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Sample records for campylobacter helicobacter arcobacter

  1. Occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter in reptiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Kik, Marja; Timmerman, Arjen J; Severs, Tim T; Kusters, Johannes G; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter species have been isolated from many vertebrate hosts, including birds, mammals, and reptiles. Multiple studies have focused on the prevalence of these Epsilonproteobacteria genera in avian and mammalian species. However, little focus has been given to the

  2. Occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Kik, Marja; Timmerman, Arjen J; Severs, Tim T; Kusters, Johannes G; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter species have been isolated from many vertebrate hosts, including birds, mammals, and reptiles. Multiple studies have focused on the prevalence of these Epsilonproteobacteria genera in avian and mammalian species. However, little focus has been given to the presence within reptiles, and their potential zoonotic and pathogenic roles. In this study, occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Epsilonproteobacteria were determined for a large variety of reptiles. From 2011 to 2013, 444 cloacal swabs and fecal samples originating from 417 predominantly captive-held reptiles were screened for Epsilonproteobacteria. Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter genus specific PCRs were performed directly on all samples. All samples were also cultured on selective media and screened for the presence of Epsilonproteobacteria. Using a tiered approach of AFLP, atpA, and 16S rRNA sequencing, 432 Epsilonproteobacteria isolates were characterized at the species level. Based on PCR, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter were detected in 69.3% of the reptiles; 82.5% of the chelonians, 63.8% of the lizards, and 58.0% of the snakes were positive for one or more of these genera. Epsilonproteobacteria were isolated from 22.1% of the reptiles and were isolated most frequently from chelonians (37.0%), followed by lizards (19.6%) and snakes (3.0%). The most commonly isolated taxa were Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter skirrowii, reptile-associated Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum, and a putative novel Campylobacter taxon. Furthermore, a clade of seven related putative novel Helicobacter taxa was isolated from lizards and chelonians. This study shows that reptiles carry various intestinal Epsilonproteobacteria taxa, including several putative novel taxa.

  3. Occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter in reptiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten J Gilbert

    Full Text Available Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter species have been isolated from many vertebrate hosts, including birds, mammals, and reptiles. Multiple studies have focused on the prevalence of these Epsilonproteobacteria genera in avian and mammalian species. However, little focus has been given to the presence within reptiles, and their potential zoonotic and pathogenic roles. In this study, occurrence, diversity, and host association of intestinal Epsilonproteobacteria were determined for a large variety of reptiles. From 2011 to 2013, 444 cloacal swabs and fecal samples originating from 417 predominantly captive-held reptiles were screened for Epsilonproteobacteria. Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter genus specific PCRs were performed directly on all samples. All samples were also cultured on selective media and screened for the presence of Epsilonproteobacteria. Using a tiered approach of AFLP, atpA, and 16S rRNA sequencing, 432 Epsilonproteobacteria isolates were characterized at the species level. Based on PCR, Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter were detected in 69.3% of the reptiles; 82.5% of the chelonians, 63.8% of the lizards, and 58.0% of the snakes were positive for one or more of these genera. Epsilonproteobacteria were isolated from 22.1% of the reptiles and were isolated most frequently from chelonians (37.0%, followed by lizards (19.6% and snakes (3.0%. The most commonly isolated taxa were Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter skirrowii, reptile-associated Campylobacter fetus subsp. testudinum, and a putative novel Campylobacter taxon. Furthermore, a clade of seven related putative novel Helicobacter taxa was isolated from lizards and chelonians. This study shows that reptiles carry various intestinal Epsilonproteobacteria taxa, including several putative novel taxa.

  4. Prevalence of Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter, and Sutterella spp. in human fecal samples as estimated by a reevaluation of isolation methods for Campylobacters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; On, Stephen L.W.; Harrington, C.S.;

    2000-01-01

    CCDA recovered significantly more thermophilic Campylobacter spp. than Skirrow's medium (P = 0.0034). No significant difference between Skirrow's medium and CAT agar was observed in this study. Another six taxa were identified, namely, Campylobacter concisus, Campylobacter curvus-like bacteria, Arcobacter...... butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, Helicobacter cinaedi, and Sutterella wadsworthensis. Most of these strains were isolated after 5 to 6 days of incubation by use of the filter technique. This paper pro,ides evidence for the existence of S. wadsworthensis in human feces from clinical cases...

  5. Taxonomy of Campylobacter, Arcobacter, Helicobacter and related bacteria: current status, future prospects and immediate concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.

    2001-01-01

    The taxonomy of the genus Campylobacter has changed dramatically since its inception in 1963. At that time the genus comprised just two species. At present, taxa that were once assigned to Campylobacter may belong to one of over 50 species distributed among six genera. Most of these taxa belong...... to a phylogenetically distinct group referred to as either ribosomal RNA (rRNA) superfamily VI or the epsilon division of the class Proteobacteria. The taxonomic diversity of the group is matched by the diverse habitats in which they may be found, and by the wide range of diseases that they are associated with...... systematics, there remain a number of important issues concerning the classification of various campylobacterial taxa that require careful consideration. Ultimately, these issues are relevant to many working in the field of applied microbiology, including clinicians, veterinarians, epidemiologists...

  6. Molecular diagnosis of Arcobacter and Campylobacter in diarrhoeal samples among Portuguese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Júlio, Cláudia; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-03-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and diversity of Arcobacter and Campylobacter spp. in 298 stool samples of patients with diarrhoea, collected from 22 Portuguese hospitals, between September and November 2012. Detection of Arcobacter and Campylobacter spp. was performed using molecular-based detection techniques, such as real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR, species-specific PCR, and sequencing of amplified PCR products. Overall, 1.3% of the samples were positive for Arcobacter butzleri and 0.3% for Arcobacter cryaerophilus. Campylobacter spp. were found in 31.9% of diarrhoeic faeces. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter concisus were the most prevalent species (13.7% and 8.0%, respectively). The prevalence of Arcobacter and Campylobacter spp. was significantly different between children and adults (39.7% versus 22.8%, P = 0.003). We underline the high prevalence of these pathogens in diarrhoeal samples among Portuguese patients, with particular relevance in the paediatric age group.

  7. A PCR-DGGE method for detection and identification of Campylobacter, Helicobacter, Arcobacter and related Epsilobacteria and its application to saliva samples from humans and domestic pets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Randi Føns; Harrington, C. S.; Kortegaard, H. E.

    2007-01-01

    distinguished. This approach detected Epsilobacteria in all saliva samples collected from humans, cats and dogs, and identified Campylobacter concisus and/or Campylobacter gracilis in the human samples. The pet animal samples were taken from individuals with oral/dental diseases; PCR-DGGE identified up to four...... identification of Epsilobacteria in the oral cavity of humans and small animals. Significance and Impact of the Study: The PCR-DGGE method should allow determination of the true prevalence and diversity of Epsilobacteria in clinical and other samples. Contact with the oral cavity of domestic pets may represent...

  8. Arcobacter spp. possess two very short flagellins of which FlaA is essential for motility

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Wösten, M.M.S.M.; van Asten, A.J.; Gaastra, W

    2008-01-01

    Like Campylobacter and Helicobacter spp., Arcobacter spp. possess two flagellin genes (flaA and flaB) located adjacent to each other. The aim of this study was to characterize the flagellin proteins of Arcobacter spp., because these proteins are known virulence factors in the Epsilonproteobacteria, to which these three species belong. With the exception of Arcobacter nitrofigilis, Arcobacter flagellins are almost half the size of those in other Epsilonproteobacteria. Arcobacter flagellin prot...

  9. Detection of Campylobacter species and Arcobacter butzleri in stool samples by use of real-time multiplex PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F. de Boer (Richard); A. Ott (Alewijn); P. Güren (Pinar); E. van Zanten; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); A.M.D. Kooistra-Smid

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe presence of Campylobacter (or Campylobacter-like) species in stools from patients suspected of infectious gastroenteritis (n = 493) was investigated using real-time PCR for detection of Arcobacter butzleri (hsp60 gene), Campylobacter coli (ceuE gene), Campylobacter jejuni (mapA), fiv

  10. Arcobacter cibarius sp nov., isolated from broiler carcasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houf, K.; On, Stephen L.W.; Coenye, T.;

    2005-01-01

    .0%) and Arcobacter nitrofigilis (95.0%). The levels of similarity to Campylobacter and Helicobacter species were below 88 and 87%, respectively. The isolates could be distinguished from other Arcobacter species by the following biochemical tests: catalase, oxidase and urease activities; reduction of nitrate; growth...

  11. FISH DETECTION OF CAMPYLOBACTER AND ARCOBACTER ADHERED TO STAINLESS STEEL COUPONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Šilhová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on detecting biofilm and planktonic bacterial cells of the genera Arcobacter and Campylobacter. This study is, to our knowledge, the first study deals with application of FISH procedure to detect biofilm formation on stainless steel coupons of Arcobacter-isolates from real-world environments. These bacteria can cause a lot of diseases. Especially, in the last decade, arcobacters have been increasingly isolated from feces of clinically healthy and ill animals, foods of animal origin and various types of water. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to detect biofilm and planktonic cells of selected microorganisms. This method was optimized and subsequently applied to biofilm samples prepared on stainless steel coupons. The study results indicate that fluorescence in situ hybridization is suitable for detecting biofilm and planktonic cells of the studied bacteria.

  12. Arcobacter spp. possess two very short flagellins of which FlaA is essential for motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Wösten, M.M.S.M.; van Asten, A.J.; Gaastra, W.

    2008-01-01

    Like Campylobacter and Helicobacter spp., Arcobacter spp. possess two flagellin genes (flaA and flaB) located adjacent to each other. The aim of this study was to characterize the flagellin proteins of Arcobacter spp., because these proteins are known virulence factors in the Epsilonproteobacteria,

  13. Biodiversity, ecology, and evolution of Campylobacter in reptiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Species of the Epsilonproteobacteria genera Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter are frequently isolated from endothermic mammals and birds. However, little information was available about the presence of Epsilonproteobacteria in ectothermic reptiles and no comprehensive studies had been perf

  14. A severe case of persistent diarrhoea associated with Arcobacter cryaerophilus but attributed to Campylobacter sp. and a review of the clinical incidence of Arcobacter spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Figueras

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although rarely, Arcobacter spp. have been associated with diarrhoea and bacteraemia. We report a persistent case in a healthy 26-year-old Spanish male of bloody diarrhoea, which was attributed to Campylobacter but in fact was caused by Arcobacter cryaerophilus, as determined by sequencing of the rpoB gene. The isolate was re-identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF and genotyped for five putative virulence genes and for seven genes included in the Arcobacter multilocus sequence typing database. The low score obtained by MALDI-TOF indicates the need to complement the database with more isolates. Only the ciaB gene, which encodes for an invasin, was detected. Despite the isolate belonging to a new sequence type, three of the alleles (glnA, pgm and tkt had been found previously in isolates from faeces of patients with diarrhoea. This study, together with the reviewed literature, indicates that Arcobacter can produce bacteraemia and that the isolation from patients with diarrhoea range from 0.11% to 1.25%. This study also demonstrates that Arcobacter species are confused with Campylobacter spp., as previously suggested. This is one of the factors that leads to underestimation of their incidence together with the use of inappropriate detection and identification methods.

  15. IMPORTANCE OF ARCOBACTER SPP. IN POULTRY MEAT

    OpenAIRE

    Ertaş, Necla

    2009-01-01

    The genus Arcobacter, previously known as aerotolerant Campylobacters were isolated from aborted bovine and porcine fetuses. Arcobacter spp. differ from Campylobacter spp. by their ability to grow at lower temperatures and in air. The genus Arcobacter comprises six species. Arcobacter nitrofigilis, Arcobacter halophilus and Arcobacter sulfidicus are environmental-related species. No association with human or animal infection has been reported. The other species, Arcobacter butzleri,Arcobacter...

  16. CAMPYLOBACTER-HYOINTESTINALIS SUBSP LAWSONII SUBSP-NOV, ISOLATED FROM THE PORCINE STOMACH, AND AN EMENDED DESCRIPTION OF CAMPYLOBACTER-HYOINTESTINALIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    on, Stephen L.W.; Bloch, Buchardt; Holmes, B.;

    1995-01-01

    .1% and could be clearly distinguished from reference strains representing 20 related taxa, principally species and subspecies belonging to the genera Campylobacter, Arcobacter, and Helicobacter. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that the porcine stomach strains were genomically homogeneous (levels...

  17. The complete genome sequence and analysis of the Epsilonproteobacterium Arcobacter butzleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The human pathogen Arcobacter butzleri is a member of the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria and a close taxonomic relative of other established pathogens, such as Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori. Here we present the complete genome sequence of the huma...

  18. Prevalence and diversity of Arcobacter spp. isolated from the internal organs of spontaneous porcine abortions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    2002-01-01

    aborted fetuses from a single sow. The high prevalence of arcobacters in Danish pig abortions may account for at least some of the >90% of cases in which no established abortifacient agent is detected, but further studies are needed to define the role of each species, especially where co...... to examine pooled tissue samples for Campylobacter, Arcobacter and Helicobacter spp. Routine microbiological, immunological, and histopathological examinations were also performed to identify concurrent infections or histopathological change. The abortions tested negative for established abortifacient...

  19. Arcobacter spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Filipović, Ivana; Zdolec, Nevijo; Benussi Skukan, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Bakterije roda Arcobacter pripadaju porodici Campylobacteriaceae, no od Campylobacter vrsta razlikuje se po sposobnosti rasta na 15 °C i u aerobnim uvjetima. Ove bakterije izolirane su iz oboljelih životinja, ljudi, ali i s trupova životinja nakon klaoničke obrade, te svježeg mesa, kao i vode. Farmske životinje, posebice perad, smatraju se rezervoarima bakterije. Razvijene su različite mikrobiološke metode za izolaciju Arcobacter spp., ali standardni protokol još uvijek ne postoji. Za brzu i ...

  20. Presence of Campylobacter and Arcobacter species in in-line milk filters of farms authorized to produce and sell raw milk and of a water buffalo dairy farm in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraino, A; Florio, D; Giacometti, F; Piva, S; Mion, D; Zanoni, R G

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the presence of Campylobacter spp. and Arcobacter spp. in dairy herds authorized for the production and sale of raw milk and in a water buffalo dairy farm, and to test the antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates. A total of 196 in-line milk filters were collected from 14 dairy farms (13 bovine and 1 water buffalo) for detection of Campylobacter spp. and Arcobacter spp. by microbiological culture. For each farm investigated, 1 isolate for each Campylobacter and Arcobacter species isolated was tested using the Etest method (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden) to evaluate the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, ampicillin, erythromycin, and gentamicin. A total of 52 isolates were detected in 49 milk filters in 12 farms (85.7%) out of 14 and the isolates were identified as Campylobacter jejuni (6), Campylobacter hyointestinalis ssp. hyointestinalis (8), Campylobacter concisus (1), Campylobacter fetus ssp. fetus (1), Arcobacter butzleri (22), and Arcobacter cryaerophilus (14). The small number of isolates tested for antimicrobial susceptibility precludes any epidemiological consideration but highlights that all Campylobacter isolates were susceptible to macrolides, which are the first-choice drugs for the treatment of campylobacteriosis, and that resistance to fluoroquinolones and tetracycline was detected; for Arcobacter isolates, resistance to ampicillin and chloramphenicol was detected. The sale of raw milk for human consumption by self-service automatic vending machines has been allowed in Italy since 2004 and the presence of C. jejuni in in-line milk filters confirms that raw milk consumption is a significant risk factor for human infection. The high occurrence of emerging Campylobacter spp. and Arcobacter spp. discovered in dairy farms authorized for production and sale of raw milk represents an emerging hazard for human health.

  1. Helicobacter (Campylobacter) pylori and Acid Peptic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sigmund Kradjen; Philip Sherman

    1990-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacteria implicated as a cause of histological gastritis, contributing to peptic ulcer disease and perhaps playing a role in gastric cancer in humans. The organism is found worldwide; the prevalence of infection increases with age; and colonization probably persists for life. Diagnostic approaches chat have been used include tissue stains, culture of stomach biopsy specimens, labelled-urea breath tests and serology. It is ...

  2. Novel gastric helicobacters and oral campylobacters are present in captive and wild cetaceans

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Cinthia G.; Matteo, Mario J.; Loureiro, Julio D.; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Catalano, Mariana; Heredia, Sergio Rodríguez; Mantero, Paula; Boccio, Jose R.; Zubillaga, Marcela B.; Cremaschi, Graciela A.; Solnick, Jay V.; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I; Blaser, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian gastric and oral mucosa may be colonized by mixed Helicobacter and Campylobacter species, respectively, in individual animals. To better characterize the presence and distribution of Helicobacter and Campylobacter among marine mammals, we used PCR and 16S rDNA sequence analysis to examine gastric and oral samples from ten dolphins (Tursiops gephyreus), one killer whale (Orcinus orca), one false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens), and three wild La Plata river dolphins (Pontopor...

  3. Novel gastric helicobacters and oral campylobacters are present in captive and wild cetaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Cinthia G; Matteo, Mario J; Loureiro, Julio D; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Vay, Carlos; Catalano, Mariana; Heredia, Sergio Rodríguez; Mantero, Paula; Boccio, Jose R; Zubillaga, Marcela B; Cremaschi, Graciela A; Solnick, Jay V; Perez-Perez, Guillermo I; Blaser, Martin J

    2011-08-26

    The mammalian gastric and oral mucosa may be colonized by mixed Helicobacter and Campylobacter species, respectively, in individual animals. To better characterize the presence and distribution of Helicobacter and Campylobacter among marine mammals, we used PCR and 16S rDNA sequence analysis to examine gastric and oral samples from ten dolphins (Tursiops gephyreus), one killer whale (Orcinus orca), one false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens), and three wild La Plata river dolphins (Pontoporia blainvillei). Helicobacter spp. DNA was widely distributed in gastric and oral samples from both captive and wild cetaceans. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated two Helicobacter sequence clusters, one closely related to H. cetorum, a species isolated from dolphins and whales in North America. The second related cluster was to sequences obtained from dolphins in Australia and to gastric non-H. pylori helicobacters, and may represent a novel taxonomic group. Dental plaque sequences from four dolphins formed a third cluster within the Campylobacter genus that likely represents a novel species isolated from marine mammals. Identification of identical Helicobacter spp. DNA sequences from dental plaque, saliva and gastric fluids from the same hosts, suggests that the oral cavity may be involved in transmission. These results demonstrate that Helicobacter and Campylobacter species are commonly distributed in marine mammals, and identify taxonomic clusters that may represent novel species.

  4. Co-infection of the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) with a novel Helicobacter sp. and Campylobacter sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Claude M; Shen, Zeli; Luong, Richard H; McKeon, Gabriel P; Ruby, Norman F; Fox, James G

    2015-05-01

    We report the isolation of a novel helicobacter isolated from the caecum of the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). Sequence analysis showed 97% sequence similarity to Helicobacter ganmani. In addition, we report the co-infection of these Siberian hamsters with a Campylobacter sp. and a second Helicobacter sp. with 99% sequence similarity to Helicobacter sp. flexispira taxon 8 (Helicobacter bilis), a species isolated previously from patients with bacteraemia. Gross necropsy and histopathology did not reveal any overt pathological lesions of the liver and gastrointestinal tract that could be attributed to the Helicobacter or Campylobacter spp. infections. This is the first helicobacter to be identified in the Siberian hamster and the first report of co-infection of Helicobacter spp. and Campylobacter sp. in asymptomatic Siberian hamsters.

  5. Intestinal Microbiota and Species Diversity of Campylobacter and Helicobacter spp. in Migrating Shorebirds in Delaware Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using rDNA sequencing analysis, we examined the bacterial diversity and the presence of opportunistic bacterial pathogens (i.e., Campylobacter and Helicobacter) in Red Knot (Calidris canutus, n=40), Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres, n=35), and Semipalmated Sandpiper (Calidris ...

  6. Arcobacter: An Opportunistic Human Foodborne Pathogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcobacter are gram negative, motile, aerotolerant campylobacter-like microbes which grow at 30C. The 10 described Arcobacter species are but a fraction of the total taxa, which encompass bacteria exploiting diverse ecological niches, such as seawater, oil fields, and estuaries. This physiological r...

  7. Recovery of Arcobacter spp. from nonlivestock species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley, Irene V; Schroeder-Tucker, Linda

    2011-09-01

    The genus Arcobacter encompasses campylobacter-like organisms that grow in air at 25 degrees C. Arcobacter has been detected or isolated from clinically healthy livestock as well as aborted fetuses and has been presumptively identified as either Campylobacter or Leptospira, based on its growth in selective semisolid media. Because reports from nonlivestock species are limited, this study examined nine presumptive isolates of Arcobacter spp. from an alpaca (Vicugna pacos), black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum), gorilla (Troglodytes gorilla), gazelle (Eudorcas thomsoni), rhea (Rhea americana), and aborted equine fetuses. Seven of these nine phenotypically identified isolates of Arcobacter were confirmed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay. The remaining two isolates were subsequently identified as Arcobacter skirrowii (Case 5) and Campylobacter jejuni (Case 6) by sequence analysis of a 527-base pair fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Together, these cases underscore the challenges to a clinical laboratory of identifying Arcobacter in cases which mimic vibrionic abortion or leptospirosis.

  8. Recovery of Arcobacter spp. from Non-livestock Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Arcobacter encompasses campylobacter-like organisms which grow in air at 25 deg C. Arcobacter spp. have been either detected and or isolated from livestock and have been incriminated in water-borne outbreaks, reflecting its adaptation to aquatic environments. Reports from non-livestock spe...

  9. AROBACTER BUTZLERI AND OTHER ARCOBACTERS IN MUSCLE FOODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcobacter spp. were first described in hogs and cattle and classified as aerotolerant campylobacteria. Arcobacter, unlike Campylobacter, grow in air (aerotolerance) at 25C. Of the seven recognized species, A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, and rarely A. skirrowii have been recovered from cases of huma...

  10. Arcobacter, what is known and unknown about a potential foodborne zoonotic agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, T.K.H.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Arcobacter which is related to Campylobacter was introduced in 1991. Nevertheless, unlike Campylobacter, Arcobacter spp. are aerotolerant and their optimal growth temperature is at 30oC. Members of this genus inhabit very diverse environments. The type species A. nitrofigilis is a nitrogen

  11. Comparison of Arcobacter isolation methods, and diversity of Arcobacter spp. in Cheshire, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merga, J Y; Leatherbarrow, A J H; Winstanley, C; Bennett, M; Hart, C A; Miller, W G; Williams, N J

    2011-03-01

    The aims of this study were, firstly, to compare five published methods for the isolation of Arcobacter spp. from animal feces in order to determine the most sensitive and specific method. Second, we analyzed the resulting isolates by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) in order to investigate the diversity of the isolates recovered. Third, we investigated the ability to recover Arcobacter spp. from frozen fecal samples. Seventy-seven fecal samples from cattle, sheep, and badgers were subjected to five isolation methods, based on published methods for the isolation of Arcobacter and Campylobacter spp. Thirty-nine Arcobacter butzleri isolates were analyzed using a multilocus sequence typing scheme. The survival of Arcobacter spp. in frozen samples was investigated by freezing the fecal samples at -80°C for 7 days and then applying the same five isolation methods. The most sensitive and specific method used an Arcobacter-specific broth in conjunction with modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) with added antibiotics. Freezing of fecal samples led to a reduction in the recovery of Arcobacter spp. by approximately 50%. The 39 allelic profiles obtained by MLST could be divided into 11 sequence types (STs). We have identified the most sensitive and specific method for the isolation of Arcobacter spp. from animal feces and demonstrated that the freezing of fecal samples prior to isolation reduces arcobacter recovery. MLST analysis of the isolates revealed a high level of diversity.

  12. Occurrence of Co-Infection of Helicobacter pullorum and Campylobacter spp. in Broiler and Village (Indigenous Chickens

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    Soe Soe Wai, A. A. Saleha*, Z. Zunita, L. Hassan and A. Jalila

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The reports on prevalence of Helicobacter pullorum in broiler chickens are rather limited and lacking in village chickens. This study aimed to determine the occurrence of H. pullorum in broiler and village chickens in Selangor, Malaysia and to report the detection of co-infection of H. pullorum and Campylobacter spp. in these chickens. Village (indigenous chickens were sampled in five markets and broiler chickens from six farms in different localities. Cecal contents were aseptically obtained from the chickens and subjected to three cultural methods. The isolates were identified by biochemical tests and confirmed using a species-specific PCR assay. Helicobacter pullorum were isolated from 25% village chickens and 24.6% broiler chickens, with an overall occurrence of 24.7%. Eleven (50% of these positive chickens (nine in broiler and two in village chickens showed co-infection with Campylobacter spp.

  13. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated arcobacter species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laid Douidah

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three small plasmids isolated from A. butzleri and the one from A. cryaerophilus strains ranged between 4.8 and 5.1 kb, and the size of the large plasmid, isolated from A. butzleri, was 27.4 kbp. The G+C content of all plasmids ranged between 25.4% and 26.2%. A total of 95% of the large plasmid sequence represents coding information, which contrasts to the 20 to 30% for the small plasmids. Some of the open reading frames showed a high homology to putative conserved domains found in other related organisms, such as replication, mobilization and genes involved in type IV secretion system. The large plasmid carried 35 coding sequences, including seven genes in a contiguous region of 11.6 kbp that encodes an orthologous type IV secretion system found in the Wolinella succinogenes genome, Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni plasmids, which makes this plasmid interesting for further exploration.

  14. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated arcobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Ingmer, Hanne; Vandenberg, Olivier; Van den Abeele, Anne-Marie; Houf, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three small plasmids isolated from A. butzleri and the one from A. cryaerophilus strains ranged between 4.8 and 5.1 kb, and the size of the large plasmid, isolated from A. butzleri, was 27.4 kbp. The G+C content of all plasmids ranged between 25.4% and 26.2%. A total of 95% of the large plasmid sequence represents coding information, which contrasts to the 20 to 30% for the small plasmids. Some of the open reading frames showed a high homology to putative conserved domains found in other related organisms, such as replication, mobilization and genes involved in type IV secretion system. The large plasmid carried 35 coding sequences, including seven genes in a contiguous region of 11.6 kbp that encodes an orthologous type IV secretion system found in the Wolinella succinogenes genome, Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni plasmids, which makes this plasmid interesting for further exploration.

  15. Complete genome sequence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis type strain (CIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2010-01-01

    Arcobacter nitrofigilis (McClung et al. 1983) Vandamme et al. 1991 is the type species of the genus Arcobacter in the epsilonproteobacterial family Campylobacteraceae. The species was first described in 1983 as Campylobacter nitrofigilis [1] after its detection as a free-living, nitrogen-fixing Campylobacter species associated with Spartina alterniflora Loisel. roots [2]. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its lifestyle as a symbiotic organism in a marine environment in contrast to many other Arcobacter species which are associated with warm-blooded animals and tend to be pathogenic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a type stain of the genus Arcobacter. The 3,192,235 bp genome with its 3,154 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. The 30th Anniversary of Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Related Organisms Workshops – What Have We Learned In Three Decades?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Szymanski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available As we commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Related Organisms (CHRO workshops with this special Frontiers edition, we look back upon three decades of research and provide some highlights from the 16th International CHRO meeting. As Martin Skirrow noted, Elizabeth King was the first to isolate campylobacters in the 1950’s, although Escherich himself provided drawings of these fecal organisms back in the 1880’s. Helicobacter is a more recent organism, first described to be the causative agent of stomach ulcers at a CHRO meeting by Barry Marshall and Robin Warren – who then later received the Nobel Prize for their findings that bacteria could cause diseases previously believed to be caused by human factors. Studies of the intersection of host microbial ecology and pathogen infection have been pioneered by scientists such as Brett Finlay, who described his current work on this topic. And as general antibiotics are routinely administered, we see a rise in bacterial antibiotic resistance. Julian Davies emphasized that there is a growing need for the development of new bioactive compounds on the horizon as we advance our knowledge on these pathogens. The first genome of C. jejuni was published in 2000; now one decade later we have 30 Campyobacter taxa sequenced, and this number continues to rise quickly. However, we continue to obtain unexpected results as a pioneer in CHRO research, Martin Blaser explained – i.e., although H. pylori is now classified as a level I carcinogen, there may be benefits to carrying this organism as part of your normal flora. Other findings indicate that Campylobacters and Helicobacters do not follow classic paradigms of other well-characterized gastrointestinal pathogens. And we are learning that there is a whole world of interesting related organisms beyond C. jejuni and H. pylori. This review summarizes some of the history of CHRO research and the exciting directions ahead.

  17. Comparison of conventional PCR, multiplex PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays for rapid detection of Arcobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Choi, Changsun

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method for the rapid detection of Arcobacter species. Specific primers targeting the 23S ribosomal RNA gene were used to detect Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii. The specificity of the LAMP primer set was assessed using DNA samples from a panel of Arcobacter and Campylobacter species, and the sensitivity was determined using serial dilutions of Arcobacter species cultures. LAMP showed a 10- to 1,000-fold-higher sensitivity than multiplex PCR, with a detection limit of 2 to 20 CFU per reaction in vitro. Whereas multiplex PCR showed cross-reactivity with Campylobacter species, the LAMP method developed in this study was more sensitive and reliable than conventional PCR or multiplex PCR for the detection of Arcobacter species.

  18. Gıda Kaynaklı Bir Patojen: Arcobacter

    OpenAIRE

    İrkin, Reyhan; Korukluoğlu, Mihriban

    2009-01-01

    Arcobacter, which are Gram-negative, zoonotic and aero-tolerant bacteria belonging to the family Campylobacteraceae, differentiate from Campylobacter, as it is able to grow at 15 ºC and optimally at 30 ºC in aerobic conditions, but not at 42 ºC and it contains 27-30% moles of G+C but not menaquinone-6 which is one of the major isoprenoid quinones. Arcobacter have some species like A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, A. skirrowii, A. cibarius, A. sulfidicus. It is known that Arcobacter recently cau...

  19. Temporal and farm-management-associated variation in faecal pat prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in ruminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove-White, D H; Leatherbarrow, A J H; Cripps, P J; Diggle, P J; French, N P

    2014-04-01

    In a 2-year longitudinal study of adult animals on 15 dairy farms and four sheep farms in Lancashire, UK, Arcobacter spp. were isolated from all farms although not at every sampling occasion. Faecal samples were collected and cultured using standard techniques for isolation of campylobacters. Assignment to species was via PCR assays. Apparent prevalence of Arcobacter spp. was higher in dairy cattle compared to sheep (40.1% vs. 8%, P Arcobacter spp. and Campylobacter jejuni although this may in part be an artefact of laboratory test method sensitivity, whereby a relative increase in the frequency of one bacterial species would reduce the sensitivity of detecting the other.

  20. Occurrence of putative virulence genes in arcobacter species isolated from humans and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douidah, Laid; de Zutter, Lieven; Baré, Julie; De Vos, Paul; Vandamme, Peter; Vandenberg, Olivier; Van den Abeele, Anne-Marie; Houf, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Interest in arcobacters in veterinary and human public health has increased since the first report of the isolation of arcobacters from food of animal origin. Since then, studies worldwide have reported the occurrence of arcobacters on food and in food production animals and have highlighted possible transmission, especially of Arcobacter butzleri, to the human population. In humans, arcobacters are associated with enteritis and septicemia. To assess their clinical relevance for humans and animals, evaluation of potential virulence factors is required. However, up to now, little has been known about the mechanisms of pathogenicity. Because of their close phylogenetic affiliation to the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter and their similar clinical manifestations, the presence of nine putative Campylobacter virulence genes (cadF, ciaB, cj1349, hecA, hecB, irgA, mviN, pldA, and tlyA) previously identified in the recent Arcobacter butzleri ATCC 49616 genome sequence was determined in a large set of human and animal Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii strains after the development of rapid and accurate PCR assays and confirmed by sequencing and dot blot hybridization.

  1. Serologic host response to Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni in socially housed Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienesberger Sabine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori are successful colonizers of the human gastric mucosa. Colonization increases the risk of peptic ulcer disease and adenocarcinoma. However, potential benefits of H. pylori colonization include protection against early-onset asthma and against gastrointestinal infections. Campylobacter jejuni are a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea and complications include Guillain-Barré syndrome. Here, we describe the development of reliable serological assays to detect antibodies against those two bacteria in Rhesus macaques and investigated their distribution within a social group of monkeys. Methods Two cohorts of monkeys were analyzed. The first cohort consisted of 30 monkeys and was used to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for H. pylori antibodies detection. To evaluate colonization of those macaques, stomach biopsies were collected and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori by histology and culture. C. jejuni ELISAs were established using human serum with known C. jejuni antibody status. Next, plasma samples of the 89 macaques (Cohort 2 were assayed for antibodies and then statistically analyzed. Results An H. pylori IgG ELISA, which was 100% specific and 93% sensitive, was established. In contrast, the IgA ELISA was only 82% specific and 61% sensitive. The CagA IgG assay was 100% sensitive and 61% of the macaques were positive. In cohort 2, 62% macaques were H. pylori sero-positive and 52% were CagA positive. The prevalence of H. pylori IgG and CagA IgG increased with monkey age as described for humans. Of the 89 macaques 52% showed IgG against C. jejuni but in contrast to H. pylori, the sero-prevalence was not associated with increasing age. However, there was a drop in the IgG (but not in IgA mean values between infant and juvenile macaques, similar to trends described in humans. Conclusions Rhesus macaques have widespread exposure to H. pylori and C. jejuni, reflecting their social

  2. Arcobacter trophiarum sp. nov., isolated from fattening pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Sarah; Vandamme, Peter; De Zutter, Lieven; On, Stephen L W; Douidah, Laid; Houf, Kurt

    2011-02-01

    In the course of a longitudinal study elucidating the dynamics of Arcobacter populations in pigs, 16 isolates of Gram-reaction-negative, rod-shaped, slightly curved, non-spore-forming bacteria were grouped by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis into a distinct phenon within the genus Arcobacter. Fragments were generated for all isolates in a genus-specific PCR assay, but no amplicon was obtained in a species-specific multiplex-PCR test. Numerical analysis of the whole-cell protein profiles also showed that all isolates clustered in a single group that was distinct from related members of the genus Arcobacter. DNA-DNA hybridizations between two representative strains, designated 64(T) and 122, of the isolates obtained exhibited a mean DNA-DNA relatedness of 72 %. DNA-DNA hybridizations between strains 64(T) and 122 and reference strains of other animal-related bacteria of the genus Arcobacter revealed binding values of 47 % or less. The DNA G+C contents of the two representative strains were 28.5 and 28.4 mol%, respectively, and analysis of three marker genes identified Arcobacter cryaerophilus, A. thereius, A. cibarius and A. skirrowii as their closest phylogenetic neighbours. Strains 64(T) and 122 could be distinguished from other members of the genus Arcobacter by means of biochemical tests for catalase and urease activities, nitrate reduction, indoxyl acetate hydrolysis, lack of growth at 37 °C, growth in 2 % (w/v) NaCl, growth on 0.1 % sodium deoxycholate and non-supplemented Campylobacter charcoal-deoxycholate base medium and resistance to cephalothin (32 mg l(-1)) and cefoperazone (64 mg l(-1)). Additionally, a PCR assay was developed for the detection and identification of strains 64(T) and 122, which represent a novel species of the genus Arcobacter, for which the name Arcobacter trophiarum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain 64(T) (=LMG 25534(T) =CCUG 59229(T)).

  3. Occurrence and species level diagnostics of Campylobacter spp., enteric Helicobacter spp. and Anaerobiospirillum spp. in healthy and diarrheic dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M; Hänninen, M L; Revez, J; Hannula, M; Zanoni, R G

    2008-06-22

    In order to study the occurrence and co-infection of different species of Campylobacter, enteric Helicobacter and Anaerobiospirillum in dogs and cats and define a possible association between these microrganisms and gastrointestinal disorders, 190 dogs and 84 cats, either healthy or with diarrhea, were sampled between 2002 and 2003. Thirty-three C. upsaliensis, 17 C. jejuni, 2 C. helveticus, 1 C. lari isolates from dogs and 14 C. helveticus, 7 C. jejuni, 6 C. upsaliensis isolates from cats were identified using species-specific PCR and phenotypic tests. Whole cell protein profile analysis, phenotypic tests, PCR-RFLP of gyrB and a phylogenetic study of partial groEL and 16S rRNA sequences were used to identify 37 H. bilis, 22 H. canis and 14 H. cinaedi in dogs and 12 H. canis, 5 H. bilis and 2 H. cinaedi in cats. Whole cell protein profile analysis, phenotypic tests and species-specific PCR of 16S rRNA were used to identify 14 A. succiniciproducens, 12 A. thomasii isolates and one unidentified Anaerobiospirillum sp. isolate in dogs and 3 A. thomasii isolates in cats. Fifty-two animals (19%) were positive for the isolation of more than one genus. No significant statistical correlation was found between any isolates of Campylobacter, Helicobacter or Anaerobiospirillum spp. or the various co-infection rates, and the presence of diarrhea in either dogs or cats. Campylobacter isolates were also tested for antibiotic resistance using the agar dilution method.

  4. SURVIVAL CAPACITY OF Arcobacter butzleri INOCULATED IN POULTRY MEAT AT TWO DIFFERENT REFRIGERATION TEMPERATURES

    OpenAIRE

    BADILLA-RAMÍREZ,Yanán; FALLAS-PADILLA,Karolina L.; FERNÁNDEZ-JARAMILLO,Heriberto; ARIAS-ECHANDI,María Laura

    2016-01-01

    Arcobacter spp. are emerging enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents that can be transmitted by food and water, being considered a public health risk. The high isolation rate of these bacteria from poultry products suggests that it may be a major source of human infections. One hallmark for differentiating the genus Arcobacter fromCampylobacter includes their growing capacity at low temperatures (15-30 °C) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about the population density v...

  5. Diversity and prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atabay, H.I.; Corry, J.E.L.; On, Stephen L.W.

    1998-01-01

    Ninety-nine strains of Arcobacter spp., isolated from 10 chicken carcasses purchased from a supermarket and 15 chicken carcasses collected from a poultry abattoir, were speciated using a variety of phenotypic identification methods. All were tested using API Campy test strips and the 16-test...... (Preston) identification scheme developed for campylobacters. Fifty strains were selected for examination using a more comprehensive probabilistic identification scheme, and the identity of representative strains confirmed by protein profiling using SDS-PAGE, All 25 carcasses yielded Arcobacter butzleri....... Three supermarket and 10 abattoir carcasses also carried ii. cryaerophilus, and two abattoir carcasses carried A. skirrowii. The API Campy scheme proved unsatisfactory for identifying these strains: only 20 of 99 strains were accurately identified, all of which were A. cryaerophilus, the only Arcobacter...

  6. Modified isolation method of Arcobacter spp. from different environmental and food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šilha, David; Šilhová-Hrušková, Lucie; Vytřasová, Jarmila

    2015-11-01

    This study provides information on the occurrence of Arcobacter in several types of water and food products of animal origin in the Czech Republic. We processed 190 samples using the modified method, and the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. was confirmed in 36.8 % of these. This total incidence consisted of Arcobacter butzleri (27.3 %), Arcobacter cryaerophilus (8.4 %) and Arcobacter skirrowii (1.1 %). We newly described the common presence of Arcobacter spp. in sewage water in the Czech Republic that is released into waterways after processing in water treatment plants (86.7 %). All the acquired isolates were subject to detailed confirmation with subsequent species classification using multiplex PCR and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). In this study, we used a modification of a method using passive filtration of an enriched sample, which could be suitable for the isolation of Arcobacter, especially in combination with Campylobacter selective agar chromogenic medium. Our studies have shown this agar to be quite suited to the isolation of Arcobacter and that it can be an appropriate instrument for accelerating culture diagnostics.

  7. The complete genome sequence and analysis of the epsilonproteobacterium Arcobacter butzleri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arcobacter butzleri is a member of the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria and a close taxonomic relative of established pathogens, such as Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori. Here we present the complete genome sequence of the human clinical isolate, A. butzleri strain RM4018. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Arcobacter butzleri is a member of the Campylobacteraceae, but the majority of its proteome is most similar to those of Sulfuromonas denitrificans and Wolinella succinogenes, both members of the Helicobacteraceae, and those of the deep-sea vent Epsilonproteobacteria Sulfurovum and Nitratiruptor. In addition, many of the genes and pathways described here, e.g. those involved in signal transduction and sulfur metabolism, have been identified previously within the epsilon subdivision only in S. denitrificans, W. succinogenes, Sulfurovum, and/or Nitratiruptor, or are unique to the subdivision. In addition, the analyses indicated also that a substantial proportion of the A. butzleri genome is devoted to growth and survival under diverse environmental conditions, with a large number of respiration-associated proteins, signal transduction and chemotaxis proteins and proteins involved in DNA repair and adaptation. To investigate the genomic diversity of A. butzleri strains, we constructed an A. butzleri DNA microarray comprising 2238 genes from strain RM4018. Comparative genomic indexing analysis of 12 additional A. butzleri strains identified both the core genes of A. butzleri and intraspecies hypervariable regions, where <70% of the genes were present in at least two strains. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of pathways and loci associated often with non-host-associated organisms, as well as genes associated with virulence, suggests that A. butzleri is a free-living, water-borne organism that might be classified rightfully as an emerging pathogen. The genome sequence and analyses presented in this study are an

  8. Taxonomy, Epidemiology, and Clinical Relevance of the Genus Arcobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Luis; Figueras, Maria José

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The genus Arcobacter, defined almost 20 years ago from members of the genus Campylobacter, has become increasingly important because its members are being considered emergent enteropathogens and/or potential zoonotic agents. Over recent years information that is relevant for microbiologists, especially those working in the medical and veterinary fields and in the food safety sector, has accumulated. Recently, the genus has been enlarged with several new species. The complete genomes of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter nitrofigilis are available, with the former revealing diverse pathways characteristic of free-living microbes and virulence genes homologous to those of Campylobacter. The first multilocus sequence typing analysis showed a great diversity of sequence types, with no association with specific hosts or geographical regions. Advances in detection and identification techniques, mostly based on molecular methods, have been made. These microbes have been associated with water outbreaks and with indicators of fecal pollution, with food products and water as the suspected routes of transmission. This review updates this knowledge and provides the most recent data on the taxonomy, species diversity, methods of detection, and identification of these microbes as well as on their virulence potential and implication in human and animal diseases. PMID:21233511

  9. Taxonomy, epidemiology, and clinical relevance of the genus Arcobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Luis; Figueras, Maria José

    2011-01-01

    The genus Arcobacter, defined almost 20 years ago from members of the genus Campylobacter, has become increasingly important because its members are being considered emergent enteropathogens and/or potential zoonotic agents. Over recent years information that is relevant for microbiologists, especially those working in the medical and veterinary fields and in the food safety sector, has accumulated. Recently, the genus has been enlarged with several new species. The complete genomes of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter nitrofigilis are available, with the former revealing diverse pathways characteristic of free-living microbes and virulence genes homologous to those of Campylobacter. The first multilocus sequence typing analysis showed a great diversity of sequence types, with no association with specific hosts or geographical regions. Advances in detection and identification techniques, mostly based on molecular methods, have been made. These microbes have been associated with water outbreaks and with indicators of fecal pollution, with food products and water as the suspected routes of transmission. This review updates this knowledge and provides the most recent data on the taxonomy, species diversity, methods of detection, and identification of these microbes as well as on their virulence potential and implication in human and animal diseases.

  10. Arcobacter marinus sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Min; Hwang, Chung Yeon; Cho, Byung Cheol

    2010-03-01

    A slightly curved, rod-shaped marine bacterium, designated strain CL-S1(T), was isolated from near Dokdo, an island in the East Sea, Korea. Cells were Gram-negative and grew well under either aerobic or microaerobic conditions. Analyses of the 16S rRNA and gyrA gene sequences of strain CL-S1(T) revealed an affiliation with the genus Arcobacter within the class Epsilonproteobacteria. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and gyrA gene sequences showed that strain CL-S1(T) formed a robust clade with Arcobacter halophilus LA31B(T), with sequence similarities of 96.1 and 88.2 %, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness between strain CL-S1(T) and A. halophilus DSM 18005(T) was 44 %, indicating that they represent genomically distinct species. Strain CL-S1(T) grew optimally at 30-37 degrees C, at pH 7 and in the presence of 3-5 % NaCl. The dominant cellular fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH and/or C(16 : 1)omega7c (28.4 %), C(16 : 0) (26.2 %) and C(18 : 1)omega7c (22.3 %). The DNA G+C content of strain CL-S1(T) was 28 mol%. Strain CL-S1(T) differed phenotypically from A. halophilus LA31B(T) based on its ability to grow aerobically at 10 degrees C and inability to grow under anaerobic conditions. Based on the data presented, strain CL-S1(T) is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Arcobacter, for which the name Arcobacter marinus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CL-S1(T) (=KCCM 90072(T) =JCM 15502(T)).

  11. Effect of selected types of beer on bacteria of the genus Arcobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šilha, David; Vytřasová, Jarmila; Beňová, Blanka; Moťková, Petra

    2013-04-01

    The genus Arcobacter is related to the well-known human pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni, and has been linked to human diseases. In this study, the survival of Arcobacter spp. in various concentrations of ethanol, in various samples of beers, and in a model stomach has been investigated. For most of these bacteria, a concentration of 10 % ethanol was determined to be the minimum inhibitory concentration. The fact that these organisms are able to survive under these conditions may have an impact in the food processing industry. We studied the activity of beer against arcobacters. These bacteria were killed in all samples of beer within 30 min. A model stomach, containing a food matrix and a synthetic gastric fluid, was used to deduce the effect of beer against Arcobacter spp. during food consumption. Complete inactivation of all monitored arcobacters was detected usually within 15 min. However, the presence of beer does not potentiate the effect of gastric fluid against these bacteria. This is apparently the first study focusing upon the effect of beer on Arcobacter spp.

  12. Emerging pathogen Arcobacter spp. in acute gastroenteritis: molecular identification, antibiotic susceptibilities and genotyping of the isolated arcobacters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayman, Tuba; Abay, Seçil; Hizlisoy, Harun; Atabay, H Ibrahim; Diker, K Serdar; Aydin, Fuat

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this study were as follows: (i) to isolate Arcobacter spp. from the stool samples of patients with gastroenteritis; (ii) to identify them with molecular methods; (iii) to genotype them using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR; and (iv) to determine their antibiotic susceptibilities. For the study, a total of 3287 diarrhoeal stool samples submitted to the Microbiology Laboratory of the Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey, between 2010 and 2011 were analysed. Campylobacter blood-free selective medium supplemented with cefoperazone, amphotericin B and teicoplanin was used for isolation. Medium inoculated with stool samples was incubated microaerobically at 37 °C for 72-96 h. Phenotypic tests, a genus-specific PCR and a multiplex PCR were used to identify the arcobacters, whilst ERIC-PCR was used for genotyping and the antibiotic susceptibilities of the isolates were detected by E-test. Arcobacter spp. were isolated from nine of the 3287 samples. These nine isolates were identified as Arcobacter butzleri and all showed different ERIC-PCR profiles. All nine isolates were resistant to ampicillin and susceptible to gentamicin, tetracycline, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin. As far as is known, this is the first study in which A. butzleri has been isolated from human acute gastrointestinal infections in Turkey. According to these results, it is recommended that, when investigating the aetiology of infections of the digestive system in humans, Arcobacter spp. be considered for inclusion. The results of this study should contribute to our knowledge related to A. butzleri infections in humans.

  13. Identificación de Arcobacter en heces de niños y adultos con/sin diarrea y en reservorios animales

    OpenAIRE

    Zerpa Larrauri, Rito; Instituto de Medicina Tropical ‘Daniel A. Carrión’, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Alarcón Villaverde, Jorge O.; Instituto de Medicina Tropical ‘Daniel A. Carrión’, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Lezama Vigo, Percy E.; Frigorífico La Colonial S.A.C., Lima, Perú; Patiño Gabriel, Lilian; Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú; Reyes Dioses, Alberto; Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, Lima, Perú; Valencia Ramírez, Augusto M.; Hospital Materno Infantil de San Bartolomé, Lima, Perú; Velásquez, Jorge; Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza, Lima, Perú; Sevilla Andrade, Carlos R.; Instituto de Medicina Tropical ‘Daniel A. Carrión’, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Alarcón León, Miriam J.; Instituto de Medicina Tropical ‘Daniel A. Carrión’, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: Los microorganismos del género Arcobacter, considerados patógenos zoonóticos emergentes, son morfológicamente similares a Campylobacter. Los reportes de Arcobacter como agente etiológico de diarrea en humanos en América Latina son escasos. En el Perú no se ha comunicado su aislamiento en heces de humanos o en animales. Objetivos: Conocer la prevalencia de Arcobacter en heces de niños y adultos con/sin diarrea y en animales: aves, ganado vacuno, porcino, peces y mariscos. Diseño:...

  14. Abortions in sheep associated with Arcobacter skirrowii infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth F. Bath

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The history, circumstances, clinical signs, post mortem lesions, morbidity, mortality and laboratory findings are described in an abortion storm in sheep that occurred in Mpumalanga, South Africa, associated with infection with Arcobacter skirrowii. Altogether, about 200 Suffolk Down ewes lost 60 lambs in late pregnancy or at term. Although only three foetuses were submitted for investigation, two had signs consistent with a diagnosis of A. skirrowii infection and the organism was isolated from the placentas of both specimens. No abortions had occurred in previous years, or have subsequently. There were no animal introductions prior to the outbreak that could have indicated a source of infection. One stillborn lamb submitted subsequently had lesions consistent with dystocia, and the history and circumstantial evidence indicated that dystocia had been a factor in several more losses. No ewes or rams had shown signs of diarrhoea or other diseases associated with A. skirrowii infection. Twenty-two faecal, preputial and vaginal swab specimens taken from six rams and 13 ewes after the abortion event were all negative for A. skirrowii. This is the first report of abortions in sheep associated with A. skirrowiiin South Africa. Because the genus Arcobacter is similar to Campylobacter, it is possible that infection has gone unrecognised in the past. Veterinarians and laboratories should take note and include this genus in the list of potential abortifacient organisms. The possible role of Arcobacter species in other diseases like enteritis and mastitis, as well as the potential role as a zoonosis, must be borne in mind.

  15. Arcobacter porcinus’ sp. nov., a novel Arcobacter species uncovered by Arcobacter thereius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Figueras

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arcobacter thereius is a species associated with human disease. A group of A. thereius pork strains (represented by strain LMG 24487 clustered separately from the type strain (LMG 24486T in the 16S rRNA and multilocus phylogenetic trees. In silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity results between their genomes (93.3 and 51.1% confirmed ‘Arcobacter porcinus’ (LMG 24487T as a new species.

  16. Arcobacter porcinus’ sp. nov., a novel Arcobacter species uncovered by Arcobacter thereius

    OpenAIRE

    M.J. Figueras; A. Pérez-Cataluña; N. Salas-Massó; A. Levican; L Collado

    2017-01-01

    Arcobacter thereius is a species associated with human disease. A group of A. thereius pork strains (represented by strain LMG 24487) clustered separately from the type strain (LMG 24486T) in the 16S rRNA and multilocus phylogenetic trees. In silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity results between their genomes (93.3 and 51.1%) confirmed ‘Arcobacter porcinus’ (LMG 24487T) as a new species.

