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Sample records for camptothecin induces escape

  1. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Germann, Susanne Manuela; Westergaard, Tine;

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is accompanied by extensive changes to chromatin organization at the site of DNA damage. Some of these changes are mediated through acetylation/deacetylation of histones. Here, we show that recombinational repair of DNA damage induced by the anti-cancer drug camptothecin...

  2. Identification and replication of loci involved in camptothecin-induced cytotoxicity using CEPH pedigrees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venita Gresham Watson

    Full Text Available To date, the Centre d'Etude Polymorphism Humain (CEPH cell line model has only been used as a pharmacogenomic tool to evaluate which genes are responsible for the disparity in response to a single drug. The purpose of this study was demonstrate the model's ability to establish a specific pattern of quantitative trait loci (QTL related to a shared mechanism for multiple structurally related drugs, the camptothecins, which are Topoisomerase 1 inhibitors. A simultaneous screen of six camptothecin analogues for in vitro sensitivity in the CEPH cell lines resulted in cytotoxicity profiles and orders of potency which were in agreement with the literature. For all camptothecins studied, heritability estimates for cytotoxic response averaged 23.1 ± 2.6%. Nonparametric linkage analysis was used to identify a relationship between genetic markers and response to the camptothecins. Ten QTLs on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 11, 12, 16 and 20 were identified as shared by all six camptothecin analogues. In a separate validation experiment, nine of the ten QTLs were replicated at the significant and suggestive levels using three additional camptothecin analogues. To further refine this list of QTLs, another validation study was undertaken and seven of the nine QTLs were independently replicated for all nine camptothecin analogues. This is the first study using the CEPH cell lines that demonstrates that a specific pattern of QTLs could be established for a class of drugs which share a mechanism of action. Moreover, it is the first study to report replication of linkage results for drug-induced cytotoxicity using this model. The QTLs, which have been identified as shared by all camptothecins and replicated across multiple datasets, are of considerable interest; they harbor genes related to the shared mechanism of action for the camptothecins, which are responsible for variation in response.

  3. Noxa/Mcl-1 Balance Regulates Susceptibility of Cells to Camptothecin-Induced Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yide Mei

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Although camptothecin (CPT has been reported to induce apoptosis in various cancer cells, the molecular details of this regulation remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that 131-113-only protein Noxa is upregulated during CPT-induced apoptosis, which is independent of p53. In addition, we show that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is responsible for Noxa's induction. Luciferase assay, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB knockdown experiments further demonstrate that CREB is involved in the transcriptional upregulation of Noxa. Moreover, blocking Noxa expression using specific small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA significantly reduces the apoptosis in response to CPT, indicating that Noxa is an essential mediator for CPT-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, antiapoptotic Mcl-1 was also upregulated through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway upon CPT treatment. Using immunoprecipitation assay, Noxa was found to interact with Mcl-1 in the presence or absence of CPT. Knockdown of Mcl-1 expression by short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA was shown to potentiate CPT-induced apoptosis. Consistently, ectopic overexpression of Mcl-1 rescued cells from apoptosis induced by CPT. Cells coexpressing Noxa, Mcl-1 at different ratio correlates well with the extent of apoptosis, suggesting that the balance between Noxa, Mcl-1 may determine the susceptibility of HeLa cells to CPT-induced apoptosis.

  4. Camptothecin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brangi, M; Litman, Thomas; Ciotti, M;

    1999-01-01

    but not after camptothecin treatment. In addition to topotecan and SN-38, MXR-overexpressing cells are highly resistant to mitoxantrone and epirubicin. Because these compounds are susceptible to glucuronidation, we examined UDP-glucurono-syltransferase (UGT) activity in parental and resistant cells by TLC...

  5. Protein kinase Cη activates NF-κB in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Protein kinase C-eta (PKCη) is an upstream regulator of the NF-κB signaling pathway. → PKCη activates NF-κB in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. → PKCη regulates NF-κB by activating IκB kinase (IKK) and inducing IκB degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-κB in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-κB regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKCη) regulates NF-κB upstream signaling by activating the IκB kinase (IKK) and the degradation of IκB. Furthermore, PKCη enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-κB under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKCη confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKCη is involved in NF-κB signaling leading to drug resistance.

  6. Wind-Induced Atmospheric Escape: Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Richard; Johnson, Robert; Sittler, Edward, Jr.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Simpson, David

    2012-01-01

    Rapid thermospheric flows can significantly enhance the estimates of the atmospheric loss rate and the structure of the atmospheric corona of a planetary body. In particular, rapid horizontal flow at the exobase can increase the corresponding constituent escape rate. Here we show that such corrections, for both thermal and non-thermal escape, cannot be ignored when calculating the escape of methane from Titan, for which drastically different rates have been proposed. Such enhancements are also relevant to Pluto and exoplanets.

  7. Protein kinase C{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit [The Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Cancer Research Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); Gopas, Jacob [The Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Cancer Research Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel); The Department of Oncology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Livneh, Etta, E-mail: etta@bgu.ac.il [The Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Cancer Research Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Protein kinase C-eta (PKC{eta}) is an upstream regulator of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway. {yields} PKC{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. {yields} PKC{eta} regulates NF-{kappa}B by activating I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and inducing I{kappa}B degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-{kappa}B in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-{kappa}B regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKC{eta}) regulates NF-{kappa}B upstream signaling by activating the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and the degradation of I{kappa}B. Furthermore, PKC{eta} enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-{kappa}B under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKC{eta} confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKC{eta} is involved in NF-{kappa}B signaling leading to drug resistance.

  8. Camptothecin and khat (Catha edulis Forsk. induced distinct cell death phenotypes involving modulation of c-FLIPL, Mcl-1, procaspase-8 and mitochondrial function in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossan Kjell O

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An organic extract of the recreational herb khat (Catha edulis Forsk. triggers cell death in various leukemia cell lines in vitro. The chemotherapeutics camptothecin, a plant alkaloid topoisomerase I inhibitor, was tested side-by-side with khat in a panel of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines to elucidate mechanisms of toxicity. Results Khat had a profound effect on MOLM-13 cells inducing mitochondrial damage, chromatin margination and morphological features of autophagy. The effects of khat on mitochondrial ultrastructure in MOLM-13 correlated with strongly impaired routine respiration, an effect neither found in the khat-resistant MV-4-11 cells nor in camptothecin treated cells. Enforced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein provided protection against camptothecin-induced cell death and partly against khat toxicity. Khat-induced cell death in MOLM-13 cells included reduced levels of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein, while both khat and camptothecin induced c-FLIPL cleavage and procaspase-8 activation. Conclusion Khat activated a distinct cell death pathway in sensitive leukemic cells as compared to camptothecin, involving mitochondrial damage and morphological features of autophagy. This suggests that khat should be further explored in the search for novel experimental therapeutics.

  9. Plasma-induced Escape and Alterations of Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.; Ewrin, J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Leblanc, F.

    2009-12-01

    The atmospheres of planets and planetary satellites are typically imbedded in space plasmas. Depending on the interaction with the induced or intrinsic fields energetic ions can have access to the thermosphere and the corona affecting their composition and thermal structure and causing loss to space. These processes are often lumped together as ‘atmospheric sputtering’ (Johnson 1994). In this talk I will review the results of simulations of the plasma bombardment at a number of solar system bodies and use those data to describe the effect on the upper atmosphere and on escape. Of considerable recent interest is the modeling of escape from Titan. Prior to Cassini’s tour of the Saturnian system, plasma-induced escape was suggested to be the dominant loss process, but recent models of enhanced thermal escape, often referred to as ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape, have been suggested to lead to much larger Titan atmospheric loss rates (Strobel 2008; Cui et al. 2008). Such a process has been suggested to be active at some point in time on a number of solar system bodies. I will present hybrid fluid/ kinetic models of the upper atmosphere of certain bodies in order to test both the plasma-induced and thermal escape processes. Preliminary results suggest that the loss rates estimated using the ‘slow hydrodynamic’ escape process can be orders of magnitude too large. The implications for Mars, Titan and Pluto will be discussed. Background for this talk is contained in the following papers (Johnson 2004; 2009; Chaufray et al. 2007; Johnson et al. 2008; 2009; Tucker and Johnson 2009). References: Chaufray, J.Y., R. Modolo, F. Leblanc, G. Chanteur, R.E. Johnson, and J.G. Luhmann, Mars Solar Wind interaction: formation of the Martian corona and atmosphric loss to space, JGR 112, E09009, doi:10.1029/2007JE002915 (2007) Cui, J., Yelle, R. V., Volk, K. Distribution and escape of molecular hydrogen in Titan's thermosphere and exosphere. J. Geophys. Res. 113, doi:10

  10. Spectroscopic Study of The Interaction between Camptothecin and DNA%喜树碱与DNA相互作用的光谱学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于岚岚; 杨冉; 白希希; 陈晓英; 李建军; 屈凌波

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of an anti-cancer drug camptothecin with salmon sperm DNA was studied by spec-troscopic techniques. DNA induced slight hypochromic and bathochromic effects on the UV-Vis absorption spectra of camptothecin, but strong fluorescence quenching of camptothecin, which suggest the formation of ground-state camptothecin-DNA complex. The binding constant and number of binding site were calculated and the main interaction force was determined. The effect of salt, phosphate and negatively charged quencher KI on camptothecin-DNA interaction was investigated and the interaction of camptothecin with double-stranded DNA and single-stranded DNA was compared. The melting temperature of camptothecin-DNA complex was 60 ℃ , which is 18℃ lower than that of pure DNA. All the results indicate that groove binding mode is the main interaction mode between camptothecin and DNA.

  11. Structured noise induced non-recross barrier escaping

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent barrier passage of a particle driven by the structured noise is studied in the field of a metastable potential. Quantities such as the probability of passing over the saddle point and transmission coefficient of the escaping rate are calculated for a thimbleful of insight into the diffusion dynamical properties. Results show that the barrier recrossing behavior is greatly reduced by the structured noisy environment. Particles diffusion in such an dissipative environment tends to successfully escape from the potential well without any embarrassments.

