations with respect to time. In addition, a natural pulse frequency is evident which will have a significant impact on the efficiency of the contaminant removal under natural groundwater advection/diffusion processes. The relationships between the PVD Extraction Flow Rate versus Cumulative Time shows a clear trend in flow rate. Consistent values between 20 to 30 g.p.m. at the beginning of the extraction duration, to less than 10 g.p.m. by the end of the extraction cycle are observed. As evidenced by the aquifer's diminishing recharge levels, the PVD extraction is affecting the response of the aquifer's natural attenuation capability. Progress was also marked on the Injection and Circulation of Potable Water Through PVDs task. Data reduction from this sequence of testing is ongoing. Work planned for next quarter includes completing the Injection / Extraction of potable water task and beginning the Surfactant Injection and removal task.

  8. Retention of iron and chromium by an anion-exchange resin under decontamination conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corti, H.R. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores; Gomez, D.G. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores; De Blanco, E.K. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores; Rebagliati, R.A.J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores; Schulman, P. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica de Reactores

    1996-04-01

    The retention of iron and chromium ions on a strong base anion exchange resin (Lewatit M500 KR) in oxalic solution was studied by means of batch and column experiments. The tests performed indicate that more than 99% of the iron is uptaken by the resin, while chromium retention depends on the formation rate of the tri-oxalate complex. The experimental conditions required to improve chromium retention, such as temperature, pH, aging time, etc., were investigated and their consequences on the practical decontamination process are discussed. The available thermodynamic information for Fe(III) and Cr(III) oxalate complexes was reviewed and extended in order to determine the speciation in aqueous solutions in the range from 25 to 100 C. That information would help in searching for the optimal experimental conditions for ion exchange removal of these ions. (orig.).

  9. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete. Final report, August 3, 1993--September 15, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The ELECTROSORB{reg_sign} {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} process is an electrokinetic process for decontaminating concrete. ELECTROSORB{reg_sign} {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} uses a carpet-like extraction pad which is placed on the contaminated concrete surface. An electrolyte solution is circulated from a supporting module. This module keeps the electrolyte solution clean. The work is advancing through the engineering development stage with steady progress toward a full scale demonstration unit which will be ready for incorporation in the DOE Large Scale Demonstration Program by Summer 1997. A demonstration was carried out at the Mound Facility in Miamisburg, Ohio, in June 1996. Third party verification by EG&G verified the effectiveness of the process. Results of this work and the development work that proceeded are described herein.

  10. Biophysical Evaluation of Food Decontamination Effects on Tissue and Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ann Zahle; Duelund, Lars; Brewer, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    in both food surface and bacteria upon surface decontamination by SonoSteam®. SonoSteam® is a recently developed method of food surface decontamination, which employs steam and ultrasound for effective heat transfer and short treatment times, resulting in significant reduction in surface bacteria. We...... employ differential scanning calorimetry, second harmonics generation imaging microscopy, two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and green fluorescence protein-expressing bacteria and compare our results with those obtained by traditional methods of food quality and safety evaluations. Our results show......Traditionally, the effects and efficiency of food surface decontamination processes, such as chlorine washing, radiation, or heating, have been evaluated by sensoric analysis and colony-forming unit (CFU) counts of surface swabs or carcass rinses. These methods suffice when determining probable...

  11. Effectiveness of Spray-Based Decontamination Methods for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report The objective of this project was to assess the effectiveness of spray-based common decontamination methods for inactivating Bacillus (B.) atrophaeus (surrogate for B. anthracis) spores and bacteriophage MS2 (surrogate for foot and mouth disease virus [FMDV]) on selected test surfaces (with or without a model agricultural soil load). Relocation of viable viruses or spores from the contaminated coupon surfaces into aerosol or liquid fractions during the decontamination methods was investigated. This project was conducted to support jointly held missions of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Within the EPA, the project supports the mission of EPA’s Homeland Security Research Program (HSRP) by providing relevant information pertinent to the decontamination of contaminated areas resulting from a biological incident.

  12. Systems analysis of decontamination options for civilian vehicles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foltz, Greg W.; Hoette, Trisha Marie

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this project, which was supported by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Chemical and Biological Division (CBD), was to investigate options for the decontamination of the exteriors and interiors of vehicles in the civilian setting in order to restore those vehicles to normal use following the release of a highly toxic chemical. The decontamination of vehicles is especially challenging because they often contain sensitive electronic equipment, multiple materials some of which strongly adsorb chemical agents, and in the case of aircraft, have very rigid material compatibility requirements (i.e., they cannot be exposed to reagents that may cause even minor corrosion). A systems analysis approach was taken examine existing and future civilian vehicle decontamination capabilities.

  13. 48 CFR 1523.303-71 - Decontamination of Government-furnished property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Decontamination of... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE Hazardous Material and Material Safety Data 1523.303-71 Decontamination of..., Decontamination of Government-Furnished Property, when it is anticipated that a Contractor will use Government...

  14. Concrete decontamination by Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    EHS is being developed for decontaminating concrete structures from radionuclides, organic substances, and hazardous metals. EHS involves the generation of powerful shock waves and intense cavitation by a strong pulsed electric discharge in a water layer at the concrete surface; high impulse pressure results in stresses which crack and peel off a concrete layer of controllable thickness. Scabbling produces contaminated debris of relatively small volume which can be easily removed, leaving clean bulk concrete. Objective of Phase I was to prove the technical feasibility of EH for controlled scabbling and decontamination of concrete. Phase I is complete.

  15. Economies of capacity use in decontamination of pig carcasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Lawson, Lartey Godwin; Lund, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the economies of capacity use regarding hot water decontamination to reduce postslaughter risk of pathogens in meat, taking interfarm heterogeneities of Salmonella risk and costs of transportation into account, using Denmark as a case study. If risk reduction goals are stated...... at the processing plant level, then the exploitation of the favorable cost-effectiveness properties of hot water slaughtering requires fairly ambitious risk reduction goals and thus high use of decontamination capacity. If instead risk reduction goals are formulated for the sector as a whole, the cost...

  16. Electron beam irradiation for biological decontamination of Spirulina platensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasoveanu, Mirela [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)]. E-mail: mirela@infim.ro; Nemtanu, Monica [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Minea, R. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Department of Electron Accelerators, 409 Atomistilor Street, P.O. Box MG-36, RO 76 900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Grecu, Maria Nicoleta [National Institute for Materials Physics, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mazilu, Elena [Hofigal SA (Romania); Radulescu, Nora [Hofigal SA (Romania)

    2005-10-15

    The Cyanobacterium Spirulina is commercialized for its use in health foods and for therapeutic purposes due to its valuable constituents particularly proteins and vitamins. The aim of the paper is to study the Spirulina platensis behaviour when it is electron beam irradiated for biological decontamination. Microbial load, antioxidant activity, enzymatic inhibition, electron spin resonance (ESR) and UV-Vis spectra were measured for doses up to 80 kGy. The results were correlated with doses in order to find where decontamination is efficient, keeping the Spirulina qualities.

  17. Electron beam irradiation for biological decontamination of Spirulina platensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasoveanu, Mirela; Nemtanu, Monica; Minea, R.; Grecu, Maria Nicoleta; Mazilu, Elena; Radulescu, Nora

    2005-10-01

    The Cyanobacterium Spirulina is commercialized for its use in health foods and for therapeutic purposes due to its valuable constituents particularly proteins and vitamins. The aim of the paper is to study the Spirulina platensis behaviour when it is electron beam irradiated for biological decontamination. Microbial load, antioxidant activity, enzymatic inhibition, electron spin resonance (ESR) and UV-Vis spectra were measured for doses up to 80 kGy. The results were correlated with doses in order to find where decontamination is efficient, keeping the Spirulina qualities.

  18. [Decontamination of continual cell lines spontaneously infected with mycoplasmas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machatková, M; Jurmanová, K; Snejdar, V

    1986-07-01

    The continual cell lines of bovine kidneys MDBK and AUBEK, and porcine kidneys RPD and IBRS, spontaneously infected with Mycoplasma arginini and Acholeplasma laidlawii, were decontaminated by the method of selective elimination. Two elimination procedures were modified to be used for the decontamination: one based on the reduction of infection by the light treatment of the cultures, the other based on the selection of mycoplasma-free cell population through cell clonation. On the basis of a long-continued control of the cell clones a methodical procedure of the preparation of mycoplasma-free cell lines was worked out.

  19. Physicochemical characteristics of PFC surfactants for dry decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Lee, Chi Woo [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Even the trace amount of the used nuclear fuels of high radioactivity are hazardous to the earth and humans. Perfluorocarbons and perfluorocarbon surfactants are emerging to be efficient chemicals in the dry decontamination process of the used fuels of high radioactivity. The theme was undertaken to increase the knowledge on perfluorocarbon surfactants to develop the perfluorocarbon system in the dry decontamination process in Korea. Several cationic and anionic pfc surfactants were synthesized. Effects of pfc surfactants on electrochemical etching of silicon were investigated to form porous silicons. Forces were measured between silicon surfaces and AFM tip in the absence and presence of pfc surfactants. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  20. In vitro skin decontamination of the organophosphorus pesticide Paraoxon with nanometric cerium oxide CeO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Alicia; Devers, Thierry; Bolzinger, Marie-Alexandrine; Pelletier, Jocelyne; Josse, Denis; Briançon, Stéphanie

    2017-04-01

    Organophosphorus compounds (OP), which mainly penetrate via the percutaneous pathway, represent a threat for both military and civilians. Body surface decontamination is vital to prevent victims poisoning. The development of a cost-effective formulation, which could be efficient and easy to handle in case of mass contamination, is therefore crucial. Metal oxides nanoparticles, due their large surface areas and the large amount of highly reactive sites, present high reactivity towards OP. First, this study aimed at evaluating the reaction of CeO 2 nanoparticles, synthetized by microwave path and calcined at 500 or 600 °C, with Paraoxon (POX) in aqueous solution. Results showed that both nanoparticles degraded 60%-70% of POX. CeO 2 calcined at 500 °C, owing to its larger specific area, was the most effective. Moreover, the degradation was significantly increased under Ultra-Violet irradiation (initial degradation rate doubled). Then, skin decontamination was studied in vitro using the Franz cell method with pig-ear skin samples. CeO 2 powder and an aqueous suspension of CeO 2 (CeO 2 -W) were applied 1 h after POX exposure. The efficiency of decontamination, including removal and/or degradation of POX, was compared to Fuller's earth (FE) and RSDL lotion which are, currently, the most efficient systems for skin decontamination. CeO 2 -W and RSDL were the most efficient to remove POX from the skin surface and decrease skin absorption by 6.4 compared to the control not decontaminated. FE reduced significantly (twice) the absorbed fraction of POX, contrarily to CeO 2 powder. Considering only the degradation rate of POX, the products ranged in the order CeO 2  > RSDL > CeO 2 -W > FE (no degradation). This study showed that CeO 2 nanoparticles are a promising material for skin decontamination of OP if formulated as a dispersion able to remove POX like CeO 2 -W and to degrade it as CeO 2 powder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mycotoxin Decontamination of Food: Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma versus "Classic" Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojnik, Nataša; Cvelbar, Uroš; Tavčar-Kalcher, Gabrijela; Walsh, James L; Križaj, Igor

    2017-04-28

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by several filamentous fungi, which frequently contaminate our food, and can result in human diseases affecting vital systems such as the nervous and immune systems. They can also trigger various forms of cancer. Intensive food production is contributing to incorrect handling, transport and storage of the food, resulting in increased levels of mycotoxin contamination. Mycotoxins are structurally very diverse molecules necessitating versatile food decontamination approaches, which are grouped into physical, chemical and biological techniques. In this review, a new and promising approach involving the use of cold atmospheric pressure plasma is considered, which may overcome multiple weaknesses associated with the classical methods. In addition to its mycotoxin destruction efficiency, cold atmospheric pressure plasma is cost effective, ecologically neutral and has a negligible effect on the quality of food products following treatment in comparison to classical methods.

  2. Mycotoxin Decontamination of Food: Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma versus “Classic” Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojnik, Nataša; Cvelbar, Uroš; Tavčar-Kalcher, Gabrijela; Walsh, James L.; Križaj, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by several filamentous fungi, which frequently contaminate our food, and can result in human diseases affecting vital systems such as the nervous and immune systems. They can also trigger various forms of cancer. Intensive food production is contributing to incorrect handling, transport and storage of the food, resulting in increased levels of mycotoxin contamination. Mycotoxins are structurally very diverse molecules necessitating versatile food decontamination approaches, which are grouped into physical, chemical and biological techniques. In this review, a new and promising approach involving the use of cold atmospheric pressure plasma is considered, which may overcome multiple weaknesses associated with the classical methods. In addition to its mycotoxin destruction efficiency, cold atmospheric pressure plasma is cost effective, ecologically neutral and has a negligible effect on the quality of food products following treatment in comparison to classical methods. PMID:28452957

  3. Definition of a concrete bio-decontamination process in nuclear substructures; Biodegradation de matrices cimentaires en vue de leur decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jestin, A

    2005-05-15

    The decontamination of sub-structural materials represents a stake of high-importance because of the high volume generated. It is agreed then to propose efficient and effective processes. The process of bio-decontamination of the hydraulic binders leans on the mechanisms of biodegradation of concretes, phenomenon characterized in the 40's by an indirect attack of the material by acids stem from the microbial metabolism: sulphuric acid (produced by Thiobacillus), nitric acid (produced by Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter) and organic acids (produced by fungi). The principle of the bio-decontamination process is to apply those micro-organisms on the surface of the contaminated material, in order to damage its surface and to retrieve the radionuclides. One of the multiple approaches of the process is the use of a bio-gel that makes possible the micro-organisms application. (author)

  4. DECONTAMINATION FACTORS AND FILTRATION FLUX IMPACT TO ARP AT REDUCED MST CONCENTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D.

    2012-06-27

    Tank Farm and Closure Engineering is evaluating changes to the Actinide Removal Process facility operations to decrease the MST concentration from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L and the contact time from 12 hours to between 6 and 8 hours. For this evaluation, SRNL reviewed previous datasets investigating the performance of MST at 0.2 g/L in salt solutions ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration. In general, reducing the MST concentration from 0.4 to 0.2 g/L and increasing the ionic strength from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration will decrease the measured decontamination factors for plutonium, neptunium, uranium and strontium. The decontamination factors as well as single standard deviation values for each sorbate are reported. These values are applicable within the sorbate and sodium concentrations used in the experimental measurements. Decreasing the MST concentration in the ARP from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L will produce an increase in the filter flux, and could lead to longer operating times between filter cleaning. The increase in flux is a function of a number of operating parameters, and is difficult to quantify. However, it is estimated that the reduction in MST could result in a reduction of filtration time of up to 20%.

  5. Penetration and decontamination of americium-241 ex vivo using fresh and frozen pig skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazrart, A; Bolzinger, M A; Moureau, A; Molina, T; Coudert, S; Angulo, J F; Briancon, S; Griffiths, N M

    2017-04-01

    Skin contamination is one of the most probable risks following major nuclear or radiological incidents. However, accidents involving skin contamination with radionuclides may occur in the nuclear industry, in research laboratories and in nuclear medicine departments. This work aims to measure the penetration of the radiological contaminant Americium ( 241 Am) in fresh and frozen skin and to evaluate the distribution of the contamination in the skin. Decontamination tests were performed using water, Fuller's earth and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), which is the recommended treatment in case of skin contamination with actinides such as plutonium or americium. To assess these parameters, we used the Franz cell diffusion system with full-thickness skin obtained from pigs' ears, representative of human skin. Solutions of 241 Am were deposited on the skin samples. The radioactivity content in each compartment and skin layers was measured after 24 h by liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrophotometry. The Am cutaneous penetration to the receiver compartment is almost negligible in fresh and frozen skin. Multiple washings with water and DTPA recovered about 90% of the initial activity. The rest remains fixed mainly in the stratum corneum. Traces of activity were detected within the epidermis and dermis which is fixed and not accessible to the decontamination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Facile and Efficient Decontamination of Thorium from Rare Earths Based on Selective Selenite Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxing; Lu, Huangjie; Dai, Xing; Duan, Tao; Bai, Xiaojing; Cai, Yawen; Yin, Xuemiao; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Du, Shiyu; Zhou, Ruhong; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Liu, Ning; Wang, Shuao

    2018-02-19

    The coexistence of radioactive contaminants (e.g., thorium, uranium, and their daughters) in rare earth minerals introduces significant environmental, economic, and technological hurdles in modern rare earth production. Efficient, low cost, and green decontamination strategies are therefore desired to ameliorate this problem. We report here a single-step and quantitative decontamination strategy of thorium from rare earths based on a unique periodic trend in the formation of crystalline selenite compounds across the lanthanide series, where Ce(III) is fully oxidized in situ to Ce(IV). This gives rise to a crystallization system that is highly selective to trap tetravalent f-blocks while all other trivalent lanthanides completely remain in solution when coexist. These results are bolstered by first-principles calculations of lattice energies and an examination of bonding in these compounds. This system is contrasted with typical natural and synthetic systems, where trivalent and tetravalent f-block elements often cocrystallize. The separation factors after one round of crystallization were determined from binary systems of Th(IV)/La(III), Th(IV)/Eu(III), and Th(IV)/Yb(III) to reach 2.1 × 10 5 , 1.2 × 10 5 , and 9 × 10 4 , respectively. Selective crystallization of thorium from a simulated monazite composite yields a separation factor of 1.9 × 10 3 with nearly quantitative removal of thorium.

  7. Modelling of the hydrodynamic behaviour of a decontamination foam; Modelisation du comportement hydrodynamique d'une mousse de decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faury, M.; Fournel, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    Decontamination of large components of nuclear power plants (refrigerants, vapor generators, effluents storage tanks...) produces an important volume of secondary effluents. The use of decontamination foams is an alternative allowing a significant diminution of this volume (about of a factor ten). The aim of this work is to propose models which could be applied by an industrialist in order to anticipate the behaviour of a foam flowing out in a component of any geometry and simplifying then the pre-study steps. (O.M.)

  8. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility`s process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-2 1). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases.

  9. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility`s process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases.

  10. Results of chemical decontamination of DOE`s uranium-enrichment scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, R.G.

    1997-02-01

    The CORPEX{reg_sign} Nuclear Decontamination Processes were used to decontaminate representative scrap metal specimens obtained from the existing scrap metal piles located at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio. In September 1995, under contract to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, MELE Associates, Inc. performed the on-site decontamination demonstration. The decontamination demonstration proved that significant amounts of the existing DOE scrap metal can be decontaminated to levels where the scrap metal could be economically released by DOE for beneficial reuse. This simple and environmentally friendly process can be used as an alternative, or in addition to, smelting radiologically contaminated scrap metal.

  11. SKIN DOSIMETRY IN CONDITIONS OF ITS CONSTANT SURFACE CONTAMINATION WITH SOLUTIONS OF PLUTONIUM-239 AND AMERICIUM-241

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Ershov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers, on the basis of experimental data, the issue of assessing dose burdens to the skin basal layer in conditions of its permanent contamination with solutions of plutonium-239 and americium-241 and subsequent decontamination.

  12. Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Murray E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    This document supplies information resources for a person seeking to create planning or pre-planning documents for chemical decontamination operations. A building decontamination plan can be separated into four different sections: Pre-planning, Characterization, Decontamination (Initial response and also complete cleanup), and Clearance. Of the identified Los Alamos resources, they can be matched with these four sections: Pre-planning -- Dave Seidel, EO-EPP, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; David DeCroix and Bruce Letellier, D-3, Computational fluids modeling of structures; Murray E. Moore, RP-2, Aerosol sampling and ventilation engineering. Characterization (this can include development projects) -- Beth Perry, IAT-3, Nuclear Counterterrorism Response (SNIPER database); Fernando Garzon, MPA-11, Sensors and Electrochemical Devices (development); George Havrilla, C-CDE, Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering; Kristen McCabe, B-7, Biosecurity and Public Health. Decontamination -- Adam Stively, EO-ER, Emergency Response; Dina Matz, IHS-IP, Industrial hygiene; Don Hickmott, EES-6, Chemical cleanup. Clearance (validation) -- Larry Ticknor, CCS-6, Statistical Sciences.

  13. Atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Hans W. (Los Alamos, NM); Selwyn, Gary S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma decontamination/sterilization chamber is described. The apparatus is useful for decontaminating sensitive equipment and materials, such as electronics, optics and national treasures, which have been contaminated with chemical and/or biological warfare agents, such as anthrax, mustard blistering agent, VX nerve gas, and the like. There is currently no acceptable procedure for decontaminating such equipment. The apparatus may also be used for sterilization in the medical and food industries. Items to be decontaminated or sterilized are supported inside the chamber. Reactive gases containing atomic and metastable oxygen species are generated by an atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge in a He/O.sub.2 mixture and directed into the region of these items resulting in chemical reaction between the reactive species and organic substances. This reaction typically kills and/or neutralizes the contamination without damaging most equipment and materials. The plasma gases are recirculated through a closed-loop system to minimize the loss of helium and the possibility of escape of aerosolized harmful substances.

  14. The Ultimate Hacker: SETI Signals May Need to Be Decontaminated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.

    2004-06-01

    Biological contamination from space is a remote but recognized possibility. SETI signals might also contain harmful information. Some argue that a SETI signal could not contaminate a terrestrial computer because the idiosyncratic computer logic and code constitute an impenetrable firewall. Suggestions are given below on how to probe these arguments and decontaminate SETI signals.

  15. Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to iron and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article This study examines the effectiveness of decontaminating Bacillus globigii spores attached to corroded iron and cement-mortar coupons with free chlorine at two pH levels, monochloramine, chlorine dioxide, ozone, peracetic acid (PAA) and acidified nitrite, followed by flushing.

  16. Minimal impact, waterless decontamination technologies for improving food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathogen contamination of produce, meats, poultry, shellfish, and other foods remains an ongoing concern. Chemical sanitizers are widely employed for foods and food contact surfaces. However, there is growing interest in the development of minimal impact, waterless decontamination processes that wil...

  17. Use of selective digestive tract decontamination in European intensive cares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reis Miranda, D; Citerio, G; Perner, A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have shown that the use of selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) reduces mortality. However, fear for increasing multi drug resistance might prevent wide acceptance. A survey was performed among the units registered in the European Registry for Intensive Care...

  18. Post-Decontamination Vapor Sampling and Analytical Test Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-12

    agent; CWA; simulants; nontraditional agent; NTA; toxic industrial chemical; TIC; toxic industrial material; TIM; coupon; contamination ...decontamination process. Chemical contaminants can include chemical warfare agents (CWAs) or their simulants, nontraditional agents (NTAs), toxic industrial...include glove ports . The chamber may have certified fume hoods for the containment of toxic chemicals. All exhaust air must be filtered to

  19. Decontamination Processes for Restorative Operations and as a Precursor to Decommissioning: A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, J. L.; Divine, J. R.

    1981-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted an comprehensive literature review of actual reactor decontamination processes that are currently available. In general, any decontamination process should be based on the following criteria: effectiveness, efficiency, safety, and waste production. The information that was collected and analyzed has been divided into three major categories of decontamination: chemical, mechanical, and electrochemical. Chemical methods can be further classified as either low-concentration, singlestep processes or high-concentration, single- or multistep processes. Numerous chemical decontamination methods are detailed. Mechanical decontamination methods are usually restricted to the removal of a contaminated surface layer, whlch limits their versatility; several mechanical decontamination methods are described. Electrochemical decontamination. is both fast and easily controlled, and numerous processes that have been used in industry for many years are discussed. Information obtained from this work is tabulated in Appendix A for easy access, and a bibliography and a glossary have been provided.

  20. Legionella on board trains: effectiveness of environmental surveillance and decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Gianluigi; Vincenti, Sara; Ferriero, Anna Maria; Boninti, Federica; Sezzatini, Romina; Turnaturi, Cinzia; Gliubizzi, Maria Daniela; Munafò, Elio; Ceccarelli, Gianluca; Causarano, Carmelo; Accorsi, Massimo; Del Nord, Pasquale; Ricciardi, Walter; Laurenti, Patrizia

    2012-08-07

    Legionella pneumophila is increasingly recognised as a significant cause of sporadic and epidemic community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Many studies describe the frequency and severity of Legionella spp. contamination in spa pools, natural pools, hotels and ships, but there is no study analysing the environmental monitoring of Legionella on board trains. The aims of the present study were to conduct periodic and precise environmental surveillance of Legionella spp. in water systems and water tanks that supply the toilet systems on trains, to assess the degree of contamination of such structures and to determine the effectiveness of decontamination. A comparative pre-post ecological study was conducted from September 2006 to January 2011. A total of 1,245 water samples were collected from plumbing and toilet water tanks on passenger trains. The prevalence proportion of all positive samples was calculated. The unpaired t-test was performed to evaluate statistically significant differences between the mean load values before and after the decontamination procedures; statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. In the pre-decontamination period, 58% of the water samples were positive for Legionella. Only Legionella pneumophila was identified: 55.84% were serogroup 1, 19.03% were serogroups 2-14 and 25.13% contained both serogroups. The mean bacterial load value was 2.14 × 10(3) CFU/L. During the post-decontamination period, 42.75% of water samples were positive for Legionella spp.; 98.76% were positive for Legionella pneumophila: 74.06% contained serogroup 1, 16.32% contained serogroups 2-14 and 9.62% contained both. The mean bacterial load in the post-decontamination period was 1.72 × 10(3) CFU/L. According to the t-test, there was a statistically significant decrease in total bacterial load until approximately one and a half year after beginning the decontamination programme (p = 0.0097). This study indicates that systematic environmental surveillance

  1. Legionella on board trains: effectiveness of environmental surveillance and decontamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaranta Gianluigi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella pneumophila is increasingly recognised as a significant cause of sporadic and epidemic community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia. Many studies describe the frequency and severity of Legionella spp. contamination in spa pools, natural pools, hotels and ships, but there is no study analysing the environmental monitoring of Legionella on board trains. The aims of the present study were to conduct periodic and precise environmental surveillance of Legionella spp. in water systems and water tanks that supply the toilet systems on trains, to assess the degree of contamination of such structures and to determine the effectiveness of decontamination. Methods A comparative pre-post ecological study was conducted from September 2006 to January 2011. A total of 1,245 water samples were collected from plumbing and toilet water tanks on passenger trains. The prevalence proportion of all positive samples was calculated. The unpaired t-test was performed to evaluate statistically significant differences between the mean load values before and after the decontamination procedures; statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Results In the pre-decontamination period, 58% of the water samples were positive for Legionella. Only Legionella pneumophila was identified: 55.84% were serogroup 1, 19.03% were serogroups 2–14 and 25.13% contained both serogroups. The mean bacterial load value was 2.14 × 103 CFU/L. During the post-decontamination period, 42.75% of water samples were positive for Legionella spp.; 98.76% were positive for Legionella pneumophila: 74.06% contained serogroup 1, 16.32% contained serogroups 2–14 and 9.62% contained both. The mean bacterial load in the post-decontamination period was 1.72 × 103 CFU/L. According to the t-test, there was a statistically significant decrease in total bacterial load until approximately one and a half year after beginning the decontamination programme (p

  2. European survey on decontamination in mass casualty incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domres, Bernd D; Rashid, AlBadi; Grundgeiger, Jan; Gromer, Stefan; Kees, Tobias; Hecker, Norman; Peter, Hanno

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the European status in the case of mass casualties regarding legislation, responsibilities of ministries and organizations, education and training, material and equipment, and bottlenecks. A questionnaire answered by 22 of 27 European Union member states and Croatia, Norway, and Switzerland. Results and recommendations of a European expert's workshop on decontamination of victims of mass casualties. Ministries and responsible organizations of 22 European Union member states Croatia, Norway, and Switzerland. Hazardous chemical agents are a global realistic risk. Therefore it is an important obligation to direct education, service activities and research towards priority concerns of prevention and response in case of an accidental or criminal liberation of toxic chemicals. The most effective procedures to save the life and health of contaminated persons are: (1) The decontamination of chemically contaminated casualties as soon as possible reduces both morbidity and mortality. (2) The removal of clothing as the first stage of the decontamination process reduces the amount of contamination by 75-85 percent. The decontamination in case of a mass casualty incident needs a high number of personnel, personal protection equipment (PPE), a decontamination unit, education and permanent training, and a management of command, communication, and coordination; all these in the shortest time of preparedness, reaction, and cross border nationally and internationally. During the German EU Council Presidency in the first 6 months of 2007 the Federal Ministry of the Interior held a 3 days seminar (Ahrweiler, February 22-24, 2007) on the "Decontamination of Casualties Involved in Incidents with Hazardous Chemical Materials--European Inventory and Perspectives." The aim was to arrange an exchange of information and experience on the various systems in place in Europe which would be beneficial to all parties concerned. The seminar was organized by the

  3. Efficacy of decontaminants and disinfectants against Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Prerna; Poxton, Ian R

    2011-08-01

    Clostridium difficile is a common nosocomial pathogen transmitted mainly via its spores. These spores can remain viable on contaminated surfaces for several months and are resistant to most commonly used cleaning agents. Thus, effective decontamination of the environment is essential in preventing the transmission of C. difficile in health-care establishments. However, this emphasis on decontamination must also be extended to laboratories due to risk of exposure of staff to potentially virulent strains. Though few cases of laboratory-acquired infection have been reported, the threat of infection by C. difficile in the laboratory is real. Our aim was to test the efficacy of four disinfectants, Actichlor, MicroSol 3+, TriGene Advance and Virkon, and one laboratory decontaminant, Decon 90, against vegetative cells and spores of C. difficile. Five strains were selected for the study: the three most commonly encountered epidemic strains in Scotland, PCR ribotypes 106, 001 and 027, and control strains 630 and VPI 10463. MICs were determined by agar dilution and broth microdilution. All the agents tested inhibited the growth of vegetative cells of the selected strains at concentrations below the recommended working concentrations. Additionally, their effect on spores was determined by exposing the spores of these strains to different concentrations of the agents for different periods of time. For some of the agents, an exposure of 10 min was required for sporicidal activity. Further, only Actichlor was able to bring about a 3 log(10) reduction in spore numbers under clean and dirty conditions. It was also the only agent that decontaminated different hard, non-porous surfaces artificially contaminated with C. difficile spores. However, this too required an exposure time of more than 2 min and up to 10 min. In conclusion, only the chlorine-releasing agent Actichlor was found to be suitable for the elimination of C. difficile spores from the environment, making it the agent

  4. Pathogen Decontamination of Food Crop Soil: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtler, Joshua B

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this review is to delineate means of decontaminating soil. This information might be used to mitigate soil-associated risks of foodborne pathogens. The majority of the research in the published literature involves inactivation of plant pathogens in soil, i.e., those pathogens harmful to fruit and vegetable production and ornamental plants. Very little has been published regarding the inactivation of foodborne human pathogens in crop soil. Nevertheless, because decontamination techniques for plant pathogens might also be useful methods for eliminating foodborne pathogens, this review also includes inactivation of plant pathogens, with appropriate discussion and comparisons, in the hopes that these methods may one day be validated against foodborne pathogens. Some of the major soil decontamination methods that have been investigated and are covered include chemical decontamination (chemigation), solarization, steaming, biofumigation, bacterial competitive exclusion, torch flaming, microwave treatment, and amendment with biochar. Other innovative means of inactivating foodborne pathogens in soils may be discovered and explored in the future, provided that these techniques are economically feasible in terms of chemicals, equipment, and labor. Food microbiology and food safety researchers should reach out to soil scientists and plant pathologists to create links where they do not currently exist and strengthen relationships where they do exist to take advantage of multidisciplinary skills. In time, agricultural output and the demand for fresh produce will increase. With advances in the sensitivity of pathogen testing and epidemiological tracebacks, the need to mitigate preharvest bacterial contamination of fresh produce will become paramount. Hence, soil decontamination technologies may become more economically feasible and practical in light of increasing the microbial safety of fresh produce.

  5. Radiocesium decontamination of a riverside in Fukushima, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikiori, Tatsuhiro; Suzuki, Satoshi

    2017-10-01

    Extensive decontamination measures have been implemented in the area affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear disaster. Typical decontamination measures, such as removing topsoil of several centimeters in depth, are not suitable for rivers where contaminated sediments have been deposited. A decontamination measure was tested that considered the spatial distribution of radiocesium at the lower part of a tributary of the Abukuma River in Fukushima. The radiocesium distribution in the flood channel was vertically and horizontally highly heterogeneous. In some parts, the activity concentration was high (>10 kBq/kg for 137 Cs) even at depths of 25 cm in the sediment. This may be due to plant growth in the flood channel favoring the deposition of sediment with high activity concentration. On the basis of the radiocesium distribution, the flood channel sediment was removed to a depth of 15-35 cm, which accumulated the most radiocesium (>3.0 kBq/kg for the sum of 134 Cs and 137 Cs). The upper 5 cm of soil was removed from the dike slopes. The river bed was not decontaminated because the activity concentration was low (decontamination measure reduced the air dose rate by a factor of approximately two, demonstrating the effectiveness of our measures. Annual external doses were calculated for when this part of the dike and the flood channel is used for commuting to school and outdoor education. The doses during the activities at the test site accounted for only 1-2% of the value during daily life in the surrounding area, indicating that radiation exposure during riverside activities is limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fighting Ebola through Novel Spore Decontamination Technologies for the Military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Doona

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractRecently, global public health organizations such as Doctors without Borders (MSF, the World Health Organization (WHO, Public Health Canada, National Institutes of Health (NIH, and the U.S. government developed and deployed Field Decontamination Kits (FDKs, a novel, lightweight, compact, reusable decontamination technology to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical devices at remote clinical sites lacking infra-structure in crisis-stricken regions of West Africa (medical waste materials are placed in bags and burned. The basis for effectuating sterilization with FDKs is chlorine dioxide (ClO2 produced from a patented invention developed by researchers at the US Army – Natick Soldier RD&E Center (NSRDEC and commercialized as a dry mixed-chemical for bacterial spore decontamination. In fact, the NSRDEC research scientists developed an ensemble of ClO2 technologies designed for different applications in decontaminating fresh produce; food contact and handling surfaces; personal protective equipment; textiles used in clothing, uniforms, tents, and shelters; graywater recycling; airplanes; surgical instruments; and hard surfaces in latrines, laundries, and deployable medical facilities. These examples demonstrate the far-reaching impact, adaptability, and versatility of these innovative technologies. We present herein the unique attributes of NSRDEC’s novel decontamination technologies and a Case Study of the development of FDKs that were deployed in West Africa by international public health organizations to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical equipment. FDKs use bacterial spores as indicators of sterility. We review the properties and structures of spores and the mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by ClO2. We also review mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by novel, emerging, and established nonthermal technologies for food preservation, such as high pressure processing, irradiation, cold plasma, and chemical sanitizers

  7. Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Echol E; Beatty, Tia Maria

    1998-07-01

    The following paragraphs comprise the research efforts during the second quarter of 1998 (April 1 - June 30.) These tasks have been granted a continuation until the end of August 1998. This report represents the last technical quarterly report deliverable for the WVU Cooperative Agreement - Decontamination Systems Information and Research Program. Final draft technical reports will be the next submission. During this period, work was completed on the Injection and Circulation of Potable Water Through PVDs on Task 1.6 - Pilot Scale Demonstration of TCE Flushing Through PVDs at the DOE/RMI Extrusion Plant. The data has been evaluated and representative graphs are presented. The plot of Cumulative Injected Volume vs. Cumulative Week Time show the ability to consistently inject through the two center PVDs at a rate of approximately ten (10) gallons per hour. This injection rate was achieved under a static head that varied from five (5) feet to three (3) feet. The plot of Extracted Flow Rate vs. Cumulative Week Time compares the extraction rate with and without the injection of water. The injection operation was continuous for eight hour periods while the extraction operation was executed over a pulsing schedule. Extraction rates as high as forty-five (45) gallons per hour were achieved in conjunction with injection (a 350% increase over no injection.) The retrieved TCE in the liquid phase varied to a considerable degree depending on the pulsing scheme, indicating a significant amount of stripping (volatilization) took place during the extraction process. A field experiment was conducted to confirm this. A liquid sample was obtained using the same vacuum system used in the pad operation and a second liquid sample was taken by a bailer. Analyzation of TCE concentration showed 99.5% volatilization when the vacuum system was used for extraction. This was also confirmed by data from the air monitoring program which indicated that 92%-99% of the retrieved TCE was being

  8. Ethylenediamine grafted to graphene oxide@Fe3O4 for chromium(VI decontamination: Performance, modelling, and fractional factorial design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinjiang Hu

    Full Text Available A method for grafting ethylenediamine to a magnetic graphene oxide composite (EDA-GO@Fe3O4 was developed for Cr(VI decontamination. The physicochemical properties of EDA-GO@Fe3O4 were characterized using HRTEM, EDS, FT-IR, TG-DSC, and XPS. The effects of pH, sorbent dose, foreign anions, time, Cr(VI concentration, and temperature on decontamination process were studied. The solution pH can largely affect the decontamination process. The pseudo-second-order model is suitable for being applied to fit the adsorption processes of Cr(VI with GO@Fe3O4 and EDA-GO@Fe3O4. The intra-particle diffusion is not the rate-controlling step. Isotherm experimental data can be described using the Freundlich model. The effects of multiple factors on the Cr(VI decontamination was investigated by a 25-1 fractional factorial design (FFD. The adsorption process can significantly be affected by the main effects of A (pH, B (Cr(VI concentration, and E (Adsorbent dose. The combined factors of AB (pH × Cr(VI concentration, AE (pH × Adsorbent dose, and BC (Cr(VI concentration × Temperature had larger effects than other factors on Cr(VI removal. These results indicated that EDA-GO@Fe3O4 is a potential and suitable candidate for treatment of heavy metal wastewater.