  17. Post-genome Analysis of the Foodborne Pathogen Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Emily J.; Gundogdu, Ozan; Wren, Brendan

    The human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is part of the genus Campylobacter that lies within the epsilon proteobacteria subclass of bacteria. The nearest family in phylogenetic terms is the Helicobacteraceae which includes the Helicobacter and Wolinella genuses. Campylobacter species are Gram-negative, curved rod shaped or spiral and are motile (via polar flagella).

  18. PRESENCE OF ARCOBACTER SPP. IN IN-LINE MILK FILTERS: AN EMERGING AND SIGNIFICANT MICROBIOLOGICAL HAZARD IN FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Giacometti

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available While a study on the presence of foodborne pathogens in in-line milk filters of Italian dairy farms authorized for production and sale of raw milk was in progress, we fortuitously detected and isolated some Arcobacter spp. during routine analysis for thermotolerant Campylobacter. This observation suggested that extraordinary and non-standardized growth conditions for detection and identification were needed to provide more information and data on this poorly known emergent zoonotic pathogen. The presence of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacacter cryaerophilus in milk filters of dairy farms authorized for production and sale of raw milk poses a risk for public health and rather suggests that raw milk samples should also be examined for Arcobacter contamination. While the role of Arcobacter spp. in human disease awaits further evaluation, a precautionary approach is advisable and control measures to prevent or to eliminate the hazard of Arcobacter spp. in food and from the human food chain should be encouraged as well as more epidemiological studies. With this article, we review the literature of this organism in order to focus the relevant information to food safety.

  19. [Arcobacter: a foodborne emerging pathogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Gerardo; Arias, Maria Laura; Fernández, Heriberto

    2013-06-01

    In the last three decades, several emergent diseases affecting human beings have been identified, most of them from infectious origin including bacterial, viral, parasitic and even difficult to classify as spongiform encephalopathy. Most of these are zoonotic as it is the case of Arcobacter, currently considered as an emerging and food borne pathogen, of growing importance for public health. The increase in the prevalence and incidence of cases associated to this bacteria as well as in the number of actual researches and reports, suggest that the infection in human beings and animals has been underestimated due to a lack in knowledge about this bacteria and of a standardized isolation protocols, as well as the use of correct identification methods and techniques. Increasing trends in the isolation of Arcobacter from animal derivates used as food and from samples taken during production processes, cause an augment in public health awareness, since there is little knowledge about the pathogenic potential of Arcobacter species and the few focused in this bacterial group, show many different transmission routes and host species. Given this, the objective of the present review is to actualize the reader in the most important characteristics of this bacterium, including its morphology, distribution, classification, transmission, association with water, food, pets and animals, as well as the laboratory isolation techniques, virulence factors and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns.

  20. Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii Circulation in a Dairy Farm and Sources of Milk Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Federica; Lucchi, Alex; Di Francesco, Antonietta; Delogu, Mauro; Grilli, Ester; Guarniero, Ilaria; Stancampiano, Laura; Manfreda, Gerardo; Merialdi, Giuseppe; Serraino, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Even though dairy cows are known carriers of Arcobacter species and raw or minimally processed foods are recognized as the main sources of human Arcobacter infections in industrialized countries, data on Arcobacter excretion patterns in cows and in milk are scant. This study aimed to identify potentially pathogenic Arcobacter species in a dairy herd and to investigate the routes of Arcobacter transmission among animals and the potential sources of cattle infection and milk contamination. A strategy of sampling the same 50 dairy animals, feed, water, and milk every month for a 10-month period, as well as the sampling of quarter milk, animal teats, the milking environment, and animals living on the farm (pigeons and cats), was used to evaluate, by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), the characteristic patterns in animals, their living environment, and the raw milk they produced. Of the 463 samples collected, 105 (22.6%) were positive for Arcobacter spp. by culture examination. All the matrices except quarter milk and pigeon gut samples were positive, with prevalences ranging from 15 to 83% depending on the sample. Only three Arcobacter species, Arcobacter cryaerophilus (54.2%), A. butzleri (34.2%), and A. skirrowii (32.3%), were detected. PFGE analysis of 370 isolates from positive samples provided strong evidence of Arcobacter circulation in the herd: cattle likely acquire the microorganisms by orofecal transmission, either by direct contact or from the environment, or both. Water appears to be a major source of animal infection. Raw milk produced by the farm and collected from a bulk tank was frequently contaminated (80%) by A. butzleri; our PFGE findings excluded primary contamination of milk, whereas teats and milking machine surfaces could be sources of Arcobacter milk contamination.

  1. Arcobacter halophilus sp nov., the first obligate halophile in the genus Arcobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donachie, S.P.; Bowman, J.P.; On, Stephen L.W.

    2005-01-01

    . Most notably, LA31B(T) was found to be an obligate halophile, a hitherto undescribed feature among recognized Arcobacter species. These data indicate that LA31B(T) should be considered to represent a novel species in the genus Arcobacter, for which the name Arcobacter halophilus sp. nov. is proposed....... This is the first obligately halophilic member of the genus. The type strain is LA31B(T) (= ATCC BAA- 102 2 T=CIP 108450(T))....

  2. SURVIVAL CAPACITY OF Arcobacter butzleri INOCULATED IN POULTRY MEAT AT TWO DIFFERENT REFRIGERATION TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanán BADILLA-RAMÍREZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arcobacter spp. are emerging enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents that can be transmitted by food and water, being considered a public health risk. The high isolation rate of these bacteria from poultry products suggests that it may be a major source of human infections. One hallmark for differentiating the genus Arcobacter fromCampylobacter includes their growing capacity at low temperatures (15-30 °C under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about the population density variation of these bacteria at different refrigeration temperatures. The aim of this study was to determine the survival behavior of two different Arcobacter butzleri concentrations (104 CFU/mL and 107 CFU/mL inoculated on chicken legs and held at two different refrigeration temperatures (4 and 10 °C throughout storage time. Results have shown that A. butzleri had growing capacity both at 4 and 10 °C. No statistical difference between the survival trends was found for both bacterial concentrations and temperatures tested. This study shows that A. butzleri is a robust species with regard to storage temperature, and represents a potential health risk for poultry meat consumers.

  3. SURVIVAL CAPACITY OF Arcobacter butzleri INOCULATED IN POULTRY MEAT AT TWO DIFFERENT REFRIGERATION TEMPERATURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badilla-Ramírez, Yanán; Fallas-Padilla, Karolina L; Fernández-Jaramillo, Heriberto; Arias-Echandi, María Laura

    2016-01-01

    Arcobacter spp. are emerging enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents that can be transmitted by food and water, being considered a public health risk. The high isolation rate of these bacteria from poultry products suggests that it may be a major source of human infections. One hallmark for differentiating the genus Arcobacter from Campylobacter includes their growing capacity at low temperatures (15-30 °C) under aerobic conditions. However, little is known about the population density variation of these bacteria at different refrigeration temperatures. The aim of this study was to determine the survival behavior of two different Arcobacter butzleri concentrations (10(4) CFU/mL and 10(7) CFU/mL) inoculated on chicken legs and held at two different refrigeration temperatures (4 and 10 °C) throughout storage time. Results have shown that A. butzleri had growing capacity both at 4 and 10 °C. No statistical difference between the survival trends was found for both bacterial concentrations and temperatures tested. This study shows that A. butzleri is a robust species with regard to storage temperature, and represents a potential health risk for poultry meat consumers.

  4. Environmental Breviatea harbor mutualistic Arcobacter epibionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Emmo; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald; Kleiner, Manuel; Tegetmeyer, Halina E.; Riedel, Dietmar; Littmann, Sten; Chen, Jianwei; Milucka, Jana; Viehweger, Bernhard; Becker, Kevin W.; Dong, Xiaoli; Stairs, Courtney W.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Brown, Matthew W.; Roger, Andrew J.; Strous, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Summary Breviatea form a lineage of free living, unicellular protists, distantly related to animals and fungi1–3. This lineage emerged almost one billion years ago, when the oceanic oxygen content was low, and extant Breviatea have evolved or retained an anaerobic lifestyle4. Here we report the cultivation of Lenisia limosa, gen. et sp. nov., a newly discovered breviate colonized by relatives of animal-associated Arcobacter. Physiological experiments showed that the association of L. limosa with Arcobacter was driven by the transfer of hydrogen and was mutualistic, providing benefits to both partners. With whole genome sequencing and differential proteomics we show that an experimentally observed fitness gain of L. limosa could be explained by the activity of a so far unknown type of NAD(P)H accepting hydrogenase, which was expressed in the presence, but not in the absence of Arcobacter. Differential proteomics further revealed that the presence of Lenisia stimulated expression of known “virulence” factors by Arcobacter. These proteins typically enable colonization of animal cells during infection5, but may in the present case act for mutual benefit. Finally, re-investigation of two currently available transcriptomic datasets of other Breviatea4 revealed the presence and activity of related hydrogen-consuming Arcobacter, indicating that mutualistic interaction between these two groups of microbes might be pervasive. Our results support the notion that molecular mechanisms involved in virulence can also support mutualism6 as shown here for Arcobacter and Breviatea. PMID:27279223

  5. Environmental Breviatea harbour mutualistic Arcobacter epibionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Emmo; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald; Kleiner, Manuel; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Riedel, Dietmar; Littmann, Sten; Chen, Jianwei; Milucka, Jana; Viehweger, Bernhard; Becker, Kevin W; Dong, Xiaoli; Stairs, Courtney W; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Brown, Matthew W; Roger, Andrew J; Strous, Marc

    2016-06-09

    Breviatea form a lineage of free living, unicellular protists, distantly related to animals and fungi. This lineage emerged almost one billion years ago, when the oceanic oxygen content was low, and extant Breviatea have evolved or retained an anaerobic lifestyle. Here we report the cultivation of Lenisia limosa, gen. et sp. nov., a newly discovered breviate colonized by relatives of animal-associated Arcobacter. Physiological experiments show that the association of L. limosa with Arcobacter is driven by the transfer of hydrogen and is mutualistic, providing benefits to both partners. With whole-genome sequencing and differential proteomics, we show that an experimentally observed fitness gain of L. limosa could be explained by the activity of a so far unknown type of NAD(P)H-accepting hydrogenase, which is expressed in the presence, but not in the absence, of Arcobacter. Differential proteomics further reveal that the presence of Lenisia stimulates expression of known 'virulence' factors by Arcobacter. These proteins typically enable colonization of animal cells during infection, but may in the present case act for mutual benefit. Finally, re-investigation of two currently available transcriptomic data sets of other Breviatea reveals the presence and activity of related hydrogen-consuming Arcobacter, indicating that mutualistic interaction between these two groups of microbes might be pervasive. Our results support the notion that molecular mechanisms involved in virulence can also support mutualism, as shown here for Arcobacter and Breviatea.

  6. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter infection is a common foodborne illness. You get it from eating raw or undercooked poultry. You ... whether you need to take antibiotics. To prevent campylobacter infection, cook poultry thoroughly. Use a separate cutting ...

  7. Campylobacter infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the small intestine from a bacteria called Campylobacter jejuni . It is a type of food poisoning. Causes ... testing for white blood cells Stool culture for Campylobacter jejuni Treatment The infection almost always goes away on ...

  8. Isolation of Arcobacter spp from poultry carcasses, in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Sérgio José de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourty eight isolates of Arcobacter spp were obtained from 37 poultry carcasses, from abattoir, among 80 carcasses examined. Attempts for culturing were made from the skin and muscle, resulting on 25 positive cultures from muscle and 23 from skin. Classification was achieved by phenotypic characterization and PCR and multiplex PCR, resulting 41 samples of Arcobacter butzleri and 07 Arcobacter sp. This is the first report on the occurrence of Arcobacter in animal carcasses in Brazil.

  9. Desiccation resistance in Arcobacter butzleri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otth Laura

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The desiccation resistance of A. butzleri was studied. Two, 3 and 4 of the strains did not resist desiccation for more than 2, 12 and 36 h, respectively. Two strains resisted desiccation for > 48 h. A. butzleri seems to be more resistant to desiccation than the classical enteropathogenic Campylobacter species.

  10. Biological Characteristics and Diagnoses of Pathogenic Arcobacter species%致病性弓形杆菌属生物学特性及诊断研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕水莲; 孟赫诚

    2013-01-01

    弓形杆菌(Arcobacter)属于弯曲菌科,革兰氏阴性,与弯曲菌(Campylobacter)类似.但不同的是,它在需氧、微需氧和15℃低温条件下均可生长.Arcobacter是一种人畜共患的食源性和水源性病原菌,主要分离自猪肉、牛肉、禽肉等动物性食品和水体.基于对国内外相关文献资料的整理,综述了Arcobacter的生物学特性、分类和分布、分离鉴定方法、致病性和防控措施等方面内容,为深入开展Arcobacter的检测、诊断、防控技术等方面研究提供背景参考.%Arcobacter species are Gram-negative organisms belonging to the family Campylobacteraceae that can grow microaerobically or aerobically. Arcobacter organisms also have the ability to grow at 15 'C, which is a distinctive feature that differentiates Arcobacter species from Campylobacter species. Arcobacter species have been considered as zoonotic foodborne and waterbome agents. The organism is routinely isolated from a range of foods of animal origin, such as pork, beef and poultry, as well as water sources. Based on the recent researches, this article reviewed the biological characteristics, classification and distribution, isolation and identification, pathogenicity, prevention and control of Arcobacter species, which will be useful for the further research on detection, diagnoses, prevention and control of Arcobacter species.

  11. Arcobacter bivalviorum sp. nov. and Arcobacter venerupis sp. nov., new species isolated from shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Arturo; Collado, Luis; Aguilar, Carmen; Yustes, Clara; Diéguez, Ana L; Romalde, Jesús L; Figueras, Maria José

    2012-05-01

    A group of ten Arcobacter isolates (Gram negative, slightly curved motile rods, oxidase positive) was recovered from mussels (nine) and from clams (one). These isolates could not be assigned to any known species using the molecular identification methods specific for this genus (16S rDNA-RFLP and m-PCR). The aim of this study is to establish the taxonomic position of these isolates. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of mussel strain F4(T) to the type strains of all other Arcobacter species ranged from 91.1% to 94.8%. The species most similar to the clams' strain F67-11(T) were Arcobacter defluvii (CECT 7697(T), 97.1%) and Arcobacter ellisii (CECT 7837(T), 97.0%). On the basis of phylogenetic analyses with 16S rRNA, rpoB, gyrB and hsp60 genes, the mussel and clam strains formed two different, new lineages within the genus Arcobacter. These data, together with their different phenotypic characteristics and MALDI-TOF mass spectra, revealed that these strains represent two new species, for which the names Arcobacter bivalviorum (type strain F4(T)=CECT 7835(T)=LMG 26154(T)) and Arcobacter venerupis (type strain F67-11(T)=CECT 7836(T)=LMG 26156(T)) are proposed.

  12. Arcobacter ebronensis sp. nov. and Arcobacter aquimarinus sp. nov., two new species isolated from marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Arturo; Rubio-Arcos, Sara; Martinez-Murcia, Antonio; Collado, Luis; Figueras, María José

    2015-02-01

    Two strains recovered from mussels (F128-2(T)) and sea water (W63(T)) were characterized as Arcobacter sp., but they could not be assigned to any known species using the molecular identification methods specific for this genus (16S rDNA-RFLP and m-PCR) and rpoB gene analysis. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strains of all Arcobacter species ranged from 92.2% to 96.7% with strain F128-2(T), and from 94.1% to 99.4% with strain W63(T), the most similar being A. bivalviorum (CECT 7835(T)) and A. defluvii (CECT 7697(T)), respectively. The phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA, and the concatenated sequences of gyrB, gyrA, rpoB, atpA and hsp60 genes confirmed that strains F128-2(T) and W63(T) belonged to two new lineages within the genus Arcobacter. Moreover, both strains showed differential phenotypic characteristics and MALDI-TOF mass spectra from all other Arcobacter species. Therefore, it has been demonstrated the existence of two new Arcobacter species and the proposed names are Arcobacter ebronensis (type strain F128-2(T)=CECT 8441(T)=LMG 27922(T)), and Arcobacter aquimarinus (type strain W63(T)=CECT 8442(T)=LMG 27923(T)).

  13. Arcobacter ellisii sp. nov., isolated from mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueras, Maria José; Levican, Arturo; Collado, Luis; Inza, Maria Isabel; Yustes, Clara

    2011-09-01

    As part of a study carried out for detecting Arcobacter spp. in shellfish, three mussel isolates that were Gram-negative slightly curved rods, non-spore forming, showed a new 16S rDNA-RFLP pattern with a specific identification method for the species of this genus. Sequences of the 16S rRNA gene and those of the housekeeping genes rpoB, gyrB and hsp60 provided evidence that these mussel strains belonged to an unknown genetic lineage within the genus Arcobacter. The similarity between the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the representative strain (F79-6(T)) and type strains of the other Arcobacter species ranged between 94.1% with A. halophilus and 99.1% with the recently proposed species A. defluvii (CECT 7697(T)). DDH results between strain F79-6(T) and the type strain of the latter species were below 70% (53±3.0%). Phenotypic characteristics together with MALDITOF mass spectra differentiated the new mussel strains from all other Arcobacter species. All the results indicate that these strains represent a new species, for which the name Arcobacter ellisii sp. nov. with the type strain F79-6(T) (=CECT 7837(T)=LMG 26155(T)) is proposed.

  14. Prevalence of Arcobacter species isolated from retail meats in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Hwa; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Choi, Sunkeum; Lee, Bog-Hieu; Jung, Ji-Youn; Choi, Changsun

    2010-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Arcobacter species identified or isolated from retail meats in Korea. Multiplex PCR assays for the detection of Arcobacter species were performed for 360 chicken, 100 pork, and 106 beef samples. Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus were detected in 18.9 and 3.3% of chicken samples, respectively. However, Arcobacter species were not found in any of the pork and beef samples. Biochemical testing of isolates selected after enrichment revealed 38 A. butzleri isolates in chicken samples, but no A. cryaerophilus isolates were detected. In this study, A. butzleri was the most prevalent Arcobacter species in chicken meat, and contamination with Arcobacter species in pork and beef may be less prevalent in Korea.

  15. Isolation of Arcobacter species in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piva, Silvia; Serraino, Andrea; Florio, Daniela; Giacometti, Federica; Pasquali, Frederique; Manfreda, Gerardo; Zanoni, Renato Giulio

    2013-05-01

    This is the first report of Arcobacter spp. in rectal fecal samples from healthy water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) reared on a dairy farm. Arcobacter species were isolated after enrichment, and isolates were identified at species level by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction assay. Thirty samples were examined and Arcobacter spp. were isolated from 96.7% of water buffaloes tested: 38 Arcobacter spp. isolates were obtained, with A. cryaerophilus as the dominant species followed by A. butzleri and A. skirrowii. Nine animals (31%) were colonized by more than one Arcobacter species. The present study indicates that water buffaloes can harbor a variety of Arcobacter spp. and that healthy buffaloes may act as hosts. Water buffalo fecal shedding of Arcobacter spp. may be of significance to human health, considering the potential fecal contamination during harvesting of raw milk and slaughtering.

  16. Taxonomy and epidemiology of the genus arcobacter

    OpenAIRE

    Collado González, Luis Roberto

    2010-01-01

    El género Arcobacter incluye especies capaces de producir patología gastrointestinal en humanos y aborto, diarrea y mastitis en ganado. Sin embargo se desconoce su prevalencia en el agua y no existen métodos que permitan la identificación de sus 9 especies. En esta tesis hemos desarrollado un protocolo (16S rDNA-RFLP) capaz de diferenciar la mayoría de las especies. Además, demostramos que la presencia de Arcobacter en aguas se correlaciona con la contaminación fecal y que tiene una elevada ...

  17. Detection and diversity of various Arcobacter species in Danish poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atabay, H.I.; Wainø, Michael; Madsen, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence and diversity of different Arcobacter spp. in various poultry species in Denmark were investigated using cultural and multiplex PCR methods. A pool of three fresh droppings obtained at the production site from 70 broiler chicken flocks aged 4-5 weeks was examined. In addition, pools...... from ducks at the abattoir were analyzed individually. In total, 85 Arcobacter isolates were obtained. Of these 45, 20 and 7 were identified as Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus and Arcobacter skirrowii, respectively, using a multiplex PCR. Interestingly, some chicken isolates of A...... positive for A. cryaerophilus (7), A. butzleri (2) or A. skirrowii (2). Four (11%) of the 37 turkey flocks analyzed harboured either A. butzleri or A. cryaerophilus. The carriage rate of Arcobacter was higher in live ducks than those of live broiler chickens and turkeys in the present study. In addition...

  18. Enterohepatic Helicobacter other than Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Mateos Muñoz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Helicobacter genus includes Gram negative bacteria which were originally considered to belong to the Campylobacter genus. They have been classified in a separate genus since 1989 because they have different biochemical characteristics, with more than 24 species having been identified and more still being studied. H. pylori is the best known. It has an important etiopathogenic role in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Enterohepatic Helicobacter s (EHH other than H. pylori colonize the bowel, biliary tree and liver of animals and human beings with pathogenic potential. The difficulties existing to correctly isolate these microorganisms limit the description of their true prevalence and of the diseases they cause. Many studies have tried to discover the different clinical implications of EHH. Diseases like chronic liver disease, autoimmune hepatitis, hepatocarcinoma, autoimmune hepatobiliary disease, biliary lithiasis, cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer, Meckel's diverticulum, acute appendicitis and inflammatory bowel disease have been related with different EHH species with different results, although their prevalence is greater than in healthy subjects. However, these data are currently not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions. Finally, the best known role of EHH in bowel disease is production of acute and chronic diarrhea pictures initially referred to as Campylobacter. H. pullorum has been identified in patients with acute gastroenteritis. The correct identification of EHH as producers of infectious gastroenteritis is found in its antibiotic susceptibility. It is generally macrolide-susceptible and quinolone-resistant.

  19. Characterization of new DsbB-like thiol-oxidoreductases of Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori and classification of the DsbB family based on phylogenomic, structural and functional criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raczko, Anna M; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Pawlowski, Marcin; Godlewska, Renata; Lewandowska, Magdalena; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elzbieta K

    2005-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacterial cells, disulfide bond formation occurs in the oxidative environment of the periplasm and is catalysed by Dsb (disulfide bond) proteins found in the periplasm and in the inner membrane. In this report the identification of a new subfamily of disulfide oxidoreductases encoded by a gene denoted dsbI, and functional characterization of DsbI proteins from Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori, as well as DsbB from C. jejuni, are described. The N-terminal domain of DsbI is related to DsbB proteins and comprises five predicted transmembrane segments, while the C-terminal domain is predicted to locate to the periplasm and to fold into a beta-propeller structure. The dsbI gene is co-transcribed with a small ORF designated dba (dsbI-accessory). Based on a series of deletion and complementation experiments it is proposed that DsbB can complement the lack of DsbI but not the converse. In the presence of DsbB, the activity of DsbI was undetectable, hence it probably acts only on a subset of possible substrates of DsbB. To reconstruct the principal events in the evolution of DsbB and DsbI proteins, sequences of all their homologues identifiable in databases were analysed. In the course of this study, previously undetected variations on the common thiol-oxidoreductase theme were identified, such as development of an additional transmembrane helix and loss or migration of the second pair of Cys residues between two distinct periplasmic loops. In conjunction with the experimental characterization of two members of the DsbI lineage, this analysis has resulted in the first comprehensive classification of the DsbB/DsbI family based on structural, functional and evolutionary criteria.

  20. Insights in the pathogenesis and resistance of Arcobacter: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Queiroz, João A; Oleastro, Mónica; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2016-05-01

    Arcobacter genus currently comprises 18 recognized species, among which Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus and Arcobacter skirrowii have been associated with human and animal disease. Although these organisms, with special emphasis A. butzleri, are emerging as clinical pathogens, several aspects of their epidemiology and virulence are only starting to be clarified. In vitro human and animal cell culture assays have been used to show that several Arcobacter species can adhere to and invade eukaryotic cells, induce an immune response and produce toxins that damage host cells. In addition, data from genome sequencing highlighted several potential markers that may be helpful candidates for the study and understanding of these mechanisms; however, more work is necessary to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in Arcobacter virulence. Arcobacter can be considered a relatively robust organism showing to be able to survive in adverse conditions, as the ones imposed by food processing and storage. Moreover, these bacteria have shown increased antibiotic resistance, along with high multidrug resistance. In this review, we seek to update the state-of-the-art concerning Arcobacter distribution, its interaction with the host, the trends of antibiotic resistance, its ability to survive, and finally the use of natural antimicrobials for control of Arcobacter.

  1. Global Distribution and Prevalence of Arcobacter in Food and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, T-T D; Lee, J

    2015-12-01

    The emerging foodborne and waterborne pathogen, Arcobacter, has been linked to various gastrointestinal diseases. Currently, 19 species are established or proposed; consequently, there has been an increase in the number of publications regarding Arcobacter since it was first introduced in 1991. To better understand the potential public health risks posed by Arcobacter, this review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the global distribution and the prevalence of Arcobacter in food and water. Arcobacter spp. were identified in food animals, food-processing environments and a variety of foods, including vegetables, poultry, beef, dairy products, seafood, pork, lamb and rabbit. A wide range of waterbodies has been reported to be contaminated with Arcobacter spp., such as wastewater, seawater, lake and river water, drinking water, groundwater and recreational water. In addition, Arcobacter has also been isolated from pets, domestic birds, wildlife, zoo and farm animals. It is expected that advancements in molecular techniques will facilitate better detection worldwide and aid in understanding the pathogenicity of Arcobacter. However, more extensive and rigorous surveillance systems are needed to better understand the occurrence of Arcobacter in food and water in various regions of the world, as well as uncover other potential public health risks, that is antibiotic resistance and disinfection efficiency, to reduce the possibility of foodborne and waterborne infections.

  2. First multi-locus sequence typing scheme for Arcobacter spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guilin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arcobacter spp. are a common contaminant of food and water, and some species, primarily A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus, have been isolated increasingly from human diarrheal stool samples. Here, we describe the first Arcobacter multilocus sequence typing (MLST method for A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, A. skirrowii, A. cibarius and A. thereius. Results A sample set of 374 arcobacters, including 275 A. butzleri, 72 A. cryaerophilus, 15 A. skirrowii and 8 A. cibarius isolates from a wide variety of geographic locations and sources, was typed in this study. Additionally, this sample set contained four strains representing a new Arcobacter species, A. thereius. The seven loci used in the four-species Arcobacter MLST method are the same as those employed previously in C. jejuni, C. coli, C. helveticus and C. fetus (i.e. aspA, atpA(uncA, glnA, gltA, glyA, pgm and tkt. A large number of alleles were identified at each locus with the majority of isolates containing a unique sequence type. All Arcobacter isolates typed in this study contain two glyA genes, one linked to lysS (glyA1 and the other linked to ada (glyA2. glyA1 was incorporated into the Arcobacter MLST method while glyA2 was not because it did not increase substantially the level of discrimination. Conclusion No association of MLST alleles or sequence types with host or geographical source was observed with this sample set. Nevertheless, the large number of identified alleles and sequence types indicate that this MLST method will prove useful in both Arcobacter strain discrimination and in epidemiological studies of sporadic Arcobacter-related gastroenteritis. A new Arcobacter MLST database was created http://pubmlst.org/arcobacter/; allele and ST data generated in this study were deposited in this database and are available online.

  3. Growth and survival at chiller temperatures of Arcobacter butzleri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldgaard, Jette; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Ingmer, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    Arcobacter butzleri is prevalent on chicken products. Arcobacter spp. are generally isolated in only low numbers from the chicken gut, so chicken carcasses may be contaminated by A. butzleri that proliferate in the slaughterhouse environment. To address this issue, we examined the behaviour of A...

  4. First multilocus sequence typing scheme for Arcobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcobacter spp. are a common contaminant of food and water, and some species, primarily A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus, have been isolated increasingly from human diarrheal stool samples. Here, we describe a novel Arcobacter multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method suitable for typing A. butzleri,...

  5. Prevalence and concentration of Arcobacter spp. on Australian Beef Carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Lesley L; Fegan, Narelle

    2012-08-01

    The International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF) classified Arcobacter spp. as emerging pathogens in 2002. Arcobacter spp. have been isolated from numerous food products at retail and from animal carcasses and feces at slaughter. A survey was conducted to determine both the prevalence and concentration of Arcobacter spp. on pre-chill beef carcasses. Surface swab samples were collected from 130 beef carcasses at the end of processing, prior to chilling. The concentration of Arcobacter spp. was determined by a most-probable-number per square centimeter (3 by 3) method with a limit of detection of 0.12 CFU/cm(2). Of the 100 carcasses examined from export abattoirs, 20 (20.0%) were contaminated with Arcobacter spp., and 5 of these had quantifiable levels of contamination ranging from 0.12 to 0.31 CFU/cm(2). Of the 30 carcasses examined at a pet food abattoir, 25 (83.3%) were contaminated with Arcobacter spp., and 10 of these had quantifiable levels of contamination ranging from 0.12 to 0.95 CFU/cm(2). Three species of Arcobacter, A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, and A. skirowii, were identified by PCR. Each of the species was present in an approximately equal ratio from export abattoirs. This study demonstrates that slaughter practices at export abattoirs are sufficient to maintain both low prevalence and low levels of contamination of beef carcasses with Arcobacter spp.

  6. Short communication: occurrence of Arcobacter species in industrial dairy plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraino, A; Giacometti, F

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the presence of Arcobacter spp. in industrial dairy plants. Between February and September 2013, pasteurized milk used for cheesemaking, processing and cleaning water, cheese, and environmental samples from different plant sites, including surfaces in contact or not in contact with food, were sampled. A total of 126 samples were analyzed by the cultural method and isolates were identified by multiplex PCR. Arcobacter spp. were isolated from 22 of 75 environmental samples (29.3%): of them, 22.7% were surfaces in contact with food and 38.7% surfaces not in contact with food. A total of 135 Arcobacter spp. isolates were obtained; of these, 129 and 6 were identified as Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus, respectively. All food processing water and pasteurized milk samples were negative for Arcobacter species. We were not able to determine the primary source of contamination, but the isolation of both A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus in surfaces in contact with food before and during manufacturing suggests that Arcobacter spp. are not or are only partially affected by routine sanitizing procedures in the industrial dairy plants studied. The efficacy of sanitizing procedures should be evaluated and further studies are needed to determine whether certain Arcobacter strains persist for long periods of time in industrial dairy plants and whether they can survive in different types of cheese in cases of postprocessing contamination.

  7. Arcobacter butzleri: first isolation report from chicken carcasses in costa rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Arias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Arcobacter butzleri isolation from chicken carcasses in Costa Rica is reported for the first time. The isolated strains (P and R were presumptively identified by their phenotypic characteristics. Definitive identification was made using a multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous detection and identification of Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus and Arcobacter skirrowii. These first isolations indicate the necessity of further investigation about the prevalence, distribution, ecology and interactions with human beings of this and other Arcobacter species.

  8. Genetic characterization of Arcobacter isolates from various sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A H; Saleha, A A; Zunita, Z; Cheah, Y K; Murugaiyah, M; Korejo, N A

    2012-12-07

    Arcobacter is getting more attention due to its detection from wide host-range and foods of animal origin. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in various sources at farm level and beef retailed in markets in Malaysia and to assess the genetic relatedness among them. A total of 273 samples from dairy cattle including cattle (n=120), floor (n=30), water (n=18) and milk (n=105) as well as 148 beef samples collected from retail markets were studied. The overall prevalence of Arcobacter in various sources was 15% (63/421). However, source-wise detection rate of Arcobacter spp. was recorded as 26.66% (8/30) in floor, 26.3% (39/148) in beef, 11.11% (2/18) in water, 7.6% (8/105) in milk and 6.66% (8/120) in cattle. Arcobacter butzleri was the frequently isolated species however, a total of 75%, 66.7%, 53.8%, 50% and 12.5%% samples from floor, milk, beef, water and cattle, respectively, were carrying more than one species simultaneously. One (12.5%) cattle and beef sample (2.5%) found to be carrying one Arcobacter spp., A. skirrowii, only. Typing of Arcobacter isolates was done though pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) after digested with Eag1 restriction endonuclease (RE). Digestion of genomic DNA of Arcobacter from various sources yielded 12 major clusters (≥ 50% similarity) which included 29 different band patterns. A number of closely related A. butzleri isolates were found from beef samples which indicate cross contamination of common type of Arcobacter. Fecal shedding of Arcobacter by healthy animals can contaminate water and milk which may act as source of infection in humans.

  9. Inhibitory effect of organic acids on arcobacters in culture and their use for control of Arcobacter butzleri on chicken skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skřivanová, Eva; Molatová, Zuzana; Matěnová, Michaela; Houf, Kurt; Marounek, Milan

    2011-01-05

    The inhibitory effects of 17 organic acids (C₂-C₁₆ fatty acids, sorbic, benzoic, phenylacetic, fumaric, succinic, lactic, malic and citric) on Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus and Arcobacter skirrowii were investigated by determining their IC₅₀ values, defined as the concentration of acid at which the target DNA sequence was expressed at 50% of the positive control level in cultures incubated at 30°C for 24 h. DNA was analysed by real-time PCR. The Arcobacter strains tested were inhibited by all the organic acids, with the sensitivities in the order A. skirrowii > A. cryaerophilus > A. butzleri. Eight acids with IC₅₀ values of arcobacters on Muller-Hinton agar. All eight tested acids suppressed bacterial proliferation. The highest inhibitory activities were observed for benzoic, citric, malic and sorbic acids. Subsequent sensory analysis revealed benzoic acid to be the most suitable organic acid for chicken skin treatment.

  10. A comparison of Arcobacter isolation methods and the diversity of Arcobacter spp. in Cheshire, UK.__________________________________________

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: The aims of this study were firstly to compare five published methods for the isolation of Arcobacter spp. from animal faeces in order to determine the most sensitive and specific method. Secondly, we analyzed the resulting isolates by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) in order to investiga...

  11. QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF CAMPYLOBACTER SPP. ON POULTRY CARCASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Alberghini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter spp. are bacterial pathogens associated with human gastroenteritis worldwide. In Europe, campylobacteriosis is one of the leading food-borne bacterial diseases and the consumption of poultry meats is suspected to be one of the major causes of illness. The aim of our research was to determine the number of Campylobacter spp. in poultry carcasses and in poultry meat samples during their storage till to retail markets. The study was conducted from February 2009 to February 2010 at slaughterhouse in Veneto region, followed by a test of fresh poultry meat placed on the market for sale. A total of 90 poultry carcass and 90 samples of poultry meat were examined. The quantitative examination resulted in Campylobacter spp. counts (mean: for carcasses between 2,0 ∙101 ufc/g and 1,5 ∙103 ufc/g (4,2 ∙102 and poultry meat between 2,0 ∙101 ufc/g and 3,7 ∙102 ufc/g (8,1 ∙101. The majority of isolates were classified as Campylobacter jejuni (58,3%, Campylobacter coli (22,9% or Arcobacter cryaerophilus (4,2%. Acknowledgments: The project was funded with grants from Fondazione Cariverona 2007.

  12. Campylobacter serology test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... time the skin is broken) Images Blood test Campylobacter jejuni organism References Allos BM. Campylobacter infections. In: Goldman ... chap 303. Allos BM, Iovine NM, Blaser MJ. Campylobacter jejuni and related species. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, ...

  13. Population Dynamics and Ecology of Arcobacter in Sewage

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    Jenny C Fisher

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arcobacter species are highly abundant in sewage where they often comprise approximately 5-11% of the bacterial community. Oligotyping of sequences amplified from the V4V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene revealed Arcobacter populations from different cities were similar and dominated by one to three members, with extremely high microdiversity in the minor members. Overall, nine subgroups within the Arcobacter genus accounted for >80% of the total Arcobacter sequences in all samples analyzed. The distribution of oligotypes varied by both sample site and temperature, with samples from the same site generally being more similar to each other than other sites. Seven oligotypes matched with 100% identity to characterized Arcobacter species, but the remaining 19 abundant oligotypes appear to be unknown species. Sequences representing the two most abundant oligotypes matched exactly to the type strains for A. cryaerophilus group 1B (CCUG 17802 and group 1A (CCUG17801, respectively. Oligotype 1 showed generally lower relative abundance in colder samples and higher relative abundance in warmer samples; the converse was true for Oligotype 2. Ten other oligotypes had significant positive or negative correlations between temperature and proportion in samples as well. The oligotype that corresponded to A. butzleri, the Arcobacter species most commonly isolated by culturing in sewage studies, was only the eleventh most abundant oligotype. This work suggests that Arcobacter populations occupy unique niches in sewer infrastructure and are modulated by temperature. Furthermore, current culturing methods used for identification of Arcobacter fail to identify some abundant members of the community and may underestimate the presence of species with affinities for growth at lower temperatures. Understanding the ecological factors that affect the survival and growth of Arcobacter spp. in sewer infrastructure may better inform the risks associated with these emerging

  14. Arcobacter thereius sp. nov., isolated from pigs and ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houf, Kurt; On, Stephen L W; Coenye, Tom; Debruyne, Lies; De Smet, Sarah; Vandamme, Peter

    2009-10-01

    During a Danish study on the prevalence of campylobacteria in pig abortions and food of animal origin, eight Gram-negative, slightly curved, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming bacteria were clustered by using amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis in a distinct phenon within the genus Arcobacter. In the present study, numerical analysis of whole-cell protein profiles also showed that all isolates clustered in a single group distinct from other recognized Arcobacter species. DNA-DNA hybridization among two representative strains exhibited a mean DNA-DNA relatedness value of 79 %. DNA-DNA hybridization with the type strains of recognized Arcobacter species revealed levels of DNA-DNA relatedness of 41 % or less. The DNA G+C content of the type strain was 28.5 mol%. Pairwise comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequences with those of the type strains of established species identified Arcobacter cryaerophilus (97.9 %), Arcobacter cibarius (97.5 %) and Arcobacter skirrowii (97.2 %) as the nearest phylogenetic neighbours. The isolates could be distinguished from other Arcobacter species by means of the following biochemical tests: activities of catalase and urease, reduction of nitrate and growth on minimal medium, lack of growth at 37 degrees C under standardized aerobic and microaerobic conditions, in 4 % NaCl and 1 % glycine media. Finally, DNA fingerprints obtained by using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consenus-PCR showed that the eight isolates represent eight strains of a single novel Arcobacter species, for which the name Arcobacter thereius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LMG 24486(T) (=CCUG 56902(T)).

  15. Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Helicobacter pylori KidsHealth > For Parents > Helicobacter pylori Print A A A What's in this article? ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention When to Call the Doctor Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) bacteria are a common cause of ...

  16. Short communication: Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus survival and growth in artisanal and industrial ricotta cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, F; Losio, M N; Daminelli, P; Cosciani-Cunico, E; Dalzini, E; Serraino, A

    2015-10-01

    Ricotta cheese is a ready-to-eat product with properties (pH >6.0, aw >0.98-0.99) and moisture content (75-80%) that may pose a risk to public health due to postprocess contamination by several bacterial pathogens, including Arcobacters. The objective of the study was to evaluate the behavior of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus in ricotta cheese during its shelf life assuming postprocessing contamination. Two types of ricotta cheese, artisanal water buffalo (WB) and industrial cow milk ricotta cheese, were experimentally contaminated with A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus and the count was monitored at 2 different temperatures (6°C and 12°C) during shelf life of 5 d for WB cheese and 22 d for industrial ricotta cheese. In WB ricotta cheese the A. butzleri count remained stable during the 5 d of storage at 6°C, whereas a moderate but significant decrease was observed in A. cryaerophilus count. The counts of both species increased when WB ricotta cheese was stored at 12°C. In industrial ricotta cheese stored at 6°C, a significant reduction was observed both in A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus counts during the 22-d storage period; at 12°C storage, a count increase was observed for both Arcobacter species up to d 14 of storage after which the log cfu/g count resulted constant until d 22 of storage. The ability of A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus to survive at 6°C and to grow at 12°C in ricotta cheese has significant food safety implications.

  17. The Immunopathogenic Potential of Arcobacter butzleri - Lessons from a Meta-Analysis of Murine Infection Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Gölz

    Full Text Available Only limited information is available about the immunopathogenic properties of Arcobacter infection in vivo. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of published data in murine infection models to compare the pathogenic potential of Arcobacter butzleri with Campylobacter jejuni and commensal Escherichia coli as pathogenic and harmless reference bacteria, respectively.Gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds were perorally infected with A. butzleri (strains CCUG 30485 or C1, C. jejuni (strain 81-176 or a commensal intestinal E. coli strain. Either strain stably colonized the murine intestines upon infection. At day 6 postinfection (p.i., C. jejuni infected mice only displayed severe clinical sequelae such as wasting bloody diarrhea. Gross disease was accompanied by increased numbers of colonic apoptotic cells and distinct immune cell populations including macrophages and monocytes, T and B cells as well as regulatory T cells upon pathogenic infection. Whereas A. butzleri and E. coli infected mice were clinically unaffected, respective colonic immune cell numbers increased in the former, but not in the latter, and more distinctly upon A. butzleri strain CCUG 30485 as compared to C1 strain infection. Both, A. butzleri and C. jejuni induced increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-6 and MCP-1 in large, but also small intestines. Remarkably, even though viable bacteria did not translocate from the intestines to extra-intestinal compartments, systemic immune responses were induced in C. jejuni, but also A. butzleri infected mice as indicated by increased respective pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in serum samples at day 6 p.i.A. butzleri induce less distinct pro-inflammatory sequelae as compared to C. jejuni, but more pronounced local and systemic immune responses than commensal E. coli in a strain-dependent manner. Hence, data point towards that A. butzleri is more than a

  18. Presence and analysis of plasmids in human and animal associated Arcobacter species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip;

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three sma...

  19. Mechanisms associated with phagocytosis of Arcobacter butzleri by Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Gustavo; Flores-Martin, Sandra; Fonseca, Belchiolina; Otth, Carola; Fernandez, Heriberto

    2014-05-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoeba widely found in environmental matrices such as soil and water. Arcobacter butzleri is an emerging potential zoonotic pathogen that can be isolated from environmental water sources, where they can establish endosymbiotic relationships with amoebas. The aim of this study was to describe the implication of mannose-binding proteins and membrane-associated receptors of glucose and galactose present in the amoebic membrane, during the attachment of Arcobacter butzleri by blocking with different saccharides. Another objective was to describe the signaling pathways involved in phagocytosis of these bacteria using specific inhibitors and analyze the implication of phagolysosome formation on the survival of Arcobacter butzleri inside the amoeba. We infer that the attachment of Arcobacter butzleri to the amoeba is a process which involves the participation of mannose-binding proteins and membrane-associated receptors of glucose and galactose present in the amoeba. We also demonstrated an active role of protozoan actin polymerization in the phagocytosis of Arcobacter butzleri and a critical involvement of PI3K and RhoA pathways. Further, we demonstrated that the tyrosine kinase-induced actin polymerization signal is essential in Acanthamoeba-mediated bacterial uptake. Through phagolysosomal formation analysis, we conclude that the survival of Arcobacter butzleri inside the amoeba could be related with the ability to remain inside vacuoles not fused with lysosomes, or with the ability to retard the fusion between these structures. All these results help the understanding of the bacterial uptake mechanisms used by Acanthamoeba castellanii and contribute to evidence of the survival mechanisms of Arcobacter butzleri.

  20. Arcobacter molluscorum sp. nov., a new species isolated from shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueras, Maria José; Collado, Luis; Levican, Arturo; Perez, Jessica; Solsona, Maria Josep; Yustes, Clara

    2011-04-01

    Nineteen bacteria isolates recovered from shellfish samples (mussels and oysters) showed a new and specific 16S rDNA-RFLP pattern with an Arcobacter identification method designed to recognize all species described up to 2008. These results suggested that they could belong to a new species. ERIC-PCR revealed that the 19 isolates belonged to 3 different strains. The sequence of the 16S rRNA gene of a representative strain (F98-3(T)) showed 97.6% similarity with the closest species Arcobacter marinus followed by Arcobacter halophilus (95.6%) and Arcobacter mytili (94.7%). The phylogenetic analysis with the16S rRNA, rpoB, gyrB and hsp60 genes placed the shellfish strains within the same cluster as the three species mentioned (also isolated from saline habitats) but they formed an independent phylogenetic line. The DDH results between strain F98-3(T) and A. marinus (54.8%±1.05), confirmed that it represents a new species. Several biochemical tests differentiated the shellfish isolates from all other Arcobacter species. Although the new species was different from A. mytili, they shared not only the same habitat (mussels) but also the characteristic of being so far the only Arcobacter species that are simultaneously negative for urea and indoxyl acetate hydrolysis. All results supported the classification of the shellfish strains as a new species, for which the name Arcobacter molluscorum sp. nov. with the type strain F98-3(T) is proposed (=CECT 7696(T)=LMG 25693(T)).

  1. Arcobacter defluvii sp. nov., isolated from sewage samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Luis; Levican, Arturo; Perez, Jessica; Figueras, Maria José

    2011-09-01

    A study employing a polyphasic taxonomic approach was undertaken to clarify the position of 12 isolates recovered from sewage samples. These isolates were recognized as a potential novel species because a new and specific pattern was produced with the 16S rRNA-RFLP Arcobacter identification method. The sequences of the 16S rRNA gene not only supported the classification of these novel strains as members of the genus Arcobacter, but also showed that they formed a separate phylogenetic line. Strain SW28-11(T), chosen as the representative of these strains, showed 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.6 % with the closest related species Arcobacter nitrofigilis. The phylogenetic position of the novel strains was further confirmed by analysis of the housekeeping genes hsp60, rpoB and, for the first time, gyrB. The latter proved to be an excellent additional gene for establishing the phylogeny of this genus. These data, together with phenotypic characterization, revealed that this group of isolates represent a novel species of the genus Arcobacter. The name Arcobacter defluvii sp. nov., is proposed, with the type strain SW28-11(T) ( = CECT 7697(T) = LMG 25694(T)).

  2. Resveratrol against Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus: activity and effect on cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Silva, Filomena; Queiroz, João A; Oleastro, Mónica; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2014-06-16

    The frequent isolation of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus from food samples makes it imperative to search for potential compounds able to inhibit the development of these bacteria. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the antimicrobial activity of resveratrol and its mechanism of action against A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus. The activity of resveratrol was assessed by a microdilution method and time-kill curves. Resveratrol effect on cellular functions was assessed by flow cytometry evaluating intracellular DNA content and metabolic activity. Ethidium bromide (EtBr) accumulation in the presence of resveratrol was also evaluated, as well as the susceptibility to resveratrol in the presence of phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to further evaluate cell damage caused by resveratrol. Resveratrol presented MIC values of 100 and 50μg/mL to A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus, respectively. Based on the time-kill curves, resveratrol exhibited bactericidal activity, leading to a ≥3log10CFU/mL reduction of initial inoculums, for A. butzleri exponential phase cells incubated for 6h with 1× MIC or with 2× MIC after 24h for stationary phase cells. For A. cryaerophilus cells in exponential growth phase, 99.9% killing was achieved after 24h incubation with 2× MIC, whereas, for stationary phase cells, bactericidal activity was only detected after incubation with 4× MIC. Incubation with resveratrol led to a decrease in both intracellular DNA content and metabolic activity. An increase in the accumulation of EtBr was observed in the presence of resveratrol, and the efflux pump inhibitor PAβN reduced the MIC of resveratrol. SEM analysis revealed disintegration of A. butzleri cells treated with resveratrol, whereas no morphological alteration was observed for A. cryaerophilus cells. Resveratrol has a good anti-Arcobacter activity, and the results obtained suggest that this compound

  3. Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    BATESON, M

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer disease, and its detection and eradication are now an important part of gastroenterology. Effective regimes are available which will eliminate the organism in about 90% of cases in developed countries.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori

  4. Prevalence and genetic diversity of arcobacter in food products in the north of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieva-Echevarria, Barbara; Martinez-Malaxetxebarria, Irati; Girbau, Cecilia; Alonso, Rodrigo; Fernández-Astorga, Aurora

    2013-08-01

    The bacterial contamination of food products can cause serious public health problems. Interest in Arcobacter contamination has increased due to the relationship between these bacteria and human enteritis. We studied the prevalence and genetic diversity of Arcobacter species at the retail level in the province of Alava in Basque Country, Spain. The results showed a high genetic diversity and indicated the regular presence of the main Arcobacter spp. associated with human enteric illness in food products. Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and Arcobacter skirrowii were detected with an overall prevalence close to 40% and were isolated from 15 (42.8%) fresh cow's milk samples, 12 (73.3%) shellfish samples, 11 (55%) chicken samples, 2 (10%) pork samples, and 1 (5%) beef sample. The results indicate the need to investigate the impact of Arcobacter spp. on public health.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of Arcobacter spp. in raw milk and retail raw beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A H; Saleha, A A; Murugaiyah, M; Zunita, Z; Memon, A A

    2012-08-01

    A total of 106 beef samples which consisted of local (n = 59) and imported (n = 47) beef and 180 milk samples from cows (n = 86) and goats (n = 94) were collected from Selangor, Malaysia. Overall, 30.2% (32 of 106) of beef samples were found positive for Arcobacter species. Imported beef was significantly more contaminated (46.80%) than local beef (16.9%). Arcobacter butzleri was the species isolated most frequently from imported (81.8%) and local (60%) beef, followed by Arcobacter cryaerophilus in local (33.3%) and imported (18.2%) beef samples. Only one local beef sample (10%) yielded Arcobacter skirrowii. Arcobacter species were detected from cow's milk (5.8%), with A. butzleri as the dominant species (60%), followed by A. cryaerophilus (40%), whereas none of the goat's milk samples were found positive for Arcobacter. This is the first report of the detection of Arcobacter in milk and beef in Malaysia.

  6. Arcobacter cloacae sp. nov. and Arcobacter suis sp. nov., two new species isolated from food and sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Arturo; Collado, Luis; Figueras, María José

    2013-02-01

    Three strains recovered from mussels (F26), sewage (SW28-13(T)) and pork meat (F41(T)) were characterized as Arcobacter. They did not appear to resemble any known species on the basis of their 16S rDNA-RFLP patterns and the rpoB gene analyses. However, strains F26 and SW28-13(T) appeared to be the same species. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of strains SW28-13(T) and F41(T) to the type strains of all other Arcobacter species ranged from 94.1% to 99.6% and 93.4% to 98.8%, respectively. Phenotypic characteristics and the DNA-DNA hybridization (DDH) results showed that they belonged to 2 new Arcobacter species. A multilocus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA) with the concatenated sequences of 5 housekeeping genes (gyrA, atpA, rpoB, gyrB and hsp60) was used for the first time in the genus, showing concordance with the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis and DDH results. The MALDI-TOF mass spectra also discriminated these strains as two new species. The names proposed for them are Arcobacter cloacae with the type strain SW28-13(T) (=CECT 7834(T)=LMG 26153(T)) and Arcobacter suis with the type strain F41(T) (=CECT 7833(T)=LMG 26152(T)).