  12. Camptothecin inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun-Seok [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Division of Life Science, College of Health and Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shin-il [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kyu-dong [Hazardous Substances Analysis Division, Gwangju Regional Food and Drug Administration, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Yea [Department of Nursing Kyungbok University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin-Tae [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hwa-Sup [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Division of Life Science, College of Health and Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bokyung [Department of Physiology, Konkuk Medical School, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo-Pyo, E-mail: ypyun@chungbuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arterial wall is a major cause of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. In this study, we investigated not only the inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation, but also its molecular mechanism of this inhibition. CPT significantly inhibited proliferation with IC50 value of 0.58 μM and the DNA synthesis of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner (0.5–2 μM ) without any cytotoxicity. CPT induced the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Also, CPT decreased the expressions of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2, cyclin D1 and PCNA in PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs. Pre-incubation of VSMCs with CPT significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced Akt activation, whereas CPT did not affect PDGF-receptor beta phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1 phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. Our data showed that CPT pre-treatment inhibited VSMC proliferation, and that the inhibitory effect of CPT was enhanced by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation. In addition, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 significantly enhanced the suppression of PCNA expression and Akt activation by CPT. These results suggest that the anti-proliferative activity of CPT is mediated in part by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. - Highlights: ► CPT inhibits proliferation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMC without cytotoxicity. ► CPT arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase by downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK2. ► CPT significantly attenuates Akt phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. ► LY294002 enhanced the inhibitory effect of CPT on VSMC proliferation. ► Thus, CPT is mediated by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  13. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Tseng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma.

  14. Metastatic Tumor Dormancy in Cutaneous Melanoma: Does Surgery Induce Escape?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, William W. [Department of Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Avenue, Room S-321, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Fadaki, Niloofar; Leong, Stanley P., E-mail: leongsx@cpmcri.org [Department of Surgery and Center for Melanoma Research and Treatment, California Pacific Medical Center and Research Institute, 2340 Clay Street, 2nd floor, San Francisco, CA 94115 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    According to the concept of tumor dormancy, tumor cells may exist as single cells or microscopic clusters of cells that are clinically undetectable, but remain viable and have the potential for malignant outgrowth. At metastatic sites, escape from tumor dormancy under more favorable local microenvironmental conditions or through other, yet undefined stimuli, may account for distant recurrence after supposed “cure” following surgical treatment of the primary tumor. The vast majority of evidence to date in support of the concept of tumor dormancy originates from animal studies; however, extensive epidemiologic data from breast cancer strongly suggests that this process does occur in human disease. In this review, we aim to demonstrate that metastatic tumor dormancy does exist in cutaneous melanoma based on evidence from mouse models and clinical observations of late recurrence and occult transmission by organ transplantation. Experimental data underscores the critical role of impaired angiogenesis and immune regulation as major mechanisms for maintenance of tumor dormancy. Finally, we examine evidence for the role of surgery in promoting escape from tumor dormancy at metastatic sites in cutaneous melanoma.

  15. bcl-xs mediated sensitization of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells to camptothecin-induced apoptosis%bcl-xs增加鼻咽癌细胞对喜树碱诱导凋亡敏感性的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张月飞; 陈扬超; 周克元; 梁统

    2001-01-01

    Objective: In order to detect the effect of bcl-xs on camptothecin-induced apoptosis in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-2Z cells in vitro.Methods:bcl-xs gene-bearing mammalian expression vector(pcDNA3xs)was transfected into CNE-2Z cells using LipofectAmine.The expression of bcl-xs was determined with western blot.Cells which were transfected with native pcDNA3 vector were used as control.Apoptotic cells were detected with flow cytometry after exposure to camptothecin for 24h.Results:Cell clone(CNE-2Zxs)with stable expression of bcl-xs was obtained as confirmed with western blot.Results from flow cytometry analysis showed a significant increase of apoptotic cells in CNE-2Zxs as compared with CNE-2Zneo after treatment with the same dose of camptothecin.Conclusion:Exogenous bcl-xs expression sensitized nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-2Z cells to camptothecin-induced apoptosis.%目的:研究bcl-xs基因对喜树碱(CPT)诱导鼻咽癌CNE-2Z细胞凋亡的影响。方法:利用脂质体LipofectAmine将含有人bcl-xs基因的重组真核表达质粒pcDNA3xs导入人鼻咽癌低分化上皮细胞株CNE-2Z,G418筛选培养后,经Western blot检测bcl-xs的表达。以不含有bcl-xs基因的pcDNA3质粒转染CNE-2Z作为对照细胞。喜树碱处理两种细胞一定时间后,通过激光流式细胞仪检测凋亡细胞百分比。结果:Western blot检测证实获得稳定表达bcl-xs的细胞,经过0.5μmol/L,1.0μmol/L CPT处理24小时后,激光流式细胞仪检测的凋亡峰值均高于对照细胞。结论:bcl-xs能显著增加鼻咽癌CNE-2Z细胞对喜树碱诱导凋亡的敏感性。

  16. Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Induced Non-Thermal Escape Fluxes from the Martian Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Lewkow, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), produced through charge exchange (CX) collisions between solar wind (SW) ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated. Subsequent induced non-thermal escape fluxes have been carried out for the Martian atmosphere. Detailed modeling of the ENA energy input and determination of connections between parameters of precipitating ENAs and resulting escape fluxes, reflection coefficients of fast atoms from the Mars atmosphere, and altitude dependent ENA energy distributions are established using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the precipitation process with accurate quantum mechanical (QM) cross sections. Detailed descriptions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules induced by ENAs have been obtained for a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for atmospheric escape and evolution. The effects of using isotropic hard sphere (HS) cross sections as compared to realistic, anisotropic quantum cross sections are examined for energy-deposition profil...

  17. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priyanka L; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-08-23

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc-dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  18. IMF-induced escape of molecular ions from the Martian ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kubota

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Mars does not possess a significant global intrinsic magnetic field, the solar wind interacts directly with the Martian ionosphere and can induce ion escapes from it. Phobos-2 and recent Mars Express (MEX observations have shown that the escaping ions are O+ as well as molecular O2+ and CO2+. While O+ escape can be understood by the ion pick-up of non-thermal O corona extended around the planet, regarding the heavy molecular O2+ and CO2+, which are buried in the lower ionosphere, a novel escape mechanism needs to considered. Here we attack this problem by global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulations. First, we clarify the global structure of the streamlines that result from the interaction with the solar wind. Then, by focusing on the streamlines that dip into the low-altitude part of the dayside ionosphere, we investigate the escape path of the molecular ions. The effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF on the molecular ion escape process are investigated by comparing the results with and without IMF. IMF has little effect on O+ escape via ion pick-up mediated by solar wind electron impact ionization of the O corona. O2+ and CO2+ are shoveled from the low-altitude regions of the dayside ionosphere by magnetic tension in the presence of IMF. These ions are pulled by the U-shaped field lines to the north and south poles, and at the terminator, they are concentrated in the noon–midnight meridian plane. These ions remain confined to the noon–midnight plane as they are transported to the nightside to form the tail ray. Then they escape along the streamlines open to the interplanetary space. Under a typical solar wind and IMF condition expected at Mars, O+, O2+ and CO2+ escape fluxes are 8.0 × 1023, 3.5 × 1023 and 5.0 × 1022 ion s−1, respectively, which are in good agreement with the MEX observations.

  19. X-ray-induced photoemission yield for surface studies of solids beyond the photoelectron escape depth

    CERN Document Server

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Zhernenkov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    X-ray-induced photoemission in materials research is commonly acknowledged as a method with a probing depth limited by the escape depth of the photoelectrons. This general statement should be complemented with exceptions arising from the distribution of the X-ray wavefield in the material. Here we show that the integral hard-X-ray-induced photoemission yield is modulated by the Fresnel reflectivity of a multilayer structure with the signal originating well below the photoelectron escape depth. A simple electric self-detection of the integral photoemission yield and Fourier data analysis permit extraction of thicknesses of individual layers. The approach does not require detection of the reflected radiation and can be considered as a framework for non-invasive evaluation of buried layers with hard X-rays under grazing incidence.

  20. Camptothecin disrupts androgen receptor signaling and suppresses prostate cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the main therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic prostate cancers. The present study demonstrates that the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin selectively inhibits androgen-responsive growth of prostate cancer cells. Camptothecin strikingly inhibited mutated and wild-type AR protein expression in LNCaP and PC-3/AR cells. This inhibition coincided with decreased androgen-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser81 and reduced androgen-mediated AR transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, camptothecin disrupted the association between AR and heat shock protein 90 and impeded binding of the synthetic androgen [3H]R1881 to AR in LNCaP cells. Camptothecin also blocked androgen-induced AR nuclear translocation, leading to downregulation of the AR target gene PSA. In addition to decreasing the intracellular and secreted prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, camptothecin markedly inhibited androgen-stimulated PSA promoter activity. Collectively, our data reveal that camptothecin not only serves as a traditional genotoxic agent but, by virtue of its ability to target and disrupt AR, may also be a novel candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Camptothecin disrupts androgen receptor signaling and suppresses prostate cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shicheng, E-mail: liusc59@yahoo.co.jp [Research and Development Department, Nipro Patch Co., Ltd., 8-1, Minamisakae-cho, Kasukabe, Saitama 344-0057 (Japan); Yuan, Yiming [Department of Geriatrics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Okumura, Yutaka; Shinkai, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Hitoshi [Research and Development Department, Nipro Patch Co., Ltd., 8-1, Minamisakae-cho, Kasukabe, Saitama 344-0057 (Japan)

    2010-04-02

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the main therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic prostate cancers. The present study demonstrates that the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin selectively inhibits androgen-responsive growth of prostate cancer cells. Camptothecin strikingly inhibited mutated and wild-type AR protein expression in LNCaP and PC-3/AR cells. This inhibition coincided with decreased androgen-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser{sup 81} and reduced androgen-mediated AR transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, camptothecin disrupted the association between AR and heat shock protein 90 and impeded binding of the synthetic androgen [{sup 3}H]R1881 to AR in LNCaP cells. Camptothecin also blocked androgen-induced AR nuclear translocation, leading to downregulation of the AR target gene PSA. In addition to decreasing the intracellular and secreted prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, camptothecin markedly inhibited androgen-stimulated PSA promoter activity. Collectively, our data reveal that camptothecin not only serves as a traditional genotoxic agent but, by virtue of its ability to target and disrupt AR, may also be a novel candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  2. Precipitation of energetic neutral atoms and induced non-thermal escape fluxes from the Martian atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms, produced through charge exchange collisions between solar wind ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated for the Martian atmosphere. Connections between parameters of precipitating fast ions and resulting escape fluxes, altitude-dependent energy distributions of fast atoms and their coefficients of reflection from the Mars atmosphere, are established using accurate cross sections in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Distributions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules, induced by precipitating particles, have been obtained and applied for computations of the non-thermal escape fluxes. A new collisional database on accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections, required for description of the energy-momentum transfer in collisions of precipitating particles and production of non-thermal atmospheric atoms and molecules, is reported with analytic fitting equations. Three-dimensional MC simulations with accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections have been carried out to track large ensembles of energetic atoms in a time-dependent manner as they propagate into the Martian atmosphere and transfer their energy to the ambient atoms and molecules. Results of the MC simulations on the energy-deposition altitude profiles, reflection coefficients, and time-dependent atmospheric heating, obtained for the isotropic hard sphere and anisotropic quantum cross sections, are compared. Atmospheric heating rates, thermalization depths, altitude profiles of production rates, energy distributions of SH atoms and molecules, and induced escape fluxes have been determined.