  9. Electrochemical decontamination of waters by advanced oxidation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    chronoamperometry and bulk electrolysis to give the optimization characteristics of the degradation of such a ... the degradation process is perfectly predicted by a theoretical mathematical model. HPLC and. GC-MS ... aqueous solutions by batch electrolysis in the potential region of water decomposition (2.3 V vs. SHE) in ...

  10. Process for cesium decontamination and immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarneni, S.; Roy, R.

    1988-04-25

    Cesium can be selectively recovered from a nuclear waste solution containing cesium together with other metal ions by contact with a modified phlogopite which is a hydrated, sodium phlogopite mica. Once the cesium has entered the modified phlogopite it is fixed and can be safely stored for long periods of time. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Process for cesium decontamination and immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarneni, Sridhar; Roy, Rustum

    1989-01-01

    Cesium can be selectively recovered from a nuclear waste solution containing cesium together with other metal ions by contact with a modified phlogopite which is a hydrated, sodium phlogopite mica. Once the cesium has entered the modified phlogopite it is fixed and can be safely stored for long periods of time.

  12. Development of a Photo-Fenton Catalyst Supported on Modified Polymer Films: Preparation, Characterization and Implication for Water Decontamination by Solar Photocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mazille, Félicien

    2010-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is a part of the European project INNOWATECH. The global objective of this project was to provide effective technological solutions for the treatment of industrial wastewater, to propose new concepts in wastewater treatment with potential benefits for the protection of the environment. In particular photo-assisted Fenton oxidation was investigated. It is a promising technology to decontaminate industrial wastewater ...

  13. Assessing cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Naito, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Despite the enormous cost of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture, it is not clear what levels of reduction in external radiation exposure are possible in the Special Decontamination Area, the Intensive Contamination Survey Areas and the whole of Fukushima. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of radiation decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture in its entirety. Using a geographic information system, we calculated the costs of removal, storage containers, transport, and temporary and interim storage facilities as well as the reduction in air dose rate for a cumulative external exposure for 9000 1 km × 1 km mesh units incorporating 51 municipalities. The decontamination cost for the basic scenario, for which forested areas within 20 m of habitation areas were decontaminated, was JPY2.53-5.12 trillion; the resulting reduction in annual external dose was about 2500 person-Sv. The transport, storage, and administrative costs of decontamination waste and removed soil reached JPY1.55-2.12 trillion under this scenario. Although implementing decontamination of all forested areas provides some major reductions in the external radiation dose for the average inhabitant, decontamination costs could potentially exceed JPY16 trillion. These results indicate that technologies for reducing the volume of decontamination waste and removed soil should be considered to reduce storage costs and that further discussions about forest decontamination policies are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Showering effectiveness for human hair decontamination of the nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, Denis; Wartelle, Julien; Cruz, Catherine

    2015-05-05

    In this work, our goals were to establish whether hair decontamination by showering one hour post-exposure to the highly toxic organophosphate nerve agent VX was effective, whether it required the addition of a detergent to water and, if it could be improved by using the adsorbent Fuller's Earth (FE) or the Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) 30 min prior to showering. Hair exposure to VX and decontamination was performed by using an in vitro model. Hair showering led to 72% reduction of contamination. Addition of detergent to water slightly increased the decontamination effectiveness. Hair treatment with FE or RSDL improved the decontamination rate. Combination of FE use and showering, which yielded a decontamination factor of 41, was demonstrated to be the most effective hair decontamination procedure. Hair wiping after showering was shown to contribute to hair decontamination. Altogether, our results highlighted the importance of considering hair decontamination as an important part of body surface decontamination protocols. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fighting Ebola with novel spore decontamination technologies for the military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doona, Christopher J.; Feeherry, Florence E.; Kustin, Kenneth; Olinger, Gene G.; Setlow, Peter; Malkin, Alexander J.; Leighton, Terrance

    2015-01-01

    Recently, global public health organizations such as Doctors without Borders (MSF), the World Health Organization (WHO), Public Health Canada, National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. government developed and deployed Field Decontamination Kits (FDKs), a novel, lightweight, compact, reusable decontamination technology to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical devices at remote clinical sites lacking infra-structure in crisis-stricken regions of West Africa (medical waste materials are placed in bags and burned). The basis for effectuating sterilization with FDKs is chlorine dioxide (ClO2) produced from a patented invention developed by researchers at the US Army Natick Soldier RD&E Center (NSRDEC) and commercialized as a dry mixed-chemical for bacterial spore decontamination. In fact, the NSRDEC research scientists developed an ensemble of ClO2 technologies designed for different applications in decontaminating fresh produce; food contact and handling surfaces; personal protective equipment; textiles used in clothing, uniforms, tents, and shelters; graywater recycling; airplanes; surgical instruments; and hard surfaces in latrines, laundries, and deployable medical facilities. These examples demonstrate the far-reaching impact, adaptability, and versatility of these innovative technologies. We present herein the unique attributes of NSRDEC’s novel decontamination technologies and a Case Study of the development of FDKs that were deployed in West Africa by international public health organizations to sterilize Ebola-contaminated medical equipment. FDKs use bacterial spores as indicators of sterility. We review the properties and structures of spores and the mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by ClO2. We also review mechanisms of bacterial spore inactivation by novel, emerging, and established non-thermal technologies for food preservation, such as high pressure processing, irradiation, cold plasma, and chemical sanitizers, using an array of Bacillus

  16. The impact of skin decontamination on the time window for effective treatment of percutaneous VX exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosen, M J A; van den Berg, R M; de Jong, A L; van der Schans, M J; Noort, D; Langenberg, J P

    2017-04-01

    The main goal of the present study was to obtain insight into depot formation and penetration following percutaneous VX poisoning, in order to identify an appropriate decontamination window that can enhance or support medical countermeasures. The study was executed in two phases, using the hairless guinea pig as an animal model. In the first phase the effect of various decontamination regimens on levels of free VX in skin and plasma were studied as well as on blood cholinesterase levels. Animals were exposed to 0.5 mg/kg VX and were not decontaminated (control), decontaminated with RSDL once at 15 or 90 min after exposure or three times at 15, 25 and 35 (10-min interval) or 15, 45 and 75 min after exposure (30-min interval). There was no significant effect of any of the decontamination regimens on the 6-h survival rate of the animals. However, all animals that had been decontaminated 15 min after exposure, showed a survival rate of more than 90%, compared to 50-60% in animals that were not decontaminated or decontaminated at 90 min after exposure. In the second phase of the study, hairless guinea pigs were exposed to 1 mg/kg VX on the shoulder, followed either by decontamination with RSDL (10 min interval), conventional treatment on indication of clinical signs or a combination thereof. It appeared that a thorough, repeated decontamination alone could not save the majority of the animals. A 100% survival rate was observed in the group that received a combination of decontamination and treatment. In conclusion, the effects of VX exposure could be influenced by various RSDL decontamination regimens. The results in freely moving animals showed that skin decontamination, although not fully effective in removing all VX from the skin and skin depot is crucial to support pharmacological intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. PROPERTIES AND BEHAVIOR OF 238PU RELEVANT TO DECONTAMINATION OF BUILDING 235-F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, A.; Kane, M.

    2009-11-24

    1101) may offer significant advantages over conventional liquid decontamination solutions. Previous trials are discussed and have been used successfully at SRS on various surfaces. Some areas showed minimal improvement, while others presented complete (100%) decontamination. However, small scale testing is recommended prior to the full scale use in the cells of PuFF in building 235-F.

  18. Measurement of internal radiation exposure among decontamination workers in villages near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Nihei, Masahiko; Sato, Katsumi; Masaki, Shin; Sakuma, Yu; Kato, Shigeaki; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Matsumura, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Makoto; Hayano, Ryugo; Shibuya, Kenji; Kami, Masahiro; Sasaki, Taro

    2013-10-01

    Decontamination workers may face a high risk of exposure to internal irradiation through inhalation during decontamination activities; there is, however, little previous research on the levels of internal contamination during decontamination procedures. The authors reviewed the medical records, including whole body counter measurements, of decontamination workers in villages near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to assess their levels of internal radiation exposure. In total, 83 decontamination workers were enrolled in this study. They were regularly engaged in decontamination activities in highly contaminated areas where surface 137Cs deposition density was over 100 kBq m-2. The present study showed low levels of internal exposure among the decontamination workers near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The cesium burdens of all the decontamination workers were below detection limits. They had reported no acute health problems. The resuspension of radioactive materials may cause minimal internal contamination during decontamination activities.

  19. Development of Decontamination Process for Soil Contaminated Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Uk-Rang; Han, Gyu-Seong; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Various experiments with full-scaled electrokinetic equipment, soil washing equipment, and gravel washing equipment were performed to remove {sup 238}U from contaminated soils of below 0.4 Bq/g. The repetition number and the removal efficiencies of the soil and gravel washing equipment were evaluated. The decontamination periods by the soil and gravel electrokinetic equipment were evaluated. Finally, a work process of full-scaled decontamination equipment was developed. Contaminated soils were classified into soils and gravels using a 8.0 cm sieve. Soils were sent to the soil washing equipment, while gravels were sent to the gravel washing equipment. Soils sent to the soil washing equipment were sent to the soil electrokinetic equipment after soil washing. A repetition number of soil washing was two times. The washed gravels were sent to the gravel electrokinetic equipment. Gravel contaminated with a high concentration requires crushing after gravel washing.

  20. Environmental Assessment for decontamination and dismantlement, Pinellas Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1092) of the proposed decontamination and dismantlement of the Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. Under the Decontamination and Dismantlement EA, the DOE proposes to clean up facilities, structures, and utilities; dismantle specific structures; and mitigate or eliminate any environmental impacts associated with the cleanup, dismantlement, and related activities. Related activities include utilization of specific areas by new tenants prior to full-scale cleanup. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  1. Solidification of metal oxide from electrokinetic-electrodialytic decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Daeseo; Park, Uk-Ryang; Kim, Gye-Nam; Kim, Seung-Soo; Moon, Jei-Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination technology reduced 80% of the concentration of the uranium soil waste to below the concentration of self-disposal. After conducting electrokinectic-electrodialytic decontamination, more than 10% of the remainder of radioactive waste from the cathodes of electrokinectic-electrodialytic equipment were produced. To dispose of such waste, it is necessary to solidify second radioactive waste owing to the requirements of radioactive waste from public corporations. In this study, a solidification experiment was carried out using a polymer. At first, a sampling of second radioactive waste was conducted. Then, second radioactive waste and a polymer were mixed. Third, the solidified state between the second radioactive waste and polymer was checked. In our next study, an experiment for the requirements of a public radioactive waste corporation will be conducted.

  2. Decontamination and Decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is dedicated to the safe and cost effective D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. There is currently a backlog of more than 7,000 contaminated US Department of Energy facilities nationwide. Added to this are 110 licensed commercial nuclear power reactors operated by utilities learning to cope with deregulation and an aging infrastructure that supports the commercial nuclear power industry, as well as medical and other uses of radioactive materials. With this volume it becomes easy to understand the importance of addressing the unique issues and objectives associated with the D{ampersand}D of surplus nuclear facilities. This photobriefing book summarizes the decontamination and decommissioning projects and activities either completed or continuing at the ANL-E site during the year.

  3. Biofilm mediated decontamination of pollutants from the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Mitra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we highlight beneficial use of microbial biofilms in remediation of environmental pollutants by bioremediation. Bioremediation is an environment friendly, cost effective, sustainable technology that utilizes microbes to decontaminate and degrade a wide variety of pollutants into less harmful products. Relative to free-floating planktonic cells, microbes existing in biofilm mode are advantageous for bioremediation because of greater tolerance to pollutants, environmental stress and ability to degrade varied harsh pollutants via diverse catabolic pathways. In biofilm mode, microbes are immobilized in a self-synthesized matrix which offers protection from stress, contaminants and predatory protozoa. Contaminants ranging from heavy metals, petroleum, explosives, pesticides have been remediated using microbial consortia of biofilms. In the industry, biofilm based bioremediation is used to decontaminate polluted soil and groundwater. Here we discuss conventional and newer strategies utilizing biofilms in environmental remediation.

  4. Physico-Chemical Dynamics of Nanoparticle Formation during Laser Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, M.D.

    2005-06-01

    Laser-ablation based decontamination is a new and effective approach for simultaneous removal and characterization of contaminants from surfaces (e.g., building interior and exterior walls, ground floors, etc.). The scientific objectives of this research are to: (1) characterize particulate matter generated during the laser-ablation based decontamination, (2) develop a technique for simultaneous cleaning and spectroscopic verification, and (3) develop an empirical model for predicting particle generation for the size range from 10 nm to tens of micrometers. This research project provides fundamental data obtained through a systematic study on the particle generation mechanism, and also provides a working model for prediction of particle generation such that an effective operational strategy can be devised to facilitate worker protection.

  5. DECONTAMINATION/DESTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION FOR ORGANICS IN TRANSURANIC WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Jones; Javier Del Campo; Patrick Nevins; Stuart Legg

    2002-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has approximately 5000 55-gallon drums of {sup 238}Pu contaminated waste in interim storage. These may not be shipped to WIPP in TRUPACT-II containers due to the high rate of hydrogen production resulting from the radiolysis of the organic content of the drums. In order to circumvent this problem, the {sup 238}Pu needs to be separated from the organics--either by mineralization of the latter or by decontamination by a chemical separation. We have conducted ''cold'' optimization trials and surrogate tests in which a combination of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process (SILVER II{trademark}) and ultrasonic mixing have been used to decontaminate the surrogate waste materials. The surrogate wastes were impregnated with copper oxalate for plutonium dioxide. Our process combines both mineralization of reactive components (such cellulose, rubber, and oil) and surface decontamination of less reactive materials such as polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinylchloride. By using this combination of SILVER II and ultrasonic mixing, we have achieved 100% current efficiency for the destruction of the reactive components. We have demonstrated that: The degree of decontamination achieved would be adequate to meet both WIPP waste acceptance criteria and TRUPACT II packaging and shipping requirements; The system can maintain near absolute containment of the surrogate radionuclides; Only minimal pre-treatment (coarse shredding) and minimal waste sorting are required; The system requires minimal off gas control processes and monitoring instrumentation; The laboratory trials have developed information that can be used for scale-up purposes; The process does not produce dioxins and furans; Disposal routes for secondary process arisings have already been demonstrated in other programs. Based on the results from Phase 1, the recommendation is to proceed to Phase 2 and use the equipment at Savannah

  6. Civilian First Responder Decontamination Equipment Characteristics Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    question is too broad. On my widescreen, I still could not see all of the ten options top to bottom and had to scroll . You should have considered...freefall and or dumped at sea type conditions 96 Sub-Appendix D: Section 8, Question 2 Human Factors: Should signage be required? "Yes" Comments: 1...very large die outs to decontaminate the buildings and personnel that cleaned or removed the dead poultry carcasses. We have a small portable 9000 ft

  7. Decontamination of Bioaerosols within Engineering Tolerances of Aircraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-04

    have been tested on aircraft and no damage was seen after 10 continuous days. These levels give a potential method to decontaminate an aircraft if...sources with intestinal typhoid bacteria. They also released plague infected fleas over several villages in China and Mongolia in 1941. Around the...psittacosis). Additionally, there are several food and water safety threats caused by different bacteria. These include Salmonella species

  8. Decontamination of 2-Chloroethyl Ethyl Sulfide by Pulsed Corona Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanguo; Hu, Zhen; Cao, Peng; Zhao, Hongjie

    2014-11-01

    Decontamination of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (2-CEES, CH3CH2SCH2CH2Cl) by pulsed corona plasma was investigated. The results show that 212.6 mg/m3 of 2-CEES, with the gas flow rate of 2 m3/h, can be decontaminated to 0.09 mg/m3. According to the variation of the inlet and outlet concentration of 2-CEES vapor with retention time, it is found that the reaction of 2-CEES in a pulsed corona plasma system follows the first order reaction, with the reaction rate constant of 0.463 s-1. The decontamination mechanism is discussed based on an analysis of the dissociation energy of chemical bonds and decontamination products. The C-S bond adjacent to the Cl atom will be destroyed firstly to form CH3CH2S· and ·CH2CH2Cl radicals. CH3CH2S· can be decomposed to ·C2H5 and ·S. ·S can be oxidized to SO2, while ·C2H5 can be finally oxidized to CO2 and H2O. The C-Cl bond in the ·CH2CH2Cl radical can be destroyed to form ·CH2CH2. and ·Cl, which can be mineralized to CO2, H2O and HCl. The H atom in the ·CH2CH2Cl radical can also be substituted by ·Cl to form CHCl2-CHCl2.

  9. Methods for Decontamination of a Bipropellant Propulsion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Mark B.; Greene, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Most propulsion systems are designed to be filled and flown, draining can be done but decontamination may be difficult. Transport of these systems may be difficult as well because flight weight vessels are not designed around DOT or UN shipping requirements. Repairs, failure analysis work or post firing inspections may be difficult or impossible to perform due to the hazards of residual propellants being present.

  10. Radiation survey and decontamination of cape Arza from depleted uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukotić Perko

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In the action of NATO A-10 airplanes in 1999, the cape Arza, Serbia and Montenegro was contaminated by depleted uranium. The clean-up operations were undertaken at the site, and 242 uranium projectiles and their 49 larger fragments were removed from the cape. That is about 85% of the total number of projectiles by which Arza was contaminated. Here are described details of the applied procedures and results of the soil radioactivity measurements after decontamination.

  11. Dental unit water lines decontamination with the aid of nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Paramashivaiah

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Biofilm formation in DUWLs is inevitable with the subsequent release of part of microbiota into the otherwise sterile dental settings. These consequences can be quite serious on clinicians and dental patients. Though conventional measures in water decontamination have been partly successful, the quest for more foolproof methods has led to the use of latest technology, i.e., nanotechnology. The most practical option has to be chosen based on the ease of their usage.

  12. Chemical decontamination and melt densification. [Chop-leach fuel hulls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, R.L.; Griggs, B.; Kemper, R.S.; Nelson, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary studies on the chemical decontamination and densification of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel undissolved residues remaining after dissolution of the UO/sub 2/--PuO/sub 2/ spent fuel material from sheared fuel bundles are reported. The studies were made on cold or very small samples to demonstrate the feasibility of the processes developed before proceeding to hot cell demonstrations with kg level of the sources. A promising aqueous decontamination method for Zr alloy cladding was developed in which oxidized surfaces are conditioned with HF prior to leaching with ammonium oxalate, ammonium citrate, ammonium fluoride, and hydrogen peroxide. Feasibility of molten salt decontamination of oxidized Zircaloy was demonstrated. A low melting alloy of Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Inconel was obtained in induction heated graphite crucibles. Segregated Zircaloy cladding sections were directly melted by the inductoslag process to yield a metal ingot suitable for storage. Both Zircaloy and Zircaloy--stainless steel--Inconel alloys proved to be highly satisfactory getters and sinks for recovered tritium. (JSR)

  13. Irradiation as a decontamination processing for rice paper sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, Michel M.; Thomaz, Fernanda S.; Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Duarte, Renato C.; Aquino, Simone; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: villavic@ipen.br; Correa, Benedito [Universidade de Sao Paulo USP, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas. Dept. de Micologia]. E-mail: correabe@usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Starch is one of the most important plant products to man. The major sources of this compound for man's use are the cereals, but roots and tubers are also important. The starch industry comes in recent years growing and perfecting it self, leading to the necessity products with specific characteristics that take care the requirements of the market, it makes possible through processing raw material, still seldom explored. Rice paper sheet is an edible product derived from potatoes and rice, being commonly used to cover cakes, pies, and sweets in confectioner's shop. A microbiological control is necessary to give a high quality and to guarantee the security of this food. Irradiation would be a safe alternative as a decontamination method without adverse effects on the physical properties in the final products. The aim of this study was to investigate the best dose used as a decontamination method as well as discover the most prevalent fungi found in this product and changes on physical properties. Samples of rice paper sheet were irradiated with 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 kGy using a {sup 60}Co irradiator. Irradiation appeared as a safe alternative as a decontamination method without adverse effects on the physical properties in the final products. (author)

  14. Decontamination of High-risk Animal and Zoonotic Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menrath, Andrea; Tomuzia, Katharina; Braeunig, Juliane; Appel, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Preparedness for the decontamination of affected environments, premises, facilities, and products is one prerequisite for an immediate response to an animal disease outbreak. Various information sources provide recommendations on how to proceed in an outbreak situation to eliminate biological contaminants and to stop the spread of the disease. In order to facilitate the identification of the right decontamination strategy, we present an overview of relevant references for a collection of pathogenic agents. The choice of pathogens is based on a survey of lists containing highly pathogenic agents and/or biological agents considered to be potential vehicles for deliberate contamination of food, feed, or farm animals. European legislation and guidelines from national and international institutions were screened to find decontamination protocols for each of the agents. Identified recommendations were evaluated with regard to their area of application, which could be facilities and equipment, wastes, food, and other animal products. The requirements of a disinfectant for large-scale incidents were gathered, and important characteristics (eg, inactivating spectrum, temperature range, toxicity to environment) of the main recommended disinfectants were summarized to assist in the choice of a suitable and efficient approach in a crisis situation induced by a specific high-risk animal or zoonotic pathogen. The literature search revealed numerous relevant recommendations but also legal gaps for certain diseases, such as Q fever or brucellosis, and legal difficulties for the use of recommended disinfectants. A lack of information about effective disinfectants was identified for some agents. PMID:23971795

  15. Zirconium Hydroxide-coated Nanofiber Mats for Nerve Agent Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sohee; Ying, Wu Bin; Jung, Hyunsook; Ryu, Sam Gon; Lee, Bumjae; Lee, Kyung Jin

    2017-03-16

    Diverse innovative fabrics with specific functionalities have been developed for requirements such as self-decontamination of chemical/biological pollutants and toxic nerve agents. In this work, Zr(OH) 4 -coated nylon-6,6 nanofiber mats were fabricated for the decontamination of nerve agents. Nylon-6,6 fabric was prepared via the electrospinning process, followed by coating with Zr(OH) 4 , which was obtained by the hydrolysis of Zr(OBu) 4 by a sol-gel reaction on nanofiber surfaces. The reaction conditions were optimized by varying the amounts of Zr(OBu) 4 ,the reaction time, and the temperature of the sol-gel reaction. The composite nanofibers show high decontamination efficiency against diisopropylfluorophosphate, which is a nerve agent analogue, due to its high nucleophilicity that aids in the catalysis of the hydrolysis of the phosphonate ester bonds. Composite nanofiber mats have a large potential and can be applied in specific fields such as military and medical markets. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Decontamination Efficiency of Fish Bacterial Flora from Processing Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birna Guðbjörnsdóttir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous parameters that can influence bacterial decontamination during washing of machinery and equipment in a food processing establishment. Incomplete decontamination of bacteria will increase the risk of biofilm formation and consequently increase the risk of pathogen contamination or prevalence of other undesirable microorganisms such as spoilage bacteria in the processing line. The efficiency of a typical washing protocol has been determined by testing three critical parameters and their effects on bacterial decontamination. Two surface materials (plastic and stainless steel, water temperatures (7 and 25 °C and detergent concentrations (2 and 4 % were used for this purpose in combination with two types of detergents. Biofilm was prepared on the surfaces with undefined bacterial flora obtained from minced cod fillets. The bacterial flora of the biofilm was characterised by cultivation and molecular analysis of 16S rRNA genes. All different combinations of washing protocols tested were able to remove more than 99.9 % of the bacteria in the biofilm and reduce the cell number from 7 to 0 or 2 log units of bacteria/cm2. The results show that it is possible to use less diluted detergents than recommended with comparable success, and it is easier to clean surface material made of stainless steel compared to polyethylene plastic.

  17. Decontamination and decommissioning of the Mayaguez (Puerto Rico) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, P.K.; Freemerman, R.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1989-11-01

    On February 6, 1987 the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the final phase of the decontamination and decommissioning of the nuclear and reactor facilities at the Center for Energy and Environmental Research (CEER), in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Bechtel National, Inc., was made the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) contractor. The goal of the project was to enable DOE to proceed with release of the CEER facility for use by the University of Puerto Rico, who was the operator. This presentation describes that project and lesson learned during its progress. The CEER facility was established in 1957 as the Puerto Rico Nuclear Center, a part of the Atoms for Peace Program. It was a nuclear training and research institution with emphasis on the needs of Latin America. It originally consisted of a 1-megawatt Materials Testing Reactor (MTR), support facilities and research laboratories. After eleven years of operation the MTR was shutdown and defueled. A 2-megawatt TRIGA reactor was installed in 1972 and operated until 1976, when it woo was shutdown. Other radioactive facilities at the center included a 10-watt homogeneous L-77 training reactor, a natural uranium graphite-moderated subcritical assembly, a 200KV particle accelerator, and a 15,000 Ci Co-60 irradiation facility. Support facilities included radiochemistry laboratories, counting rooms and two hot cells. As the emphasis shifted to non-nuclear energy technology a name change resulted in the CEER designation, and plans were started for the decontamination and decommissioning effort.

  18. Application of a novel decontamination process using gaseous ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moat, J.; Shone, J.; Upton, M. [Manchester Univ., School of Medecine, Manchester (United Kingdom). Medical Microbiology, Translation Medicine; Cargill, J. [Old Medical School, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Microbiology

    2009-08-15

    Hospital surfaces that are touched regularly by staff carry bacterial spores and pathogens. Environmental disinfection of health care facilities is an important aspect of infection control. This paper presented a recent innovation aimed at improving hospital hygiene and decontamination of laboratory equipment. The vapour- and gas-based treatment was developed to penetrate rooms or soft furnishings and reach places inaccessible by conventional approaches. Surfaces seeded with a range of vegetative cells and spores of bacteria of clinical relevance were decontaminated using the ozone-based treatment. The efficiency of the approach for room sanitization was also evaluated. A quenching agent was used to rapidly reduce ozone concentrations to safe levels allowing treatment times of less than 1 h for most of the organisms tested. Bacteria was seeded onto agar plates and solid surfaces. Reductions in bacterial load of greater than 3 log values were then recorded for a number of organisms including Escherichia coli and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Application of the process in a 30 m{sup 3} room showed similar reductions in viable counts for these organisms and for Clostridium difficile spores. It was concluded that ozone-based decontamination of healthcare environments could prove to be a highly cost-effective intervention. 35 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  19. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Technology for Decontamination of Space Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Rettberg, Petra; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Thoma, Markus; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia; Müller, Meike; Semenov, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) technology is very fast and effective in inactivation of all kinds of pathogens. It is used in hygiene and especially in medicine, since the plasma treatment can be applied to sensitive surfaces, like skin, too. In a first study to use CAP for the decontamination of space equipment we could show its potential as a quite promising alternative to the standard "dry heat" and H2O2 methods [Shimizu et al. Planetary and Space Science, 90, 60-71. (2014)]. In a follow-on study we continue the investigations to reach high application level of the technology. First, we redesign the actual setup to a plasma-gas circulation system, increasing the effectivity of inactivation and the sustainability. Additionally, we want to learn more about the plasma chemistry processes involved in the inactivation. Therefore, we perform detailed plasma and gas measurements and compare them to numerical simulations. The latter will finally be used to scale the decontamination system to sizes useful also for larger space equipment. Typical materials relevant for space equipment will be tested and investigated on surface material changes due to the plasma treatment. Additionally, it is planned to use electronic boards and compare their functionality before and after the CAP expose. We will give an overview on the status of the plasma decontamination project funded by the Bavarian Ministry of Economics.

  20. Application of ozone gas for decontamination of nucleoside anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Ayumi; Ishiwata, Shunji; Kajimoto, Asami; Murata, Ryusuke; Kitano, Rika; Inoue, Tomomi; Kotake, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to anticancer drugs is hazardous and may lead to chromosomal abnormalities and spontaneous abortion in healthcare workers. Guidelines recommend surface decontamination and cleaning in order to minimize the occupational exposure to anticancer drugs, although no single process has been found to deactivate all currently available hazardous drugs. Ozone gas is oxidative and a decontaminant for bacteria; its characteristic as a gas has advantages in that it does not need to be wiped off or neutralized after use. The nucleoside anticancer drugs, cytarabine and fluorouracil, were exposed to ozone gas on plates under controlled humidity. The levels of exposed ozone were evaluated using the concentration-time (CT) value, which is the mathematical product of ozone concentration and exposure time. The effects of exposure to ozone on levels of the anticancer drugs were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The levels of cytarabine decreased with increasing CT value and were not detected beyond 40,000 CT. The decomposition levels of the anticancer drug by ozone were CT-dependent irrespective of the maximum concentration of ozone. Higher humidity in the range from 70 to 90 % accelerated the decomposition of cytarabine and fluorouracil, and neither of the drugs were detected at 90 % humidity after exposure to ozone gas. Ozone gas decomposed these nucleoside anticancer drugs. This is the first report of the applicability of ozone gas as a decontaminator for anticancer drugs.

  1. Decontamination of soils and materials containing medium-fired PuO{sub 2} using inhibited fluorides with polymer filtration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temer, D.J.; Villarreal, R.; Smith, B.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The decontamination of soils and/or materials from medium-fired plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) with an effective and efficient decontamination agent that will not significantly dissolve the matrix requires a new and innovative technology. After testing several decontamination agents and solutions for dissolution of medium-fired PuO{sub 2}, the most successful decontamination solutions were fluoride compounds, which were effective in breaking the Pu-oxide bond but would not extensively dissolve soil constituents and other materials. The fluoride compounds, tetra fluoboric acid (HBF{sub 4}) and hydrofluorosilicic acid (H{sub 2}F{sub 6}Si), were effective in dissolving medium-fired PuO{sub 2}, and did not seem to have the potential to dissolve the matrix. In both compounds, the fluoride atom is attached to a boron or silicon atom that inhibits the reactivity of the fluoride towards other compounds or materials containing atoms less attracted to the fluoride atom in an acid solution. Because of this inhibition of the reactivity of the fluoride ion, these compounds are termed inhibited fluoride compounds or agents. Both inhibited fluorides studied effectively dissolved medium-fired PuO{sub 2} but exhibited a tendency to not attack stainless steel or soil. The basis for selecting inhibited fluorides was confirmed during leaching tests of medium-fired PuO{sub 2} spiked into soil taken from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). When dissolved in dilute HNO{sub 3}, HCl, or HBr, both inhibited fluoride compounds were effective at solubilizing the medium-fired PuO{sub 2} from spiked INEL soil.