  7. Susceptibility of Arcobacter butzleri to heavy metals Sensibilidade de Arcobacter butzleri a metais pesados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Otth

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of 50 strains of Arcobacter butzleri isolated from chicken liver [12], mussels [18], river water [6] and bovine [5], duck [2] and pelicans [7] feces to mercury (Hg, chromium (Cr, silver (Ag, nickel (Ni, cobalt (Co, iron (Fe, manganese (Mn, molybdenum (Mo and lead (Pb was determined.All the strains were resistant to Mo, Mn, Ni, Co, Pb and Fe and susceptible to Hg, Ag and Cr. MIC values showed high variability, indicating a non homogeneous behavior among the strains.Arcobacter butzleri é um bacilo Gram negativo de caráter zoonótico, pertencente à Família Campylobacteraceae, que tem sido associado a diarréia e septicemia no ser humano. A susceptibilidade de 50 amostras de A. butzleri isoladas de fígados de frango [12], mariscos [18], água de rio [6] e fezes de bovinos [5], patos [2] e pelicanos [7] aos metais pesados mercúrio (Hg, cromo (Cr, prata (Ag, níquel (Ni, cobalto Co, ferro (Fe, manganês (Mn, molibdênio (Mo e chumbo (Pb foi determinada.Todas as amostras foram resistentes a Mo, Mn, Ni, Co, Pb e Fe, sendo susceptíveis a Hg, Ag e Cr. Os valores das CIM apresentaram alta variabilidade indicando um comportamento não homogêneo entre as amostras.

  8. Campylobacter jejuni organism (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni infection causes cramping, diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever within 2 to 5 days after a person has been exposed to the organism. Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial causes ...

  9. EUCAST recommendations for antimicrobial susceptibility testing applied to the three main Campylobacter species isolated in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifré, Elodie; Salha, Ben Amor; Ducournau, Astrid; Floch, Pauline; Chardon, Hubert; Mégraud, Francis; Lehours, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Campylobacter isolates is of great importance for treatment options especially in systemic diseases. The European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) recently proposed epidemiological cut-offs (ECOFFs) for a limited number of antimicrobial compounds and for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli only. In the present study, the EUCAST method was used after minor modifications to define antimicrobial susceptibility patterns for, 1997 C. jejuni, 419 C. coli and 100 Campylobacter fetus strains received at the French National Reference Center for Campylobacters and Helicobacters. Our results show that the ECOFFs defined by EUCAST for tetracycline and ciprofloxacin can be used for C. jejuni and C. coli. The same ECOFF can be used for erythromycin for the three species. The C. jejuni and C. coli ECOFFs for ciprofloxacin however cannot be applied to C. fetus. We also provide data to categorise two 2 β-lactams of interest for systemic diseases, ampicillin and amoxicillin+clavulanate, for the three species.

  10. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  11. Arcobacter anaerophilus sp. nov., isolated from an estuarine sediment and emended description of the genus Arcobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasi Jyothsna, T S; Rahul, K; Ramaprasad, E V V; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2013-12-01

    Two strains (JC83, JC84(T)) of obligately anaerobic, H2S-producing bacteria were isolated from estuarine sediment samples collected from Gangasagar, West Bengal, India. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, non-motile rods. Both strains were positive for oxidase, negative for catalase, hydrolysed casein, reduced nitrate and utilized citrate. Both strains grew chemoorganoheterotrophically with optimal pH of 7-8 (range 7-10) and at 30 °C (range 25-37 °C). C16 : 1ω7c, C18 : 1ω7c, C16 : 0 and C12 : 0 were the major fatty acids of both strains with minor amounts of C14 : 0, C12 : 0 3-OH and C18 : 0. Polar lipids of both strains included diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, an unidentified aminolipid (AL2), an unidentified phospholipid (PL2) and an unidentified lipid (L3). MK-6 was the major respiratory quinone. The DNA G+C content of strains JC83 and JC84(T) was 25.0 and 24.6 mol%, respectively. The strains showed DNA reassociation >85 % (86.0±0.5 %) (based on DNA-DNA hybridization). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, both strains were identified as belonging to the family Campylobacteraceae of the class Epsilonproteobacteria with Arcobacter marinus CL-S1(T) (95.4 % sequence similarity) as their closest phylogenetic neighbour. On the basis of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics as well as phylogenetic analysis, strains JC83 and JC84(T) are considered to represent a novel species, for which the name Arcobacter anaerophilus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JC84(T) ( = KCTC 15071(T) = MTCC 10956(T) = DSM 24636(T)). An emended description of the genus Arcobacter is provided.

  12. Epidemiology of Campylobacter in poultry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs-Reitsma, W.

    1994-01-01

    Campylobacter , causing human infections with severe symptoms of diarrhoea, is mainly transmitted by food, especially poultry meat products.Several studies on Campylobacter colonization in breeders, laying hens, and broilers were carried out. Campylobacter isolates were serotyped, using a modificati

  13. The Immunopathogenic Potential of Arcobacter butzleri – Lessons from a Meta-Analysis of Murine Infection Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gölz, Greta; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Only limited information is available about the immunopathogenic properties of Arcobacter infection in vivo. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis of published data in murine infection models to compare the pathogenic potential of Arcobacter butzleri with Campylobacter jejuni and commensal Escherichia coli as pathogenic and harmless reference bacteria, respectively. Methodology / Principal Findings Gnotobiotic IL-10-/- mice generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds were perorally infected with A. butzleri (strains CCUG 30485 or C1), C. jejuni (strain 81-176) or a commensal intestinal E. coli strain. Either strain stably colonized the murine intestines upon infection. At day 6 postinfection (p.i.), C. jejuni infected mice only displayed severe clinical sequelae such as wasting bloody diarrhea. Gross disease was accompanied by increased numbers of colonic apoptotic cells and distinct immune cell populations including macrophages and monocytes, T and B cells as well as regulatory T cells upon pathogenic infection. Whereas A. butzleri and E. coli infected mice were clinically unaffected, respective colonic immune cell numbers increased in the former, but not in the latter, and more distinctly upon A. butzleri strain CCUG 30485 as compared to C1 strain infection. Both, A. butzleri and C. jejuni induced increased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF, IL-6 and MCP-1 in large, but also small intestines. Remarkably, even though viable bacteria did not translocate from the intestines to extra-intestinal compartments, systemic immune responses were induced in C. jejuni, but also A. butzleri infected mice as indicated by increased respective pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in serum samples at day 6 p.i. Conclusion / Significance A. butzleri induce less distinct pro-inflammatory sequelae as compared to C. jejuni, but more pronounced local and systemic immune responses than commensal E. coli in a strain-dependent manner. Hence

  14. Behavior of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus in ultrahigh-temperature, pasteurized, and raw cow's milk under different temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Federica; Serraino, Andrea; Pasquali, Frederique; De Cesare, Alessandra; Bonerba, Elisabetta; Rosmini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The growth and survival of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus in milk were investigated at different storage temperatures. Three strains of each Arcobacter species were inoculated into ultrahigh-temperature (UHT), pasteurized, and raw cow's milk and stored at 4, 10, and 20°C for 6 days. The survival of Arcobacter spp. during storage was evaluated by a culture method. Results clearly showed that A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus remained viable in milk when stored at 4°C and 10°C for a period of 6 days. When UHT and pasteurized milk were stored at 20°C, the A. butzleri count increased, with a longer lag-phase in pasteurized milk, whereas the A. cryaerophilus count increased in the first 48 h and then rapidly decreased to below the detection limit on the sixth storage day. When raw milk was stored at 20°C, the A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus counts decreased from the first day of storage and no viable bacteria were recovered on the last day of storage. Generally, A. butzleri displayed a significantly better growth and survival capacity than A. cryaerophilus in milk. The present study is the first to assess the survival and/or growth of A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus in milk. The evidence suggests that in case of primary contamination of milk or secondary contamination due to postprocessing contamination, milk can act as a potential source of Arcobacter infection in humans and could have public health implications, especially for raw milk consumption.

  15. Occurence and antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter species in food and slaughterhouse samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ELMALI

    Full Text Available Abstract The objectives of this study were i to isolate Arcobacter species (Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter skirrowii, Arcobacter cryaerophilus from different foods and sources, ii to verify the isolates by multiplex PCR assay, iii to detect the antibiotic resistance profiles of the isolates. In this study a total of 60 Arcobacter isolates were obtained. Arcobacter species were mostly isolated from swab samples (40%, followed by wastewater (29.1%, broiler wing meat (30%, raw milk (23.9% and minced meat (6.6%. Regarding the seasonal distribution of Arcobacter from swab and wastewater samples, the bacterium was commonly isolated from wastewater in winter and spring, while it was frequently detected in swab samples during autumn and spring. All of the isolates were found to be resistant to nalidixic acid, ampicillin, rifampin, and erythromycin. The most effective antibiotic was tetracycline, because 96.66% of the isolates were susceptible against it. This is the first report of the isolation, seasonal distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of Arcobacter species in cattle slaughterhouse samples in Turkey. These results indicate that foods of animal origin and cattle slaughterhouses are significant source of the antimicrobial resistant arcobacters.

  16. Occurrence of Arcobacter in Iranian poultry and slaughterhouse samples implicates contamination by processing equipment and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshbakht, R; Tabatabaei, M; Shirzad Aski, H; Seifi, S

    2014-01-01

    1. The occurrence of Arcobacter spp. and three pathogenic species of Arcobacter from Iranian poultry carcasses was investigated at different steps of broiler processing to determine critical control points for reducing carcass contamination. 2. Samples were collected from (a) cloaca immediately before processing, (b) different points during processing and (c) at different stations in a processing plant of a slaughterhouse in southern Iran. 3. After enrichment steps in Arcobacter selective broth, DNA of the samples was extracted and three significant pathogen species of Arcobacter were identified based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of 16S rRNA and specific species PCR. 4. Out of a total of 540 samples, 244 (45%) were positive for Arcobacter spp. Arcobacter butzleri was more frequently detected (73% ± 13.9%) than A. cryaeophilus (9% ± 13.9%) and A. skirrowii (4.1%). In addition, co-colonisation (A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus) occurred in 13.9% of the positive samples. 5. The results indicate a high prevalence of Arcobacter in the investigated slaughterhouse and broiler carcasses and that Arcobacter is not a normal flora of the broilers. Evidence for the presence of Arcobacter in the environment and water of processing plants suggests that these are sources of contamination of poultry carcasses. In addition, contamination of the poultry carcasses can spread between poultry meats in different parts and processes of the slaughterhouse (pre-scalding to after evisceration).

  17. Flying insects and Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Skovgård, Henrik

    to broiler houses may be counted in thousands per broiler rotation during summer periods, even a low prevalence of Campylobacter positive flies constitute a risk of introduction of Campylobacter to the chickens. M. domestica – the house fly is the most important vector fly for Campylobacter transmission...... organisms, which may collect on their bodies or survive passage through the fly gut. Campylobacter and other pathogens are then easily transferred to other surfaces, for instance peoples food – or to broiler houses where they may be swallowed by chickens or contaminate the environment. On a large material...... of several species of flies collected outside broiler houses, merely ~1% of the flies were found Campylobacter positive. However, the prevalence varied considerably with fly species, time of the year, and availability of Campylobacter sources. Influx of flies to broiler houses As the influx of flies...

  18. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Arcobacter species in cow milk, water buffalo milk and fresh village cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilmen, Simten; Vural, Aydin; Erkan, Mehmet Emin; Yildirim, Ibrahim Halil

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the presence of Arcobacter spp. was examined in cow milk (n=50), water buffalo (WB) milk (n=50) and fresh village cheese (n=50) samples. The 16S rDNA-RFLP method was used for the identification of Arcobacter spp. The disc diffusion method was used to investigate the susceptibility of all strains identified to 18 different antimicrobial substances. The most commonly isolated Arcobacter species were found to be Arcobacter butzleri (38.89%), Arcobacter cryaerophilus (22.23%) and Arcobacter skirrowii (11.12%) in cow milk; A. cryaerophilus (33.33%), Arcobacter cibarius (20.83%) and A. butzleri (12.50%) in WB milk; and A. skirrowii (28.57%), A. butzleri (21.43%) and A. cryaerophilus (14.29%) in fresh village cheese. This is the first study to identify the presence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis, Arcobacter cloacae, Arcobacter halophilus, Arcobacter bivalviorum and A. cibarius species in analyzed samples. It was found that all of the A. cryaerophilus (n:16) isolates were resistant to cefoperazone, cloxacillin and penicillin G; all of the A. skirrowii (n:12) and A. butzleri (n:10) isolates were resistant to cefoperazone, tetracycline, ampicillin, erythromycin, cloxacillin and penicillin G. It was concluded that cow milk, WB milk and fresh village cheese samples are an important source of Arcobacter species and pose a risk to public health.

  19. Evaluation of Various Campylobacter-Specific Quantitative PCR (qPCR) Assays for Detection and Enumeration of Campylobacteraceae in Irrigation Water and Wastewater via a Miniaturized Most-Probable-Number–qPCR Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banting, Graham S.; Braithwaite, Shannon; Scott, Candis; Kim, Jinyong; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Ashbolt, Nicholas; Ruecker, Norma; Tymensen, Lisa; Charest, Jollin; Pintar, Katarina; Checkley, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter spp. are the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, and water is increasingly seen as a risk factor in transmission. Here we describe a most-probable-number (MPN)–quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay in which water samples are centrifuged and aliquoted into microtiter plates and the bacteria are enumerated by qPCR. We observed that commonly used Campylobacter molecular assays produced vastly different detection rates. In irrigation water samples, detection rates varied depending upon the PCR assay and culture method used, as follows: 0% by the de Boer Lv1-16S qPCR assay, 2.5% by the Van Dyke 16S and Jensen glyA qPCR assays, and 75% by the Linton 16S endpoint PCR when cultured at 37°C. Primer/probe specificity was the major confounder, with Arcobacter spp. routinely yielding false-positive results. The primers and PCR conditions described by Van Dyke et al. (M. I. Van Dyke, V. K. Morton, N. L. McLellan, and P. M. Huck, J Appl Microbiol 109:1053–1066, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2010.04730.x) proved to be the most sensitive and specific for Campylobacter detection in water. Campylobacter occurrence in irrigation water was found to be very low (arcobacters. Overall, when Campylobacter prevalence and/or concentration in water is reported using molecular methods, considerable validation is recommended when adapting methods largely developed for clinical applications. Furthermore, combining MPN methods with molecular biology-based detection algorithms allows for the detection and quantification of Campylobacter spp. in environmental samples and is potentially suited to quantitative microbial risk assessment for improved public health disease prevention related to food and water exposures. IMPORTANCE The results of this study demonstrate the importance of assay validation upon data interpretation of environmental monitoring for Campylobacter when using molecular biology-based assays. Previous studies describing

  20. Arcobacter population dynamics in pigs on farrow-to-finish farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Sarah; De Zutter, Lieven; Debruyne, Lies; Vangroenweghe, Frédéric; Vandamme, Peter; Houf, Kurt

    2011-03-01

    Healthy pigs are an important reservoir for the emerging human pathogen Arcobacter which can result in contamination of porcine carcasses and pork and the spread of arcobacters into the environment. Up to now, the excretion of arcobacters by pigs has been studied, but information about the transmission routes in fattening pigs is lacking. The present study aimed to elucidate the Arcobacter population dynamics in pigs during the fattening period on four farrow-to-finish farms. On each farm, 30 clinically healthy, 12-week-old piglets were selected. Fecal samples were collected on 10 sampling occasions until a slaughter age of 30 weeks was reached. Arcobacter spp. were isolated by a selective method and identified by multiplex PCR. The genetic diversity was examined by amplified fragment length polymorphism and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR. The Arcobacter presence in the fecal samples on the four farms ranged from 11.3 to 50.0%, with excretion levels of up to 10(4) CFU/g feces. The ratio in which Arcobacter species were isolated varied between the farms and over time. Characterization revealed a high degree of genotypic diversity among the isolates. Arcobacter strains persisted and spread within the finishing unit during the fattening period. The occurrence of both unique and shared genotypes in pigs in adjacent and nonadjacent pens demonstrates that transmission routes other than fecal-oral transmission occur.

  1. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of emergent Arcobacter spp. isolated from cattle and sheep in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzad Aski, Hesamaddin; Tabatabaei, Mohammad; Khoshbakht, Rahem; Raeisi, Mojtaba

    2016-02-01

    This study is conducted to determine the occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter spp. isolated from clinically healthy food animals. A total of 308 samples from cattle (200) and sheep (108) were collected from Shiraz slaughterhouse, southern Iran to investigate the presence of the important Arcobacter spp. using cultivation and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Arcobacter isolates was determined for 18 antibiotics using disk diffusion method. Among 308 samples, 27 (8.7%) and 44 (14.28%) were positive for the presence of Arcobacter species with cultivation and PCR procedures, respectively. The predominant species was A. butzleri in both cattle (58.33%) and sheep (55%). In addition, concurrent incidence of the species was observed in 25% of the positive samples. All Arcobacter isolates were resistant to rifampicin, vancomycin, ceftriaxone, trimethoprim and cephalothin. The isolates showed high susceptibility to tetracycline, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, amikacin, gentamicin and enrofloxacin. No significant difference among cattle and sheep isolates in resistance pattern was observed. The results indicate that cattle and sheep are significant intestinal carriers for Arcobacter spp. Moreover, tetracycline and aminoglycosides showed great effects on Arcobacter species in antibiogram test and can be used for treatment of human Arcobacter infections.

  2. The Use of Two Culturing Methods in Parallel Reveals a High Prevalence and Diversity of Arcobacter spp. in a Wastewater Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Arturo Levican; Luis Collado; Maria José Figueras

    2016-01-01

    The genus Arcobacter includes species considered emerging food and waterborne pathogens. Despite Arcobacter has been linked to the presence of faecal pollution, few studies have investigated its prevalence in wastewater, and the only isolated species were Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of Arcobacter spp. at a WWTP using in parallel two culturing methods (direct plating and culturing after enrichment) and a direct detection by m-P...

  3. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are common in animals because of the use of fluoroquinolones as therapeutic agents in animal husbandry, particularly in chickens and other poultry. Campylobacter is a commensal in poultry, and therefore, poultry and poultry products are the...

  4. Zoonotic species of the genus Arcobacter in poultry from different regions of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogantes, Esteban Valverde; Fallas-Padilla, Karolina L; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Jaramillo, Heriberto Fernández; Echandi, María Laura Arias

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, emerging pathogens have received special attention due to their consequences for public health. Given that Arcobacter has been isolated in Costa Rica from commercial meat poultry samples, the aim of this research was to determine its isolation frequency from laying hens, broilers, ducks, and geese and to compare two types of samples, namely, cloacal swabs and stool collection. Arcobacter was isolated from 22 (11%) of the 200 samples examined. Fifteen (55%), eight (30%), and four (15%) of the isolated strains were identified as A. butzleri, A. cryareophilus, and Arcobacter spp., respectively. Also, there is a statistically significant difference among the isolation frequencies of Arcobacter for the types of samples evaluated, yielding more isolates from stool samples than from cloacal swab collection. This work describes the distribution of Arcobacter in farm animals as potential sources for its spread from animal-derived products.

  5. Isolation of Arcobacter butzleri in environmental and food samples collected in industrial and artisanal dairy plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Giacometti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of Arcobacter species in two cheese factories; a total of 22 environmental samples and 10 food samples were collected from an artisanal and an industrial cheese factory; Arcobacter species were isolated after enrichment, and isolates were identified at species level by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. In the artisanal cheese factory, Arcobacter spp. were isolated from several environmental samples, cow and water buffalo raw milk and ricotta cheese. In the industrial plant, Arcobacter spp. were isolated from surfaces not in contact with food and from a cleaned surface in contact with food; no Arcobacter spp. was isolated from food. All isolates were identified as A. butzleri. We report of the presence of A. butzleri in a ready-to-eat cheese produced for retail. In addition, the isolation of A. butzleri in food processing surfaces in the two cheese factories could be assessed as a source of potential contamination for cheeses

  6. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus isolates from retail meat in Lower Silesia region, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharow, I; Bystroń, J; Wałecka-Zacharska, E; Podkowik, M; Bania, J

    2015-01-01

    Arcobacter butzleri and A. cryaerophilus are considered potential foodborne pathogens. Consumption of Arcobacter-contaminated food is regarded the most likely source of human poisoning. We investigated the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter isolates in 210 retail meat samples. Seventy-nine A. butzleri and 6 A. cryaerophilus were isolated from pork, beef and chicken meat. Incidence ofA. butzleri was found to be the highest in chicken meat (83%). Less of A. butzleri was isolated from beef (16%) and pork (14%). Most of the A. butzleri isolates were resistant to β-lactams, like ampicillin (85%), amoxicillin with clavulonic acid (63%), cefotaxime (66%) and mac- rolides, i.e., erythromycin (62%). In contrast, all except one A. cryaerophilus isolates were susceptible to erythromycin. Tetracycline and aminoglycosides showed the highest efficacy against A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus since almost 80% of their population was susceptible to these agents. All, except one A. cryaerophilus and the majority ofA. butzleri isolates (70%) were susceptible to fluoroquinolones. The incidence of multiresistant isolates was found in forty two (53%) A. butzleri, and one (16%) A. cryaerophilus isolates Eight A. butzleri isolates were resistant to all antimicrobials tested. These results indicate significant incidence of potential foodborne zoonotic agents, i.e. A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus including multiresistant isolates in retail meat in Poland.

  7. Arcobacter in Lake Erie beach waters: an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen linked with human-associated fecal contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Agidi, Senyo; Marion, Jason W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2012-08-01

    The genus Arcobacter has been associated with human illness and fecal contamination by humans and animals. To better characterize the health risk posed by this emerging waterborne pathogen, we investigated the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in Lake Erie beach waters. During the summer of 2010, water samples were collected 35 times from the Euclid, Villa Angela, and Headlands (East and West) beaches, located along Ohio's Lake Erie coast. After sample concentration, Arcobacter was quantified by real-time PCR targeting the Arcobacter 23S rRNA gene. Other fecal genetic markers (Bacteroides 16S rRNA gene [HuBac], Escherichia coli uidA gene, Enterococcus 23S rRNA gene, and tetracycline resistance genes) were also assessed. Arcobacter was detected frequently at all beaches, and both the occurrence and densities of Arcobacter spp. were higher at the Euclid and Villa Angela beaches (with higher levels of fecal contamination) than at the East and West Headlands beaches. The Arcobacter density in Lake Erie beach water was significantly correlated with the human-specific fecal marker HuBac according to Spearman's correlation analysis (r = 0.592; P Arcobacter sequences were closely related to Arcobacter cryaerophilus, which is known to cause gastrointestinal diseases in humans. Since human-pathogenic Arcobacter spp. are linked to human-associated fecal sources, it is important to identify and manage the human-associated contamination sources for the prevention of Arcobacter-associated public health risks at Lake Erie beaches.

  8. Isolation of Arcobacter spp from the milk of dairy cows in Brazil Isolamento de Arcobacter spp do leite de vacas leiteiras no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Pianta

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriologic examinations were performed on 188 milk samples collected from cows from 11 farms for diagnosis of mastitis in three cities of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Among the common causes of mastitis, the most frequent isolates were Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Corynebacterium sp, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Streptococcus agalactiae. Bacteriologic examination of 32 milk samples from one farm didn't show bacteria known as common etiologic agent of mastitis. Six samples of Arcobacter spp typed by genotypic tests as Arcobacter cryaerophilus (five strains and Arcobacter butzleri (one strain were isolated from cows' milk of that farm. It is reported the isolation of Arcobacter species from the milk of cows in absence of clinical signs of mastitis. This is the first report of the detection of the microorganisms in the milk of dairy cows in Brazil. No previous reports are known from other countries.Foram realizados exames bacteriológicos em 188 amostras de leite colhidas de vacas de 11 propriedades leiteiras para diagnóstico de mastite, em três municípios no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Entre as causas comuns de mastite, os isolados mais freqüentes foram Staphylococcus aureus, seguido de Corynebacterium sp, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae e Streptococcus agalactiae. O exame bacteriológico realizado em 32 amostras de leite de vacas de uma propriedade não demonstrou a presença de bactérias conhecidas como causadoras de mastite. Foram isoladas do leite de vacas desta propriedade seis amostras de Arcobacter spp, classificadas por testes moleculares como Arcobacter cryaerophilus (cinco amostras e Arcobacter butzleri (uma amostra. É relatado o isolamento de espécies de Arcobacter do leite de vacas na ausência de sinais clínicos de mastite. Este é o primeiro relato da detecção dos microorganismos no leite de vacas leiteiras no Brasil.

  9. Differentiation of Arcobacter species by numerical analysis of AFLP profiles and description of a novel Arcobacter from pig abortions and turkey faeces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Harrington, C.S.; Atabay, H.I.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based genetic profiling for taxonomic and epidemiological analyses of diverse Arcobacter species. Methods and Results: Seventy-two isolates of A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, A. skirrowii and A. nitrofigilis, and a pre......Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based genetic profiling for taxonomic and epidemiological analyses of diverse Arcobacter species. Methods and Results: Seventy-two isolates of A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, A. skirrowii and A. nitrofigilis...... revealed five phenons at the 29% similarity level, four of which represented each of the known species studied. The remaining phenon was further characterized by phenotypic and 16S rDNA sequence analyses, the results of which indicated it to be a novel Arcobacter species. The genetically distinct subgroups...... relationships for arcobacters. Significance and Impact of the Study: First use of AFLP profiling for diverse Arcobacter species; indication of clonality in A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii; potentially novel Arcobacter taxon identified....

  10. Spatial distribution of the emerging foodborne pathogen Arcobacter in the gastrointestinal tract of pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Sarah; De Zutter, Lieven; Houf, Kurt

    2012-12-01

    Pigs are important reservoirs for Arcobacter. Since 1978, Arcobacter species have been associated with reproduction disorders, but excretion by clinically healthy pigs has been frequently reported as well. Information on Arcobacter colonization of the porcine gastrointestinal tract is lacking. In the present study, gastrointestinal tracts of 12 pigs were collected, and the content and mucus of eight sections were examined. Arcobacters were enumerated and isolated by a selective quantitative and qualitative method, respectively, and identified by multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Their genetic diversity was examined by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Arcobacter species were isolated from at least two gastrointestinal sections of all pigs in levels up to 10(5) colony-forming units (CFU) g(-1) in content and 10(4) CFU g(-1) in mucus. Characterization of the isolates revealed a high degree of genotypic diversity. In general, the highest counts, and greatest species and strain diversity was obtained from the large intestine, and especially from the rectum. Though Arcobacter strains were mostly detected in one gastrointestinal section, several unique strains were also recovered from the content and/or mucus of various gastrointestinal sections of individual pigs. In the gastrointestinal tract, Arcobacter is present with species distributions, numbers, and strain heterogeneity comparable to those reported on porcine carcasses post slaughter, thus confirming the potential route of transmission to carcasses by fecal contamination during processing.

  11. Identification, characterization and description of Arcobacter faecis sp. nov., isolated from a human waste septic tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteduck-Léveillée, Kerri; Whiteduck-Léveillée, Jenni; Cloutier, Michel; Tambong, James T; Xu, Renlin; Topp, Edward; Arts, Michael T; Chao, Jerry; Adam, Zaky; Lévesque, C André; Lapen, David R; Villemur, Richard; Khan, Izhar U H

    2016-03-01

    A study on the taxonomic classification of Arcobacter species was performed on the cultures isolated from various fecal sources where an Arcobacter strain AF1078(T) from human waste septic tank near Ottawa, Ontario, Canada was characterized using a polyphasic approach. Genetic investigations including 16S rRNA, atpA, cpn60, gyrA, gyrB and rpoB gene sequences of strain AF1078(T) are unique in comparison with other arcobacters. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the strain is most closely related to Arcobacter lanthieri and Arcobacter cibarius. Analyses of atpA, cpn60, gyrA, gyrB and rpoB gene sequences suggested that strain AF1078(T) formed a phylogenetic lineage independent of other species in the genus. Whole-genome sequence, DNA-DNA hybridization, fatty acid profile and phenotypic analysis further supported the conclusion that strain AF1078(T) represents a novel Arcobacter species, for which the name Arcobacter faecis sp. nov. is proposed, with type strain AF1078(T) (=LMG 28519(T); CCUG 66484(T)).

  12. Role of emerging Campylobacter species in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Mitchell, Hazel M; Man, Si Ming

    2014-11-01

    The gut microbiota is a central player in the etiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. As such, there is intense scientific interest in elucidating the specific group/s of bacteria responsible for driving barrier damage and perpetuating the chronic inflammation that results in disease. Because of their ability to colonize close to the surface of the host intestinal epithelium, mucosa-associated bacteria are considered key players in the initiation and development of both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The leading bacterial candidates include adherent and invasive Escherichia coli, Helicobacter, Fusobacteria, Mycobacteria, and Campylobacter species. Of these, a member of the Campylobacter genus, Campylobacter concisus, has recently emerged as a putative player in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. Current research indicates that this bacterium possesses extraordinarily diverse pathogenic capacities as well as unique genetic and functional signatures that are defined by their ability to adhere to and invade host cells, secrete toxins, and the presence of a virulence-associated restriction-modification system. These characteristics enable the potential classification of C. concisus into distinct pathotypes, which we have named adherent and invasive C. concisus and adherent and toxinogenic C. concisus. In this review, we evaluate evidence for the role of emerging Campylobacter species in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  13. Media for Campylobacter jejuni and other campylobacters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mossel, D.A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Despite their recent elaboration and the many variations in antibiotic combinations designed to attain selectivity, highly selective liquid and solid culture media for Campylobacter jejuni have proved satisfactory provided they are incubated at about 42°C and in a microaerophilic atmosphere such as

  14. First detection of Arcobacter sp. in Eurasian collared doves (Streptopelia decaocto).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Francesco, Antonietta; Delogu, Mauro; Giacometti, Federica; Stancampiano, Laura; Grilli, Ester; Guarniero, Ilaria; Serraino, Andrea

    2014-12-29

    Data about the presence of Arcobacter in wild birds are currently lacking. In this study cloacal swabs from 95 collared doves (Streptopelia decaocto), submitted to the Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences (Bologna, Italy) between 2011 and 2013 from various urban and suburban areas of the Emilia-Romagna region (Northern Italy), were tested for the presence of Arcobacter sp. by a rRNA 23S nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Eighteen out of 95 (19%) samples showed the expected PCR product. Further cultural and molecular studies are needed to assess the Arcobacter prevalence in wild birds and elucidate their potential epidemiological role as source of animal and human infections.

  15. Short communication. First detection of Arcobacter sp. in Eurasian collared doves (Streptopelia decaocto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Di Francesco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Data about the presence of Arcobacter in wild birds are currently lacking. In this study cloacal swabs from 95 collared doves (Streptopelia decaocto, submitted to the Department of Veterinary Medical Sciences (Bologna, Italy between 2011 and 2013 from various urban and suburban areas of the Emilia-Romagna region (Northern Italy, were tested for the presence of Arcobacter sp. by a rRNA 23S nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Eighteen out of 95 (19% samples showed the expected PCR product. Further cultural and molecular studies are needed to assess the Arcobacter prevalence in wild birds and elucidate their potential epidemiological role as source of animal and human infections.

  16. Occurrence and genetic diversity of Arcobacter spp. in a spinach-processing plant and evaluation of two Arcobacter-specific quantitative PCR assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausdorf, Lena; Neumann, Maria; Bergmann, Ingo; Sobiella, Kerstin; Mundt, Kerstin; Fröhling, Antje; Schlüter, Oliver; Klocke, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Some species of the genus Arcobacter are considered to be emerging food pathogens. With respect to recent vegetable-borne outbreaks, the aim of this work was to investigate the occurrence and diversity of Arcobacter within the production chain of a spinach-processing plant by a combination of cultivation and molecular methods. Samples including spinach, water, and surface biofilm were taken over a period of three years from the entire processing line. Ten 16S rRNA (rrs) gene clone libraries were constructed and analysed using amplified rRNA gene restriction analysis (ARDRA). Approximately 1200 clones were studied that resulted in 44 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Sequences with high similarities to Arcobacter cryaerophilus (13% of clones, 3 OTUs), A. ellisii (4%, 6 OTUs), A. suis (15%, 3 OTUs), and the type strain of A. nitrofigilis (1%, 7 OTUs) were identified. This represents the first report of the detection of the recently described species A. ellisii, A. suis and, in addition, A. venerupis from alternative habitats. A total of 67% of the clones (22 OTUs) could not be assigned to a genus, which indicated the presence of uncharacterised Arcobacter species. For the cultivation-independent detection of Arcobacter, two genus-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were developed and tested on 15 Arcobacter species. When these assays were applied to samples from the spinach-processing plant, they showed positive results for up to 35% of the samples and supported the conclusion that there is a considerable risk for the transfer of pathogenic Arcobacter species on vegetables, which was also verified by a cultivation approach.

  17. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal name: Helicobacter pylori Related tests: Gastrin At a Glance Test Sample ... else I should know? How is it used? Helicobacter pylori testing is used to diagnose an infection due ...

  18. Prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in raw milk and retail raw meats in northern Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scullion, R.; Harrington, C.S.; Madden, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    A 1-year study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in raw milk and retail raw meats on sale in Northern Ireland. Retail raw poultry samples (n = 94), pork samples (n = 101), and beef samples (n = 108) were obtained from supermarkets in Northern Ireland, and raw milk...... samples (n = 101) were kindly provided by the Milk Research Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Presumptive arcobacters were identified by previously described genus-specific and species-specific PCR assays. Arcobacter spp. were found to be common...... contaminants of retail raw meats and raw milk in Northern Ireland. Poultry meat (62%) had the highest prevalence, but frequent isolations were made from pork (35%), beef (34%), and raw milk (46%). Arcobacter butzleri was the predominant species isolated from retail raw meats and was the only species isolated...

  19. Detection of Arcobacter spp. in Mytilus galloprovincialis samples collected from Apulia region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Bonerba

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in 20 samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis purchased at fish markets in Apulia region. The detection of Arcobacter spp. was performed, after selective enrichment, on modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate (mCCD agar supplemented with Cefoperazone, Amphotericin B and Teicoplanin (CAT. In 6 out of the 20 tested samples the presence of Arcobacter spp. was found and confirmed by genus-based polymerase chain reaction. All the isolates were identified as belonging to the species Arcobacter butzleri using 16S rDNA sequencing and BLAST online. The results represent the first report in Italy of A. butzleri detection in marketed Mytilus galloprovincialis. The survey underlines the epidemiological importance of A. butzleri as an emerging pathogen, and highlights that mussels should be considered as a potential cause of foodborne disease outbreak.

  20. High Prevalence of Arcobacter Carriage in Older Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Fera

    2010-01-01

    Our study demonstrated a high prevalence of arcobacters colonization in type 2 diabetic and older subjects. The clinical significance and the potential health risk associated with these emerging species remain to be determined.

  1. Arcobacter butzleri and A. cryaerophilus in human, animals and food sources, in southern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Heriberto; Villanueva, Maria Paz; Mansilla, Ingrid; Gonzalez, Mario; Latif, Fadua

    2015-01-01

    The isolation frequency of Arcobacter species in children with diarrhea, fowls, mammals and food of avian and marine origin was established. In all the samples it was possible to isolate Arcobacter species corresponding 201 (39.4%) to A. butzleri and 24 (4.7) to A. cryaerophilus . Both species were simultaneously isolated in 19 (3.7%) being A. butzleri the most frequently isolated species. PMID:26221100

  2. Development of a Real-Time Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer PCR To Detect Arcobacter Species▿

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelbaqi, Khalil; Buissonnière, Alice; Prouzet-Mauleon, Valérie; Gresser, Jessica; Wesley, Irene; Mégraud, Francis; Ménard, Armelle

    2007-01-01

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was done by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology. Discrimination between Arcobacter species was straightforward, as the corresponding melting points showed significant differences with the characteristic melting temperatures of 63.5°C, 58.4°C, 60.6°C...

  3. Arcobacter butzleri and A. cryaerophilus in human, animals and food sources, in southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Fernandez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The isolation frequency of Arcobacter species in children with diarrhea, fowls, mammals and food of avian and marine origin was established. In all the samples it was possible to isolate Arcobacter species corresponding 201 (39.4% to A. butzleri and 24 (4.7 to A. cryaerophilus. Both species were simultaneously isolated in 19 (3.7% being A. butzleri the most frequently isolated species.

  4. Arcobacter butzleri and A. cryaerophilus in human, animals and food sources, in southern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Heriberto; Villanueva, Maria Paz; Mansilla, Ingrid; Gonzalez, Mario; Latif, Fadua

    2015-03-01

    The isolation frequency of Arcobacter species in children with diarrhea, fowls, mammals and food of avian and marine origin was established. In all the samples it was possible to isolate Arcobacter species corresponding 201 (39.4%) to A. butzleri and 24 (4.7) to A. cryaerophilus . Both species were simultaneously isolated in 19 (3.7%) being A. butzleri the most frequently isolated species.

  5. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter species isolated from poultry meat in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    1. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Arcobacter spp. isolated from different species of retail poultry meat in Iran. 2. From August 2012 to April 2013, a total of 540 raw poultry meat samples from chicken (n = 100), turkey (n = 100), quail (n = 100), partridge (n = 80), duck (n = 50), ostrich (n = 60) and geese (n = 50) were purchased from randomly selected retail outlets in Shahrekord, Isfahan, Sari and Rasht, Iran. 3. Using culture techniques, 71 of 540 poultry meat samples (13.1%) were positive for Arcobacter spp. The highest prevalence of Arcobacter spp. was found in chicken meat (28.0%), followed by quail (12.0%), duck (11.4%), turkey (11.0%), geese (8.0%), partridge (7.5%) and ostrich (3.3%) meat. The number of A. butzleri isolated from poultry meat samples (90.1%) was significantly higher than A. cryaerophilus (7.1%) and A. skirrowii (2.8%). Significantly more poultry meat samples were found to contain Arcobacter spp. by the PCR assay than by the culture method. 4. Susceptibilities of Arcobacter isolates were determined for 14 antimicrobial drugs using the disk diffusion method. All of the 71 Arcobacter isolates tested were resistant to one or more antimicrobial agents. Resistance to cephalothin and vancomycin (95.8%) was the most common finding, followed by resistance to methicillin, azithromycin and ampicillin. All Arcobacter isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, streptomycin, tetracyclin and kanamycin. 5. The results of this study indicated the importance of poultry meat, especially chicken meat, as potential sources of Arcobacter spp. infection in people. Furthermore, the strains indicated resistance to a broad spectrum of antibiotics.

  6. Study of Arcobacter spp. contamination in fresh lettuces detected by different cultural and molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana; Ferrús, Maria Antonia

    2011-01-31

    Arcobacters are considered potential emerging food and waterborne pathogens. However, there is no data on the presence of Arcobacter spp. in fresh vegetables. Therefore the objective of this research was to study the presence of Arcobacter spp. in fresh lettuces. Fifty fresh lettuces purchased from different local shops in Valencia (Spain) were analyzed. The assay was performed simultaneously by cultural and molecular methods. Isolates were identified by real-time, multiplex PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragment (PCR-RFLP). Finally, all the isolates were genotyped using the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD-PCR) method. Arcobacter sp. was detected in 10 of the 50 samples (20%) by real-time PCR, being A. butzleri the unique detected species by mPCR. The detection levels obtained by conventional PCR (7 samples/50, 14%) were slightly lower. These seven samples were found to be positive also by culture isolation. All 19 obtained isolates were identified as A. butzleri by multiplex PCR and PCR-RFLP. Great genetic heterogeneity among the isolates was observed by RAPD-PCR profiling. To our knowledge, this is the first study in which Arcobacter spp. is detected in fresh vegetables such as lettuces. Although these foods are generally considered safe, given the large quantities consumed and the fact that further cooking is absent, lettuce could be a source of Arcobacters of public health concern.

  7. Higher Water Temperature and Incubation under Aerobic and Microaerobic Conditions Increase the Recovery and Diversity of Arcobacter spp. from Shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Arturo; Collado, Luis; Yustes, Clara; Aguilar, Carme

    2014-01-01

    Some Arcobacter species are considered emerging food-borne and waterborne pathogens, and shellfish have been suggested as one of their reservoirs. However, only a few studies have investigated the presence of Arcobacter in this kind of food. This study assesses the prevalence and diversity of Arcobacter spp. in shellfish by multiplex PCR (m-PCR) and culturing methods (under different atmospheric conditions) and evaluates the possible influence of environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, and harvesting bay). Arcobacter was detected by m-PCR and/or culturing in 61 (29.9%) of 204 shellfish samples. Of the positive samples by culturing, 41.1% were obtained under only aerobic incubation conditions, while 23.2% were obtained under only microaerobic conditions. Of 476 investigated isolates, 118 belonged to different enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR genotypes (strains) and to 11 different species. This study shows the highest diversity of Arcobacter species ever observed in samples from any origin. The most prevalent species was Arcobacter butzleri (60.2%), followed by Arcobacter molluscorum (21.2%). The prevalence of Arcobacter was significantly higher during the summer than in other seasons, being associated with an increase in water temperature. Results confirm that shellfish are a reservoir for a remarkable diversity of Arcobacter spp. PMID:24185851

  8. Higher water temperature and incubation under aerobic and microaerobic conditions increase the recovery and diversity of Arcobacter spp. from shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Arturo; Collado, Luis; Yustes, Clara; Aguilar, Carme; Figueras, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Some Arcobacter species are considered emerging food-borne and waterborne pathogens, and shellfish have been suggested as one of their reservoirs. However, only a few studies have investigated the presence of Arcobacter in this kind of food. This study assesses the prevalence and diversity of Arcobacter spp. in shellfish by multiplex PCR (m-PCR) and culturing methods (under different atmospheric conditions) and evaluates the possible influence of environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, and harvesting bay). Arcobacter was detected by m-PCR and/or culturing in 61 (29.9%) of 204 shellfish samples. Of the positive samples by culturing, 41.1% were obtained under only aerobic incubation conditions, while 23.2% were obtained under only microaerobic conditions. Of 476 investigated isolates, 118 belonged to different enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR genotypes (strains) and to 11 different species. This study shows the highest diversity of Arcobacter species ever observed in samples from any origin. The most prevalent species was Arcobacter butzleri (60.2%), followed by Arcobacter molluscorum (21.2%). The prevalence of Arcobacter was significantly higher during the summer than in other seasons, being associated with an increase in water temperature. Results confirm that shellfish are a reservoir for a remarkable diversity of Arcobacter spp.

  9. Misidentifying helicobacters: the Helicobacter cinaedi example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, P.; Harrington, C.S.; Jalava, K.;

    2000-01-01

    of Helicobacter cinaedi and that Helicobacter sp. strain Mainz belongs to the same species. H. cinaedi occurs in various animal reservoirs, including hamsters, dogs, cats, rats, and foxes. Appropriate growth conditions and identification strategies will be required to establish the genuine significance......Whole-cell protein electrophoresis and biochemical examination by means of a panel of 64 tests were used to identify 14 putative helicobacters to the species level. The results were confirmed by means of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and were used to discuss misidentification of helicobacters...... based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data. The data indicated that comparison of near-complete 16S ribosomal DNA sequences does not always provide conclusive evidence for species level identification and may prove highly misleading. The data also indicated that "Helicobacter westmeadii" is a junior synonym...

  10. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  11. Campylobacter Risk Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauta, Maarten

    In several countries quantitative microbiological risk assessments (QMRAs) have been performed for Campylobacter in chicken meat. The models constructed for this purpose provide a good example of the development of QMRA in general and illustrate the diversity of available methods. Despite...... in generating and testing hypotheses in food microbiology will be advocated....... the differences between the models, the most prominent conclusions of the QMRAs are similar. These conclusions for example relate to the large risk of highly contaminated meat products and the insignificance of contamination from Campylobacter positive flocks to negative flocks during slaughter and processing...

  12. The Use of Two Culturing Methods in Parallel Reveals a High Prevalence and Diversity of Arcobacter spp. in a Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Levican

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Arcobacter includes species considered emerging food and waterborne pathogens. Despite Arcobacter has been linked to the presence of faecal pollution, few studies have investigated its prevalence in wastewater, and the only isolated species were Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of Arcobacter spp. at a WWTP using in parallel two culturing methods (direct plating and culturing after enrichment and a direct detection by m-PCR. In addition, the genetic diversity of the isolates was established using the ERIC-PCR genotyping method. Most of the wastewater samples (96.7% were positive for Arcobacter and a high genetic diversity was observed among the 651 investigated isolates that belonged to 424 different ERIC genotypes. However, only few strains persisted at different dates or sampling points. The use of direct plating in parallel with culturing after enrichment allowed recovering the species A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, Arcobacter thereius, Arcobacter defluvii, Arcobacter skirrowii, Arcobacter ellisii, Arcobacter cloacae, and Arcobacter nitrofigilis, most of them isolated for the first time from wastewater. The predominant species was A. butzleri, however, by direct plating predominated A. cryaerophilus. Therefore, the overall predominance of A. butzleri was a bias associated with the use of enrichment.

  13. The Use of Two Culturing Methods in Parallel Reveals a High Prevalence and Diversity of Arcobacter spp. in a Wastewater Treatment Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The genus Arcobacter includes species considered emerging food and waterborne pathogens. Despite Arcobacter has been linked to the presence of faecal pollution, few studies have investigated its prevalence in wastewater, and the only isolated species were Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus. This study aimed to establish the prevalence of Arcobacter spp. at a WWTP using in parallel two culturing methods (direct plating and culturing after enrichment) and a direct detection by m-PCR. In addition, the genetic diversity of the isolates was established using the ERIC-PCR genotyping method. Most of the wastewater samples (96.7%) were positive for Arcobacter and a high genetic diversity was observed among the 651 investigated isolates that belonged to 424 different ERIC genotypes. However, only few strains persisted at different dates or sampling points. The use of direct plating in parallel with culturing after enrichment allowed recovering the species A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, Arcobacter thereius, Arcobacter defluvii, Arcobacter skirrowii, Arcobacter ellisii, Arcobacter cloacae, and Arcobacter nitrofigilis, most of them isolated for the first time from wastewater. The predominant species was A. butzleri, however, by direct plating predominated A. cryaerophilus. Therefore, the overall predominance of A. butzleri was a bias associated with the use of enrichment. PMID:27981053

  14. Susceptibilidad in vitro de Arcobacter butzleri a seis drogas antimicrobianas In vitro susceptibility of Arcobacter butzleri to six antimicrobial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Otth

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Se determinaron los patrones de susceptibilidad de 50 cepas de A. butzleri mediante el método del E-test. Ninguna cepa fue resistente a gentamicina y tetraciclina, pero, hubo cepas resistentes a eritromicina (2% y ciprofloxacina (2%. Además, el 90 y el 98% de las cepas fueron resistentes a ampicilina y cloramfenicol respectivamente. Solamente dos de las 45 cepas ampicilina-resistentes fueron productoras de ß-lactamasa. Palabras clave: Arcobacter butzleri, susceptibilidad antimicrobiana, bacterias emergentes, E-test, ß-lactamasaThe susceptibility patterns of 50 A. butzleri strains to six antimicrobial agents were determined using the E-test method. No strain was found to be resistant to gentamicin and tetracycline, but two different strains (2% were resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin. Ninety and 98% of the strains were resistant to ampicillin and chloramphenicol, respectively. Only two of the 45 ampicillin resistant strains were able to produce ß-lactamase.

  15. Nieuw vaccin tegen campylobacter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Het vaccin dat de kip moet beschermen tegen de bacterie Campylobacter werkt in het laboratorium. Dat wil bacterioloog Jaap Wagenaar wel kwijt. Wanneer het er komt en zelfs of het er komt, daarover laat Wagenaar zich niet uit. "Het is een hele klus om het immuunsysteem van kippen effectief op te late

  16. Campylobacter-Acanthamoeba interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Ana; Seddon, Alan M; Karlyshev, Andrey V

    2015-05-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne pathogen recognized as the major cause of human bacterial enteritis. Undercooked poultry products and contaminated water are considered as the most important sources of infection. Some studies suggest transmission and survival of this bacterial pathogen may be assisted by the free-living protozoa Acanthamoeba. The latter is known to play the role of a host for various pathogenic bacteria, protecting them from harsh environmental conditions. Importantly, there is a similarity between the mechanisms of bacterial survival within amoebae and macrophages, making the former a convenient tool for the investigation of the survival of pathogenic bacteria in the environment. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction between Campylobacter and Acanthamoeba are not well understood. Whilst some studies suggest the ability of C. jejuni to survive within the protozoa, the other reports support an extracellular mode of survival only. In this review, we focus on the studies investigating the interaction between Campylobacter and Acanthamoeba, address some reasons for the contradictory results, and discuss possible implications of these results for epidemiology. Additionally, as the molecular mechanisms involved remain unknown, we also suggest possible factors that may be involved in this process. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms of pathogen-protozoa interaction will assist in a better understanding of Campylobacter lifestyle and in the development of novel antibacterial drugs.

  17. Specific detection and confirmation of Campylobacter jejuni by DNA hybridization and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, L K; Kingombe, C I; Yan, W; Taylor, D E; Hiratsuka, K; Malik, N; Garcia, M M

    1997-11-01

    Conventional detection and confirmation methods for Campylobacter jejuni are lengthy and tedious. A rapid hybridization protocol in which a 1,475-bp chromogen-labelled DNA probe (pDT1720) and Campylobacter strains filtered and grown on 0.22-micron-pore-size hydrophobic grid membrane filters (HGMFs) are used was developed. Among the environmental and clinical isolates of C. jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni subsp. doylei, Campylobacter lari, and Arcobacter nitrofigilis and a panel of 310 unrelated bacterial strains tested, only C. jejuni and C. jejuni subsp. doylei isolates hybridized with the probe under stringent conditions. The specificity of the probe was confirmed when the protocol was applied to spiked skim milk and chicken rinse samples. Based on the nucleotide sequence of pDT1720, a pair of oligonucleotide primers was designed for PCR amplification of DNA from Campylobacter spp. and other food pathogens grown overnight in selective Mueller-Hinton broth with cefoperazone and growth supplements. All C. jejuni strains tested, including DNase-producing strains and C. jejuni subsp. doylei, produced a specific 402-bp amplicon, as confirmed by restriction and Southern blot analysis. The detection range of the assay was as low as 3 CFU per PCR to as high as 10(5) CFU per PCR for pure cultures. Overnight enrichment of chicken rinse samples spiked initially with as little as approximately 10 CFU/ml produced amplicons after the PCR. No amplicon was detected with any of the other bacterial strains tested or from the chicken background microflora. Since C. jejuni is responsible for 99% of Campylobacter contamination in poultry, PCR and HGMF hybridization were performed on naturally contaminated chicken rinse samples, and the results were compared with the results of conventional cultural isolation on Preston agar. All samples confirmed to be culture positive for C. jejuni were also identified by DNA hybridization and PCR amplification, thus confirming that

  18. Prevalence of arcobacter species in drinking water, spring water, and raw milk as determined by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Nurhan; Dogruer, Yusuf; Gonulalan, Zafer; Guner, Ahmet; Ulger, Ismail

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of Arcobacter species in water sources and raw milk from healthy animals in Kayseri, Turkey. A total of 175 samples of drinking water (n = 100), spring water (n = 25), and raw milk (n = 50) were examined. Arcobacter species were isolated using the membrane filtration technique. Overall, 7 (4%) of the 175 samples yielded Arcobacter spp.: 3 (3%) drinking water samples, 1 (4%) spring water sample, and 3 (6%) raw milk samples. Two species of Arcobacter were recovered from the seven positive samples: Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter skirrowii, and A. butzleri plus A. skirrowii found in 3 (1.7%), 2 (1.1%), and 2 (1.1%) samples, respectively. Our study is the first to report the isolation of both A. butzleri and A. skirrowii together from drinking water and is the first report of Arcobacter in milk from healthy cows in Turkey. Based on these findings, the presence of Arcobacter species in environmental waters and raw milk may pose a potential hazard for human health.