  3. Overestimating climate warming-induced methane gas escape from the seafloor by neglecting multiphase flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranne, C.; O'Regan, M.; Jakobsson, M.

    2016-08-01

    Continental margins host large quantities of methane stored partly as hydrates in sediments. Release of methane through hydrate dissociation is implicated as a possible feedback mechanism to climate change. Large-scale estimates of future warming-induced methane release are commonly based on a hydrate stability approach that omits dynamic processes. Here we use the multiphase flow model TOUGH + hydrate (T + H) to quantitatively investigate how dynamic processes affect dissociation rates and methane release. The simulations involve shallow, 20-100 m thick hydrate deposits, forced by a bottom water temperature increase of 0.03°C yr-1 over 100 years. We show that on a centennial time scale, the hydrate stability approach can overestimate gas escape quantities by orders of magnitude. Our results indicate a time lag of > 40 years between the onset of warming and gas escape, meaning that recent climate warming may soon be manifested as widespread gas seepages along the world's continental margins.

  4. Topoisomerase I inhibitors: camptothecins and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Yves

    2006-10-01

    Nuclear DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) is an essential human enzyme. It is the only known target of the alkaloid camptothecin, from which the potent anticancer agents irinotecan and topotecan are derived. As camptothecins bind at the interface of the TOP1-DNA complex, they represent a paradigm for interfacial inhibitors that reversibly trap macromolecular complexes. Several camptothecin and non-camptothecin derivatives are being developed to further increase anti-tumour activity and reduce side effects. The mechanisms and molecular determinants of tumour response to TOP1 inhibitors are reviewed, and rational combinations of TOP1 inhibitors with other drugs are considered based on current knowledge of repair and checkpoint pathways that are associated with TOP1-mediated DNA damage. PMID:16990856

  5. Role of renal aquaporins in escape from vasopressin-induced antidiuresis in rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Ecelbarger, C A; S. Nielsen; Olson, B R; Murase, T; Baker, E A; Knepper, M A; Verbalis, J G

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether escape from vasopressin-induced antidiuresis is associated with altered regulation of any of the known aquaporin water channels. After 4-d pretreatment with 1-deamino-[8-D-arginine]-vasopressin (dDAVP) by osmotic mini-pump, rats were divided into two groups: control (continued dDAVP) and water-loaded (continued dDAVP plus a daily oral water load). A significant increase in urine volume in the water-loaded rats was observed by the second day...

  6. 喜树碱类化合物调控缺氧诱导因子-1的研究进展%Research advances in regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by camptothecin compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁

    2008-01-01

    缺氧诱导因子-1(HIF-1)促进肿瘤恶化、浸润及转移,以HIF-1信号途径为靶点的治疗正成为研究热点.近年研究显示,喜树碱类化合物除了独特的选择性拓扑异构酶Ⅰ(Topo Ⅰ)抑制作用外,还可抑制HIF-1蛋白翻译进而调控HIF-1活性,并被作为HIF-1非选择性化学抑制剂提出.%Hypoxia- inducible factor-1 ( HIF-1) promotes tumor deterioration, invasion and metasta-sis. Treatment targeting the HIF-1 signal pathway is becoming a hot research. In addition to uniquely selective inhibition of topoisomerase Ⅰ(Topo Ⅰ) ,the recent studies show that camptothecin compounds can regulate the activity of HIF-1 through decreasing HIF-1 protein translation and have been classified as a non-selective chemical inhibitor of HIF-1.

  7. Solar cycle dynamic of the Martian induced magnetosphere. Planetary ions acceleration zones and escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Andrey; Modolo, Ronan; Jarvinen, Riku; Barabash, Stas

    2016-10-01

    This work presents a massive statistical analysis of the ion flows in the Martian induced magnetosphere. We performed this analysis using Mars Express ion mass spectrometer data taken during 2008 - 2013 time interval. This data allows to make an enhanced study of the induced magnetosphere variations as a response of the solar activity level. Since Mars Express has no onboard magnetometer, we used the hybrid models of the Martian plasma environment to get a proper frame to make an adequate statistics of the magnetospheric response. In this paper we present a spatial distribution of the planetary plasma properties in the planetary wake as well as the ionosospheric escape as a function of the solar activity.

  8. Synthesis of camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials have been synthesized by the sodium borohydride reduction method under a strong basic condition. The obtained gold nanomaterials have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The camptothecin-loaded gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored for more than two months at room temperature without obvious changes. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to purple and blue during the acidifying process. It was revealed that the release of camptothecin and the aggregation of gold nanoparticles can be controlled by tuning the solution pH. The present study implied that the gold nanomaterials can be used as the potential carrier for CPT delivery.

  9. Mutator suppression and escape from replication error-induced extinction in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J Herr

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cells rely on a network of conserved pathways to govern DNA replication fidelity. Loss of polymerase proofreading or mismatch repair elevates spontaneous mutation and facilitates cellular adaptation. However, double mutants are inviable, suggesting that extreme mutation rates exceed an error threshold. Here we combine alleles that affect DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ proofreading and mismatch repair to define the maximal error rate in haploid yeast and to characterize genetic suppressors of mutator phenotypes. We show that populations tolerate mutation rates 1,000-fold above wild-type levels but collapse when the rate exceeds 10⁻³ inactivating mutations per gene per cell division. Variants that escape this error-induced extinction (eex rapidly emerge from mutator clones. One-third of the escape mutants result from second-site changes in Pol δ that suppress the proofreading-deficient phenotype, while two-thirds are extragenic. The structural locations of the Pol δ changes suggest multiple antimutator mechanisms. Our studies reveal the transient nature of eukaryotic mutators and show that mutator phenotypes are readily suppressed by genetic adaptation. This has implications for the role of mutator phenotypes in cancer.

  10. Quantitation of camptothecin and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, M; Sissi, C; Gatto, B; Moro, S; Zagotto, G

    2001-11-25

    Camptothecin and congeners represent a clinically very useful class of anticancer agents. Proper identification and quantitation of the original compounds and their metabolites in biological fluids is fundamental to assess drug metabolism and distribution in animals and in man. In this paper we will review the recent literature available on the methods used for separation and quantitative determination of the camptothecin family of drugs. Complications arise from the fact that they are chemically labile, and the pharmacologically active lactone structure can undergo ring opening at physiological conditions. In addition, a number of metabolic changes usually occur, producing a variety of active or inactive metabolites. Hence, the conditions of extraction, pre-treatment and quantitative analysis are to be carefully calibrated in order to provide meaningful results. PMID:11817024

  11. Production of camptothecin in cultures of Chonemorpha grandiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Kulkarni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Chonemorpha grandiflora (Syn. Chonemorpha fragrans (Apocynaceae is an endangered medicinal plant. It is used in different preparations, such as sudarsanasavam and kumaryasavam used in Kerala Ayurvedic system. C. grandiflora is used for the treatment of fever and stomach disorders. Phytochemical investigations have revealed the presence of steroidal alkaloids, such as chonemorphine and funtumafrine in C. grandiflora. Camptothecin, a well-known anticancer alkaloid has been detected in ethanolic extracts of stem with bark and callus cultures derived from C. grandiflora. Methods: Callus cultures of C. grandiflora were raised on Murashige and Skoog′s medium supplemented with 2, 4-D. Stem with bark and callus were used for phytochemical analysis mainly the alkaloids. Detection and identification of camptothecin was carried out using thin-layer chromatography (TLC, high-performance thin-layer chromatography, (HPTLC and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results: An important anticancer alkaloid, camptothecin was detected in ethanolic extracts of stem with bark and callus cultures of C. grandiflora. camptothecin content was 0.013 mg/g in stem with bark and 0.003 mg/g in callus. Conclusion : This is the first report on in vivo and in vitro production of camptothecin in C. grandiflora. Camptothecin is known to occur only in six plant sources so, alternative sources for camptothecin are needed. Thus of C. grandiflora could be a new promising alternative source of camptothecin.

  12. Exploring the Cellular Activity of Camptothecin-Triple-Helix-Forming Oligonucleotide Conjugates†

    OpenAIRE

    Arimondo, Paola B.; Thomas, Craig J.; Oussedik, Kahina; Baldeyrou, Brigitte; Mahieu, Christine; Halby, Ludovic; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Lansiaux, Amélie; Hecht, Sidney M.; Bailly, Christian; Giovannangeli, Carine

    2006-01-01

    Topoisomerase I is a ubiquitous DNA-cleaving enzyme and an important therapeutic target in cancer chemotherapy for camptothecins (CPTs). These drugs stimulate DNA cleavage by topoisomerase I but exhibit little sequence preference, inducing toxicity and side effects. A convenient strategy to confer sequence specificity consists of the linkage of topoisomerase poisons to DNA sequence recognition elements. In this context, triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) covalently linked to CPTs we...

  13. Escape Velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Nikola Vlacic

    2010-01-01

    In this project, we investigated if it is feasible for a single staged rocket with constant thrust to attain escape velocity. We derived an equation for the velocity and position of a single staged rocket that launches vertically. From this equation, we determined if an ideal model of a rocket is able to reach escape velocity.

  14. Effect of P-glycoprotein modulators on the pharmacokinetics of camptothecin using microdialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, T H; Lee, C. H.; Yeh, P H

    2001-01-01

    By performing microdialysis, this study investigated the pharmacokinetics of unbound camptothecin in rat blood, brain and bile in the presence of P-glycoprotein mediated transport modulators (cyclosporin A, berberine, quercetin, naringin and naringenin). Pharmacokinetic parameters of camptothecin were assessed using a non-compartmental model.Camptothecin rapidly crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) within 20 min after camptothecin administration. The disposition of camptothecin in rat bile a...

  15. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Neng [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Yin, Huabing, E-mail: huabing.yin@glasgow.ac.uk [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Ji, Bozhi; Klauke, Norbert; Glidle, Andrew [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yongkui; Song, Hang [Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Cai, Lulu; Ma, Liang; Wang, Guangcheng [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen, Lijuan, E-mail: lijuan17@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Wenwen [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  16. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: ► BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. ► Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. ► The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent ► In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  17. Sequence-specific targeting of IGF-I and IGF-IR genes by camptothecins

    OpenAIRE

    Oussedik, Kahina; François, Jean-Christophe; Halby, Ludovic; Senamaud-Beaufort, Catherine; Toutirais, Géraldine; Dallavalle, Sabrina; Pommier, Yves; Pisano, Claudio; Arimondo, Paola B.