  2. EDF/CIDEN - ONECTRA: PWR decontamination; EDF/CIDEN - ONECTRA: assainissement REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayolle, P. [EDFICIDEN, 35-37, rue Louis Guerin - B.P. 21212, 69611 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Orcel, H. [ONECTRA, ZA les Tomples BP45, 26701 Pierrelatte Cedex (France); Wertz, L. [ONECTRA, Le Britannia, Allee C, 20 Bd Eugene Deruelle, 69432 Lyon Cedex 03 (France)

    2010-07-01

    In the context of PWR circuit renewal (expected in 2011) and their decontamination, an analysis of data coming from cartography and on site decontamination measurements as well as from premise modelling by means of the PANTHERE radioprotection code, is presented. Several French PWRs have been studied. After a presentation of code principles and operation, the authors discuss the radiological context of a workstation, and give an assessment of the annual dose associated with maintenance operations with or without decontamination

  3. Development of Nanocrystalline Zeolite Materials for the Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-17

    intermediates. Bellamy also found that HD could be decontaminated by 13X zeolites .(10) These previous studies suggest that nanomaterials may have unique...REPORT Development of Nanocrystalline Zeolite Materials for the Decontamination of Chemical Warfare Agents 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...The main objective of this research is to use novel nanocrystalline zeolite materials synthesized in our laboratories for the decontamination of

  4. Behaviour of co-inoculated pathogenic and spoilage bacteria on poultry following several decontamination treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Hernando, Alicia; Capita, Rosa; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    The potential of chemical decontaminants to cause harmful effects on human health is among the causes of the rejection of antimicrobial treatments for removing surface contamination from poultry carcasses in the European Union. This study was undertaken to determine whether decontaminants might give a competitive advantage to pathogenic bacteria on poultry and involve a potential risk to consumer. A total of 144 chicken legs were co-inoculated with similar concentrations of pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis or Escherichia coli) and spoilage bacteria (Brochothrix thermosphacta or Pseudomonas fluorescens). Samples were dipped for 15min in solutions (w/v) of trisodium phosphate (12%; TSP), acidified sodium chlorite (1200ppm; ASC), citric acid (2%; CA), peroxyacids (220ppm; PA) or chlorine dioxide (50ppm; CD), or were left untreated (control). Microbiological analyses were carried out on day 0 and every 24h until day 7 of storage (at 10±1°C). The modified Gompertz equation was used as the primary model to fit observed data. TSP, ASC and CA were effective in extending the lag phase (L, ranging from 1.47±1.34days to 4.06±1.16days) and in decreasing the concentration of bacteria during the stationary phase (D, ranging from 2.46±0.51 log(10) cfu/cm(2) to 8.64±0.53 log(10) cfu/cm(2)), relative to the control samples (L values ranging from 0.59±0.38days and 2.52±2.28days, and D values ranging from 6.32±0.89 log(10) cfu/cm(2) to 9.39±0.39 log(10) cfu/cm(2), respectively). Both on untreated and on most decontaminated samples the overgrowth of spoilage bacteria among the species tested was observed throughout storage, suggesting that spoilage would occur prior to any noteworthy increase in the levels of pathogenic microorganisms. However, L. monocytogenes counts similar to, or higher than, those for spoilage bacteria were observed on samples treated with TSP, ASC or CA, suggesting that these

  5. Decontamination of B. globigii spores from drinking water infrastructure using disinfectants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination of Bacillus spores adhered to common drinking water infrastructure surfaces was evaluated using a variety of disinfectants. Corroded iron and...

  6. Decontamination and decommissioning technology tree and the current status of the technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Won, H.J.; Kim, G.N.; Lee, K.W.; Chol, W.K.; Jung, C.H.; Kim, C.J.; Kim, S.H.; Kwon, S.O.; Chung, C.M

    2001-03-01

    A technology tree diagram was developed on the basis of the necessary technologies applicable to the decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The technology tree diagram is consist of 6 main areas such as characterization, decontamination, decommissioning and remote technology, radwaste management, site restoration, and decommissioning plan and engineering. Characterization is divided into 4 regions such as sampling and data collection, general characterization, chemical analysis and radiological analysis. Decontamination is also divided into 4 regions such as chemical decontamination, mechanical decontamination, the other decontamination technologies and new decontamination technologies. Decommissioning and remote technology area is divided into 4 regions such as cutting techniques, decommissioning technologies, new developing technologies and remote technologies. Radwaste management area is divided into 5 regions such as solid waste treatment, sludge treatment, liquid waste treatment, gas waste treatment and thermal treatment. Site restoration area is divided into 3 regions such as the evaluation of site contamination, soil decontamination and ground water decontamination. Finally, permission, decommissioning process, cost evaluation, quality assurance and the estimation of radionuclide inventory were mentioned in the decommissioning plan and engineering area. The estimated items for each technology are applicable domestic D and D facilities, D and D problem area and contamination/requirement, classification of D and D technology, similar technology, principle and overview of technology, status, science technology needs, implementation needs, reference and contact point.

  7. Antifungal activity of components used for decontamination of dental prostheses on the growth of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Lima Gouveia

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effectiveness of antimicrobial solutions employed in dental prosthesis decontamination is still uncertain. Aim: To evaluate the antifungal activity of cleaners used in the decontamination of dental prostheses on the growth of Candida albicans. Material and method: The evaluated products were: Corega Tabs(r (S1, Sodium Hypochlorite 1% (S2, Sodium Bicarbonate 1% (S3, Hydrogen Peroxide 1% (S4, Chlorhexidine Digluconate 0.12% - Periogard (r (S5, Mouthrinse based on essential oils - Listerine(r (S6, essential oil from Rosmarinus officinalis (rosemary at concentrations of 1% (S7 and 2% (S8. The antifungal activity of the products was evaluated by agar diffusion technique and the determination of microbial death curve of samples of C. albicans (ATCC 90028 in concentration 1.5 × 106 CFU/mL. The tests were performed in triplicate and statistical analysis was made by ANOVA Two-Way and Tukey tests, with the confidence level of 95%. Result: The average of the zones of inhibition growth, in millimeters, obtained for the products were: 0.0 (S1, 44.7 (S2, 0.0 (S3, 21.6 (S4, 10.0 (S5, 6.1 (S6, 0.0 (S7 and 2.4 (S8. Considering the determination of microbial death curve, all products showed a statistical difference (p<0.01 from control (0.85% sodium chloride and S3 groups. Fungal growth less than 2×104 CFU/mL and an accentuation of the microbial death curve were observed after 30 minutes, with exception for S3 and control groups. Conclusion: The studied compounds, with the exception of Sodium Bicarbonate, have antifungal effect against C. albicans, which contribute for dental prostheses hygiene.

  8. TC-99 Decontaminant from heat treated gaseous diffusion membrane -Phase I, Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Duignan, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-01

    Uranium gaseous diffusion cascades represent a significant environmental challenge to dismantle, containerize and dispose as low-level radioactive waste. Baseline technologies rely on manual manipulations involving direct access to technetium-contaminated piping and materials. There is a potential to utilize novel decontamination technologies to remove the technetium and allow for on-site disposal of the very large uranium converters. Technetium entered these gaseous diffusion cascades as a hexafluoride complex in the same fashion as uranium. Technetium, as the isotope Tc-99, is an impurity that follows uranium in the first cycle of the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) process. The technetium speciation or exact form in the gaseous diffusion cascades is not well defined. Several forms of Tc-99 compounds, mostly the fluorinated technetium compounds with varying degrees of volatility have been speculated by the scientific community to be present in these cascades. Therefore, there may be a possibility of using thermal or leaching desorption, which is independent of the technetium oxidation states, to perform an insitu removal of the technetium as a volatile species and trap the radionuclide on sorbent traps which could be disposed as low-level waste. Based on the positive results of the first part of this work1 the use of steam as a thermal decontamination agent was further explored with a second piece of used barrier material from a different location. This new series of tests included exposing more of the material surface to the flow of high temperature steam through the change in the reactor design, subjecting it to alternating periods of stream and vacuum, as well as determining if a lower temperature steam, i.e., 121°C (250°F) would be effective, too. Along with these methods, one other simpler method involving the leaching of the Tc-99 contaminated barrier material with a 1.0 M aqueous solution of ammonium carbonate, with and without sonication, was

  9. Cost and effectiveness of decontamination strategies in radiation contaminated areas in Fukushima in regard to external radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasutaka, Tetsuo; Naito, Wataru; Nakanishi, Junko

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of decontamination strategies in the special decontamination areas in Fukushima in regard to external radiation dose. A geographical information system (GIS) was used to relate the predicted external dose in the affected areas to the number of potential inhabitants and the land use in the areas. A comprehensive review of the costs of various decontamination methods was conducted as part of the analysis. The results indicate that aerial decontamination in the special decontamination areas in Fukushima would be effective for reducing the air dose rate to the target level in a short period of time in some but not all of the areas. In a standard scenario, analysis of cost and effectiveness suggests that decontamination costs for agricultural areas account for approximately 80% of the total decontamination cost, of which approximately 60% is associated with storage. In addition, the costs of decontamination per person per unit area are estimated to vary greatly. Appropriate selection of decontamination methods may significantly decrease decontamination costs, allowing more meaningful decontamination in terms of the limited budget. Our analysis can help in examining the prioritization of decontamination areas from the viewpoints of cost and effectiveness in reducing the external dose. Decontamination strategies should be determined according to air dose rates and future land-use plans.

  10. Decontamination of radioactive materials (part II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashi, Makoto; Shimomura, Satoshi; Hachiya, Misao [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    Drifting agents accelerate the exchange process and thus promote to eliminate radioactive materials from human body. The earlier is the administration of the agent, the more effective is the elimination. Against the uptake of radioiodine by thyroid, anti-thyroid drug like NaI, Lugol`s iodine solution, propylthiouracil and methimazole are recommended. Ammonium chloride can be a solubilizer of radioactive strontium. Diuretics may be useful for excretion of radioisotopes of sodium, chlorine, potassium and hydrogen through diuresis. Efficacy of expectorants and inhalants is not established. Parathyroid extract induces decalcification and thus is useful for elimination of 32P. Steroids are used for compensating adrenal function and for treatment of inflammation and related symptoms. Chelating agents are useful for removing cations and effective when given early after contamination. EDTA and, particularly, DTPA are useful for elimination of heavy metals. For BAL (dimercaprol), its toxicity should be taken into consideration. Penicillamine is effective for removing copper and deferoxamine, for iron. Drugs for following radioisotopes are summarized: Am, As, Ba, Br, Ca, Cf, C, Ce, Cs, Cr, Co, Cm, Eu, fission products, F, Ga, Au, H, In, I, Fe, Kr, La, PB, Mn, Hg, Np, P, Pu, Po, K, Pm, Ra, Rb, Ru, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, S, Tc, Th, U, Y, Zn and Zr. Lung and bronchia washing are effective for treatment of patients who inhaled insoluble radioactive particles although their risk-benefit should be carefully assessed. The present review is essentially based of NCRP Report No.65. (K.H.) 128 refs.

  11. Reduction of thermotolerant Campylobacter species on broiler carcasses following physical decontamination at slaughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Louise; Rosenquist, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    through physical decontamination of the meat. The current study was conducted to compare the Campylobacter-reducing ability of three physical decontamination techniques, forced air chilling, crust freezing, and steam-ultrasound, performed in the plant with naturally contaminated broiler chickens...

  12. Decontamination of a field laboratory dedicated to Ebola virus-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Tiphaine; Delaune, Déborah; Flusin, Olivier; Paucod, Jean-Charles; Richard, Stéphane; Boubis, Laetitia; Honeywood, Yan; Janvier, Frédéric; Foissaud, Vincent; Thibault, François; Valade, Eric; Mérens, Audrey

    2016-12-01

    In 2015, the French Armed Forces deployed a biosafety level 3 (BSL3) field laboratory as a part of an Ebola treatment center in Guinea. When closing the center, laboratory decontamination operations were necessary. We present the decontamination protocols applied for the BSL3 field laboratory, making the entire module ready for a future use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. 40 CFR 265.114 - Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils. 265.114 Section 265.114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... decontamination of equipment, structures and soils. During the partial and final closure periods, all contaminated...

  14. Low pressure water vapour plasma treatment of surfaces for biomolecules decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fumagalli, F; Kylian, O; Amato, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination treatments of surfaces are performed on bacterial spores, albumin and brain homogenate used as models of biological contaminations in a low-pressure, inductively coupled plasma reactor operated with water-vapour-based gas mixtures. It is shown that removal of contamination can...... vapour plasma process are discussed for practical applications in medical devices decontamination....

  15. Variation in the effect of carcass decontamination impacts the risk for consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro Duarte, Ana Sofia; Nauta, Maarten; Aabo, Søren

    2016-01-01

    •The variation of decontamination has an effect on consumer risk reduction.•The effect of variation on risk is lower when mean log reduction is high.•The effect of variation on risk also depends on initial carcass contamination.•The effect of decontamination should be expressed as consumer risk...

  16. 40 CFR 264.114 - Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disposal or decontamination of equipment, structures and soils. 264.114 Section 264.114 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Closure and Post-Closure § 264.114 Disposal or decontamination...

  17. Bioinspired Surface Treatments for Improved Decontamination: Silicon and Latex Polymer SLIPS Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    area code) b. ABSTRACT c. THIS PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Bioinspired Surface Treatments for Improved Decontamination : Silicon...type application to identify those technologies that may improve decontamination capabilities for painted surfaces. This report details results for

  18. Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite for decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, J.; Prasad, G.K., E-mail: gkprasad2001@yahoo.com; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Garg, P.; Ganesan, K.

    2013-11-01

    Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. They were prepared by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Obtained data indicated the presence of mesopores with diameter ranging from 2 to 80 nm and the materials exhibited relatively high surface area 86 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} when compared to the individual metal oxide nanoparticles. Reactive sites of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied by infrared spectroscopy technique using pyridine as a probe molecule. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard when compared to single component metal oxides and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard, a well known chemical warfare agent. These materials demonstrated superior decontamination properties against sulfur mustard and decontaminated it to divinyl sulfide, chloroethyl vinyl sulfide, hemisulfur mustard, etc. - Highlights: • Preparation of mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • CuO–ZnO with better surface area was synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis. • Decontamination of HD using mesoporous CuO–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposite. • HD decontaminated by elimination and hydrolysis reactions.

  19. Decontamination and Management of Human Remains Following Incidents of Hazardous Chemical Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Bock, Robert Eldon [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To provide specific procedural guidance and resources for identification, assessment, control, and mitigation of compounds that may contaminate human remains resulting from chemical attack or release. Design: A detailed technical, policy, and regulatory review is summarized. Setting: Guidance is suitable for civilian or military settings where human remains potentially contaminated with hazardous chemicals may be present. Settings would include sites of transportation accidents, natural disasters, terrorist or military operations, mortuary affairs or medical examiner processing and decontamination points, and similar. Patients, Participants: While recommended procedures have not been validated with actual human remains, guidance has been developed from data characterizing controlled experiments with fabrics, materiel, and laboratory animals. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presentation of logic and specific procedures for remains management, protection and decontamination of mortuary affairs personnel, as well as decision criteria for determining when remains are sufficiently decontaminated so as to pose no chemical health hazard. Results: Established procedures and existing equipment/materiel available for decontamination and verification provide appropriate and reasonable means to mitigate chemical hazards from remains. Extensive characterization of issues related to remains decontamination indicates that supra-lethal concentrations of liquid chemical warfare agent VX may prove difficult to decontaminate and verify in a timely fashion. Specialized personnel can and should be called upon to assist with monitoring necessary to clear decontaminated remains for transport and processing. Conclusions: Once appropriate decontamination and verification have been accomplished, normal procedures for remains processing and transport to the decedent s family and the continental United States can be followed.

  20. Development of high-level radioactive waste treatment and conversion technologies 'Dry decontamination technology development for highly radioactive contaminants'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K. W.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. J.; Choi, W. K.; Kim, G. N.; Moon, J. K

    2001-04-01

    The followings were studied through the project entitled 'Dry Decontamination Technology Development for Highly Radioactive Contaminants'. 1.Contaminant Characteristics Analysis of Domestic Nuclear Fuel Cycle Projects(NFCP) and Applicability Study of the Unit Dry-Decontamination Techniques A. Classification of contaminated equipments and characteristics analysis of contaminants B. Applicability study of the unit dry-decontamination techniques 2.Performance Evaluation of Unit Dry Decontamination Technique A. PFC decontamination technique B. CO2 decontamination technique C. Plasma decontamination technique 3.Development of Residual Radiation Assessment Methodology for High Radioactive Facility Decontamination A. Development of radioactive nuclide diffusion model on highly radioactive facility structure B. Obtainment of the procedure for assessment of residual radiation dose 4.Establishment of the Design Concept of Dry Decontamination Process Equipment Applicable to Highly Radioactive Contaminants 5.TRIGA soil unit decontamination technology development A. Development of soil washing and flushing technologies B. Development of electrokinetic soil decontamination technology.

  1. Advanced technologies for decontamination and conversion of scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, T.R.; Shasteen, K.E.; Liby, A.L. [Manufacturing Sciences Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) accumulated large quantities of radioactive scrap metal (RSM) through historic maintenance activities. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of major sites formerly engaged in production of nuclear materials and manufacture of nuclear weapons will generate additional quantities of RSM, as much as 3 million tons of such metal according to a recent study. The recycling of RSM is quickly becoming appreciated as a key strategy in DOE`s cleanup of contaminated sites and facilities. The work described here has focused on recycle of the concentrated and high-value contaminated scrap metal resource that will arise from cleanup of DOE`s gaseous diffusion plants.

  2. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination. 761.386 Section 761.386 Protection of... Validating a New Performance-Based Decontamination Solvent Under § 761.79(d)(4) § 761.386 Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination. The following...

  3. Efficacy of scalp hair decontamination following exposure to vapours of sulphur mustard simulants 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide and methyl salicylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Prevost, Philippe; Maloni, Pascal; Torre, Franck; Asia, Laurence; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Chemical warfare agents are an actual threat and victims' decontamination is a main concern when mass exposure occurs. Skin decontamination with current protocols has been widely documented, as well as surface decontamination. However, considering hair ability to trap chemicals in vapour phase, we investigated hair decontamination after exposure to sulphur mustard simulants methyl salicylate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide. Four decontamination protocols were tested on hair, combining showering and emergency decontamination (use of Fuller's earth or Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion RSDL ® ). Both simulants were recovered from hair after treatment, but contents were significantly reduced (42-85% content allowance). Showering alone was the least efficient protocol. Concerning 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide, protocols did not display significant differences in decontamination efficacy. For MeS, use of emergency decontaminants significantly increased showering efficacy (10-20% rise), underlining their usefulness before thorough decontamination. Our results highlighted the need to extensively decontaminate hair after chemical exposure. Residual amounts after decontamination are challenging, as their release from hair could lead to health issues. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Testing, expanding and implementing pollution prevention tools for environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roybal, J.A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McInroy, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Watson, J. [GTS Duratek, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mizner, J. [ICF Kaiser, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Pollution Prevention (P2) programs and projects within the DOE Environmental Restoration (ER) and Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Programs have been independently developed and implemented at various sites. As a result, unique, innovative solutions used at one site may not be known to other sites, and other sites may continue to duplicate efforts to develop and implement similar solutions. Several DOE Program offices have funded the development of tools to assist ER/D and D P2 projects. To realize the full value of these tools, they need to be evaluated and publicized to field sites. To address these needs and concerns, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL/NM), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) have teamed to pilot test DOE training and tracking tools; transfer common P2 analyses between sites, and evaluate and expand P2 tools and methodologies. The project is supported by FY 98 DOE Pollution Prevention Complex-Wide Project Funds. This paper presents the preliminary results for each of the following project modules: Training, Waste Tracking Pilot, Information Exchange, Evaluate P2 Tools for ER/D and D, Field Test of P2 Tools; and DOE Information Exchange.

  5. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Progress reports are given on the following projects: (A) Subsurface contaminants, containment and remediation: 1.1 Characteristic evaluation of grout barriers in grout testing chamber; 1.2 Development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for desiccation barriers; 1.3 Development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in-situ formed barriers -- technical support; 1.4 Laboratory studies and field testing at the DOE/RMI Extrusion Plant (Ashtabula, Ohio); 1.5 Use of drained enhanced soil flushing for contaminants removal; (B) Mixed waste characterization, treatment and disposal: Analysis of the Vortec cyclone melting system for remediation of PCB contaminated soils using computational fluid dynamics; (C) Decontamination and decommissioning: 3.1 Production and evaluation of biosorbents and cleaning solutions for use in D and D; 3.2 Use of Spintek centrifugal membrane technology and sorbents/cleaning solutions in the D and D of DOE facilities; (D) Cross-cutting innovative technologies: 4.1 Use of centrifugal membrane technology with novel membranes to treat hazardous/radioactive wastes; 4.2 Environmental pollution control devices based on novel forms of carbon; 4.3 Design of rotating membrane filtration system for remediation technologies; and (E) Outreach: Small business technical based support.

  6. Application of a laser to decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities at JAERI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Takakuni; Kameo, Yutaka; Myodo, Masato

    2000-01-01

    In the research and development of various advanced technologies needed for decontamination and decommissioning of nuclear facilities, laser was applied to decontamination of metal and concrete surfaces and to cutting of large metal of low level radioactive waste. (a) Laser decontamination for metal waste: Metal waste was irradiated by laser in the atmosphere of chloride gas, and contaminant was changed from oxide to chloride which is sublimable or soluble in water and could be easily removed; and also metal waste coated with gel-decontamination reagent was irradiated by laser, and contaminant could be removed through the laser-induced chemical reaction. (b) Laser decontamination for concrete surface: Concrete surface was bursted or vitrified by laser irradiation and easily removed. (c) Laser cutting: Laser cutter was applied to cutting of large metal wastes such as tanks arising from dismantling of nuclear facilities.

  7. Preventive measures and lifestyle habits against exertional heat illness in radiation decontamination workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Shota; Kakamu, Takeyasu; Sato, Sei; Hidaka, Tomoo; Kumagai, Tomohiro; Nakano, Shinichi; Koyama, Kikuo; Fukushima, Tetsuhito

    2017-09-28

    The aim of this study was to reveal the current state of preventive measures and lifestyle habits against heat illness in radiation decontamination workers and to examine whether young radiation decontamination workers take less preventive measures and have worse lifestyle habits than the elder workers. This was a cross-sectional study. Self-administered questionnaires were sent to 1,505 radiation decontamination workers in Fukushima, Japan. Five hundred fifty-eight men who replied and answered all questions were included in the statistical analysis. The questionnaire included age, duration of decontamination work, previous occupation, lifestyle habit, and preventive measures for heat illness. We classified age of the respondents into five groups: decontamination workers are more likely to have worse lifestyle habits and take insufficient preventive measures for heat illness. This may be the cause of higher incidence of heat illness among young workers.

  8. Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear decontamination: Recent trends and future perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN decontamination is the removal of CBRN material from equipment or humans. The objective of the decontamination is to reduce radiation burden, salvage equipment, and materials, remove loose CBRN contaminants, and fix the remaining in place in preparation for protective storage or permanent disposal work activities. Decontamination may be carried out using chemical, electrochemical, and mechanical means. Like materials, humans may also be contaminated with CBRN contamination. Changes in cellular function can occur at lower radiation doses and exposure to chemicals. At high dose, cell death may take place. Therefore, decontamination of humans at the time of emergency while generating bare minimum waste is an enormous task requiring dedication of large number of personnel and large amount of time. General principles of CBRN decontamination are discussed in this review with emphasis on radiodecontamination.

  9. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-24

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  10. Decontamination of contaminated oils with radio nuclides using magnetic fields; Descontaminacion de aceites contaminados con radionuclidos utilizando campos magneticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez R, C. E.

    2011-07-01

    The present work is focused in to find a solution to the wastes treatment that are generated during the maintenance to the nuclear power industry, the specify case of the contaminated oils with radio nuclides, for this purpose was necessary to make a meticulous characterization of the oils before the treatment proposal using advanced techniques, being determined the activity of them, as well as their physical-chemical characteristics. By means of the developed procedure that combines the use of magnetic fields and filtration to remove the contaminated material with radioactive particles, is possible to diminish the activity of the oils from values that oscillate between 6,00 and 10,00 up to 0,00 to 0,0003 Bq/ml. The decontamination factor of the process is of 99.00%. The proposal of the necessary technology for to decontaminate the oils is also made and is carried out the economic analysis based on the reuse of these, as well as the calculation of the avoided damages. (Author)

  11. Mechanical decontamination tests in areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, K.G.; Barkovsky, A.N.; Fogh, C.L.; Mishine, A.S.; Olsen, S.K.; Ponamarjov, A.V.; Prip, H.; Ramzaev, V.P.; Vorobiev, B.F

    1998-08-01

    Decontamination was carried out around three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Russia, in the summer of 1997. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.27) and outdoor (DRF = 0.17) can be achieved when a careful cleaning is undertaken. This report describes the decontamination work carried out and the results obtained. The roof of one of the houses was replaced with a new roof. This reduced the Chernobyl related dose rate by 10% at the ground floor and by 27% at the first floor. The soil around the houses was removed by a bobcat, while carefully monitoring the ground for residual contamination with handheld dose meters. By monitoring the decline in the dose rate during the different stages of the work the dose reducing effect of each action has been estimated. This report also describes a test of a skim-and-burial plough developed especially for treatment of contaminated land. In the appendices of the report the measurement data is available for further analysis. (au) 24 tabs., 75 ills., 33 refs.

  12. A solar powered handheld plasma source for microbial decontamination applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Lynch, M. J.; Modic, M.; Whalley, R. D.; Walsh, J. L.

    2016-09-01

    A fully portable atmospheric pressure air plasma system is reported to be suitable for the microbial decontamination of both surfaces and liquids. The device operates in quiescent air, and includes an integrated battery which is charged from a solar cell and weighs less than 750 g, making it highly amenable for a wide variety of applications beyond the laboratory. Using particle imaging velocimetry to visualise air flows around the device, the geometric configuration of the plasma generating electrodes was enhanced to induce a gas flow on the order of 0.5 m s-1 directed towards a sample placed downstream, thus improving the transport of plasma generated reactive species to the sample. The microbial decontamination efficiency of the system was assessed using potable water samples inoculated with common waterborne organisms Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The reduction in the number of microorganisms was found to be in the range of 2-8 log and was strongly dependent on the plasma generation conditions.

  13. Nanocrystalline zinc oxide for the decontamination of sarin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahato, T.H. [Defense R and D Establishment, Jhansi Road, 474002, Gwalior, MP (India); Prasad, G.K., E-mail: gkprasad@lycos.com [Defense R and D Establishment, Jhansi Road, 474002, Gwalior, MP (India); Singh, Beer; Acharya, J.; Srivastava, A.R.; Vijayaraghavan, R. [Defense R and D Establishment, Jhansi Road, 474002, Gwalior, MP (India)

    2009-06-15

    Nanocrystalline zinc oxide materials were prepared by sol-gel method and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, nitrogen adsorption and infrared spectroscopy techniques. The data confirmed the formation of zinc oxide materials of zincite phase with an average crystallite size of {approx}55 nm. Obtained material was tested as destructive adsorbent for the decontamination of sarin and the reaction was followed by GC-NPD and GC-MS techniques. The reaction products were characterized by GC-MS and the data explored the role of hydrolysis reaction in the detoxification of sarin. Sarin was hydrolyzed to form surface bound non-toxic phosphonate on the surface of nano-zinc oxide. The data also revealed the values of rate constant and half-life to be 4.12 h{sup -1} and 0.16 h in the initial stages of the reaction and 0.361 h{sup -1} and 1.9 h at the final stages of the reaction for the decontamination reaction on nanocrystalline ZnO.

  14. Phytoremediation: an overview of metallic ion decontamination from soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, O.V.; Labana, S.; Pandey, G.; Budhiraja, R.; Jain, R.K. [Inst. of Microbial Technology, Chandigarh (India)

    2003-07-01

    In recent years, phytoremediation has emerged as a promising ecoremediation technology, particularly for soil and water cleanup of large volumes of contaminated sites. The exploitation of plants to remediate soils contaminated with trace elements could provide a cheap and sustainable technology for bioremediation. Many modern tools and analytical devices have provided insight into the selection and optimization of the remediation process by plant species. This review describes certain factors for the phytoremediation of metal ion decontamination and various aspects of plant metabolism during metallic decontamination. Metal-hyperaccumulating plants, desirable for heavily polluted environments, can be developed by the introduction of novel traits into high biomass plants in a transgenic approach, which is a promising strategy for the development of effective phytoremediation technology. The genetic manipulation of a phytoremediator plant needs a number of optimization processes, including mobilization of trace elements/metal ions, their uptake into the root, stem and other viable parts of the plant and their detoxification and allocation within the plant. This upcoming science is expanding as technology continues to offer new, low-cost remediation options. (orig.)

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning project for the nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Paik, S. T.; Park, S. W. (and others)

    2007-02-15

    The final goal of this project is to complete the decommissioning of the Korean Research Reactor no.1 and no. 2(KRR-1 and 2) and uranium conversion plant safely and successfully. The goal of this project in 2006 is to complete the decontamination of the inside reactor hall of the KRR-2 which will be operating as a temporary storage for the radioactive waste until the construction and operation of the national repository site. Also the decommissioning work of the KRR-1 and auxiliary facilities is being progress. As the compaction of decommissioning project is near at hand, a computer information system was developed for a systematically control and preserve a technical experience and decommissioning data for the future reuse. The nuclear facility decommissioning, which is the first challenge in Korea, is being closed to the final stages. We completed the decommissioning of all the bio-shielding concrete for KRR-2 in 2005 and carried out the decontamination and waste material grouping of the roof, wall and bottom of the reactor hall of the KRR-2. The decommissioning for nuclear facility were demanded the high technology, remote control equipment and radioactivity analysis. So developed equipment and experience will be applied at the decommissioning for new nuclear facility in the future.

  16. Tritium contamination and decontamination of sealing oil for vacuum pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeishi, T.; Kotoh, K.; Kawabata, Y.; Tanaka, J.I. [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawamura, S.; Iwata, M. [ATOX Co. Ltd, Technoly Development Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The existence of tritium-contaminated oils from vacuum pumps used in tritium facilities, is becoming an important issue since there is no disposal way for tritiated waste oils. On recovery of tritiated water vapor in gas streams, it is well-known that the isotope exchange reaction between the gas phase and the liquid phase occurs effectively at room temperature. We have carried out experiments using bubbles to examine the tritium contamination and decontamination of a volume of rotary-vacuum-pump oil. The contamination of the pump oil was made by bubbling tritiated water vapor and tritiated hydrogen gas into the oil. Subsequently the decontamination was processed by bubbling pure water vapor and dry argon gas into the tritiated oil. Results show that the water vapor bubbling was more effective than dry argon gas. The experiment also shows that the water vapor bubbling in an oil bottle can remove and transfer tritium efficiently from the tritiated oil into another water-bubbling bottle.

  17. Developmental Testing of Liquid and Gaseous/Vaporous Decontamination on Bacterial Spores and Other Biological Warfare Agents on Military Relevant Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-11

    Vaporous Decontamination on Bacterial Spores and Other Biological Warfare Agents on Military-Relevant Surfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...biological decontamination protocol to analyze the efficacy of liquid and gaseous/vaporous decontaminants on military-relevant surfaces. The...acquisition program, and are not intended for operational testing. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Decontaminant ; spore-forming; vegetative; virus

  18. Decontamination of Surfaces by Ultrasonics; La decontamination des surfaces par l'emploi des ultra-sons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerre, P.; Mestre, E.; Kerdelleau, J. de [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique. Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1962-07-01

    A study was made of factors such as frequency, intensity, and time in the case of steel and of cotton cloth contaminated by fission products. Results show that the method is only of value in the case of steel and that it is necessary to operate at an optimum frequency of 80 khz and with an intensity of at least 4 W/cm{sup 2}. The difficulty of proposing a valid explanation for the decontamination mechanism is discussed. (authors) [French] Apres un examen des donnees theoriques du probleme, les auteurs font une etude systematique des facteurs frequence, intensite et temps dans le cas de l'acier et des tissus de coton contamines par des produits de fission. Ils montrent que la methode n'est interessante que pour l'acier qu'il faut operer a la frequence optimale de 80 kHz avec une intensite d'au moins 4 W/cm{sup 2}. Ils concluent en insistant sur la difficulte de proposer une explication valable pour le mecanisme de decontamination. (auteurs)

  19. Bis(β-lactosyl-[60]fullerene as novel class of glycolipids useful for the detection and the decontamination of biological toxins of the Ricinus communis family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Dohi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Glycosyl-[60]fullerenes were first used as decontaminants against ricin, a lactose recognition proteotoxin in the Ricinus communis family. A fullerene glycoconjugate carrying two lactose units was synthesized by a [3 + 2] cycloaddition reaction between C60 and the azide group in 6-azidohexyl β-lactoside per-O-acetate. A colloidal aqueous solution with brown color was prepared from deprotected bis(lactosyl-C60 and was found stable for more than 6 months keeping its red color. Upon mixing with an aqueous solution of Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA120, the colloidal solution soon caused precipitations, while becoming colorless and transparent. In contrast, a solution of concanavalin A (Con A caused no apparent change, indicating that the precipitation was caused specifically by carbohydrate–protein interactions. This notable phenomenon was quantified by means of sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, and the results were discussed in terms of detection and decontamination of the deadly biological toxin in the Ricinus communis family.

  20. Effects of CBRN decontaminants in common use by first responders on the recovery of latent fingerprints--assessment of the loss of ridge detail on glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidberg, Matthijs C; van Woerkom, Tiest; de Bruin, Karla G; Stoel, Reinoud D; de Puit, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Following a CBRN incident, first responders use decontamination procedures to reduce the risk of exposure. The effect of decontamination on forensic trace material has, however, not been fully examined. This study sought to evaluate the effect of five different physical or chemical decontamination materials on the recovery of latent fingerprints. Fingerprints were deposited on glass slides, decontaminated, and assessed on the presence of ridge detail. The results demonstrate that decontamination affects the quality of latent fingerprints substantially. On at least 61% of the fingerprints, a reduced amount of ridge detail was observed upon decontamination. Furthermore, development with cyanoacrylate appeared not to succeed anymore. Instead, the ability of vacuum metal deposition to successfully develop decontaminated fingerprints is demonstrated. The results from this study may contribute to an increased forensic awareness regarding decontamination and emphasize the necessity for further research into new item decontamination procedures or new forensic initiatives prior to decontamination. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  1. Comparative study of the corrosion and surface analytical effects of the decontamination technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baja, B.; Rado, K.; Nemeth, Z.; Varga, K. [Pannonia Univ., Institute of Radiochemistry and Radioecology (Hungary); Szabo, N.A. [Istvan Szechenyi Univ., Dept. of Physics and Chemistry (Hungary); Schunk, J.; Patek, G. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd. (Hungary)

    2009-07-01

    Decontamination technologies are generally developed to reduce the collective dose of the maintenance and operation personnel at NPPs. The highest efficiency (i.e., the highest decontamination factors) available without detrimental modification of the treated surface of structural material is the most important goal in the course of the application of a decontamination technology. At the Paks NPP the AP-CITROX procedure has been utilized for the decontamination of the primary coolant circuit's components (e.g. main circulating pump (MCP) and steam generators (SGs)). While decontamination of the dismountable devices (e.g. MCP) has been carried out in big tanks, separable equipments (e.g. SGs) have been treated with special decontamination facilities. Our previous studies have revealed that a 'hybrid' structure of the amorphous and crystalline phases was formed in the outermost surface region of the austenitic stainless steel tubes of SGs as an undesired consequence of the industrial application of the AP-CITROX decontamination technology during the period of 1993-2001. In this paper, we report some comparative findings on the corrosion and surface analytical effects of the AP-CITROX procedure and the novel decontamination technology elaborated at our institution. On optimizing the operational parameters the latter technology may become suitable for the effective decontamination of both dismountable (e.g. MCP swivel) and separable (e.g. SGs) equipments. For this purpose experiments were performed. In this laboratory scale experiments, the passivity, morphology and chemical compositions of the treated surfaces of tube specimens were investigated by voltammetry, and SEM-EDX methods, respectively. The SEM-EDX results have revealed that the oxide removal is surprisingly uniform even after 2 or 3 consecutive cycles. The electrochemical studies have provided evidences that no unfavorable tendencies in the general corrosion state of the tube samples can be

  2. Ares I Reaction Control System Propellant Feedline Decontamination Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the work presented here is to quantify the effects of purge gas temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate on Hydrazine (Hz) decontamination rates of the Ares I Roll Control System and Reaction Control System. A survey of experts in this field revealed the absence of any decontamination rate prediction models. Three basic decontamination methods were identified for analysis and modeling. These include low pressure eduction, high flow rate purge, and pulse purge. For each method, an approach to predict the Hz mass transfer rate, as a function of system pressure, temperature, and purge gas mass flow rate, is developed based on the applicable physics. The models show that low pressure eduction is two orders of magnitude more effective than the high velocity purge, which in turn is two orders of magnitude more effective than the pure diffusion component of pulse purging of deadheads. Eduction subjects the system to low pressure conditions that promote the extraction of Hz vapors. At 120 F, Hz is saturated at approximately 1 psia. At lower pressures and 120 F, Hz will boil, which is an extremely efficient means to remove liquid Hz. The Hz boiling rate is predicted by equating the rate at which energy is added to the saturated liquid Hz through heaters at the tube outer wall with the energy removed from the liquid through evaporation. Boil-off fluxes were predicted by iterating through the range of local pressures with limits set by the minimum allowed pressure of 0.2 psia and maximum allowed wall temperature of 120 F established by the heaters, which gives a saturation pressure of approximately 1.0 psia. Figure 1 shows the resulting boil-off fluxes as a function of local eduction pressure. As depicted in figure 1, the flux is a strong inverse function of eduction pressure, and that minimizing the eduction pressure maximizes the boil-off flux. Also, higher outer wall temperatures lead to higher boil-off fluxes and allow for boil-off over a greater range

  3. Effects of decontamination at varying contamination levels of Campylobacter jejuni on broiler meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Louise; Wechter, Naja Strandby; Rosenquist, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    When assessing effects of decontamination techniques on counts of Campylobacter spp. on broiler meat, it is essential that the results reflect the variations that may exist. Decontamination studies often use high inoculation levels (107 to 108 cfu) and one or few strains of Campylobacter jejuni......, thereby restricting the results to reflect only a limited part of the true situation. This study presents results from physical and chemical decontamination of broiler meat medallions using different strains and different initial concentrations of C. jejuni. For 3 strains of C. jejuni, mean log reductions...