  19. Arcobacter species and their pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotypes in Finnish raw milk during summer 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revez, Joana; Huuskonen, Marianne; Ruusunen, Marjo; Lindström, Miia; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of Arcobacter species in raw milk in Finland. A total of 177 raw milk samples, each from a separate farm, were examined from June to August 2011. Arcobacter species were isolated using an enrichment and selective detection procedure. Overall, 26 (15 % ) of the 177 samples yielded Arcobacter spp. Samples from 25 farms were positive for Arcobacter butzleri and from 1 farm for Arcobacter cryaerophilus. Moreover, both Arcobacter butzleri and A. cryaerophilus were recovered from 1 positive sample. To evaluate a possible genetic variability, one strain of A. butzleri from each farm and the A. cryaerophilus sample were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Genotyping revealed that Arcobacter spp. populations are heterogeneous, and no dominant clone has spread in the investigated samples. Our study is the first report on the isolation of both A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus in raw milk in Finland. Based on our findings, the presence of Arcobacter species in raw milk may pose a potential hazard for human health, in particular for consumers who prefer drinking unpasteurized milk.

  20. Specific Detection of Campylobacter Jejuni and Campylobacter Coli by Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-10-01

    D2676 CDC C. cryaerophila ( Arcobacter cryoaerophilus) 1 D2792 (type strain) CDC C. hyoinestinilis 3 D2189 CDC D2411 (porcine) CDC D1932 (type...polymerase descriptions and proposal of Arcobacter gen. nov. Int. J. Syst. chain reaction for the detection of Mycobacterium leprae. 1. Bacteriol. 41:451-455

  1. Inhibitory effects of some plant essential oils against Arcobacter butzleri and potential for rosemary oil as a natural food preservative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irkin, Reyhan; Abay, Secil; Aydin, Fuat

    2011-03-01

    We investigated the inhibitory activity of commercially marketed essential oils of mint, rosemary, orange, sage, cinnamon, bay, clove, and cumin against Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter skirrowii and the effects of the essential oil of rosemary against A. butzleri in a cooked minced beef system. Using the disc diffusion method to determine the inhibitory activities of these plant essential oils against strains of Arcobacter, we found that those of rosemary, bay, cinnamon, and clove had strong inhibitory activity against these organisms, whereas the essential oils of cumin, mint, and sage failed to show inhibitory activity against most of the Arcobacter strains tested. The 0.5% (vol/wt) essential oil of rosemary was completely inhibitory against A. butzleri in the cooked minced beef system at 4°C. These essential oils may be further investigated as a natural solution to the food industry by creating an additional barrier (hurdle technology) to inhibit the growth of Arcobacter strains.

  2. Multilocus sequence typing and biocide tolerance of Arcobacter butzleri from Danish broiler carcasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Louise Hesselbjerg; Kjeldgaard, Jette; Christensen, Jens Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Background Arcobacter spp. have in recent years received increasing interest as potential emerging enteropathogens and zoonotic agents. They are associated with various animals including poultry and can be isolated from meat products. The possibilities of persistence and cross-contamination in sl......Background Arcobacter spp. have in recent years received increasing interest as potential emerging enteropathogens and zoonotic agents. They are associated with various animals including poultry and can be isolated from meat products. The possibilities of persistence and cross......-contamination in slaughterhouses during meat processing are not well established. We have evaluated the occurrence and persistence of Arcobacter spp. in a Danish slaughterhouse and determined the sensitivity of isolates to sodium hypochlorite, a commonly used biocide. Results Arcobacter contamination was examined in a broiler...... slaughterhouse by selective enrichment of 235 swabs from the processing line during two production days and after sanitizing in between. In total 13.6% of samples were positive for A. butzleri with the majority (29 of 32 isolates) originating from the evisceration machine. No Arcobacter spp. was isolated after...

  3. Adherence to and invasion of human intestinal cells by Arcobacter species and their virulence genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levican, Arturo; Alkeskas, Aldukali; Günter, Claudia; Forsythe, Stephen J; Figueras, María José

    2013-08-01

    The genus Arcobacter is composed of 17 species which have been isolated from various sources. Of particular interest are A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus, and A. skirrowii, as these have been associated with human cases of diarrhea, the probable transmission routes being through the ingestion of contaminated drinking water and food. To date, only limited studies of virulence traits in this genus have been undertaken. The present study used 60 Arcobacter strains isolated from different sources, representing 16 of the 17 species of the genus, to investigate their ability to adhere to and invade the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. In addition, the presence of five putative virulence genes (ciaB, cadF, cj1349, hecA, and irgA) was screened for in these strains by PCR. All Arcobacter species except A. bivalviorum and Arcobacter sp. strain W63 adhered to Caco-2 cells, and most species (10/16) were invasive. The most invasive species were A. skirrowii, A. cryaerophilus, A. butzleri, and A. defluvii. All invasive strains were positive for ciaB (encoding a putative invasion protein). Other putative virulence genes were present in other species, i.e., A. butzleri (cadF, cj1349, irgA, and hecA), A. trophiarum (cj1349), A. ellisii (cj1349), and A. defluvii (irgA). No virulence genes were detected in strains which showed little or no invasion of Caco-2 cells. These results indicate that many Arcobacter species are potential pathogens of humans and animals.

  4. Prevalence, virulence gene distribution and genetic diversity of Arcobacter in food samples in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Daniel; Alter, Thomas; Lehmann, Laura; Uherkova, Simona; Seidler, Tassilo; Gölz, Greta

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in food samples in Germany. In addition, the presence of putative virulence genes and the genetic diversity was tested for Arcobacter (A.) butzleri strains isolated during this study. The prevalence of Arcobacter spp. was 34% in fish meat, 26.8% in poultry meat and 2% in minced meat (beef and pork). All investigated A. butzleri isolates carried the genes cadF, ciaB, cj1349, mviN and pldA. The gene tlyA was detectable in 97.5% of the strains. Lower detection rates were observed for hecA (47.5%), hecB (45%), iroE (40%) and irgA (35%). Genotyping by ERIC-PCR demonstrated a high genetic diversity of A. butzleri strains from different foods. In conclusion, this study shows that about one third of fish meat and poultry meat samples contained Arcobacter spp. These data highlight the need to strengthen our effort to elucidate the importance ofArcobacter on veterinary public health.

  5. Isolation and Identification of Arcobacter spp. by Multiplex PCR from Water Sources in Kars Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Elif; Ünver, Ahmet

    2015-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in various water sources of stream, creek, pond, and drinking water in Kars and surrounding areas. A total of 113 water samples including 19 samples from creeks, 49 from streams, 10 from ponds, and 35 from drinking water samples collected from different regions were examined for presence of Arcobacter spp. by cultural methods. Arcobacter spp. were isolated from 14 (12.38 %) samples including 5 (26.31 %) creek and 9 (18.36 %) stream water samples and all were identified as Arcobacter butzleri by multiplex PCR. No agent was isolated from pond and drinking water samples. The results of this study demonstrated that creek and stream waters are contaminated by this agent showing high potential risk of Arcobacter species to be transmitted to humans and animals and in the contamination of food. It is concluded that water sources should also be considered as a factor not only carrying agents but also as a primary source of the infection.

  6. Prevalence of Arcobacter spp. in humans, animals and foods of animal origin including sea food from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyal, A; Rathore, R S; Mohan, H V; Dhama, K; Kumar, A

    2011-10-01

    The present study reports the prevalence of Arcobacter, an emerging pathogen in human, animals and foods of animal origin in India. A total of 600 samples from various sources, viz. diarrhoeal stools of humans and dogs, faecal swabs of animals (pig, poultry), preputial washings of breeding bulls and food samples (chicken, pork, fish) were examined for presence of Arcobacter spp. Using cultural methods, a total of 63 Arcobacter spp. were isolated of 600 (10.50%) samples with highest isolation rate were from pig faeces (21.33%) followed by sea foods (17.33%), poultry faeces (14.67%), pork (16.00%), chicken meat (12.00%) and human stools (2.67%). The isolates were confirmed as arcobacters by genus-based PCR. PCR screening of all the enriched samples revealed the overall prevalence of Arcobacter spp. to be 12.00% with highest in pig (25.33%), followed by sea food (21.33%), poultry (17.33%), pork (16%), chicken meat (12%) and human stools (4.00%). No Arcobacter spp. was isolated or detected from diarrhoeal faecal samples of dogs and preputial washings. With multiplex PCR, three different species were detected (A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii) with most of the samples showing mixed infections. There are only two recent reports from India; one with cultural isolation and another with PCR detection of Arcobacter spp. in stool samples of humans with clinical diarrhoea. In this context, our present report is the first report of isolation and detection of Arcobacter spp. from various sources of animals and foods including diarrhoeic human stool samples, utilizing both cultural and molecular tools identifying arcobacters at genus and species level. These results support the importance of arcobacters as an emerging food-borne pathogen, possessing zoonotic potential.

  7. Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp hyointestinalis, a common Campylobacter species in reindeer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanninen, M.L.; Sarelli, L.; Sukura, A.;

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To study the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in the faecal material of reindeer, and to identify the isolates by means of a polyphasic approach. In addition, to study the genetic diversity of Camp. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis reindeer isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis...... slaughterhouses. Samples were cultured by methods suitable for isolation of fastidious Campylobacter species. Of all samples, 6% (24/399) were Campylobacter-positive. Phenotypic characteristics, SDS-PAGE protein patterns, dot blot DNA-DNA hybridization, 23S rDNA restriction fragment polymorphism analysis and PFGE...... identified the isolates as Camp. hyointestinalis subsp. kyointestinalis. Conclusions: Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis was the only Campylobacter species isolated from reindeer in this study. The isolates showed high genomic diversity in PFGE with the restriction enzymes SmaI and Kpn...

  8. Arcobacter lanthieri sp. nov., isolated from pig and dairy cattle manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteduck-Léveillée, Kerri; Whiteduck-Léveillée, Jenni; Cloutier, Michel; Tambong, James T; Xu, Renlin; Topp, Edward; Arts, Michael T; Chao, Jerry; Adam, Zaky; André Lévesque, C; Lapen, David R; Villemur, Richard; Talbot, Guylaine; Khan, Izhar U H

    2015-08-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and diversity of species of the genus Arcobacter in pig and dairy cattle manure, which led to the identification of strains AF1440T, AF1430 and AF1581. Initially identified as Arcobacter butzleri based on colony morphology and initial PCR-confirmation tests, analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences of these strains confirmed that they belonged to the genus Arcobacter and were different from all known species of the genus. The isolates formed a distinct group within the genus Arcobacter based on their 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB, cpn60, gyrA and atpA gene sequences and fatty acid profiles. Their unique species status was further supported by physiological properties and DNA-DNA hybridization that allowed phenotypic and genotypic differentiation of the strains from other species of the genus Arcobacter. The isolates were found to be oxidase, catalase and esterase positive and urease negative; they grew well at 30 °C under microaerophilic conditions and produced nitrite and acetoin. Based on their common origin and various physiological properties, it is proposed that the isolates are classified as members of a novel species with the name Arcobacter lanthieri sp. nov. The type strain is AF1440T ( = LMG 28516T = CCUG 66485T); strains AF1430 ( = LMG 28515 = CCUG 66486) and AF1581 ( = LMG 28517 = CCUG 66487) are reference strains.

  9. Prevalence, distribution and antibiotic resistance of emergent Arcobacter spp. from clinically healthy cattle and goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A H; Saleha, A A; Zunita, Z; Murugaiyah, M; Aliyu, A B; Jafri, N

    2013-02-01

    Prevalence, distribution and antibiotic resistance of Arcobacter spp. were investigated in cattle, goats, floor and treated water samples in this study. The prevalence of Arcobacter in adult and young was recorded as 8/110 (7.27%) and 4/83 (4.81%), respectively, which showed insignificant difference (P = 0.3503) in detection rates between adult and young cattle. A total of 33.33% of the floor samples and 11.11% of the treated water samples analysed were determined as positive for Arcobacter. Among the species isolated, over all, A. butzleri (45%) was the most frequently detected species, followed by A. skirrowii (5%). A. butzleri was isolated from adult cattle, floor and water samples at the rates of 75.0%, 33.4% and 50%, respectively. Co-colonization of species was not uncommon, and 50% of the samples were carrying more than one Arcobacter species. Only 12.5% sample from cattle (adult) was detected positive for only A. skirrowii. All samples from young animals, floor and water contained mixed isolates. None of the samples from goat farm was found to be carrying Arcobacter species. On profiling of antimicrobial resistance patterns, it was found that only one A. butzleri isolate (3.7%) was sensitive to all nine antibiotics tested. A. butzleri was found highly resistant to ampicillin (55.6%), followed by cefotaxime (33.4%) and ciprofloxacin (33.4%). Overall, 20% of the isolates showed multidrug resistance (resistant ≥4 antibiotics). Gentamicin and enrofloxacin can be used as drugs of choice for the treatment for Arcobacter infections.

  10. Genotypic and phenotypic features of Arcobacter butzleri pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Queiroz, João A; Oleastro, Mónica; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2014-11-01

    Even though Arcobacter butzleri has been implicated in some human disease as diarrhoea and bacteraemia, much of its pathogenesis and virulence factors remain unclear. In this work we have compared pathogenic and genotypic properties of six A. butzleri isolates from human and non-human sources. The tested isolates showed to be susceptible to tetracyclines and aminoglycosides, however non-human isolates were all resistant to quinolones. The ability to form biofilms was variable among the tested strains, and all of them showed a weak haemolytic activity. The presence of nine putative virulence genes was determined, with cadF, ciaB, cj1349, mviN, pldA, tlyA being detected in all strains, while irgA (3/6), hecA (5/6), hecB (4/6) were detected only in some strains. High levels of adhesion were observed for A. butzleri on Caco-2 cells, with pre-existing inflammation showing no significant effect on the adherence ability; yet variable levels of invasion were observed. A. butzleri isolates were able to survive intracellularly in Caco-2 cells and to induce a significant up-regulation of interleukin-8 secretion and structural cell rearrangements. These data brings new insights on A. butzleri virulence and highlights its pathogenic potential.

  11. Arcobacter: comparison of isolation methods, diversity, and potential pathogenic factors in commercially retailed chicken breast meat from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallas-Padilla, Karolina L; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Fernández Jaramillo, Heriberto; Arias Echandi, María Laura

    2014-06-01

    Arcobacter species have been recognized as potential food- and waterborne pathogens. The lack of standardized isolation methods and the relatively scarce knowledge about their prevalence and distribution as emerging pathogens are due to the limitations in their detection and identification. This study aimed to determine the presence and the identification of Arcobacter in chicken breast samples commercially retailed in San José, Costa Rica, as well as to describe the adherence and invasive potential of the strains to human cells (HEp-2). Fifty chicken breast samples were collected from retail markets in the metropolitan area of the country. Six different isolation methodologies were applied for the isolation of Arcobacter. Isolation strategies consisted of combinations of enrichments in de Boer or Houf selective broths and subsequent isolation in blood agar (directly or with a previous passive membrane filtration step) or Arcobacter selective agar. Suspicious colonies were identified with a genus-specific PCR, whereas species-level identification was achieved with a multiplex PCR. The overall isolation frequency of Arcobacter was 56%. From the isolation strategies, the combination of enrichment in Houf selective broth followed by filtration on blood agar showed the best performance, with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 84%. A total of 46 isolates were confirmed as Arcobacter with the genus-specific PCR, from which 27 (59%) corresponded to Arcobacter butzleri, 9 (19%) to Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and 10 (22%) were not identified with this multiplex PCR. Regarding the potential pathogenicity, 75% of the isolates presented adherence to HEp-2 cells, while only 22% were invasive to that cell line. All invasive strains were A. butzleri or nonidentified strains. The results show the presence of potentially pathogenic Arcobacter in poultry and recognize the importance it should receive as a potential foodborne pathogen from public health authorities.

  12. Identification methods for Campylobacters, Helicobacters, and related organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.

    1996-01-01

    for furthering our understanding of their pathology and epidemiology. However, the identification process is made difficult because of the complex and rapidly evolving taxonomy, fastidious nature, and biochemical inertness of these bacteria. These problems have resulted in a proliferation of phenotypic...

  13. Genotyping and genetic diversity of Arcobacter butzleri by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Atabay, H.I.; Amisu, K.O.;

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the potential of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiling for genotyping Arcobacter butzleri and to obtain further data on the genetic diversity of this organism. Methods and Results: Seventy-three isolates of Danish, British, Turkish, Swedish, Nigerian and Nor...

  14. Discrimination of Arcobacter butzleri isolates by polymerase chain reaction-mediated DNA fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atabay, H. I.; Bang, Dang Duong; Aydin, F.;

    2002-01-01

    Aims: The objective of this study was to subtype Arcobacter butzleri isolates using RAPD-PCR. Methods and Results: Thirty-five A. butzleri isolates obtained from chicken carcasses were examined. PCR-mediated DNA fingerprinting technique with primers of the variable sequence motifs was used...

  15. The complete genome sequence of the Arcobacter butzleri cattle isolate 7h1h

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcobacter butzleri strain 7h1h was isolated in the UK from a clinically healthy dairy cow. The genome of this isolate was sequenced to completion. Here we present the annotation and analysis of the completed 7h1h genome, as well as comparison of this genome to the existing A. butzleri RM4018 and ED...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER (FRET) PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using the Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology...

  17. Regulation of energy metabolism by the extracytoplasmic function (ECF) s factors of Arcobacter butzleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extracytoplasmic function (ECF) s factors are fundamental for bacterial adaptation to distinct environments and for survival under different stress conditions. The emerging pathogen Arcobacter butzleri possesses seven putative pairs of s/anti-s factors belonging to the ECF family. Here, we repor...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF A REAL-TIME FLUORESCENCE RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER PCR TO DETECT ARCOBACTER SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A real-time PCR targeting the gyrase A subunit gene outside the quinolone resistance-determining region has been developed to detect Arcobacter species. The species identification was made by probe hybridization and melting curve analysis, using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer technology. D...

  19. Campylobacter Immunity and Quantitative Excretion Rates in Thai Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    isolates Fecal RBC 58 50 59 50 were group 2 aerotolerant Camp)’lobacter species (now re- Diarrhea for ឈ h 42 30 50 20 ferred to as Arcobacter but:leri...Intern Sled 1979,9 1: 179-85. of the emendcd genus Arcobacter with Arcobacter but~leri comb. nov. 16. Blaser NIJ. Hardesty HI_ Powers B. Wang WLL...Survival of Campy/c. and Arcobacter skirrowii sp. nov.. an aerocolerant bacterium isolated bacter fetus subsp. jejuni in biological milieus. J Clin

  20. Physiological and genomic characterization of Arcobacter anaerophilus IR-1 reveals new metabolic features in Epsilonproteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene eRoalkvam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study we characterized and sequenced the genome of Arcobacter anaerophilus strain IR-1 isolated from enrichment cultures used in nitrate-amended corrosion experiments. A. anaerophilus IR-1 could grow lithoautotrophically on hydrogen and hydrogen sulfide and lithoheterothrophically on thiosulfate and elemental sulfur. In addition, the strain grew organoheterotrophically on yeast extract, peptone and various organic acids. We show for the first time that Arcobacter could grow on the complex organic substrate tryptone and oxidize acetate with elemental sulfur as electron acceptor. Electron acceptors utilized by most Epsilonproteobacteria, such as oxygen, nitrate and sulfur, were also used by A. anaerophilus IR-1. Strain IR-1 was also uniquely able to use iron citrate as electron acceptor. Comparative genomics of the Arcobacter strains A. butzleri RM4018, A. nitrofigilis CI and A. anaerophilus IR-1 revealed that the free-living strains had a wider metabolic range and more genes in common compared to the pathogen strain. The presence of genes for NAD+-reducing hydrogenase (hox and dissimilatory iron reduction (fre were unique for A. anaerophilus IR-1 among Epsilonproteobacteria. Finally, the new strain had an incomplete denitrification pathway where the end product was nitrite, which is different from other Arcobacter strains where the end product is ammonia. Altogether, our study shows that traditional characterization in combination with a modern genomics approach can expand our knowledge on free-living Arcobacter, and that this complementary approach could also provide invaluable knowledge about the physiology and metabolic pathways in other Epsilonproteobacteria from various environments.

  1. Survival and resuscitation of ten strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli under acid conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaveerach, P.; Huurne, ter A.A.H.M.; Lipman, L.J.A.; Knapen, van F.

    2003-01-01

    The culturability of 10 strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli was studied after the bacteria were exposed to acid conditions for various periods of time. Campylobacter cells could not survive 2 h under acid conditions (formic acid at pH 4). The 10 Campylobacter strains could not be

  2. Updated 16S rRNA-RFLP method for the identification of all currently characterised Arcobacter spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueras María José

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arcobacter spp. (family Campylobacteraceae are ubiquitous zoonotic bacteria that are being increasingly recognised as a threat to human health. A previously published 16S rRNA-RFLP Arcobacter spp. identification method produced specific RFLP patterns for the six species described at that time, using a single endonuclease (MseI. The number of characterised Arcobacter species has since risen to 17. The aim of the present study was to update the 16S rRNA-RFLP identification method to include all currently characterised species of Arcobacter. Results Digestion of the 16S rRNA gene with the endonuclease MseI produced clear, distinctive patterns for 10 of the 17 species, while the remaining species shared a common or very similar RFLP pattern. Subsequent digestion of the 16S rRNA gene from these species with the endonucleases MnlI and/or BfaI generated species-specific RFLP patterns. Conclusions 16S rRNA-RFLP analysis identified 17 Arcobacter spp. using either polyacrylamide or agarose gel electrophoresis. Microheterogeneities within the 16S rRNA gene, which interfered with the RFLP identification, were also documented for the first time in this genus, particularly in strains of Arcobacter cryaerophilus isolated from animal faeces and aborted foetuses.

  3. Occurrence and diversity of Arcobacter spp. along the Llobregat River catchment, at sewage effluents and in a drinking water treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Luis; Kasimir, Georg; Perez, Unai; Bosch, Albert; Pinto, Rosa; Saucedo, Gemma; Huguet, Josep M; Figueras, Maria Jose

    2010-06-01

    The presence of Arcobacter species in faecally contaminated environmental waters has previously been studied. However, the ability to eliminate Arcobacter during the water treatment processes that produce drinking water has been little studied. We have investigated the prevalence and diversity of Arcobacter spp. throughout the year at 12 sampling points in the Llobregat River catchment (Catalonia, Spain) including 3 sites at a drinking water treatment plant. Positive samples for Arcobacter spp., came predominantly from the most faecally polluted sites. Recovery rates from all sites were greater in the spring (91.7%) and summer (83.3%) than in autumn and winter (75.0% in both cases), but this trend was not statistically evaluated due to the limited number of samples. Among the 339 colonies analyzed, the most prevalent species by multiplex PCR and 16S rDNA restriction fragment length polymorphism were Arcobacter butzleri (80.2%), followed by Arcobacter cryaerophilus (19.4%) and Arcobacter skirrowii (0.3%). Isolates showed a high genotype diversity as determined by the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR. In fact, 91.2% (309/339) of the colonies had different genotypes, i.e. 248 of them among the 275 isolates of A. butzleri and 60 among the 63 isolates of A. cryaerophilus and 1 genotype of A. skirrowii. Arcobacter was never detected or isolated from finished drinking water, demonstrating that water treatment is effective in removing Arcobacter species.

  4. Campylobacter bacteriophages and bacteriophage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerton, P L; Timms, A R; Connerton, I F

    2011-08-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease with occasionally very serious outcomes. Much of this disease burden is thought to arise from consumption of contaminated poultry products. More than 80% of poultry in the UK harbour Campylobacter as a part of their intestinal flora. To address this unacceptably high prevalence, various interventions have been suggested and evaluated. Among these is the novel approach of using Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages, which are natural predators of the pathogen. To optimize their use as therapeutic agents, it is important to have a comprehensive understanding of the bacteriophages that infect Campylobacter, and how they can affect their host bacteria. This review will focus on many aspects of Campylobacter-specific bacteriophages including: their first isolation in the 1960s, their use in bacteriophage typing schemes, their isolation from the different biological sources and genomic characterization. As well as their use as therapeutic agents to reduce Campylobacter in poultry their future potential, including their use in bio-sanitization of food, will be explored. The evolutionary consequences of naturally occurring bacteriophage infection that have come to light through investigations of bacteriophages in the poultry ecosystem will also be discussed.

  5. Multilocus sequence typing reveals genetic diversity of foodborne Arcobacter butzleri isolates in the North of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Girbau, Cecilia; Martinez-Malaxetxebarria, Irati; Fernández-Astorga, Aurora

    2014-11-17

    The emerging pathogen Arcobacter butzleri is being increasingly isolated from different animal food products but the routes of its transmission to human are not well established yet. Typing methods would be useful in gaining such knowledge. Here we report the great genetic diversity observed among A. butzleri isolates from different food products. Forty-five isolates were analyzed by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST). A total of 157 alleles were identified across all seven loci, ranging from 16 alleles at glnA to 31 at glyA. MLST differentiated the isolates into 34 sequence types (STs), with the majority of isolates containing a unique sequence type. Seventy-four new alleles were identified, which resulted in the assignment of 33 new STs. No association of alleles or STs with food source was observed. For the first time, lateral gene transfer from Arcobacter skirrowii to A. butzleri at the glyA locus is also reported.

  6. Occurrence of six virulence-associated genes in Arcobacter species isolated from various sources in Shiraz, Southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Mohammad; Shirzad Aski, Hesamaddin; Shayegh, Hossein; Khoshbakht, Rahem

    2014-01-01

    In humans, arcobacters are associated with watery diarrhea and septicemia. Although, recently, more cases of diarrhea have been caused by Arcobacter species, very little is known about its pathogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of six putative Arcobacter virulence genes (cadF, ciaB, cj1349, mviN, pldA, and tlyA), in a set of 113 Arcobacter butzleri, 40 Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and 15 Arcobacter skirrowii isolates that were recovered from various origins. The isolates were confirmed on the basis of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genus and species specific PCR for determining three species. For confirmed isolates, PCR was carried out for the presence of virulence genes using specific primers. All A. butzleri isolates carried all six genes. For A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii, the cadF gene was detected just in 55 and 53.3%, ciaB in 97.5 and 86.6%, cj1349 in 45 and 60%, mviN in 90 and 80%, pldA in 32.5 and 13.3%, and tlyA in 37.5 and 40%, respectively. For A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii, the genes ciaB and mviN were significantly more prevalent than other virulence markers (P ≤ 0.05). The findings revealed that many of the important Arcobacter strains (86%) have these putative virulence genes which can be potential pathogenic properties for humans.

  7. Prevalence of ten putative virulence genes in the emerging foodborne pathogen Arcobacter isolated from food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girbau, Cecilia; Guerra, Cristian; Martínez-Malaxetxebarria, Irati; Alonso, Rodrigo; Fernández-Astorga, Aurora

    2015-12-01

    Arcobacter spp. are considered to be emerging food- and waterborne pathogens for both humans and animals. However, their virulence mechanisms are still poorly understood. In this study the presence of ten virulence genes (cadF, ciaB, cj1349, hecA, hecB, mviN, pldA, irgA, tlyA and iroE) was assessed in a set of 47 strains of Arcobacter butzleri, 10 of Arcobacter cryaerophilus and 1 Arcobacter skirrowii strain recovered from different food products (pork, chicken, beef, milk, clams and mussels). Overall, the genes cadF, ciaB, cj1349, mviN, pldA and tlyA were detected in all A. butzleri and A. skirrowii strains. Lower detection rates were observed for irgA, iroE, hecA and hecB. The genes hecB and iroE were detected neither in A. cryaerophilus nor in A. skirrowii. The genes hecA and irgA were not detected in A. skirrowii. It was noteworthy that the genes hecA and hecB were significantly (P < 0.05) highly detected in A. butzleri strains isolated from clams compared with strains isolated from milk and chicken. Therefore, our findings underline clams as a source of A. butzleri strains with high prevalence of putative virulence genes. This could be hazardous to human health, especially because these bivalves are usually consumed raw or undercooked.

  8. Occurrence and genetic diversity of Arcobacter butzleri in an artisanal dairy plant in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Federica; Lucchi, Alex; Manfreda, Gerardo; Florio, Daniela; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; Serraino, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the presence, distribution, and persistence of Arcobacter spp. in an artisanal dairy plant and to test the isolates to determine their different genotypes in the processing plant and in foods. Samples were collected in an artisanal cheese factory on four occasions between October and December 2012. Food samples (raw milk, ricotta cheese, mozzarella cheese, and conditioning liquid), water samples, and environmental samples were analyzed by the culture method; isolates were identified by multiplex PCR and genotyped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis. Arcobacter butzleri was isolated from 29 out of 59 samples (46.6%), 22 of which were from environmental samples and 7 of which were from food samples. Cluster analysis divided the strains into 47 PFGE patterns: 14 PFGE clusters and 33 unique types. Our findings indicate that the plant harbored numerous A. butzleri pulsotypes and that the manual cleaning and sanitation in the studied dairy plant do not effectively remove Arcobacter. The recurrent isolation of A. butzleri suggests that the environmental conditions in the dairy plant constitute a good ecological niche for the colonization of this microorganism. In some cases, the presence of indistinguishable strains isolated from the same facilities on different sampling days showed that these strains were persistent in the processing environment.

  9. Characterization of Arcobacter suis isolated from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Federica; Salas-Massó, Nuria; Serraino, Andrea; Figueras, Maria José

    2015-10-01

    During a survey in a dairy plant in Italy, the second strain (strain FG 206) of Arcobacter suis described in the literature was isolated from raw water buffalo milk. The objective of this study was to confirm the species identification, better define the species by comparing its characteristics with those of the reference strain (F41(T) = CECT 7833(T) = LMG 26152(T)) and to investigate its potential clinical relevance by detecting the virulence gene pattern of the new strain. Phenotypical characterization and 16S rRNA-RFLP gave a complete overlap of results for the two strains. As expected, an RFLP pattern common to A. suis and Arcobacter defluvii was obtained by MseI endonuclease digestion, and a pattern specific for A. suis was obtained by BfaI endonuclease digestion. 16S rRNA sequencing and multilocus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA) showed a robust relatedness of strain FG 206 to the A. suis type strain F41(T). The recovery of strain FG 206 from a dairy plant shows that this species of Arcobacter is present in the food chain. Like the type strain recovered from pig meat, the species A. suis may not be confined to a single type of food.

  10. Campylobacter bacteremia: A rare and under-reported event?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, R.; Baarlen, van P.; Vliet, van A.H.M.; Belkum, van A.; Hays, J.P.; Endtz, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the species Campylobacter are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhoea in humans. The clinical phenotype associated with Campylobacter infections ranges from asymptomatic conditions to severe colitis and bacteremia. In susceptible patients, Campylobacter infections are asso

  11. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control.

  12. Antimicrobial resistance of thermophilic Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Engberg, J.

    2001-01-01

    Campylobacter has become the leading cause of zoonotic enteric infections in developed and developing countries world-wide. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged among Campylobacter mainly as a consequence of the use of antimicrobial agents in food animal production. Resistance to drugs of choice...... for the treatment of infections, macrolides and fluoroquinolones has emerged as a clinical problem and interventions to reduce this are recommended. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and macrolides is mediated by chromosomal mutations. Resistance to other relevant antimicrobial agents, mediated by acquired resistance...

  13. Campylobacter hyoilei Alderton et al. 1995 and Campylobacter coli Veron and Chatelain 1973 are subjective synonyms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, P.; VanDoorn, L.J.; AlRashid, S.T.

    1997-01-01

    The taxonomic affiliation of Campylobacter hyoilei was reevaluated by examining a variety of phenotypic and genotypic criteria. Whole cell protein electrophoresis and a comparison of 66 phenotypic characters revealed that reference strains of C. hyoilei were indistinguishable from Campylobacter c...

  14. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vinni; Rosenquist, Hanne; Baggesen, Dorte Lau;

    2007-01-01

    Background: The predominant food borne pathogen in the western world today is Campylobacter. Campylobacter specific bacteriophages (phages) have been proposed as an alternative agent for reducing the burden of Campylobacter in broilers. One concern in relation to phage biocontrol is the narrow host...... range often displayed by phages. To identify the potential of phages as a Campylobacter reducing agent we needed to determine their infectivity on a panel of isolates representing the Campylobacter strains found in broilers as well as humans. Results: In this study, Campylobacter phages were isolated...... from the intestines of broilers and ducks and from abattoir sewage. Twelve phages were investigated to determine their ability to infect the Campylobacter Penner serotypes commonly present in Danish poultry and patients with campylobacteriosis. A total of 89% of the Campylobacter jejuni strains and 14...

  15. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  16. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Harris

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Using an evidence-based approach this review discusses the current treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcer disease, functional (non-ulcer)dyspepsia or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).It also briefly addresses the potential role of eradication of H . pylori in preventing gastric cancer .

  17. Distribution and Polymorphism of the Flagellin Genes from Isolates of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    American Society for Microbioloc% Distribution and Polymorphism of the Flagellin Genes from Isolates of Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni RICHARD...in Campylobacter jejuni . serogroups both the flaA and flaB genes are extremely Mol. M;crobiol. 5:1151-1158. z homologous. Within most LIO heat-labile...irllwn hungatei. J1. Bacteriol. 123:-28 proteins of Campylobacter jejuni 81116. Infect. Immun. 59: 42. Thomashow, L S., and S. C. Rittenberg. 198

  18. The Helicobacter pylori theory and duodenal ulcer disease. A case study of the research process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A H; Gjørup, T

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the medical research process from the time of the generation of a new theory to its implementation in clinical practice. The Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) theory, i.e. the theory that H. pylori plays a significant causal role in duodenal ulcer disease was chosen as a case....... MATERIAL: Abstracts from 1984 to 1993, identified in the CD-Rom, Medline system, ("Silverplatter"), using the search terms Campylobacter pylori and Helicobacter pylori, and reviews and editorials about H. pylori in some of the most widespread clinical journals. RESULTS: 2204 papers on H. pylori were....... pylori in duodenal ulcer disease had been published in some of the most widespread clinical journals. In half of the papers the authors were convinced of the causal role of H. pylori in duodenal ulcer disease, while in the remainder they were sceptical. In seven cases the authors stated which patients...

  19. Lectin typing of Campylobacter concisus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune Munck; Hynes, Sean O; Permin, Henrik;

    2002-01-01

    A total of 44 clinical isolates and the type strain of the putative pathogen Campylobacter concisus were grouped based on their reactions with plant lectins. The optimized lectin typing system used C. concisus strains proteolytically pretreated and subsequently typed by using a panel of four...

  20. Protozoa: a novel Campylobacter reservoir?

    Science.gov (United States)

    In previous in vitro studies we found that Campylobacter jejuni remained viable for longer periods of time when they were cultivated in the presence of Tetrahymena pyriformis (ciliate) and Acanthamoeba castellanii (amoeba) than when they were in an independent planktonic state. Increased survival t...

  1. Inflammasome activation by Campylobacter jejuni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, Lieneke I; de Zoete, Marcel R; Bleumink-Pluym, Nancy M C; Flavell, Richard A; van Putten, Jos P M

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial foodborne disease worldwide. The mechanisms that lead to bacterial invasion of eukaryotic cells and massive intestinal inflammation are still unknown. In this study, we report that C. jejuni infection of mouse macr

  2. Serotypes and typability of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from poultry products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Eva Møller; Nielsen, Niels Ladefoged

    1999-01-01

    Campylobacter infection is one of the most common bacterial enteric pathogens. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli infections are mostly food- and waterborne and especially poultry is often assumed to be an important source. The heat-stable serotyping system (the 'Penner' scheme) was used...

  3. Evaluation of 11 PCR assays for species-level identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    On, Stephen L.W.; Jordan, Penelope J.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the sensitivity and specificity of 11 PCR assays described for the species identification of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by using 111 type, reference, and field strains of C. jejuni, C. coli, and Campylobacter lari. For six assays, an additional 21 type strains...

  4. Development and evaluation of multiplex PCR assays for rapid detection of virulence-associated genes in Arcobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteduck-Léveillée, Jenni; Cloutier, Michel; Topp, Edward; Lapen, David R; Talbot, Guylaine; Villemur, Richard; Khan, Izhar U H

    2016-02-01

    As the pathogenicity of Arcobacter species might be associated with various virulence factors, this study was aimed to develop and optimize three single-tube multiplex PCR (mPCR) assays that can efficiently detect multiple virulence-associated genes (VAGs) in Arcobacter spp. including the Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus and Arcobacter skirrowii, respectively. The recognized target virulence factors used in the study were fibronectin binding protein (cj1349), filamentous hemagglutinin (hecA), hemolysin activation protein (hecB), hemolysin (tlyA), integral membrane protein virulence factor (mviN), invasin (ciaB), outer membrane protein (irgA) and phospholipase (pldA). Identical results were obtained between singleplex PCR and mPCR assays and no cross- and/or non-specific amplification products were obtained when tested against other closely related bacterial species. The sensitivities of these three mPCR assays were ranging from 1ngμL(-1) to 100ngμL(-1) DNA. The developed assays with combinations of duplex or triplex PCR primer pairs of VAGs were further evaluated and validated by applying them to isolates of the A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii recovered from fecal samples of human and animal origins. The findings revealed that the distribution of the ciaB (90%), mviN (70%), tlyA (50%) and pldA (45%) genes among these target species was significantly higher than the hecA (16%), hecB (10%) and each of irgA and cj1349 (6%) genes, respectively. The newly developed mPCR assays can be used as rapid technique and useful markers for the detection, prevalence and profiling of VAGs in the Arcobacter spp. Moreover, these assays can easily be performed with a high throughput to give a presumptive identification of the causal pathogen in epidemiological investigation of human infections.

  5. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  6. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma M. Alves

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Myeloma cells Sp2/0-Ag14 and spleen cells from BALB/c mouse immunized with sonicated Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis NCTC 10354 were fused with polyethylene glycol (PEG for the selection of clones producing antibodies. Clones were obtained by limiting dilution and screened for the production of specific antibodies to C. fetus subsp. venerealis NCTC 10354 by indirect ELISA and western blot against a panel of bacteria: C. fetus subsp. venerealis NCTC 10354, C. fetus subsp fetus ADRI 1812, C. sputorum biovar sputorum LMG 6647, C. lari NCTC 11352, and Arcobacter skirrowii LMG 6621 for the ELISA and C. fetus subsp. venerealis NCTC 10354 and C. sputorum biovar sputorum LMG 6647 for the western blotting. Fifteen clones producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs anti-C. fetus subsp. venerealis of the IgM (1 and IgG (14 classes were further screened for species-specificity. Four clones of the 15 obtained were producers of species-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs: two were specific for C. fetus subsp. venerealis and two were specific for C. fetus subsp. fetus. None of the clones were reactive against C. sputorum biovar sputorum LMG 6647. All clones recognized a protein with molecular mass of approximately 148 kDa from lysed C. fetus subsp. venerealis NCTC 10354.

  7. Isolation and identification of zoonotic species of genus arcobacter from chicken viscera obtained from retail distributors of the metropolitan area of San José, Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Edgar García; Jaramillo, Heriberto Fernández; Ulate, Carolina Chaves; Echandi, María Laura Arias

    2013-05-01

    Arcobacter is a genus of growing importance worldwide; some of its species are considered emerging enteropathogens and potential zoonotic agents. In Costa Rica, as well as in other countries, its isolation has been reported, so the objective of this project was to evaluate and identify the presence of Arcobacter in chicken viscera sold in the metropolitan area of San José, Costa Rica, as well as to determine the antimicrobial resistance patterns associated with it. One hundred fifty samples of chicken viscera including heart, liver, and other gastrointestinal organs were purchased from 15 supermarkets and 15 local retailers. De Boer and Houf broths were used as enrichment media; isolation was done with Arcobacter-selective medium and with membrane filtration with blood agar. Typical colonies were identified with genus-specific PCR, and species identification was made with multiplex PCR. Susceptibility to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, gentamicin, and tetracycline was done with the Epsilometer test. The isolation frequency of Arcobacter genus obtained in this study was of 17.3%. A total of 33 isolates were obtained from the poultry samples, and according to the multiplex PCR methodology, 22 (66.7%) isolates were identified as Arcobacter butzleri, 8 (24.2%) as Arcobacter cryaerophilus, and 1 (3.1%) as Arcobacter skirrowii. Two strains were not identified. No statistical significant difference was found when the source of samples was compared. Resistance toward chloramphenicol was 68.75%, followed by ampicillin (43.75%) and ciprofloxacin (18.75%); all strains were susceptible to tetracycline.

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2000-01-01

    @@ IS THERE ANYTHING NEW? Helicobacter pylori has been for many years a forgotten bacterium, since the first report on this spiral organism dated from the 19th century[1]. As early as in 1906, an association between a spiral organism and gastric carcinoma was suggested[2].Doenges reported in 1938 that on autopsy not less than 40% of human stomachs were found to be invaded by spiral organisms[3].

  9. Substrate utilization by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, H.N.; Rollins, D.M.; Weiss, E.

    1986-10-01

    An attempt was made to elucidate in Campylobacter spp. some of the physiologic characteristics that are reflected in the kinetics of CO/sub 2/ formation from four /sup 14/C-labeled substrates. Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli were grown in a biphasic medium, and highly motile spiral cells were harvested at 12 h. The cells were incubated with 0.02 M glutamate, glutamine, ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate, or formate, or with concentrations of these substrates ranging from 0.0032 to 0.125 M. All four substrates were metabolized very rapidly by both species. A feature of many of these reactions, particularly obvious with /sup 2/chemically bond-ketoglutarate, was an immediate burst of CO/sub 2/ production followed by CO/sub 2/ evolution at a more moderate rate. These diphasic kinetics of substrate utilization were not seen in comparable experiments with Escherichia coli grown and tested under identical conditions. With C. jejuni, CO/sub 2/ production from formate proceeded rapidly for the entire period of incubation. The rate of metabolism of glutamate, glutamine, and ..cap alpha..-ketoglutarate by both species was greatly enhanced by increased substrate concentration. The approach to the study of the metabolism of campylobacters here described may be useful in detecting subtle changes in the physiology of cells as they are maintained past their logarithmic growth phase.

  10. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-02-08

    The author reviews the main achievements in Helicobacter pylori research in the past 2 years. Of the more than 1000 microRNAs described thus far, sets of over- and underexpressed samples were identified that are associated with either gastric cancer or precancerous lesions, and some of them could be either markers or therapeutic targets in the near future. Meta-analyses involved 95 new publications: the association between infection and oesophageal, colorectal, pancreatic and liver carcinomas is supported by the increased odds ratios, but the results do not reach the strength seen in gastric carcinoma. Epstein-Barr virus is an emerging pathogen: 10% of gastric cancers are virus-associated; the prevalence of the virus in normal mucosa, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently being studied. Current Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens frequently achieve suboptimal results: a few optimisation methods are presented, although not all are supported by the meta-analyses. In 2013, the European Helicobacter Study Group proposed the development of a pan-European registry; data from 5792 patients registered so far indicated that many therapeutic regimens resulted in a low eradication rate. In 2013, the Healthy Stomach Initiative was started with the aim of supporting and disseminating research performed in the field of healthy and diseased stomachs.

  11. Occurrence of emerging food-borne pathogenic Arcobacter spp. isolated from pre-cut (ready-to-eat) vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Anna; Bonerba, Elisabetta; Bozzo, Giancarlo; Marchetti, Patrizia; Celano, Gaetano Vitale; Colao, Valeriana; Terio, Valentina; Tantillo, Giuseppina; Figueras, Maria José; Di Pinto, Angela

    2016-11-01

    Given that changes in consumer food behaviours have led to an increase in the demand for pre-cut ready-to-eat (RTE) vegetables, and that few data are currently available on the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. in such foods, the aim of the present study was to assess the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. that carry virulence-associated genes on pre-cut RTE vegetables, using cultural and molecular methods. Arcobacter was detected using biomolecular identification methods in 44/160 (27.5%) of the samples, of which 40/44 (90.9%) isolates corresponded to A. butzleri and 4/44 (9.1%) to A. cryaerophilus. Studying the incidence of 9 virulence-associated genes revealed the widespread distribution of these genes among the Arcobacter isolates tested. The results obtained in our research provided plenty of information on the health risks associated with the direct consumption of raw vegetables, and highlight the need to implement further studies at each level of the production chain, in order to obtain further information to help protect human health.

  12. Exploring the diversity of Arcobacter spp. in cattle in the UK using MLST and whole genome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcobacter butzleri is considered to be an emerging human foodborne pathogen. The completion of an A. butzleri genome sequence along with microarray analysis of 13 isolates in 2007 revealed a surprising amount of diversity amongst A. butzleri isolates from humans, animals and food. In order to furth...

  13. Integrated approach leads to less Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Hald, Birthe; Borck Høg, Birgitte;

    2012-01-01

    Methods of reducing the risk of Campylobacter infection during indoor broiler (chicken) production are discussed, including: risk management intiatives; biosecurity measures; scheduled slaughter; hygiene and decontamination; and improving consumer information.......Methods of reducing the risk of Campylobacter infection during indoor broiler (chicken) production are discussed, including: risk management intiatives; biosecurity measures; scheduled slaughter; hygiene and decontamination; and improving consumer information....

  14. Flies and Campylobacter infection of broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skovgård, Henrik; Bang, Dang Duong;

    2004-01-01

    A total of 8.2% of flies caught outside a broiler house in Denmark had the potential to transmit Campylobacter jejuni to chickens, and hundreds of flies per day passed through the ventilation system into the broiler house. Our study suggests that flies may be an important source of Campylobacter...

  15. Campylobacter in zwemwater en mogelijke emissiebronnen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, H.; Rijs, G.; Jacobs-Reitsma, W.F.; Leenen, I.

    2004-01-01

    Campylobacter vormt samen met Salmonella en Shigella één van de belangrijkste bacteriële ziekteverwekkers van het maagdarmkanaal bij de mens. De bacterie Campylobacter komt voor bij eenden, meeuwen, kippen en kalkoenen, maar is ook aanwezig in koeien, varkens en schapen. Al deze dieren zijn drager,

  16. [Campylobacter fetus endocarditis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Désidéri-Vaillant, Catherine; Guichon, Jean-Michel; Noyer, Vincent; Nedelec, Yolande; Galinat, Hubert; Sapin-Lory, Jeanne; Di Costanzo, Laurence; Le Guen, Patrick; Nicolas, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter are known to be a cause of enteritidic infections but Campylobacter fetus is more often a cause of systemic infections, mainly in fragilized patients. We report a C. fetus endocarditis. The prognosis seemstobe improved by a prolonged betalactam antibiotic treatment.

  17. Campylobacter as a venereal disease in cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, T.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Visser, I.J.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Pastoor, P.W.; Strampel, J.; Kock, P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Since the introduction of AI, venereal diseases caused by Tritrichomonas fetus and Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis haved been eradicated in The Netherlands. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus can cause sporadic abortion and early embryonic death. When natural breeding is practised, venereal dise

  18. Aspects of epidemiology of Campylobacter in poultry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs-Reitsma, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    Campylobacter bacteria, which in humans cause infections with severe symptoms of diarrhoea, are mainly transmitted by food, especially poultry meat products. Several studies on Campylobacter colonization in breeders, laying hens, and broilers were carried out. Isolates were serotyped, using a modifi

  19. Campylobacter iguaniorum sp. nov., isolated from reptiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Kik, Marja; Miller, William G; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2015-01-01

    During samplings of reptiles for Epsilonproteobacteria, Campylobacter strains not belonging to any of the established taxa were isolated from lizards and chelonians. Initial AFLP, PCR, and 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that these strains were most closely related to Campylobacter fetus and Campy

  20. Campylobacter jejuni enteritis and reactive arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Short, C. D.; Klouda, P T; Smith, Lorna

    1982-01-01

    A further case of reactive arthritis following Campylobacter jejuni enteritis is reported. The interim results of a small prospective study are discussed. It may be desirable to do serological studies for campylobacter infection in the investigation of mono- or polyarthritis of acute onset.

  1. Bibliometric analysis of publications on Campylobacter: (2000–2015)

    OpenAIRE

    Sweileh, Waleed M.; Al-Jabi, Samah W.; Sawalha, Ansam F; AbuTaha, Adham S; Zyoud, Sa’ed H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Campylobacter species are widespread zoonotic pathogens. Campylobacter jejuni causes a form of gastroenteritis called campylobacteriosis. Campylobacter drug resistance is considered a serious threat. In order to better understand national and international research output on Campylobacter, we conducted this bibliometric overview of publications on Campylobacter. This study can be used to assess extent of interaction and response of researchers, food regulators, and health policy ma...

  2. The first closed genome sequence of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis biovar intermedius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter fetus venerealis biovar intermedius is a variant of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis, the causative agent of Bovine Genital Campylobacteriosis. In contrast to Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis which is restricted to the genital tract of cattle, Campylobacter fetus subsp. vener...

  3. Survival of Arcobacter butzleri during production and storage of artisan water buffalo mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraino, Andrea; Giacometti, Federica; Daminelli, Paolo; Losio, Marina N; Finazzi, Guido; Marchetti, Giacomo; Zambrini, Angelo V; Rosmini, Roberto

    2013-09-01

    Water buffalo mozzarella cheese (WBMC) is a fresh stretched cheese produced from whole chilled buffalo milk. Although pasteurization of milk and the use of defined starter cultures are recommended, traditional technology involving unpasteurized milk and natural whey cultures is still employed for WBMC production in Italy. The purpose of this study was to assess the behavior of Arcobacter butzleri during WBMC production and storage under different temperature conditions (5, 10, and 20 °C). Raw milk was experimentally inoculated with one reference strain and two isolates of A. butzleri, and the count was monitored during WBMC production and storage. The bacterial count of A. butzleri decreased during curd ripening (from 7.83 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g to 4.14 log CFU/g in about 4 h) and a further decrease (>4 log CFU/g) was observed at the end of curd stretching. During storage testing, A. butzleri was never detected by direct plating, whereas it was recovered from 12 of the total 162 WBMC until the end of storage testing by enrichment. The results revealed that A. butzleri is able to survive during WBMC production and storage at different temperature conditions. Consequently, traditional WBMC produced from raw milk could represent a potential source of Arcobacter infection for humans.

  4. The first experimental research on the pathogenicity of Arcobacter butzleri in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açik, Mehmet Nuri; Yüksel, Hayati; Ulucan, Aykut; Çetinkaya, Burhan

    2016-06-30

    This experimental study was conducted to investigate the pathogenicity and histopathology of Arcobacter butzleri in zebrafish model organism. Firstly, mean infective dose (ID50) of A. butzleri was calculated in zebrafish as 1.3×10(8)CFU/mL and 1×10(5)CFU/mL by immersion and intraperitoneal injection, respectively. For histopathological trials, the ID50 of A. butzleri were given to zebrafish by both immersion and intraperitoneal routes and then, clinical and pathological findings were evaluated on days 1, 3, 5, 7 and 21 of the experiment. During the experimental period, no clinical signs or gross lesions of disease were observed in the zebrafish groups infected with the ID50 of A. butzleri by either method. In the histopathological examination, acute inflammation characterized by neutrophil and plasma cells and local necrosis or congestion were determined in liver, kidney, spleen, gaster and other visceral organs. In addition peritonitis, leukocyte infiltration, villous atrophy and septicemia were observed in the experimental groups. Neither gross nor microscopic lesions were detected in the control groups. This study presented the first report of experimental A. butzleri infection in wild zebrafish. In the light of the findings obtained here, it was concluded that zebrafish could be used as a model organism to investigate pathogenicity and histopathology of arcobacters.