    2010-01-01

    We and others have clearly demonstrated that a topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitor, such as camptothecin (CPT), coupled to a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) through a suitable linker can be used to cause site-specific cleavage of the targeted DNA sequence in in vitro models. Here we evaluated whether these molecular tools induce sequence-specific DNA damage in a genome context. We targeted the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I axis and in particular promoter 1 of IGF-I and intron 2 of typ...

  18. Sequence-specific targeting of IGF-I and IGF-IR genes by camptothecins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oussedik, Kahina; François, Jean-Christophe; Halby, Ludovic; Senamaud-Beaufort, Catherine; Toutirais, Géraldine; Dallavalle, Sabrina; Pommier, Yves; Pisano, Claudio; Arimondo, Paola B

    2010-07-01

    We and others have clearly demonstrated that a topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitor, such as camptothecin (CPT), coupled to a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) through a suitable linker can be used to cause site-specific cleavage of the targeted DNA sequence in in vitro models. Here we evaluated whether these molecular tools induce sequence-specific DNA damage in a genome context. We targeted the insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I axis and in particular promoter 1 of IGF-I and intron 2 of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) in cancer cells. The IGF axis molecules represent important targets for anticancer strategies, because of their central role in oncogenic maintenance and metastasis processes. We chemically attached 2 CPT derivatives to 2 TFOs. Both conjugates efficiently blocked gene expression in cells, reducing the quantity of mRNA transcribed by 70-80%, as measured by quantitative RT-PCR. We confirmed that the inhibitory mechanism of these TFO conjugates was mediated by Top1-induced cleavage through the use of RNA interference experiments and a camptothecin-resistant cell line. In addition, induction of phospho-H2AX foci supports the DNA-damaging activity of TFO-CPT conjugates at specific sites. The evaluated conjugates induce a specific DNA damage at the target gene mediated by Top1. PMID:20179147

  19. Layer-by-layer nanoencapsulation of camptothecin with improved activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Gaurav; Pattekari, Pravin; Joshi, Chaitanya; Shutava, Tatsiana; DeCoster, Mark; Levchenko, Tatyana; Torchilin, Vladimir; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-04-25

    160 nm nanocapsules containing up to 60% of camptothecin in the core and 7-8 polyelectrolyte bilayers in the shell were produced by washless layer-by-layer assembly of heparin and block-copolymer of poly-l-lysine and polyethylene glycol. The outer surface of the nanocapsules was additionally modified with polyethylene glycol of 5 kDa or 20 kDa molecular weight to attain protein resistant properties, colloidal stability in serum and prolonged release of the drug from the capsules. An advantage of the LbL coated capsules is the preservation of camptothecin lactone form with the shell assembly starting at acidic pH and improved chemical stability of encapsulated drug at neutral and basic pH, especially in the presence of albumin that makes such formulation more active than free camptothecin. LbL nanocapsules preserve the camptothecin lactone form at pH 7.4 resulting in triple activity of the drug toward CRL2303 glioblastoma cell. PMID:24508806

  20. A process for preparation of anticancer drug 9-nitro camptothecin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Qing-Quan; CHEN Zhi-Yong; WANG Yuan-Hua; LIU Wei-Jun; HUANG Hao-Xi; HU Wen-Hao

    2004-01-01

    Camptothecin and some of its semisythetic derivatives such as topotecan, irinotecan and 9-nitrocamptothecin, have exhibited strong antitumor activity against various experimental tumor model. The water insoluble 9-nitrocamptothecin demonstrated very potent antitumor activity against many different types of human cancers and HIV. Literature procedures for preparing 9-nitrocamptothecin are direct nitration of camptothecin using a concentrated nitric/concentrated sulfuric acid system or a combination of two or more different nitrate salts/concentrated sulfuric acid system. The two systems demand on the chromatographically separation, which is a hindrance to industrial production. We found that the main products of nitration of camptothecin,9-nitrocamptothecin and 12-nitrocamptothecin, have the great difference for the solubility in the organic solvent. So we studied various organic solvent for the crude product obtained from nitration of camptothecin using KNO3/concentrated sulfuric acid system. At last we found that the ethyl acetate is the best solvent for extraction of the reaction solution and tchloroform and the ether is the best solvent for recrystalization by screening various polarity of organic solvent.

  1. Recent advances in topoisomerase I-targeting agents, camptothecin analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Kee; Lee, Namkyu

    2002-12-01

    The present review concentrates on camptothecin (CPT) analogues, the most extensively studied topoisomerase I (topo I) inhibitors, and provides concise information on the structural features of human topo I enzyme, mechanisms of interaction of CPT with topo I, structure-activity relationship study of CPT analogues including the influence of lactone stability on antitumor activity, and recent updates of valuable CPT analogues. PMID:12370044

  2. Different Sensitivities to Apoptotic Induction by Camptothecin between Normal and Senescent Lens Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haike Guo; Haiying Jin; Liya Wang; Hongyang Zhang; Xin Yang

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether normal and senescent lens epithelial cells have different defense abilities to apoptotic induction factor in vitro.Methods: Rabbit lens epithelial cells were cultured, passed. When reaching confluence, cells from the first and seventh passage were stained by x-gal staining to detect cell senescence. Cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL(Roche).10μmol/L camptothecin was used to induce cell apoptosis from the lens epithelial cells of the first and seventh passage to distinguish different sensitivities to apoptotic induction factor between normal and senescent cells.Results: The senescent cells (41.17% ± 5.24% ) were detected in the lens epithelial cell culture of the seventh passage, which are higher than those of the first passage (0.98% ±0. 39% ). There was no apoptotic cell detected in the cell cultures undisturbed. Exposure of the first passage cells to camptothecin resulted in death of approximately 23.87% ± 3.45% of the cells during a 36 hour exposure period. In contrast, significantly more lens epithelial cells died through the apoptosis (38.29% ±4. 01% ) from the seventh passage.Conclusion: Senescent cells increased with cell passage. Senescence lens epithelial cells do not undergo apoptosis if they were not disturbed. But the vulnerabilities to apoptotic induction between health and senescence cells were different.

  3. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of 7-alkynyl camptothecin derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiao; Yadong Xue; Yu Luo; Bo Zhang; Wei Lu; Bo Yang

    2009-01-01

    Several 7-alkynyl camptothecin derivatives were prepared via Sonogashira coupling.And anti-tumor activities of these compounds were evaluated against human esophageal cancer cell line (Eca-109),human chronic myeloid leukaemia cell line (K562),bladder cancer cell line (5637) and gastric cell line (SGC7901).Compounds 9a-d and 10a exhibited remarkable in vitro cytotoxic activity,compared with topotecan.

  4. Polylactide Conjugates of Camptothecin with Different Drug Release Abilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Oledzka; Paweł Horeglad; Zuzanna Gruszczyńska; Andrzej Plichta; Grzegorz Nałęcz-Jawecki; Marcin Sobczak

    2014-01-01

    Camptothecin-polylactide conjugates (CMPT-PLA) were synthesized by covalent incorporation of CMPT into PLA of different microstructure, i.e., atactic PLA and atactic-block-isotactically enriched PLA (Pm = 0.79) via urethane bonds. The kinetic release of CPMT from CMPT-PLA conjugates, tested in vitro under different conditions, is possible in both cases and notably, strongly dependent on PLA microstructure. It shows that release properties of drug-PLA conjugates can be tailored by controlled ...

  5. The combination of olaparib and camptothecin for effective radiosensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miura Katsutoshi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is a key enzyme involved in the repair of radiation-induced single-strand DNA breaks. PARP inhibitors such as olaparib (KU-0059436, AZD-2281 enhance tumor sensitivity to radiation and to topoisomerase I inhibitors like camptothecin (CPT. Olaparib is an orally bioavailable inhibitor of PARP-1 and PARP-2 that has been tested in multiple clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of the sensitizing effect of olaparib for radiation and CPT in order to support clinical application of this agent. Methods DLD-1 cells (a human colorectal cancer cell line and H1299 cells (a non-small cell lung cancer cell line with differences of p53 gene status were used. The survival of these cells was determined by clonogenic assay after treatment with drugs and X-ray irradiation. The γH2AX focus formation assay was performed to examine the influence of olaparib on induction and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks after exposure to radiation or CPT. Results A radiosensitizing effect of olaparib was seen even at 0.01 μM. Its radiosensitizing effect after exposure for 2 h was similar to that after 24 h. H1299 cells with depletion or mutation of p53 were more radioresistant than H1299 cells with wild-type p53. However, similar enhancement of radiosensitization by olaparib was observed with all of the tested cell lines regardless of the p53 status. Olaparib also sensitized cells to CPT. This sensitizing effect was seen at low concentrations of olaparib such as 0.01 μM, and its sensitizing effect was the same at both 0.01 μM and 1 μM. The combination of olaparib and CPT had a stronger radiosensitizing effect. The results of the γH2AX focus assay corresponded with the clonogenic assay findings. Conclusion Olaparib enhanced sensitivity to radiation and CPT at low concentrations and after relatively short exposure times such as 2 h. The radiosensitizing effect of olaprib

  6. Sequence dependent modulating effect of camptothecin on the DNA-cleaving activity of the calf thymus type I topoisomerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Gromova, I I; Buchman, V L; Abagyan, R A; Ulyanov, A V; Bronstein, I B

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution mapping of topol cleavages in the regions of human DNA including the oncogene c-Ha-ras and p53, has revealed three kinds of topol cleavage sites: cleavage sites not affected by camptothecin; cleavage sites reinforced only in the presence of camptothecin, and cleavage sites which weaken in the presence of camptothecin. Statistical analysis of sequences revealed certain nucleotide or dinucleotide preferences for three groups studied. The preferences in camptothecin-reduced sites...

  7. Brain targeting effect of camptothecin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles in rat after intravenous administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, S. M.; Sarmento, B.; Nunes, C.;

    2013-01-01

    This study intended to investigate the ability of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) to deliver camptothecin into the brain parenchyma after crossing the blood-brain barrier. For that purpose, camptothecin-loaded SLN with mean size below 200 nm, low polydispersity index (94%) were produced...

  8. Mutations in topoisomerase I as a self-resistance mechanism coevolved with the production of the anticancer alkaloid camptothecin in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2008-01-01

    Plants produce a variety of toxic compounds, which are often used as anticancer drugs. The self-resistance mechanism to these toxic metabolites in the producing plants, however, remains unclear. The plant-derived anticancer alkaloid camptothecin (CPT) induces cell death by targeting DNA topoisomerase I (Top1), the enzyme that catalyzes changes in DNA topology. We found that CPT-producing plants, including Camptotheca acuminata, Ophiorrhiza pumila, and Ophiorrhiza liukiuensis, have Top1s with ...