  4. Guide on the use of low energy electron beams for microbiological decontamination of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Gondim, Ondina

    This Guide describes the validation and routine monitoring of microbiological decontamination of surfaces by low energy electron beams (100-200 keV). The Guide is mainly based on experience gained in connection with installation of electron beam systems for surface decontamination of pre......-sterilized containers at several aseptic filling lines at pharmaceutical manufacturers. Its main emphasis is on the dosimetric measurements that should be carried out for the validation of the decontamination process and on establishing the appropriate effective dose. Other aspects such as use of measurement...

  5. [Mechanical irrigation and selective decontamination in critically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zejkan, A; Bakosová, M; Drábková, J; Maternová, H; Bejcek, Z; Horejs, J

    1989-09-22

    The authors debugged and launched into routine operation an automated monitoring system using computer techniques. Working off-line, they monitored microbiological, immunologic and biochemical parameters of mechanical irrigation of the mouth and selective decontamination of the gastro-intestinal tract. They ran and classified the data concerned into two index-sequence subsets defined on a set of patients treated with artificial pulmonary ventilation and patients with reduced defenses, and/or corticoid-dependent patients with myasthenia gravis. At present, they study basic sets, representative enough to permit the statistically significant examination of all the parameters under study as well as their exact interpretation with regard to the efficiency of the therapeutical strategy chosen.

  6. CO{sub 2} pellet decontamination technology at Westinghouse Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, T.L.; Aldrich, L.K. II; Bowman, E.V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Experimentation and testing with CO{sub 2} pellet decontamination technology is being conducted at Westinghosue Hanford Company (WHC), Richland, Washington. There are 1,100 known existing waste sites at Hanford. The sites specified by federal and state agencies are currently being studied to determine the appropriate cleanup methods best for each site. These sites are contaminated and work on them is in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). There are also 63 treatment, storage, and disposal units, for example: groups of waste tanks or drums. In 1992, there were 100 planned activities scheduled to bring these units into the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) compliance or close them after waste removal. Ninety-six of these were completed. The remaining four were delayed or are being negotiated with regulatory agencies. As a result of past defense program activities at Hanford a tremendous volume of materials and equipment have accumulated and require remediation.

  7. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasevich, R.S. [KAI Technologies, Inc., Portsmouth, NH (United States); Vaux, W.G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nocito, T. [Ohio DSI Corp., New York (United States)

    1995-10-01

    DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCB`s, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay and fission products of DOE operations. The asbestos must be converted by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives.

  8. OIL DECONTAMINATION OF BOTTOM SEDIMENTS EXPERIMENTAL WORK RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lushnikov Sergey V.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of experimental work during 2004-2005 on oil decontamination of bottom sediments of Lake Schuchye, situated in the Komi Republic (Northern Russia. The cause of thecontamination were huge oil spills occurred after a series of accidental ruptures on the Harjaga-Usinsk and Vozej-Usinsk oil-pipe lines in 1994. Flotation technology was used for the cleaning of bottom sediments.157 tons of crude oil were removed during the course of 2-year experimental work from an area of 4,1 ha.The content of aliphatic and alicyclic oil hydrocarbons was reduced from 53,3 g/kg to 2,2 g/kg, on average.Hydrobiological investigations revealed that bottom sediments started to be inhabited by benthos organisms, dominantly Oligochaeta. Besides Oligochaeta, Chironomidae maggots and Bivalvia were detected. Theappearance of Macrozoobenthos organisms can serve as a bioindicator of water quality.

  9. Natural coagulation for the decontamination of industrial effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Banchón

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial and agricultural pollution has generated undoubtedly a high environmental impact on the natural resources of our planet. Deficiencies in the provision of water for human consumption due to pollution from natural sources are expected. In response to this, the application of iron and aluminum coagulants are the first choice for wastewater treatment. However, the abundant use of aluminum is subject of discussion because of the potential impact on humans. Therefore, this article highlights the latest advances in the field of natural coagulation, an ancestral technology used for water decontamination. Its proven effectiveness is based on electrokinetic destabilization mechanisms that remove turbidity up to 99%. Experimental evidence agrees that concentrations of tannins and mucilages allow the remediation of effluents from chemical industries such as textile and tanneries.

  10. Decontamination formulation with additive for enhanced mold remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM; Irvine, Kevin [Huntsville, AL; Berger, Paul [Rome, NY; Comstock, Robert [Bel Air, MD

    2010-02-16

    Decontamination formulations with an additive for enhancing mold remediation. The formulations include a solubilizing agent (e.g., a cationic surfactant), a reactive compound (e.g., hydrogen peroxide), a carbonate or bicarbonate salt, a water-soluble bleaching activator (e.g., propylene glycol diacetate or glycerol diacetate), a mold remediation enhancer containing Fe or Mn, and water. The concentration of Fe.sup.2+ or Mn.sup.2+ ions in the aqueous mixture is in the range of about 0.0001% to about 0.001%. The enhanced formulations can be delivered, for example, as a foam, spray, liquid, fog, mist, or aerosol for neutralization of chemical compounds, and for killing certain biological compounds or agents and mold spores, on contaminated surfaces and materials.

  11. Concrete decontamination by Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS). Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-30

    Electro-Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS) technology and equipment for decontaminating concrete structures from radionuclides, organic substances, and hazardous metals is being developed by Textron Systems Division (TSD). This wet scabbling technique involves the generation of powerful shock waves and intense cavitation by a strong pulsed electric discharge in a water layer at the concrete surface. The high pressure impulse results in stresses which crack and peel off a concrete layer of a controllable thickness. Scabbling produces contaminated debris of relatively small volume which can be easily removed, leaving clean bulk concrete. This new technology is being developed under Contract No. DE-AC21-93MC30164. The project objective is to develop and demonstrate a cost-efficient, rapid, controllable process to remove the surface layer of contaminated concrete while generating minimal secondary waste. The primary target of this program is uranium-contaminated concrete floors which constitute a substantial part of the contaminated area at DOE weapon facilities.

  12. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the decontamination of water polluted with cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S. Helal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles are attracting considerable interest because of their potential applications in practically all fields of science and technology, including the removal of heavy metals from contaminated waters. It is, therefore, of great importance to adapt the surfaces of these nanoparticles according to the application. In this work advanced nanoparticles (NPs with well-tailored surface functionalities were synthesized using the polyol method. The efficiency of a chelating agent, succinyl-β-cyclodextrin (SBCD, was first investigated spectrophotometrically and by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC. SBCD was then grafted onto nanoparticles previously functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxsilane (NP-APTES. The resulting NP-SBCD system was then incubated with a solution of cesium. After magnetic separation, the solid residue was removed from the supernatant and characterized by X-Ray Photoelectron spectrometry (XPS, X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometry (XRF and Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID magnetometry. These characterizations show the presence of cesium in the solid residue, which indicates Cs uptake by the NP-SBCD system. This nanohybrid system constitutes a promising model for heavy metal decontamination.

  13. Occurrence of Fungal DNA Contamination in PCR Reagents: Approaches to Control and Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czurda, S; Smelik, S; Preuner-Stix, S; Nogueira, F; Lion, T

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification techniques permitting sensitive and rapid screening in patients at risk for invasive fungal infections are an important addition to conventional fungal diagnostic methods. However, contamination with fungal DNA may be a serious threat to the validity of fungal amplification-based assays. Besides rigorous handling procedures to avoid false-positive test results from exogenous sources, we have implemented protocols for comprehensive assessment of fungal contamination in all materials involved in the analytical process. Traces of fungal DNA were found in different commercially available PCR reagents, including lyophilized primers, TaqMan probes, and master mix solutions. These contaminants resulted in a considerable rate of false-positive tests in panfungal real-time PCR analysis. To address this problem, we have established a decontamination protocol based on the activity of a double-strand specific DNase. Using this approach, we have significantly reduced the frequency of false-positive test results attributable to contaminated reagents. On the basis of our findings, we strongly recommend routine monitoring of all reagents used in fungal PCR assays for the presence of relevant contaminants. As long as fungal-grade reagents are not readily available, pretreatment methods facilitating elimination of fungal DNA are critical for reducing the risk of false-positive results in highly sensitive molecular fungal detection assays. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Occurrence of Fungal DNA Contamination in PCR Reagents: Approaches to Control and Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czurda, S.; Smelik, S.; Preuner-Stix, S.; Nogueira, F.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification techniques permitting sensitive and rapid screening in patients at risk for invasive fungal infections are an important addition to conventional fungal diagnostic methods. However, contamination with fungal DNA may be a serious threat to the validity of fungal amplification-based assays. Besides rigorous handling procedures to avoid false-positive test results from exogenous sources, we have implemented protocols for comprehensive assessment of fungal contamination in all materials involved in the analytical process. Traces of fungal DNA were found in different commercially available PCR reagents, including lyophilized primers, TaqMan probes, and master mix solutions. These contaminants resulted in a considerable rate of false-positive tests in panfungal real-time PCR analysis. To address this problem, we have established a decontamination protocol based on the activity of a double-strand specific DNase. Using this approach, we have significantly reduced the frequency of false-positive test results attributable to contaminated reagents. On the basis of our findings, we strongly recommend routine monitoring of all reagents used in fungal PCR assays for the presence of relevant contaminants. As long as fungal-grade reagents are not readily available, pretreatment methods facilitating elimination of fungal DNA are critical for reducing the risk of false-positive results in highly sensitive molecular fungal detection assays. PMID:26560539

  15. Cold atmospheric plasma - A new technology for spacecraft component decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Satoshi; Barczyk, Simon; Rettberg, Petra; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klaempfl, Tobias; Zimmermann, Julia L.; Hoeschen, Till; Linsmeier, Christian; Weber, Peter; Morfill, Gregor E.; Thomas, Hubertus M.

    2014-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) based on the Surface Micro-Discharge (SMD) technology was investigated for inactivation of different bacteria and endospores. The used technique was developed to serve as an alternative method for the decontamination of spacecraft components based on the COSPAR planetary protection policy where currently the dry heat microbial reduction method is the only applicable way to satisfy the required demands. However it is known, that dry heat can thermally damage sophisticated components installed on the device. Therefore, the development of a low temperature sterilization system is one of the high priority issues for upcoming space missions in the extraterrestrial field. In the study presented here, the vegetative bacteria Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans and several types of bacterial endospores - including Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus safensis, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus megaterium 2c1 and Bacillus thuringiensis E24 - were inactivated by exposing them indirectly i.e. only to the reactive gases produced by the SMD electrode at room temperature. The results showed a 5 log inactivation for E. coli after 10 min of exposure. In contrast D. radiodurans proved to be more resistant resulting in a reduction of 3 log after exposure of 30 min. More than 6 log reductions were achieved for B. safensis, B. megaterium and B. megaterium 2c1 after 90 min of exposure. Furthermore the applicability of the used CAP system for spacecraft decontamination according to the planetary protection policy was investigated. This included also the investigation of the inactivation homogeneity by the plasma gas, the control of the temperature at the area of interest, the measurement of the O3 density in the treatment region and the detailed investigation of the effects of the exposure on different materials.

  16. Dental unit water lines decontamination with the aid of nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramashivaiah, Rashmi; Prabhuji, M L V; Narayanan, Roopalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews the issue of dental unit waterline (DUWL) contamination which affects all the clinical and hospital settings. The contaminating microorganisms commonly isolated from these settings and the most pathogenic among them have serious consequences. Over the years several measures are inculcated for decontamination of water, their advantages and shortcomings have been addressed. Options using nanotechnology which are available in the market are described briefly. A manual and electronic search was conducted. Google and PubMed were searched for relevant material from studies up to 2013. Medical Subject Headings words looked for were "Nanotechnology," "Water purification," and "Biofilms." Reviewed findings were summarized by topic, using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses statement for reporting. Seventy articles were shortlisted for articles pertaining to our topic of discussion. A systematic approach was followed by two independent reviewers and included eligibility criteria for study inclusion, data extraction, data synthesis, and drawing of conclusion. Dental waterline contamination is widespread in any type of dental setting having serious implications on clinicians and patients alike, especially elderly and immune-compromised. Hence, international bodies like center for disease and control and American Dental Association have come up with stringent measures for maintenance of water quality. A gamut of procedures has been tried to overcome this problem ranging from chlorinated products, water filters to the usage of distilled water. The use of nanoemulsions, nanofilters, nanomembranes, etc., and their applicability for routine usage is discussed. Biofilm formation in DUWLs is inevitable with the subsequent release of part of microbiota into the otherwise sterile dental settings. These consequences can be quite serious on clinicians and dental patients. Though conventional measures in water decontamination have

  17. Time domain reflectometry-measuring dielectric permittivity to detect soil non-acqeous phase liquids contamination-decontamination processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Comegna

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of soils with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL constitutes a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and high mobility of these organic compounds. To develop effective decontamination methods, characterisation and identification of contaminated soils are needed. The objective of this work is to explore the potential of dielectric permittivity measurements to detect the presence of NAPLs in soils. The dielectric permittivity was measured by Time Domain Reflectometry method (TDR in soil samples with either different volumetric content of water (w and NAPL (NAPL or at different stages during immiscible displacement test carried out with two different flushing solutions. A mixing model proposed by Francisca and Montoro, was calibrated to estimate the volume fraction of contaminant present in soil. Obtained results, showed that soil contamination with NAPL and the monitoring of immiscible fluid displacement, during soil remediation processes, can be clearly identified from dielectric measurements.

  18. A Decontamination Process to Remove Metals and Stabilise Montreal Sewage Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mercier

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Montreal Urban Community (MUC treatment plant produces approximately 270 tons of dry sludge daily (tds/day during physicochemical wastewater treatment. The sludges are burned and contribute to the greenhouse effect by producing atmospheric CO2. Moreover, the sludge emanates a nauseating odour during its thermal stabilisation and retains unpleasant odours for the part (25% that is dried and granulated. To solve this particular problem, the treatment plant authorities are currently evaluating an acidic chemical leaching (sulfuric or hydrochloric acid process at a pH between 2 and 3, using an oxidizing agent such as ferric chloride or hydrogen peroxide (METIX-AC technology, patent pending; [20]. They could integrate it to a 70 tds/day granulated sludge production process. Verification of the application of METIX-AC technology was carried out in a pilot plant set up near the sludge production plant of the MUC. The tests showed that METIX-AC technology can be advantageously integrated to the process used at the MUC. The residual copper (274 ± 58 mg/kg and cadmium (5.6 ± 2.9 mg/kg concentrations in the treated sludge meet legislation standards. The results have also shown that odours have been significantly eliminated for the dewatered, decontaminated, and stabilized biosolids (> 97% compared to the non-decontaminated biosolids. A high rate of odour elimination also was obtained for the liquid leached biosolids (> 93%, compared to the untreated liquid biosolids. The fertilising value (N and P is well preserved by the METIX-AC process. Dissolved organic carbon measurements have showed that little organic matter is brought in solution during the treatment. In fact, the average concentration of dissolved organic carbon measured in the treated liquid phase is 966 ± 352 mg/l, whereas it is 1190 ± 325 mg/l in untreated sludge. The treated sludge was first conditioned with an organic polymer and a coagulant aid. It was successfully dewatered with

  19. Selective oropharyngeal decontamination versus selective digestive decontamination in critically ill patients: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao D

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Di Zhao,1,* Jian Song,2,* Xuan Gao,3 Fei Gao,4 Yupeng Wu,2 Yingying Lu,5 Kai Hou1 1Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 2Department of Neurosurgery, 3Department of Neurology, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 4Hebei Provincial Procurement Centers for Medical Drugs and Devices, 5Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Selective digestive decontamination (SDD and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD are associated with reduced mortality and infection rates among patients in intensive care units (ICUs; however, whether SOD has a superior effect than SDD remains uncertain. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs to compare SOD with SDD in terms of clinical outcomes and antimicrobial resistance rates in patients who were critically ill. Methods: RCTs published in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of SOD and SDD in patients who were critically ill. Outcomes included day-28 mortality, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU-acquired bacteremia, and prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Results were expressed as risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs, and weighted mean differences (WMDs with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: A total of four RCTs involving 23,822 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. Among patients whose admitting specialty was surgery, cardiothoracic surgery (57.3% and neurosurgery (29.7% were the two main types of surgery being performed. Pooled results showed that SOD had similar effects as SDD in day-28 mortality (RR =1

  20. How Clean is Safe? Improving the Effectiveness of Decontamination of Structures and People Following Chemical and Biological Incidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt (Sorensen), B.M.

    2003-04-03

    This report describes a U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Chemical and Biological National Security Program project that sought to establish what is known about decontamination of structures, objects, and people following an exposure to chemical or biological materials. Specifically we sought to identify the procedures and protocols used to determine when and how people or buildings are considered ''clean'' following decontamination. To fulfill this objective, the study systematically examined reported decontamination experiences to determine what procedures and protocols are currently employed for decontamination, the timeframe involved to initiate and complete the decontamination process, how the contaminants were identified, the factors determining when people were (or were not) decontaminated, the problems encountered during the decontamination process, how response efforts of agencies were coordinated, and the perceived social psychological effects on people who were decontaminated or who participated in the decontamination process. Findings and recommendations from the study are intended to aid decision-making and to improve the basis for determining appropriate decontamination protocols for recovery planners and policy makers for responding to chemical and biological events.

  1. Technical Improvements to an Absorbing Supergel for Radiological Decontamination in Tropical Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mertz, Carol J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kivenas, Nadia [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); demmer, Rick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) developed a superabsorbing gel-based process (SuperGel) for the decontamination of cesium from concrete and other porous building materials. Here, we report on results that tested the gel decontamination technology on specific concrete and ceramic formulations from a coastal city in Southeast Asia, which may differ significantly from some U.S. sources. Results are given for the evaluation of americium and cesium sequestering agents that are commercially available at a reasonable cost; the evaluation of a new SuperGel formulation that combines the decontamination properties of cesium and americium; the variation of the contamination concentration to determine the effects on the decontamination factors with concrete, tile, and brick samples; and pilot-scale testing (0.02–0.09 m2 or 6–12 in. square coupons).

  2. Recent knowledge: Concepts of dermal absorption in relation to skin decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Christina; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Skin decontamination is an important step mitigating percutaneous absorption through the stratum corneum (SC), which is also a highly complex process. Thus, understanding diffusion mechanisms and measuring dermal absorption rates are critical to protect humans from toxic exposures. Here, highly varied literature is placed in a biological and clinical perspective in regards to decontamination. Literature from PubMed and Surge Laboratory library files were searched and reviewed for relevance. Recent data have shown multiple layers of SC structural heterogeneity, which results in unique substance partitioning characteristics across the membrane. As such, attempts to model and understand this behavior in alternative in vitro membranes prove difficult. More synthetic and natural membranes are being explored as models for in vivo behavior. In addition, commonly accepted decontamination methods are undergoing risk assessment. These recent and varied literature findings update available knowledge regarding skin decontamination and its challenges, with a focus on dermal absorption. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Oral decontamination with chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeman, M.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Hak, E.; Joore, H.C.; Kaasjager, K.A.; Smet, A.G. de; Ramsay, G.; Dormans, T.P.J.; Aarts, L.P.H.J.; Bel, E.E. de; Hustinx, W.; Tweel, I. van de; Hoepelman, A.M.; Bonten, M.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    RATIONALE: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequently occurring nosocomial infection associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Although oral decontamination with antibiotics reduces incidences of VAP, it is not recommended because of potential selection of

  4. Analytical cell decontamination and shielding window refurbishment. Final report, March 1984-March 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smokowski, R.T.

    1985-12-01

    This is a report on the decontamination and refurbishment of five inactive contaminated analytical cells and six zinc bromide filled shielding windows. The analytical cells became contaminated during the nuclear fuel reprocessing carried out by Nuclear Fuel Services from 1966 to 1972. The decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) work was performed in these cells to make them useful as laboratories in support of the West Valley Demonstration Project. To accomplish this objective, unnecessary equipment was removed from these cells. Necessary equipment and the interior of each cell were decontaminated and repaired. The shielding windows, essentially tanks holding zinc bromide, were drained and disassembled. The deteriorated, opaque zinc bromide was refined to optical clarity and returned to the tanks. All wastes generated in this operation were characterized and disposed of properly. All the decontamination and refurbishment was accomplished within 13 months. The Analytical Hot Cell has been turned over to Analytical Chemistry for the performance high-level waste (HLW) characterization analysis.

  5. A DECONTAMINATION PROCESS FOR METAL SCRAPS FROM THE DECOMMISSIONING OF TRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, T.Y.; Gan, J.S.; Lin, K.M.; Chung, Z.J.

    2003-02-27

    A decontamination facility including surface condition categorizing, blasting, chemical/electrochemical cleaning, very low radioactivity measuring, and melting, is being established at INER. The facility will go into operation by the end of 2004. The main purpose is to clean the dismantled metal wastes from the decommissioning of Taiwan Research Reactor (TRR). The pilot test shows that over 70% of low level metal waste can be decontaminated to very low activity and can be categorized as BRC (below regulatory concern) waste. All the chemical decontamination technologies applied are developed by INER. In order to reduce the secondary wastes, chemical reagents will be regenerated several times with a selective precipitation method. The exhausted chemical reagent will be solidified with INER's patented process. The total secondary waste is estimated about 0.1-0.3 wt.% of the original waste. This decontamination process is accessed to be economic and feasible.

  6. Survey of Biodegradation of Electronic Components and Associated Testing Using Decontamination Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    Medical Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Airforce Base, OH, November 1974, UNCLASSIFIED Report. Rubidge, T., Growth of Cladosporium resinae ...Report. A-5 METALS AvLlon, E.S., and Rosales, B.M., "Corrosion of AA 7075 Aluminum Alloy in Media Contaminated with Cladosporiim resinae ," Corrosion

  7. Development of laser decontamination technique. 7. The pollution distribution check examination of the test piece after laser decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Ryuichiro; Fukui, Yasutaka; Yoshizawa, Shunji; Tanimoto, Kenichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2001-12-01

    On irradiating laser ray to surface of metal, the surface is rapidly heated, melted, and evaporated. Laser decontamination technique has been developed by using the transpire process to radionuclides contaminated machine surface. The decontamination experiments using normal pulse YAG laser and hot sample were carried out. In the experiments, it was understood that even if the surface is ground by 150{mu}m or more, radioactivities could not be completely removed. On this account, for the purpose of study the depth where a radioactivities merges in the metal by the laser irradiation, surveys using the hot test specimen were performed. Results are as follows. (1) Observation of topographic profile suggested that the depth of irregularity by laser irradiation were from 200{mu}m to 500{mu}m, and there were crud on the surface, which seems reattached melting crud by laser irradiation. (2) Metallic composition analysis with fluorescent X-ray analysis device suggested that there was the segregation of Cr in the test specimen that used Air for the assistance gas, and there were not the segregation that used Ar for the assistance gas. (3) The radioactivity analysis of the test specimen that uses the imaging plate and the radio autograph could not clear the distribution of radioactivities. However, it could be confirmed that a radioactive nuclide exited in a range of 500 {mu}m or less. (4) Grounding the test specimen and measurement of the doses of radiation with Ge measuring tool suggested that there were radioactivities up to the depth of 300{mu}m in the test specimen which used Air for the assistance gas, and 120{mu}m in the test specimen which used Ar for the assistance gas. (author)

  8. The use of chemical gel for decontamination during decommissioning of nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurau, Daniela; Deju, Radu

    2015-01-01

    A technical research study was developed for testing the decontamination using chemical gels. The study was realized for different type of samples, systems often encountered in the VVR-S nuclear research reactor from Magurele-Romania. The results obtained in the study have demonstrated that the decontamination gels could be an efficient way to reduce or to eliminate the surface contamination of buildings or equipment's, minimizing the potential for spreading contamination during decommissioning activities.

  9. An efficient multistrategy DNA decontamination procedure of PCR reagents for hypersensitive PCR applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Champlot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PCR amplification of minute quantities of degraded DNA for ancient DNA research, forensic analyses, wildlife studies and ultrasensitive diagnostics is often hampered by contamination problems. The extent of these problems is inversely related to DNA concentration and target fragment size and concern (i sample contamination, (ii laboratory surface contamination, (iii carry-over contamination, and (iv contamination of reagents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we performed a quantitative evaluation of current decontamination methods for these last three sources of contamination, and developed a new procedure to eliminate contaminating DNA contained in PCR reagents. We observed that most current decontamination methods are either not efficient enough to degrade short contaminating DNA molecules, rendered inefficient by the reagents themselves, or interfere with the PCR when used at doses high enough to eliminate these molecules. We also show that efficient reagent decontamination can be achieved by using a combination of treatments adapted to different reagent categories. Our procedure involves γ- and UV-irradiation and treatment with a mutant recombinant heat-labile double-strand specific DNase from the Antarctic shrimp Pandalus borealis. Optimal performance of these treatments is achieved in narrow experimental conditions that have been precisely analyzed and defined herein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is not a single decontamination method valid for all possible contamination sources occurring in PCR reagents and in the molecular biology laboratory and most common decontamination methods are not efficient enough to decontaminate short DNA fragments of low concentration. We developed a versatile multistrategy decontamination procedure for PCR reagents. We demonstrate that this procedure allows efficient reagent decontamination while preserving the efficiency of PCR amplification of minute quantities of DNA.

  10. Radioactivity decontamination of materials commonly used as surfaces in general-purpose radioisotope laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Natalia M; Tesán, Fiorella C; Zubillaga, Marcela B; Salgueiro, María J

    2014-12-01

    In accord with as-low-as-reasonably-achievable and good-manufacturing-practice concepts, the present study evaluated the efficiency of radioactivity decontamination of materials commonly used in laboratory surfaces and whether solvent spills on these materials affect the findings. Four materials were evaluated: stainless steel, a surface comprising one-third acrylic resin and two-thirds natural minerals, an epoxy cover, and vinyl-based multipurpose flooring. Radioactive material was eluted from a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc generator, and samples of the surfaces were control-contaminated with 37 MBq (100 μL) of this eluate. The same procedure was repeated with samples of surfaces previously treated with 4 solvents: methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, acetone, and ethanol. The wet radioactive contamination was allowed to dry and then was removed with cotton swabs soaked in soapy water. The effectiveness of decontamination was defined as the percentage of activity removed per cotton swab, and the efficacy of decontamination was defined as the total percentage of activity removed, which was obtained by summing the percentages of activity in all the swabs required to complete the decontamination. Decontamination using our protocol was most effective and most efficacious for stainless steel and multipurpose flooring. Moreover, treatment with common organic solvents seemed not to affect the decontamination of these surfaces. Decontamination of the other two materials was less efficient and was interfered with by the organic solvents; there was also great variability in the overall results obtained for these other two materials. In expanding our laboratory, it is possible for us to select those surface materials on which our decontamination protocol works best. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. The effect of saliva decontamination procedures on dentin bond strength after universal adhesive curing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayang Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of multiple decontamination procedures for salivary contamination after curing of a universal adhesive on dentin bond strength according to its etch modes. Materials and Methods Forty-two extracted bovine incisors were trimmed by exposing the labial dentin surfaces and embedded in cylindrical molds. A universal adhesive (All-Bond Universal, Bisco was used. The teeth were randomly divided into groups according to etch mode and decontamination procedure. The adhesive was applied according to the manufacturer's instructions for a given etch mode. With the exception of the control groups, the cured adhesive was contaminated with saliva for 20 sec. In the self-etch group, the teeth were divided into three groups: control, decontamination with rinsing and drying, and decontamination with rinsing, drying, and adhesive. In the etch-and-rinse group, the teeth were divided into four groups: control, decontamination with rinsing and drying, decontamination with rinsing, drying, and adhesive, and decontamination with rinsing, drying, re-etching, and reapplication of adhesive. A composite resin (Filtek Z350XT, 3M ESPE was used for filling and was cured on the treated surfaces. Shear bond strength was measured, and failure modes were evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way analysis of variation and Tukey's HSD test. Results The etch-and-rinse subgroup that was decontaminated by rinse, drying, re-etching, and reapplication of adhesive showed a significantly higher bond strength. Conclusions When salivary contamination occurs after curing of the universal adhesive, additional etching improves the bond strength to dentin.

  12. Pulsed light effects on surface decontamination, physical qualities and nutritional composition of tomato fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Florence; Renard, Catherine; Page, David; Carlin, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed light (PL) is a nonthermal food technology with a potential as postharvest decontamination strategy for fruit and vegetables. The feasibility of PL in extending shelf-life of food products while assuring appropriate quality is still under investigation. The effect of pulsed light (PL) on surface decontamination (natural and inoculated microorganisms), physical (colour, texture and weight) and nutritional quality (ascorbic acid and major carotenoids) was investigated in red-ripe tomatoe...

  13. Mesoporous binary metal oxide nanocomposites: Synthesis, characterization and decontamination of sulfur mustard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, J., E-mail: praveenjella10@gmail.com; Prasad, G.K.; Ramacharyulu, P.V.R.K.; Singh, Beer; Gopi, T.; Krishna, R.

    2016-04-15

    Mesoporous MnO{sub 2}–ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. They were synthesized by precipitation pyrolysis method and characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive analysis of X rays, X ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption techniques. The transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption data indicated the presence of pores with diameter ranging from 10 to 70 nm in the binary metal oxide nanocomposites and these materials exhibited surface area values in the range of 76–134 m{sup 2}/g. These binary metal oxide nanocomposites demonstrated large decontamination efficiencies against sulfur mustard when compared to their single component metal oxide nanoparticles. The binary metal oxide nanocomposites effectively decontaminated sulfur mustard into relatively non toxic products such as chloro ethyl vinyl sulfide, divinyl sulfide, 1,4-oxathiane, etc. The promising decontamination properties of binary metal oxide nanocomposites against sulfur mustard were attributed to the basic sites, Lewis acid sites, and the presence of these sites was confirmed by CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} temperature programmed desorption. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous MnO{sub 2}–ZnO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}–ZnO, NiO–ZnO, and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO binary metal oxide nanocomposites were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. - Highlights: • Binary metal oxide nanocomposites were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • They were studied as sorbent decontaminants against sulfur mustard. • They decontaminated sulfur mustard into non toxic products. • MnO{sub 2}–ZnO and CeO{sub 2}–ZnO nanocomposites showed greater decontamination efficiency.

  14. Effectiveness of Three Decontamination Treatments Against Influenza Virus Applied to Filtering Facepiece Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    filtering facepiece respirators contami­ nated with H1N1 aerosols and droplets. Am J Infect Control; 39: 1-9. Rutten IM. (2007) Handbook of nonwoven ...AFRL-RX-TY-TP-2010-0080 EFFECTIVENESS OF THREE DECONTAMINATION TREATMENTS AGAINST INFLUENZA VIRUS APPLIED TO FILTERING FACEPIECE RESPIRATORS...SEP-2010 Effectiveness of Three Decontamination Treatments Against Influenza Virus Applied to Filtering Facepiece Respirators (POSTPRINT) FA8650-07-C

  15. Off-site consequences of radiological accidents: methods, costs and schedules for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawil, J.J.; Bold, F.C.; Harrer, B.J.; Currie, J.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report documents a data base and a computer program for conducting a decontamination analysis of a large, radiologically contaminated area. The data base, which was compiled largely through interviews with knowledgeable persons both in the public and private sectors, consists of the costs, physical inputs, rates and contaminant removal efficiencies of a large number of decontamination procedures. The computer program utilizes this data base along with information specific to the contaminated site to provide detailed information that includes the least costly method for effectively decontaminating each surface at the site, various types of property losses associated with the contamination, the time at which each subarea within the site should be decontaminated to minimize these property losses, the quantity of various types of labor and equipment necessary to complete the decontamination, dose to radiation workers, the costs for surveying and monitoring activities, and the disposal costs associated with radiological waste generated during cleanup. The program and data base are demonstrated with a decontamination analysis of a hypothetical site. 39 refs., 24 figs., 155 tabs.

  16. Development of laser decontamination technique (3). Experiments of laser beam transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Ryuichirou; Ishijima, Noboru; Tanimoto, Kenichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-04-01

    Laser decontamination system is able to decontaminate thoroughly, and it is able to mitigate the secondary waste quantity, and the system is able to operate by remote control. It is advantageous compared with other decontamination methods. YAG laser is competent for decontamination of stainless steel surface. In this paper, using normal and Q switch pulse YAG laser, experiments to confirm transmission efficiency using mirror and optical fiber, shape dependency at decontamination, and secondary waste size distribution were performed. The results are as follows. (1) The beam energy of normal pulse YAG laser is able to transmit using optical fiber. The beam energy of Q switch pulse YAG laser is difficult to transmit using a single optical fiber. (2) Normal pulse YAG laser has 10{sup 2} Decontamination Factor (DF) on L-shaped, bolt-shaped, and cylindrical-shaped waste. Q switch pulse YAG laser has over 10{sup 2} DF on L-shaped and cylindrical-shaped waste, but on the other hand, under 10 DF on bolt-shaped waste. (3) In the case of argon as auxiliary gas, most secondary products are dropped as dross. In this case, scattered area is within 1 m. In the case of the atmosphere as auxiliary gas, most particles of secondary products are floated in the air, their diameter being less 3 {mu}m. (J.P.N.)