  5. Campylobacter in poultry, pork and beef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hasseldam; Carroll, C.; Rudi, K.;

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter infection has become one of the most important zoonoses worldwide. A low prevalence of Campylobacter is generally found in beef and pork at retail, although they may still be sources of infection. Based on the high prevalence of poultry-associated infections, this chapter mainly...... focuses on rapid methods for detection of Campylobacter in this particular production chain, and describes the routes of transmission and sampling in the different levels as well as intervention strategies. The chapter focuses on the introduction, infection dynamics, and sampling of Campylobacter...... throughout the poultry production chain, from farm to consumer level. It also describes culture-based, immunological, and molecular methods for rapid detection, characterization, and enumeration for Campylobacter. Rapid methods can generally be also more sensitive and specific than culture-based methods...

  6. Rapid and accurate detection of Arcobacter contamination in commercial chicken products and wastewater samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana; Suski, Jan; Ferrús, Maria A

    2010-03-01

    An SYBR Green real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for Arcobacter detection in food and wastewater samples. The assay was applied to 36 chicken and 33 wastewater samples, and the results were compared with those obtained for conventional PCR, multiplex PCR, and culture isolation. Isolates were identified by multiplex PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragment, and typed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. Arcobacter sp. was detected in 25 of the 26 chicken carcasses (96%) and in 4 of the 10 liver samples (40%) by real-time PCR. Twenty-five chicken samples were positive also by conventional PCR, but in most of them the detection was only possible after 48-h enrichment. Arcobacter butzleri was the most frequently detected species. Twenty-four Arcobacter isolates were obtained from chicken samples, where A. butzleri is the only identified species. All the wastewater samples (100%) were positive for Arcobacter sp. by real-time PCR without enrichment. A. butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus were detected by multiplex PCR. Fifteen samples were found to be positive by culture. Thirty-six isolates were obtained; all of them were identified as A. butzleri by multiplex PCR. However, by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism, 34 were identified as A. butzleri, 1 as A. cryaerophilus, and another 1 as Arcobacter skirrowii. A great genetic heterogeneity was observed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiling. The real-time PCR assay developed in this work showed better detection levels than conventional PCR, together with shorter times of testing samples. Therefore, it could be used as a rapid and accurate instrument for monitoring Arcobacter contamination levels in food and water samples.

  7. Campylobacter in Poultry: Ecology and Potential Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Orhan; Kassem, Issmat I; Shen, Zhangqi; Lin, Jun; Rajashekara, Gireesh; Zhang, Qijing

    2015-06-01

    Avian hosts constitute a natural reservoir for thermophilic Campylobacter species, primarily Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, and poultry flocks are frequently colonized in the intestinal tract with high numbers of the organisms. Prevalence rates in poultry, especially in slaughter-age broiler flocks, could reach as high as 100% on some farms. Despite the extensive colonization, Campylobacter is essentially a commensal in birds, although limited evidence has implicated the organism as a poultry pathogen. Although Campylobacter is insignificant for poultry health, it is a leading cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in humans worldwide, and contaminated poultry meat is recognized as the main source for human exposure. Therefore, considerable research efforts have been devoted to the development of interventions to diminish Campylobacter contamination in poultry, with the intention to reduce the burden of food-borne illnesses. During the past decade, significant advance has been made in understanding Campylobacter in poultry. This review summarizes the current knowledge with an emphasis on ecology, antibiotic resistance, and potential pre- and postharvest interventions.

  8. Campylobacter iguaniorum sp. nov., isolated from reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Kik, Marja; Miller, William G; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2015-03-01

    During sampling of reptiles for members of the class Epsilonproteobacteria, strains representing a member of the genus Campylobacter not belonging to any of the established taxa were isolated from lizards and chelonians. Initial amplified fragment length polymorphism, PCR and 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that these strains were most closely related to Campylobacter fetus and Campylobacter hyointestinalis. A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic position of five strains. The strains were characterized by 16S rRNA and atpA sequence analysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and conventional phenotypic testing. Whole-genome sequences were determined for strains 1485E(T) and 2463D, and the average nucleotide and amino acid identities were determined for these strains. The strains formed a robust phylogenetic clade, divergent from all other species of the genus Campylobacter. In contrast to most currently known members of the genus Campylobacter, the strains showed growth at ambient temperatures, which might be an adaptation to their reptilian hosts. The results of this study clearly show that these strains isolated from reptiles represent a novel species within the genus Campylobacter, for which the name Campylobacter iguaniorum sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 1485E(T) ( = LMG 28143(T) = CCUG 66346(T)).

  9. Campylobacter Enteritis among Children in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Pourmand

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter enteritis is a common form of acute gastroenteritis. Among children, especially in developing countries, Campylobacter infections can cause sever life-threatening diarrheal disease. The incidence of Campylobacter infection among children is age related with a higher incidence among younger children in the developing world whereas in industrialized countries the incidence is highest in older children. In a study of American children, Campylobacter was isolated in 4.8% of diarrheal stools in aged 1-4 years. In 1985 the prevalence of Campylobacter diarrheal was 4.4%, whereas in current report 6% of stool samples from children aged<5 years with diarrhea grew Campylobacter jejuni. There were no significant differences between age groups of patients. All thirteen isolated strains of Campylobacter were resistance to Bactrim, Colistin and Polymyxin B and were sensitive to Neomycin, Erythromycin, Gentamicin and Nalidixic acid. The incidence of human campylobacteriosis is increasing worldwide. Thus, public health awareness about the problem is necessary, with a view towards setting up national surveillance programs.

  10. Campylobacter carcass contamination throughout the slaughter process of Campylobacter-positive broiler batches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliwiorstow, Tomasz; Baré, Julie; Van Damme, Inge; Uyttendaele, Mieke; De Zutter, Lieven

    2015-02-02

    Campylobacter contamination on broiler carcasses of Campylobacter colonized flocks was quantified at seven sampling sites throughout the slaughter process. For this purpose, in four slaughterhouses samples were collected from twelve Campylobacter positive batches. Broilers from all visits carried high numbers of campylobacters in their caeca (≥7.9log10cfu/g). Campylobacter counts on feathers (up to 6.8log10cfu/g), positively associated with the breast skin contamination of incoming birds and carcasses after plucking, were identified as an additional source of carcass contamination. A high variability in Campylobacter carcass contamination on breast skin samples within batches and between batches in the same slaughterhouse and between slaughterhouses was observed. In slaughterhouses A, B, C and D Campylobacter counts exceeded a limit of 1000cfu/g on 50%, 56%, 78% and 11% of carcasses after chilling, respectively. This finding indicates that certain slaughterhouses are able to better control Campylobacter contamination than others. Overall, the present study focuses on the descriptive analysis of Campylobacter counts in different slaughterhouses, different batches within a slaughterhouse and within a batch at several sampling locations.

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection causes gastric cancer? A review of the epidemiological, meta-analytic, and experimental evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guy D Eslick

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of Campylobacter-like organisms (Helicobacter pylori) more than two decades ago the possibility of a relationship with gastric cancer has been postulated, tested and supposedly proven. There have been numerous human studies of various designs from many countries around the world. Several meta-analyses have been published and more recently a small number of experimental animal studies were reported looking at the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer. Over the years, the human epidemiological studies have produced conflicting results; the metaanalyses have as one would expect produced similar pooled estimates; while the early experimental animal studies require replication. The exact mechanisms by which H pylori might cause gastric cancer are still under investigation and remain to be elucidated.

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  13. Management of Helicobacter pylori infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin; Kusters, Johannes G

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe digestive diseases including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Successful eradication of this common gastric pathogen in individual patients is known to prevent the occurrence of peptic ulcer disease

  14. Campylobacter ureolyticus: an emerging gastrointestinal pathogen?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bullman, Susan

    2011-03-01

    A total of 7194 faecal samples collected over a 1-year period from patients presenting with diarrhoea were screened for Campylobacter spp. using EntericBio(®) , a multiplex-PCR system. Of 349 Campylobacter-positive samples, 23.8% were shown to be Campylobacter ureolyticus, using a combination of 16S rRNA gene analysis and highly specific primers targeting the HSP60 gene of this organism. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of C. ureolyticus in the faeces of patients presenting with gastroenteritis and may suggest a role for this organism as an emerging enteric pathogen.

  15. The role of radiology in Campylobacter enterocolitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P.; Ponette, E.; Baert, A.L. (Leuven Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology); Lacquet, F.; Verbist, L. (Leuven Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Microbiology); Rutgeerts, A.L. (Leuven Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Internal Medicine)

    1989-05-01

    A series of 18 patients with diarrhoea and positive stool cultures for Campylobacter jejuni is presented. The most important radiological features were thickening of ileal mucosal folds, of interhaustral indentations and of the ileocaecal valve, lymphoid hyperplasia and microulcerations. Radiology, as well as endoscopy, are both non-specific in Campylobacter jejuni enterocolitis. The importance of radiology is to exclude more typical features of other causes of inflammatory bowel diseases. Moreover, before the result of the stool culture is available, the radiological features should suggest the suspicion of an acute infectious enterocolitis by Campylobacter jejuni as possible diagnosis. (orig.).

  16. Septic abortion caused by Campylobacter jejuni bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuhala, Tomislava; Škerk, Višnja; Markotić, Alemka; Bukovski, Suzana; Desnica, Boško

    2016-08-01

    A 20-year-old female patient, 14 weeks pregnant, was admitted to hospital with anamnestic and clinical features of acute pyelonephritis. Clinical signs of septic abortion developed and after obstetric examination the therapy was changed to ampicillin, gentamicin and clindamycin. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from blood cultures. Pathohistological findings confirmed diagnosis of purulent chorioamnionitis. After 2 weeks of ciprofloxacin administration the patient fully recovered. Campylobacter jejuni was not isolated from stool culture and no signs of acute enteritis were registered during the illness. Invasive forms of Campylobacter disease without enteritis are not unusual in immunocompromised hosts but they are restricted to C. fetus rather than C. jejuni isolates.

  17. Regulation of energy metabolism by the extracytoplasmic function (ECF σ factors of Arcobacter butzleri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irati Martinez-Malaxetxebarria

    Full Text Available The extracytoplasmic function (ECF σ factors are fundamental for bacterial adaptation to distinct environments and for survival under different stress conditions. The emerging pathogen Arcobacter butzleri possesses seven putative pairs of σ/anti-σ factors belonging to the ECF family. Here, we report the identification of the genes regulated by five out of the seven A. butzleri ECF σ factors. Three of the ECF σ factors play an apparent role in transport, energy generation and the maintenance of redox balance. Several genes like the nap, sox and tct genes are regulated by more than one ECF σ factor, indicating that the A. butzleri ECF σ factors form a network of overlapping regulons. In contrast to other eubacteria, these A. butzleri ECF regulons appear to primarily regulate responses to changing environments in order to meet metabolic needs instead of an obvious role in stress adaptation.

  18. Characterization of the extrachromosomal function (ECF) sigma factors of Arcobacter butzleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most commonly reported cause of bacterial foodborne illness in North America. C. jejuni decorates its surface polysaccharides with a variety of variable phosphorylated structures, including O-methyl phosphoramidate (MeOPN) modifications on the capsular polysaccharide. Alt...

  19. Risicobeheersing Campylobacter op het vleeskuikenbedrijf = Campylobacter control on the broiler farm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, T.; Bokma-Bakker, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    In dit onderzoek werden de risico’s voor introductie en verspreiding van Campylobacter op het vleeskuikenbedrijf geïnventariseerd. Er worden mogelijkheden aangegeven hoe deze risico’s beheerst kunnen worden. Het blijkt dat er veel mogelijkheden zijn waardoor Campylobacter geïntroduceerd of verspreid

  20. Better Campylobacter Detection: Furthering our understanding of Campylobacter ecology in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter is an important human pathogen and consumption of undercooked poultry has been linked to significant human illnesses. To reduce human illness, intervention strategies targeting Campylobacter reduction in poultry are in development. For more than a decade, there has been an ongoing na...

  1. Influxed insects as Vectors for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coll in Danish Broiler Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skovgård, Henrik; Pedersen, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The vector potential of flies (Diptera: Brachycera) for spread of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli on 5 Danish broiler farms was evaluated in a longitudinal field study from April to November 2004. First, the prevalence of C. jejuni- and C. coli-positive flies was determined in 2...

  2. Presence of antibodies against campylobacter flagellar capping proteins versus campylobacter jejuni isolation in broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading foodborne pathogen that causes human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Human cases have been linked to consumption and/or handling of contaminated poultry products. Although Campylobacter jejuni is commonly regarded as a commensal in broiler cecal micro...

  3. An outbreak of infectious hepatitis in commercially reared ostriches associated with Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephens, C.P.; On, S.L.W.; Gibson, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    lesions resembled those of vibrionic hepatitis in other avian species. Campylobacter coli was isolated from the livers of affected ostriches from five of the six properties. Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni was isolated from birds from the remaining property. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis-based (PFGE...

  4. Ribosomal operon intergenic sequence region (ISR) heterogeneity in Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are closely related species that can not be distinguished by their 16S or 23S rRNA gene sequences. However, the intergenic sequence region (ISR) that is between the 16S and 23S genes is markedly different and characteristic for each species. A peculiarit...

  5. Recombinant Helicobacter pylori catalase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Bai; Ya-Li Zhang; Jian-Feng Jin; Ji-De Wang; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant strain which highly expresses catalase of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) and assay the activity of H. pylori catalase.METHODS: The catalase DNA was amplified from H. pylori chromosomal DNA with PCR techniques and inserted into the prokaryotie expression vector pET-22b (+), and then was transformed into the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain which expressed catalase recombinant protein. The activity of H.pylori catalase was assayed by the Beers & Sizers.RESULTS: DNA sequence analysis showed that the sequence of catalase DNA was the same as GenBank's research. The catalase recombinant protein amounted to 24.4 % of the total bacterial protein after induced with IPTG for 3 hours at 37 ℃ and the activity of H. pylori catalase was high in the BL21 (DE3) E. coli strain.CONCLUSION: A clone expressing high activity H. pylori catalase is obtained, laying a good foundation for further studies.

  6. Helicobacter pylori in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Matjaž; Hojsak, Iva; Kolaček, Sanja

    2012-09-01

    This review summarizes important pediatric studies published from April 2011 up to March 2012. Proteomics profile of ulcerogenic Helicobacter pylori strains was defined in the most interesting study of the last year. The antigen stool test is becoming the "gold standard" in prevalence studies, and according to the last epidemiologic studies, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in childhood is not decreasing any more in the developed world. The resistance rate of H. pylori strains is high in children. Therefore, among other important issues concerning H. pylori in pediatrics, guidelines published by ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN last year also recommended culture and susceptibility testing before first-line treatment in areas with high or unknown antibiotic resistance rates.

  7. New Helicobacter species in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, L P

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade several new Helicobacter species have been isolated from human gastric mucosa, fecal samples, liver, and gallbladder. Gastric corkscrew-shaped Helicobacter species: H. heilmannii is usually seen in the gastric foveolae in 0.2-0.6% of histological sections from the gastric mucosa of patients with dyspepsia in Western Europe, but it has only been cultured once. It is genetically and morphologically closely related to H. bizzozeronii and H. salmonis which are common in dogs and cats. It causes constantly active chronic gastritis and is regularly associated with peptic ulcer. Intestinal Helicobacter species: H. cinaedi, H. fennelliae, H. pullorum, H. westmeadii, H. canadensis, and 'H. rappini' have been isolated from patients with enteritis and proctitis. H. fennelliae, H. cinaedi, H. westmeadii, and 'H. rappini' have been isolated also from patients with septicemia. Studies indicate that H. cinaedi is transmitted from hamsters and that H. pullorum is common in chickens. 'H. rappini' has been isolated from sheep, dogs, and mice, whereas no animal reservoir has been found for H. fennelliae. Except for the cases of septicemia, none of these Helicobacter species have yet been proven to cause human disease, but they are suspected to play a role in inflammatory bowel diseases. Hepatobiliary Helicobacter species include several Helicobacter species isolated from bile and liver of animals, but only H. bilis has been isolated from the human gallbladder and H. pylori from the human liver. H. bilis has been isolated from dogs, cats, mice, and rats. Nonpylori Helicobacter species are usually difficult to culture and may be more frequently causes of human disease than realized today.

  8. Exploring the diversity of Arcobacter butzleri from cattle in the UK using MLST and whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Yvette Merga

    Full Text Available Arcobacter butzleri is considered to be an emerging human foodborne pathogen. The completion of an A. butzleri genome sequence along with microarray analysis of 13 isolates in 2007 revealed a surprising amount of diversity amongst A. butzleri isolates from humans, animals and food. In order to further investigate Arcobacter diversity, 792 faecal samples were collected from cattle on beef and dairy farms in the North West of England. Arcobacter was isolated from 42.5% of the samples and the diversity of the isolates was investigated using multilocus sequence typing. An A. butzleri whole genome sequence, obtained by 454 shotgun sequencing of an isolate from a clinically-healthy dairy cow, showed a number of differences when compared to the genome of a human-derived A. butzleri isolate. PCR-based prevalence assays for variable genes suggested some tentative evidence for source-related distributions. We also found evidence for phenotypic differences relating to growth capabilities between our representative human and cattle isolates. Our genotypic and phenotypic observations suggest that some level of niche adaptation may have occurred in A. butzleri.

  9. Towards a typing strategy for Arcobacter species isolated from humans and animals and assessment of the in vitro genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Baré, Julie; Houf, Kurt

    2014-04-01

    Arcobacter species have a widespread distribution with a broad range of animal hosts and environmental reservoirs, and are increasingly associated with human illness. To elucidate the routes of infection, several characterization methods such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), amplified fragment-length polymorphism, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR have already been applied, but without proper validation or comparison. At present, no criterion standard typing method or strategy has been proposed. Therefore, after the validation of PFGE, those commonly applied typing methods were compared for the characterization of six human- and animal-associated Arcobacter species. With a limited number of isolates to be characterized, PFGE with restriction by KpnI is proposed as the first method of choice. However, ERIC-PCR represents a more convenient genomic fingerprinting technique when a large number of isolates is involved. Therefore, a first clustering of similar patterns obtained after ERIC-PCR, with a subsequent typing of some representatives per ERIC cluster by PFGE, is recommended. As multiple genotypes are commonly isolated from the same host and food, genomic plasticity has been suggested. The in vitro genomic stability of Arcobacter butzleri and A. cryaerophilus was assessed under two temperatures and two oxygen concentrations. Variability in the genomic profile of A. cryaerophilus was observed after different passages for different strains at 37°C under microaerobic conditions. The bias due to these genomic changes must be taken into account in the evaluation of the relationship of strains.

  10. Exploring the diversity of Arcobacter butzleri from cattle in the UK using MLST and whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merga, J Yvette; Williams, Nicola J; Miller, William G; Leatherbarrow, Andrew J H; Bennett, Malcolm; Hall, Neil; Ashelford, Kevin E; Winstanley, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Arcobacter butzleri is considered to be an emerging human foodborne pathogen. The completion of an A. butzleri genome sequence along with microarray analysis of 13 isolates in 2007 revealed a surprising amount of diversity amongst A. butzleri isolates from humans, animals and food. In order to further investigate Arcobacter diversity, 792 faecal samples were collected from cattle on beef and dairy farms in the North West of England. Arcobacter was isolated from 42.5% of the samples and the diversity of the isolates was investigated using multilocus sequence typing. An A. butzleri whole genome sequence, obtained by 454 shotgun sequencing of an isolate from a clinically-healthy dairy cow, showed a number of differences when compared to the genome of a human-derived A. butzleri isolate. PCR-based prevalence assays for variable genes suggested some tentative evidence for source-related distributions. We also found evidence for phenotypic differences relating to growth capabilities between our representative human and cattle isolates. Our genotypic and phenotypic observations suggest that some level of niche adaptation may have occurred in A. butzleri.

  11. Prevalence of thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. in farmed hares (Lepus europaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaniello, Antonio; Dipineto, Ludovico; Veneziano, Vincenzo; Mariani, Ugo; Fioretti, Alessandro; Menna, Lucia Francesca

    2014-10-01

    Thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 118/240 (49.2%) rectal swabs from commercially farmed hares (Lepus europaeus) in southern Italy. Using multiplex PCR, Campylobacter coli was identified in 118/118 (100%) positive samples, while 17/118 (14.4%) positive samples were also positive for Campylobacter jejuni. Adult hares had a higher prevalence of infection with Campylobacter spp. than juvenile hares.

  12. High-resolution genomic fingerprinting of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; On, Stephen L.W.

    1999-01-01

    A method for high-resolution genomic fingerprinting of the enteric pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, based on the determination of amplified fragment length polymorphism, is described. The potential of this method for molecular epidemiological studies of these species...

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been linked to peptic ulcer disease, gastric lymphoma, and gastric carcinoma. Apart from its well-demonstrated role in gastroduodenal diseases, some authors have suggested a potential role of Helicobacter pylori infection in several extra-intestinal pathologies including haematological, cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic, autoimmune, and dermatological diseases. Some studies suggest an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and skin diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria and rosacea. There have also been few case reports documenting association between Helicobacter pylori and psoriasis vulgaris, Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases; most of the studies do not show relevant relationships of these diseases with Helicobacter pylori infections. This review discusses skin diseases that are believed to be associated with Helicobacter pylori.

  14. 21 CFR 866.3110 - Campylobacter fetus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. 866.3110... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3110 Campylobacter fetus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Campylobacter fetus serological reagents are...

  15. The globins of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Shepherd, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a zoonotic Gram-negative bacterial pathogen that is exposed to reactive nitrogen species, such as nitric oxide, from a variety of sources. To combat the toxic effects of this nitrosative stress, C. jejuni upregulates a small regulon under the control of the transcriptional activator NssR, which positively regulates the expression of a single-domain globin protein (Cgb) and a truncated globin protein (Ctb). Cgb has previously been shown to detoxify nitric oxide, but the role of Ctb remains contentious. As C. jejuni is amenable to genetic manipulation, and its globin proteins are easily expressed and purified, a combination of mutagenesis, complementation, transcriptomics, spectroscopic characterisation and structural analyses has been used to probe the regulation, function and structure of Cgb and Ctb. This ability to study Cgb and Ctb with such a multi-pronged approach is a valuable asset, especially since only a small fraction of known globin proteins have been functionally characterised.

  16. Multi drug resistance of campylobacter jejuni and campylobacter coli to tested antibiotics in strains originating from humans, poultry and swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambur Zoran Ž.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermophilic Campylobacter are among the most common cause of bacterial enteritis in humans. Food animals are considered one of the most important sources of Campylobacter causing infections in man. Campylobacter infection is clinically mild and resolves spontaneously. In severe or long-lasting cases, treatment with antibiotics is necessary. Resistance of Campylobacter spp. to drugs used in treatment of infection is a matter of concern. The aim of this paper is to determine presence of multi drug resistant strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from animals and man. Material for testing was obtained by scraping the cecum surface from boilers, pig cecum and colon, and human feces. For isolation Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli microaerophilic conditions, temperature of 42°C and antibiotic supplement were required to inhibit the growth of other intestinal bacteria. In this research, for sensitivity testing of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli three different methods were used: disc diffusion test, E-test, and dilution agar method. A total of 55 strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. Out of the total, 24 strains originated from man, 16 from broilers were isolated, and 15 from pigs. Multidrug resistance was determined in cases when the strains were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Applying E-test, we detected that the largest number of Campylobacter jejuni were multi drug resistant to two antibiotics (41.2%, and three antibiotics (11.8%. Applying disc diffusion method it was detected that 5.9% of Campylobacter jejuni from man was resistant to four tested antibiotics. Applying all three methods, it was detected that the largest number of Campylobacter strains was resistant to two antibiotics and three antibiotics. Applying disc diffusion method it was detected that 50% of Campylobacter coli strains from pigs were resistant to three tested antibiotics.

  17. Physiological and genetic description of dissimilatory perchlorate reduction by the novel marine bacterium Arcobacter sp. strain CAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlström, Charlotte I; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D

    2013-05-21

    A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4(-)) or chlorate (ClO3(-)) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl(-)), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld) enzymes. When grown with perchlorate, optimum growth was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 3% NaCl. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations were dominated by free-swimming straight rods with 1 to 2 polar flagella per cell. Strain CAB utilized a variety of organic acids, fructose, and hydrogen as electron donors coupled to (per)chlorate reduction. Further, under anoxic growth conditions strain CAB utilized the biogenic oxygen produced as a result of chlorite dismutation to oxidize catechol via the meta-cleavage pathway of aerobic catechol degradation and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme. In addition to (per)chlorate, oxygen and nitrate were alternatively used as electron acceptors. The 3.48-Mb draft genome encoded a distinct perchlorate reduction island (PRI) containing several transposases. The genome lacks the pcrC gene, which was previously thought to be essential for (per)chlorate reduction, and appears to use an unrelated Arcobacter c-type cytochrome to perform the same function. IMPORTANCE The study of dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacteria (DPRB) has largely focused on freshwater, mesophilic, neutral-pH environments. This study identifies a novel marine DPRB in the genus Arcobacter that represents the first description of a DPRB associated with the Campylobacteraceae. Strain CAB is currently the only epsilonproteobacterial DPRB in pure culture. The genome of strain CAB lacks the pcrC gene found in all

  18. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. A diagnosis of infection is thus an important part of a treatment strategy of many gastrointestinal tract diseases. Many diagnostic tests are available but all have some limitations in different clinical situations and laboratory settings. A single gold standard cannot available, but be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in daily clinical practice in all areas, so several techniques have been developed to give reliable results, especially focusing on real time endoscopic features. The narrow band imaging system (NBI) and high resolution endoscopy are imaging techniques for enhanced visualization of infected mucosa and premalignant gastric lesions. The aim of this article is to review the current diagnostic options and possible future developments detection of Helicobacter pylori infection.

  19. Dispepsia ed Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Helicobacter pylori (HP eradication on functional dyspepsia has been analysed in several clinical trials, including large, controlled and well-designed studies as well as small, flowed studies. The results of these studies indicate that HP infection does not play a major role in the aetiology of this disease and that HP eradication improves dyspeptic symptoms in no more than 15% of patients as compared to placebo. From a practical point of view 15 patients need to be treated for one to benefit while, in duodenal ulcer, 1.4 patient need to be treated for one to benefit. It remains to be elucidated if HP eradication in functional dyspepsia is useful to reduce the risk of developing organic dyspepsia (namely peptic ulcer in functional dyspepsia. In uninvestigated dyspepsia the management of HP infection in primary care has been fully debated.Two therapeutics strategies have been proposed: test and scope and test and treat. The value of test and treat strategy over alternative strategies has been demonstrated in several decision analyses. HP test and scope increases costs in primary care without improving symptoms and saves only 15% of endoscopies.

  20. Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weakened from medications or other illnesses. Azithromycin and fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin) are commonly used for treatment of these infections, but resistance to fluoroquinolones is common. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing can help guide ...

  1. Foodborne Campylobacter: Infections, Metabolism, Pathogenesis and Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon V. R. Epps

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter species are a leading cause of bacterial-derived foodborne illnesses worldwide. The emergence of this bacterial group as a significant causative agent of human disease and their propensity to carry antibiotic resistance elements that allows them to resist antibacterial therapy make them a serious public health threat. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are considered to be the most important enteropathogens of this genus and their ability to colonize and survive in a wide variety of animal species and habitats make them extremely difficult to control. This article reviews the historical and emerging importance of this bacterial group and addresses aspects of the human infections they cause, their metabolism and pathogenesis, and their natural reservoirs in order to address the need for appropriate food safety regulations and interventions.

  2. Foodborne Campylobacter: Infections, Metabolism, Pathogenesis and Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Sharon V. R.; Harvey, Roger B.; Hume, Michael E.; Phillips, Timothy D.; Anderson, Robin C.; Nisbet, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter species are a leading cause of bacterial-derived foodborne illnesses worldwide. The emergence of this bacterial group as a significant causative agent of human disease and their propensity to carry antibiotic resistance elements that allows them to resist antibacterial therapy make them a serious public health threat. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are considered to be the most important enteropathogens of this genus and their ability to colonize and survive in a wide variety of animal species and habitats make them extremely difficult to control. This article reviews the historical and emerging importance of this bacterial group and addresses aspects of the human infections they cause, their metabolism and pathogenesis, and their natural reservoirs in order to address the need for appropriate food safety regulations and interventions. PMID:24287853

  3. Low occurrence of Helicobacter DNA in tropical wild birds, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Amado, María Alexandra; Sanz, Virginia; Martinez, Leoncia Margarita; Contreras, Mónica; Lentino, Miguel; Michelangeli, Fabian

    2013-10-01

    Enteric Helicobacter species (Helicobacter pullorum, Helicobacter pametensis, Helicobacter canadensis, Helicobacter anseris, and Helicobacter brantae) have been found in birds from temperate latitudes. We evaluated the occurrence of Helicobacter spp. in terrestrial wild birds from Venezuela. A fragment of 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR with Helicobacter genus-specific primers. Helicobacter spp. were detected in four of 80 fecal and in three of 42 intestinal tissue samples. Analyses of 16S and 23S rRNA gene sequences confirm for the first time the presence of Helicobacter in tropical terrestrial wild birds. However, the occurrence of Helicobacter was low, suggesting these bacteria may be uncommon in the populations we studied.

  4. Nickel Homeostasis in Helicobacter Species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Stoof (Jeroen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractGastric Helicobacter species are adapted to colonize the acidic environment of the stomach. Colonization with H pylori is life long if untreated, and can lead to gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and eventually to gastric cancer. Although H pylori is sensitive to many antibiotics in vitro,

  5. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detec

  6. Nitroimidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wouden, EJ; Thijs, JC; Van Zwet, AA; Kleibeuker, JH

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of a nitroimidazole-containing regimen for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection is decreased by nitroimidazole resistance. Nitroimidazoles are metabolized by H. pylori by several nitro-reductases of which an oxygen-insensitive NADPH nitroreductase encoded by the rdxA gene is t

  7. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  8. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Kusters (Johannes); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractHelicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection

  9. Invasion Assays and Genomotyping to Investigate Differences in Virulence of Campylobacter spp. Isolates from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter spp. are the leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Epithelial cell invasion is thought to be essential for Campylobacter spp. infection. Previous invasion studies with intestinal epithelial cells revealed that the ability of different Campylobacter jejuni isolates to inva...

  10. MicroRNA Response of Primary Human Macrophages to Arcobacter Butzleri Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Bruegge, Jennifer; Backes, Christina; Gölz, Greta; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Scharek-Tedin, Lydia; Franke, Andre; Alter, Thomas; Einspanier, Ralf; Keller, Andreas; Sharbati, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in infectious diseases is becoming more and more apparent, and the use of miRNAs as a diagnostic tool and their therapeutic application has become the major focus of investigation. The aim of this study was to identify miRNAs involved in the immune signaling of macrophages in response to Arcobacter (A.) butzleri infection, an emerging foodborne pathogen causing gastroenteritis. Therefore, primary human macrophages were isolated and infected, and miRNA expression was studied by means of RNAseq. Analysis of the data revealed the expression of several miRNAs, which were previously associated with bacterial infections such as miR-155, miR-125, and miR-212. They were shown to play a key role in Toll-like receptor signaling where they act as fine-tuners to establish a balanced immune response. In addition, miRNAs which have yet not been identified during bacterial infections such as miR-3613, miR-2116, miR-671, miR-30d, and miR-629 were differentially regulated in A. butzleri-infected cells. Targets of these miRNAs accumulated in pathways such as apoptosis and endocytosis – processes that might be involved in A. butzleri pathogenesis. Our study contributes new findings about the interaction of A. butzleri with human innate immune cells helping to understand underlying regulatory mechanisms in macrophages during infection. PMID:27429792

  11. Healthy puppies and kittens as carriers of Campylobacter spp., with special reference to Campylobacter upsaliensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Madsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    Living in a household with a dog or cat has previously been identified as a significant risk factor for acquiring campylobacteriosis, in particular, with reference to Campylobacter upsaliensis infection. In a cross-sectional study carried out in Denmark between August and December 1996, 72 healthy...... puppies and 42 healthy kittens, aged between 11 and 17 weeks, were sampled for fecal campylobacter shedding by culture of rectal swab specimens on blood-free agar base with cefoperazone at 32 mg/liter and amphotericin at 10 mg/liter and on blood-free agar base with cefoperazone at 8 mg/liter, teicoplanin...... for Campylobacter spp., with a species distribution of 76% C. jejuni, 5% C. coli, and 19% C. upsaliensis, Of the kittens examined, two (5%) excreted campylobacters; both strains were C. upsaliensis, None of the chicken samples examined were found to be positive for C. upsaliensis. We concluded that young puppies...

  12. Biopatologia do Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladeira Marcelo Sady Plácido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A infecção pelo Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori induz inflamação persistente na mucosa gástrica com diferentes lesões orgânicas em humanos, tais como gastrite crônica, úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. Os fatores determinantes desses diferentes resultados incluem a intensidade e a distribuição da inflamação induzida pelo H. pylori na mucosa gástrica. Evidências recentes demonstram que cepas do H. pylori apresentam diversidade genotípica, cujos produtos acionam o processo inflamatório por meio de mediadores e citocinas, que podem levar a diferentes graus de resposta inflamatória do hospedeiro, resultando em diferentes destinos patológicos. Cepas H. pylori com a ilha de patogenicidade cag induzem resposta inflamatória mais grave, através da ativação da transcrição de genes, aumentando o risco para desenvolvimento de úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. O estresse oxidativo e nitrosativo induzido pela inflamação desempenha importante papel na carcinogênese gástrica como mediador da formação ou ativação de cancerígenos, danos no DNA, bem como de alterações da proliferação celular e da apoptose.

  13. Campylobacter jejuni in commercial eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belchiolina Beatriz Fonseca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the ability of Campylobacter jejuni to penetrate through the pores of the shells of commercial eggs and colonize the interior of these eggs, which may become a risk factor for human infection. Furthermore, this study assessed the survival and viability of the bacteria in commercial eggs. The eggs were placed in contact with wood shavings infected with C. jejuni to check the passage of the bacteria. In parallel, the bacteria were inoculated directly into the air chamber to assess the viability in the egg yolk. To determine whether the albumen and egg fertility interferes with the entry and survival of bacteria, we used varying concentrations of albumen and SPF and commercial eggs. C. jejuni was recovered in SPF eggs (fertile after three hours in contact with contaminated wood shavings but not in infertile commercial eggs. The colonies isolated in the SPF eggs were identified by multiplex PCR and the similarity between strains verified by RAPD-PCR. The bacteria grew in different concentrations of albumen in commercial and SPF eggs. We did not find C. jejuni in commercial eggs inoculated directly into the air chamber, but the bacteria were viable during all periods tested in the wood shavings. This study shows that consumption of commercial eggs infected with C. jejuni does not represent a potential risk to human health.

  14. Studies on the epidemiology of Campylobacter jejuni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Oosterom (Johannes)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractOver the last few years the bacterial species Campylobacter jejuni has been recognized as an important cause of acute enteritis in man. Investigations in several countries have shown that infections caused by C. jejuni may be as serious as those due to Salmonella spp., both in prevalence

  15. Campylobacter iguaniorum sp. nov., isolated from reptiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Maarten J.; Kik, Marja; Miller, William G.; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2015-01-01

    During sampling of reptiles for members of the class Epsilonproteobacteria, strains representing a member of the genus Campylobacter not belonging to any of the established taxa were isolated from lizards and chelonians. Initial amplified fragment length polymorphism, PCR and 16S rRNA sequence an

  16. Thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tomoyuki; Urata, Teruo; Nemoto, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus, an organism considered as a periodontal pathogen but rarely recovered from extraoral specimens. The patient fully recovered through drainage of purulent pleural fluid and administration of antibiotics. The present case illustrates that C. rectus can be a cause of not only periodontal disease but also pulmonary infection.

  17. Gastric and enterohepatic helicobacters other than Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Armelle; Péré-Védrenne, Christelle; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2014-09-01

    During the past year, research on non-Helicobacter pylori species has intensified. H. valdiviensis was isolated from wild birds, and putative novel species have been isolated from Bengal tigers and Australian marsupials. Various genomes have been sequenced: H. bilis, H. canis, H. macacae, H. fennelliae, H. cetorum, and H. suis. Several studies highlighted the virulence of non-H. pylori species including H. cinaedi in humans and hyperlipidemic mice or H. macacae in geriatric rhesus monkeys with intestinal adenocarcinoma. Not surprisingly, increased attention has been paid to the position of Helicobacter species in the microbiota of children and animal species (mice, chickens, penguins, and migrating birds). A large number of experimental studies have been performed in animal models of Helicobacter induced typhlocolitis, showing that the gastrointestinal microbial community is involved in modulation of host pathways leading to chronic inflammation. Animal models of H. suis, H. heilmannii, and H. felis infection have been used to study the development of severe inflammation-related pathologies, including gastric MALT lymphoma and adenocarcinoma.

  18. Arcobacter butzleri an emerging enteropathogen: communication of two cases with chronic diarrhea Arcobacter butzleri um enteropatógeno emergente: comunicação de dois casos de diarréia crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Fernández

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The first two cases of chronic diarrhea due to Arcobacter butzleri in Chile are reported. The clinical findings, the absence of other enteropathogens, virus or parasites, the epidemiological association between both patients, the treatment outcome and the fact that A. butzleri was the only bacteria isolated, support the assumption that it was the etiological agent of these chronic diarrhea cases.Os primeiros dois casos de diarréia crônica por Arcobacter butzleri no sul do Chile são apresentados. As características clínicas, a ausência de outros enteropatógenos, vírus ou parasitas, o resultado do tratamento, bem como a associação epidemiológica entre ambos pacientes e o fato de A. butzleri ter sido a única bactéria isolada permitem assumir que este microrganismo seria o agente etiológico destes dois casos de diarréia crônica.

  19. Campylobacter pinnipediorum sp. nov., isolated from pinnipeds, comprising Campylobacter pinnipediorum subsp. pinnipediorum subsp. nov. and Campylobacter pinnipediorum subsp. caledonicus subsp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    During independent diagnostic screenings of otariid seals in California (US) and phocid seals in Scotland (UK), Campylobacter-like isolates, which differed from the established Campylobacter taxa, were cultured from abscesses and internal organs of different seal species. A polyphasic study was unde...

  20. [Evaluation of usefulness of commercial recomwell Campylobacter enzyme--linked immunosorbent assays for routine serodiagnosis of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosz, Natalia; Rastawicki, Waldemar; Jagielski, Marek

    2008-01-01

    The commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA recomWell Campylobacter) from Mikrogen was evaluated for the diagnosis of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli infections. Serum samples from 20 healthy controls, 44 persons with symptoms of primary Campylobacter infection and 24 serum samples from patients with Yersinia enterocolitica or Salmonella infections were tested. This ELISA assay detects IgA and IgG antibodies against three recombinant antigens of the Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli: OMP 18 (18 kDa), PEB4 (31 kDa) and P39 (39 kDa). The healthy controls showed significantly lower antibody titers in all two immunoglobulin classes. The IgA antibodies were diagnosed only in 2 (18.2%) serum samples obtained from patients with bacteriologically confirmed campylobacteriosis. The presence of IgG antibodies was confirmed in 82% of serum samples. Furthermore, we showed that 66.7% of the 33 serum samples obtained from the patients suspected for campylobacteriosis not confirmed by isolation, were positive for IgG and 15.2% for IgA antibodies. We observed also not specific reactions in ELISA recom Well Campylobacter with sera obtained form patients with yersiniosis and salmonelosis. This study demonstrates the usefulness of commercially available assay for the routine diagnosis of Campylobacter infection but with some limitations.

  1. Recovery of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from inoculated foods by selective enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, M P; Roman, D J

    1982-06-01

    A direct enrichment procedure was developed to selectively recover small numbers of Campylobacter jejuni, C. coli, and nalidixic acid-resistant thermophilic Campylobacter from foods. The procedure includes an enrichment medium composed of brucella broth, 7% lysed horse blood, 0.3% sodium succinate, 0.01% cysteine hydrochloride, vancomycin (15 micrograms/ml), trimethoprim (5 micrograms/ml), polymyxin B (20 IU/ml), and cycloheximide (50 micrograms/ml) that is inoculated with 10 or 25 g of food and incubated with agitation under microaerophilic conditions at 42 degrees C for 16 to 18 h. After incubation, the medium is plated directly onto Campy-BAP agar plates (M. J. Blaser et al., Ann. Intern. Med. 91:179-185, 1979), and resulting colonies that resemble Campylobacter are identified by conventional tests. The foods evaluated included raw milk, hamburger, and chicken skin which had aerobic plate counts of 10(5) to 10(9) bacteria/g. The procedure was effective in recovering as few as 0.1 cell of Campylobacter per g of food. Of the 50 isolates of Campylobacter evaluated, all were recovered from raw milk and hamburger at a level of 1 to 4 cells/g, and 41 and 40 isolaes were recovered from the hamburger and milk, respectively, at 0.1 to 0.4 cell/g. The enrichment was least effective for recovering campylobacters from chicken skin, as 7 and 26 of 50 isolates were not recovered at 1 to 4 and 0.1 to 0.4 cell/g, respectively. This new procedure is more rapid, direct, and effective than other enrichment or direct plating procedures for recovering small numbers of campylobacters from foods.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter spp isolated from broiler flocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kuana, Suzete Lora; SANTOS Luciana Ruschel dos; RODRIGUES, Laura Beatriz; Anderlise BORSOI; Moraes, Hamilton Luis do Souza; Salle, Carlos Tadeu Pippi; Nascimento, Vladimir Pinheiro do

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility of 62 Campylobacter spp. strains obtained from broiler flocks using the agar diffusion method. The Campylobacter spp strains were isolated from 22 flocks aged between 3 and 5 weeks of life, isolated from cloacae swabs, stools and cecal droppings in the farm and from the carcass rinsing in the slaughterhouse. Campylobacter spp strains were tested on Mueller-Hilton (MH) agar (27 samples) and MH plus TTC agar (35 samples). The ...

  3. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces...

  4. Exopolysaccharide production by Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a widespread Gram-negative bacterium that infects the stomach of humans leading to the onset of several gastric disorders, such as, gastritis, gastric ulcers, and cancers. Studies from developing countries with low socioeconomic status and poor management of the drinking water suggest that it may serve as an environmental reservoir of H. pylori and therefore contribute to human infection. It has been reported that H. pylori has the ability to form microbi...

  5. Novel Campylobacter lari-like bacteria from humans and molluscs: description of Campylobacter peloridis sp. nov., Campylobacter lari subsp. concheus subsp. nov. and Campylobacter lari subsp. lari subsp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debruyne, Lies; On, Stephen L W; De Brandt, Evie; Vandamme, Peter

    2009-05-01

    A polyphasic study was undertaken to clarify the taxonomic position of Campylobacter lari-like strains isolated from shellfish and humans. The diversity within the strain collection was initially screened by means of fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis and whole-cell protein electrophoresis, revealing the existence of two clusters distinct from C. lari and other Campylobacter species. The divergence of these clusters was confirmed by phenotypic analysis and by 16S rRNA and hsp60 gene sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis identified C. lari, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli and Campylobacter insulaenigrae as the closest phylogenetic neighbours of both taxa. DNA-DNA hybridizations revealed that one cluster, comprising 10 strains, represented a novel Campylobacter species, for which the name Campylobacter peloridis sp. nov. is proposed, with 2314BVA(T) (=LMG 23910(T) =CCUG 55787(T)) as the type strain. The second cluster, comprising six strains, represents a novel subspecies within the species C. lari, for which the name Campylobacter lari subsp. concheus subsp. nov. is proposed, with 2897R(T) (=LMG 21009(T) =CCUG 55786(T)) as the type strain. The description of C. lari subsp. concheus has the effect of automatically creating the subspecies Campylobacter lari subsp. lari subsp. nov. (type strain LMG 8846(T)=NCTC 11352(T)).

  6. Salmonella and Campylobacter: Antimicrobial resistance and bacteriophage control in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Ar'Quette; Hashem, Fawzy; Parveen, Salina

    2016-02-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are major causes of foodborne related illness and are traditionally associated with consuming undercooked poultry and/or consuming products that have been cross contaminated with raw poultry. Many of the isolated Salmonella and Campylobacter that can cause disease have displayed antimicrobial resistance phenotypes. Although poultry producers have reduced on-the-farm overuse of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter strains still persist. One method of bio-control, that is producing promising results, is the use of lytic bacteriophages. This review will highlight the current emergence and persistence of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella and Campylobacter recovered from poultry as well as bacteriophage research interventions and limitations.

  7. Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in salad vegetables in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Lay Ching; Robin, Tunung; Ragavan, Usha Menon; Gunsalam, Jurin Wolmon; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Ghazali, Farinazleen Mohamad; Radu, Son; Kumar, Malakar Pradeep

    2007-06-10

    The main aim of this study was to combine the techniques of most probable number (MPN) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for quantifying the prevalence and numbers of Campylobacter spp. in ulam, a popular Malaysian salad dish, from a traditional wet market and two modern supermarkets in Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 309 samples of raw vegetables which are used in ulam were examined in the study. The prevalences of campylobacters in raw vegetables were, for supermarket I, Campylobacter spp., 51.9%; Campylobacter jejuni, 40.7%; and Campylobacter coli, 35.2%: for supermarket II, Campylobacter spp., 67.7%; C. jejuni, 67.7%; and C. coli, 65.7%: and for the wet market, Campylobacter spp., 29.4%; C. jejuni, 25.5%; and C. coli, 22.6%. In addition Campylobacter fetus was detected in 1.9% of raw vegetables from supermarket I. The maximum numbers of Campylobacter spp. in raw vegetables from supermarkets and the wet market were >2400 and 460 MPN/g, respectively.

  8. Helicobacter spp. other than H. pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Mirko; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2012-09-01

    Significant advances have been made over the last 12 months in the understanding of the biology of non-H. pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). Several studies have investigated the association between NHPH and human disease, including Crohn's disease, lithiasis, liver disease, coronary disease, gastritis, and pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers. Novel Helicobacter taxa were identified in new vertebrate hosts, and new methodologies in the fields of identification of Helicobacter spp. and evaluation of antibiotic resistance were described. The genome of the first human-derived gastric NHPH strain (Helicobacter bizzozeronii CIII-1) was sequenced, and several studies elucidated functions of different genes in NHPH. A number of important investigations regarding pathogenesis and immunopathobiology of NHPH infections have been published including the description of a new urease in Helicobacter mustelae. Finally, the effects of the gut microbiota and probiotics on NHPH infections were investigated.

  9. Comparative genomics and proteomics of Helicobacter mustelae, an ulcerogenic and carcinogenic gastric pathogen

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, Paul W

    2010-03-10

    Abstract Background Helicobacter mustelae causes gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer in ferrets and other mustelids. H. mustelae remains the only helicobacter other than H. pylori that causes gastric ulceration and cancer in its natural host. To improve understanding of H. mustelae pathogenesis, and the ulcerogenic and carcinogenic potential of helicobacters in general, we sequenced the H. mustelae genome, and identified 425 expressed proteins in the envelope and cytosolic proteome. Results The H. mustelae genome lacks orthologs of major H. pylori virulence factors including CagA, VacA, BabA, SabA and OipA. However, it encodes ten autotransporter surface proteins, seven of which were detected in the expressed proteome, and which, except for the Hsr protein, are of unknown function. There are 26 putative outer membrane proteins in H. mustelae, some of which are most similar to the Hof proteins of H. pylori. Although homologs of putative virulence determinants of H. pylori (NapA, plasminogen adhesin, collagenase) and Campylobacter jejuni (CiaB, Peb4a) are present in the H. mustelae genome, it also includes a distinct complement of virulence-related genes including a haemagglutinin\\/haemolysin protein, and a glycosyl transferase for producing blood group A\\/B on its lipopolysaccharide. The most highly expressed 264 proteins in the cytosolic proteome included many corresponding proteins from H. pylori, but the rank profile in H. mustelae was distinctive. Of 27 genes shown to be essential for H. pylori colonization of the gerbil, all but three had orthologs in H. mustelae, identifying a shared set of core proteins for gastric persistence. Conclusions The determination of the genome sequence and expressed proteome of the ulcerogenic species H mustelae provides a comparative model for H. pylori to investigate bacterial gastric carcinogenesis in mammals, and to suggest ways whereby cag minus H. pylori strains might cause ulceration and cancer. The genome sequence was

  10. Comparative genomics and proteomics of Helicobacter mustelae, an ulcerogenic and carcinogenic gastric pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMullan Geoff

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter mustelae causes gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer in ferrets and other mustelids. H. mustelae remains the only helicobacter other than H. pylori that causes gastric ulceration and cancer in its natural host. To improve understanding of H. mustelae pathogenesis, and the ulcerogenic and carcinogenic potential of helicobacters in general, we sequenced the H. mustelae genome, and identified 425 expressed proteins in the envelope and cytosolic proteome. Results The H. mustelae genome lacks orthologs of major H. pylori virulence factors including CagA, VacA, BabA, SabA and OipA. However, it encodes ten autotransporter surface proteins, seven of which were detected in the expressed proteome, and which, except for the Hsr protein, are of unknown function. There are 26 putative outer membrane proteins in H. mustelae, some of which are most similar to the Hof proteins of H. pylori. Although homologs of putative virulence determinants of H. pylori (NapA, plasminogen adhesin, collagenase and Campylobacter jejuni (CiaB, Peb4a are present in the H. mustelae genome, it also includes a distinct complement of virulence-related genes including a haemagglutinin/haemolysin protein, and a glycosyl transferase for producing blood group A/B on its lipopolysaccharide. The most highly expressed 264 proteins in the cytosolic proteome included many corresponding proteins from H. pylori, but the rank profile in H. mustelae was distinctive. Of 27 genes shown to be essential for H. pylori colonization of the gerbil, all but three had orthologs in H. mustelae, identifying a shared set of core proteins for gastric persistence. Conclusions The determination of the genome sequence and expressed proteome of the ulcerogenic species H mustelae provides a comparative model for H. pylori to investigate bacterial gastric carcinogenesis in mammals, and to suggest ways whereby cag minus H. pylori strains might cause ulceration and cancer. The genome

  11. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  12. Sequence variability of Campylobacter temperate bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Lai-King

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophages integrated within the chromosomes of Campylobacter jejuni isolates have been demonstrated very recently. Prior work with Campylobacter temperate bacteriophages, as well as evidence from prophages in other enteric bacteria, suggests these prophages might have a role in the biology and virulence of the organism. However, very little is known about the genetic variability of Campylobacter prophages which, if present, could lead to differential phenotypes in isolates carrying the phages versus those that do not. As a first step in the characterization of C. jejuni prophages, we investigated the distribution of prophage DNA within a C. jejuni population assessed the DNA and protein sequence variability within a subset of the putative prophages found. Results Southern blotting of C. jejuni DNA using probes from genes within the three putative prophages of the C. jejuni sequenced strain RM 1221 demonstrated the presence of at least one prophage gene in a large proportion (27/35 of isolates tested. Of these, 15 were positive for 5 or more of the 7 Campylobacter Mu-like phage 1 (CMLP 1, also designated Campylobacter jejuni integrated element 1, or CJIE 1 genes tested. Twelve of these putative prophages were chosen for further analysis. DNA sequencing of a 9,000 to 11,000 nucleotide region of each prophage demonstrated a close homology with CMLP 1 in both gene order and nucleotide sequence. Structural and sequence variability, including short insertions, deletions, and allele replacements, were found within the prophage genomes, some of which would alter the protein products of the ORFs involved. No insertions of novel genes were detected within the sequenced regions. The 12 prophages and RM 1221 had a % G+C very similar to C. jejuni sequenced strains, as well as promoter regions characteristic of C. jejuni. None of the putative prophages were successfully induced and propagated, so it is not known if they were functional or

  13. Longitudinal study of the excretion patterns of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in young pet dogs in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Pedersen, Karl; Wainø, Michael;

    2004-01-01

    .7% Campylobacter coli, and 2.8% Campylobacter spp. Isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to elucidate the strain excretion pattern. All study dogs excreted Campylobacter spp. during the study period. At 3 months of age, 60% of the dogs carried Campylobacter, increasing to nearly 100...