  9. Synthesis and anti-tumor activity of alkenyl camptothecin esters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-song CAO; John MENDOZA; Albert DEJESUS; Beppino GIOVANELLA

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the degrees of influence of changing side ester chains at position C20 of camptothecin on the anti-tumor activity of the molecules. Methods: The esterification reaction of camptothecin 1 and 9-nitrocamptothecin 2 with crotonic anhydride in pyridine gave the corresponding esters 3 and 4, respectively. The acylation of 1 and 2 with cinnamoyl chloride gave products 7 and 8. Epoxidation reaction of 3 and 4 with m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid in benzene solvent gave the products 5 and 6. Esters 3, 4, and 5 were tested for anti-tumor activity against 14 human cancer cell lines. Results: Both in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity studies for these esters were conducted and the data demonstrated positive results, that is, these esters were active against the tested tumor lines. Conclusion: Alkenyl esters 3 and 4 showed strong anti-tumor activity in vitro against 14 different cancer cell lines. Ester 3 was active against human breast carcinoma in mice and the toxicity of the agent was not observed in mice during the treatment, implying that this agent is effective for treatment with low toxicity.

  10. Genome-wide transcriptional effects of the anti-cancer agent camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Veloso

    Full Text Available The anti-cancer drug camptothecin inhibits replication and transcription by trapping DNA topoisomerase I (Top1 covalently to DNA in a "cleavable complex". To examine the effects of camptothecin on RNA synthesis genome-wide we used Bru-Seq and show that camptothecin treatment primarily affected transcription elongation. We also observed that camptothecin increased RNA reads past transcription termination sites as well as at enhancer elements. Following removal of camptothecin, transcription spread as a wave from the 5'-end of genes with no recovery of transcription apparent from RNA polymerases stalled in the body of genes. As a result, camptothecin preferentially inhibited the expression of large genes such as proto-oncogenes, and anti-apoptotic genes while smaller ribosomal protein genes, pro-apoptotic genes and p53 target genes showed relative higher expression. Cockayne syndrome group B fibroblasts (CS-B, which are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR, showed an RNA synthesis recovery profile similar to normal fibroblasts suggesting that TCR is not involved in the repair of or RNA synthesis recovery from transcription-blocking Top1 lesions. These findings of the effects of camptothecin on transcription have important implications for its anti-cancer activities and may aid in the design of improved combinatorial treatments involving Top1 poisons.

  11. Semisynthesis, cytotoxic activity, and oral availability of new lipophilic 9-substituted camptothecin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Berna, Guillermo; Cabañas, Maria Jose Díaz; Mangas-Sanjuán, Victor; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Marta; Gonzalez-Alvarez, Isabel; Abasolo, Ibane; Schwartz, Simó; Bermejo, Marival; Corma, Avelino

    2013-07-11

    Despite that 9-substituted camptothecins are promising candidates in cancer therapy, the limited accessibility to this position has reduced the studies of these derivatives to a few standard modifications. We report herein a novel semisynthetic route based on the Tscherniac-Einhorn reaction to synthesize new lipophilic camptothecin derivatives with amidomethyl and imidomethyl substitutions in position 9. Compounds were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity, topoisomerase I inhibition, and oral availability. Preliminary data demonstrated that bulky imidomethyl modification is an appropriate lipophilic substitution for an effective oral administration relative to topotecan. In addition, this general procedure paves the way for obtaining new camptothecin derivatives. PMID:24900725

  12. Polylactide Conjugates of Camptothecin with Different Drug Release Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Oledzka

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Camptothecin-polylactide conjugates (CMPT-PLA were synthesized by covalent incorporation of CMPT into PLA of different microstructure, i.e., atactic PLA and atactic-block-isotactically enriched PLA (Pm = 0.79 via urethane bonds. The kinetic release of CPMT from CMPT-PLA conjugates, tested in vitro under different conditions, is possible in both cases and notably, strongly dependent on PLA microstructure. It shows that release properties of drug-PLA conjugates can be tailored by controlled design of the PLA microstructure, and allow in the case of CMPT-PLA conjugates for the development of highly controlled biodegradable CMPT systems—important delivery systems for anti-cancer agents.

  13. Investigation on Voltammetric Behavior of Camptothecin and Its Analytical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG, Jian-Bin; MENG, Zu-Chao; LIU, Bo; ZHANG, Hong-Fang

    2006-01-01

    The voltammetric behavior of camptothecin (CPT) in Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffer solutions (pH 2.09-9.07)was studied by the means of linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and normal pulse voltammetry (NPV) at a hanging mercury drop electrode. In different pH range of B-R buffer solutions, CPT could cause three reduction waves. In B-R buffer solutions (pH 2.09-5.46), wave P1 yielded by CPT was a two-electron wave.Between pH 6.01 and 9.07, CPT could yield two reduction waves P2 and P3. In addition, the pure CPT obtained from camptotheca acumina grown only in China was determined by NPV, and a linear response was observed in the tion limit for CPT.

  14. Estimation of camptothecin and pharmacological evaluation of Ophiorrhiza prostrata D. Don and Ophiorrhiza mungos L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krishnakumar G; Rameshkumar KB; Priya Srinivas; Satheeshkumar K; Krishnan PN

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To carry out the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of camptothecin, estimation of total phenolic compounds and evaluation of in vitro antioxidant activity and cytotoxic activity of Ophiorrhiza prostrata and Ophiorrhiza mungos. Methods: Direct Analysis in Real Time- Mass Spectrometry (DART-MS) was employed for the detection of camptothecin in the Ophiorrhiza species, while high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) was used for the estimation of camptothecin. Total phenolic compounds were estimated by modified Folins-Ciocalteu’s reagent method. Antioxidant activity was evaluated through DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical, superoxide radical scavenging assays and reducing power assay. The cytotoxicity evaluation was performed using MTT assay on MCF-7 cell lines. Results: The presence of camptothecin was confirmed in both the species by the [M++H] peak at 349 by DART-MS analysis. Camptothecin content was estimated as 1.47 μg/gm (dry wt) in O. prostrata and 188.60 μg/gm (dry wt) in O.mungos using HPTLC method. The moderate in vitro antioxidant activities of the methanol extracts corroborates with the low content of phenolic compounds in O. prostrata (9.88 GAE mg/g) and O. mungos (12.73 GAE mg/g). The methanol extract of O. prostrata exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity on human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7), with IC50 value 1.10μg/mL compared to O. mungos (3.48μg/mL) and standard camptothecin (3.51μg/mL). Conclusions: The application of DART-MS proved to be a simple and rapid technique for the detection of camptothecin in Ophiorrhiza species. The higher cytotoxicity for O. prostrata, despite the low content of camptothecin suggests the presence of other potential cytotoxic compounds in O. prostrata.

  15. Characterization of DNA topoisomerase-1 in Spodoptera exigua for toxicity evaluation of camptothecin and hydoxy-camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhang

    Full Text Available Camptothecin (CPT, a plant alkaloid originally isolated from the native Chinese tree, Camptotheca acuminate, exerts the toxic effect by targeting eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase 1 (DNA Topo1. Besides as potent anti-cancer agents, CPT and its derivatives are now being explored as potential pesticides for insect control. In this study, we assessed their toxicity to an insect homolog, the Topo1 protein from beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua Hübner, a worldwide pest of many important crops. The S. exigua Topo1 gene contains an ORF of 2790 base pairs that is predicted to encode a polypeptide of 930 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide exhibits polymorphism at residue sites V420, L530, A653 and T729 (numbered according to human Topo1 among insect species, which are predicted to confer sensitivity to CPT. The DNA relaxation activity of this protein was subsequently examined using a truncated form that contained the residues 337-930 and was expressed in bacteria BL21 cells. The purified protein retained the ability to relax double-stranded DNA and was susceptible to CPT and its derivative hydroxy-camptothecin (HCPT in a dose-dependent manner. The same inhibitory effect was also found on the native Topo1 extracted from IOZCAS-Spex-II cells, a cell line established from beet armyworms. Additionally, CPT and HCPT treatment reduced the steady accumulation of Topo1 protein despite the increased mRNA expression in response to the treatment. Our studies provide information of the S. exigua Topo1 gene and its amino acid polymorphism in insects and uncover some clues about potential mechanisms of CPT toxicity against insect pests. These results also are useful for development of more effective Topo1-targeted CPT insecticides in the future.

  16. Brain delivery of camptothecin by means of solid lipid nanoparticles: Formulation design, in vitro and in vivo studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, S.; Tho, I.; Reimold, I.;

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of brain delivery upon intravenous injection, formulations of camptothecin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), prepared by hot high pressure homogenisation, were designed. Incorporation of camptothecin in the hydrophobic and acidic environment of SLN matrix was chosen to stabi......For the purpose of brain delivery upon intravenous injection, formulations of camptothecin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), prepared by hot high pressure homogenisation, were designed. Incorporation of camptothecin in the hydrophobic and acidic environment of SLN matrix was chosen...... affinity of the SLN to the porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC) was shown in comparison to macrophages. MTT studies in BCEC revealed a moderate decrease in the cell viability of camptothecin, when incorporated in SLN compared to free camptothecin in solution. In vivo studies in rats showed...

  17. A hypoxia-induced decrease of either MICA/B or Hsp70 on the membrane of tumor cells mediates immune escape from NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Daniela; Tetzlaff, Fabian; Konrad, Sarah; Li, Wei; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that hypoxia of the tumor microenvironment contributes to immune escape from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and the stress-regulated major histocompatibility class I chain-related protein A and B (MICA/B) both serve as ligands for activated NK cells when expressed on the cell surface of tumor cells. Herein, we studied the effects of hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) on the membrane expression of these NK cell ligands in H1339 with high and MDA-MB-231 tumor cells with low basal HIF-1α levels and its consequences on NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. We could show that a hypoxia-induced decrease in the membrane expression of MICA/B and Hsp70 on H1339 and MDA-MB-231 cells, respectively, is associated with a reduced sensitivity to NK cell-mediated lysis. A knockdown of HIF-1α revealed that the decreased surface expression of MICA/B under hypoxia is dependent on HIF-1α in H1339 cells with high basal HIF-1α levels. Hypoxia and HIF-1α did not affect the MICA/B expression in MDA-MB-231 cells but reduced the Hsp70 membrane expression which in turn also impaired NK cell recognition. Furthermore, we could show that the hypoxia-induced decrease in membrane Hsp70 is independent of HIF-1α in MDA-MB-231. Our data indicate that hypoxia-induced downregulation of both NK cell ligands MICA/B and Hsp70 impairs NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, whereby only MICA/B appears to be regulated by HIF-1α.