  17. Decontamination of biological agents from drinking water infrastructure: a literature review and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Jeff; Minamyer, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This report summarizes the current state of knowledge on the persistence of biological agents on drinking water infrastructure (such as pipes) along with information on decontamination should persistence occur. Decontamination options for drinking water infrastructure have been explored for some biological agents, but data gaps remain. Data on bacterial spore persistence on common water infrastructure materials such as iron and cement-mortar lined iron show that spores can be persistent for weeks after contamination. Decontamination data show that common disinfectants such as free chlorine have limited effectiveness. Decontamination results with germinant and alternate disinfectants such as chlorine dioxide are more promising. Persistence and decontamination data were collected on vegetative bacteria, such as coliforms, Legionella and Salmonella. Vegetative bacteria are less persistent than spores and more susceptible to disinfection, but the surfaces and water quality conditions in many studies were only marginally related to drinking water systems. However, results of real-world case studies on accidental contamination of water systems with E. coli and Salmonella contamination show that flushing and chlorination can help return a water system to service. Some viral persistence data were found, but decontamination data were lacking. Future research suggestions focus on expanding the available biological persistence data to other common infrastructure materials. Further exploration of non-traditional drinking water disinfectants is recommended for future studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Decontamination System Development of Radioative Activated Carbon using Micro-bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Jong seon; Kim, Wi soo [NESS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Byoung sub. [Enesys Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This study was aimed to develop a decontamination system by applying such technical characteristics that minimizes a generation of secondary wastes while decontaminating radiation wastes. The radioactive activated carbon is removed from the end-of-life air cleaning filter in replacement or decommission of nuclear power plant or nuclear facility. By removing radioactive activated carbon, the filter would be classified as a low radioactive contaminant. And thus the amount of radioactive wastes and the treatment cost would be decreased. We are in development of the activated carbon cleaning technique by utilizing micro-bubbles, which improve efficiency and minimize damage of activated carbon. The purpose of using micro-bubbles is to decontamination carbon micropore, which is difficult to access, by principle of cavitation phenomenon generated in collapse of micro-bubbles. In this study, we introduced the micro-bubble decontamination system developed to decontaminate activated carbon. For further researches, we will determine carbon weight change and the decontamination rate under the experimental conditions such as temperature and pH.

  19. Local antibiotic decontamination to prevent anastomotic leakage short-term outcome in rectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Ulrich; Rogers, Susanne; Haubensak, Kristina; Schopf, Stefan; von Ahnen, Thomas; Schardey, Hans Martin

    2017-11-08

    Anastomotic leakage still presents an issue in rectal cancer surgery with rates of about 11%. As bacteria play a critical role, there is the concept of perioperative local decontamination to prevent anastomotic leakage. To ascertain the effectiveness of this treatment, we performed a retrospective analysis on 206 rectal resections with primary anastomosis and routine use of a selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD) regimen for local decontamination. SDD medication was administered every 8 h from the day before surgery to the seventh postoperative day. All patients were treated according to the fast-track protocol without mechanical bowel preparation; instead, a laxative was used. Overall morbidity was 30%, overall mortality 0.5%. In our data, overall rate of anastomotic leakage (AL) was 5.8%, with 3.9% in anterior rectal resection and 6.5% in low anterior rectal resection group. In 75% of cases, anastomotic leakage was grade "C" and needed re-laparotomy. Surgical site infection rate was 19.9%. No serious adverse events were related to decontamination. Local antibiotic decontamination appears to be safe and effective to decrease the rate of anastomotic leakage in rectal cancer surgery. Further focus should be on perioperative management including bowel preparation and choice of antimicrobial agents for local decontamination.

  20. Plutonium solution in concentration range from 8 to 17 G/liter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-06-01

    This paper very briefly discusses the need for a fundamental criticality study of low concentrations of plutonium solutions. Examples of the occurrence of such solutions, which are characteristic of waste, are cited. Due to the prevalence of decontaminating and decommissioning activities, low concentration solutions are expected to become an important concern. Technical deficiencies in previous calculations are also discussed as a reason for performing low concentration criticality studies. 3 refs.

  1. Decontamination of hard cheeses by pulsed UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Fidan O; Demirci, Ali; Puri, Virendra M; Gourama, Hassan

    2014-10-01

    Cheese is a ready-to-eat food that may be contaminated on the surface by undesirable spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms during production, packaging, and postpackaging processes. Penicillium roqueforti is commonly found on cheese surfaces at refrigeration temperatures and is one of the most common spoilage fungal species. Consumption of cheese contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes can result in foodborne listeriosis. Therefore, cheese should be decontaminated at postprocessing stages. Pulsed UV light is a nonthermal method for food preservation that involves the use of intense short pulses to ensure microbial decontamination on the surface of foods or packaging materials. In this study, the efficacy of pulsed UV light for inactivation of P. roqueforti and L. monocytogenes inoculated onto packaged and unpackaged hard cheeses was investigated. Treatment times and the distance from the UV strobe were evaluated to determine optimum treatment conditions. Packaged and unpackaged cheeses were treated at distances of 5, 8, and 13 cm for up to 60 s. For P. roqueforti, maximum reduction after 40 s at 5 cm was 1.32 log CFU/cm(2) on unpackaged cheese and 1.24 log CFU/cm(2) on packaged cheese. Reductions of L. monocytogenes under the same treatment conditions were about 2.9 and 2.8 log CFU/cm(2) on packaged and unpackaged cheeses, respectively. The temperature changes and total energy increases were directly proportional to treatment time and inversely proportional to distance between the UV lamp and the samples. The changes in color and lipid oxidation were determined at mild (5 s at 13 cm), moderate (30 s at 8 cm), and extreme (40 s at 5 cm) treatments. The color and chemical quality of cheeses were not significantly different after mild treatments (P > 0.05). The mechanical properties of the plastic packaging material (polypropylene) also were evaluated after mild, moderate, and extreme treatments. A decreasing trend was noted for elastic modulus; however, no

  2. Large-Scale Urban Decontamination; Developments, Historical Examples and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rick Demmer

    2007-02-01

    Recent terrorist threats and actual events have lead to a renewed interest in the technical field of large scale, urban environment decontamination. One of the driving forces for this interest is the real potential for the cleanup and removal of radioactive dispersal device (RDD or “dirty bomb”) residues. In response the U. S. Government has spent many millions of dollars investigating RDD contamination and novel decontamination methodologies. Interest in chemical and biological (CB) cleanup has also peaked with the threat of terrorist action like the anthrax attack at the Hart Senate Office Building and with catastrophic natural events such as Hurricane Katrina. The efficiency of cleanup response will be improved with these new developments and a better understanding of the “old reliable” methodologies. Perhaps the most interesting area of investigation for large area decontamination is that of the RDD. While primarily an economic and psychological weapon, the need to cleanup and return valuable or culturally significant resources to the public is nonetheless valid. Several private companies, universities and National Laboratories are currently developing novel RDD cleanup technologies. Because of its longstanding association with radioactive facilities, the U. S. Department of Energy National Laboratories are at the forefront in developing and testing new RDD decontamination methods. However, such cleanup technologies are likely to be fairly task specific; while many different contamination mechanisms, substrate and environmental conditions will make actual application more complicated. Some major efforts have also been made to model potential contamination, to evaluate both old and new decontamination techniques and to assess their readiness for use. Non-radioactive, CB threats each have unique decontamination challenges and recent events have provided some examples. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as lead agency for these emergency

  3. Reduced weight decontamination formulation utilizing a solid peracid compound for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-09-20

    A reduced weight decontamination formulation that utilizes a solid peracid compound (sodium borate peracetate) and a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride) that can be packaged with all water removed. This reduces the packaged weight of the decontamination formulation by .about.80% (as compared to the "all-liquid" DF-200 formulation) and significantly lowers the logistics burden on the warfighter. Water (freshwater or saltwater) is added to the new decontamination formulation at the time of use from a local source.

  4. The state of the art on the dry decontamination technologies applicable to highly radioactive contaminants and their needs for the national nuclear fuel cycle developent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Zin; Lee, K.W.; Won, H.J.; Jung, C.H.; Chol, W.K.; Kim, G.N.; Moon, J.K

    2000-12-01

    This report is intended to establish their needs to support the dry decontamination activities applicable to highly radioactive contaminants based on the requirement of technologies development suggested from the national nuclear fuel cycle projects, such as DUPIC, advanced spent fuel management and long-lived radionuclides conversion. The technology needs associated with decontamination addressed the requirements associated with the efficiency of decontamination technology, the reduction of secondary wastes, applicabilities and the remote operation. And also, Characterization and decontamination technologies for various contaminants are reviewed and analysed. Based on the assessment, Unit dry decontamination processes are selected and the schematic flow diagram for decontamination of highly radioactive contaminants.

  5. Inactivation of E.coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on strawberries by sanitizing solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A recent foodborne outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in Oregon associated with the consumption of fresh strawberries highlights the need for effective sanitizing washes, suitable for the inactivation of pathogens on fresh produce. Sanitizing solutions were screened for decontaminating E. coli O157:H7 (E...

  6. Design, fabrication and testing of an electrolytic membrane cell to minimize the active waste generated during decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangarajan, S.; Sumathi, S.; Balaji, V.; Puspalata, R. [BARC Facilities, Water and Steam Chemistry Div., Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-07-01

    Decontamination of the Primary Heat Transport system of the Nuclear Power Plants has become a regular exercise, carried out once in three or four years, to reduce the background radioactivity levels around the circuit and hence to control the associated man-rem budgeting. In a typical dilute chemical decontamination campaign, either a reducing or an oxidizing formulation (which depends on the nature of the oxide) containing a mixture of complexing acids are used to dissolve the surface oxides and the impregnated radioactive metal ions which are subsequently removed using ion-exchanger columns. However, this procedure not only requires many ion-exchanger columns, but also generates a large volume of active waste. By coupling suitably the ion exchange resins and electrolytic membrane cell one can effectively remove metal ions from the decontaminant formulation. This will also reduce the waste liquid volume. Apart from this, by optimizing the current-potential characteristics of the cell, one can selectively deposit / remove a particular metal ion from the other metal ions. In this paper, the design, fabrication and testing of an Electrolytic Membrane Cell containing three compartments viz., cathodic, anodic and a central feed compartment, each separated from the other by a cation-permeable nafion membrane (Na form) with Titanium cathode and a Platinum-coated Titanium anode are described in detail. Experiments were carried out with simulated decontamination solutions containing either magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) or cobalt oxide (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) or both as a mixture in ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid/ Nitrilo triacetic acid, ascorbic acid and citric acid (EAC / NAC) formulations, for effective removal of Co from a large quantity of Fe. The percentage of metal ion transport, pH and conductivity in the feed, catholyte and anolyte solutions were monitored as a function of electrical charge passed through the electrochemical cell. The results showed that the

  7. Decontamination tests in the recreational areas affected by the Chernobyl accident: efficiency of decontamination and long-term stability of the effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramzaev, V.; Barkovsky, A.; Mishine, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a review of the decontamination tests and the follow up monitoring program conducted by the Russian and Danish researchers in two recreational areas in the period 1995–2003. The recreational areas Novie Bobovichi and Muravinka consisted of sets of wooden and brick summer houses...

  8. Electrokinetics and soil decontamination: concepts and overview (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Karim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrokinetic decontamination and extraction have been proven to be one of the most viable, cost effective and emerging techniques in removing contaminants, especially heavy metals from soils for about last five decades. Basic concepts and an overview of the electrokinetic extraction processes and their potential applications in geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering have been reviewed based on the literature and presented in this paper. Primarily, theoretical and laboratory experimental studies related to electroreclamation of soils are summarised in brief with basic concepts of electrokinetic processes. The paper has been divided into different sections that include history of electrokinetics, background and concepts, modelling, parameter effects, instrumentation, contaminant extraction, field applications, and summary and recommendation. Based on the review it is obvious that the field application of electrokinetic technology to remediate heavy metal contaminated soils /sediments is very limited and site specific. Additional laboratory studies and more pilot- and full-scale information from field applications are critical to the further understanding of the technology and to customize the process in different field conditions.

  9. The decontamination of industrial casein and milk powder by irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żegota, H.; Małolepszy, B.

    2008-09-01

    The efficacy of gamma radiation decontamination of industrial casein, a milk protein utilized as a component of many food and non-food products has been studied. Low-fat milk powder was also included with a purpose to study the microflora survival in protein-rich materials. Microbial analysis of the samples prior to irradiation showed that the initial total viable count was higher than 6.0 log cfu g -1 in both casein and milk powders. The contamination of casein with moulds and yeasts was found to be equal to 3.56 log cfu g -1. The counts of coliforms have not exceeded the value of 2.48 log cfu g -1. Radiation processing of casein and milk powder has substantially reduced the microbial population of all samples. The dose of 5 kGy was sufficient to reduce the total microflora and coliforms counts to the level permitted for food products. Survivals of microorganisms were analyzed by the generalized exponential equation, SF =exp[ -D/ Do) α]. Values of an exponent, α, standing for the dispersion parameter, were equal to 0.65 and 0.70 for microorganisms contaminating casein and milk powders, respectively. The numerical value of the dispersion parameter α<1 indicates the concave dependence of a logarithm of surviving fraction versus radiation dose. No difference in microflora survival in irradiated samples tested immediately and in samples stored for 1-month after irradiation has been noticed.

  10. Concrete decontamination by electro-hydraulic scabbling (EHS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    Contamination of concrete structures by radionuclides, hazardous metals and organic substances (including PCB`s) occurs at many DOE sites. The contamination of concrete structures (walls, floors, ceilings, etc.) varies in type, concentration, and especially depth of penetration into the concrete. In many instances, only the surface layer of concrete is contaminated, up to a depth of one inch, according to estimates provided in the R and D ID document. Then, removal of the concrete surface layer (scabbling) is considered to be the most effective decontamination method. Textron Systems Corp. (TSC) has developed a scabbling concept based on electro-mechanical phenomena accompanying strong electric pulses generated by applying high voltage at the concrete/water interface. Depending on the conditions, the electric discharge may occur either through a waste layer or through the concrete body itself. This report describes the development, testing, and results of this electro-mechanical process. Phase 1 demonstrated the feasibility of the process for the controlled removal of a thin layer of contaminated concrete. Phase 2 designed, fabricated, and tested an integrated subscale unit. This was tested at Fernald. In Phase 3, the scabbling unit was reconfigured to increase its power and processing rate. Technology transfer to an engineering contracting company is continuing.

  11. The decontamination of industrial casein and milk powder by irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zegota, H. [Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry, Technical University, Wroblewskiego 15, 93-590 Lodz (Poland)], E-mail: ahzegota@mitr.p.lodz.pl; Malolepszy, B. [Fleur Comp. Ltd., Artyleryjska 6, 91-072 Lodz (Poland)

    2008-09-15

    The efficacy of gamma radiation decontamination of industrial casein, a milk protein utilized as a component of many food and non-food products has been studied. Low-fat milk powder was also included with a purpose to study the microflora survival in protein-rich materials. Microbial analysis of the samples prior to irradiation showed that the initial total viable count was higher than 6.0 log cfu g{sup -1} in both casein and milk powders. The contamination of casein with moulds and yeasts was found to be equal to 3.56 log cfu g{sup -1}. The counts of coliforms have not exceeded the value of 2.48 log cfu g{sup -1}. Radiation processing of casein and milk powder has substantially reduced the microbial population of all samples. The dose of 5 kGy was sufficient to reduce the total microflora and coliforms counts to the level permitted for food products. Survivals of microorganisms were analyzed by the generalized exponential equation, SF=exp[-D/D{sub o}){sup {alpha}}]. Values of an exponent, {alpha}, standing for the dispersion parameter, were equal to 0.65 and 0.70 for microorganisms contaminating casein and milk powders, respectively. The numerical value of the dispersion parameter {alpha}<1 indicates the concave dependence of a logarithm of surviving fraction versus radiation dose. No difference in microflora survival in irradiated samples tested immediately and in samples stored for 1-month after irradiation has been noticed.

  12. DECONTAMINATING AND PROCESSING DREDGED MATERIAL FOR BENEFICIAL USE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CLESCERI,N.L.; STERN,E.A.; FENG,H.; JONES,K.W.

    2000-07-01

    Management of contaminated dredged material is a major problem in the Port of New York and New Jersey. One component of an overall management plan can be the application of a decontamination technology followed by creation of a product suitable for beneficial use. This concept is the focus of a project now being carried out by the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region 2, the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District, the US Department of Energy-Brookhaven National Laboratory, and regional university groups that have included Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Rutgers University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, and Stevens Institute of Technology. The project has gone through phased testing of commercial technologies at the bench scale (15 liters) and pilot scale (1.5--500 m{sup 3}) levels. Several technologies are now going forward to large-scale demonstrations that are intended to treat from 23,000 to 60,000 m{sup 3}. Selections of the technologies were made based on the effectiveness of the treatment process, evaluation of the possible beneficial use of the treated materials, and other factors. Major elements of the project are summarized here.

  13. Decontamination of drinking water by direct heating in solar panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjendbo Jørgensen, A J; Nøhr, K; Sørensen, H; Boisen, F

    1998-09-01

    A device was developed for direct heating of water by solar radiation in a flow-through system of copper pipes. An adjustable thermostat valve prevents water below the chosen temperature from being withdrawn. The results show that it is possible to eliminate coliform and thermotolerant coliform bacteria from naturally contaminated river water by heating to temperatures of 65 degrees C or above. Artificial additions of Salmonella typhimurium, Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli to contaminated river water were also inactivated after heating to 65 degrees C and above. The total viable count could be reduced by a factor of 1000. The heat-resistant bacteria isolated from the Mlalakuva River (Tanzania) were spore-forming bacteria which exhibited greater heat resistance than commonly used test bacteria originating from countries with colder climates. To provide a good safety margin it is recommended that an outlet water temperature of 75 degrees C be used. At that temperature the daily production was about 501 of decontaminated water per m2 of solar panel, an amount that could be doubled by using a heat exchanger to recycle the heat.

  14. Practical means for decontamination 9 years after a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, K.G.; Prip, H. [eds.

    1995-12-01

    Nine years after the Chernobyl accident, the contamination problems of the most severely affected areas remain unsolved. As a consequence of this, large previously inhabited areas and areas of farmland now lie deserted. An international group of scientists funded by the EU European Collaboration Programme (ECP/4) has investigated in practice a great number of feasible means to solve the current problems. The basic results of this work group are presented in this report that was prepared in a format which facilitates an intercomparison (cost-benefit analysis) of the individual examined techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in various different types of environmental scenarios. Each file containing information on a method or procedure was created by the persons and institutes responsible for the practical trial. Although the long period that has elapsed since the contamination took place has added to the difficulties in removing the radioactive matter, it could be concluded that many of the methods are still capable of reducing the dose level substantially. (au).

  15. Evaluation of Microwave Steam Bags for the Decontamination of Filtering Facepiece Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Edward M.; Williams, Jessica L.; Shaffer, Ronald E.

    2011-01-01

    Reusing filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) has been suggested as a strategy to conserve available supplies for home and healthcare environments during an influenza pandemic. For reuse to be possible, used FFRs must be decontaminated before redonning to reduce the risk of virus transmission; however, there are no approved methods for FFR decontamination. An effective method must reduce the microbial threat, maintain the function of the FFR, and present no residual chemical hazard. The method should be readily available, inexpensive and easily implemented by healthcare workers and the general public. Many of the general decontamination protocols used in healthcare and home settings are unable to address all of the desired qualities of an efficient FFR decontamination protocol. The goal of this study is to evaluate the use of two commercially available steam bags, marketed to the public for disinfecting infant feeding equipment, for FFR decontamination. The FFRs were decontaminated with microwave generated steam following the manufacturers' instructions then evaluated for water absorption and filtration efficiency for up to three steam exposures. Water absorption of the FFR was found to be model specific as FFRs constructed with hydrophilic materials absorbed more water. The steam had little effect on FFR performance as filtration efficiency of the treated FFRs remained above 95%. The decontamination efficacy of the steam bag was assessed using bacteriophage MS2 as a surrogate for a pathogenic virus. The tested steam bags were found to be 99.9% effective for inactivating MS2 on FFRs; however, more research is required to determine the effectiveness against respiratory pathogens. PMID:21525995

  16. Self-care Decontamination within a Chemical Exposure Mass-casualty Incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Raymond G; Pearce, Laurie D R

    2015-06-01

    Growing awareness and concern for the increasing frequency of incidents involving hazardous materials (HazMat) across a broad spectrum of contaminants from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) sources indicates a clear need to refine the capability to respond successfully to mass-casualty contamination incidents. Best results for decontamination from a chemical agent will be achieved if done within minutes following exposure, and delays in decontamination will increase the length of time a casualty is in contact with the contaminate. The findings presented in this report indicate that casualties involved in a HazMat/CBRN mass-casualty incident (MCI) in a typical community would not receive sufficient on-scene care because of operational delays that are integral to a standard HazMat/CBRN first response. This delay in response will mean that casualty care will shift away from the incident scene into already over-tasked health care facilities as casualties seek aid on their own. The self-care decontamination protocols recommended here present a viable option to ensure decontamination is completed in the field, at the incident scene, and that casualties are cared for more quickly and less traumatically than they would be otherwise. Introducing self-care decontamination procedures as a standard first response within the response community will improve the level of care significantly and provide essential, self-care decontamination to casualties. The process involves three distinct stages which should not be delayed; these are summarized by the acronym MADE: Move/Assist, Disrobe/Decontaminate, Evaluate/Evacuate.

  17. Skin decontamination efficacy of potassium ketoxime on rabbits exposed to sulfur mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing-Hai; Sun, Pei-Pei; Zheng, Wei; Han, Song; Ying, Ying; Liu, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Zhao, Bao-Quan; Zuo, Guo-Min; Lu, Hong; Zhong, Yu-Xu

    2015-03-01

    The chemical weapon sulfur mustard (SM) is a blister agent, and currently, there is no effective antidote. To evaluate the decontamination efficacy of potassium ketoxime against SM and preliminarily elucidate its decontamination mechanism. Potassium ketoxime reacted with SM, and SM residues were tested at different time intervals by T-135 colorimetry after the reaction. Rabbit skin was topically exposed to 2 mg/cm(2) SM, treated with potassium ketoxime 1 min later, and observed after 6, 12, and 24 h. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was employed to screen and identify the main products of potassium ketoxime decontamination of SM. Potassium ketoxime had a great effect against SM contamination. With a mass ratio of decontaminant: SM of 50:1, decontamination rates against SM were 87.5% after 30 s, 95.9% after 1 min, and 99.0% after 5 min. Fifteen minutes after exposure to SM, the untreated group showed clear erythema lesions, whereas the experimental group showed no clear erythema lesions within 6 h. After 12 and 24 h, the areas of damaged skin in the experimental group were 0.038 and 0.125 cm(2), respectively, compared with 2.21 and 2.65 cm(2) in the control group. Histopathological analysis revealed that treatment with potassium ketoxime also reduced inflammation-induced damage. The results of this study indicate that potassium ketoxime reacted rapidly and completely with SM, and thus, it was found to be a suitable and effective skin decontaminant against SM. The decontamination reaction mechanism is mainly related to nucleophilic substitution.

  18. DNA decontamination methods for internal quality management in clinical PCR laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingping; Wu, Jianyong; Zhang, Zhihui; Cheng, Chen

    2017-06-30

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, one of the most commonly applied methods in diagnostic and molecular biology, has a frustrating downside: the occurrence of false-positive signals due to contamination. In previous research, various DNA decontamination methods have been developed to overcome this limitation. Unfortunately, the use of random or poorly focused sampling methods for monitoring air and/or object surfaces leads to the incomplete elimination during decontamination procedures. We herein attempted to develop a novel DNA decontamination method (environmental surveillance, including surface and air sampling) and quality management program for clinical molecular diagnostic laboratories (or clinical PCR laboratories). Here, we performed a step-by-step evaluation of current DNA decontamination methods and developed an effective procedure for assessing the presence of decontaminating DNA via PCR analysis. Performing targeted environmental surveillance by sampling, which reached optimal performance over 2 weeks, and the decontamination process had been verified as reliable. Additionally, the process was validated to not affect PCR amplification efficiency based on a comparative study. In this study, effective guidelines for DNA decontamination were developed. The method employed ensured that surface DNA contamination could be effectively identified and eliminated. Furthermore, our study highlighted the importance of overall quality assurance and good clinical laboratory practices for preventing contamination, which are key factors for compliance with regulatory or accreditation requirements. Taken together, we provided the evidence that the presented scheme ranged from troubleshooting to the elimination of surface contamination, could serve as critical foundation for developing regular environmental surveillance guidelines for PCR laboratories. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Comparative study of the corrosion and surface analytical effects of the decontamination technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, K.; Baja, B.; Deak, E.H.; Rado, K.; Nemeth, Z. [Univ. of Pannonia, Inst. of Radiochemistry and Radioecology, Veszprem (Hungary)

    2010-07-01

    Decontamination technologies are generally developed to reduce the collective dose of the maintenance and operation personnel at nuclear power plants (NPP). The highest efficiency (i.e., the highest decontamination factors) available without detrimental modification of the treated surface of structural material is the most important goal in the course of the application of a decontamination technology. At the Paks NPP the AP-CITROX procedure has been utilized for the decontamination of the primary coolant circuit's components (e.g. main circulating pump (MCP) and steam generators (SGs)). Our previous studies have revealed that a 'hybrid' structure of the amorphous and crystalline phases was formed in the outermost surface region of the austenitic stainless steel tubes of SGs as an undesired consequence of the industrial application of the AP-CITROX decontamination technology during the period of 1993-2001. In this paper, we report some comparative findings on the corrosion and surface chemical effects of the AP-CITROX procedure and the novel decontamination technology elaborated at our institution. On optimizing the operational parameters the latter technology may become suitable for the effective decontamination of both dismountable (e.g. MCP swivel) and separable (e.g. SGs) equipments. For this purpose experiments were performed. In this laboratory scale experiments, the passivity, morphology and chemical compositions of the treated surfaces of tube specimens were investigated by voltammetry, and SEM-EDX methods, respectively. The SEM-EDX results have revealed that the oxide removal is surprisingly uniform even after 2 or 3 consecutive cycles. The electrochemical studies have provided evidences that no unfavorable tendencies in the general corrosion state of the tube samples can be detected in the course of the chemical treatments. (author)

  20. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Wilmarth, William R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-01-21

    compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 (99Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are 129I, 90Sr, 137Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove 90Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for 99Tc, and zeolites for 137Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of 99Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl2 as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination

  1. Universal Oxidation for CBW Decontamination: L-Gel System Development and Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raber, E.; McGuire, R.; Hoffman, M.; Shepley, D.; Carlsen, T.; Krauter, P.; Alcaraz, A.

    2000-07-10

    The optimum goal of this study is to develop a single decontamination system for chemical and biological agents which is non-toxic, non-corrosive, and easily deployable. The specific objective of this work was to evaluate oxidizer systems as reagents for detoxification and/or degradation to non-toxic environmentally acceptable components rather than necessitate complete destruction. Detoxification requires less reagent material than total oxidation, thereby reducing the logistic burden for a decontamination team. One of the goals is to develop decontamination systems for use by first responders as well as more complete systems to be used by specialized decontamination teams. Therefore, the overall project goal is to develop better decontamination methods that can be quickly implemented by these organizations. This includes early demonstrations and field work with companies or other government agencies who can identify implementation concerns and needs. The approach taken in this work is somewhat different than the standard military approach to decontamination. In a battlefield scenario, it is critical to decontaminate to a useful level in a very short time so the soldiers can continue their mission. In a domestic, urban scenario, time is of less consequence but collateral damage and re-certification (public perception and stakeholder acceptance) are of much greater importance. Since we wanted to maximize the contact time between the decontaminating reagent and the contaminant agent, we selected gelled reagents as the primary carrier material. Gels have the additional advantage of adhering to vertical or horizontal surfaces such as walls and ceilings. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, over a period of twenty years from the late 1960s to the late 1980s, developed a series of extrudable high explosives based on the gelling of polar energetic liquids. While never going into production, this development served as an experience base for formulation

  2. Detection and decontamination of residual energetics from ordnance and explosives scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Carina M; Newcombe, David A; Crawford, Don L; Crawford, Ronald L

    2004-02-01

    Extensive manufacturing of explosives in the last century has resulted in widespread contamination of soils and waters. Decommissioning and cleanup of these materials has also led to concerns about the explosive hazards associated with residual energetics still present on the surfaces of ordnance and explosives scrap. Typically, open burning or detonation is used to decontaminate ordinance and explosive scrap. Here the use of an anaerobic microbiological system applied as a bioslurry to decontaminate energetics from the surfaces of metal scrap is described. Decontamination of model metal scrap artificially contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene and of decommissioned mortar rounds still containing explosives residue was examined. A portable ion mobility spectrometer was employed for the detection of residual explosives residues on the surfaces of the scrap. The mixed microbial populations of the bioslurries effectively decontaminated both the scrap and the mortar rounds. Use of the ion mobility spectrometer was an extremely sensitive field screening method for assessing decontamination and is a method by which minimally trained personnel can declare scrap clean with a high level of certainty.

  3. Primary coolant technology in VVER/PWR units. Experience with preconditioning, decontamination and recontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vonkova, Katerina [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic); Kysela, Jan

    2012-01-15

    For the latest Czech and Slovak stations commissioned (Temelin and Mochovce) a modified hot functional test (HFT) chemistry was developed in the NRI Rez. Chromium rich surface layer formed due to modified HTF chemistry ensures lower corrosion rates and radiation field formation. Long term operation experience from both nuclear power plants are discussed in this paper. Radiation field, occupational radiation exposure and corrosion layers evolution during the first 10 years of operation are compared and presented. The operation experience from all above mentioned units showed a low level of corrosion products in the primary system as well as low dose rates. Second part of the paper deals with radiation fields that exist in nuclear power plants primarily due to the deposition of radioisotopes on the surfaces of primary components after decontamination. Large-scale crud deposition on fuel surface resulted in cases NPP Loviisa, Paks and Novovoronezh after steam generators decontamination. After decontamination higher corrosion products release occurs followed by subsequent higher radiation fields. Actual in-pile loop tests carried at the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) Rez are focused on the study of surface preconditioning - similar to HFT chemistry - after decontamination. Effects of the decontamination on deposition formation on primary circuit surfaces are investigated under steam generator operating conditions with the model device which contains heat exchanger tube. (orig.)

  4. All-Weather Hydrogen Peroxide-Based Decontamination of CBRN Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, George W. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Procell, Lawrence R. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Sorrick, David C. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Lawson, Glenn E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, VA (United States); Wells, Claire M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, VA (United States); Reynolds, Charles M. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Foley, Karen L. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Blanchard, David L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-03-11

    A hydrogen peroxide-based decontaminant, Decon Green, is efficacious for the decontamination of chemical agents VX (S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate), GD (Soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and HD (mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide); the biological agent anthrax (Bacillus anthracis); and radiological isotopes Cs-137 and Co-60; thus demonstrating the ability of this decontamination approach to ameliorate the aftermath of all three types of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Reaction mechanisms afforded for the chemical agents are discussed as are rationales for the enhanced removal efficacy of recalcitrant 60Co on certain surfaces. Decontaminants of this nature can be deployed, and are effective, at very low temperatures (-32 °C), as shown for studies done with VX and HD simulants, without the need for external heat sources. Finally, the efficacy of a lower-logistics, dry decontaminant powder concentrate (utilizing the solid active-oxygen compounds peracetyl borate and Peroxydone) which can be reconstituted with water in the field prior to use, is presented.

  5. Development of an assessment instrument to evaluate performance of the skill of decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farra, Sharon; Smith, Sherrill; French, DeAnne; Gillespie, Gordon

    2015-10-01

    Nurses must competently demonstrate psychomotor skills. Few reliable and valid instruments are available for psychomotor evaluation for disaster skills, including the skill of decontamination. The purpose of this study was to develop and refine an instrument to measure the skill of decontamination. A seven step instrument development design was implemented that included content validity and reliability as well as inter-rater reliability analysis. A convenience sample of approximately 140 participants was drawn from two colleges of nursing at two large academic universities. The sample included senior nursing students in either their community or final practicum nursing course. Based on a sample of 140 students who participated in a decontamination training experience using virtual reality simulation, a seven step established process for assessment of reliability and validity was implemented to develop a checklist for the skill of decontamination. The final instrument statistics: Content Validity Index for the overall instrument score was 0.94, Internal consistency coefficient=0.607(KR-20) and Inter-rater reliability=0.9114. This instrument provides a reliable and valid assessment of nurses' competency in performing the skill of decontamination offering a template for educators to develop similar tools. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of decontamination protocol by antimicrobial treatment in Iranian Tissue Bank (ITB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Dabardani, Fariba; Mahdavi-Mazdeh, Mitra; Ravanasa, Elham; Hosseini, Seyed Kazem

    2015-09-01

    Iranian Tissue Bank established in 1994 provides soft tissues for implantation in Iran. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of decontamination process of cardiac and soft tissues in Iranian Tissue Bank. In this bank after initial assessments, the tissues were incubated in a 5-antibiotic cocktail at room temperature for 24 h and then at 4 °C for 14 days. Contamination status was compared before and after antibiotic cocktail incubation. Of 3,315 assessed tissues, 1,057 were pericardia, 1,051 were fascia and 1,207 were other soft tissues including tibialis and aorta. The initial contamination rate was 36.86%. Pericardia showed the highest contamination rate. Klebsiella species was the most prevalent organism causing contamination. Decontamination rate after antibiotic incubation was 86.91% with the highest successful decontamination rate for fascia tissue. Klebsiella species was the major source of contamination in tissues that remained contaminated after antibiotic incubation. This may be due to resistance of this organism to applied antibiotics in the decontamination cocktail possibly due to a negative drug interaction between aminoglycoside and penicillin derivatives in this antibiotic cocktail. In conclusion collected data shows comparable efficacy of the decontamination process that is used in ITB compared with homograft banks of other countries.