  14. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in wild birds on Danish livestock farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Nielsen, Eva Møller

    2016-01-01

    to study the factors influencing the prevalence in wild birds according to their ecological guild. In total, 1607 individual wild bird cloacal swab samples and 386 livestock manure samples were cultured for Campylobacter spp. according to the Nordic Committee on Food Analysis method NMKL 119.Results......: The highest Campylobacter spp. prevalence was seen in 110 out of 178 thrushes (61.8 %), of which the majority were Common Blackbird (Turdus merula), and in 131 out of 616 sparrows (21.3 %), a guild made up of House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) and Eurasian Tree Sparrow (Passer montanus). In general, birds.......54), and between the prevalence (%) of C. coli in wild birds and the proportions (%) of C. coli in manure on pig farms (R-2 = 0.62).Conclusions: The ecological guild of wild birds influences the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. through the behavioural patterns of the birds. More specifically, wild birds eating...

  15. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in Children With Acute Diarrhea in Health Centers of Hamadan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastyani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Enteritis caused by Campylobacter is considered as the most common acute bacterial diarrhea around the world. In most cases, infection occurs as a result of consuming contaminated water or food, especially raw meat of fowls. Objectives The purpose of the present study was to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of campylobacter species among pediatrics of Hamadan city, Iran. Patients and Methods A total of 120 stool samples from children less than 10 years old were examined from January 2013 to December 2014 in Hamadan, Iran. The samples were incubated in Campy-Thio enrichment medium for 1 - 2 hours and then cultured on a specific medium; after that, the suspected colonies were analyzed for Campylobacter spp. identification by conventional tests. The identified species by biochemical methods were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by disk agar diffusion (DAD method. Results Twelve (10% Campylobacter spp. from 120 stool samples were isolated including C. coli and C. jejuni. In the antibiotic susceptibility test, the most frequent resistance was observed to ciprofloxacin 8 (88.8%, followed by 7 (77.7% resistant strains to tetracycline, 7 (77.7% to erythromycin, 6 (66.6% to clindamycin, 5 (55.5% to meropenem, 4 (44.4% to gentamicin, 3 (33.3% to nalidixicacid and only 1 (11.1% to chloramphenicol. Conclusions Campylobacter is responsible for some important clinical problems such as enteritis and is also associated with meningitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. It is imperative to monitor the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Campylobacter spp. as well as other the zoonotic bacteria.

  16. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Campylobacter spp. are Gram-negative bacilli enteric pathogens that pose a major public health problem worldwide. In this genus, the most important species is Campylobacter jejuni. This bacterium causes diarrhea as its main symptom, which its intensity varies from mild to severe. Patients’ stools may be watery or bloody. Objectives In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of the species of Campylobacter. jejuni in Zahedan, a major city in southeastern Iran. Patients and Methods Fecal samples from 164 patients with acute diarrhea from Zahedan hospitals were collected from 2011 to 2013. Then the samples were streaked onto a campylobacter selective agar containing supplement and 7% defibrinated sheep blood. Conventional bacteriological tests (such as culture and biochemical tests were performed to confirm the genus and differentiate at the species level. Finally, disk diffusion method was performed according to the recommendation of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI to determine the susceptibility of isolates to antibacterial agents. Results Out of 164 samples, 19 (11.6% were reported positive by culture which confirmed by biochemical tests. Fifteen (78.9% patients, whose samples were positive, hospitalized in infant ward. Two (10.5% patients treated as outpatients. Two remaining (10.5% patients were admitted in internal medicine ward. All of isolated strains were susceptible or moderately susceptible to erythromycin as the drug of choice. Conclusions In this study, the prevalence of the disease (11.6% is found to be more than other parts of Iran. The symptomatic infection mainly affects children younger than 5 years.

  17. Detection of Campylobacter jejuni in raw meat

    OpenAIRE

    Z Noori; SH Saadati; A. Mirsalehian; SH Shoeibi; N Rahimifard; Mehrangiz Mehdizadeh; M Pirali- Hamedani

    2009-01-01

    Background & Objectives: Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram negative, microaerophilic, non-spore-forming and a small"ncurved bacillus which is able to cause foodborne infection in human. In this study the occurrence of C. jejuni in poultry and"nbeef meat was investigated."nMaterials & Methods: Forty raw meat samples including 22 poultry samples and 18 beef samples were investigated for the"npresence of C. jejuni. To isolate the bacterium, the samples were initially enriched in Preston Bro...

  18. Isolation of Campylobacter from human stool samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Salim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Campylobacter is an undetected cause of diarrhoea especially under 5 years of age in most of the countries. Isolation of this organism is difficult, expensive and cumbersome. Aims: Our objective of this study was to isolate this pathogen from the stool specimens on routinely available blood containing laboratory media using the candle jar for creating the microaerophilic atmosphere in our setup. Settings and Designs: A descriptive study. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 stool samples were inoculated onto selective and non-selective media with and without filtration using a 0.45 μm membrane. The inoculated media were simultaneously incubated in microaerophilic conditions using the Anoxomat as well as in candle jars at temperatures 37°C and 42°C. The culture isolates were confirmed by standard phenotypic tests. A simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting the 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid of Campylobacter was performed on the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA of the culture isolates as well as on the DNA extracted from the stool filtrates. Statistical Analysis: Data was expressed as a proportion. Results: Campylobacter could be isolated in 5 out of 50 stool samples using both the Anoxomat as well as the candle jar. Furthermore, we did not find any difference between the isolation using the selective and blood containing media as well as the different incubation temperatures. All the five were confirmed phenotypically and genotypically to be Campylobacter jejuni. The PCR results corroborated with that of the culture. Conclusions: Isolation by culture was as sensitive as that of the PCR.

  19. Change Is Good: Variations in Common Biological Mechanisms in the Epsilonproteobacterial Genera Campylobacter and Helicobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    been shown in Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas spp. to regulate flagellar number (109, 121, 122, 352). V. cholera and Pseu- domonas aeruginosa FlhG...2005. Roles of the regulatory proteins FlhF and FlhG in the Vibrio cholerae flagellar transcription hier- archy. J. Bacteriol. 187:6324–6332. 110...69:6951–6961. 330. Klose, K. E., and J. J. Mekalanos. 1998. Differential regulation of multiple flagellins in Vibrio cholerae . J. Bacteriol. 180:303

  20. Identification of unusual Campylobacter-like isolates from poultry products as Helicobacter pullorum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atabay, H.I.; Corry, J.E.L.; On, Stephen L.W.

    1998-01-01

    %) suggests that routine isolation and identification methods should be amended to enable a thorough evaluation of its role in human gastroenteritis and avian hepatitis. Some phenotypic characters useful in identifying poultry campylobacteria are presented which could be utilized, along with other technique...

  1. Detection of Campylobacter jejuni in raw meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Noori

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram negative, microaerophilic, non-spore-forming and a small"ncurved bacillus which is able to cause foodborne infection in human. In this study the occurrence of C. jejuni in poultry and"nbeef meat was investigated."nMaterials & Methods: Forty raw meat samples including 22 poultry samples and 18 beef samples were investigated for the"npresence of C. jejuni. To isolate the bacterium, the samples were initially enriched in Preston Broth medium and subsequently"ntransferred to Campylobacter selective Agar containing defibrinated sheep blood and antibiotics. The biochemical tests were"nused for identification of isolated bacteria at species level."nResults: Three poultry samples were positive for C. jejuni."nConclusion: Alimentary tract of chickens contain high numbers of C. jejuni therefore, this bacterium can be easily found in"ntheir feces. It is recommended to use chlorinated water in birds’ feed and to perform slaughtering, skinning and evisceration"nunder aseptic conditions to prevent campylobacteriosis in human from poultry meat. None of the beef samples yielded any"nCampylobacter, this may be due to limited number of samples of beef meat analyzed in this study.

  2. Campylobacter infections in fattening pigs; Excretion pattern and genetic diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijtens, M.J.B.M.; Reinders, R.D.; Urlings, H.A.P.; Plas, J. van der

    1999-01-01

    The excretion of campylobacter by eight individually housed fattening pigs was monitored during 15 weeks. Rectal faeces samples were collected six times from these pigs and twice from their mothers (seven sows). Campylobacter was cultured from these samples on Preston medium. In some pigs, samples p

  3. Efficacy of natural cranberry extracts against campylobacter colonization in poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter spp. has been identified as one of the leading causative agents of food borne diarrheal illness. Epi-demiological evidence has shown that poultry is the main source for human infection. Currently there are no consistently effective treatments to eliminate Campylobacter from poultry flo...

  4. Effect of Noradrenaline on the Virulence Properties of Campylobacter Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sree V. Aroori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter species cause a spectrum of illnesses in humans. The type of illness and the outcome is dependent on the virulence of the infecting pathogen strain and host immune status. Acute stress can seriously compromise host immunity and increase susceptibility to infection. Noradrenaline (NA is a stress hormone. Several studies have shown that it stimulated growth and increased the pathogenicity of organisms including E. coli and Campylobacter jejuni. However, the effect of NA on other Campylobacter species is unknown. We have examined the effect of NA on growth rate, motility, invasion of T84 epithelial cells, and colonisation of chickens by diverse Campylobacter species. Campylobacter cultures grown with NA had reduced lag phases, increased growth rates, and higher final optical densities than controls. The motility of Campylobacter was also significantly increased in the presence of noradrenaline. Some of the Campylobacter strains tested also showed increased invasion of T84 epithelial cells, greater breakdown of tight junctions, and an enhanced potential to colonise chickens. Our results show that noradrenaline-induced enhancement of virulence of Campylobacter can influence the outcome of infection.

  5. Quantifying Transmission of Campylobacter jejuni in Commercial Broiler Flocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerwe, van T.; Miflin, J.K.; Templeton, J.M.; Bouma, A.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Jacobs-Reitsma, W.F.; Stegeman, A.; Klinkenberg, D.

    2009-01-01

    Since meat from poultry colonized with Campylobacter spp. is a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, human exposure should be reduced by, among other things, prevention of colonization of broiler flocks. To obtain more insight into possible sources of introduction of Campylobacter into broiler f

  6. Vaccination of poultry against Campylobacter in the EU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Grinsted; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter is the most commonly reported gastrointestinal bacterial pathogen in the European Union (EU) since 2005. Reportedly, 212,064 humans have been confirmed ill in 2010 due to a Campylobacter infection in the EU. The major source of infection, among sporadic human cases is to be found in...

  7. Effectiveness and Efficiency of Controlling Campylobacter on Broiler Chicken Meat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar, A.H.; Mangen, M.J.J.; Koeijer, de A.A.; Bogaardt, M.J.; Evers, E.G.; Jacobs-Reitsma, W.F.; Pelt, van W.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Wit, de G.A.; Zee, van der H.; Nauta, M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Campylobacter bacteria are an important cause of foodborne infections. We estimated the potential costs and benefits of a large number of possible interventions to decrease human exposure to Campylobacter by consumption of chicken meat, which accounts for 20¿40% of all cases of human campylobacterio

  8. The role of Campylobacter jejuni cytolethal distending toxin in gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ninell P; Schiellerup, Peter; Boisen, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    The role of Campylobacter jejuni cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) on clinical outcome after gastroenteritis was investigated. Clinical data, blood serum samples, and Campylobacter spp. isolated, from each of 30 patients were collected over a period of 6 months. The CDT encoding genes, cdt...

  9. Cellular response of Campylobacter jejuni to trisodium phosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, Charlotte Tandrup; Cohn, M. T.; Stabler, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The highly alkaline compound trisodium phosphate (TSP) is used as an intervention to reduce the load of Campylobacter on poultry meat in U.S. poultry slaughter plants. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cellular responses of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168 when exposed to sublethal...

  10. A Review of Bacteriocins to Control Campylobacter spp. in Poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The unacceptably high frequency of Campylobacter jejuni transmission from poultry to humans encourages scientists to consider and create alternative intervention strategies to control the pathogen in poultry production. Extremely high numbers of Campylobacter (often >108 cfu/g of poultry intestinal...

  11. Bacteriocins to Control Campylobacter spp. in Poultry—a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    The unacceptably high frequency of Campylobacter jejuni transmission from poultry to humans encourages scientists to consider and create alternative intervention strategies to control the pathogen in poultry production. Extremely high numbers of Campylobacter (often >108 cfu/g of poultry intestinal...

  12. Campylobacter infections in fattening pigs; excretion pattern and genetic diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijtens, M.J.B.M.; Reinders, R.D.; Urlings, H.A.P.; Plas, van der J.

    1999-01-01

    The excretion of campylobacter by eight individually housed fattening pigs was monitored during 15 weeks. Rectal faeces samples were collected six times from these pigs and twice from their mothers (seven sows). Campylobacter was cultured from these samples on Preston medium. In some pigs, samples p

  13. Foodborne disease prevention and broiler chickens with reduced Campylobacter infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Rangstrup-Christensen, Lena; Nordentoft, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Studies have suggested that flies play a linking role in the epidemiology of Campylobacter spp. in broiler chickens and that fly screens can reduce the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. We examined the year-round and long-term effects of fly screens in 10 broiler chicken houses (99 flocks) in Denm...

  14. Glucose Metabolism via the Entner-Doudoroff Pathway in Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, Christina S; Jansen van Rensburg, Melissa J; Rasmussen, Janus J;

    2016-01-01

    Isolates of the zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter are generally considered to be unable to metabolize glucose due to lack of key glycolytic enzymes. However, the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway has been identified in Campylobacter jejuni subsp. doylei and a few C. coli isolates. A systematic search f...

  15. Campylobacter and Toll-like receptors : implications for vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zoete, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative highly motile bacterium that colonizes the intestinal tract of humans, leading to inflammation of the intestinal mucosal layer. Campylobacter-induced enteritis causes (bloody) diarrhea, cramps, malaise and fever, which resolves within two weeks. In a small num

  16. Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter: prevalence and trends in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igimi, S; Okada, Y; Ishiwa, A; Yamasaki, M; Morisaki, N; Kubo, Y; Asakura, H; Yamamoto, S

    2008-09-01

    Campylobacter is one of the most frequently diagnosed bacterial causes of human gastroenteritis in Japan and throughout the world. Resistance to quinolones in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolated from humans has emerged in many countries during the past 15 years because fluoroquinolones are the drug of choice for the treatment of suspected bacterial gastroenteritis. Food contaminated with Campylobacter is the usual source of human infection; therefore, the presence of antimicrobial resistance strains in the food chain has raised concerns that the treatment of human infections will be compromised. The use of antimicrobial agents for food animals and in veterinary medicine is suspected to be correlated with an increase in quinolone-resistant strains of Campylobacter in food animals, especially in poultry products. In contrast to macrolide resistance in C. jejuni and C. coli isolated from humans showing a stable low rate, resistant Campylobacter spp. to quinolones have emerged in Japan. The paper summarizes food-borne Campylobacter infection in Japan, and the prevalence and trends of antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter from the authors' data and other Japanese papers which reported the antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter.

  17. Relationship between Presence of Anti-Campylobacter FliD Protein Antibodies and Campylobacter jejuni Isolation from Broiler Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative rod, is a zoonotic pathogen associated with human acute bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Poultry products are regarded as a major source of this bacterium for human infection. Although this bacterium is a commensal in chicken cecal microbiome, Campylobacte...

  18. Biochar, Bentonite and Zeolite Supplemented Feeding of Layer Chickens Alters Intestinal Microbiota and Reduces Campylobacter Load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanka P Prasai

    Full Text Available A range of feed supplements, including antibiotics, have been commonly used in poultry production to improve health and productivity. Alternative methods are needed to suppress pathogen loads and maintain productivity. As an alternative to antibiotics use, we investigated the ability of biochar, bentonite and zeolite as separate 4% feed additives, to selectively remove pathogens without reducing microbial richness and diversity in the gut. Neither biochar, bentonite nor zeolite made any significant alterations to the overall richness and diversity of intestinal bacterial community. However, reduction of some bacterial species, including some potential pathogens was detected. The microbiota of bentonite fed animals were lacking all members of the order Campylobacterales. Specifically, the following operational taxonomic units (OTUs were absent: an OTU 100% identical to Campylobacter jejuni; an OTU 99% identical to Helicobacter pullorum; multiple Gallibacterium anatis (>97% related OTUs; Bacteroides dorei (99% and Clostridium aldenense (95% related OTUs. Biochar and zeolite treatments had similar but milder effects compared to bentonite. Zeolite amended feed was also associated with significant reduction in the phylum Proteobacteria. All three additives showed potential for the control of major poultry zoonotic pathogens.

  19. Helicobacter Infection and Chronic Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recentHelicobacter infection associated with chronic liver disease. The bacteriology, prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis were reviewed. Future work should be conducted on the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease.

  20. Diversidade antigênica entre amostras de Arcobacter spp isoladas de suínos no Rio Grande do Sul e presença de anticorpos aglutinantes em amostras de soro de porcas com problemas reprodutivos Antigenic diversity among strains of Arcobacter spp isolated from pigs in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil and presence of agglutinin titers in serum samples of sows with reproductive problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio José de Oliveira

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available O teste de aglutinação microscópica, usando a técnica descrita para o diagnóstico de leptospirose, foi utilizado para verificar a antigenicidade de 47 amostras de Arcobacter cryaerophilus e duas amostras de Arcobacter butzleri isoladas de suínos no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, em frente a soros hiperimunes produzidos em coelhos a partir de amostras padrões das bactérias. Verificou-se grande heterogeneidade antigênica e apenas quatro amostras provocaram títulos acima de 1.600 com os anti-soros padrões. A classificação genética dos microorganismos foi confirmada no teste em 48,97% dos antígenos. Igualmente, utilizando a técnica de aglutinação microscópica, foram testadas amostras de soro de porcas que apresentaram problemas reprodutivos, procedentes de granjas de onde foram isoladas amostras de Arcobacter spp. Não existe registro anterior na literatura sobre o uso do referido teste em infecções por Arcobacter spp. Os exames sorológicos em fêmeas suínas reprodutoras revelaram títulos de até 1.600, possibilitando indicar que houve a presença de aglutininas para Arcobacter spp.Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT described as a diagnostic test for Leptospirosis was used to check antigenicity on 47 samples of Arcobacter cryaerophilus and two samples of Arcobacter butzleri isolated from pigs in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Rabbit antisera used in the test were produced against reference strains of Arcobacter spp. Antigenic heterogenicity among the samples was shown. Only four samples provoked titres higher than 1.600 with standard antisera. 48.97% of the antigens confirmed the genetic classification of the microrganisms. MAT was used also to identify serum samples from sows with reproductive problems from farms where Arcobacter spp had been isolated. There is no reference in the literature on the use of the test as diagnostic tool in Arcobacter infections. Serologic tests in sows showed titres as high as 1,600, suggesting that

  1. Quantifying potential sources of surface water contamination with Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Penny, Christian; Ragimbeau, Catherine; Schets, Franciska M.; Blaak, Hetty; Duim, Birgitta; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Boer, de Albert; Cauchie, Henry-Michel; Mossong, Joel; Pelt, Van Wilfrid

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter is the most common causative agent of human bacterial gastroenteritis and is frequently found in surface water, where it indicates recent contamination with animal faeces, sewage effluent, and agricultural run-off. The contribution of different animal reservoirs to surface water contam

  2. Toename Salmonella en Campylobacter bij slacht : Campylobacter in pluimveesector constant, Salmonella sterk gedaald

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Asselt, van E.D.

    2009-01-01

    In vrijwel alle schakels van de pluimveevleesketen is de besmetting met Salmonella in de periode van 2002 tot 2005 gedaald. Campylobacter werd in diezelfde periode juist vaker in slachthuizen aangetroffen. Tijdens het slachten nam de besmetting met beide pathogenen toe, voor Salmonella gold dit voor

  3. Campylobacter jejuni: exposure assessment and hazard characterization : growth, survival and infectivity of Campylobacter jejuni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff-Bakkenes, L.

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, a small, curved or spirally shaped highly motile microorganism, is identified as a major cause of bacterial gastroenteritis throughout the world. Serious complications such as the Guillain-Barré syndrome and reactive arthritis might occasionally follow infection. In this

  4. Computer-assisted analysis and epidemiological value of genotyping methods for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P. de; Duim, B.; Rigter, A.; Plas, J. van der; Jacobs-Reitsma, W.F.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    For epidemiological tracing of the thermotolerant Campylobacter species C. jejuni and C. coli, reliable and highly discriminatory typing techniques are necessary. In this study the genotyping techniques of flagellin typing (flaA typing), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), automated ribotyping,

  5. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in wild birds on Danish livestock farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Nielsen, Eva Møller;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reducing the occurrence of campylobacteriosis is a food safety issue of high priority, as in recent years it has been the most commonly reported zoonosis in the EU. Livestock farms are of particular interest, since cattle, swine and poultry are common reservoirs of Campylobacter spp...

  6. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in wild birds on Danish livestock farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Nielsen, Eva Møller;

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reducing the occurrence of campylobacteriosis is a food safety issue of high priority, as in recent years it has been the most commonly reported zoonosis in the EU. Livestock farms are of particular interest, since cattle, swine and poultry are common reservoirs of Campylobacter spp. ...

  7. Arcobacter butzleri in sheep ricotta cheese at retail and related sources of contamination in an industrial dairy plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Christian; Giacometti, Federica; Manfreda, Gerardo; Lucchi, Alex; Pes, Emanuela; Spanu, Carlo; De Santis, Enrico Pietro Luigi; Serraino, Andrea

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate Arcobacter species contamination of industrial sheep ricotta cheese purchased at retail and to establish if the dairy plant environment may represent a source of contamination. A total of 32 sheep ricotta cheeses (1.5 kg/pack) packed in a modified atmosphere were purchased at retail, and 30 samples were collected in two sampling sessions performed in the cheese factory from surfaces in contact with food and from surfaces not in contact with food. Seven out of 32 samples (21.9%) of ricotta cheese collected at retail tested positive for Arcobacter butzleri at cultural examination; all positive samples were collected during the same sampling and belonged to the same batch. Ten surface samples (33.3%) collected in the dairy plant were positive for A. butzleri. Cluster analysis identified 32 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. The same PFGE pattern was isolated from more than one ricotta cheese sample, indicating a common source of contamination, while more PFGE patterns could be isolated in single samples, indicating different sources of contamination. The results of the environmental sampling showed that A. butzleri may be commonly isolated from the dairy processing plant investigated and may survive over time, as confirmed by the isolation of the same PFGE pattern in different industrial plant surface samples. Floor contamination may represent a source of A. butzleri spread to different areas of the dairy plant, as demonstrated by isolation of the same PFGE pattern in different production areas. Isolation of the same PFGE pattern from surface samples in the dairy plant and from ricotta cheese purchased at retail showed that plant surfaces may represent a source of A. butzleri postprocessing contamination in cheeses produced in industrial dairy plants.

  8. Comparative Detection and Quantification of Arcobacter butzleri in Stools from Diarrheic and Nondiarrheic People in Southwestern Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Andrew L; Boras, Valerie F; Kruczkiewicz, Peter; Selinger, L Brent; Taboada, Eduardo N; Inglis, G Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Arcobacter butzleri has been linked to enteric disease in humans, but its pathogenicity and epidemiology remain poorly understood. The lack of suitable detection methods is a major limitation. Using comparative genome analysis, we developed PCR primers for direct detection and quantification ofA. butzleri DNA in microbiologically complex matrices. These primers, along with existing molecular and culture-based methods, were used to detectA. butzleri and enteric pathogens in stools of diarrheic and nondiarrheic people (n= 1,596) living in southwestern Alberta, Canada, from May to November 2008. In addition, quantitative PCR was used to compare A. butzleridensities in diarrheic and nondiarrheic stools.Arcobacter butzleriwas detected more often by PCR (59.6%) than by isolation methods (0.8%). Comparison by PCR-based detection found no difference in the prevalence ofA. butzleri between diarrheic (56.7%) and nondiarrheic (45.5%) individuals. Rates of detection in diarrheic stools peaked in June (71.1%) and October (68.7%), but there was no statistically significant correlation between the presence ofA. butzleri and patient age, sex, or place of habitation. Densities ofA. butzleriDNA in diarrheic stools (1.6 ± 0.59 log10 copies mg(-1)) were higher (P= 0.007) than in nondiarrheic stools (1.3 ± 0.63 log10copies mg(-1)). Of the 892 diarrheic samples that were positive for A. butzleri, 74.1% were not positive for other bacterial and/or viral pathogens. The current study supports previous work suggesting that A. butzleri pathogenicity is strain specific and/or dependent on other factors, such as the level of host resistance.

  9. Development of a selective agar plate for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Jung-Su; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-17

    This study was conducted to develop a selective medium for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Campylobacter spp. (n=4), non-Campylobacter (showing positive results on Campylobacter selective agar) strains (n=49) isolated from fresh produce, indicator bacteria (n=13), and spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce (n=15) were plated on four Campylobacter selective media. Bolton agar and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) exhibited higher sensitivity for Campylobacter spp. than did Preston agar and Hunt agar, although certain non-Campylobacter strains isolated from fresh produce by using a selective agar isolation method, were still able to grow on Bolton agar and mCCDA. To inhibit the growth of non-Campylobacter strains, Bolton agar and mCCDA were supplemented with 5 antibiotics (rifampicin, polymyxin B, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyruvate, ferrous sulfate) and the growth of Campylobacter spp. (n=7) and non-Campylobacter strains (n=44) was evaluated. Although Bolton agar supplemented with rifampicin (BR agar) exhibited a higher selectivity for Campylobacter spp. than did mCCDA supplemented with antibiotics, certain non-Campylobacter strains were still able to grow on BR agar (18.8%). When BR agar with various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were tested with Campylobacter spp. (n=8) and non-Campylobacter (n=7), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was inhibitory against 3 of 7 non-Campylobacter strains. Finally, we validated the use of BR agar containing 50mg/L sulfamethoxazole (BRS agar) or 0.5mg/L ciprofloxacin (BRCS agar) and other selective agars for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and fresh produce. All chicken samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. when tested on mCCDA, BR agar, and BRS agar. In fresh produce samples, BRS agar exhibited the highest selectivity for Campylobacter spp., demonstrating its suitability for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

  10. N-nitrosation of medicinal drugs catalysed by bacteria from human saliva and gastro-intestinal tract, including Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, D; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    1997-02-01

    Micro-organisms commonly present in human saliva and three DSM strains (Helicobacter pylori, Campylobacter jejuni and Neisseria cinerea), which can be isolated from the human gastro-intestinal tract, were assayed in vitro for their capacity to catalyse N-nitrosation of a series of medicinal drugs and other compounds. Following incubation at pH 7.2 in the presence of nitrate (or nitrite) for up to 24 (48) h, the yield of N-nitroso compounds (NOC) was quantified by HPLC equipped with a post-column derivatization device, allowing the sensitive detection of acid-labile and acid-stable NOC. Eleven out of the 23 test compounds underwent bacteria-catalysed nitrosation by salivary bacteria, the yield of the respective nitrosation products varying 800-fold. 4-(Methylamino)antipyrine exhibited the highest rate of nitrosation, followed by dichlofenac > metamizole > piperazine > five other drugs, whilst L-proline and L-thioproline had the lowest nitrosation rate. Ten drugs including aminophenazone, cimetidine and nicotine, did not inhibit bacterial growth, allowing transitory nitrite to be formed, but no N-nitroso derivatives were detected. Three drugs inhibited the proliferation of bacteria and neither nitrite nor any NOC were formed. Using metamizole as an easily nitrosatable precursor, two strains, Campylobacter jejuni and Helicobacter pylori, were shown to catalyse nitrosation in the presence of nitrite at pH 7.2. As compared to Neisseria cinerea used as a nitrosation-proficient control strain, H. pylori was 30-100 times less effective, whilst C. jejuni had intermediary activity. The results of our sensitive nitrosation assay further confirm that bacteria isolated from human sources, possessing nitrate reductase and/or nitrosating enzymes such as cytochrome cd1-nitrite reductase (Calmels et al., Carcinogenesis, 17, 533-536, 1996), can contribute to intragastric nitrosamine formation in the anacidic stomach when nitrosatable precursors from exogenous and endogenous sources

  11. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  12. Campylobacter species in animal, food, and environmental sources, and relevant testing programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongsheng; Brooks, Brian W; Lowman, Ruff; Carrillo, Catherine D

    2015-10-01

    Campylobacter species, particularly thermophilic campylobacters, have emerged as a leading cause of human foodborne gastroenteritis worldwide, with Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, and Campylobacter lari responsible for the majority of human infections. Although most cases of campylobacteriosis are self-limiting, campylobacteriosis represents a significant public health burden. Human illness caused by infection with campylobacters has been reported across Canada since the early 1970s. Many studies have shown that dietary sources, including food, particularly raw poultry and other meat products, raw milk, and contaminated water, have contributed to outbreaks of campylobacteriosis in Canada. Campylobacter spp. have also been detected in a wide range of animal and environmental sources, including water, in Canada. The purpose of this article is to review (i) the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in animals, food, and the environment, and (ii) the relevant testing programs in Canada with a focus on the potential links between campylobacters and human health in Canada.

  13. Helicobacter infection in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Ying Xuan; Ning Li; Xin Qiang; Rong-Rong Zhou; Yong-Xin Shi; Wen-Jie Jiang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether Helicobacter species (Helicobacter spp.) could be detected in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue.METHODS: Liver samples from 28 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosed by histopathology were studied. Twenty-two patients with other liver diseases (5 with liver trauma, 7 with cavernous liver hemangioma, 6 with liver cyst and 4 with hepatolithiasis), 25 patients with gastric cancer, 15 with colonic cancer and 15 with myoma of uterus served as controls. Two piceces of biopsy were obtained from each patient. One was cultured for Helicobacter spp. and extraction of DNA, the other was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and in situ hybridization. The samples were cultured on Columbia agar plates with microaerobic techniques. Helicobacter spp. in biopsy from the studied subjects was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with Helicobacter spp. 16S rRNA primers. Amplified products were identified by Southern hybridization and sequenced further. Besides, other genes (vacA, cagA) specific for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) were also detected by PCR. Helicobacter spp. in biopsies was observed by SEM. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was performed to identify the cultured positive Helicobacter spp. The presence of Helicobacter spp. was detected by in situ hybridization to confirm the type of Helicobacter.RESULTS: The positive rate of Helicobacter cultured in HCC and gastric cancer tissue was 10.7% (3/28) and 24%(6/25), respectively. Helicobacter microorganisms were identified further by typical appearance on Gram staining, positive urease test and characteristic colony morphology on TEM. The bacterium was observed in adjacent hepatocytes of the two HCC samples by SEM.The number of cocci was greater than that of bacilli. The bacterium was also found in four gastric cancer samples.PCR showed that the positive rate of HCC and gastric cancer samples was 60.7% and 72% respectively, while the controls were negative

  14. Arsenic Resistance and Prevalence of Arsenic Resistance Genes in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Isolated from Retail Meats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed K. Fakhr

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies that investigate arsenic resistance in the foodborne bacterium Campylobacter are limited. A total of 552 Campylobacter isolates (281 Campylobacter jejuni and 271 Campylobacter coli isolated from retail meat samples were subjected to arsenic resistance profiling using the following arsenic compounds: arsanilic acid (4–2,048 μg/mL, roxarsone (4–2048 μg/mL, arsenate (16–8,192 μg/mL and arsenite (4–2,048 μg/mL. A total of 223 of these isolates (114 Campylobacter jejuni and 109 Campylobacter coli were further analyzed for the presence of five arsenic resistance genes (arsP, arsR, arsC, acr3, and arsB by PCR. Most of the 552 Campylobacter isolates were able to survive at higher concentrations of arsanilic acid (512–2,048 μg/mL, roxarsone (512–2,048 μg/mL, and arsenate (128–1,024 μg/mL, but at lower concentrations for arsenite (4–16 μg/mL. Ninety seven percent of the isolates tested by PCR showed the presence of arsP and arsR genes. While 95% of the Campylobacter coli isolates contained a larger arsenic resistance operon that has all of the four genes (arsP, arsR, arsC and acr3, 85% of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates carried the short operon (arsP, and arsR. The presence of arsC and acr3 did not significantly increase arsenic resistance with the exception of conferring resistance to higher concentrations of arsenate to some Campylobacter isolates. arsB was prevalent in 98% of the tested Campylobacter jejuni isolates, regardless of the presence or absence of arsC and acr3, but was completely absent in Campylobacter coli. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine arsenic resistance and the prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in such a large number of Campylobacter isolates.

  15. Arsenic Resistance and Prevalence of Arsenic Resistance Genes in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Isolated from Retail Meats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormohamed, Aneesa; Fakhr, Mohamed K.

    2013-01-01

    Studies that investigate arsenic resistance in the foodborne bacterium Campylobacter are limited. A total of 552 Campylobacter isolates (281 Campylobacter jejuni and 271 Campylobacter coli) isolated from retail meat samples were subjected to arsenic resistance profiling using the following arsenic compounds: arsanilic acid (4–2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (4–2048 μg/mL), arsenate (16–8,192 μg/mL) and arsenite (4–2,048 μg/mL). A total of 223 of these isolates (114 Campylobacter jejuni and 109 Campylobacter coli) were further analyzed for the presence of five arsenic resistance genes (arsP, arsR, arsC, acr3, and arsB) by PCR. Most of the 552 Campylobacter isolates were able to survive at higher concentrations of arsanilic acid (512–2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (512–2,048 μg/mL), and arsenate (128–1,024 μg/mL), but at lower concentrations for arsenite (4–16 μg/mL). Ninety seven percent of the isolates tested by PCR showed the presence of arsP and arsR genes. While 95% of the Campylobacter coli isolates contained a larger arsenic resistance operon that has all of the four genes (arsP, arsR, arsC and acr3), 85% of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates carried the short operon (arsP, and arsR). The presence of arsC and acr3 did not significantly increase arsenic resistance with the exception of conferring resistance to higher concentrations of arsenate to some Campylobacter isolates. arsB was prevalent in 98% of the tested Campylobacter jejuni isolates, regardless of the presence or absence of arsC and acr3, but was completely absent in Campylobacter coli. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine arsenic resistance and the prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in such a large number of Campylobacter isolates. PMID:23965921

  16. Arsenic resistance and prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolated from retail meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noormohamed, Aneesa; Fakhr, Mohamed K

    2013-08-07

    Studies that investigate arsenic resistance in the foodborne bacterium Campylobacter are limited. A total of 552 Campylobacter isolates (281 Campylobacter jejuni and 271 Campylobacter coli) isolated from retail meat samples were subjected to arsenic resistance profiling using the following arsenic compounds: arsanilic acid (4-2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (4-2048 μg/mL), arsenate (16-8,192 μg/mL) and arsenite (4-2,048 μg/mL). A total of 223 of these isolates (114 Campylobacter jejuni and 109 Campylobacter coli) were further analyzed for the presence of five arsenic resistance genes (arsP, arsR, arsC, acr3, and arsB) by PCR. Most of the 552 Campylobacter isolates were able to survive at higher concentrations of arsanilic acid (512-2,048 μg/mL), roxarsone (512-2,048 μg/mL), and arsenate (128-1,024 μg/mL), but at lower concentrations for arsenite (4-16 μg/mL). Ninety seven percent of the isolates tested by PCR showed the presence of arsP and arsR genes. While 95% of the Campylobacter coli isolates contained a larger arsenic resistance operon that has all of the four genes (arsP, arsR, arsC and acr3), 85% of the Campylobacter jejuni isolates carried the short operon (arsP, and arsR). The presence of arsC and acr3 did not significantly increase arsenic resistance with the exception of conferring resistance to higher concentrations of arsenate to some Campylobacter isolates. arsB was prevalent in 98% of the tested Campylobacter jejuni isolates, regardless of the presence or absence of arsC and acr3, but was completely absent in Campylobacter coli. To our knowledge, this is the first study to determine arsenic resistance and the prevalence of arsenic resistance genes in such a large number of Campylobacter isolates.

  17. Climate variability and campylobacter infection: an international study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari Kovats, R.; Edwards, Sally J.; Charron, Dominique; Cowden, John; D'Souza, Rennie M.; Ebi, Kristie L.; Gauci, Charmaine; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Hajat, Shakoor; Hales, Simon; Hernández Pezzi, Gloria; Kriz, Bohumir; Kutsar, Kuulo; McKeown, Paul; Mellou, Kassiani; Menne, Bettina; O'Brien, Sarah; Pelt, Wilfrid; Schmid, Hans

    2005-03-01

    Campylobacter is among the most important agents of enteritis in developed countries. We have described the potential environmental determinants of the seasonal pattern of infection with campylobacter in Europe, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Specifically, we investigated the role of climate variability on laboratory-confirmed cases of campylobacter infection from 15 populations. Regression analysis was used to quantify the associations between timing of seasonal peaks in infection in space and time. The short-term association between weekly weather and cases was also investigated using Poisson regression adapted for time series data. All countries in our study showed a distinct seasonality in campylobacter transmission, with many, but not all, populations showing a peak in spring. Countries with milder winters have peaks of infection earlier in the year. The timing of the peak of infection is weakly associated with high temperatures 3 months previously. Weekly variation in campylobacter infection in one region of the UK appeared to be little affected by short-term changes in weather patterns. The geographical variation in the timing of the seasonal peak suggests that climate may be a contributing factor to campylobacter transmission. The main driver of seasonality of campylobacter remains elusive and underscores the need to identify the major serotypes and routes of transmission for this disease.

  18. Presence of Campylobacter spp. in refrigerated chicken cuts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Alves

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter spp. is a common cause of bacterial food-borne illness. Birds, especially poultry are primary reservoirs of C. jejuni. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in chicken cuts purchased in supermarkets of Londrina, Parana. A total of 50 samples of chicken cuts, such as breasts, thighs and drumsticks were analyzed. The confirmation of the presence of Campylobacter spp. was performed by identifying the suspected colonies on the selective medium using the polymerase chain reaction. Of the 50 samples analyzed, 28 (56% were positive for Campylobacter spp. Chicken meat, as observed in this study, is a possible source of Campylobacter transmission to humans. This study alerts for the importance to analyze the occurrence of Campylobacter in chicken meat, due to the significant number of positive samples observed and no available epidemiological data in Brazil. The correct orientation about handling and cooking of chicken meat is also necessary to prevent human infection by Campylobacter spp.

  19. Prevalence of Campylobacter concisus in diarrhoea of immunocompromised patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, Rune; Permin, Henrik; On, Stephen L.W.;

    2002-01-01

    The importance of Campylobacter species other than C. jejuni/coli in diarrhoeal disease is largely unknown. We wished to determine the prevalence and clinical presentation of C. concisus infection in patients with enteric disease in a tertiary hospital. Stool specimens were routinely tested...... for the presence of Campylobacter species, by use of the filter isolation method. The medical records of the C. concisus-positive patients were reviewed. Of 224 Campylobacter isolates obtained, 110 were identified as C. concisus. Concomitant infection occurred in only 27% of cases. 13 means of protein profiling we...

  20. Spatio-temporal patterns of Campylobacter colonization in Danish broilers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdhury, S; Themudo, G E; Sandberg, M;

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite a number of risk-factor studies in different countries, the epidemiology of Campylobacter colonization in broilers, particularly spatial dependencies, is still not well understood. A series of analyses (visualization and exploratory) were therefore conducted in order to obtain...... a better understanding of the spatial and temporal distribution of Campylobacter in the Danish broiler population. In this study, we observed a non-random temporal occurrence of Campylobacter, with high prevalence during summer and low during winter. Significant spatio-temporal clusters were identified...

  1. Chronic diarrhea associated with Campylobacter jejuni infection in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J G; Claps, M; Beaucage, C M

    1986-08-15

    Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from a cat with chronic diarrhea. The diarrheic cat and another cat (which previously had diarrhea) in the same household had bactericidal antibody titers to the C jejuni. Clinical response to antibiotic therapy and not recovering Campylobacter sp from normal feces after treatment also supported the diagnosis of Campylobacter-associated diarrhea. Although the owner had a protracted episode of diarrhea, C jejuni was not isolated from the owner's feces, nor was a bactericidal antibody detected in the owner's serum.

  2. Campylobacter spp. as a foodborne pathogen: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana eSilva

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter is well recognized as the leading cause of bacterial foodborne diarrheal disease worldwide, causing mild to severe symptoms including serious infections of the extremities and permanent neurological symptoms. The organism is a cytochrome oxidase positive, microaerophilic, curved Gram-negative rod exhibiting corkscrew motility and is carried in the intestine of many wild and domestic animals, particularly avian species including poultry, where the intestine is colonized resulting in healthy animals as carriers. This review aims to elucidate and discuss the i genus Campylobacter, growth and survival characteristics; ii detection, isolation and confirmation of Campylobacter; iii campylobacteriosis and presence of virulence factors and iv colonization of poultry and control strategies.

  3. Quantitative microbiological data analysis of a Campylobacter vaccination trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Clavero, Ana Belén; Bahrndorff, Simon; Hald, Birthe

    Campylobacter jejuni is considered the main pathogen causing human campylobacteriosis and poultry has been identified as one of the main risk factors. Strategies that aim to control Campylobacter in poultry such as vaccination strategies could reduce the incidence of human campylobacteriosis....... The objective of the present trial was to assess whether or not a vaccine candidate could give a 2 logs reduction of the numbers of Campylobacter in broilers. Sample size calculations indicated the use of 400 animals (200 vaccinated and 200 controls). The experiment was conducted in four different rotations...

  4. Oral Campylobacter species: Initiators of a subgroup of inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li

    2015-08-21

    In recent years, a number of studies detected a significantly higher prevalence of Campylobacter species such as Campylobacter concisus (C. concisus) in intestinal biopsies and fecal samples collected from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to controls. Most of these Campylobacter species are not of zoonotic origin but are human oral Campylobacter species. Bacterial species usually cause diseases in the location where they colonize. However, C. concisus and other oral Campylobacter species are associated with IBD occurring at the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting that these Campylobacter species may have unique virulence factors that are expressed in the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract.

  5. Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli and their biotypes in beef and dairy cattle from the south of Chile Ocorrência de Campylobacter jejuni e Campylobacter coli e seus biotipos em bovinos de corte e de leite no sul do Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Fernández

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli and their biotypes in beef and dairy cattle from the South of Chile was established. Campylobacter were statistically more prevalent among beef cattle (35.9% than among dairy cattle (21.3%, being C. jejuni the species most frequently isolated.Foi estabelecida a prevalência de Campylobacter jejuni e Campylobacter coli e seus biotipos, em bovinos de corte e de leite do sul do Chile. Campylobacter foi estatisticamente mais prevalente nos bovinos de corte (35,9% do que nos bovinos de leite (21,3%, sendo C. jejuni a espécie mais frequentemente isolada.

  6. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  7. Filamentation of Campylobacter in broth cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nacheervan M Ghaffar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The transition from rod to filamentous cell morphology has been identified as a response to stressful conditions in many bacterial species and has been ascribed to confer certain survival advantages. Filamentation of Campylobacter jejuni was demonstrated to occur spontaneously on entry in to stationary phase distinguishing it from many other bacteria where a reduction in size is more common. The aim of this study was to investigate the cues that give rise to filamentation of C. jejuni and C. coli and gain insights into the process. Using minimal medium, augmentation of filamentation occurred and it was observed that this morphological change was wide spread amongst C. jejuni strains tested but was not universal in C. coli strains. Filamentation did not appear to be due to release of diffusible molecules, toxic metabolites, or be in response to oxidative stress in the medium. Separated filaments exhibited greater intracellular ATP contents (2.66 to 17.4 fg than spiral forms (0.99 to 1.7 fg and showed enhanced survival in water at 4oC and 37oC compared to spiral cells. These observations support the conclusion that the filaments are adapted to survive extra-intestinal environments. Differences in cell morphology and physiology need to be considered in the context of the design of experimental studies and the methods adopted for the isolation of campylobacters from food, clinical and environmental sources.

  8. Use of phages to control Campylobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janež, Nika; Loc-Carrillo, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    The use of phages to control pathogenic bacteria has been investigated since they were first discovered in the beginning of the 1900s. Over the last century we have slowly gained an in-depth understanding of phage biology including which phage properties are desirable when considering phage as biocontrol agents and which phage characteristics to potentially avoid. Campylobacter infections are amongst the most frequently encountered foodborne bacterial infections around the world. Handling and consumption of raw or undercooked poultry products have been determined to be the main route of transmission. The ability to use phages to target these bacteria has been studied for more than a decade and although we have made progress towards deciphering how best to use phages to control Campylobacter associated with poultry production, there is still much work to be done. This review outlines methods to improve the isolation of these elusive phages, as well as methods to identify desirable characteristics needed for a successful outcome. It also highlights the body of research undertaken so far and what criteria to consider when doing in-vivo studies, especially because some in-vitro studies have not been found to translate into to phage efficacy in-vivo.

  9. Campylobacter fetus infections in humans : exposure and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Bergen, Marcel A P; Blaser, Martin J; Tauxe, Robert V; Newell, Diane G; van Putten, Jos P M

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus can cause intestinal illness and, occasionally, severe systemic infections. Infections mainly affect persons at higher risk, including elderly and immunocompromised individuals and those with occupational exposure to infected animals. Outbreaks are infrequent but have provided in

  10. Semi-quantitative method to estimate levels of Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Research projects utilizing live animals and/or systems often require reliable, accurate quantification of Campylobacter following treatments. Even with marker strains, conventional methods designed to quantify are labor and material intensive requiring either serial dilutions or MPN ...

  11. Campylobacter coli infection in pet birds in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipineto, Ludovico; Borrelli, Luca; Pace, Antonino; Romano, Violante; D'Orazio, Stefano; Varriale, Lorena; Russo, Tamara Pasqualina; Fioretti, Alessandro

    2017-01-06

    Avian species are considered as the main reservoir of Campylobacter spp. However, few data are available on the presence of this microorganism in pet birds. This study was therefore performed to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in pet birds bred in southern Italy. Faecal samples were collected from 88 cages housing different species of pet birds and examined by bacteriological culture and polymerase chain reaction. A total of 13.6% of the cage samples were positive for Campylobacter coli. Other Campylobacter spp. were not found. The study shows that C. coli can be isolated from the cages of apparently healthy pet birds, which should therefore be considered as potential carriers of C. coli and a possible source of infection for humans and companion animals.

  12. Campylobacter concisus: an evaluation of certain phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J.; Bang, D. D.; Aabenhus, R.;

    2005-01-01

    The clinical relevance of Campylobacter concisus in gastrointestinal disease has not been determined definitively. This study investigated the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of 39 C. concisus isolates from Danish patients with diarrhoea, three isolates from healthy individuals and the t...

  13. Resistance to quinolones in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from Danish broilers at farm level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl; Wedderkopp, A.

    2003-01-01

    Aims : To investigate the prevalence of quinolone resistance among Campylobacter jejuni and Camp. coli isolates from Danish poultry at the farm level, as well as for the whole country. Methods and Results : Data and isolates were collected from a national surveillance of Campylobacter in poultry....... Quinolone resistance was investigated by determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to nalidixic acid and enrofloxacin. Among Camp. jejuni and Camp. coli combined, 7.5% were resistant to nalidixic acid. Quinolone resistance varied considerably from farm to farm, with 0% on some farms and almost...... 100% on others, but the resistance was evenly distributed geographically. With respect to isolates from farms where resistance was detected, quinolone resistance was higher among Camp. coli (28.7%) than among Camp. jejuni (11.3%). PFGE typing of quinolone-resistant and quinolone-susceptible isolates...

  14. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Persons with Intellectual Disability in Residential Care in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joav Merrick

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (formerly Campylobacter pylori was identified in 1982 by researchers from Australia as a pathogenic factor in peptic ulcer disease. Due to the few studies on H. pylori infection conducted in the population of persons with intellectual disability it was decided to conduct a clinical study in Israel. The purpose of the study was to determine the occurrence of H. pylori infection in persons who presented with severe dyspeptic symptoms and to monitor clinically the effect of treatment. The Division for Mental Retardation in Israel provides service to 6,022 persons in 53 residential care centers and 1 in central Israel was selected for this pilot study. The study has been performed since 1999 and each patient who came to the medical clinic of the institution with severe dyspeptic symptoms was examined clinically and a blood specimen drawn for IgG antibodies to H. pylori (ELISA, Pharmatop Millenia. In case of positive serology, triple drug treatment (amoxycillin, metronidazole, and pantoprazole or omepra-zole was initiated for 1 week. Since 1999 a total of 43 persons (total population in care was 224 had severe dyspeptic symptoms and 42 persons (98%, 26 males, 16 females, mean age 45 years, mean institutionalization 20 years had Helicobacter infection. All patients were treated for 1 week, but six patients received an extra month of omeprazole due to persistent symptoms. At follow-up, clinically all patients had improvement and only seven still had minor complaints (83% treatment success. Persons with developmental disability, intellectual disability, or mental retardation in residential care presenting with severe dyspeptic symptoms had a high incidence of H. pylori infection. Therefore, we recommend serology or urea breath investigations in this population presenting with dyspeptic symptoms and triple drug treatment for 1 week in case of positive findings.

  15. Successful culture techniques for Helicobacter species: general culture techniques for Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Jeannette M; Merrell, D Scott

    2012-01-01

    Half of the world's population is persistently infected with Helicobacter pylori. The chronicity of this infection ultimately elicits clinical manifestations ranging from gastritis and peptic ulcers to adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Laboratory research following the initial observations of Helicobacter species was greatly hindered by an inability to isolate and culture the bacteria. Thus, the ability to culture bacterial species from this genus is an extremely important step in expanding clinical knowledge and development of therapies. This chapter describes successful techniques for culturing H. pylori on selective horse blood agar media and in Brucella broth liquid media. Additionally, the specific growth requirements of other Helicobacter species are noted.

  16. Identification of Novel Vaccine Candidates against Campylobacter through Reverse Vaccinology

    OpenAIRE

    Meunier, Marine; Guyard-Nicodème, Muriel; Hirchaud, Edouard; Parra, Alberto; Chemaly, Marianne; Dory, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent bacterial foodborne gastroenteritis affecting humans in the European Union. Human cases are mainly due to Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli, and contamination is associated with the handling and/or consumption of poultry meat. In fact, poultry constitutes the bacteria’s main reservoir. A promising way of decreasing the incidence of campylobacteriosis in humans would be to decrease avian colonization. Poultry vaccination is of potential for thi...