  18. Targeting of Topoisomerase I for Prognoses and Therapeutics of Camptothecin-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiang-Ping; An, Herng-Wei; Lee, Chi-Ming; Wu, Jen-Chine; Chen, Chien-Shu; Huang, Shih-Hao; Hwang, Jaulang; Cheng, Kur-Ta; Leiw, Phui-Ly; Chen, Chi-Long; Lin, Chun-Mao

    2015-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) levels of several human neoplasms are higher than those of normal tissues. TOP1 inhibitors are widely used in treating conventional therapy-resistant ovarian cancers. However, patients may develop resistance to TOP1 inhibitors, hampering chemotherapy success. In this study, we examined the mechanisms associated with the development of camptothecin (CPT) resistance in ovarian cancers and identified evodiamine (EVO), a natural product with TOP1 inhibiting activity that overcomes the resistance. The correlations among TOP1 levels, cancer staging, and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. The effect of EVO on CPT-resistant ovarian cancer was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. TOP1 was associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancers (p = 0.024). EVO induced apoptosis that was detected using flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The tumor size decreased significantly in the EVO treatment group compared with the control group (p < 0.01) in a xenograft mouse model. Effects of drugs targeting TOP1 for prognosis and therapy in CPT-resistant ovarian cancer are anticipated. EVO with TOP1 can be developed as an antiproliferative agent for overcoming CPT resistance in ovarian cancers. PMID:26207989

  19. Targeting of Topoisomerase I for Prognoses and Therapeutics of Camptothecin-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chieh Lee

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1 levels of several human neoplasms are higher than those of normal tissues. TOP1 inhibitors are widely used in treating conventional therapy-resistant ovarian cancers. However, patients may develop resistance to TOP1 inhibitors, hampering chemotherapy success. In this study, we examined the mechanisms associated with the development of camptothecin (CPT resistance in ovarian cancers and identified evodiamine (EVO, a natural product with TOP1 inhibiting activity that overcomes the resistance. The correlations among TOP1 levels, cancer staging, and overall survival (OS were analyzed. The effect of EVO on CPT-resistant ovarian cancer was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. TOP1 was associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancers (p = 0.024. EVO induced apoptosis that was detected using flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL assay. The tumor size decreased significantly in the EVO treatment group compared with the control group (p < 0.01 in a xenograft mouse model. Effects of drugs targeting TOP1 for prognosis and therapy in CPT-resistant ovarian cancer are anticipated. EVO with TOP1 can be developed as an antiproliferative agent for overcoming CPT resistance in ovarian cancers.

  20. DNA damaging and cell cycle effects of the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin in irradiated human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study addressed the potential radiosensitizing and DNA-damaging actions of the DNA topoisomerase I poison camptothecin (CPT) on SV40 transformed normal (MRC5CVI) and ataxia-telangiectasia (AT5BIVA) fibroblast cell lines. In both cell lines CPT induced a dose-dependent delay of cells in S phase, followed by a dose-dependent trapping in G2/M phase. Acute X-irradiation produced patterns of G2/M arrest and S-phase delay similar to those observed for CPT in the MRC5CVI cell line, but no S phase delay was observed in the AT5BIVA cell line consistent with the ataxia-telangiectasia phenotype of this cell line. X-irradiation of CPT-treated cells resulted in additive prolongation of S phase delay in MRC5CVI cultures and additive effects for cell killing in both cell lines. The potential for topoisomerase I-DNA cross-linking by CPT was not altered by 24 h pretreatment with CPT, or by acute X-irradiation. Hypersensitivity of AT5BIVA to CPT was not attributable to elevated levels of complex trapping. (author)

  1. Isoeugenol is a selective potentiator of camptothecin cytotoxicity in vertebrate cells lacking TDP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Waheba; El-Shafie, Lamia; Hassan, Mohamed K; Farag, Mohamed A; El-Khamisy, Sherif F

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), a topoisomerase I (TOP1) inhibitor, exhibits anti-tumor activity against a wide range of tumors. Redundancy of TOP1-mediated repair mechanisms is a major challenge facing the efficiency of TOP1-targetting therapies. This study aims to uncover new TOP1 targeting approaches utilising a selection of natural compounds in the presence or absence of tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I (TDP1); a key TOP1-mediated protein-linked DNA break (PDB) repair enzyme. We identify, isoeugenol, a phenolic ether found in plant essential oils, as a potentiator of CPT cytotoxicity in Tdp1 deficient but not proficient cells. Consistent with our cellular data, isoeugenol did not inhibit Tdp1 enzymatic activity in vitro nor it sensitized cells to the PARP1 inhibitor olaparib. However, biochemical analyses suggest that isoeugenol inhibits TDP2 catalytic activity; a pathway that can compensate for the absence of TDP1. Consistent with this, isoeugenol exacerbated etoposide-induced cytotoxicity, which generates TOP2-mediated PDBs for which TDP2 is required for processing. Together, these findings identify isoeugenol as a potential lead compound for developing TDP2 inhibitors and encourage structure-activity relationship studies to shed more light on its utility in drug discovery programs. PMID:27220325

  2. Thermosensitive PNIPAM-b-HTPB block copolymer micelles: molecular architectures and camptothecin drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan-Ling; Yang, Xiao-Li; Xu, Feng; Chen, Ya-Shao; Zhang, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Two kinds of thermo-sensitive poly(N-isoproplacrylamide) (PNIPAM) block copolymers, AB4 four-armed star multiblock and linear triblock copolymers, were synthesized by ATRP with hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as central blocks, and characterization was performed by (1)H NMR, FT-IR and SEC. The multiblock copolymers could spontaneously assemble into more regular spherical core-shell nanoscale micelles than the linear triblock copolymer. The physicochemical properties were detected by a surface tension technique, nano particle analyzer, TEM, DLS and UV-vis measurements. The multiblock copolymer micelles had lower critical micelle concentration than the linear counterpart, TEM size from 100 to 120 nm and the hydrodynamic diameters below 150 nm. The micelles exhibited thermo-dependent size change, with low critical solution temperature about 33-35 °C. The characteristic parameters were affected by the composition ratios, length of PNIPAM blocks and molecular architectures. The camptothecin release demonstrated that the drug release was thermo-responsive, accompanied by the temperature-induced structural changes of the micelles. MTT assays were performed to evaluate the biocompatibility or cytotoxicity of the prepared copolymer micelles. PMID:24184534

  3. Escaping from MOND

    OpenAIRE

    Famaey, Benoit; Bruneton, Jean-Philippe; Zhao, HongSheng

    2007-01-01

    We present a new test of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) on galactic scales, based on the escape speed in the solar neighbourhood. This test is independent from other empirical successes of MOND at reproducing the phenomenology of galactic rotation curves. The galactic escape speed in MOND is entirely determined by the baryonic content of the Galaxy and the external field in which it is embedded. We estimate that the external field in which the Milky Way must be embedded to produce the obs...

  4. Enhanced camptothecin production by ethanol addition in the suspension culture of the endophyte, Fusarium solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Aarthi; Srivastava, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Ethanolic extract of a non-camptothecin producing plant, Catharanthus roseus when added in the suspension culture of the endophyte Fusarium solani known to produce camptothecin, resulted in enhanced production of camptothecin by 10.6-fold in comparison to that in control (2.8 μg/L). Interestingly, addition of pure ethanol (up to 5% v/v) in the suspension culture of F. solani resulted in maximum enhancement in camptothecin production (up to 15.5-fold) from that obtained in control. In the presence of ethanol, a reduced glucose uptake (by ∼ 40%) and simultaneous ethanol consumption (up to 9.43 g/L) was observed during the cultivation period (14 days). Also, the total NAD level and the protein content in the biomass increased by 3.7- and 1.9-fold, respectively, in comparison to that in control. The study indicates a dual role of ethanol, presumably as an elicitor and also as a carbon/energy source, leading to enhanced biomass and camptothecin production. PMID:25603728

  5. Camptothecin targets WRN protein: mechanism and relevance in clinical breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Lu, Huiming; Croteau, Deborah L; Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Ball, Graham; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Ellis, Ian O; Pommier, Yves; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-03-22

    Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is a RecQ helicase that participates in DNA repair, genome stability and cellular senescence. The five human RecQ helicases, RECQL1, Bloom, WRN, RECQL4 and RECQL5 play critical roles in DNA repair and cell survival after treatment with the anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT). CPT derivatives are widely used in cancer chemotherapy to inhibit topoisomerase I and generate DNA double-strand breaks during replication. Here we studied the effects of CPT on the stability and expression dynamics of human RecQ helicases. In the cells treated with CPT, we observed distinct effects on WRN compared to other human RecQ helicases. CPT altered the cellular localization of WRN and induced its degradation by a ubiquitin-mediated proteasome pathway. WRN knockdown cells as well as CPT treated cells became senescent and stained positive for senescence-associated β-galactosidase at a higher frequency compared to control cells. However, the senescent phenotype was attenuated by ectopic expression of WRN suggesting functional implication of WRN degradation in CPT treated cells. Approximately 5-23% of breast cancer tumors are known to respond to CPT-based chemotherapy. Interestingly, we found that the extent of CPT-induced WRN degradation correlates with increasing sensitivity of breast cancer cells to CPT. The abundance of WRN decreased in CPT-treated sensitive cells; however, WRN remained relatively stable in CPT-resistant breast cancer cells. In a large clinical cohort of breast cancer patients, we find that WRN and topoisomerase I expression correlate with an aggressive tumor phenotype and poor prognosis. Our novel observations suggest that WRN abundance along with CPT-induced degradation could be a promising strategy for personalizing CPT-based cancer chemotherapeutic regimens.

  6. Deep sequencing reveals direct targets of gammaherpesvirus-induced mRNA decay and suggests that multiple mechanisms govern cellular transcript escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Clyde

    Full Text Available One characteristic of lytic infection with gammaherpesviruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV68, is the dramatic suppression of cellular gene expression in a process known as host shutoff. The alkaline exonuclease proteins (KSHV SOX, MHV-68 muSOX and EBV BGLF5 have been shown to induce shutoff by destabilizing cellular mRNAs. Here we extend previous analyses of cellular mRNA abundance during lytic infection to characterize the effects of SOX and muSOX, in the absence of other viral genes, utilizing deep sequencing technology (RNA-seq. Consistent with previous observations during lytic infection, the majority of transcripts are downregulated in cells expressing either SOX or muSOX, with muSOX acting as a more potent shutoff factor than SOX. Moreover, most cellular messages fall into the same expression class in both SOX- and muSOX-expressing cells, indicating that both factors target similar pools of mRNAs. More abundant mRNAs are more efficiently downregulated, suggesting a concentration effect in transcript targeting. However, even among highly expressed genes there are mRNAs that escape host shutoff. Further characterization of select escapees reveals multiple mechanisms by which cellular genes can evade downregulation. While some mRNAs are directly refractory to SOX, the steady state levels of others remain unchanged, presumably as a consequence of downstream effects on mRNA biogenesis. Collectively, these studies lay the framework for dissecting the mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of mRNA to destruction during lytic gammaherpesvirus infection.