  7. Applying crowd psychology to develop recommendations for the management of mass decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Holly; Drury, John; Rubin, G James; Williams, Richard; Amlôt, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mass decontamination is a public health intervention employed by emergency responders following a chemical, biological, or radiological release. It involves a crowd of people whose interactions with each other and with the emergency responders managing the incident are likely to affect the success of the decontamination process. The way in which members of the public collectively experience decontamination is likely to affect their behavior and hence is crucial to the success of the decontamination process. Consequently, responders and the responsible authorities need to understand crowd psychology during mass emergencies and disasters. Recently, the social identity approach to crowd psychology has been applied to explain public perceptions and behavior during mass emergencies. This approach emphasizes that crowd events are characteristically intergroup encounters, in which the behavior of one group can affect the perceptions and behavior of another. We summarize the results from a program of research in which the social identity approach was applied to develop and test recommendations for the management of mass decontamination. The findings from this program of research show that (1) responders' perceptions of crowd behavior matter; (2) participants value greater communication and this affects their compliance; and (3) social identity processes explain the relationship between effective responder communication and relevant outcome variables, such as public compliance, public cooperation, and public anxiety. Based on this program of research, we recommend 4 responder management strategies that focus on increasing public compliance, increasing orderly and cooperative behavior among members of the public, reducing public anxiety, and respecting public needs for privacy.

  8. Analysis of the application of decontamination technologies to radioactive metal waste minimization using expert systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayrakal, Suna [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-09-30

    Radioactive metal waste makes up a significant portion of the waste currently being sent for disposal. Recovery of this metal as a valuable resource is possible through the use of decontamination technologies. Through the development and use of expert systems a comparison can be made of laser decontamination, a technology currently under development at Ames Laboratory, with currently available decontamination technologies for applicability to the types of metal waste being generated and the effectiveness of these versus simply disposing of the waste. These technologies can be technically and economically evaluated by the use of expert systems techniques to provide a waste management decision making tool that generates, given an identified metal waste, waste management recommendations. The user enters waste characteristic information as input and the system then recommends decontamination technologies, determines residual contamination levels and possible waste management strategies, carries out a cost analysis and then ranks, according to cost, the possibilities for management of the waste. The expert system was developed using information from literature and personnel experienced in the use of decontamination technologies and requires validation by human experts and assignment of confidence factors to the knowledge represented within.

  9. Applying Crowd Psychology to Develop Recommendations for the Management of Mass Decontamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John; Rubin, G. James; Williams, Richard; Amlôt, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mass decontamination is a public health intervention employed by emergency responders following a chemical, biological, or radiological release. It involves a crowd of people whose interactions with each other and with the emergency responders managing the incident are likely to affect the success of the decontamination process. The way in which members of the public collectively experience decontamination is likely to affect their behavior and hence is crucial to the success of the decontamination process. Consequently, responders and the responsible authorities need to understand crowd psychology during mass emergencies and disasters. Recently, the social identity approach to crowd psychology has been applied to explain public perceptions and behavior during mass emergencies. This approach emphasizes that crowd events are characteristically intergroup encounters, in which the behavior of one group can affect the perceptions and behavior of another. We summarize the results from a program of research in which the social identity approach was applied to develop and test recommendations for the management of mass decontamination. The findings from this program of research show that (1) responders' perceptions of crowd behavior matter; (2) participants value greater communication and this affects their compliance; and (3) social identity processes explain the relationship between effective responder communication and relevant outcome variables, such as public compliance, public cooperation, and public anxiety. Based on this program of research, we recommend 4 responder management strategies that focus on increasing public compliance, increasing orderly and cooperative behavior among members of the public, reducing public anxiety, and respecting public needs for privacy. PMID:25812428

  10. Evaluation of Decontamination Factor of Aerosol in Pool Scrubber according to Bubble Shape and Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyun Joung; Ha, Kwang Soon; Jang, Dong Soon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The scrubbing pool could play an important role in the wet type FCVS because a large amount of aerosol is captured in the water pool. The pool scrubbing phenomena have been modelled and embedded in several computer codes, such as SPARC (Suppression Pool Aerosol Removal Code), BUSCA (BUbble Scrubbing Algorithm) and SUPRA (Suppression Pool Retention Analysis). These codes aim at simulating the pool scrubbing process and estimating the decontamination factors (DFs) of the radioactive aerosol and iodine gas in the water pool, which is defined as the ratio of initial mass of the specific radioactive material to final massy after passing through the water pool. The pool scrubbing models were reviewed and an aerosol scrubbing code has been prepared to calculate decontamination factor through the pool. The developed code has been verified using the experimental results and parametric studies the decontamination factor according to bubble shape and size. To evaluate the decontamination factor more accurate whole pool scrubber phenomena, the code was improved to consider the variety shape and size of bubbles. The decontamination factor were largely evaluated in ellipsoid bubble rather than in sphere bubble. The pool scrubbing models will be enhanced to apply more various model such as aerosol condensation of hygroscopic. And, it is need to experiment to measure to bubble shape and size distribution in pool to improve bubble model.

  11. 324 and 325 Building hot cell cleanout program: Decontamination of C-Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Y.B.; Holton, L.K. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    During FY 1989 the decontamination of C-Cell of Hanford's 324 Building was completed as part of the 324 and 325 Building Hot Cell Cleanout Program sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Energy's Surplus Facilities Management Program. The decontamination effort was completed using a series of remote and contact decontamination techniques. Initial radiation readings in C-Cell averaged 50 rad/hr and were reduced remotely to less than 200 mrad/hr using an alkaline foam cleaner followed by a 5000-psi water flush. Contact decontamination was then permissible using ultra high-pressure water, at 36,000 psi, further reducing the average radiation level in the cell to less than 86 mrem/hr. The approach used in decontaminating C-Cell resulted in a savings in radiation exposure of 87% and a cost savings of 39% compared to a hands-on procedure used in A-Cell, 324 Building in 1987. The radiation dose and the costs to achieve a 244-fold reduction in radiation contamination were 1.65 mrem per ft{sup 2} and $96 per ft{sup 2} of cell surface area. 14 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

    2008-05-01

    New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

  13. Multiple Animal Studies for Medical Chemical Defense Program in Soldier/ Patient Decontamination and Drug Development on Task Order 84-6: Pyruvate Dehydrogenase System for Determining the Effectiveness of Arsenic Antidotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-11

    block, decontam- inant solution (5% NaOH for G and V agents; 5% sodium hypochlorite for arsenic compounds and mustard), first aid kit, absorbent paper...transport. decontaminant, absorbant paper, and vermiculite . ’L IL Revised August 15, 1984 10 March 20, 1984 Step Description Specific Instructions 2...and add O.1N NaOH solution dropwise to adjust pH to 5.8, if ’the product will be used with enzyme or cellular preparations. If so, replace adjusted

  14. Decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-23

    Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 was very successful in terms of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) project completions. This photobriefing book highlights these projects and activities in one ongoing project. Brief descriptions of projects planned for the future are also provided. Two D&D projects funded by the US DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM-40) were completed safely and on schedule in FY 1998: (1) Argonne Thermal Source Reactor (ATSR) was a low-power research reactor that operated from 1950 to 1989; and (2) The Building 594 (a.k.a. 579) Waste Ion-Exchange Facility was an obsolete facility constructed in the 1950s to process waste fluids from a collecting lagoon. Field work at one project was ongoing during FY 1998: (1) Chicago Pile 5 (CP-5) was a 5-megawatt, heavy water-moderated, enriched uranium-fueled reactor used to produce neutrons for scientific research from 1954-79. The reactor was shut down and defueled in 1979. D&D is scheduled to be completed in FY 2000. Project experience has lent itself to developing unique staff capabilities. The D&D group was chosen as lead organization for a project supported with operating funds provided by Argonne's Plant Facilities and Services (PFS) Division. This project was also completed safely and on schedule in FY 1998: (1) The Building 200/205 Pneumatic Transfer Tube was constructed in the late 1960s between Hot Cell M-4 in Building 200 and a glove box in Room F-131, Building 205, and used to transfer irradiated fuel specimens and other samples between the two buildings.

  15. Decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-08

    The Chicago Pile 5 (CP-5) Reactor, the first reactor built on the Argonne National Laboratory-East site, followed a rich history that had begun in 1942 with Enrico Fermi's original pile built under the west stands at the Stagg Field Stadium of The University of Chicago. CP-5 was a 5-megawatt, heavy water-moderated, enriched uranium-fueled reactor used to produce neutrons for scientific research from 1954--79. The reactor was shut down and defueled in 1979, and placed into a lay-up condition pending funding for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). In 1990, work was initiated on the D and D of the facility in order to alleviate safety and environmental concerns associated with the site due to the deterioration of the building and its associated support systems. A decision was made in early Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 to direct focus and resources to the completion of the CP-5 Reactor D and D Project. An award of contract was made in December 1998 to Duke Engineering and Services (Marlborough, MA), and a D and D crew was on site in March 1999 to begin work, The project is scheduled to be completed in July 2000. The Laboratory has determined that the building housing the CP-5 facility is surplus to the Laboratory's needs and will be a candidate for demolition. In addition to a photographic chronology of FY 1999 activities at the CP-5 Reactor D and D Project, brief descriptions of other FY 1999 activities and of projects planned for the future are provided in this photobriefing book.

  16. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

  17. Thermal Stability Studies of Candidate Decontamination Agents for Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant Plutonium-Contaminated Gloveboxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Cooper, Thurman D.; Jones, Susan A.; Ewalt, John R.; Compton, James A.; Trent, Donald S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2005-09-29

    This report provides the results of PNNL's and Fluor's studies of the thermal stabilities of potential wastes arising from decontamination of Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant's plutonium contaminated gloveboxes. The candidate wastes arising from the decontamination technologies ceric nitrate/nitric acid, RadPro, Glygel, and Aspigel.

  18. Differences detected in vivo between samples of aflatoxin-contaminated peanut meal, following decontamination by two ammonia-based processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neal, G.E.; Judah, D.J.; Garthew, P.; Verma, A.; Latour, I.; Weir, L.; Coker, R.D.; Nagler, M.J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2001-01-01

    A sample of peanut meal, highly contaminated with aflatoxins, has been subjected to decontamination by two commercial ammonia-based processes. The original contaminated and the two decontaminated meals were fed to rats for 90 days. No lesions associated with aflatoxin-induced hepatocarcinogenesis

  19. METHOD OF CHEMICAL DECONTAMINATION OF STAINLESS STEEL NUCLEAR FACILITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancer, G.P.; Zegger, J.L.

    1961-12-19

    A chemical method is given for removing activated corrosion products on the primary system surfaces of a pressurized water reactor. The corrosion product deposits are composed chiefly of magnetite (Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/) with small amounts of nickel and chromium oxides. The corroded surfaces are first flushed with a caustic permanganate primary solution consisting of sodium hydroxide and potassium permanganate followed by a secondary rinse solution of ammonium citrate and citric acid containing the complexing agent Versene in small amounts. Demineralized water is used to clean out the primary and secondary solutions and a 60-minute drying period precedes the rinse solution. (AEC)

  20. Effect of decontamination on aging processes and considerations for life extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1987-10-01

    The basis for a recently initiated program on the chemical decontamination of nuclear reactor components and the possible impact of decontamination on extended-life service is described. The incentives for extending plant life beyond the present 40-year limit are discussed, and the possible aging degradation processes that may be accentuated in extended-life service are described. Chemical decontamination processes for nuclear plant primary systems are summarized with respect to their corrosive effects on structural alloys, particularly those in the aged condition. Available experience with chemical cleaning processes for the secondary side of PWR steam generators is also briefly considered. Overall, no severe materials corrosion problems have been found that would preclude the use of these chemical processes, but concerns have been raised in several areas, particularly with respect to corrosion-related problems that may develop during extended service.

  1. Decontamination of paint-coated concrete in nuclear plants using laser technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthofer, Anton; Lippmann, Wolfgang; Hurtado, Antonio [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Chair of Hydrogen and Nuclear Technology

    2013-07-01

    A review of the state of the art shows the technical novelty of the combined project. The development of an all-in-one process for treatment hazard chemical contamination on concrete structures with online monitoring method reduces the laborious mechanic decontamination and post-treatment. For safe experimental investigations, a three-barrier-system was constructed and can be used for tests with - first - epoxy paint in order to analyze and optimize the process. Simulation models help to formulate a mathematic scheme of the decontamination process by laser technology. The goal is a decontamination system with an online analyzing system of the flue gas for a mobile and extensive component in nuclear and conventional decommission. (orig.)

  2. A state of the art report on the decontamination technology for dry ice blasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, J. M.; Kim, K. H.; Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Yang, M. S.; Nam, S. H.; Kim, M. J

    2000-05-01

    DUPIC fuel fabrication process is a dry processing technology to manufacture CANDU compatible fuel through a direct reprocessing fabrication process from spent PWR fuel. DUPIC fuel fabrication process consists of the slitting of the spent PWR fuel rods, OREOX processing, homogeneous mixing, pelletizing and sintering. All these processes should be conducted by remote means in a M6 hot cell at IMEF. Since DUPIC fuel fabrication process includes powder handling process of highly radioactive spent fuel, decontamination of highly radioactive particulates from all types of surfaces such as DUPIC fuel manufacturing equipment, hot cell floor, tools is very important to improve the safety of hot cell and reduce the dose exposure to operator, This report describes various technologies for dry ice blasting. It provides the fundamentals of dry ice blasting decontamination and technical review of dry ice blasting on the radioactive decontamination.

  3. Plutonium Decontamination Using CBI Decon Gel 1101 in Highly Contaminated and Unique Areas at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton, M; Fischer, R P; Thoet, M M; O' Neill, M; Edgington, G

    2008-06-09

    A highly contaminated glove-box at LLNL containing plutonium was decontaminated using a strippable decontamination gel. 6 x 12 inch quadrants were mapped out on each of the surfaces. The gel was applied to various surfaces inside the glove-box and was allowed to cure. The radioactivity in each quadrant was measured using a LLNL Blue Alpha meter with a 1.5 inch standoff distance. The results showed decontamination factors of 130 and 210 on cast steel and Lexan{reg_sign} surfaces respectively after several applications. The gel also absorbed more than 91% of the radiation emitted from the surfaces during gel curing. The removed strippable film was analyzed by neutron multiplicity counting and gamma spectroscopy, yielding relative mass information and radioisotopic composition respectively.

  4. Decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Status report Task 2: process evaluation. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divine, J.R.; Woodruff, E.M.; McPartland, S.A.; Zima, G.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to reduce occupational exposure and waste volumes, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is studying decontamination as a precursor to decommissioning. Eleven processes or solvents were examined for their behavior in decontaminating BWR carbon steel samples. The solvents included NS-1, a proprietary solvent of Dow Chemical Corporation, designed for BWR use, and AP-Citrox, a well-known, two-step process designed for PWR stainless steel; it was used to provide a reference for later comparison to other systems and processes. The decontamination factors observed in the tests performed in a small laboratory scale recirculating loop ranged from about 1 (no effect) to 222 (about 99.6% of the initial activity removed. Coordinated corrosion measurements were made using twelve chemical solvents and eight metal alloys found in a range of reactor types.

  5. Effectiveness of automated ultraviolet-C light for decontamination of textiles inoculated with Enterococcus faecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolle, C; Huss, F; Lindblad, M; Reischies, F; Tano, E

    2018-01-01

    Healthcare textiles are increasingly recognized as potential vehicles for transmission of hospital-acquired infections. This study tested the ability of an automated ultraviolet-C (UV-C) room disinfection device (Tru-D Smart UV-C) to decontaminate textiles inoculated with Enterococcus faecium in a clinical setting. Contaminated polycotton (50/50 polyester/cotton) swatches were distributed to predefined locations in a ward room and exposed to UV-C light. UV-C decontamination reduced E. faecium counts by a mean log10 reduction factor of 1.37 (all P = 0.005, Wilcoxon signed rank test). UV-C decontamination may be a feasible adjunctive measure to conventional laundering to preserve the cleanliness of healthcare textiles in ward rooms. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety analysis report for packaging (onsite) decontaminated equipment self-container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnke, W.M.

    1998-09-29

    The purpose of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) is to demonstrate that specific decontaminated equipment can be safely used as its own self-container. As a Decontaminated Equipment Self-Container (also referred to as a self-container), no other packaging, such as a burial box, would be required to transport the equipment onsite. The self-container will consist of a piece of equipment or apparatus which has all readily removable interior contamination removed, all of its external openings sealed, and all external surfaces decontaminated to less than 2000 dpm/100 cm for gamma-emitting radionuclides and less than 220 dpm/100 CM2 for alpha-emitting radionuclides.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM RESEARCH PROJECTS TO IMPROVE DECONTAMINATION AND DECOMMISIONING OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Ann Marie

    2003-02-27

    This paper describes fourteen basic science projects aimed at solving decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) problems within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Funded by the Environmental Science Management Program (EMSP), these research projects address D&D problems where basic science is needed to expand knowledge and develop solutions to help DOE meet its cleanup milestones. EMSP uses directed solicitations targeted at identified Environmental Management (EM) needs to ensure that research results are directly applicable to DOE's EM problems. The program then helps transition the projects from basic to applied research by identifying end-users and coordinating proof-of-principle field tests. EMSP recently funded fourteen D&D research projects through the directed solicitation process. These research projects will be discussed, including description, current status, and potential impact. Through targeted research and proof-of-principle tests, it is hoped that EMSP's fourteen D&D basic research projects will directly impact and provide solutions to DOE's D&D problems.

  8. Theoretical approach to the destruction or sterilization of drugs in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slegers, Catherine; Tilquin, Bernard

    2005-02-01

    Two novel applications in the radiation processing of aqueous solutions of drugs are the sterilization of injectable drugs and the decontamination of hospital wastewaters by ionizing radiation. The parameters influencing the destruction of the drug in aqueous solutions are studied with a computer simulation program. This theoretical approach has revealed that the dose rate is the most important parameter that can be easily varied in order to optimize the destruction or the protection of the drug.

  9. Development of Personal Decontamination System Final Report CRADA No. TC-02078-04

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); O' Dell, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    This was a collaborative effort between The Regents of the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and O’Dell Engineering, Ltd. (O’Dell) to develop an improved low-cost personal decontamination system for Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs) and chemical agents. The significant change to the project was that COTS (Commercial Off-the Shelf Components) were identified that performed as well, or better than, the proprietary materials created and tested as part of this CRADA. These COTS components were combined to create a new LPDS (low-cost personal decontamination system) that met all specifications.

  10. Transportation cask decontamination and maintenance at the potential Yucca Mountain repository; Yucca Mountain Site characterization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, D.J.; Miller, D.D. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Hill, R.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This study investigates spent fuel cask handling experience at existing nuclear facilities to determine appropriate cask decontamination and maintenance operations at the potential Yucca Mountain repository. These operations are categorized as either routine or nonroutine. Routine cask decontamination and maintenance tasks are performed in the cask preparation area at the repository. Casks are taken offline to a separate cask maintenance area for major nonroutine tasks. The study develops conceptual designs of the cask preparation area and cask maintenance area. The functions, layouts, and major features of these areas are also described.

  11. Wide-area decontamination in an urban environment after radiological dispersion: A review and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, Michael D., E-mail: Kaminski@anl.gov [Nuclear Decontamination and Separations, Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Lee, Sang Don; Magnuson, Matthew [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Homeland Security Research Center (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • We review wide area, urban decontamination techniques for rapid response. • We examine historical data and its application to radiological terrorism scenario. • Data is insufficient to ensure a detailed, organized mitigation response. • Primary deficit is lessons-learned and relations to extrapolate a limited data set. • Research is needed to model a mitigation response and help guide data gathering. - Abstract: Nuclear or radiological terrorism in the form of uncontrolled radioactive contamination presents a unique challenge in the field of nuclear decontamination. Potential targets require an immediate decontamination response, or mitigation plan to limit the social and economic impact. To date, experience with urban decontamination of building materials – specifically hard, porous, external surfaces – is limited to nuclear weapon fallout and nuclear reactor accidents. Methods are lacking for performing wide-area decontamination in an urban environment so that in all release scenarios the area may be re-occupied without evaluation and/or restriction. Also lacking is experience in developing mitigation strategies, that is, methods of mitigating contamination and its resultant radiation dose in key areas during the immediate aftermath of an event and after lifesaving operations. To date, the tremendous strategy development effort primarily by the European community has focused on the recovery phase, which extends years beyond the release event. In this review, we summarize the methods and data collected over the past 70 years in the field of hard, external surface decontamination of radionuclide contaminations, with emphasis on methods suitable for response to radiological dispersal devices and their potentially unique physico-chemical characteristics. This review concludes that although a tremendous amount of work has been completed primarily by the European Community (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), the few studies existing on each

  12. Decontamination of a rotating cutting tool during operation by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Kusano, Yukihiro; Hansen, F.

    2010-01-01

    The decontamination of a rotating cutting tool used for slicing in the meat industry by means of atmospheric pressure plasmas is investigated. The target is Listeria monocytogenes, a bacterium which causes listeriosis and can be found in plants and food. The non-pathogenic species, Listeria innocua...... of the whole cutting tool. A log 5 reduction of L. innocua is obtained after 340 s of plasma operation. The temperature of the knife after treatment was found to be below 30 °C. The design of the setup allows a decontamination during slicing operation....

  13. Industrial Hygiene Concerns during the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lumia, M E

    2002-01-01

    A significant industrial hygiene concern during the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) was the oxidation of the lead bricks' surface, which were utilized for radiation shielding. This presented both airborne exposure and surface contamination issues for the workers in the field removing this material. This paper will detail the various protection and control methods tested and implemented to protect the workers, including those technologies deployed to decontaminate the work surfaces. In addition, those techniques employed to recycle the lead for additional use at the site will be discussed.

  14. IMPLEMENTATION OF MECHANICAL DECONTAMINATION FOR REDUCTION OF EXTERNAL EXPOSURE AT THE TERRITORY OF THE BRYANSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Ramzaev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a review of the data relevant to the technologies and some results of the mechanical decontamination of the ground and buildings located at the territory of two recreational areas in the Bryansk Region. Both areas were significantly contaminated by the Chernobyl debris in 1986. The obtained values of the gamma-dose rate reduction factor were about 0.2 and 0.3 for the outdoor and indoor locations, respectively. The follow-up monitoring of the treated and control areas demonstrated long-term stability of the effect of the decontamination carried out.

  15. Decontamination of digital image sensors and assessment of electron microscope performance in a BSL-3 containment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Sherman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A unique biological safety level (BSL-3 cryo-electron microscopy facility with a 200 keV high-end cryo-electron microscope has been commissioned at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB to study the structure of viruses and bacteria classified as select agents. We developed a microscope decontamination protocol based on chlorine dioxide gas with a continuous flow system. In this paper we report on testing digital camera sensors (both CCD and CMOS direct detector in a BSL-3 environment, and microscope performance after chlorine dioxide (ClO2 decontamination cycles.

  16. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  17. Decontamination and redox catalysis. Final report, 1 January 1991-31 March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, C.L.

    1994-06-01

    Development of effective homogeneous catalysts for the dehalogenation mustard (HD) and other toxic halocarbons; Design, preparation and investigation of new robust redox active polyoxometalates with catalytic activity for hydrolytic and or oxidative decontamination of cw agents and simulants; Design, preparation and investigation of catalytically active polyoxometalates with covalently attached organic groups to facilitate formation; The detailed study of new redox mechanisms involving organic compounds including cw agents and simulants and inorganic clusters; The relationships between the physical, catalytic, and photocatalytic properties of semiconductor metal oxides and polyoxometalates, with respect to decontamination of HD type compounds.

  18. Estimation and characterization of decontamination and decommissioning solid waste expected from the Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millar, J.S.; Pottmeyer, J.A.; Stratton, T.J. [and others

    1995-01-01

    Purpose of the study was to estimate the amounts of equipment and other materials that are candidates for removal and subsequent processing in a solid waste facility when the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant is decontaminated and decommissioned. (Building structure and soil are not covered.) Results indicate that {approximately}5,500 m{sup 3} of solid waste is expected to result from the decontamination and decommissioning of the Pu Finishing Plant. The breakdown of the volumes and percentages of waste by category is 1% dangerous solid waste, 71% low-level waste, 21% transuranic waste, 7% transuranic mixed waste.

  19. Chemical decontamination in BWR Philippsburg 1; Chemische Dekontamination im Siedewasserreaktor Philippsburg 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensen, Micael; Bolz, Michael [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Philippsburg (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    After the accident in the Fukushima nuclear power plant, the Philippsburg nuclear power plant (KKP1) was shut down for good due to political decision on March 17, 2011. Following the shutdown, all power plant components must be dismantled. This includes also parts that had been radioactively contaminated during operation. In order to reduce the dose rate for personnel involved in decommissioning, it is necessary to remove active oxide layers that had been formed during passivation. The systems are decontaminated by treatment with oxidative and reductive reagents which chemically dissolve the oxide. A report is given on the experience made with the chemical decontamination system in KKP 1.

  20. Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

  1. Novel adsorbent applicability for decontamination of printing wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiurski, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Ranogajec, Jonjaua; Kecic, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption capacity of clayey minerals can be enhanced by replacing the natural exchangeable cations with organic cations, which makes the clay surface more hydrophobic. Different solids such as activated carbon, clay minerals, zeolites, metal oxides and organic polymers have been tested as effective adsorbents. On a global scale, clays have a large applicability for decontamination, purification of urban and industrial residual waters, protection of waste disposal areas, and purification of industrial gases and so on. Clay derivative materials with high adsorption capacities are very attractive from an economical point of view. Due to the economic constraints, a development of cost effective and clean processes is desired. Adsorption processes has proved to be the most effective, especially for effluents with moderate and low heavy metal concentrations, as like as in printing wastewaters. Among several removal technologies, the adsorption of Zn(II) ion onto NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 addition could be of great importance for the printing wastewaters purification. However, the newly designed adsorbent of the defined pore size distribution and phase structure considered as the most suitable material for Zn(II) ion removal. The values of distribution coefficient (Kd) increased with decreasing of the adsorbent amount. The Kd values depend also on the type of used adsorbent, the following increased order is obtained: NZ Langmuir > DKR. The study also showed that the fired clay modified with PEG 600 addition has great potential (up to 93.5%) to remove Zn(II) ion from printing wastewaters. The results showed that fired clay, fired clay modified with polymer addition, natural zeolite and bentonite can be used for Zn(II) ion removal from printing wastewaters by adsorption method in laboratory batch mode. Based on higher affinity to the Zn(II) ion adsorption than fired clay, bentonite and zeolite it was concluded that feasibility of newly designed clayey adsorbent

  2. Fluxes of radionuclides in the agricultural production after a nuclear accident: countermeasures and decontamination techniques; Flux des radionucleides dans les productions agricoles suite a un accident nucleaire: contre-mesures et techniques de rehabilitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouve, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 -Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)]|[Universite de Provence, 13 - Marseille (France)

    1997-12-31

    This thesis deals with the radiological consequences of a nuclear accident through the radioactive contamination of the food chain and the subsequent countermeasures for decreasing the fluxes of radionuclides and decontaminating agricultural lands. After a brief summary of the radioprotection ground and context in case of a nuclear accident, this work surveys existing data on the fluxes of radionuclides in soils and from soil to plants. The research work focuses on both the prediction of the fluxes of radionuclides and possible countermeasures: the measurement of the bioavailability of radionuclides in the soil solution, its use in a mathematical expression to quantify the soil-to-plant transfer of caesium and strontium, and the perspectives of an innovative technique of soil decontamination. The obtained results show that based on 4 coefficients, it is possible to predict crop contamination within a 3 % confidence interval: the fluid solid distribution coefficient of radionuclides kd, the amount of chemical analogues of caesium and strontium, i.e. potassium and calcium, respectively, soil pH and a constant characterising the plant species that is concerned. However, it generally appears from soil to plant transfer studies that the reduction of the fluxes of radionuclides is not a promising way of radiological exposure mitigation after a nuclear accident. The work performed shows that it is more efficient to tackle the source of the contamination, i.e. decontaminate the soil. The proposed technique of soil scraping using a turf harvester appears to be the most advantageous among the tested options, for the decontamination of peat-bog meadows. (author).

  3. Optimization of Hexadecylpyridinium Chloride Decontamination for Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Bradner, L.; Robbe-Austerman, S.; Beitz, D. C.; Stabel, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    A protocol was optimized for the isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) from milk and colostrum, with parameters including chemical decontamination, antibiotics, and different culture media. This study demonstrates that the efficiency of MAP recovery from milk is highly dependent upon the culturing protocol, and such protocols should be optimized to ensure that low concentrations of MAP in milk can be detected.

  4. The impact of skin decontamination on the time window for effective treatment of percutaneous VX exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosen, M.J.A.; Berg, R.M. van den; Jong, A.L. de; Schans, M.J. van der; Noort, D.; Langenberg, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of the present study was to obtain insight into depot formation and penetration following percutaneous VX poisoning, in order to identify an appropriate decontamination window that can enhance or support medical countermeasures. The study was executed in two phases, using the hairless

  5. In vivo laser scanning microscopic investigation of the decontamination of hazardous substances from the human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Schanzer, S.; Richter, H.; Gross, I.; Menting, K. H.; Frazier, L.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stimulation of the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin is a topic of intensive dermatological and pharmacological research. In this context, it was found that in addition to the intercellular penetration, the follicular penetration also represents an efficient penetration pathway. The hair follicles act as a long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. They are surrounded by all important target structures, such as blood capillaries, stem and dendritic cells. Therefore, the hair follicles, as well as the skin, need to be protected from hazardous substances. The traditional method of decontamination after respective accidental contacts consists of an intensive washing of the skin. However, during this mechanical procedure, the substances can be pushed even deeper into the hair follicles. In the present study, absorbent materials were applied to remove a fluorescent model substance from the skin without inducing mechanical stress. The results were compared to the decontamination effects obtained by intensive washing. Investigations were performed by means of in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The comparison revealed that decontamination with absorbent materials is more effective than decontamination with washing processes.

  6. A study of the decontamination procedures used for chemical analysis of polar deep ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Miyake

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the decontamination procedures used on polar deep ice cores before chemical analyses such as measurements of the concentrations of iron species and dust (microparticles. We optimized cutting and melting protocols for decontamination using chemically ultraclean polyethylene bags and simulated ice samples made from ultrapure water. For dust and ion species including acetate, which represented a high level of contamination, we were able to decrease contamination to below several μg l^ for ion concentrations and below 10000 particles ml^ for the dust concentration. These concentration levels of ion species and dust are assumed to be present in the Dome Fuji ice core during interglacial periods. Decontamination of the ice core was achieved by cutting away approximately 3 mm of the outside of a sample and by melting away approximately 30% of a sample's weight. Furthermore, we also report the preparation protocols for chemical analyses of the 2nd Dome Fuji ice core, including measurements of ion and dust concentrations, pH, electric conductivity (EC, and stable isotope ratios of water (δD and δO, based on the results of the investigation of the decontamination procedures.

  7. Development of chlorine dioxide releasing film and its application in decontaminating fresh produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    A feasibility study was conducted to develop chlorine dioxide releasing packaging films for decontaminating fresh produce. Sodium chlorite and citric acid powder were incorporated into polylactic acid (PLA) polymer. Films made with different amount of PLA (100 & 300 mg), percentage of reactant (5-60...

  8. Genotoxicity testing of extracts from aflatoxin-contaminated peanut meal, following chemical decontamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Polman, Th.H.G.; Neal, G.E.; Verma, A.; Guyomard, C.; Tulliez, J.; Gautier, J.P.; Coker, R.D.; Nagler, M.J.; Heidenreich, E.; Delort-Laval, J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most important concerns in the decontamination of aflatoxin-containing feed commodities is the safety of the products for food-producing animals and for human consumption of products derived from these animals. A new method, based on the use of florisil and C18 solid phase extraction

  9. Autonomous bio-chemical decontaminator (ABCD) against weapons of mass destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyacinthe, Berg P.

    2006-05-01

    The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and the use of such elements pose an eminent asymmetric threat with disastrous consequences to the national security of any nation. In particular, the use of biochemical warfare agents against civilians and unprotected troops in international conflicts or by terrorists against civilians is considered as a very peculiar threat. Accordingly, taking a quarantine-before-inhalation approach to biochemical warfare, the author introduces the notion of autonomous biochemical decontamination against WMD. In the unfortunate event of a biochemical attack, the apparatus proposed herein is intended to automatically detect, identify, and more importantly neutralize a biochemical threat. Along with warnings concerning a cyber-WMD nexus, various sections cover discussions on human senses and computer sensors, corroborating evidence related to detection and neutralization of chemical toxins, and cyber-assisted olfaction in stand alone, peer-to-peer, and network settings. In essence, the apparatus can be used in aviation and mass transit security to initiate mass decontamination by dispersing a decontaminant aerosol or to protect the public water supply against a potential bioterrorist attack. Future effort may involve a system-on-chip (SoC) embodiment of this apparatus that allows a safer environment for the emerging phenomenon of cyber-assisted olfaction and morph cell phones into ubiquitous sensors/decontaminators. Although this paper covers mechanisms and protocols to avail a neutralizing substance, further research will need to explore the substance's various pharmacological profiles and potential side effects.

  10. Stainless steel crowns reuse and decontamination techniques: a survey among Indian pediatric dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhin, K; Abhinav, S; Thejokrishna, P; Sajjad, M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the pattern and extent of stainless steel crown (SSC) reuse following try-in and the methods employed for their decontamination among Indian pediatric dentists. Questionnaires were delivered personally to 100 pediatric dentists selected randomly across India. Questionnaire was divided into three subsections. The first section assessed demographics to determine the sample population characteristics. The second section dealt with the pattern of SSCs use and reuse following size determination. The third section inquired into general cross infection control procedures including cleaning, sterilization, and training to assess the general level of compliance. Data analysis involved descriptive analysis using SPSS 16.0 software. The majority of respondents (98.92%) routinely reused the crowns after they had been tried in the patient. Only one respondent (1.08%) discarded the crowns after try-in. Autoclave (25%) was the most common method employed for the decontamination of tried-in SSCs among the respondents. The majority of the participating pediatric dentists are reusing SSCs following try-in during crown selection. However, great diversity exists in the methods employed for the decontamination of the same. This demands for more research to provide guidelines into the most effective method of decontamination.

  11. Stainless steel crowns reuse and decontamination techniques: A survey among Indian pediatric dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Farhin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the pattern and extent of stainless steel crown (SSC reuse following try-in and the methods employed for their decontamination among Indian pediatric dentists. Study Design: Questionnaires were delivered personally to 100 pediatric dentists selected randomly across India. Questionnaire was divided into three subsections. The first section assessed demographics to determine the sample population characteristics. The second section dealt with the pattern of SSCs use and reuse following size determination. The third section inquired into general cross infection control procedures including cleaning, sterilization, and training to assess the general level of compliance. Data analysis involved descriptive analysis using SPSS 16.0 software. Results: The majority of respondents (98.92% routinely reused the crowns after they had been tried in the patient. Only one respondent (1.08% discarded the crowns after try-in. Autoclave (25% was the most common method employed for the decontamination of tried-in SSCs among the respondents. Conclusion: The majority of the participating pediatric dentists are reusing SSCs following try-in during crown selection. However, great diversity exists in the methods employed for the decontamination of the same. This demands for more research to provide guidelines into the most effective method of decontamination.