  17. [Evaluation of antigenic properties of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli proteins in a western-immunoblot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosz, Natalia; Waldemar, Rastawicki; Jagielski, Marek

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the most common bacterial cause for acute diarrheal illnesses in developed countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antigenic properties of Campylobacterjejuni and Campylobacter coli proteins in western-blot assay. Whole-cell components of Campulobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electroforesis. Using this method we detected in all seven C. jejuni strains 21 peptides migrating between 180-29 kDa. All three Ccoli strains had a 17 bands migrating with the same molecular weight range. Proteins were transferred electrophoretically to nitrocellulose paper for immunoblotting experiments. The 74 kDa protein reacted strongly in all classes ofimmmunoglobulin with all tested human serum samples. We observed that this protein reacted also with human immunoglobulins for Salmonella and Yersinia sp. This cross-reaction observed for this protein could give false positive results in routine diagnosis of C. jejuni infections. The proteins with molecular weight of: 92, 62, 56, 52, 45-43, 29 kDa were most recognized in the 20 human serum samples. The other proteins of Cljejuni and C. coli, particularly in the 68-50 kDa and 45-31 kDa regions, were recognized occasionally and the response to these in reconvalescent sera was usually weak. The result of this study showed that the proteins with molecular weight: 92, 62, 56, 52, 45-43 and 29 kDa can be use in routine serological diagnostic of campylobacteriosis.

  18. Microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Rokosz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are Gram-negative, microaerophilic bacteria which are worldwide in distribution, causing a zoonotic disease in humans called campylobacteriosis. These infections are mainly caused by eating contaminated food products, most often improperly prepared poultry meat. Campylobacteriosis usually takes the form of gastroenteritis, or inflammation of the intestines, and the characteristic symptoms are watery-mucous diarrhea often with the presence of blood in stool, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and fever. The epidemiological data suggest that in Europe, as well as in North America, bacteria of the genus Campylobacter, especially C. jejuni and C. coli, are the most commonly isolated pathogens in infections of the gastrointestinal tract in humans. Epidemiological data indicate that these organisms are a much more common cause of acute diarrhea, mostly in young children, than Salmonella and Yersinia. The lack of specific symptoms makes the diagnosis of campylobacteriosis necessary to carry out specialized microbiological diagnostics. Because so far these studies are performed in our country only in a few laboratories, the overwhelming number of cases of campylobacteriosis are not recorded in Polish epidemiological statistics. The purpose of this paper is to discuss issues related to the microbiological diagnosis of infections caused by C. jejuni and C. coli. It also describes the basic epidemiological and clinical data, as well as current treatment of campylobacteriosis.

  19. Phylogenetic diversity and position of the genus Campylobacter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, P. P.; DeBrunner-Vossbrinck, B.; Dunn, B.; Miotto, K.; MacDonnell, M. T.; Rollins, D. M.; Pillidge, C. J.; Hespell, R. B.; Colwell, R. R.; Sogin, M. L.; Fox, G. E.

    1987-01-01

    RNA sequence analysis has been used to examine the phylogenetic position and structure of the genus Campylobacter. A complete 5S rRNA sequence was determined for two strains of Campylobacter jejuni and extensive partial sequences of the 16S rRNA were obtained for several strains of C. jejuni and Wolinella succinogenes. In addition limited partial sequence data were obtained from the 16S rRNAs of isolates of C. coli, C. laridis, C. fetus, C. fecalis, and C. pyloridis. It was found that W. succinogenes is specifically related to, but not included, in the genus Campylobacter as presently constituted. Within the genus significant diversity was noted. C. jejuni, C. coli and C. laridis are very closely related but the other species are distinctly different from one another. C. pyloridis is without question the most divergent of the Campylobacter isolates examined here and is sufficiently distinct to warrant inclusion in a separate genus. In terms of overall position in bacterial phylogeny, the Campylobacter/Wolinella cluster represents a deep branching most probably located within an expanded version of the Division containing the purple photosynthetic bacteria and their relatives. The Campylobacter/Wolinella cluster is not specifically includable in either the alpha, beta or gamma subdivisions of the purple bacteria.

  20. Importance of Campylobacter jejuni for Food Safety and Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Cakmak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter spp. are microorganisms that can be found in nature in the entire domestic and wild animal’s intestinal flora including the poultry and the sea animals. Campylobacter can better colonize in the poultry than the other animals. Campylobacter jejuni is an important pathogen among the thermophilic Campylobacter spp. whose growth temperature’s are different than the other Campylobacter spp. and can cause serious gastroenteritis in human beings which in some cases ended up with death. Human beings are generally infected with C. jejuni mainly because of the poultry meat and products and rarely because of the red meat which are contaminated during preparation and serving stages. Inadequate cooking, consumption of poorly chlorinated drinking water or unpasteurized milk are other infection sources of C. jejuni. Campylobacteriosis especially affect children under 5 years of age and reported to be a zoonotic illness that cause acute gastroenteritis in human. In many countries, food sourced C. jejuni infections were reported to occur more frequently than Salmonella spp. infections. In order to avoid Campylobacter infections, it is very important to enforce food security programmes and HACCP like systems during growth, slaughterhouses and point of sales stages. Also adequate cooking of the products, hygiene of the kitchen and personnel are important. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(2.000: 157-166

  1. Detection of Campylobacter Bacteria in Air Samples for Continuous Real-Time Monitoring of Campylobacter Colonization in Broiler Flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Katja Nyholm; Lund, Marianne; Skov, J.;

    2009-01-01

    Improved monitoring tools are important for the control of Campylobacter bacteria in broiler production. In this study, we compare the sensitivities of detection of Campylobacter by PCR with feces, dust, and air samples during the lifetimes of broilers in two poultry houses and conclude...... that the sensitivity of detection of Campylobacter in air is comparable to that in other sample materials. Profiling of airborne particles in six poultry houses revealed that the aerodynamic conditions were dependent on the age of the chickens and very comparable among different poultry houses, with low proportions...... of particles in the 0.5- to 2-mu m-diameter range and high proportions in the 2- to 5-mu m-diameter range. Campylobacter could also be detected by PCR in air samples collected at the hanging stage during the slaughter process but not at the other stages tested at the slaughterhouse. The exploitation...

  2. Use of culture, PCR analysis, and DNA microarrays for detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli from chicken feces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keramas, Georgios; Bang, Dang Duong; Lund, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    . detection obtained with DNA microarrays were compared to those obtained by conventional culture and gel electrophoresis. By conventional culture, 60% of the samples were positive for either Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli. By PCR and capillary electrophoresis, 95% of the samples were positive...... for Campylobacter spp., whereas with DNA microarrays all samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. By application of DNA microarray analysis, the isolates in 4 samples (6%) could not be identified to the species level, whereas by PCR-capillary electrophoresis, the isolates in 12 samples (19%) remained...... unidentified. Interestingly, PCR-capillary electrophoresis analysis revealed that two (3%) of the samples were positive for both C. jejuni and C. coli, while DNA microarray analysis revealed that nine (14%) of the samples were positive for both species. Of 65 samples, 2 samples were identified to contain C...

  3. Variation in Campylobacter Mulilocus Sequence Typing Subtypes Detected on Three Different Plating Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: There are multiple selective plating media available for detection and enumeration of naturally occurring Campylobacter. Campylobacter produce colonies with differing morphology and characteristics depending on the plating medium used. It is unclear if choice of plating medium can a...

  4. Isolation method (direct plating or enrichment) does not affect antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter from chicken carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine if Campylobacter isolation method influenced antimicrobial susceptibility results, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of nine antimicrobials were compared for 291 pairs of Campylobacter isolates recovered from chicken carcass rinse samples using direct plating and an enrichment...

  5. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of thermophilic Campylobacter in organic and conventional broiler flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuer, Ole Eske; Pedersen, Karl; Andersen, J.S.;

    2001-01-01

    Aims: To determine the flock prevalence and to estimate the within flock prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks from different rearing systems, and to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter isolates to selected antimicrobial substances. Methods and Results: One hundred...

  6. Eugenol wash and chitosan based coating reduces Campylobacter jejuni counts on poultry products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter, a leading cause of foodborne illness globally in humans, is strongly associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry products. Unfortunately, current strategies to reduce Campylobacter counts in poultry have had limited success. Our study investigated the efficacy of eugenol ...

  7. Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptilesand Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Maarten J.; Miller, William G.; Yee, Emma; Zomer, Aldert; Graaf-Van Bloois, Van Der Linda; Fitzgerald, C.; Forbes, Ken J.; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, S.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Duim, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C. fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and molecular typing of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolates from ducks in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bai; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Kang, Min; Roh, Jae-Hee; Seo, Hye-Suk; Yoon, Ran-Hee; Jang, Hyung-Kwan

    2014-12-01

    Campylobacter is a food-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes human gastroenteritis worldwide. Campylobacter bacteria are commensal in the intestines of many food production animals, including ducks and chickens. The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of Campylobacter species in domestic ducks, and the agar dilution method was used to determine resistance of the isolates to eight antibiotics. In addition, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed to determine the sequence types (STs) of selected Campylobacter isolates. Between May and September 2012, 58 duck farms were analyzed, and 56 (96.6%) were positive for Campylobacter. Among the isolates, 82.1% were Campylobacter jejuni, 16.1% were C. coli, and one was unidentified by PCR. Of the 46 C. jejuni isolates, 87.0%, 10.9%, and 21.7% were resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and azithromycin, respectively. Among the C. coli isolates, all 9 strains were resistant to ampicillin, and 77.8% and 33.3% were resistant to ciprofloxacin and azithromycin, respectively. The majority of the Campylobacter isolates were classified as multidrug resistant. Twenty-eight STs were identified, including 20 STs for C. jejuni and 8 STs for C. coli. The most common clonal complexes in C. jejuni were the ST-21 complex and the ST-45 complex, while the ST-828 complex predominated in C. coli. The majority of isolates were of STs noted in ducks and humans from earlier studies, along with seven STs previously associated only with human disease. These STs overlapped between duck and human isolates, indicating that Campylobacter isolates from ducks should be considered potential sources of human infection.

  9. Effect of clavulanic acid on susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to eight beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, C L; Lariviere, L A; Lauzer, J C; Turgeon, F F

    1987-01-01

    The effect of clavulanic acid on the susceptibility of 32 strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to eight beta-lactam agents was studied. Almost all strains tested became susceptible to amoxicillin and ticarcillin with 1 microgram of clavulanic acid per ml. This compound had little or no effect on susceptibility to penicillin G, cephalothin, cefamandole, and cefoxitin. Clavulanic acid had a marginal effect on cefotaxime and moxalactam susceptibility. PMID:3619428

  10. Effect of clavulanic acid on susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to eight beta-lactam antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gaudreau, C L; Lariviere, L A; Lauzer, J C; Turgeon, F F

    1987-01-01

    The effect of clavulanic acid on the susceptibility of 32 strains of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli to eight beta-lactam agents was studied. Almost all strains tested became susceptible to amoxicillin and ticarcillin with 1 microgram of clavulanic acid per ml. This compound had little or no effect on susceptibility to penicillin G, cephalothin, cefamandole, and cefoxitin. Clavulanic acid had a marginal effect on cefotaxime and moxalactam susceptibility.

  11. Persistence of Arcobacter butzleri CCUG 30484 on plastic, stainless steel and glass surfaces Persistência de Arcobacter butzleri CCUG 30404 em superfícies de plástico, aço inox e vidro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libor Cervenka

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of A. butzleri CCUG 30484 on various surfaces under 32% and 64% relative humidity suspended in physiological saline or nutrient broth to simulate relatively clean or soiled conditions was studied using various isolation techniques. Our study revealed that A. butzleri CCUG 30484 cells were able to survive for a considerable period of time, even after the droplet of suspending medium has been visibly dried. An extended survival on polypropylene coupons at both humidity levels was observed, particularly at soiled conditions.Estudou-se a persistência de Arcobacter butzleri CCUG 30404 em várias superfícies de contato com alimentos a 32% e 64% de umidade relativa, suspenso em salina fisiológica e caldo nutriente para simular condições limpas e sujas. Nosso estudo indicou que A. butzleri CCUG 30404 foi capaz de sobreviver por longo tempo, mesmo após a secagem da gota. Observou-se que a sobrevivência for mais prolongada nos cupons de polipropileno, especialmente em condições sujas.

  12. Phenotyping of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by a quantitative antibiogram [MIC] typing scheme using Euclidean distances [QATED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldsmith Colin E

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enteropathogenic Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli are presently the most common cause of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. An understanding of sources and means of transmission of Campylobacter is an essential factor in order to reduce the incidence of Campylobacter-related gastroenteritis in man. Consequently a reproducible, sensitive and well-standardised typing scheme is critical in the successful discrimination of strains and in the subsequent investigations of outbreaks. For this purpose, a phenotypic typing scheme based on quantitative antibiogram determination based on Euclidean distance (QATED, was developed. Results and Conclusion The results obtained with this typing scheme demonstrated that individual livers of colonized pigs could be infected with multiple strains of Campylobacter spp. and subspecies types. In conclusion, phenotyping of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli by QATED is a simple, inexpensive and discriminatory sub-species characterisation scheme, which may be useful in primary diagnostic clinical laboratories, where no specialist Campylobacter phenotyping or molecular genotyping schemes exist. It is especially suitable for food-bome outbreak investigations in the community, where a rapid and local response is required to aid with public health epidemiological investigations.

  13. Complete genome sequence of the Campylobacter iguaniorum strain RM11343, isolated from an alpaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter iguaniorum is a member of the C. fetus group of campylobacters and is one of two Campylobacter taxa isolated from reptiles. This study describes the whole-genome sequence of the C. iguaniorum strain RM11343, which was isolated from a California alpaca fecal sample....

  14. Danish strategies to control Campylobacter in broilers and broiler meat: facts and effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Boysen, Louise; Galliano, C.;

    2009-01-01

    Thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. have been the most common bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal disease in Denmark since 1999. In 2003, the Danish voluntary strategy to control Campylobacter was intensified. The focus was on biosecurity, allocation of meat from Campylobacter-negative broilers...

  15. Isolation and characterization of Campylobacter spp. from Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) at Deception Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Peña, F J; Pérez-Boto, D; Jiménez, C; San Miguel, E; Echeita, A; Rengifo-Herrera, C; García-Párraga, D; Ortega-Mora, L M; Pedraza-Díaz, S

    2010-09-01

    The presence of Campylobacter spp. was investigated in 41 Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella) and 9 Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) at Deception Island, Antarctica. Infections were encountered in six Antarctic fur seals. The isolates, the first reported from marine mammals in the Antarctic region, were identified as Campylobacter insulaenigrae and Campylobacter lari.

  16. Beta-resorcylic acid reduces Campylobacter jejuni in post-harvest poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Campylobacter infections, a leading food borne illnesses globally, has been linked with high prevalence of this bacterium in retail chicken meat. Reduction of Campylobacter in poultry will greatly reduce the risk of this disease. Unfortunately, strategies employed to reduce Campylobacter in li...

  17. Isolation and detection of Campylobacter jejuni from chicken fecal samples by immunomagnetic separation–PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Ly, Tram Thuy; Cao, Cuong; Høgberg, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is one of the leading causes of bacterial food-borne disease worldwide. The presence of Campylobacter in chicken feces poses a high risk for contamination of chicken meat and for Campylobacter infections in human. Detection of this bacterium in chicken fecal...

  18. Presence of Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. in Wild Small Mammals on Organic Farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Jacobs-Reitsma, W.F.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Kijlstra, A.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of Salmonella and Campylobacter spp. in rodents and insectivores (n = 282) was investigated on organic farms. Infections were encountered in house mice (8 of 83 Campylobacter positive and 1 of 83 Salmonella sp. strain Livingstone positive) and brown rats (1 of 8 Campylobacter positive)

  19. Cost-effectiveness of Campylobacter interventions on broiler farms in six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Wagenberg, C.P.A.; van Horne, P.L.M.; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard

    2016-01-01

    Broilers are an important reservoir for human Campylobacter infections, one of the leading causes of acute diarrheal disease in humans worldwide. Therefore, it is relevant to control Campylobacter on broiler farms. This study estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of eight Campylobacter interven...

  20. 食品中弓形菌16S rRNA特异性扩增检测方法的建立%Development of a specific amplification method of Arcobacter 16S rRNA gene in foods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    针对弓形菌16SrRNA基因合成1对引物,通过对聚合酶链式反应(PCR)扩增条件的优化,建立了检测弓形菌的PCR方法。3株弓形菌标准菌株PCR产物测序结果与NCBI上公布的弓形菌16S rRNA基因序列进行比对,比对结果表明3株弓形菌测序结果与NCBI上公布的弓形菌16S rRNA基因序列同源性均在99%以上。3株弓形菌标准菌株均特异性地扩增出了长度为1202bp的片段,其他19株不同种类的菌株均无扩增产物出现。55份食品样品用Johnson-Murano肉汤增菌后用此法进行检测,其中6份样品为弓形菌阳性,阳性率为10.9%。上述实验结果表明,方法特异性强、操作简便,节省了检测时间,可用于食品中弓形菌的快速检测。%One pair of primers were used to amplify 16S rRNA sequence of Arcobacter,and a PCR method for detection of Arcobacter was developed with optimization of PCR amplification conditions.PCR products of 3 different Arcobacter type strains were sequenced and compared with 16S rRNA genes of Arcobacter published on NCBI.It's proved that the homology between the PCR products and 16S rRNA genes of Arcobacter published were all above 99%.3 different type strains of Arcobacter produced a 1202 bp amplified band,while all of the other 19 different bacteria didn't produced any band.55 food samples were detected whether Arcobacter present or not by the PCR method following enrichment in Johnson-Murano broth,and 6 samples were detected positive for this microorganism,namely with the positive ratio of 10.9%.The result suggested that the method developed was specific,easy to operate and timesaving,and could be used for rapid detection of Arcobacter in foods.

  1. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, J.D.; Maxcy, R.B.

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 10/sup 0/C, at 0-5/sup 0/C, and at 30 +/- 10/sup 0/C. Irradiation at -30/sup 0/C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D/sub 10/ value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D/sub 10/ values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures.

  2. Relationship between childhood asthma andHelicobacter pyloriinfection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the correlation between childhood asthma andHelicobacter pylori infection.Methods: A total of 80 children with asthma who were treated in our hospital from May 2012 to May 2015 were selected as the research subjects, and 40 cases of healthy children were selected as control group, theHelicobacter pylori infection of the two groups of patients were compared, the double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the serumHelicobacter pylori-IgG,Helicobacter pylori-CagAIgG, IL-4,Helicobacter pylori, IFN-γ and IL-1β,etc., and the correlation betweenHelicobacter pylori infection and asthma was analyzed.Results:The positive rates ofHelicobacter pylori infection in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly higher than those in control group and children in remission stage (P<0.05). The positive rates of serumHelicobacter pylori-IgG and Helicobacter pylori-CagAIgG in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly lower than those in control group and children in remission stage (P<0.05). The serum levels of IFN-γ in asthma group and children in attack stage were significantly lower than those in control group and children in remission stage, IL-4 and IL-1β levels in the former were significantly higher than those in the latter (P<0.05).Helicobacter pyloriinfection positive had significant positive correlation with IL-1β concentration (r=0.75,P<0.05).Conclusions:Helicobacter pylori infection in children has significant positive correlation with the incidence of asthma, suggesting thatHelicobacter pylori infection has a certain protective effect on childhood asthma, but persistentHelicobacter pyloriinfection in children with asthma can aggravate the immune disorder, which is the main reason for the difficulty of treatment of asthma.

  3. Arcobacter butzleri induces a pro-inflammatory response in THP-1 derived macrophages and has limited ability for intracellular survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Bruegge, Jennifer; Hanisch, Carlos; Einspanier, Ralf; Alter, Thomas; Gölz, Greta; Sharbati, Soroush

    2014-11-01

    Recent case reports have identified Arcobacter (A.) butzleri to be another emerging pathogen of the family Campylobacteraceae causing foodborne diseases. However, little is known about its interaction with the human immune system. As macrophages act as first defense against bacterial infections, we studied for the first time the impact of A. butzleri on human macrophages using THP-1 derived macrophages as an in vitro infection model. Our investigations considered the inflammatory response, intracellular survival and activation of caspases as potential virulence mechanisms employed by A. butzleri. Induction of IL-1α, IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12ß and TNFα demonstrated a pro-inflammatory response of infected macrophages towards A. butzleri. gentamycin protection assays revealed the ability of A. butzleri strains to survive and resist the hostile environment of phagocytic immune cells for up to 22 h. Moreover, initial activation of intitiator- (CASP8) as well as effector caspases (CASP3/7) was observed without the onset of DNA damage, suggesting a potential counter regulation. Intriguingly, we recognized distinct strain specific differences in invasion and survival capabilities. This suggests the existence of isolate dependent phenotype variations and different virulence potentials as known for other intestinal pathogens such as Salmonella enterica ssp.

  4. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, G; Acuña, R; Troncoso, M; Portell, D P; Toledo, M S; Valenzuela, J

    1997-11-01

    This article summarizes studies designed to evaluate the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in Chile, described in 21 reports from nine centers in various Chilean regions published between 1985 and 1995. According to their data, H. pylori infection is quite frequent among patients with a variety of gastric conditions, including adults (43%-92%) and children (6%-100%). Levels of specific IgG antibodies to H. pylori are also elevated among patients with duodenal ulcers (100%) and gastritis (86%) as well as asymptomatic adults (75%). Combination therapy with three (but not two) drugs has been proved effective, with clinical improvement, ulcer cure, and H. pylori eradication occurring in well-controlled studies. Available evidence suggests that antibiotic resistance is not a major problem in treatment. The H. pylori reinfection rate is low (4.2% per year), suggesting that combination therapy with three drugs constitutes a cost-effective alternative for treating colonized symptomatic patients. Concurrent preliminary studies revealed that antibodies to VacA but not CagA proteins correlate with disease severity in Chilean patients. It can be concluded that local research assists local administrators of health resources to implement adequate policies to prevent, control, and treat H. pylori-related pathologies.

  6. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzung-Shiun; Hu, Huang-Ming; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Kuo, Chao-Hung

    2014-04-01

    Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection has become an important issue recently, because this bacterial species cluster can cause many gastrointestinal diseases. Elevated antibiotic resistance is related to an increasing failure rate of H. pylori eradication. Standard triple therapy is still the first-line therapy; however, according to the Maastricht IV Consensus Report, it should be abandoned in areas of high clarithromycin resistance. Alternative first-line therapies include bismuth-containing quadruple therapy, sequential, concomitant, and hybrid therapies. Quinolone-based triple therapy may be considered as first-line therapy in areas of clarithromycin resistance >15-20% and quinolone resistance <10%. Unique second-line therapy is still unclear, and bismuth-containing quadruple therapy or levofloxacin-based triple therapy can be used as rescue treatment. Third-line therapy should be under culture guidance to select the most effective regimens (such as levofloxacin-based, rifabutin-based, or furazolidone-based therapies). Antibiotics resistance, patient compliance, and CYP 2C19 genotypes could influence the outcome. Clinicians should use antibiotics according to local reports.

  7. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  8. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection.

  9. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Qing Wang; Ying-Nin Xin; Ni Li; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic sequences have been determined for a number of strains of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and related bacteria.With the development of microarray analysis and the wide use of subtractive hybridization techniques,comparative studies have been carried out with respect to the interstrain differences between H pylori and inter-species differences in the genome of related bacteria.It was found that the core genome of H pylori constitutes 1111 genes that are determinants of the species properties.A great pool of auxillary genes are mainly from the categories of cag pathogenicity islands,outer membrane proteins,restriction-modification system and hypothetical proteins of unknown function.Persistence of H pylori in the human stomach leads to the diversification of the genome.Comparative genomics suggest that a host jump has occurs from humans to felines.Candidate genes specific for the development of the gastric diseases were identified.With the aid of proteomics,population genetics and other molecular methods,future comparative genomic studies would dramatically promote our understanding of the evolution,pathogenesis and microbiology of H pylori.

  10. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  11. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  12. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event.

  13. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Oderda

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. It is accepted as the major cause of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, carcinoma of the distal part of the stomach and gastric lymphoma. However, how and when the infection is acquired remain largely unknown. Identification of mode of transmission is vital for developing preventive measures to interrupt its spread, but studies focused on this issue are difficult to implement. From epidemiological studies, it is known that there are great differences in the prevalence of infection in different populations and in ethnic groups originating from high prevalence regions. This is likely related to inferior hygienic conditions and sanitation. In developing countries, infection occurs at a much earlier age. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is related to poor socioeconomic conditions, particularly density of living. Humans seem to be the only reservoir of H pylori, which spread from person to person by oral-oral, fecal-oral or gastro-oral routes. Most infections are acquired in childhood, possibly from parents or other children living as close contacts. Infection from the environment or from animals cannot be entirely excluded.

  14. Campylobacter epidemiology from breeders to their progeny in Eastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingresa-Capaccioni, S; Jiménez-Trigos, E; Marco-Jiménez, F; Catalá, P; Vega, S; Marin, C

    2016-03-01

    While horizontal transmission is a route clearly linked to the spread of Campylobacter at the farm level, few studies support the transmission of Campylobacter spp. from breeder flocks to their offspring. Thus, the present study was carried out to investigate the possibility of vertical transmission. Breeders were monitored from the time of housing day-old chicks, then throughout the laying period (0 to 60 wk) and throughout their progeny (broiler fattening, 1 to 42 d) until slaughter. All samples were analyzed according with official method ISO 10272:2006. Results revealed that on breeder farms, Campylobacter isolation started from wk 16 and reached its peak at wk 26, with 57.0% and 93.2% of positive birds, respectively. After this point, the rate of positive birds decreased slightly to 86.0% at 60 wk. However, in broiler production all day-old chicks were found negative for Campylobacter spp, and the bacteria was first isolated at d 14 of age (5.0%), with a significant increase in detection during the fattening period with 62% of Campylobacter positive animals at the end of the production cycle. Moreover, non-positive sample was determined from environmental sources. These results could be explained because Campylobacter may be in a low concentration or in a non-culturable form, as there were several studies that successfully detected Campylobacter DNA, but failed to culture. This form can survive in the environment and infect successive flocks; consequently, further studies are needed to develop more modern, practical, cost-effective and suitable techniques for routine diagnosis.

  15. In vitro bactericidal activities of Japanese rice-fluid against Helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kawakami, Kozue Oana, Masayoshi Hayama, Hiroyoshi Ota, Masahiko Takeuchi, Kazuhiro Miyashita, Tsunetomo Matsuzawa, Kiyomi Kanaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori has now been widely recognized as a causative agent of gastroduodenal diseases. The development of safer anti- H. pylori compounds is desirable due to the antibiotic-resistant strains emerged to date. Methods: We successfully developed the compounds of Rice-fluid derived from unpolished, polished, and usually cooked Japanese rice, and investigated their in vitro antibacterial activities by means of the Time-Kill-Curve methods against various species of bacteria including H. pylori strains. Results: All of the compounds revealed keen bactericidal activities against H. pylori, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Campylobacter jejuni strains, but failed to affect the viability of other bacterial species investigated including staphylococci, enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and other gram-negative rods belonging to the family Enterobacteraceae. The bactericidal activities were demonstrated to be time- and concentration-dependent. Conclusions: The compounds of Rice-fluid are considered to be potentially new and safe therapeutic regimens against H. pylori infections. The mechanism of their bactericidal activities against H. pylori strains remains to be elucidated.

  16. Natural transformation and recombination in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, L.C.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteriën kennen geen geslachtelijke voortplanting, ze hebben altijd één “ouder” in plaats van twee. Ze kunnen dus tijdens de voortplanting niet kruisen. Om toch erfelijke eigenschappen te kunnen uitwisselen hebben ze andere methoden. De maagbacterie Helicobacter pylori kan dit bijvoorbeeld doen doo

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Helicobacter pylori may possibly affect the iron metabolism by occult bleeding, impaired absorption of non-hem iron, and by scavenging hem iron or ferritin, as some studies have suggested. The aim of this study was to analyze the association between H. pylori infection and serum ferrit...

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first...

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eriksen, Jens Ravn;

    2011-01-01

    National Danish guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection have been approved by the Danish Society for Gastroenterology. All patients with peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and MALT lymphoma should be tested for Hp. We also recommend testing in first deg...

  20. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  1. Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Children With Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Yousefichaijan; Mosayebi; Sharafkhah; Kahbazi; Heydarbagi; Rafiei

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have reported an association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization and the occurrence of asthma or other allergies. However, data are inconsistent, and few studies have been performed in children. Objectives The current study aimed to investigate H. pylori seropositivity in children with and without asthma. Patients and Methods This cross-sect...

  2. Method-dependent variability in determination of prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in Canadian retail poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Catherine D; Plante, Daniel; Iugovaz, Irène; Kenwell, Robyn; Bélanger, Ghislaine; Boucher, Francine; Poulin, Nathalie; Trottier, Yvon-Louis

    2014-10-01

    Campylobacter is the most frequent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in Canada, and the illness is commonly associated with poultry consumption. Whereas Canadian retail poultry is often contaminated with campylobacters, studies on the prevalence of this organism are inconsistent due to variability in sampling and microbiological methodology. To determine the current microbiological status of Canadian poultry, and to evaluate two commonly used microbiological methods, 348 raw poultry samples were collected at retail across Canada over a period of 3 years (2007 to 2010) and were analyzed for the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter species. The overall prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was found to be 42.8% by a combination of the two testing methods, with 33.9% of the samples positive for C. jejuni, 3.7% of the samples positive for C. coli, and 5.2% of the samples positive for both. Variability in Campylobacter spp. prevalence was observed in samples obtained from different regions across Canada and from poultry with or without skin, but this was not statistically significant. In co-contaminated samples, C. jejuni was preferentially recovered from Preston agar compared with mCCDA and Campy-Cefex agar, with an increase in recovery of C. coli on all selective media after 48 h of enrichment. A subset of 214 of the poultry rinses were analyzed by both Health Canada's standard method, MFLP-46 (enrichment in Park and Sanders broth), and a second method requiring enrichment in Bolton broth. Significantly more positive samples were obtained with the MFLP-46 method (40.6%) than with the alternate method (35.0%). This improved recovery with MFLP-46 may be due to the omission of cycloheximide from this method. These results demonstrate that determination of prevalence of Campylobacter spp. on poultry products may be significantly impacted by the choice of microbiological methods used. Canadian poultry continues to be a source of exposure to Campylobacter spp.

  3. Campylobacter jejuni y Campylobacter coli en tres grupos de gallinas de diferente origen geográfico del sur de Chile Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in three groups of hens of different geographic origin in Southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. FERNANDEZ

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron 300 muestras fecales de gallinas obtenidas en tres sitios geográficos del sur de Chile (comunas de Loncoche, Valdivia y Puerto Montt, para conocer la prevalencia de Campylobacter jejuni y de C. coli en estas aves consideradas como reservorio. La prevalencia de especies termotolerantes del género Campylobacter fue del 25,7%, siendo C. jejuni aislado con una frecuencia del 76,6% y la de C. coli del 23,4%. Fueron encontrados sólo 2 de los 4 biotipos de C. jejuni, siendo aislado el biotipo II con mayor frecuencia (68.8%. En C. coli fueron encontrados los 2 biotipos descritos para esta especie, siendo, también, el biotipo II el más frecuenteIn order to establish the prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli, 300 fecal samples obtained from hens in three different geographical places (Loncoche, Valdivia and Puerto Montt cities from Southern Chile were studied. The prevalence of the thermotolerant species of Campylobacter was 25.7%, being Campylobacter jejuni isolated with a frequency of 76.6% and C. coli with 23.4%. Only two of the four biotypes of C. jejuni were found, being biotype II the most frequent one (68.8%. The two biotypes described for C. coli were isolated, and biotype II was also the most frequent (68.8%.

  4. Survival with a helping hand: Campylobacter and microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eIndikova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacteriosis is the most important bacterial food-borne disease in the developed world. Consumption of chicken meat, beef or raw milk, direct contact with ruminants and exposure to contaminated surface water or even consumption of tap water have been identified as risk factors for human disease. However, the most important risk factor is consumption of and/or handling contaminated chicken. Campylobacter spp. are fastidious microorganisms but must somehow survive outside the host, especially in food and agricultural environments and also resist the innate and humoral immune responses inside the host. In this paper we hypothesize that other microorganisms in mixed populations with Campylobacter may act to improve survival outside the host and may also protect the pathogen against the intestinal immune system. Our evidence for this hypothesis is based on: 1. newly generated microbial community analysis; 2. the prolonged survival of Campylobacter in mixed species biofilms and in co-culture with environmental bacteria; 3. improved survival in amoebae and rumen fluid; 4. sulphur release and iron uptake systems within the intestinal lumen. This would make Campylobacter an exceptional food-borne pathogen. With this in mind, new strategies are necessary to combat Campylobacter along the total food chain.

  5. A study of Helicobacter pylori infection in diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Khwaja Saifullah Zafar; Vidyasagar Ram; Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori is the most common bacterial infection in human beings. The aim was to study the association of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients of diabetes mellitus. Design of the study was observational analytic cross sectional study. Methods: A total of 69 subjects were studied. Of these 30 were non diabetics and 39 were diabetics, with disease duration more than 1 year. The serological diagnosis of H. pylori was made by Anti- Helicobacter pylori antibody test....

  6. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Osawa

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primar-ily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lym-phoid tissue lymphorna. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in Hpylori injected sub-jects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in associa-tion with atrophic gastritis induced by Hpylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentra-tion. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may re-sult from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations be-fore and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels.

  7. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B Dogra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:peptic ulcers were earlier believed to be caused by dietary factors, gastric acid, and stress. However, in 1983, Warren and Marshall identified the correlation between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and peptic ulcers. It is now well established that most of the peptic ulcers occur as a result of H. pylori infection. But the co-relation between perforated peptic ulcer and H. pylori infection is not yet fully established. Aims and objectives : to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated peptic ulcer. Materials and methods: this was a prospective study carried out in all cases of perforated peptic ulcer reporting in surgical wards of a medical college during 2008-2010. A total of 50 cases, presenting as acute perforation of duodenum and stomach during this period, formed the study group. After resuscitation, all the cases were subjected to emergency exploratory laparotomy. The exact site of perforation was identified, biopsy was taken from the ulcer margin from 2-3 sites and the tissue was sent for H. pylori culture and histopathological examination. Simple closure of perforation, omentoplasty, thorough peritoneal lavage and drainage was carried out. Results: out of the 50 cases of perforated peptic ulcer, 38 happened to be males, and only 12 were females. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 70 years. All the patients underwent only emergency laparotomy. As many as 46 cases (92% turned out to be positive for H. pylori and only four cases (8% were negative for this infection. Postoperatively, patients who were found to be positive for H. pylori were put on anti-H. pylori treatment. Conclusion: there was a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with perforated gastroduodenal ulcers.

  8. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  9. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangerman, A; Winkel, E G; de Laat, L; van Oijen, A H; de Boer, W A

    2012-03-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detect halitosis. In this study a possible relation between H. pylori and halitosis was evaluated, using an objective method (gas chromatography, GC) to detect the VSCs, responsible for the halitosis. The levels of the VSCs hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), methyl mercaptan (MM) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in mouth breath and in stomach air of 11 H. pylori positive patients and of 38 H. pylori negative patients, all with gastric pathology. Halitosis was also established by organoleptic scoring (OLS) of mouth-breath. The levels of H(2)S, MM and DMS in the mouth-breath and stomach air of the H. pylori positive patients did not differ significantly from those of the H. pylori negative patients. OLS of the mouth-breath resulted in 9 patients with halitosis, 1 out of the H. pylori positive group and 8 out of the H. pylori negative group, which is not statistically different. The concentrations of the VSCs in stomach air were in nearly all cases below the thresholds of objectionability of the various VSCs, indicating that halitosis does not originate in the stomach. The patients with gastric pathology were also compared with control patients without gastric pathology and with normal volunteers. No significant differences in VSCs in mouth breath were observed between these groups. Thus, in this study no association between halitosis and H. pylori infection was found. Halitosis, as established by GC and OLS, nearly always originates within the oral cavity and seldom or never within the stomach.

  10. Chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP have recently emerged as a novel eliciting factor for chronic urticaria (CU. The possible association between HP and CU has enormous potential, as eradicating HP could cure CU. Aims and Objectives: We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of HP infection and effect of bacterium eradication on skin lesions in patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU. Settings and Design: Four hundred sixty patients of CU attending the allergy clinic, SMS hospital, Jaipur during the period February 6, 2004, to February 6, 2006, were screened for possible eliciting factors. Patients with CIU were enrolled and others were excluded. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight patients of CIU and similar number of age and sex matched controls, attending the allergy clinic, SMS Hospital, Jaipur were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endoscopy with antral biopsy for urease and histopathology to identify HP-associated gastritis. Infected patients were given HP eradication therapy. Eradication of bacterium was confirmed by fecal antigen assay. Subjective response to treatment was judged using chronic urticaria quality-of-life questionnaire (CU-Q 2 oL while objective response to treatment was judged by need for ′rescue medication′ (antihistaminics. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi square and paired′t′ test for their level of significance. Results: HP associated gastritis was present in 48 (70.58% patients, out of which 39 (81.25% patients responded to eradication therapy. Ten (50.00% patients without HP associated gastritis showed response to symptomatic therapy. Overall 49 (72.05% patients responded and 19 (27.94% showed no response. The value of χ2 was 28.571 (P = 0.003, which showed significant association between presence of HP and response to eradication regimen. Conclusion: The response of HP eradication therapy in infected patients of CIU is significant. HP should be included in diagnostic

  11. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Paul; Waidner, Barbara; Hofman, Véronique; Bereswill, Stefan; Brest, Patrick; Kist, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    Research in the last year has provided new insights into the function of the the cag-associated type IV secretion system and the vacuolating toxin VacA. A quite new aspect was disclosed by the finding that Helicobacter pylori in Mongolian gerbils colonizes a very distinct topology in the gastric mucous layer, obviously providing optimal conditions for long-term survival. Further research activities focused on H. pylori ammonia and metal metabolism as well as on bacterial stress defence mechanisms. Differential expression of approximately 7% of the bacterial genome was found at low pH suggesting that H. pylori has evolved a multitude of acid-adaptive mechanisms. VacA was shown to interrupt phagosome maturation in macrophage cell lines as well as to modulate and interfere with T lymphocyte immunological functions. Gastric mucosa as well as the H. pylori-infected epithelial cell line AGS strongly express IL-8 receptor A and B, which might contribute to the augmentation of the inflammatory response. Accumulating evidence implicates genetic variation in the inflammatory response to H. pylori in the etiology of the increased risk of gastric cancer after H. pylori infection. The chronic imbalance between apoptosis and cell proliferation is the first step of gastric carcinogenesis. In this regard, it was demonstrated that coexpression of two H. pylori proteins, CagA and HspB, in AGS cells, caused an increase in E2F transcription factor, cyclin D3, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Taken together, we now have a better understanding of the role of different virulence factors of H. pylori. There is still a lot to be learned, but the promising discoveries summarized here, demonstrate that the investigation of the bacterial survival strategies will give novel insights into pathogenesis and disease development.

  12. Prevalence of Campylobacter species in ground water in Sokoto, Sokoto state, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agatha N. Ugboma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to determine the presence and prevalence of Campylobacter species in ground water in Sokoto, Sokoto State. Materials and Methods: The prevalence of Campylobacter species was determined by collecting a total of 74 water samples from wells in Sokoto over a period of four months from May to August 2011 and analyzed using cultural isolation techniques and biochemical characterization. Results: Totally 39 (52.70% water samples were Campylobacter positive. The species identified were Campylobacter jejuni 23 (58.97%, Campylobacter coli 11 (28.21% and Campylobacter hyointestinalis 5 (12.82%. Conclusion: Based on this study, the isolation of Campylobacter species from ground water (wells in this study is of serious public health importance as untreated water has been implicated as the cause of sporadic infections and outbreaks of Campylobacteriosis worldwide. [Vet World 2013; 6(6.000: 285-287

  13. Arcobacter butzleri脂蛋白的in silico方法鉴定与功能分析%Identification and function analysis on putative lipoproteins of Arcobacter butzleri by in silico approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙理云

    2010-01-01

    目的 鉴别已公布基因组序列的Arcobacter butzleri RM4018株的脂蛋白(Lpp).方法 首先从GenBank获取由A. butzleri RM4018基因组推测的蛋白质氨基酸序列,然后利用Lpp预测软件PrositeScan和DOLOP预测05ZYH33株的Lpp,采用SignalP 3.0 HMM、PrediSi、Phobius、LipoP-HMM和TMHMM version 2.0分析预测的Lpp的信号肽,然后经"多数票决法"确定Lpp;最后利用InterProScan和BlastP服务器对鉴定的Lpp进行功能分析.结果 鉴定出54种Lpp,占A. butzleri蛋白质组的2.435%.经分析,约28种Lpp的脂蛋白盒基序为[F][ASTV][GA]C,约6种为[L][ASTV][GA]C.34种蛋白为假定蛋白,功能未知;YP_001489204、YP_001489480和YP_001491078等3种Lpp为酶类,YP_001489759、YP_001489957、YP_001491044、YP_001491046、YP_001491105和YP_001491107等6种与细菌的物质运输/药物抗性有关.YP_001489154是鞭毛成分;YP_001489112是补体结合蛋白,可能与细菌逃避宿主的免疫功能有关.结论 这些资料提示一些Lpp可能在A. butzleri RM4018的生理和致病性方面具有作用.

  14. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  15. [Role of animal gastric Helicobacter species in human gastric pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdeev, O K; Pozdeeva, A O; Pozdnyak, A O; Saifutdinov, R G

    2015-01-01

    Animal Helicobacter species other than Helicobacter pylori are also able to cause human gastritis, gastric ulcers, and MALT lymphomas. Animal Helicobacter species are presented with typical spiral fastidious microorganisms colonizing the gastric mucosa of different animals. Bacteria initially received their provisional name Helicobacter heilmannii, and out of them at least five species colonizing the gastric mucosa of pigs, cats, and dogs were isolated later on. A high proportion of these diseases are shown to be zoonotic. Transmission of pathogens occurs by contact. The factors of bacterial pathogenicity remain little studied.

  16. Variation in the limit-of-detection of the ProSpecT Campylobacter microplate enzyme immunoassay in stools spiked with emerging Campylobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanić, Krunoslav; Midwinter, Anne Camilla; Marshall, Jonathan Craig; Rogers, Lynn Elizabeth; Biggs, Patrick Jon; Acke, Els

    2016-08-01

    Campylobacter enteritis in humans is primarily associated with C. jejuni/coli infection. The impact of other Campylobacter spp. is likely to be underestimated due to the bias of culture methods towards Campylobacter jejuni/coli diagnosis. Stool antigen tests are becoming increasingly popular and appear generally less species-specific. A review of independent studies of the ProSpecT® Campylobacter Microplate enzyme immunoassay (EIA) developed for C. jejuni/coli showed comparable diagnostic results to culture methods but the examination of non-jejuni/coli Campylobacter spp. was limited and the limit-of-detection (LOD), where reported, varied between studies. This study investigated LOD of EIA for Campylobacter upsaliensis, Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter helveticus spiked in human stools. Multiple stools and Campylobacter isolates were used in three different concentrations (10(4)-10(9)CFU/ml) to reflect sample heterogeneity. All Campylobacter species evaluated were detectable by EIA. Multivariate analysis showed LOD varied between Campylobacter spp. and faecal consistency as fixed effects and individual faecal samples as random effects. EIA showed excellent performance in replicate testing for both within and between batches of reagents, in agreement between visual and spectrophotometric reading of results, and returned no discordance between the bacterial concentrations within independent dilution test runs (positive results with lower but not higher concentrations). This study shows how limitations in experimental procedures lead to an overestimation of consistency and uniformity of LOD for EIA that may not hold under routine use in diagnostic laboratories. Benefits and limitations for clinical practice and the influence on estimates of performance characteristics from detection of multiple Campylobacter spp. by EIA are discussed.

  17. Detection of Campylobacter bacteria in air samples for continuous real-time monitoring of Campylobacter colonization in broiler flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Katja N; Lund, Marianne; Skov, Julia; Christensen, Laurids S; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2009-04-01

    Improved monitoring tools are important for the control of Campylobacter bacteria in broiler production. In this study, we compare the sensitivities of detection of Campylobacter by PCR with feces, dust, and air samples during the lifetimes of broilers in two poultry houses and conclude that the sensitivity of detection of Campylobacter in air is comparable to that in other sample materials. Profiling of airborne particles in six poultry houses revealed that the aerodynamic conditions were dependent on the age of the chickens and very comparable among different poultry houses, with low proportions of particles in the 0.5- to 2-microm-diameter range and high proportions in the 2- to 5-microm-diameter range. Campylobacter could also be detected by PCR in air samples collected at the hanging stage during the slaughter process but not at the other stages tested at the slaughterhouse. The exploitation of airborne dust in poultry houses as a sample material for the detection of Campylobacter and other pathogens provides an intriguing possibility, in conjunction with new detection technologies, for allowing continuous or semicontinuous monitoring of colonization status.

  18. Identification of the main quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by MAMA-DEG PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormeño, Lorena; Palomo, Gonzalo; Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Porrero, M Concepción; Borge, Carmen; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Domínguez, Lucas; Campos, Maria J; Quesada, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Among zoonotic diseases, campylobacteriosis stands out as the major bacterial infection producing human gastroenteritis. Antimicrobial therapy, only recommended in critical cases, is challenged by resistance mechanisms that should be unambiguously detected for achievement of effective treatments. Quinolone (ciprofloxacin) resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, the 2 main Campylobacter detected in humans, is conferred by the mutation gyrA C-257-T, which can be genotyped by several methods that require a previous identification of the pathogen species to circumvent the sequence polymorphism of the gene. A multiplex PCR, based on degenerated oligonucleotides, has been designed for unambiguous identification of the quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter spp. isolates. The method was verified with 249 Campylobacter strains isolated from humans (141 isolates) and from the 3 most important animal sources for this zoonosis: poultry (34 isolates), swine (38 isolates), and cattle (36 isolates). High resistance to ciprofloxacin, MIC above 4μg/mL, linked to the mutated genotype predicted by MAMA-DEG PCR (mismatch amplification mutation assay PCR with degenerated primers) was found frequently among isolates from the different hosts.

  19. Isolation of Campylobacter from Brazilian broiler flocks using different culturing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, C S L; Voss-Rech, D; Pozza, J S; Coldebella, A; Silva, V S

    2014-11-01

    Conventional culturing methods enable the detection of Campylobacter in broiler flocks. However, laboratory culture of Campylobacter is laborious because of its fastidious behavior and the presence of competing nontarget bacteria. This study evaluated different protocols to isolate Campylobacter from broiler litter, feces, and cloacal and drag swabs. Samples taken from commercial Brazilian broiler flocks were directly streaked onto Preston agar (PA), Campy-Line agar (CLA), and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) and also enriched in blood-free Bolton broth (bfBB) for 24 and 48 h followed by plating onto the different selective media. Higher numbers of Campylobacter-positive cloacal and drag swab samples were observed using either direct plating or enrichment for 24 h before plating onto PA, compared with enrichment for 48 h (P Campylobacter in broiler litter and feces samples. Analysis of directly plated samples revealed that higher Campylobacter levels were detected in feces streaked onto PA (88.8%), cloacal swabs plated onto mCCDA (72.2%), drag swabs streaked onto CLA or mCCDA (69.4%), and litter samples inoculated onto PA (63.8%). Preston agar was the best agar to isolate Campylobacter from directly plated litter samples (P Campylobacter in other samples. The isolated Campylobacter strains were phenotypically identified as Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli. The predominant contaminant observed in the Campylobacter cultures was Proteus mirabilis, which was resistant to the majority of antimicrobial agents in selective media. Together, these data showed that direct plating onto PA and onto either CLA or mCCDA as the second selective agar enabled the reliable isolation of thermophilic Campylobacter species from broiler samples. Finally, Campylobacter was detected in all broiler flocks sampled.

  20. Time-series analysis of Campylobacter incidence in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W; Schüpbach, G; Held, L

    2015-07-01

    Campylobacteriosis has been the most common food-associated notifiable infectious disease in Switzerland since 1995. Contact with and ingestion of raw or undercooked broilers are considered the dominant risk factors for infection. In this study, we investigated the temporal relationship between the disease incidence in humans and the prevalence of Campylobacter in broilers in Switzerland from 2008 to 2012. We use a time-series approach to describe the pattern of the disease by incorporating seasonal effects and autocorrelation. The analysis shows that prevalence of Campylobacter in broilers, with a 2-week lag, has a significant impact on disease incidence in humans. Therefore Campylobacter cases in humans can be partly explained by contagion through broiler meat. We also found a strong autoregressive effect in human illness, and a significant increase of illness during Christmas and New Year's holidays. In a final analysis, we corrected for the sampling error of prevalence in broilers and the results gave similar conclusions.

  1. Estimation of on-farm interventions to control Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Borck Høg, Birgitte; Rosenquist, Hanne;

    2015-01-01

    Before making risk management decisions to control Campylobacter prevalence in broiler flocks, it is useful to identify effective interventions. A given risk factor may seem to have a large effect, but in practice interventions related to this risk factor may have only limited effect due to a rel......Before making risk management decisions to control Campylobacter prevalence in broiler flocks, it is useful to identify effective interventions. A given risk factor may seem to have a large effect, but in practice interventions related to this risk factor may have only limited effect due...... individual interventions gave only a limited reduction in prevalence if the biosecurity was not accounted for. Furthermore, the effect of the interventions differed between countries, depending on current farm management practices and Campylobacter prevalence. The most effective interventions were “building...

  2. Clinical Manifestations of Campylobacter concisus Infection in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Linde; Engberg, Jørgen; Ejlertsen, Tove;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: There is only sparse information about the clinical impact of Campylobacter concisus infections in children. METHODS:: A study was performed during a two-year period to determine the clinical manifestations in C. concisus positive children with gastroenteritis. A case patient...... with Campylobacter jejuni/coli infection. RESULTS:: Two thousand three hundred and seventy-two diarrheic stool samples from 1,867 children were cultured for pathogenic enteric bacteria during the study period, and 85 and 109 children with C. concisus and C. jejuni/coli, respectively, were identified. Comparison...... for more than two weeks and two-thirds of all children with C. concisus reported loose stools after six month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS:: Campylobacter concisus infection in children seems to have a milder course of acute gastroenteritis compared with C. jejuni/coli infection, but is associated with more...

  3. Ultrastructure of Campylobacter jejuni in gamma-irradiated mouse jejunum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosula, L.; Nicholls, E.M.; Skeen, M.

    1988-04-01

    This paper describes the ultrastructure of intracellular elongated, transitional and coccoid forms of Campylobacter jejuni, in irradiated mouse jejunum infected both in vitro and in vivo and in cultured human skin fibroblasts. Jejunum of irradiated mouse incubated for 1 hour under conditions favorable to the organisms showed minimal tissue degeneration. The intracellular organisms in this material were free cytoplasmic forms showing inner membrane degeneration, loss of cytoplasmic granules, and absence of flagella. The diameter of the coccoids was up to four times that of the elongated forms, as in plate cultures. Intracellular organisms were not found in challenged unirradiated controls, indicating that irradiation of mouse cells may be required for intracellular infection with human strains of C jejuni. In contrast, challenged human fibroblasts contained typical elongated organisms in cytoplasmic vacuoles. These findings are discussed with reference to Campylobacter strain, host resistance, and natural animal and human Campylobacter infections.