  7. A Lucky Escape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王道庚

    2009-01-01

    @@ This story concerns(有关)a spider(蜘蛛)and a certain general of ancient times who had lost a battle and,in the company of(在……陪同下)a faithful(忠诚的)servant,was trying to escape(逃脱)from the enemy.Both were extremely(极度,非常)tired,and both were hungry and thirsty,but they did not dare to go into any town for fear of (担心,害怕)being discovered and captured(捉)by the enemy.Toward evening they arrived at a mountain where there was a small cave.

  8. Escape from the Alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets out to elaborate on Romania’s specific agenda regarding the approach to the integration process in the EU as a project of modernization. The focus is on the functional aspects, the type of strategic solutions destined to consolidate the specific transformations belonging to post-communist transition seen as an internal transition, on the one hand and on the other hand to push convergence as the essence of integration, marked by the vision of EU integration as a continuation of change, which is the stage of external transition. Identifying the prominent factors and the pragmatic priorities of the escape from the peripheries of development by engaging in evolution by way of the second modernization constitutes as well a target for analysis. One particularity of the method of analysis is the review if the value-set of the bobsled effect of path dependency – the path of the peripheries – as well as of the set of values of the escape from the peripheries.

  9. Targeted gene correction using psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin conjugates of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    Gene correction activation effects of a small series of triplex forming peptide nucleic acid (PNA) covalently conjugated to the DNA interacting ligands psoralen, chlorambucil and camptothecin targeted proximal to a stop codon mutation in an EGFP reporter gene were studied. A 15-mer homopyrimidine...... interstrand crosslinked adducts with dsDNA dramatically decreased the frequency of targeted repair/correction. The PNA conjugates were also studied in mammalian cell lines upon transfection of PNA bound EGFP reporter vector and scoring repair of the EGFP gene by FACS analysis of functional EGFP expression...... suggest that simple triplex forming PNAs have little effect on proximal gene correctional events whereas PNA conjugates capable of forming DNA adducts and interstrand crosslinks are strong inhibitors. Most interestingly the PNA conjugated to the topoisomerase inhibitor, camptothecin enhanced repair...

  10. PVA engineered microcapsules for targeted delivery of camptothecin to HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbiati, Alice; Rocca, Blasco Morozzo della; Tabolacci, Claudio; Beninati, Simone; Desideri, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Biologia, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); Paradossi, Gaio, E-mail: paradossi@stc.uniroma2.it [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    Capsular microvectors are an important tool in the recent research field of nanomedicine to address a drug cargo for the therapeutic treatment of several pathologies. In this study we describe how the product of the conjugation of the polysaccharide chitosan with folate can be used as a coating of poly (vinyl alcohol), PVA, based microcapsules for an efficient targeting of HeLa cells. The influence of the coating on the bioadhesive properties of the vector and on its cargo capacity was also considered using camptothecin as an anticancer drug model. The coating strategy was finalized to exploit the good chemical versatility of PVA, used to form the shell of the vector. This study is a follow up of an investigation activity aiming to show the potentialities of PVA-shelled microcapsules or microbubbles as injectable microdevices supporting a theranostic approach for different types of tumour. Highlights: {yields}Coating of PVA-shelled microcapsules with chitosan-folate. {yields} Selective bioadhesion of microcapsules to HeLa Cells. {yields} Effective loading and release of camptothecin. {yields} In vitro anti-proliferative action of camptothecin loaded microcapsules.

  11. Synthesis and Insecticidal Activity of Novel Camptothecin Derivatives Containing Analogs of Chrysanthemic Acid Moieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Li; ZHANG Lan; CAO Li-dong; XIE Ru-liang; ZHANG Yan-ning; HE Wei-zhi; JIANG Hong-yun

    2014-01-01

    Creating high-efifcient and environment-friendly pesticides is very important to produce the pollution free agriculture food and maintain the balance of the survival environmental of the human being. According to reports, camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives are now being explored as a class of botanical insecticide in agriculture due to its novel mode of action. In order to improve the insecticidal activity of CPT, ten novel camptothecin (1) and 10-hydroxycamptothecin (2) derivatives (1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e;2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e) were designed and synthesized via esteriifcation with analogs of chrysanthemic acid, which have outstanding insecticidal activity. The results showed that compound 2a exhibited potent antifeeding effect and the best contact toxicity among the target compounds against the third-instar larvae of beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua Hübner. Compound 2a was also found to be the most effective cytotoxic compound to the tested insect cell lines, IOZCAS-Spex-II, which were established from the fat bodies of S. exigua. It was proposed that the 10-hydroxyl group in the camptothecin derivatives is a key factor for the antifeeding activity of a compound. The nature of the substituents was considered the major factor in determining the insecticidal activity of these compounds.

  12. Mars - an escaping planet?

    CERN Document Server

    Dvorak, R

    2005-01-01

    The chaotic behaviour of the motion of the planets in our Solar System is well established. Numerical experiments with a modified Solar System consisting of a more massive Earth have shown, that for special values of an enlargement factor K around 5 the dynamical state of a truncated planetary system (excluding Mercury and the outer planets Uranus and Neptune) is highly chaotic. On the contrary for values of the mass of the Earth up to the mass of Saturn no irregular dynamical behaviour was observed. We extended our investigations to the complete planetary system and showed, that this chaotic window found before still exists. Tests in different 'Solar Systems' showed that only including Jupiter and Saturn with their actual masses together with a 'massive' Earth (between 4 and 6 times more massive) destabilize the orbit of Mars so that even escapes from the system are possible.

  13. Reconstructing the Alcatraz escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; Hoes, O.; Hut, R.; Donchyts, G.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the night of June 12, 1962 three inmates used a raft made of raincoatsto escaped the ultimate maximum security prison island Alcatraz in SanFrancisco, United States. History is unclear about what happened tothe escapees. At what time did they step into the water, did theysurvive, if so, where did they reach land? The fate of the escapees has been the subject of much debate: did theymake landfall on Angel Island, or did the current sweep them out ofthe bay and into the cold pacific ocean? In this presentation, we try to shed light on this historic case using avisualization of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the San Francisco Bay, combined with historical tidal records. By reconstructing the hydrodynamic conditions and using a particle based simulation of the escapees we show possible scenarios. The interactive model is visualized using both a 3D photorealistic and web based visualization. The "Escape from Alcatraz" scenario demonstrates the capabilities of the 3Di platform. This platform is normally used for overland flooding (1D/2D). The model engine uses a quad tree structure, resulting in an order of magnitude speedup. The subgrid approach takes detailed bathymetry information into account. The inter-model variability is tested by comparing the results with the DFlow Flexible Mesh (DFlowFM) San Francisco Bay model. Interactivity is implemented by converting the models from static programs to interactive libraries, adhering to the Basic ModelInterface (BMI). Interactive models are more suitable for answeringexploratory research questions such as this reconstruction effort. Although these hydrodynamic simulations only provide circumstantialevidence for solving the mystery of what happened during the foggy darknight of June 12, 1962, it can be used as a guidance and provides aninteresting testcase to apply interactive modelling.

  14. Escape Performance Following Exposure to Inescapable Shock: Deficits in Motor Response Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisman, Hymie; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A series of 13 experiments employing mice systematically investigated shock-elicited activity in a circular field and escape performance in a shuttle box following exposure to either escapable or inescapable shock. Results show that escape interference induced by inescapable shock may be comfortably interpreted in terms of a decreased tendency for…

  15. Effects of submarine escape training on the pulmonary function and carbon dioxide retention in the escape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rui-yong; WANG Wen-bo; FANG Yi-qun; XU Ji; XU Lin-jun

    2011-01-01

    Objective Fast buoyancy ascent escape used in submarine escape is the most probable choice of survival in case of a submarine accident.Rate of success for escape depends very much on the extent of training,in spite of the fact that rapid compression and decompression pose great challenges to the human body in terms of enormous stresses.To minimize stresses experienced during sub escape training has always been a research subject for us.Lungs are susceptible to rapid change in pressure during escape.Dynamic pulmonary function and the end-tidal PCO2 ( PETCO2 ) might be the best indicator for its effect on the pulmonary function of the submarine escapee.Methods Five male navy divers received submarine escape trainings,at different depths from 3-60 m.They were compressed at different rates (with pressure doubled every 20 s or 30 s),in the simulated submarine escape tower located in the Naval Medical Research Institute.The gas of end-expiration was collected immediately after escape,respiratory rate (RR) and dynamic pulmonary function were closely monitored,and PETCO2 was determined with the mass spectrometer.Results Experimental results showed that forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1.0) tended to increase with increasing depth,and that it increased significantly at 50 m and 60 m,when compared with the basic data (P < 0.05 ),and it was coupled with a decrease in forced expiratory flow at 25 % ( FEF25% ),indicating that it had certain effect on the function of small airways.PETCO2 and RR all elevated markedly following escapes.No significant differences could be seen in RR following escapes at various depths.PETCO2 and depth ( r =0.387,P < 0.01 ) were positively correlated with compression rate ( r =0.459,P < 0.01 ) and RR ( r =0.467,P < 0.01 ).CO2 retention might be attributed to pulmonary ventilation disorder induced by rapid changes in pressure.PETCO2 was within normal range,following escapes at various depths,suggesting that increased RR might be

  16. Thermosensitive AB4 four-armed star PNIPAM-b-HTPB multiblock copolymer micelles for camptothecin drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yan-Ling; Fu, Jing-Yu; Xu, Feng; Chen, Ya-Shao; Zhang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Thermo-sensitive poly(N-isoproplacrylamide)m-block-hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene-block-poly(N-isoproplacrylamide)m (PNIPAMm-b-HTPB-b-PNIPAMm, m = 1 or 2) block copolymers, AB4 four-armed star multiblock and linear triblock copolymers, were synthesized by ATRP with HTPB as central blocks, and characterization was performed by (1)H NMR, Fourier transform infrared, and size exclusion chromatography. The multiblock copolymers could spontaneously assemble into more regular spherical core-shell nanoscale micelles than the linear triblock copolymer. The physicochemical properties were detected by a surface tension, nanoparticle analyzer, transmission electron microscope (TEM), dynamic light scattering, and UV-vis measurements. The multiblock copolymer micelles had lower critical micelle concentration than the linear counterpart, TEM size from 100 to 120 nm, and the hydrodynamic diameters below 150 nm. The micelles exhibited thermo-dependent size change, with low critical solution temperature of about 33-35 °C. The characteristic parameters were affected by the composition ratios, length of PNIPAM blocks, and molecular architectures. The camptothecin release demonstrated that the drug release was thermo-responsive, accompanied by the temperature-induced structural changes of the micelles. MTT assays were performed to evaluate the biocompatibility or cytotoxicity of the prepared copolymer micelles. PMID:24236748

  17. Escape from a Riddled-Like Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO Xiao-Gang; DAI Jun; WANG Wen-Xiu; HE Da-Ren

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate a system described by a conservative and a dissipative map concatenation. A fat fractal forbidden net, induced by interaction between discontinuous and noninvertible properties, introduces rippled-like attraction basins of two periodic attractors. Small areas, which serve as escaping holes of a new type of crisis, are dominated by conventional strong dissipation and are bounded by the forbidden region, but only in the vicinity of each periodic point.