  12. Health care worker protection in mass casualty respiratory failure: infection control, decontamination, and personal protective equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Elizabeth L

    2008-02-01

    Maintenance of a safe and stable health care infrastructure is critical to an effective mass casualty disaster response. Both secondary contamination during chemical disasters and hospital-associated infections during epidemic illness can pose substantial threats to achieving this goal. Understanding basic principles of decontamination and infection control during responses to chemical and biologic disasters can help minimize the risks to patients and health care workers. Effective decontamination following toxic chemical exposure should include both removal of contaminated clothing and decontamination of the victim's skin. Wet decontamination is the most feasible strategy in a mass casualty situation and should be performed promptly by trained personnel. In the event of an epidemic, infection prevention and control measures are based on essential principles of hand hygiene and standard precautions. Expanded precautions should be instituted as needed to target contact, droplet, and airborne routes of infectious disease transmission. Specific equipment and measures for critical care delivery may serve to decrease risk to health care workers in the event of an epidemic. Their use should be considered in developing comprehensive disaster response plans.

  13. Reduced weight decontamination formulation for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2014-06-03

    A reduced weight DF-200 decontamination formulation that is stable under high temperature storage conditions. The formulation can be pre-packed as an all-dry (i.e., no water) or nearly-dry (i.e., minimal water) three-part kit, with make-up water (the fourth part) being added later in the field at the point of use.

  14. Biosafety and containment plan & design for direct sampling of operating effluent decontamination tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) uses an effluent decontamination system (EDS) that serves as an enhancement, or extra barrier for biocontainment. Wastewater effluent from (A)BSL-3E and (A)BSL-2E laboratories is collected in tanks for thermal inactivation (180°F for 30 minut...

  15. Decontamination of heater-cooler units associated with contamination by atypical mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, M I; Ashford, R; Bradley, C W; Bradley, C R; Martin, T A; Walker, J; Jumaa, P

    2016-07-01

    Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium chimaera are found widely in hospital water systems. Invasive M. chimaera infections have recently been attributed to heater-cooler units (HCUs) of cardiopulmonary bypass equipment. To assess the extent of microbiological contamination within the HCUs and to inform decontamination strategies for reducing the microbial load. Water samples taken from HCUs used at University Hospitals Birmingham for cardiopulmonary bypass surgery were sampled to determine the number of micro-organisms by membrane filtration. Various decontamination processes were used throughout the study, all based on the manufacturer's guidance. Total viable counts >300cfu per 100mL containing a wide variety of micro-organisms were obtained from water inside the HCUs. Working with the manufacturers, we significantly reduced the microbial load of the water within the HCUs by removing the internal tubing soiled with biofilm followed by a weekly decontamination regimen with peracetic acid. A decontamination cycle including an initial replacement of internal tubing with weekly microbiological water samples is required to maintain the water quality within HCUs at an acceptable level. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. In-situ generation of chlorine dioxide for surface decontamination of produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruits and vegetables, particularly fresh-cut products, are frequently contaminated with bacterial pathogens and implicated in foodborne illnesses. The objective of this study was to develop a unique in-situ sequential surface decontamination method for produce using sodium chlorite and acid. The ...

  17. Decontamination of radiological agents from drinking water infrastructure: a literature review and summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Jeff; Minamyer, Scott

    2014-11-01

    This report summarizes the current state of knowledge on the persistence of radiological agents on drinking water infrastructure (such as pipes) along with information on decontamination should persistence occur. Decontamination options for drinking water infrastructure have been explored for some important radiological agents (cesium, strontium and cobalt), but important data gaps remain. Although some targeted experiments have been published on cesium, strontium and cobalt persistence on drinking water infrastructure, most of the data comes from nuclear clean-up sites. Furthermore, the studies focused on drinking water systems use non-radioactive surrogates. Non-radioactive cobalt was shown to be persistent on iron due to oxidation with free chlorine in drinking water and precipitation on the iron surface. Decontamination with acidification was an effective removal method. Strontium persistence on iron was transient in tap water, but adherence to cement-mortar has been demonstrated and should be further explored. Cesium persistence on iron water infrastructure was observed when flow was stagnant, but not with water flow present. Future research suggestions focus on expanding the available cesium, strontium and cobalt persistence data to other common infrastructure materials, specifically cement-mortar. Further exploration chelating agents and low pH treatment is recommended for future decontamination studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of a Biological Pathogen Decontamination Protocol for Animal Feed Mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Anne R; Cochrane, Roger A; Deliephan, Aiswariya; Stark, Charles R; Jones, Cassandra K

    2015-09-01

    Animal feed and ingredients are potential vectors of pathogenic bacteria. Contaminated ingredients can contaminate facility equipment, leading to cross-contamination of other products. This experiment was conducted to evaluate a standardized protocol for decontamination of an animal feed manufacturing facility using Enterococcus faecium (ATCC 31282) as an indicator. A pelleted swine diet inoculated with E. faecium was manufactured, and environmental samples (swabs, replicate organism detection and counting plates, and air samples) were collected (i) before inoculation (baseline data), (ii) after production of inoculated feed, (iii) after physical removal of organic material using pressurized air, (iv) after application of a chemical sanitizer containing a quaternary ammonium-glutaraldehyde blend, (v) after application of a chemical sanitizer containing sodium hypochlorite, (vi) after facility heat-up to 60 8 C for 24 h, (vii) for 48 h, and (viii) for 72 h. Air samples collected outside the facility confirmed pathogen containment; E. faecium levels were equal to or lower than baseline levels at each sample location. The decontamination step and its associated interactions were the only variables that affected E. faecium incidence (P 0.22). After production of the inoculated diet, 85.7% of environmental samples were positive for E. faecium. Physical cleaning of equipment had no effect on contamination (P = 0.32). Chemical cleaning with a quaternary ammonium-glutaraldehyde blend and sodium hypochlorite each significantly reduced E. faecium contamination (P decontamination. These results confirmed both successful containment and decontamination of biological pathogens in the tested pilot-scale feed mill.

  19. Application of ultraviolet C technology for surface decontamination of fresh produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultraviolet C (UV-C) employs physical light energy to inactivate microorganisms. This article discusses factors affecting the efficacy of UV-C against common foodborne pathogenic bacteria for food surface decontamination, means to assess and overcome the shading effect, survival and growth of patho...

  20. Use of hydrogen peroxide vapour & plasma irradiation in combination for quick decontamination of closed chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourya, Devendra T; Shahani, Hamish C; Yadav, Pragya D; Barde, Pradip V

    2016-08-01

    Various conventional methods such as gaseous, vapour and misting systems, fogging, manual spray and wipe techniques employing a number of chemical agents are used for decontamination of enclosed spaces. Among all these methods, use of aerosolized formaldehyde is the most preferred method due to cost-effectiveness and practical aspects. However, being extremely corrosive in nature generating very irritating fumes and difficulty in maintaining a high level of gas concentration, many laboratories prefer the vaporization of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) as an alternative. We present here the results of using H 2 O 2 vapour in combination with plasma irradiation for quick decontamination of closed chambers. The present study describes a decontamination method, using plasma irradiation in combination with H 2 O 2 (5%). Effect of plasma irradiation and H 2 O 2 on the viability of bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis), Chikungunya and Kyasanur Forest Disease viruses was assessed. Data suggest that with the combination of H 2 O 2 vapour and plasma irradiation, within short time (three minutes), decontamination of surfaces and space volume could be achieved. Although it showed damage of spores present on the strips, it did not show any penetration power. The results were encouraging, and this method was found to be efficient for achieving surface sterilization in a short time. This application may be useful in laboratories and industries particularly, those working on clean facility concept following good laboratory and manufacturing practices.

  1. Use of hydrogen peroxide vapour & plasma irradiation in combination for quick decontamination of closed chambers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra T Mourya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Various conventional methods such as gaseous, vapour and misting systems, fogging, manual spray and wipe techniques employing a number of chemical agents are used for decontamination of enclosed spaces. Among all these methods, use of aerosolized formaldehyde is the most preferred method due to cost-effectiveness and practical aspects. However, being extremely corrosive in nature generating very irritating fumes and difficulty in maintaining a high level of gas concentration, many laboratories prefer the vaporization of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 as an alternative. We present here the results of using H 2 O 2 vapour in combination with plasma irradiation for quick decontamination of closed chambers. Methods: The present study describes a decontamination method, using plasma irradiation in combination with H 2 O 2 (5%. Effect of plasma irradiation and H 2 O 2 on the viability of bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis, Chikungunya and Kyasanur Forest Disease viruses was assessed. Results: Data suggest that with the combination of H 2 O 2 vapour and plasma irradiation, within short time (three minutes, decontamination of surfaces and space volume could be achieved. Although it showed damage of spores present on the strips, it did not show any penetration power. Interpretation & conclusions: The results were encouraging, and this method was found to be efficient for achieving surface sterilization in a short time. This application may be useful in laboratories and industries particularly, those working on clean facility concept following good laboratory and manufacturing practices.

  2. Decontamination and dismantling at the CEA; L'assainissement et le demantelement au CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This document presents the dismantling policy at the CEA (French Research Center on the atomic energy), the financing of the decontamination and the dismantling, the regulatory framework, the knowledge and the technology developed at the CEA, the radiation protection, the environment monitoring and the installations. (A.L.B.)

  3. Selective digestive tract decontamination decreases time on ventilator in Guillain-Barré syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos Eyssen, Martine E.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Jacobs, Bart C.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Voort, Peter H. J.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Horn, Janneke; Spronk, Peter E.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W.; Bakker, Jan; van der Jagt, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) occurs in more than half of mechanically ventilated patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and is associated with prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV). We investigated the impact of selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD), an intervention

  4. Screening for the next generation heavy metal hyperaccumulators for dryland decontamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravanbakhsh, Mohammadhossein; Ronaghi, Abdol Majid; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen; Jousset, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal removal by plants bears a great potential to decontaminate soils. A major challenge remains to find plant species that accumulate heavy metal, harbor a sufficient biomass and grow in the desired environmental conditions. Here we present candidate plants for phytoremediation in arid

  5. Characterization of chars produced in the co-pyrolysis of different wastes: decontamination study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, M; Gonçalves, M; Lapa, N; Barbosa, R; Mendes, B; Pinto, F

    2012-03-15

    The present work is devoted to the study of the decontamination of chars obtained in the co-pyrolysis of plastics, biomass and tyre wastes. The chars were extracted with several organic solvents of different polarities either individually or in sequence. The ability of each selected extractant to remove toxic pollutants was evaluated by comparing the extraction yields and by characterizing the crude extracts with a combination of chemical analysis and toxicity bioassays. Also, the mineral composition of the treated and non-treated chars was assessed. The results obtained in this study indicate that hexane is the more efficient extraction solvent to be used in the organic decontamination of chars obtained in the co-pyrolysis of plastics, tyres and biomass. A sequential extraction with solvents of increasing polarity can provide a better decontamination of the raw pyrolysis char than any individual extraction. The compounds removed from the char during the decontamination process are mainly aliphatic hydrocarbons and aromatic hydrocarbons, therefore a material that may be upgraded to be used as a fuel and/or as raw material for the organic chemical industry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Decontamination of Fumonisin B1 in maize grain by Pleurotus eryngii and antioxidant enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam HAIDUKOWSKI

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fumonisin B1 (FB1 is among the most common mycotoxins found in maize kernels and maize products worldwide. The microbiological process of detoxification and transformation of toxic organic pollutants is a promising method for foodstuffs decontamination. Some basidiomycetes, such as the Pleurotus eryngii species complex, include several important commercial edible varieties that can detoxify polycyclic organic compounds and a range of wastes and pollutants. We investigated the potential role of P. eryngii, one of the most consumed mushrooms, in the decontamination of FB1 in maize. In addition, selected antioxidant enzymes, (soluble peroxidase (POD, catalase (CAT and ascorbate peroxidase, primarily involved in control of cell hydrogen peroxide levels, and lignin degradation, were analyzed, to evaluate their contributions to the molecular mechanisms of FB1 by P. eryngii. FB1 decontamination by P. eryngii and involvement of CAT and POD enzymes in the control of toxic decontamination levels of H2O2 were demonstrated. A consistent reduction of FB1 was observed at different incubation times. The average decrease levels of FB1, with respect to the control cultures, ranged from 45 to 61% (RSD < 15%. This study is a possible eco-friendly approach to reducing this mycotoxin in the feed supply chains.

  7. An attemp to use a pulsed CO2 laser for decontamination of radioactive metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILAN S. TRTICA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in laser radioactive decontamination of metal surfaces. It offers advantages over conventional methods: improved safety, reduction of secondary waste, reduced waste volume, acceptable cost. The main mechanism of cleaning by lasers is ablation. A pulsed TEA CO2 laser was used in this work for surface cleaning in order to show that ablation of metal surfaces is possible even at relatively low pulse energies, and to suggest that it could be competitive with other lasers because of much higher energy efficiencies. A brief theoretical analysis was made before the experiments. The laser beam was focused using a KBr-lens onto a surface contaminated with 137Cs (b-, t1/2 = 30.17 y. Three different metals were used: stainless steel, copper and aluminium. The ablated material was pumped out in an air atmosphere and transferred to a filter. The presence of activity on the filter was shown by a germanium detector-multichannel analyzer. The activity levels were measured by a GM counter. The calculated decontamination factors and collection factors showed that ablation occurs with a relatively high efficiency of decontamination. This investigation suggests that decontamination using a CO2 laser should be seriously considered.

  8. Wide-area decontamination in an urban environment after radiological dispersion: A review and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Michael D; Lee, Sang Don; Magnuson, Matthew

    2016-03-15

    Nuclear or radiological terrorism in the form of uncontrolled radioactive contamination presents a unique challenge in the field of nuclear decontamination. Potential targets require an immediate decontamination response, or mitigation plan to limit the social and economic impact. To date, experience with urban decontamination of building materials - specifically hard, porous, external surfaces - is limited to nuclear weapon fallout and nuclear reactor accidents. Methods are lacking for performing wide-area decontamination in an urban environment so that in all release scenarios the area may be re-occupied without evaluation and/or restriction. Also lacking is experience in developing mitigation strategies, that is, methods of mitigating contamination and its resultant radiation dose in key areas during the immediate aftermath of an event and after lifesaving operations. To date, the tremendous strategy development effort primarily by the European community has focused on the recovery phase, which extends years beyond the release event. In this review, we summarize the methods and data collected over the past 70 years in the field of hard, external surface decontamination of radionuclide contaminations, with emphasis on methods suitable for response to radiological dispersal devices and their potentially unique physico-chemical characteristics. This review concludes that although a tremendous amount of work has been completed primarily by the European Community (EU) and the United Kingdom (UK), the few studies existing on each technique permit only very preliminary estimates of decontamination factors for various building materials and methods and extrapolation of those values for use in environments outside the EU and UK. This data shortage prevents us from developing an effective and detailed mitigation response plan and remediation effort. Perhaps most importantly, while the data available does include valuable information on the practical aspects of performing

  9. Contribution to the study of external contamination by radioactive products: skin contamination by radioactive cobalt in soluble form and decontamination; Contribution a l'etude de la contamination externe par des produits radioactifs: contamination cutanee par les cobalts radioactifs sous forme soluble et decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tymen, H.

    2002-12-15

    The aim of this work was to characterize the behavior of the radioactive cobalt isotopes, which are present in reactor coolant systems of a pressurized water reactor (PWR), in the case of occupational skin exposure, and to study different therapies. Our experimental approach stems from standardized methods in skin pharmacology. In a first step, a physico-chemical study of a primary coolant water was carried out to characterize the soluble fraction of radio-cobalt and its skin affinity. The second step consisted in quantifying the diffusion through the skin, in vivo and in vitro in rats, and in vitro in human. Parallel experiments were carried out to study biokinetics of cobalt in rats, after intravenous, intramuscular and subcutaneous injection. Whatever the route of administration, cobalt diffuses easily in the organism. On the contrary, its skin absorption is very limited. In a fourth step, the influence of the skin injuries on absorption was estimated in vivo on rat skin. Several skin models were developed to standardize different injuries: excoriation, heat burns (convection, conduction) and chemical burns (acid or alkaline). Biokinetics study over 24 hours and histological study have shown a relation between skin absorption and stratum corneum alteration. In the latest step of this work, we compared the efficacy of various decontaminating agents administered under different galenic forms. Per (3, 6- anhydro, 2-O-carboxy-methyl)-{alpha}-cyclo-dextrin exhibited a significant efficacy for cobalt decontamination of skin. This macromolecule was tested in aqueous solution, in agarose gel and loaded on 'functionalized' fibers intended for development of new decontaminating tissues. (author)

  10. Influence of Decontaminating Agents and Swipe Materials on Laboratory Simulated Working Surfaces Wet Spilled with Sodium Pertechnetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchata, Suman; Lavanya, K; Shivanand, Bhushan

    2017-01-01

    Decontamination of various working surfaces with sodium pertechnetate minor spillage is essential for maintaining good radiation safety practices as well as for regulatory compliance. To observe the influences of decontaminating agents and swipe materials on different type of surfaces used in nuclear medicine laboratory work area wet spilled with 99m-technetium (99mTc) sodium pertechnetate. Lab-simulated working surface materials. Experimental study design. Direct decontamination method on dust-free lab simulated new working surfaces [stainless steel, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Perspex, resin] using four decontaminating agents [tap water, soap water (SW), Radiacwash, and spirit] with four different swipe material [cotton, tissue paper (TP), Whatman paper (WP), adsorbent sheet (AS)] was taken 10 samples (n = 10) for each group. Parametric test two-way analysis of variance is used with significance level of 0.005, was used to evaluate statistical differences between different group of decontaminating agent and swipe material, and the results are expressed in mean ± SD. Decontamination factor is calculated after five cleaning for each group. A total of 160 samples result calculated using four decontaminating agent (tap water, SW, Radiacwash, and spirit), four swipe material (cotton, TP, WP, and AS) for commonly used surface (stainless steel, PVC, Perspex, resin) using direct method by 10 samples (n = 10) for each group. Tap water is the best decontaminating agent compared with SW, Radiac wash and spirit for the laboratory simulated stainless steel, PVC, and Perspex surface material, whereas in case of resin surface material, SW decontaminating agent is showing better effectiveness. Cotton is the best swipe material compared to WP-1, AS and TP for the stainless steel, PVC, Perspex, and resin laboratory simulated surface materials. Perspex and stainless steel are the most suitable and recommended laboratory surface material compared to PVC and resin in nuclear medicine

  11. Microbial flora on cell-phones in an orthopedic surgery room before and after decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgier, J; Coste, J-F; Cavaignac, E; Bayle-Iniguez, X; Chiron, P; Bonnevialle, P; Laffosse, J-M

    2016-12-01

    Cell-phones are the typical kind of object brought into the operating room from outside by hospital staff. A great effort is made to reduce the level of potentially contaminating bacteria in the operating room, and introducing these devices may run counter to good practice. The study hypothesis was that cell-phones are colonized by several strains of bacteria and may constitute a source of nosocomial contamination. The main study objective was to screen for bacterial colonies on the surfaces of cell-phones introduced in an orthopedic surgery room. The secondary objective was to assess the efficacy of decontamination. Samples were taken from the cell-phones of hospital staff (surgeons, anaesthetists, nurses, radiology operators, and external medical representatives) entering the operating room of the university hospital center orthopedic surgery department, Toulouse (France). Sampling used Count Tact(®) contact gel, without wiping the phone down in advance. Both sides of the phone were sampled, before and after decontamination with a pad imbibed with 0.25% Surfanios(®) Premium disinfectant. A nasal sample was also taken to investigate the correlation between Staphylococcus aureus in the nasal cavities and on the cell-phone. Fifty-two cell-phones were sampled. Before decontamination, the mean number of colony-forming units (CFU) was 258 per phone (range, 0-1,664). After decontamination, it was 127 (range, 0-800) (P=0.0001). Forty-nine cell-phones bore CFUs before decontamination (94%), and 39 after (75%) (P=0.02). Cell-phones are CFU carriers and may thus lead to contamination. Guidelines should be drawn up to encourage cleaning phones regularly and to reduce levels of use within the operating room. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of Different Household Decontamination Procedures on Antioxidant Activity and Microbial Load of Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimohammadi M.*

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Decontamination procedures are different in each country, as the other applications of disinfection, and standards. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of household decontaminations and storage time on the antioxidant activity and microbial load of salad vegetables. Instrument & Methods: This analytic-descriptive study was conducted on 4 types of salad vegetables; cucumber, tomato, lettuce, and sweet basil. After washing, samples with storage time of 0 day were analyzed immediately. Other samples were held in 4°C for 3 and 5 days. Five different washing and decontamination methods were compared; water washing, detergent washing, benzalkonium chloride, sequential washing and Kanz disinfecting method. The Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma assay was used to measure the antioxidant activity. Aerobic mesophyll bacteria and total coliforms were chosen as microbial load index. ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests were used to analyze the data. Findings: By increasing the storage time, the antioxidant activity of all types of vegetables reduced. There was a significant decrease in antioxidant activity in all types of vegetables using sequential washing method with water, detergent, and benzalkonium chloride and Kanz disinfection method. All washing methods were effective in decontamination for either mesophyll bacteria or total coliforms, except for total coliforms in lettuce. There was no significant difference in microbial load among first 4 methods of washing (p>0.05, but a significant difference was observed in Kanz disinfection method (p<0.05. Conclusion: Kanz disinfection is the most effective decontamination method to eliminate microorganisms index, which also reduce the antioxidant activity.

  13. The effect of decontamination procedures on the pharmacodynamics of venlafaxine in overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Venkata V Pavan; Isbister, Geoffrey K; Duffull, Stephen B

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To investigate the relationship between decontamination procedures and seizure events caused by venlafaxine overdose and to estimate the time at which 90% of patients would have had their first seizure in the presence and absence of decontamination. METHODS Data were collected from 319 patients who took an overdose of venlafaxine on 436 occasions. Seizures occurred on 24 of 436 occasions (5%). Patients received one of single dose activated charcoal (SDAC), whole bowel irrigation (WBI), a combination of either (SDAC/WBI) or no decontamination. Logistic regression and time to event analysis were used to investigate the influence of dose and decontamination on the probability of seizures and time to 90% (t90) of seizure, respectively. RESULTS A linear logistic regression model described the data. Simulation from the model showed that the probability of seizure was 0.05 (0.03–0.08), 0.19 (0.09–0.35) and 0.75 (0.30–0.96) at 1000, 5000 and 10 000 mg, respectively (median and 95% credible interval). At the mean dose of 2100 mg the odds ratios (OR) in the presence of SDAC, WBI and SDAC/WBI were 0.48 (0.25–0.89), 0.71 (0.35–1.22) and 0.25 (0.08–0.62), respectively. A modified Gompertz model described the time to seizure events. Simulations from the Gompertz model showed that the t90 values for first seizure was 26 h and was not affected by dose or decontamination procedure. CONCLUSION SDAC/WBI provided greater benefits than the sum of the independent effects of SDAC and WBI. Patients should be observed for at least 24 h for seizures based on the dose and risk of seizure occurring. PMID:21306417

  14. Effects of slag composition and process variables on decontamination of metallic wastes by melt refining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    Melt refining has been suggested as an alternative for decontamination and volume reduction of low-level-contaminated metallic wastes. Knowledge of metallurgical and thermochemical aspects of the process is essential for effective treatment of various metals. Variables such as slag type and composition, melting technique, and refractory materials need to be identified for each metal or alloy. Samples of contaminated metals were melted with fluxes by resistance furnace or induction heating. The resulting ingots as well as the slags were analyzed for their nuclide contents, and the corresponding partition ratios were calculated. Compatibility of slags and refractories was also investigated, and proper refractory materials were identified. Resistance furnace melting appeared to be a better melting technique for nonferrous scrap, while induction melting was more suitable for ferrous metals. In general uranium contents of the metals, except for aluminum, could be reduced to as low as 0.01 to 0.1 ppM by melt refining. Aluminum could be decontaminated to about 1 to 2 ppM U when certain fluoride slags were used. The extent of decontamination was not very sensitive to slag type and composition. However, borosilicate and basic oxidizing slags were more effective on ferrous metals and Cu; NaNO/sub 3/-NaCl-NaOH type fluxes were desirable for Zn, Pb, and Sn; and fluoride type slags were effective for decontamination of Al. Recrystallized alumina proved to be the most compatible refractory for melt refining both ferrous and nonferrous metals, while graphite was suitable for nonferrous metal processing. In conclusion, melt refining is an effective technique for volume reduction ad decontamination of contaminated metal scrap when proper slags, melting technique, and refractories are used.

  15. Selective digestive or oropharyngeal decontamination and topical oropharyngeal chlorhexidine for prevention of death in general intensive care: systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard; MacLennan, Graeme; Glen, John

    2014-03-31

    To determine the effect on mortality of selective digestive decontamination, selective oropharyngeal decontamination, and topical oropharyngeal chlorhexidine in adult patients in general intensive care units and to compare these interventions with each other in a network meta-analysis. Systematic review, conventional meta-analysis, and network meta-analysis. Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL were searched to December 2012. Previous meta-analyses, conference abstracts, and key journals were also searched. We used pairwise meta-analyses to estimate direct evidence from intervention-control trials and a network meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework to combine direct and indirect evidence. Prospective randomised controlled trials that recruited adult patients in general intensive care units and studied selective digestive decontamination, selective oropharyngeal decontamination, or oropharyngeal chlorhexidine compared with standard care or placebo. Selective digestive decontamination had a favourable effect on mortality, with a direct evidence odds ratio of 0.73 (95% confidence interval 0.64 to 0.84). The direct evidence odds ratio for selective oropharyngeal decontamination was 0.85 (0.74 to 0.97). Chlorhexidine was associated with increased mortality (odds ratio 1.25, 1.05 to 1.50). When each intervention was compared with the other, both selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination were superior to chlorhexidine. The difference between selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination was uncertain. Selective digestive decontamination has a favourable effect on mortality in adult patients in general intensive care units. In these patients, the effect of selective oropharyngeal decontamination is less certain. Both selective digestive decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination are superior to chlorhexidine, and there is a possibility that chlorhexidine is associated with increased

  16. Study of the indoor decontamination using nanocoated woven polyester fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Hafeezullah; Kumari, Naveeta; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Khoso, Nazakat Ali

    2017-11-01

    This research primarily deals with the photocatalytic degradation of methanol in indoor air using nanocoated indoor textiles used for curtains as household textiles. The woven polyester was coated by titanium dioxide by sol gel method, using silicon-based binder. The characterization of the coating has been done using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image analysis, energy dispersive analysis using X-ray (EDAX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The DIY instrument providing the similar environment as of indoor was designed to assess the performance of the degradation of formaldehyde under UV light. The photocatalytic degradation rate was measured using the absorption value of the solutions obtained in the result of liquid chromatography of test solution and reagent solution. Different amount of dosages (1-3 %) and different time period of coatings (half hour to 3 h) have been evaluated for optimization.

  17. Removal of Uranium by Exchanger Resins from Soil Washing Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on AM-resin resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a batch-type washing with a 60 .deg. C heated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods for uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions. If the uranium selectively removed from the waste solution, a very small amount of the 2nd waste would be generated. Thus, selective sorption of uranium by ion exchange resins was examined in this study.

  18. Decontamination of chemical-warfare agent simulants by polymer surfaces doped with the singlet oxygen generator zinc octaphenoxyphthalocyanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Raymond T; Coneski, Peter N; Wynne, James H

    2013-10-23

    Using reactive singlet oxygen (1O2), the oxidation of chemical-warfare agent (CWA) simulants has been demonstrated. The zinc octaphenoxyphthalocyanine (ZnOPPc) complex was demonstrated to be an efficient photosensitizer for converting molecular oxygen (O2) to 1O2 using broad-spectrum light (450-800 nm) from a 250 W halogen lamp. This photosensitization produces 1O2 in solution as well as within polymer matrices. The oxidation of 1-naphthol to naphthoquinone was used to monitor the rate of 1O2 generation in the commercially available polymer film Hydrothane that incorporates ZnOPPc. Using electrospinning, nanofibers of ZnOPPc in Hydrothane and polycarbonate were formed and analyzed for their ability to oxidize demeton-S, a CWA simulant, on the surface of the polymers and were found to have similar reactivity as their corresponding films. The Hydrothane films were then used to oxidize CWA simulants malathion, 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide (CEPS), and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). Through this oxidation process, the CWA simulants are converted into less toxic compounds, thus decontaminating the surface using only O2 from the air and light.

  19. Radionuclide-Chelating Agent Complexes in Low-Level Radioactive Decontamination Waste; Stability, Adsorption and Transport Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Cantrell, Cantrell J.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Orr, Robert D.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2002-02-01

    Speciation calculations were done to determine whether organic complexants facilitate transport of radionuclides leached from waste buried in soils. EDTA readily mobilizes divalent transition metals and moderately impacts trivalent actinides. Picolinate readily mobilizes only Ni2+ and Co2+. These speciation predictions ignore the influence of soil adsorption and biodegradation that break apart the complexes. In adsorption studies, picolinate concentrations have to be >10-4 M to lower the adsorption of Ni and Co. For Sm(III), Th(IV), Np(V), U(VI), and Pu, the picolinate concentration must be >10-3 M before adsorption decreases. EDTA forms strong complexes with divalent transition metals and can stop adsorption of Ni and Co when EDTA solution concentrations are 10-5 M. EDTA complexes with Np(V), U(VI), and Pu are much weaker; EDTA concentrations would have to be >10-3 M to adversely effects non-transition metal/radionuclide adsorption. Most picolinate and ETDA-metal complexes appear to readily dissociate during interactions with soils. The enhanced migration of radionuclide-organic complexes may be limited to a few unique conditions. We recommend that mixtures of metal/radionuclides and EDTA should not be solidified or co-disposed with high pH materials such as cement. For weaker binding organic complexants, such as picolinate, citrate and oxalate, co-disposal of decontamination wastes and concrete should be acceptable.

  20. Chemical Decontamination of Campylobacter jejuni on Chicken Skin and Meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, Charlotte Tandrup; Brøndsted, Lone; Rosenquist, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of 11 chemical compounds to reduce Campylobacter jejuni on chicken skin and meat samples dipped in chemical solutions. Treatment of skin samples for 1 min using tartaric acid (2%) and caprylic acid sodium salt (5%) caused reductions of C. jejuni NCTC11168, w...

  1. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. N. Doyle

    2002-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

  2. Optimisation of surfactant decontamination and pre-treatment of waste chicken feathers by using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Tamrat; Sithole, Bruce; Ramjugernath, Deresh; Ndlela, Luyanda

    2017-11-10

    Commercially processed, untreated chicken feathers are biologically hazardous due to the presence of blood-borne pathogens. Prior to valorisation, it is crucial that they are decontaminated to remove the microbial contamination. The present study focuses on evaluating the best technologies to decontaminate and pre-treat chicken feathers in order to make them suitable for valorisation. Waste chicken feathers were washed with three surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate) dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium chloride, and polyoxyethylene (40) stearate) using statistically designed experiments. Process conditions were optimised using response surface methodology with a Box-Behnken experimental design. The data were compared with decontamination using an autoclave. Under optimised conditions, the microbial counts of the decontaminated and pre-treated chicken feathers were significantly reduced making them safe for handling and use for valorisation applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of Environmental Contamination and Environmental Decontamination Practices within an Ebola Holding Unit, Freetown, Sierra Leone: e0145167

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel Youkee; Colin S Brown; Paul Lilburn; Nandini Shetty; Tim Brooks; Andrew Simpson; Neil Bentley; Marta Lado; Thaim B Kamara; Naomi F Walker; Oliver Johnson

    2015-01-01

    .... We conducted an audit of decontamination procedures inside Connaught Hospital EHU in Freetown, Sierra Leone, by assessing environmental swab specimens for evidence of contamination with Ebola virus by RT-PCR...

  4. DECONTAMINATION ASSESSMENT OF BACILLUS ANTHRACIS, BACILLUS SUBTILIS, AND GEOBACILLUS STEAROTHERMOPHILUS SPORES ON INDOOR SURFACTS USING A HYDROGEN PERIOXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: To evaluate the decontamination of Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus subtilis, and Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores on indoor surface materials using hydrogen peroxide gas. Methods and Results: B. anthracis, B. subtilis, and G. Stearothermophilus spores were dried on seven...