  4. Risk factors for Campylobacter infection in Danish broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdhury, S; Sandberg, M; Themudo, G E;

    2012-01-01

    Data from the Quality Assurance System in Danish Broiler Production (KIK system) were analyzed to identify within farm biosecurity- and management-related risk factors for Campylobacter infection in Danish broiler flocks. In the study, data from 2,835 flocks originating from 187 farms in the time...... period of December 2009 to November 2010 were included. The PCR test results of fecal samples collected on socks revealed that 14% of the Danish broiler flocks were positive to Campylobacter during the study period. Of the positive flocks, 55% were positive during summer time and the positive flocks...

  5. Survival and Virulence of Campylobacter spp. in the Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan

    of Campylobacter. In the second part of my PhD project, I have investigated the mechanisms involved in the interactions of Campylobacter and two protozoa: Acanthamoeba castellanii and Cercomonas sp. which are commonly found in soil and water. I have found that C. jejuni can survive intracellularly within A....... Interestingly, I identified the depletion of dissolved oxygen by A. castellanii as the major contributor for the observed amoeba-mediated growth enhancement. To test whether another protozoan rather than Acanthamoeba has similar impacts on survival of C. jejuni as well as other food-borne pathogens S...

  6. Prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni in poultry breeder flocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico Dipineto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to present the preliminary results of a study about the prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni in poultry breeder flocks. It was examined three different breeder flocks of Bojano in Molise region. A total of 360 cloacal swabs and 80 enviromental swabs was collected. Of the 3 flocks studied, 6.9% tested were positive for Campylobacter spp. The most-prevalent isolated species is C. jejuni (8.2%. Only 3 of the 360 cloacal swabs samples examined were associated with C. coli. The environmental swabs resulted negative. This results confirms again that poultry is a reservoir of this germ.

  7. Enterite da Campylobacter upsaliensis: un paradigma della microbiologia clinica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letizia D’Annibale

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The Authors describe a case of acute enteritis in a adult woman with severe hepatitis C infection caused by a strain of Campylobacter upsaliensis.The clinical isolate was obtained only on blood agar because filter membrane technique was performed. In fact for this strain it was no growth on selective Campy agar, which include cephalotin too; C. upsaliensis is sensitive to this antibiotic molecule. So, the use of filter membrane on blood agar or charcoal agar at 37°C in microaerophilic atmosphere is recommended for isolation of all campylobacters responsible of human enteritis.

  8. Genetic diversity, antibiotic resistance and biofilm-forming ability of Arcobacter butzleri isolated from poultry and environment from a Portuguese slaughterhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Fraqueza, Maria J; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C; Oleastro, Mónica

    2013-03-01

    The genus Arcobacter is an emerging pathogen associated with several clinical symptoms. This genus is widely distributed and has been isolated from environmental, animal, food and human samples, where poultry is considered the major source. In this study, forty three Arcobacter butzleri strains isolated from poultry and environment of a Portuguese slaughterhouse, were characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and assessed for antimicrobial susceptibility and ability to form biofilms. PFGE patterns obtained using restriction enzymes SmaI and SacII revealed high genetic diversity, with 32 distinct PFGE patterns. Most of A. butzleri isolates presented multiple antimicrobial resistance, exhibiting four different resistance profiles. All 43 isolates were susceptible to gentamicin and 2.3% were resistant to chloramphenicol, in contrast to twenty four (55.8%) that were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Among 36 selected isolates, 26 strains presented biofilm-forming ability, which was dependent on the atmosphere and initial inoculum density. Overall, the results showed that A. butzleri displays a high genetic diversity, and presents resistance to several antibiotics, which together with its biofilm formation ability may represent a potential hazard for foodborne infections and a considerable risk for human health.

  9. Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli genotypes in poultry flocks by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Ana Cláudia; Cunha, Mónica V

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple, rapid, and discriminatory methodology that allows the routine molecular characterization of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolates. The proposed approach is built on one of the earliest and simplest molecular typing methods ever, consisting on the analysis of the fragments of different lengths generated by digestion of homologous DNA sequences with specific restriction endonucleases, a process known as restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The strategy underneath the workflow reported here is meant to explore the polymorphisms of Campylobacter spp. flaA gene (flaA-RFLP) that allows the local investigation of the genetic diversity and distribution of C. coli and C. jejuni isolates from different sources, namely, chickens' caeca. Although not appropriate for global and long-term epidemiological studies as a single approach, flaA-RFLP analysis can be very useful in surveys limited in space and time and, for specific epidemiological settings, an alternative to more modern and resource-demanding techniques.

  10. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  11. 基于rpoB靶基因的PCR法快速检测弓形菌%Detection of Arcobacter by polymerase chain reaction method based on the rpoB gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕水莲; 孟赫诚

    2013-01-01

    建立了一种弓形菌(Arcobacter)快速、敏感、特异的PCR检测方法.采用PCR技术扩增弓形菌编码RNA聚合酶β亚基的rpoB基因,并对该方法进行特异性和敏感性测试.结果只有弓形菌在205bp处出现目的扩增带,其他菌株扩增结果均为阴性.该法对弓形菌的检测限可达8.20×102cfu/mL.建立的PCR方法具有操作简便、准确可靠以及灵敏特异的特点,为食品中弓形菌的快速检测提供了新的手段.%To establish a rapid,sensitive and specific method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)for detection of Arcobacter species.PCR technique was used to amplify the rpoB gene of Arcobacter,and meanwhile the specificity and sensitivity of this method were valued.Only the target gene of Arcobacter was amplified at 205bp,while the fragments of other bacteria were not detected.The detection limit could reach 8.20 x 102cfu/mLThis PCR method was useful for the investigation of Arcobacter in food,with the advantages of simple operation,accurate reliability and good sensitivity.

  12. Transmission of Campylobacter coli in chicken embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daise Aparecida Rossi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter coli is an important species involved in human cases of enteritis, and chickens are carriers of the pathogen mainly in developing country. The current study aimed to evaluate the transmission of C. coli and its pathogenic effects in chicken embryos. Breeder hens were inoculated intra-esophageally with C. coli isolated from chickens, and their eggs and embryos were analyzed for the presence of bacteria using real-time PCR and plate culture. The viability of embryos was verified. In parallel, SPF eggs were inoculated with C. coli in the air sac; after incubation, the embryos were submitted to the same analysis as the embryos from breeder hens. In embryos and fertile eggs from breeder hens, the bacterium was only identified by molecular methods; in the SPF eggs, however, the bacterium was detected by both techniques. The results showed no relationship between embryo mortality and positivity for C. coli in the embryos from breeder hens. However, the presence of bacteria is a cause of precocious mortality for SPF embryos. This study revealed that although the vertical transmission is a possible event, the bacteria can not grow in embryonic field samples.

  13. Nutrient Acquisition and Metabolism by Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eStahl

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is able to colonize numerous different hosts and compete against the gut microbiota. To do this, it must be able to efficiently acquire sufficient nutrients from its environment to support its survival and rapid growth in the intestine. However, despite almost 50 years of research, many aspects as to how C. jejuni accomplishes this feat remain poorly understood. C. jejuni lacks many of the common metabolic pathways necessary for the use of glucose, galactose, or other carbohydrates upon which most other microbes thrive. It does however make efficient use of citric acid cycle intermediates and various amino acids. C. jejuni readily uses the amino acids aspartate, glutamate, serine, and proline, with certain strains also possessing additional pathways allowing for the use of glutamine and asparagine. More recent work has revealed that some C. jejuni strains can metabolize the sugar L-fucose. This finding has upset years of dogma that C. jejuni is an asaccharolytic organism. C. jejuni also possesses diverse mechanisms for the acquisition of various transition metals that are required for metabolic activities. In particular, iron acquisition is critical for the formation of iron-sulphur complexes. C. jejuni is also unique in possessing both molybdate and tungsten cofactored proteins and thus has an unusual regulatory scheme for these metals. Together these various metabolic and acquisition pathways help C. jejuni to compete and thrive in wide variety of hosts and environments.

  14. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  15. Helicobacter Pylori Bacteremia: An Unusual Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Concetta; Mancin, Annalisa; Calabrò, Maria; Daleno, Cristina; Ferrario, Antonella; Renzulli, Raffaella; Scuderi, Cristina; Casari, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent immediately to Laboratory, were positive for a spiral Gram-negative bacterium. This isolate was identified as H. pylori and the specific susceptibility test was performed. One day after the fever was decreased but antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin was continued and it was maintained until discharge. In summary, H. pylori transient bacteremia may occur as a rare complication after stomach surgery. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the potential role of Helicobacter pylori presence in blood.

  16. Helicobacter pylori vaccine: from past to future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Kanishtha; Agarwal, Shvetank

    2008-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide and is an important cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma), and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is usually acquired during childhood and tends to persist unless treated. Because eradication requires treatment with multidrug regimens, prevention of initial infection by a suitable vaccine is attractive. Although immunization with H pylori protein subunits has been encouraging in animals, similar vaccine trials in humans have shown adjuvant-related adverse effects and only moderate effectiveness. Newer immunization approaches (use of DNA, live vectors, bacterial ghosts, and microspheres) are being developed. Several questions about when and whom to vaccinate will need to be appropriately answered, and a cost-effective vaccine production and delivery strategy will have to be useful for developing countries. For this review, we searched MEDLINE using the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms Helicobacter pylori and vaccines for articles in English from 1990 to 2007.

  17. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health.

  18. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Oral Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Irani, Soussan; Monsef Esfahani, Alireza; Bidari Zerehpoush, Farahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Helicobacter pylori is a microaerophilic gram-negative spiral organism. It is recognized as the etiologic factor for peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Recently, it has been isolated from dental plaque and the dorsum of the tongue. This study was designed to assess the association between H. pylori and oral lesions such as ulcerative/inflammatory lesions, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and primary lymphoma. Materials and methods. A total of 228 bio...

  19. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haim Shmuely; Noam Domniz; Jacob Yahav

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro antiHelicobacter pylori(H.pylori)activity,but are less effective in vivo.The anti-H.pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane,anti-adhesion,inhibition of bacterial enzymes andbacterial grown.We,herein,review treatment effects of cranberry,garlic,curcumin,ginger and pistacia gum against H.pylori in both in vitro,animal studies and in vivo studies.

  20. Systems analysis of metabolism in Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Daniela M.

    2014-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Engenharia Química e Biológica Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric diseases, such as gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinomas. Despite more than half of the global population being infected with this bacterium, not all individuals will develop clinical symptoms. Nevertheless, its association with gastric cancer, the high infection rate, as well as the failures on eradication ...

  1. Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigro Casimiro

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nature of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and reflux oesophagitis is still not clear. To investigate the correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and GERD taking into account endoscopic, pH-metric and histopathological data. Methods Between January 2001 and January 2003 a prospective study was performed in 146 patients with GERD in order to determine the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection at gastric mucosa; further the value of the De Meester score endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric parameters, i.e. reflux episodes, pathological reflux episodes and extent of oesophageal acid exposure, of the patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection were studied and statistically compared. Finally, univariate analysis of the above mentioned data were performed in order to evaluate the statistical correlation with reflux esophagitis. Results There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups, HP infected and HP negative patients, regarding age, gender and type of symptoms. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding severity of symptoms and manometric parameters. The value of the De Meester score and the ph-metric parameters were similar in both groups. On univariate analysis, we observed that hiatal hernia (p = 0,01, LES size (p = 0,05, oesophageal wave length (p = 0,01 and pathological reflux number (p = 0,05 were significantly related to the presence of reflux oesophagitis. Conclusion Based on these findings, it seems that there is no significant evidence for an important role for H. pylori infection in the development of GERD and erosive esophagitis. Nevertheless, current data do not provide sufficient evidence to define the relationship between HP and GERD. Further assessments in prospective large studies are warranted.

  2. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia; Pacifico; Caterina; Anania; John; F; Osborn; Flavia; Ferraro; Claudio; Chiesa

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the hu-man stomach for many decades without adverse con-sequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent a...

  3. Helicobacter pylori : migrations humaines et cancer gastrique

    OpenAIRE

    Breurec, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with severe gastroduodenal disorders but is also a bacterial genetic marker of human migrations. First, we provide evidence that distinct H. pylori genetic populations accompanied at least four ancient human migrations into Oceania and Southeast Asia: i) an expansion of Austronesian speaking people about 5000 years ago from Taiwan into Oceania, ii) a migration from India into Southeast Asia within the last 2000 years, iii) a migration of Austro-Asiatic speaki...

  4. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Osborn, John F.; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the human stomach for many decades without adverse consequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children wit...

  5. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Pediatric Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Karimi; Koroush Fakhimi Derakhshan; Farid Imanzadeh; Mohamad Rezaei; Zahra Cavoshzadeh; Saeid Maham

    2013-01-01

    Objective Childhood infectious diseases are one of the most known environmental pathogenic causes of childhood asthma. The high prevalence of both Helicobacter pylori infection and asthma in our country prompted us to assess anyprobable association between them in childhood. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 196 children aged 6 to 12 years old comprising 98 asthmatic (case group) and 98 healthy (control group) individuals. Urea breath test was performed for all of the children and ...

  6. A Biotin Biosynthesis Gene Restricted to Helicobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hongkai; Zhu, Lei; Jia, Jia; Cronan, John E

    2016-02-12

    In most bacteria the last step in synthesis of the pimelate moiety of biotin is cleavage of the ester bond of pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester. The paradigm cleavage enzyme is Escherichia coli BioH which together with the BioC methyltransferase allows synthesis of the pimelate moiety by a modified fatty acid biosynthetic pathway. Analyses of the extant bacterial genomes showed that bioH is absent from many bioC-containing bacteria and is replaced by other genes. Helicobacter pylori lacks a gene encoding a homologue of the known pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester cleavage enzymes suggesting that it encodes a novel enzyme that cleaves this intermediate. We isolated the H. pylori gene encoding this enzyme, bioV, by complementation of an E. coli bioH deletion strain. Purified BioV cleaved the physiological substrate, pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester to pimeloyl-ACP by use of a catalytic triad, each member of which was essential for activity. The role of BioV in biotin biosynthesis was demonstrated using a reconstituted in vitro desthiobiotin synthesis system. BioV homologues seem the sole pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester esterase present in the Helicobacter species and their occurrence only in H. pylori and close relatives provide a target for development of drugs to specifically treat Helicobacter infections.

  7. Isolamento de Aerobacter (Campylobacter cryaerophila de fetos suínos abortados Isolation of Aerobacter (Campylobacter cryaerophila from aborted pig fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio José de Oliveira

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram examinados 6 fetos suínos abortados no terço final da gestação, provenientes de duas granjas do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Os órgãos internos (rim e fígado de cada feto foram inoculados em meio semi-sólido de Tween 80/40 LH, visando o isolamento de leptospiras. Os tubos foram incubados a 30°C. Foi isolado de todos os materiais um microorganismo, classificado como Arcobacter cryaerophila. Estes foram os primeiros isolamentos desta bactéria no Brasil.Samples of liver and kidney from aborted pig fetuses from two different farms were examined. Samples were cultured in semi-solid leptospira isolation media and incubated at 30°C. Arcobacter cryaerophila was isolated from all the specimens. These were the first reports on the isolation of the microorganism from pigs in Brazil.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Campylobacter jejuni 11168H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Sarah E.; Gundogdu, Ozan; Dorrell, Nick; Wren, Brendan W.; Blake, Damer

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter jejuni is the most prevalent cause of food-borne gastroenteritis in the developed world. The reference and original sequenced strain C. jejuni NCTC11168 has low levels of motility compared to clinical isolates. Here, we describe the draft genome of the laboratory derived hypermotile variant named 11168H. PMID:28153902

  9. Prevalence of Campylobacter in Dutch sewage purification plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenraad, P.M.F.J.

    1995-01-01

    Campylobacter bacteria are an important cause of bacterial gastro-enteritis in man. Although food of animal origin is the main source of human infection, a casecontrol study in the United States of America showed that 8% of all campylobacteriosis cases could be attributed to consumption of contamina

  10. First attempt to produce experimental Campylobacter concisus infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabenhus, R.; Stenram, U.; Andersen, L.P.;

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To infect mice with atypical Campylobacter concisus (C. concisus) for the first time. METHODS: Three separate experiments were conducted in order to screen the ability of five clinical C. concisus isolates of intestinal origin and the ATCC 33237 type strain of oral origin to colonize...

  11. Specific pathogen-free pig herds also free from Campylobacter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolstoe, E M; Iversen, T; Østensvik, Ø; Abdelghani, A; Secic, I; Nesbakken, T

    2015-03-01

    As Specific Pathogen-Free (SPF) pig herds are designed and managed to prevent specific pig diseases, it might be feasible to expand the list of micro-organisms also including zoonotic pathogens such as Campylobacter coli as this agent has its origin in pigs. In a previous survey, 15 of 16 of SPF herds were found free from human pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica. Accordingly, three nucleus and seven multiplying herds were surveyed for Campylobacter to investigate whether the Norwegian SPF pig pyramid also might be free from this agent. In conclusion, the intervention of Campylobacter at the herd level might be possible as four of 10 SPF herds tested negative in two sets of samples from both autumn 2008 and summer/early autumn 2010. The four negative herds were all located in remote areas several kilometres away from conventional pig farming while the positive SPF farms were all situated in neighbourhoods with conventional pig production. It seems more difficult to control Campylobacter than some specific animal disease agents and another significant zoonotic agent, Y. enterocolitica, in pig herds.

  12. Maatschappelijke acceptatie van maatregelen tegen Campylobacter in kippenvlees in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaardt, M.J.; Sengers, H.H.W.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    In dit rapport wordt ingegaan op de acceptatie bij vleeskuikenhouders, pluimveeslachterijen en consumenten van elf mogelijk te nemen maatregelen waarmee de besmetting van kippenvlees met Campylobacter kan worden verminderd in Nederland. Uit het enquêteonderzoek blijkt dat bij vleeskuikenhouders en p

  13. Routes of transmission of salmonella and campylobacter in breeder turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are frequent colonizers of the intestinal tracts of poultry and have often been associated with human foodborne illness. The entry, transmission and prevalence of both pathogens have been extensively studied in chickens but little information is available for turkeys. ...

  14. Discriminative power of Campylobacter phenotypic and genotypic typing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to compare typing methods, individually and combined, to use in the routine surveillance of Campylobacter in broiler carcasses. C. jejuni (n=94) and C. coli (n=52) isolated from different broiler carcasses were characterized using different typing methods: multilocus sequen...

  15. Host adaptation mechanisms and transcriptional regulation in Campylobacter jejuni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, A.

    2011-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial foodborne illness causing >100 million human cases each year worldwide. In contrast to other important enteropathogens such as Salmonella and Shigella spp., C. jejuni appears to lack a set of classical virulence traits, like adhesins, type I

  16. Role of Rodents in transmission of Salmonella and Campylobacter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerburg, B.G.; Kijlstra, A.

    2007-01-01

    Salmonella and Campylobacter are generally regarded as the most important food-borne pathogens in the world. Reduction or elimination of these pathogens in the first part of the food chain (on the farm) is important to prevent disease among consumers of animal products. In organic farming, eliminati

  17. Colonization of broilers by Campylobacter jejuni internalized within Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present the first report that Campylobacter jejuni, internalized within Acanthamoeba castellanii, colonized broilers. After 1, 3, 7 and 14 days post challenge none of the broilers challenged with negative controls were colonized, but were with internalized C. jejuni. The biology of protozoa-Cam...

  18. Arsenic resistance in Campylobacter spp. isolated from retail poultry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Amy R; Price, Lance B; Silbergeld, Ellen K; Schwab, Kellogg J

    2006-04-01

    Organoarsenicals are commonly used for growth promotion in U.S. poultry production. Susceptibilities to arsenite, arsenate, and the organoarsenical roxarsone were measured in 251 Campylobacter isolates from conventional and antimicrobial-free retail poultry products. Isolates from conventional poultry products had significantly higher roxarsone MICs (z = 8.22; P < 0.0001).

  19. Phage therapy reduces Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Mueller, M.A.; Wassenaar, T.M.; Carlton, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phage therapy in the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in young broilers, either as a preventive or a therapeutic measure, was tested. A prevention group was infected with C. jejuni at day 4 of a 10-day phage treatment. A therapeutic group was phage treated for 6 days, start

  20. Campylobacter hominis sp nov., from the human gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson, A.J.; On, Stephen L.W.; Logan, J.M.J.

    2001-01-01

    , an isolation strategy was developed employing initial non-selective membrane filtration onto fastidious anaerobe agar. Campylobacters were then isolated from the resulting mixed microbial flora by a dilution strategy and/or by immunomagnetic separation with genus-specific polyclonal antibody. Isolates were...

  1. Identification of possible virulence marker from Campylobacter jejuni isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, James W; Dung, Tran Thi Ngoc; Siddiqui, Fariha; Korbrisate, Sunee; Bukhari, Habib; Tra, My Phan Vu; Hoang, Nguyen Van Minh; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Bryant, Juliet; Campbell, James I; Studholme, David J; Wren, Brendan W; Baker, Stephen; Titball, Richard W; Champion, Olivia L

    2014-06-01

    A novel protein translocation system, the type-6 secretion system (T6SS), may play a role in virulence of Campylobacter jejuni. We investigated 181 C. jejuni isolates from humans, chickens, and environmental sources in Vietnam, Thailand, Pakistan, and the United Kingdom for T6SS. The marker was most prevalent in human and chicken isolates from Vietnam.

  2. Metronidazole resistance in Campylobacter jejuni from poultry meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sigrid Rita; Shukri, Naseer Mahmoud; Boel, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of metronidazole resistance was investigated among Campylobacter jejuni in raw poultry meat collected from supermarkets. MICs were determined by the agar dilution procedure in the testing range of 3 to 60 mu g/ml metronidazole. The MICs showed a bimodal distribution...

  3. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni in different gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Louise; Knochel, Susanne; Rosenquist, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni in fresh chilled chicken meat is known to be a major risk factor for human gastrointestinal disease. In the present study, the survival under chilled conditions of different C. jejuni strains exposed to different gas mixtures usually used for gas packaging of food was examined...

  4. Reactions of Chicken Sera to Recombinant Campylobacter jejuni Flagellar Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative rod bacterium and is the leading but under-reported bacterial food-borne pathogen that causes human campylobacteriosis worldwide. Raw or undercooked poultry products are regarded as a major source for human infection. C. jejuni flagella have been implicated ...

  5. Clonal distribution and virulence of Campylobacter jejuni isolates in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feodoroff, Benjamin; de Haan, Caroline P A; Ellström, Patrik; Sarna, Seppo; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2013-10-01

    Campylobacter jejuni bacteria are highly diverse enteropathogens. Seventy-three C. jejuni isolates from blood collected in Finland were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing and serum resistance. Approximately half of the isolates belonged to the otherwise uncommon sequence type 677 clonal complex. Isolates of this clonal complex were more resistant than other isolates to human serum.

  6. Milk modulates campylobacter invasion into caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, R.; Neerven, van R.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    Raw milk is a recognized source of Campylobacter outbreaks, but pasteurization is an effective way to eliminate the causative agent of Campylobacteriosis. Whereas breastfeeding is protective against infectious diseases, consumption of formula milk is thought to be not. However, in relation to Campyl

  7. Campylobacter Prevalence in the Broiler Supply Chain in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, van E.D.; Jacobs-Reitsma, W.F.; Brakel, van R.P.; Voet, van der H.; Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.

    2008-01-01

    After a national control program, data on Campylobacter prevalence in the broiler supply chain in the Netherlands were gathered for 3 sampling points: departure of broiler farm and arrival and departure of the slaughterhouse. Monitoring data from this control program for 2002 to 2005 were analyzed t

  8. Genomic Rearrangements Associated with Antigenic Variation in Campylobacter coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    AU’rHORS) P. Guerrv, S.M. Logan, and T.J. Trust. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 15. PAGE COUNT Journal article ...level. Olsen, N. R. Pace, and D. A. Stahl. 1987. Campylohacterpylori. the spiral bacterium associated with human gastritis , is not a true Campylobacter

  9. Development and stability of bacteriocin resistance 1 in Campylobacter spp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aims: Several bacteriocins (BCNs) identified from chicken commensal bacteria dramatically reduced Campylobacter colonization in poultry and aredirected toward on farm control of this important food-borne human pathogen. BCN resistance in C. jejuni is very difficult to develop in vitro. In this study...

  10. Prevalence, development, and molecular mechanisms of bacteriocin resistance in Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriocins (BCNs) are antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with narrow or broad spectra of antimicrobial activity. Recently, several unique anti-Campylobacter BCNs have been identified from commensal LAB isolated from chicken intestines. These BCNs dramatically reduced C. ...

  11. Case of acute pancreatitis associated with Campylobacter enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Rumiko; Matsumoto, Satohiro; Yoshida, Yukio

    2014-06-21

    A 25-year-old man was admitted with the chief complaints of right flank pain, watery diarrhea, and fever. Blood tests revealed high levels of inflammatory markers, and infectious enteritis was diagnosed. A stool culture obtained on admission revealed no growth of any significant pathogens. Conservative therapy was undertaken with fasting and fluid replacement. On day 2 of admission, the fever resolved, the frequency of defecation reduced, the right flank pain began to subside, and the white blood cell count started to decrease. On hospital day 4, the frequency of diarrhea decreased to approximately 5 times per day, and the right flank pain resolved. However, the patient developed epigastric pain and increased blood levels of the pancreatic enzymes. Abdominal computed tomography revealed mild pancreatic enlargement. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed, and conservative therapy with fasting and fluid replacement was continued. A day later, the blood levels of the pancreatic enzymes peaked out. On hospital day 7, the patient passed stools with fresh blood, and Campylobacter jejuni/coli was detected by culture. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy performed on hospital day 8 revealed diffuse aphthae extending from the terminal ileum to the entire colon. Based on the findings, pancreatitis associated with Campylobacter enteritis was diagnosed. In the present case, a possible mechanism of onset of pancreatitis was invasion of the pancreatic duct by Campylobacter and the host immune responses to Campylobacter.

  12. Optimal interventions to control campylobacter in broilers in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Sommer, Helle Mølgaard; Hald, Anna Bodil;

    In a multi disciplinary project we have evaluated interventions against Campylobacter in the broiler production chain. Taking into account risk reduction, costs, practicability and public acceptance of decontamination, it was concluded that at present the optimal control measure for the Danish...

  13. Salmonella og Campylobacter i økologisk svineproduktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annette Nygaard; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    2005-01-01

    De mere ekstensive systemer i økologisk svineproduktion formodes at have en positiv effekt på dyrenes robusthed f.eks. over for infektioner. Der er dog ingen dokumentation for, at økologiske svin har et lavere indhold af de almindelige zoonotiske bakterier som f.eks. Salmonella og Campylobacter end...

  14. PCR detection of seven virulence and toxin genes of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli isolates from Danish pigs and cattle and cytolethal distending toxin production of the isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Dang Duong; Nielsen, E.M.; Scheutz, F.

    2003-01-01

    demonstrated that these putative pathogenic determinants are widespread among Campylobacter isolates from pigs and cattle. Campylobacter coli isolates from pigs produced much higher CDT titres compared with C. coli isolates from other sources suggesting that C. coli may be particularly adapted to or associated...

  15. Cell wall anchoring of the Campylobacter antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Anna Kobierecka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type Campylobacter jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analysed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered

  16. High Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Campylobacter jejuni in Wild Crows and Pigeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramonaitė, Sigita; Novoslavskij, Aleksandr; Zakarienė, Gintarė; Aksomaitienė, Jurgita; Malakauskas, Mindaugas

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence, seasonal variation and genetic diversity of Campylobacter spp. in pigeons and crows over a 1-year period were evaluated. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from 166 (34.6 %) out of 480 wild bird faecal samples. The occurrence of Campylobacter spp. in faecal samples was higher among crows (39.2 %) than pigeons (30.0 %), (P Campylobacter jejuni was the most common species detected among wild bird faecal samples (98.2 %). Meanwhile, Campylobacter coli prevalence in wild bird faecal samples was low-6 %. The Simpson's diversity index of C. jejuni flaA RFLP types was lower in pigeons (D = 0.88) compared with C. jejuni isolates detected in crows (D = 0.97). Obtained results revealed that C. jejuni are widely prevalent among crows and pigeons, indicating these wild birds as potential infection sources to humans. Further studies are required to determine crows and pigeons role in zoonotic transmission of Campylobacter.

  17. Sewage effluent as a source of Campylobacter sp. in a surface water catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechenburg, Andrea; Kistemann, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    Campylobacter sp. can regularly be found in wastewater-affected surface waters. The occurrence of Campylobacter sp. in rivers, treated sewage and combined sewer overflows was analysed in a catchment with sparse annual precipitation. During regular treatment the reduction efficacy for Campylobacter sp. varies between 1.75 and 3.5 log(10). However, Campylobacter sp. concentrations do not increase downstream in the river as more sewage treatment plants discharge into it. During rain events, the Campylobacter sp. concentration in the river upstream of any sewage plant rises and in the sewer overflow water it is more than 150-fold higher than the average concentration in the river water at the river mouth. The highest Campylobacter sp. loads and the highest risk of infection occur during summertime after heavy rainfall. Risk management strategies should focus on problems regarding water scarcity, reuse of sewage effluent and the impact of heavy rain events.

  18. Description and sources of contamination by Campylobacter spp. of river water destined for human consumption in Brittany, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, M; M Tanguy; Chidaine, B; Laisney, M-J; Mégraud, F; Fravalo, P

    2011-10-01

    Presence or absence of Campylobacter spp. in water of five rivers upstream from an intake point for drinking water production was investigated, and isolates genetically compared with human, pig and poultry isolates in order to determine their source. River water and drinking water obtained from these rivers were sampled one time per month, over a period of one year, and tested for Campylobacter. Isolates were typed by PFGE. Campylobacter was not detected in treated drinking water, but 50% of the river samples were contaminated. Contamination was observed on the four seasons. In total, 297 Campylobacter isolates were collected and generated 46 PFGE profiles. Campylobacter jejuni was the most frequently detected species in samples (74.1% of the isolates), followed by Campylobacter coli (17.8%) and Campylobacter lari (8.1%). Forty-two of the 46 PFGE profiles were unique. Only one genotype was detected three times in a river during the year and four genotypes in two different rivers. When compared to animal and human Campylobacter PFGE profiles, 14, 11 and one Campylobacter genotypes from water were genetically closed to human, poultry, and pig Campylobacter genotypes, respectively. The Campylobacter population displayed a high level of genetic diversity, suggesting that contamination originated from various origins. Human, poultry and pig were sources of contamination of the river by Campylobacter. Finally, no Campylobacter were detected in drinking water, indicating that the risk of outbreaks due to consumption of drinking water is low.

  19. Bacteriophage receptor binding protein based assays for the simultaneous detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad A; Poshtiban, Somayyeh; Arutyunov, Denis; Evoy, Stephane; Szymanski, Christine M

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the most common bacterial causes of foodborne gastroenteritis which is occasionally followed by a debilitating neuropathy known as Guillain-Barré syndrome. Rapid and specific detection of these pathogens is very important for effective control and quick treatment of infection. Most of the diagnostics available for these organisms are time consuming and require technical expertise with expensive instruments and reagents to perform. Bacteriophages bind to their host specifically through their receptor binding proteins (RBPs), which can be exploited for pathogen detection. We recently sequenced the genome of C. jejuni phage NCTC12673 and identified its putative host receptor binding protein, Gp047. In the current study, we localized the receptor binding domain to the C-terminal quarter of Gp047. CC-Gp047 could be produced recombinantly and was capable of agglutinating both C. jejuni and C. coli cells unlike the host range of the parent phage which is limited to a subset of C. jejuni isolates. The agglutination procedure could be performed within minutes on a glass slide at room temperature and was not hindered by the presence of buffers or nutrient media. This agglutination assay showed 100% specificity and the sensitivity was 95% for C. jejuni (n = 40) and 90% for C. coli (n = 19). CC-Gp047 was also expressed as a fusion with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Chimeric EGFP_CC-Gp047 was able to specifically label C. jejuni and C. coli cells in mixed cultures allowing for the detection of these pathogens by fluorescent microscopy. This study describes a simple and rapid method for the detection of C. jejuni and C. coli using engineered phage RBPs and offers a promising new diagnostics platform for healthcare and surveillance laboratories.

  20. Bacteriophage receptor binding protein based assays for the simultaneous detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad A Javed

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are the most common bacterial causes of foodborne gastroenteritis which is occasionally followed by a debilitating neuropathy known as Guillain-Barré syndrome. Rapid and specific detection of these pathogens is very important for effective control and quick treatment of infection. Most of the diagnostics available for these organisms are time consuming and require technical expertise with expensive instruments and reagents to perform. Bacteriophages bind to their host specifically through their receptor binding proteins (RBPs, which can be exploited for pathogen detection. We recently sequenced the genome of C. jejuni phage NCTC12673 and identified its putative host receptor binding protein, Gp047. In the current study, we localized the receptor binding domain to the C-terminal quarter of Gp047. CC-Gp047 could be produced recombinantly and was capable of agglutinating both C. jejuni and C. coli cells unlike the host range of the parent phage which is limited to a subset of C. jejuni isolates. The agglutination procedure could be performed within minutes on a glass slide at room temperature and was not hindered by the presence of buffers or nutrient media. This agglutination assay showed 100% specificity and the sensitivity was 95% for C. jejuni (n = 40 and 90% for C. coli (n = 19. CC-Gp047 was also expressed as a fusion with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Chimeric EGFP_CC-Gp047 was able to specifically label C. jejuni and C. coli cells in mixed cultures allowing for the detection of these pathogens by fluorescent microscopy. This study describes a simple and rapid method for the detection of C. jejuni and C. coli using engineered phage RBPs and offers a promising new diagnostics platform for healthcare and surveillance laboratories.

  1. Complete genome sequences of Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis strain LMG9260 and Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. lawsonii strain LMG15993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter hyointestinalis is isolated primarily from ruminants and swine, but is also occasionally isolated from humans. C. hyointestinalis is currently divided into two subspecies: subsps. hyointestinalis and lawsonii. This study describes the first closed whole-genome sequences of the subsp. h...

  2. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  3. Affinity Probe Capillary Electrophoresis Evaluation of Aptamer Binding to Campylobacter jejuni Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Affinity Probe Capillary Electrophoresis Evaluation of Aptamer Binding to Campylobacter jejuni Bacteria by Dimitra N. Stratis-Cullum, Sun...Aptamer Binding to Campylobacter jejuni Bacteria Dimitra N. Stratis-Cullum, Sun McMasters, and Paul M. Pellegrino Sensors and Electron Devices...To) 2007–2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Affinity Probe Capillary Electrophoresis Evaluation of Aptamer Binding to Campylobacter jejuni Bacteria 5a

  4. Campylobacter concisus pathotypes are present at significant levels in patients with gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Alexander P; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Sodhi, Nidhi; Merif, Juan; Seah Lee, Way; Riordan, Stephen M; Rawlinson, William D; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2016-03-01

    Given that Campylobacter jejuni is recognized as the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide, recent findings showing comparable levels of Campylobacter concisus in patients with gastroenteritis would suggest that this bacterium is clinically important. The prevalence and abundance of Campylobacter concisus in stool samples collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis was examined using quantitative real-time PCR. The associated virulence determinants exotoxin 9 and zonula occludens toxin DNA were detected for Campylobacter concisus-infected samples using real-time PCR. Campylobacter concisus was detected at high prevalence in patients with gastroenteritis (49.7 %), higher than that observed for Campylobacter jejuni (∼5 %). The levels of Campylobacter concisus were putatively classified into clinically relevant and potentially transient subgroups based on a threshold developed using Campylobacter jejuni levels, as the highly sensitive real-time PCR probably detected transient passage of the bacterium from the oral cavity. A total of 18 % of patients were found to have clinically relevant levels of Campylobacter concisus, a significant number of which also had high levels of one of the virulence determinants. Of these patients, 78 % were found to have no other gastrointestinal pathogen identified in the stool, which strongly suggests a role for Campylobacter concisus in the aetiology of gastroenteritis in these patients. These results emphasize the need for diagnostic laboratories to employ identification protocols for emerging Campylobacter species. Clinical follow-up in patients presenting with high levels of Campylobacter concisus in the intestinal tract is needed, given that it has been associated with more chronic sequelae.

  5. A longitudinal study of Campylobacter distribution in a turkey production chain

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    Hänninen Marja-Liisa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial enteritis worldwide. Handling and eating of contaminated poultry meat has considered as one of the risk factors for human campylobacteriosis.Campylobacter contamination can occur at all stages of a poultry production cycle. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of Campylobacter during a complete turkey production cycle which lasts for 1,5 years of time. For detection of Campylobacter, a conventional culture method was compared with a PCR method. Campylobacter isolates from different types of samples have been identified to the species level by a multiplex PCR assay. Methods Samples (N = 456 were regularly collected from one turkey parent flock, the hatchery, six different commercial turkey farms and from 11 different stages at the slaughterhouse. For the detection of Campylobacter, a conventional culture and a PCR method were used. Campylobacter isolates (n = 143 were identified to species level by a multiplex PCR assay. Results No Campylobacter were detected in either the samples from the turkey parent flock or from hatchery samples using the culture method. PCR detected Campylobacter DNA in five faecal samples and one fluff and eggshell sample. Six flocks out of 12 commercial turkey flocks where found negative at the farm level but only two were negative at the slaughterhouse. Conclusion During the brooding period Campylobacter might have contact with the birds without spreading of the contamination within the flock. Contamination of working surfaces and equipment during slaughter of a Campylobacter positive turkey flock can persist and lead to possible contamination of negative flocks even after the end of the day's cleaning and desinfection. Reduction of contamination at farm by a high level of biosecurity control and hygiene may be one of the most efficient ways to reduce the amount of contaminated poultry meat in Finland. Due to the low numbers of

  6. A longitudinal study of Campylobacter distribution in a turkey production chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko-Mäkelä, Päivikki; Isohanni, Pauliina; Katzav, Marianne; Lund, Marianne; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa; Lyhs, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Background Campylobacter is the most common cause of bacterial enteritis worldwide. Handling and eating of contaminated poultry meat has considered as one of the risk factors for human campylobacteriosis.Campylobacter contamination can occur at all stages of a poultry production cycle. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of Campylobacter during a complete turkey production cycle which lasts for 1,5 years of time. For detection of Campylobacter, a conventional culture method was compared with a PCR method. Campylobacter isolates from different types of samples have been identified to the species level by a multiplex PCR assay. Methods Samples (N = 456) were regularly collected from one turkey parent flock, the hatchery, six different commercial turkey farms and from 11 different stages at the slaughterhouse. For the detection of Campylobacter, a conventional culture and a PCR method were used. Campylobacter isolates (n = 143) were identified to species level by a multiplex PCR assay. Results No Campylobacter were detected in either the samples from the turkey parent flock or from hatchery samples using the culture method. PCR detected Campylobacter DNA in five faecal samples and one fluff and eggshell sample. Six flocks out of 12 commercial turkey flocks where found negative at the farm level but only two were negative at the slaughterhouse. Conclusion During the brooding period Campylobacter might have contact with the birds without spreading of the contamination within the flock. Contamination of working surfaces and equipment during slaughter of a Campylobacter positive turkey flock can persist and lead to possible contamination of negative flocks even after the end of the day's cleaning and desinfection. Reduction of contamination at farm by a high level of biosecurity control and hygiene may be one of the most efficient ways to reduce the amount of contaminated poultry meat in Finland. Due to the low numbers of Campylobacter in the

  7. Prevalence and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Thermophilic Campylobacter Species in Broiler Chickens

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Murat; İSTANBULLUOĞLU, Ersin; AYVALI, Burcu

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of thermophilic Campylobacter species in broiler chicken faecal samples and on their carcasses. The possible routes of carcass contamination were assessed from slaughterhouse to market. Furthermore, the study aimed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility of Campylobacter isolates from broilers. Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. was isolated from 393 (91.8%) of 428 samples examined. A total of 53 out of 57 rectal swab samples wa...

  8. Serologic Evidence of Previous Campylobacter jejuni Infection in Patients with the Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-15

    Outer Membrane Proteins of Campylobacter Jejuni for Vaccine Development Approved for public release; distribution unlimited Acccsiccn For rNTIS CRA&I... Campylobacter jejuni may tigation of 106 patients with the Guillain-Barre syn- play a role in the initiation of the Guillain-Barr6 syn- drome, C. jejuni...C. jejuni infection also lain-Barr6 syndrome were 5.3 times more likely to have Table 2. Campylobacter jejuni Antibodies in Patients with Culture

  9. Prevalence of Campylobacter species in ground water in Sokoto, Sokoto state, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Agatha N. Ugboma; Muhammed D. Salihu; Abdullahi A. Magaji; Abubakar, Mikail B.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The present study was conducted to determine the presence and prevalence of Campylobacter species in ground water in Sokoto, Sokoto State. Materials and Methods: The prevalence of Campylobacter species was determined by collecting a total of 74 water samples from wells in Sokoto over a period of four months from May to August 2011 and analyzed using cultural isolation techniques and biochemical characterization. Results: Totally 39 (52.70%) water samples were Campylobacter positive. The ...

  10. II Consenso Brasileiro sobre Helicobacter pylori Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection

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    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Primeiro Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 1995, em Belo Horizonte, MG, justificam este segundo consenso. O evento foi organizado pela Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia e pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, sendo realizado em São Paulo nos dias 19 e 20 de junho de 2004. Contou com a participação das principais autoridades nacionais na área, a partir de lista elaborada pelas duas sociedades organizadoras do evento. Assim, participaram 36 delegados provenientes de 15 estados brasileiros, incluindo gastroenterologistas, patologistas, pediatras e microbiologistas. Os participantes foram alocados em um dos cinco sub-temas a serem contemplados no encontro, a saber: Helicobacter pylori e dispepsia funcional; Helicobacter pylori e AINEs; Helicobacter pylori e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico; tratamento Helicobacter pylori e retratamento Helicobacter pylori. Foi adotado como consensual as decisões que atingissem 70% ou mais de concordância entre os participantes. Os resultados foram apresentados em outubro de 2004 durante sessão especial da VI Semana Brasileira do Aparelho Digestivo, realizada em Recife, PE, e esta publicação apresenta o sumário das principais recomendações e conclusões do evento.Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The

  11. Diversity of the Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb (disulfide bond) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian-Ostrzycka, Katarzyna M; Grzeszczuk, Magdalena J; Dziewit, Lukasz; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial proteins of the Dsb family-important components of the post-translational protein modification system-catalyze the formation of disulfide bridges, a process that is crucial for protein structure stabilization and activity. Dsb systems play an essential role in the assembly of many virulence factors. Recent rapid advances in global analysis of bacteria have thrown light on the enormous diversity among bacterial Dsb systems. While the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is quite well understood, the mechanisms of action of Dsb systems in other bacteria, including members of class Epsilonproteobacteria that contain pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria colonizing extremely diverse ecological niches, are poorly characterized. Here we present a review of current knowledge on Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb systems. We have focused on the Dsb systems of Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter spp. because our knowledge about Dsb proteins of Wolinella and Arcobacter spp. is still scarce and comes mainly from bioinformatic studies. Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen that colonizes the gastric epithelium of humans with severe consequences. Campylobacter spp. is a leading cause of zoonotic enteric bacterial infections in most developed and developing nations. We focus on various aspects of the diversity of the Dsb systems and their influence on pathogenicity, particularly because Dsb proteins are considered as potential targets for a new class of anti-virulence drugs to treat human infections by Campylobacter or Helicobacter spp.

  12. Diversity of the Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb (disulfide bond systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Marta Bocian-Ostrzycka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial proteins of the Dsb family – important components of the posttranslational protein modification system – catalyze the formation of disulfide bridges, a process that is crucial for protein structure stabilization and activity. Dsb systems play an essential role in the assembly of many virulence factors. Recent rapid advances in global analysis of bacteria have thrown light on the enormous diversity among bacterial Dsb systems. While the Escherichia coli disulfide bond-forming system is quite well understood, the mechanisms of action of Dsb systems in other bacteria, including members of class Epsilonproteobacteria that contain pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria colonizing extremely diverse ecological niches, are poorly characterized. Here we present a review of current knowledge on Epsilonproteobacteria Dsb systems. We have focused on the Dsb systems of Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter spp. because our knowledge about Dsb proteins of Wolinella and Arcobacter spp. is still scarce and comes mainly from bioinformatic studies. Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen that colonizes the gastric epithelium of humans with severe consequences. Campylobacter spp. is a leading cause of zoonotic enteric bacterial infections in most developed and developing nations. We focus on various aspects of the diversity of the Dsb systems and their influence on pathogenicity, particularly because Dsb proteins are considered as potential targets for a new class of anti-virulence drugs to treat human infections by Campylobacter or Helicobacter spp.

  13. Associations between Campylobacter levels on chicken skin, underlying muscle, caecum and packaged fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, I; Nyman, A; Lahti, E; Gustafsson, P; Olsson Engvall, E

    2015-06-01

    A study was performed with the aim to investigate associations between Campylobacter in chicken caecum, carcass skin, underlying breast muscle and packaged breast fillets. Samples were taken from 285 chickens from 57 flocks and analysed according to ISO 10272. Campylobacter spp. were isolated from caecal samples from 41 flocks. From birds of the same 41 flocks Campylobacter could be detected and quantified in 194 (68%) skin samples. Moreover, Campylobacter spp. were enumerated in 13 (5%) underlying muscle samples originating from 9 of the 41 flocks. The mean number of Campylobacter spp. in the 194 skin samples which could be counted was 2.3 log cfu/g and for the 13 underlying muscle samples 1.3 log cfu/g. Campylobacter could only be quantified in those breast muscle samples with a finding in corresponding skin sample. Five packaged chicken fillets were taken from each 25 of the 57 flocks and analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. In qualitative analysis Campylobacter was detected in 79 (63%) fillets from 16 flocks and quantified in 24 (19%) samples from 11 flocks. The results showed a significant association (P Campylobacter on carcass skin (log cfu/g) and the proportion of Campylobacter positive breast muscle samples.

  14. Development of a PCR assay suitable for Campylobacter spp. mass screening programs in broiler production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Dang Duong; Pedersen, Karl; Madsen, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    culture techniques since 1998. However, using conventional culture methods is time consuming and laborious, and therefore a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Campylobacter detection assay suitable for mass screening of cloacal swab samples from broilers was developed. By comparing the PCR detection...... with conventional culture methods, significantly more samples were found positive for Campylobacter with the PCR method. The PCR method is rapid, sensitive and suitable for mass screening for Campylobacter in poultry. Using this PCR method Campylobacter can be detected within 15 h. Notably, the method can...

  15. Campylobacter MLST Subtypes and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Broiler Cecal Isolates: A Two Year Study from 142 Commercial Flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction: Campylobacter spp. are recognized as important agents of human foodborne gastroenteritis. To monitor trends in food safety and public health, antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Campylobacter derived from poultry products and infected patients has become common practice in both r...

  16. Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptiles and Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Miller, William G; Yee, Emma; Zomer, Aldert L; van der Graaf-van Bloois, Linda; Fitzgerald, Collette; Forbes, Ken J; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, Samuel K; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Duim, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated wi

  17. Assessment of PCR-DGGE for the identification of diverse Helicobacter species, and application to faecal samples from zoo animals to determine Helicobacter prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu Al-Soud, W.; Bennedsen, M.; On, Stephen L.W.;

    2003-01-01

    bilis and Helicobacter hepaticus in a Nile crocodile, Helicobacter cinaedi in a baboon and a red panda, and Helicobacter felis in a wolf and a Taiwan beauty snake. All of these PCR products (similar to400 bp) showed 100 % sequence similarity to 16S rDNA sequences of the mentioned species. These results...

  18. Frequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopy

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    Ahmet Tay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate thefrequency of Helicobacter pylori in patients underwent endoscopyeastern Anatolia.Materials and methods: The patients whose endoscopicantral biopsies were taken for any reason in our endoscopyunit in February-June 2010 period were includedand retrospectively investigated. The frequency of Helicobacterpylori was determined as separating the patientsaccording to general, sex and the age groups. Antral biopsieswere stained with hematoxylin-eosin and modified giemsamethod and examined under light microscope andreported as (+ mild, (++ moderate, (+++ severe positiveaccording to their intensities.Results: Biopsy specimens of 1298 patients were includedinto the study. The mean age was 47.5 ± 17.5 years(range 14-88 and 607 of these patients (47% were male.Histopathological evaluation revealed that, 918 of the patientswere (71% positive and 379 (29% were negativefor Helicobacter pylori. Approximately 60% of our patientshad mild, 29% had moderate and 11% had severe positivityfor Helicobacter pylori. No significant difference wasfound in the frequency of Helicobacter pylori betweenwomen and men. The frequencies of Helicobacter pyloriwere 73.2%, 71.5%, 68.6% and 70.4%, respectively, inthe age groups of 14-30 years, 31-45 years, 46-60 yearsand 61-88 years.Conclusion: The frequency of Helicobacter pylori was71% in Eastern Anatolia Region. No statistically significantdifference was found between genders and agegroups in term of the frequency of Helicobacter pylori.

  19. Characterization of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in Patients with Gastric Ulcer

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    Marcos Félix Osorio Pagola

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, infection due to Helicobacter Pylori is recognized as a medical problem worldwide. It causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, lymphatic proliferative disorders and it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Objective: To characterize Helicobacter Pylori infection in patients with gastric ulcer and to relate this infection to gastric histological diagnoses. Methods: An observational, descriptive, correlational retrospective study in patients with gastric ulcers at the Dr.Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital was carried out from January 2005 to December 2007. Endoscopy and mucous gastric biopsy were performed for the histological and diagnostic study of the infection due to Helicobacter Pylori by means of the hematoxiline-eosine and giemsa stain respectively. The sample was composed by 137 patients. Results: the frequency of infection due to Helicobacter pylori was 59,1 % prevailing in the age groups 51-60 years old (34,6 % and 61-70 yearsold. (30,8 %. The highest frequency of malignant ulcers were located at the antral region (85,7 % with predominance of Helicobacter Pylori (80 %. There was a 95 % reliability between the relationship of Helicobacter Pylori and the histological diagnoses. The patients under the diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori showed a greater probability to present cancer (OR 4,32 IC: 0,58-39,44 and worsened chronic gastritis (OR 2,59 IC: 0,61-11,30. Chronic gastritis did not constitute a risk factor for acute gastritis(OR 0,86 IC: 0,09-7,08. Conclusions: The probability of suffering from gastric cancer, chronic gastritis and worsened chronic gastritis was greater in all those patients who presented with Helicobacter pylori infection but in this study Helicobacter pylori did not constitute a risk factor for acute gastritis

  20. The effect of citric acid, lactic acid, sodium citrate and sodium lactate, alone and in combination with nisin, on the growth of Arcobacter butzleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, C A

    1999-12-01

    The importance of Arcobacter spp. as a cause of human foodborne illness is unresolved. Organic acids and their sodium salts, and nisin are preservatives commonly used in the type of foods from which the organism is recovered. In this study their effect on the growth of A. butzleri in culture, alone and in combination, was investigated. At 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% lactic and citric acids inhibited A. butzleri growth; 2% sodium lactate was effective in inhibiting growth over 8 h incubation but not over longer periods. Sodium citrate was more effective than sodium lactate. Nisin alone inhibited A. butzleri growth at 500 IU ml-1 over 5 h. It did not enhance the effect of sodium citrate inhibition but it did augment the effect of sodium lactate alone over 8 h.