  5. Germinant-Enhanced Decontamination of Bacillus Spores Adhered to Iron and Cement-Mortar Drinking Water Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Nur; Heckman, Lee; Rice, Eugene W.; Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    Germination was evaluated as an enhancement to decontamination methods for removing Bacillus spores from drinking water infrastructure. Germinating spores before chlorinating cement mortar or flushing corroded iron was more effective than chlorinating or flushing alone. PMID:22267659

  6. Plasma Decontamination: A Case Study on Kill Efficacy of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores on Different Carrier Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, Egmont; Novak, Wenzel; Allinson, Wilf; Wallis, Darren; Wood, Nigel; Awakowicz, Peter; Wunderlich, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    A new technology to the pharmaceutical field is presented: surface decontamination by plasmas The technology is comparable to established barrier systems like e-beam, volatile hydrogen peroxide, or radiation inactivation of microbiological contaminations. This plasma technology is part of a fully automated and validated syringe filling line at a major pharmaceutical company and is in production operation. Incoming pre-sterilized syringe containers ("tubs") are processed by plasma, solely on the outside, and passed into the aseptic filling isolator upon successful decontamination. The objective of this article is to present the operating principles and develop and establish a validation routine on the basis of standard commercial biological indicators. Their decontamination efficacies are determined and correlated to the actual inactivation efficacy on the pharmaceutical packaging material.The reference setup is explained in detail and a short presentation of the cycle development and the relevant plasma control parameters is given, with a special focus on the in-process monitor determining the cycle validity. Different microbial inactivation mechanisms are also discussed and evaluated for their contribution and interaction to enhance plasma decontamination. A material-dependent inactivation behavior was observed. In order to be able to correlate the tub surface inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus endospores to metallic biological indicators, a comparative study was performed. Through consistently demonstrating the linear inactivation behavior between the different materials, it becomes possible to develop an effective and time-saving validation scheme. The challenge in new decontamination systems lies in a thorough validation of the inactivation efficacy under different operating regimes. With plasma, as an ionized gas, a new barrier concept is introduced into pharmaceutical aseptic processing of syringes. The presented system operates in vacuum and only

  7. Improving the Accuracy of Coastal Sea Surface Heights by Retracking Decontaminated Radar Altimetry Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengkai; Wang, Haihong; Luo, Zhicai

    2017-04-01

    Due to the complex coastal topography and energetic ocean dynamics effect, the return echoes are contaminated while the satellite footprint approaches or leaves the coastline. Specular peaks are often induced in the trailing edges of contaminated waveforms, thus leading the error in the determination of the leading edge and associated track offset in the waveform retracking process. We propose an improved algorithm base on Tseng's modification method to decontaminated coastal (0-7 km from coastline) waveforms, thus improving both the utilization and precision of coastal sea surface height (SSH). Using the Envisat/Jason-2 SGDR data, the shortcoming of Tseng's method is pointed out and the novel algorithm is proposed by revising the strategy of selecting reference waveform and determining weight for removing outlier. The reference waveform of the decontaminated technology is closer to the real waveform of the offshore area, which avoids the over-modification problem of Tseng method. The sea-level measurements from tide gauge station and geoid height from EGM2008 model were used to validate the retracking strategy. Experimental results show that decontaminated waveform was more suitable than original and Tseng modified waveform and has uniform performance in both compare to the tide gauge and geoid. The retrieved altimetry data in the 0-1km and 1-7km coastal zone indicate that threshold retracker with decontaminated waveform have STD of 73.8cm and 33cm as compared with in situ gauge data,which correspond to 62.1% and 58% in precession compared to the unretracked altimetry measurements. The retracked SSHs are better in two coastal (0-1 km and 1-7km) zones, which have STD of 11.9cm and 22.7cm as compared with geoid height. Furthermore, the comparisons shows that the precision of decontaminated technology improve 0.3cm and 3.3cm than the best result of PISTACH product in coastal sea. This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos

  8. Study of potentialities of micellar enhanced ultrafiltration for the decontamination of aqueous effluents containing heavy metals; Etude des potentialites de l'extraction micellaire couplee a l'ultrafiltration pour la decontamination des effluents contenant des metaux lourds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tounissou, Ph

    1998-03-15

    This work deals with the extraction of thorium, ruthenium and uranium by ultrafiltration using different micellar systems. These extractions are carried out in media which are strongly charged in salts (nitrates and carbonates). In the first part of this work has been studied the behaviour of micellar solutions. The type of used ultrafiltration (frontal or tangential), the pH, the initial concentration of surfactant, the salt type, the pressure, the recirculation rate, the surfactant type, the nature of the membrane (organic or mineral), the membrane support (aluminium oxide or carbon), the membrane cut threshold are factors able to affect the behaviour of micellar solutions, so their influences have been studied. This preliminary study has allowed to determine the ultrafiltration experimental conditions required to obtain the best possible flux for a minimal loss of surfactant in the permeate. The second part of this work deals with the metals extraction. The presence of strong salts concentrations is prejudicial to the process for the extractions carried out with SDC, CPC, or CTAB alone. The author has then studied micellar systems solubilizing an extractant agent (systems: Triton-X-100/Kelex-100, Triton-X-100/HS-21 and Brij 35/HS-21). The study of the different parameters affecting the extraction yields has allowed in this case to improve the results for reaching yields sometimes superior to 99.9% as well as for some metals taken separately than for the three metals treated simultaneously. The results of this work have shown the evident potentialities of the use of a surfactant/extractant system for the decontamination of effluents containing heavy metals and metals strongly charged in nitrates. (O.M.)

  9. A controlled trial in intensive care units of selective decontamination of the digestive tract with nonabsorbable antibiotics. The French Study Group on Selective Decontamination of the Digestive Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastinne, H; Wolff, M; Delatour, F; Faurisson, F; Chevret, S

    1992-02-27

    Selective decontamination of the digestive tract with topical nonabsorbable antibiotics has been reported to prevent nosocomial infections in patients receiving mechanical ventilation, and the procedure is used widely in Europe. However, it is unclear whether selective decontamination improves survival. We conducted a randomized, double-blind multicenter study in which 445 patients receiving mechanical ventilation in 15 intensive care units were given either prophylactic nonabsorbable antibiotics (n = 220) or a placebo (n = 225). Topical antibiotics (tobramycin, colistin sulfate, and amphotericin B) or a placebo was administered through a nasogastric tube and applied to the oropharynx throughout the period of ventilation. The main end points were the mortality rate in the intensive care unit and within 60 days of randomization. A total of 142 patients died in the intensive care unit; 75 (34 percent) in the treatment group and 67 (30 percent) in the placebo group (P = 0.37). Mortality within 60 days of randomization was similar in the two groups (P = 0.40), even after adjustment for factors that were either unbalanced or individually predictive of survival in the two groups (P = 0.70). Pneumonia developed in 59 patients (13 percent) in the intensive care unit within 30 days of enrollment in the study (33 in the placebo group and 26 in the treatment group, P = 0.42). Pneumonia acquired in the intensive care unit and due to gram-negative bacilli was less frequent (P = 0.01) in the treatment group than in the placebo group. The total charges for antibiotics were 2.2 times higher in the treatment group. Selective decontamination of the digestive tract does not improve survival among patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit, although it substantially increases the cost of their care.

  10. Viscosity Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Camilli, Fabio; Prados, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Viscosity solution is a notion of weak solution for a class of partial differential equations of Hamilton-Jacobi type. The range of applications of the notions of viscosity solution and Hamilton-Jacobi equations is enormous, including common class of partial differential equations such as evolutive problems and problems with boundary conditions, equations arising in optimal control theory, differential games, second-order equations arising in stochastic optimal control...

  11. Decontamination Workshop for Emergency Responding Personnel "How Clean is Clean Enough" 12-14 September 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Workahop Emergency Responders Must Be Decontaminated ECBC Decontamination Workahop Post Response Checkup & Medical Surveillance Vet jC"*> "\\r 1 A...Therefore, some measurable amount greater than zero needs to be agreed upon among the first responder and medical communities, with input from relevant...provided at Appendix G. Participants were then separated into four work groups, which were primarily organized by discipline [federal, medical , and

  12. Effect of contamination and decontamination on adhesion of a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to bovine dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangpermtam, Pitsapaporn; Botelho, Michael G; Dyson, John E

    2011-10-01

    To determine the adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement to bovine dentin under contaminated and decontaminated conditions. Forty-five bovine mandibular incisors were used. The surfaces of bovine dentin specimens were subjected to Temp-bond, dental handpiece lubricant (contamination), Hibiscrub, chlorhexidine or pumice (decontamination), as well as contamination followed by decontamination. From these, 14 test groups were created to investigate the effects of these variables on the microtensile bond strength of a resin-modified glassionomer cement to dentin. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was performed to examine the effects of contamination and decontamination procedures on the dentin surfaces. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann-Whitney tests. SEM examination showed visible differences between the control group and dentin contaminated with Temp-bond or handpiece lubricant. All the contamination and decontamination test agents when used alone - except Hibiscrub - showed significant reductions in bond strength when compared to the control (p bond strength (p bond, handpiece lubricant, chlorhexidine, and pumice may have an adverse effect on the bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer to dentin. Hibiscrub was effective in decontaminating handpiece lubricant but not Temp-bond.

  13. The Microbial Quality Aspects and Decontamination Approaches for the Herbal Medicinal Plants and Products: An in-Depth Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisleni, Daniela Dal Molim; Braga, Marina de Souza; Kikuchi, Irene Satiko; Braşoveanu, Mirela; Nemţanu, Monica R; Dua, Kamal; Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus Andreoli

    2016-01-01

    The present review article provides an overview of the published literature concerning microbial quality of medicinal plants and products and their decontamination methods. It is important to analyze different aspects regarding the cultivation, growing, harvesting, storage, manufacturing, and decontamination of medicinal plant products. Herbal medicinal plants bear a massive microbial load leading to contamination and mycotoxin, which needs to be considered, and properly controlled using suitable sterilization and decontamination methods. The main focus of this review is on the definition, advantages, disadvantages and applications of decontamination methods, particularly to show that one must consider the characteristics of the initial sample to be decontaminated. The effects of various methods (ozone, plasma, irradiation) on medicinal herbs and products treated for microbiological decontamination are dependent on factors related to microbial load (i.e., nature and amount of initial contamination), herb/product matrix (i.e., complexity of chemical composition, physical state - solid or liquid) and treatment conditions (i.e., time, irradiation dose, absence or presence of oxygen). In addition, it is important to accept some loss of the chemical compounds, while decreasing microbial load to acceptable limits according to official herbal pharmacopoeias and literature, thus ensuring a final product with quality, safety and therapeutic efficacy. The conclusion, which comes from this contribution, is that herbal medicine has more contaminants than a chemically welldefined drug, thus, good manufacturing practices should be followed.

  14. Influence of radiocesium transfer and decontamination on ambient dose in Japanese forest environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-depositional migration of radiocesium and decontamination on ambient dose rate in Japanese forest environment following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. We measured cesium-137 deposition from canopy to forest floor in association with rainfall and litterfall in two coniferous stands (plantation of Japanese cedar) and a deciduous broad-leaved forest stand (oak with red pine). We also measured temporal evolution of ambient dose rate at different height in each forest site. Radiocesium inventory balance in each forest component (e.g., canopy, litter and mineral soil layer) were established to determine causes of the measured changes of ambient dose rate in three forest sites. Furthermore, we assessed influence of forest decontamination (removal of organic layer of forest floor) on spatial pattern of radiocesium at the forest floor and reduction of ambient dose rate.

  15. Concrete decontamination: two innovative processes in response to surface or deep contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CUER, F.; Nadai, A. de; Faure, S. [CEA Marcoule, Lab. des Procedes Avances de Decontamination, 30 (France)

    2008-07-01

    To meet the future needs in the nuclear industry as regards dismantling and decommissioning, the LPAD (Laboratoire des Procedes Avances de Decontamination) develops new specific techniques to decontaminate concretes: the drying gel process adapted to surface contamination and the electrokinetics process to treat deep contamination. Indeed, because the concrete constitute a porous medium, two types of contamination can be met according to the environment to which is subjected the material. In the case of an accidental or dry contamination, radio elements do not penetrate beyond the first millimeters of the material. The contamination is then considered as surface. On the contrary, the contamination is considered as 'deep' when radioactive ions have diffused deeply under the effects of the natural diffusion. This is the case in fuel storage pond or other many nuclear infrastructures. (authors)

  16. Effectiveness of different chemical agents in rapid decontamination of gutta-percha cones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Celso Luíz

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of seven disinfectant compounds used in dentistry for a rapid decontamination of 32 gutta-percha cones adhered with Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli strains or Bacillus subtilis spores was compared. Cones were treated with 2% glutaraldehyde, 1% sodium hypochlorite, 70% ethyl alcohol, 1% and 0.3% iodine alcohol, 2% chlorhexidine, 6% hydrogen peroxide, and 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine, for 1, 5, 10, and 15 minutes. After treatment, each cone was transferred to thioglycollate broth and incubated at 37ºC for 7 days. The products were bactericidal after 1 to 5 minutes and, with exception of ethyl alcohol and iodine-alcohol, sporicidal after 1 to 15 minutes of exposure. Results suggest that chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite, polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine, hydrogen peroxide, and glutaraldehyde were the most effective products in the decontamination of gutta-percha cones.

  17. Ventilator-associated pneumonia rates after introducing selective digestive tract decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Ronny M; Scholte, Johannes B J; Van Der Velden, Kim E H M; Roekaerts, Paul M H J; Bergmans, Dennis C J J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) before and after the introduction of selective oral decontamination (SOD) only and selective digestive tract decontamination (SDD) in a general intensive care population was examined. SOD as standard of care was introduced in December 2010 and SDD, including SOD, in January 2012 for all patients with an expected length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay of at least 48 h. The diagnosis of VAP was based on clinical criteria and quantitative cultures of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. A total of 4945 mechanically ventilated patients accounting for 37 554 ventilator days in the period from 2005 to 2013 were analyzed. The incidence of VAP per 1000 ventilator days declined significantly from 4.38 ± 1.64 before to 1.64 ± 0.43 after introduction of SOD/SDD (p = 0.007). Implementation of SOD/SDD as standard of care in ICUs may thus be effective in preventing VAP.

  18. Behavior of radioactive cesium during incineration of radioactively contaminated wastes from decontamination activities in Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Kuramochi, Hidetoshi; Nomura, Kazutaka; Maeseto, Tomoharu; Osako, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Large volumes of decontamination wastes (DW) generated by off-site decontamination activities in Fukushima Prefecture have been incinerated since 2015. The behavior of radioactive cesium during incineration of DW was investigated at a working incineration plant. The incineration discharged bottom ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) with similar levels of radiocesium, and the leachability of the radiocesium from both types of ash was very low (<1%). These results are significantly different from those obtained for the incineration of contaminated municipal solid waste (CMSW) reported in earlier studies. The source of radiocesium in DW-FA is chiefly small particles derived from DW and DW-BA blown into the flue gas, not the deposition of gaseous synthesized radiocesium compounds on the surfaces of ash particles in the flue gas as observed in CMSW incineration. This source difference causes the behavior of radiocesium during waste incineration to differ between DW and CMSW. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Low pressure plasma discharges for the sterilization and decontamination of surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F; Rauscher, H; Hasiwa, M; Gilliland, D [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection, Via E. Fermi 2749, 21027 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy); Kylian, O [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8, 180 00 (Czech Republic)], E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.ec.europa.eu

    2009-11-15

    The mechanisms of sterilization and decontamination of surfaces are compared in direct and post discharge plasma treatments in two low-pressure reactors, microwave and inductively coupled plasma. It is shown that the removal of various biomolecules, such as proteins, pyrogens or peptides, can be obtained at high rates and low temperatures in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) by using Ar/O{sub 2} mixtures. Similar efficiency is obtained for bacterial spores. Analysis of the discharge conditions illustrates the role of ion bombardment associated with O radicals, leading to a fast etching of organic matter. By contrast, the conditions obtained in the post discharge lead to much lower etching rates but also to a chemical modification of pyrogens, leading to their de-activation. The advantages of the two processes are discussed for the application to the practical case of decontamination of medical devices and reduction of hospital infections, illustrating the advantages and drawbacks of the two approaches.

  20. Separation of technetium and rare earth metals for co-decontamination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine; Martin, Leigh

    2015-05-01

    Poster. In the US there are several technologies under consideration for the separation of the useful components in used nuclear fuel. One such process is the co-decontamination process to separate U, Np and Pu in a single step and produce a Np/ Pu and a U product stream. Although the behavior of the actinide elements is reasonably well defined in this system, the same is not true for the fission products, mainly Zr, Mo, Ru and Tc. As these elements are cationic and anionic they may interact with each other to extract in a manner not predicted by empirical models such as AMUSE. This poster presentation will discuss the initial results of batch contact testing under flowsheet conditions and as a function of varying acidity and flowsheet conditions to optimize recovery of Tc and minimize extraction of Mo, Zr and Ru with the goal of developing a better understanding of the behavior of these elements in the co-decontamination process.

  1. DECISION ANALYSIS AND TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENTS FOR METAL AND MASONRY DECONTAMINATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a comparative analysis of innovative technologies for the non-aggressive removal of coatings from metal and masonry surfaces and the aggressive removal of one-quarter to one-inch thickness of surface from structural masonry. The technologies tested should be capable of being used in nuclear facilities. Innovative decontamination technologies are being evaluated under standard, non-nuclear conditions at the FIU-HCET technology assessment site in Miami, Florida. This study is being performed to support the OST, the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, and the environmental restoration of DOE facilities throughout the DOE complex by providing objective evaluations of currently available decontamination technologies.

  2. Decontamination of grains and legumes infected with Aspergillus spp. and Penicillum spp. by cold plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Meral; Oksuz, Lutfi; Basaran, Pervin

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of a self-designed low pressure cold plasma (LPCP) system using air gases or SF6. For the inactivation and/or elimination of two pathogenic fungi, Aspergillus spp. and Penicillum spp. artificially contaminated on seed surface. The plasma decontamination process was performed by batch process in vacuum chamber, using gas injection followed by plasma discharge for the duration of 5-20 min. The plasma treatment reduced the fungal attachment to seeds below 1% of initial load depending on the initial contamination level, while preserving germination quality of the seed. A significant reduction of 3-log for both species was achieved within 15 min of SF6 plasma treatment time. Air gases plasma and SF6 plasma in particular provides an interesting surface decontamination alternative for seeds.

  3. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, January 1996--March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    West Virginia University (WVU) and the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) entered into a Cooperative Agreement in August 1992 titled {open_quotes}Decontamination Systems Information and Research Programs{close_quotes} (DOE Instrument No.: DE-FC21-92MC29467). Requirements stipulated by the Agreement require WVU to submit quarterly Technical Progress reports. This report contains the efforts of the research projects comprising the Agreement for the 1st calendar quarter of 1996. For the period January 1 through December 31, 1996 twelve projects have been selected for funding, and the Kanawha Valley will continue under a no-cost extension. Three new projects have also been added to the program. This document describes these projects involving decontamination, decommissioning and remedial action issues and technologies.

  4. Measurement of Radioactive Contamination on Work Clothing of Workers Engaged in Decontamination Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Norio; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Hoshi, Katsuya

    To rationally judge the necessity of the contamination screening measurements required in the decontamination work regulations, a field study of the surface contamination density on the clothing of the workers engaged in decontamination operations was performed. The clothing and footwear of 20 workers was analyzed by high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectroscopy. The maximum radiocesium activities (134Cs + 137Cs) observed were 3600, 1300, and 2100 Bq for the work clothing, gloves, and boots, respectively, and the derived surface contamination densities were below the regulatory limit of 40 Bq/cm2. The results of this field study suggest that the upper bounds of the surface contamination density on the work clothing, gloves, and boots are predictable from the maximum soil loading density on the surface of clothing and footwear and the radioactivity concentration in soil at the site.

  5. Chemical burns revisited: What is the most appropriate method of decontamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Teresa; Wong, David S Y

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of decontamination by immediate surgical debridement in the acute management of chemical burns as compared to conventional dilutional approaches by irrigation or wetting. A retrospective review of the medical records of patients admitted to the Burns Centre of the Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, between 2001 and 2012, was performed. The time to recovery as reflected by the hospital stay for patients who had received immediate debridement, continuous irrigation, and wet packs was calculated and compared. A total of 99 patients were admitted for chemical burns (3.3% of total admissions). There were three mortalities. Immediate surgical debridement failed to achieve a faster recovery than irrigation or wet packs. Continuous water irrigation was better than wet packs in achieving earlier recovery. Continuous water irrigation remains the most preferred method of decontamination in acute chemical burn management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Sodium tetraphenylborate solution stability: A long term study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1992-06-11

    Sodium tetraphenylborata (NaTPB) is a specialty chemical required for the In Tank Precipitation Process (ITP). It precipitates cesium, aiding in the decontamination of high level radioactive waste solutions. Long term stability of aqueous alkaline solutions of NATPB has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the relative stabilities of NATPB solutions exposed to varying temperatures and copper concentrations over an extended period of time. Additionally, vendor-supplied samples, incubated at 40{degree}C, were stored for more than a year without decomposing. Collected data demonstrates that in the absence of elevated copper concentrations, NATPB solutions will remain stable for periods of 1 to 2 years (at a minimum) at maximum expected operating conditions (<40{degree}C). Additionally, biuret, (H{sub 2}NCO){sub 2}NH, was tested as an additive to prevent copper-induced decomposition without success.

  7. Sodium tetraphenylborate solution stability: A long term study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1992-06-11

    Sodium tetraphenylborata (NaTPB) is a specialty chemical required for the In Tank Precipitation Process (ITP). It precipitates cesium, aiding in the decontamination of high level radioactive waste solutions. Long term stability of aqueous alkaline solutions of NATPB has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the relative stabilities of NATPB solutions exposed to varying temperatures and copper concentrations over an extended period of time. Additionally, vendor-supplied samples, incubated at 40[degree]C, were stored for more than a year without decomposing. Collected data demonstrates that in the absence of elevated copper concentrations, NATPB solutions will remain stable for periods of 1 to 2 years (at a minimum) at maximum expected operating conditions (<40[degree]C). Additionally, biuret, (H[sub 2]NCO)[sub 2]NH, was tested as an additive to prevent copper-induced decomposition without success.

  8. Decontamination by fractional distillation of a radioactive mixture of perchlorethylene, bitumen, and sludges from chemical co-precipitations; Decontamination par distillation fractionnee d'un melange radioactif constitue par du perchlorethylene, du bitume et des boues de coprecipitation chimique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefillatre, G.; Hullo, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Chusclan (France). Centre de Production de Plutonium de Marcoule

    1969-07-01

    It is not possible to incinerate the contaminated organic waste containing chlorine, produced at the Marcoule Centre. The only valid method for these solvents of average activity is fractional distillation. This report presents a pilot fractional distillation plant designed for decontaminating the residual solvents produced by the Centre's Waste Processing Station. These contaminated solvents come from the decontamination of a screw extrusion apparatus with perchlorethylene; this equipment is used for coating the radioactive sludges with bitumen. The pilot plant operates discontinuously and is used to decontaminate the perchlorethylene, to separate the perchlorethylene from the water, and to process the distillation residue. The electrically heated boiler is fitted with a removable base in the form of a disposable container. The installations decontamination factor is 3.4 x 10{sup 6} when solvents with a specific activity of 0.23 Ci/m{sup 3} are used. The average flow-rate for a distillation run is 10 l/hr at atmospheric pressure, and 21 l/hr at a residual pressure of 40 torr. The decontamination factor for the installation is better at atmospheric pressure than in a vacuum. (authors) [French] Les effluents organiques contamines chlores du Centre de Marcoule ne peuvent etre incineres. Le seul mode de traitement qui s'impose pour ces solvants de moyenne activite s'avere etre la distillation fractionnee. Ce rapport presente une installation pilote de distillation fractionnee qui a ete concue pour decontaminer des solvants residuaires provenant de la Station de Traitement des Effluents du Centre. Ces solvants contamines resultent de la decontamination au moyen de perchlorethylene d'une extrudeuse a vis servant a l'enrobage par le bitume des boues radioactives de cette station. L'installation pilote fonctionne en discontinu et assure a la fois la decontamination du perchlorethylene, la separation du perchlorethylene et de l'eau et le

  9. Smart Materials for Advanced Applications: Self-Decontaminating Polymers, Photofunctional Composites, and Electroconductive Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Brian Kevin

    2011-12-01

    Materials capable of providing multifunctional properties controllable by some external stimulus (pH, light, temperature, etc) are highly desirable and obtainable given recent advancements in material science. Development of these so called "Smart" materials spanned across many disciplines of science with applications in industrial areas such as medical, military, security, and environmental. Furthermore, next-generation materials require the ability to not only sense/respond to changes in their external/internal environment, but process information in regards to these changes and adapt accordingly in a dynamic fashion, autonomously, so called "Intelligent" materials. Findings reported in this manuscript detail the synthesis, characterization, and application of smart materials in the following three areas: (1) self-cleaning polymers (2) photoresponsive composites and (3) electroconductive fibers. Self-Cleaning Polymers: Self-decontaminating polymers are unique materials capable of degrading toxic organic chemicals (TOCs). Barriers composed of or coated with our photochemical reactive polymer matrix could be applied to multiple surfaces for defense against TOCs; for example, military garments for protection against chemical warfare agents. This study investigates conditions necessary for formation of peroxides via O2 reduction induced by long-lived, strongly reducing benzophenyl ketyl (BPK) polymer radicals. Photolysis of aqueous solutions composed of sulphonated poly(ether etherketone), SPEEK, and poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA lead to the formation of the BPK radicals. Experiments investigate the formation and decomposition of peroxides in aqueous solutions of SPEEK/PVA under photolysis. Photofunctional Composites: Photoresponsive nanoporous (PN) films and powders were studied and evaluated as possible additives to sensitize the initiation of CH3NO2 via a mechanism involving coalescence of reaction sites. Such materials consist of a 3-D mesoporous silica framework

  10. Decontamination of radionuclides using γ-Fe2O3 as a Nanosorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, Hemlata; Thakur, Jyotsna

    2017-04-01

    The release of radioactive waste into the environment and the disposal of conditioned waste is a major environmental concern which demands the improvement in the remediation processes [1]. Due to the advancements in Nanotechnology, novel and simple nanoparticles have been proved very efficient worldwide, in the radioactive waste treatment processes [2]. These nanoparticles prove to be an excellent nanosorbents owing to its very high surface area and other size dependent properties [3]. In the present study, nanocrystalline γ-Fe2O3 was synthesized by gel-combustion method. Gel combustion method [4, 5] is the most facile method of synthesis of nanocrystalline oxides. Fuel deficient composition of ferric nitrate (oxidant) and malonyl dihydrazide (fuel) were mixed well in de-ionised water and heated at temperature 300 °C. The smouldering combustion took place resulting in formation of γ-Fe2O3 which further calcined at 500 °C to remove undesirable impurities. The prepared powder further characterized by various techniques such as X-ray diffractometer, transmission electron microscopy, BET technique and zeta potential measurements. The crystallite size of γ-Fe2O3 was found to be 11 nm. TEM images showed that the grain size obtained was in agreement with the XRD report. Sorption study have been carried out using tracer technique for batch equilibration method at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. A known amount of sorbent (γ-Fe2O3) was mixed with 10 mL of solution containing radiotracer and 1mg/mL solution of carrier. Various parameters such as contact time, pH, amount of sorbent, concentration, temperature, agitation speed were optimized, determination of sorption capacity and interference study was also conducted. The activity is measured by using single channel NaI(Tl) well type gamma ray spectrometer. γ-Fe2O3 was found to be an efficient and cost effective sorbent for the decontamination of heavy radionuclides such as Cs-137, Sr-90, Cd-115m, Cr-51, Hg

  11. Stainless steel crowns reuse and decontamination techniques: A survey among Indian pediatric dentists

    OpenAIRE

    K Farhin; Abhinav, S.; Thejokrishna, P; Sajjad, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the pattern and extent of stainless steel crown (SSC) reuse following try-in and the methods employed for their decontamination among Indian pediatric dentists. Study Design: Questionnaires were delivered personally to 100 pediatric dentists selected randomly across India. Questionnaire was divided into three subsections. The first section assessed demographics to determine the sample population characteristics. The second section dealt with the pattern of SSCs use and...

  12. From penicillin-streptomycin to amikacin-vancomycin: antibiotic decontamination of cardiovascular homografts in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Ling Heng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In February 2012, the National Cardiovascular Homograft Bank (NCHB became the first tissue bank outside of North America to receive accreditation from the American Association of Tissue Banks. From 2008 to 2009, NCHB had been decontaminating its cardiovascular homografts with penicillin and streptomycin. The antibiotic decontamination protocol was changed in January 2010 as amikacin and vancomycin were recommended, in order to cover bacteria isolated from post-recovery and post- antibiotic incubation tissue cultures. AIM: The objective of this study is to determine the optimal incubation conditions for decontamination of homografts by evaluating the potencies of amikacin and vancomycin in different incubation conditions. Retrospective reviews of microbiological results were also performed for homografts recovered from 2008 to 2012, to compare the effectiveness of penicillin-streptomycin versus the amikacin-vancomycin regimens. METHODS: Based on microbiological assays stated in United States Pharmacopeia 31, potency of amikacin was evaluated by turbidimetric assay using Staphylococcus aureus, while vancomycin was by diffusion assay using Bacillus subtilis sporulate. Experiments were performed to investigate the potencies of individual antibiotic 6-hours post incubation at 4°C and 37°C and 4°C for 24 hours, after the results suggested that amikacin was more potent at lower temperature. FINDINGS: Tissue incubation at 4°C for 24 hours is optimal for both antibiotics, especially for amikacin, as its potency falls drastically at 37°C. CONCLUSION: The decontamination regimen of amikacin-vancomycin at 4°C for 24 hours is effective. Nevertheless, it is imperative to monitor microbiological trends closely and evaluate the efficacy of current antibiotics regimen against emerging strains of micro-organisms.

  13. Implant decontamination with phosphoric acid during surgical peri-implantitis treatment: a RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentenaar, Diederik F M; De Waal, Yvonne C M; Strooker, Hans; Meijer, Henny J A; Van Winkelhoff, Arie-Jan; Raghoebar, Gerry M

    2017-12-01

    Peri-implantitis is known as an infectious disease that affects the peri-implant soft and hard tissue. Today, scientific literature provides very little evidence for an effective intervention protocol for treatment of peri-implantitis. The aim of the present randomized controlled trial is to evaluate the microbiological and clinical effectiveness of phosphoric acid as a decontaminating agent of the implant surface during surgical peri-implantitis treatment. Peri-implantitis lesions were treated with resective surgical treatment aimed at peri-implant granulation tissue removal, bone recontouring, and pocket elimination. Fifty-three implant surfaces in 28 patients were mechanically cleaned and treated with either 35% phosphoric etching gel (test group) or sterile saline (control group). Microbiological samples were obtained during surgery; clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and at 3 months after treatment. Data were analyzed using multi-variable linear regression analysis and multilevel statistics. Significant immediate reductions in total anaerobic bacterial counts on the implant surface were found in both groups. Immediate reduction was greater when phosphoric acid was used. The difference in log-transformed mean anaerobic counts between both procedures was not statistical significant (p = 0.108), but there were significantly less culture-positive implants after the decontamination procedure in the phosphoric acid group (p = 0.042). At 3 months post-surgery, 75% of the implants in the control group and 63.3% of the implants in the test group showed disease resolution. However, no significant differences in clinical and microbiological outcomes between both groups were found. The application of 35% phosphoric acid after mechanical debridement is superior to mechanical debridement combined with sterile saline rinsing for decontamination of the implant surface during surgical peri-implantitis treatment. However, phosphoric acid as implant surface

  14. Destruction of Spores on Building Decontamination Residue in a Commercial Autoclave▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lemieux, P.; Sieber, R.; Osborne, A; Woodard, A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted an experiment to evaluate the effectiveness of a commercial autoclave for treating simulated building decontamination residue (BDR). The BDR was intended to simulate porous materials removed from a building deliberately contaminated with biological agents such as Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) in a terrorist attack. The purpose of the tests was to assess whether the standard operating procedure for a commercial autoclave provided sufficiently r...

  15. Destruction of Spores on Building Decontamination Residue in a Commercial Autoclave▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, P.; Sieber, R.; Osborne, A.; Woodard, A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency conducted an experiment to evaluate the effectiveness of a commercial autoclave for treating simulated building decontamination residue (BDR). The BDR was intended to simulate porous materials removed from a building deliberately contaminated with biological agents such as Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) in a terrorist attack. The purpose of the tests was to assess whether the standard operating procedure for a commercial autoclave provided sufficiently robust conditions to adequately destroy bacterial spores bound to the BDR. In this study we investigated the effects of several variables related to autoclaving BDR, including time, temperature, pressure, item type, moisture content, packing density, packing orientation, autoclave bag integrity, and autoclave process sequence. The test team created simulated BDR from wallboard, ceiling tiles, carpet, and upholstered furniture, and embedded in the BDR were Geobacillus stearothermophilus biological indicator (BI) strips containing 106 spores and thermocouples to obtain time and temperature profile data associated with each BI strip. The results indicated that a single standard autoclave cycle did not effectively decontaminate the BDR. Autoclave cycles consisting of 120 min at 31.5 lb/in2 and 275°F and 75 min at 45 lb/in2 and 292°F effectively decontaminated the BDR material. Two sequential standard autoclave cycles consisting of 40 min at 31.5 lb/in2 and 275°F proved to be particularly effective, probably because the second cycle's evacuation step pulled the condensed water out of the pores of the materials, allowing better steam penetration. The results also indicated that the packing density and material type of the BDR in the autoclave could have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the decontamination process. PMID:17012597

  16. Alkaline decontamination of sputum specimens adversely affects stability of mycobacterial mRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Desjardin, L E; Perkins, M D; Teixeira, L; Cave, M D; Eisenach, K D

    1996-01-01

    Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) is an important tool for Mycobacterium tuberculosis research and diagnostics. A standard procedure using N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NALC) and NaOH has been widely adopted for digestion and decontamination of sputum specimens for mycobacterial culture. The objective of this study was to determine the compatibility of this method with the recovery of RNA for RT-PCR assays. Nineteen sputum specimens were collected from smear-positive, pretreatment tuberculosis patien...

  17. FY08 Chemical Synthesis for the Self-Decontaminating Coatings Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    propionic acid (figure 1), is an AB2-type monomer. This means that each monomer contains one A group (the acid ) and two B groups (alcohol), and during...g/mol). Figure 1. Structure of 2,2- bis(hydroxymethyl) propionic acid . During this reporting period, scientists at ARL attempted to synthesize...FY08 Chemical Synthesis for the Self-Decontaminating Coatings Project by André A. Williams, Joshua A. Orlicki, Adam M. Rawlett, Wendy Kosik

  18. Pulsed-light system as a novel food decontamination technology: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Elmnasser, Noura; Guillou, Sandrine; Leroi, Francoise; Orange, Nicole; Bakhrouf, Amina; Federighi, Michel

    2007-01-01

    In response to consumer preferences for high quality foods that are as close as possible to fresh products, athermal technologies are being developed to obtain products with high levels of organoleptic and nutritional quality but free of any health risks. Pulsed light is a novel technology that rapidly inactivates pathogenic and food spoilage microorganisms. It appears to constitute a good alternative or a complement to conventional thermal or chemical decontamination processes. This food pre...

  19. Decontamination of concrete surfaces in Building 3019, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. [After Nov. 20, 1959 incident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrott, Sr, J R

    1980-01-01

    This building was built in 1943 to serve as a pilot plant for separating isotopes from irradiated fuels. A chemical explosion leading to widespread Pu contamination occurred on Nov. 20, 1959, and the steps taken to treat the building afterwards are discussed, in particular the floor and the cells. The experience shows how hard it is to decontaminate concrete; smooth coatings should be utilized. (DLC)

  20. Ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation processes for water decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Nilsun H

    2017-04-09

    The study reflects a part of my experience in sonochemistry and ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) acquired during the last fifteen years with my research team. The data discussed were selected from studies with azo dyes, endocrine disrupting compounds and analgesic/anti-inflammatory pharmaceuticals, which are all classified as "hazardous" or "emerging" contaminants. The research focused on their treatability by ultrasound (US) and AOPs with emphasis on the mineralization of organic carbon. Some of the highlights as pointed out in the manuscript are: i) ultrasound is capable of partially or completely oxidizing the above contaminant groups if the operating conditions are properly selected and optimized, but incapable of mineralizing them; ii) the mechanism of degradation in homogeneous solutions is OH-mediated oxidation in the bulk solution or at the bubble-liquid interface, depending on the molecular properties of the contaminant, the applied frequency and pH; iii) US-assisted AOPs such as ozonation, UV/peroxide, Fenton and UV/Fenton are substantially more effective than ultrasound alone, particularly for the mineralization process; iv) catalytic processes involving TiO2, alumina and zero-valent iron and assisted by ultrasound are promising options not only for the destruction of the parent compounds, but also for the mineralization of their oxidation byproducts. The degradation reactions in heterogeneous solutions take place mostly at the catalyst surface despite the high-water solubility of the compounds; v) sonolytic modification of the above catalysts to reduce their particle size (to nano-levels) or to decorate the surface with metallic nanoparticles increases the catalytic activity under sonolysis, photolysis and both, and improves the stability of the catalyst. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.