  18. Dynamics of immune escape during HIV/SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L Althaus

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs play an important role in controlling HIV/SIV infection. Notably, the observation of escape mutants suggests a selective pressure induced by the CTL response. However, it remains difficult to assess the definite role of the cellular immune response. We devise a computational model of HIV/SIV infection having a broad cellular immune response targeting different viral epitopes. The CTL clones are stimulated by viral antigen and interact with the virus population through cytotoxic killing of infected cells. Consequently, the virus population reacts through the acquisition of CTL escape mutations. Our model provides realistic virus dynamics and describes several experimental observations. We postulate that inter-clonal competition and immunodominance may be critical factors determining the sequential emergence of escapes. We show that even though the total killing induced by the CTL response can be high, escape rates against a single CTL clone are often slow and difficult to estimate from infrequent sequence measurements. Finally, our simulations show that a higher degree of immunodominance leads to more frequent escape with a reduced control of viral replication but a substantially impaired replicative capacity of the virus. This result suggests two strategies for vaccine design: Vaccines inducing a broad CTL response should decrease the viral load, whereas vaccines stimulating a narrow but dominant CTL response are likely to induce escape but may dramatically reduce the replicative capacity of the virus.

  19. An escape from crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Jeremy; Pelli, Denis G

    2007-10-26

    Crowding occurs when nearby flankers jumble the appearance of a target object, making it hard to identify. Crowding is feature integration over an inappropriately large region. What determines the size of that region? According to bottom-up proposals, the size is that of an anatomically determined isolation field. According to top-down proposals, the size is that of the spotlight of attention. Intriligator and Cavanagh (2001) proposed the latter, but we show that their conclusion rests on an implausible assumption. Here we investigate the role of attention in crowding using the change blindness paradigm. We measure capacity for widely and narrowly spaced letters during a change detection task, both with and without an interstimulus cue. We find that standard crowding manipulations-reducing spacing and adding flankers-severely impair uncued change detection but have no effect on cued change detection. Because crowded letters look less familiar, we must use longer internal descriptions (less compact representations) to remember them. Thus, fewer fit into working memory. The memory limit does not apply to the cued condition because the observer need remember only the cued letter. Cued performance escapes the effects of crowding, as predicted by a top-down account. However, our most parsimonious account of the results is bottom-up: Cued change detection is so easy that the observer can tolerate feature degradation and letter distortion, making the observer immune to crowding. The change detection task enhances the classic partial report paradigm by making the test easier (same/different instead of identifying one of many possible targets), which increases its sensitivity, so it can reveal degraded memory traces.

  20. Design and synthesis of new 7-(N-substituted-methyl)-camptothecin derivatives as potent cytotoxic agents

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xiao-Bo; Goto, Masuo; Song, Zi-Long; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Zhao, Yu; Wu, Dan; Yang, Liu; Li, Shu-Gang; Liu, Ying-Qian; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    A series of novel 7-(N-substituted-methyl)-camptothecin derivatives was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against four human tumor cell lines, A-549, MDA-MB-231, KB, and KBvin. All of the derivatives showed promising in vitro cytotoxic activity against the tested tumor cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 0.0023 to 1.11 μM, and were as or more potent than topotecan. Compounds 9d, 9e, and 9r exhibited the highest antiproliferative activity among all prepared d...

  1. A Novel Preparation Method for Camptothecin (CPT Loaded Folic Acid Conjugated Dextran Tumor-Targeted Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Sun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, folic-dextran-camptothecin (Fa-DEX-CPT tumor-targeted nanoparticles were produced with a supercritical antisolvent (SAS technique by using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO as a solvent and carbon dioxide as an antisolvent. A factorial design was used to reveal the effect of various process parameters on the mean particle size (MPS and morphology of the particles formed. Under the optimum operation conditions, Fa-DEX-CPT nanoparticles with a MPS of 182.21 nm were obtained. Drug encapsulation efficiency and loading efficiency were 62.13% and 36.12%, respectively. It was found that the concentrations of the camptothecin (CPT and dextran solution had a major influence upon morphology and shape of the final product. In addition, the samples were characterized by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and X-ray diffraction (XRD with the purpose of developing a suitable targeted drug delivery system for cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Amplitude modulation control of escape from a potential well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacón, R. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela de Ingenierías Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Apartado Postal 382, E-06006 Badajoz (Spain); Martínez García-Hoz, A. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela Universitaria Politécnica, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-13400 Almadén (Ciudad Real) (Spain); Miralles, J.J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-02071 Albacete (Spain); Martínez, P.J. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, E.I.N.A., Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC – Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of periodic amplitude modulations in controlling (suppressing and enhancing) escape from a potential well through the universal model of a damped Helmholtz oscillator subjected to an external periodic excitation (the escape-inducing excitation) whose amplitude is periodically modulated (the escape-controlling excitation). Analytical and numerical results show that this multiplicative control works reliably for different subharmonic resonances between the two periodic excitations involved, and that its effectiveness is comparable to those of different methods of additive control. Additionally, we demonstrate the robustness of the multiplicative control against the presence of low-intensity Gaussian noise. -- Highlights: •Multiplicative control of escape from a potential well has been demonstrated. •Theoretical predictions are obtained from a Melnikov analysis. •It has been shown the robustness of the multiplicative control against noise.

  3. Energy-limited escape revised

    OpenAIRE

    Salz, M.; Schneider, P. C.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) < 13.11~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets th...

  4. Homogenate extraction technology of camptothecine and hydroxycamptothecin from Camptotheca acuminata leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-guo; ZU Yuan-gang; ZHAO Chun-jian; YANG Lei

    2009-01-01

    Camptothecine (CPT) and hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), two kinds of anti-cancer alkaloids, were extracted from Camptotheca acuminata leaves using homogenate extraction technology under different conditions such as the ratio of material to liquid, ethanol concentration, and homogenate time. The optimum technology parameters for homogenate extraction of CPT and HCPT from C. acuminata leaves were determined as homogenate time at 8 min, ethanol concentration at 55% and the ratio of material to liquid at 1:15 (g:mL). By using the optimized parameters, we obtained 0.639‰ extraction rate for CPT and 0.437‰ for HCPT. The extraction yields of CPT and HCPT extracted by homogenating technology were higher than those by other extractive methods, such as ultrasonic, reflux, shaking in water bath. It is concluded that the homogenate extraction technology was an efficient method for extracting CPT and HCPT from C. acuminata leaves, with characteristics of less extraction time and high yield.

  5. Antifungal activity of camptothecin, trifolin, and hyperoside isolated from Camptotheca acuminata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiyou; Zhang, Zhizhen; Cain, Abigail; Wang, Bo; Long, Melissa; Taylor, Josephine

    2005-01-12

    Leaf spots and root rots are major fungal diseases in Camptotheca acuminata that limit cultivation of the plant for camptothecin (CPT), a promising anticancer and antiviral alkaloid. Bioassays showed that pure CPT and flavonoids (trifolin and hyperoside) isolated from Camptotheca effectively control fungal pathogens in vitro, including Alternaria alternata, Epicoccum nigrum, Pestalotia guepinii, Drechslera sp., and Fusarium avenaceum, although antifungal activity of these compounds in the plant is limited. CPT inhibited mycelial growth by approximately 50% (EC50) at 10-30 microg/mL and fully inhibited growth at 75-125 microg/mL. The flavonoids were less effective than CPT at 50 microg/mL, particularly within 20 days after treatment, but more effective at 100 or 150 microg/mL. CPT, trifolin, and hyperoside may serve as leads for the development of fungicides. PMID:15631505

  6. Clinical developments of chemotherapeutic nanomedicines: Polymers and liposomes for delivery of camptothecins and platinum (II) drugs

    KAUST Repository

    Kieler-Ferguson, Heidi M.

    2013-01-17

    For the past 40 years, liposomal and polymeric delivery vehicles have been studied as systems capable of modulating the cytotoxicity of small molecule chemotherapeutics, increasing tumor bearing animal survival times, and improving drug targeting. Although a number of macromolecular-drug conjugates have progressed to clinical trials, tuning drug release to maintain efficacy in conjunction with controlling drug toxicity has prevented the clinical adoption of many vehicles. In this article, we review the motivations for and approaches to polymer and liposomal delivery with regard to camptothecin and cisplatin delivery. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2013, 5:130-138. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1209 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Conflict of interest: Drs Kieler-Ferguson and Fréchet declare no conflicts of interest. Dr Szoka is the founder of a liposome drug delivery company that is not working on any of the compounds mentioned in this article. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Experimental and theoretical spectroscopic and structural study of A-ring substituted camptothecins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka B.; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The molecular architecture design and physical properties of seven camptothecin (CPT) alkaloids, structurally related to irinotecan (CPT-11), substituted with the cyclic bulk N-aliphatic substituents at A-ring as well as their different protonated forms were studied. The correlation between the molecular geometry and physical properties of the neutral lactone form and different possible cationic forms was elucidated, using the electronic absorptions (EAs), circular dichroic (CD) and Raman spectroscopy within the far-IR region as well as electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The electronic structures, and properties of the neutral CPTs, their mono- and diprotonated forms as well as molecular ion fragments, obtained by the mass spectrometric data are predicted theoretically using the DFT method.

  8. Design, synthesis, cytotoxic activity and molecular docking studies of new 20(S)-sulfonylamidine camptothecin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zi-Long; Wang, Mei-Juan; Li, Lanlan; Wu, Dan; Wang, Yu-Han; Yan, Li-Ting; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Liu, Ying-Qian; Zhao, Yong-Long; Wang, Chih-Ya; Liu, Huanxiang; Goto, Masuo; Liu, Heng; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-06-10

    In an ongoing investigation of 20-sulfonylamidine derivatives (9, YQL-9a) of camptothecin (1) as potential anticancer agents directly and selectively inhibiting topoisomerase (Topo) I, the sulfonylamidine pharmacophore was held constant, and a camptothecin derivatives with various substitution patterns were synthesized. The new compounds were evaluated for antiproliferative activity against three human tumor cell lines, A-549, KB, and multidrug resistant (MDR) KB subline (KBvin). Several analogs showed comparable or superior antiproliferative activity compared to the clinically prescribed 1 and irinotecan (3). Significantly, the 20-sulfonylamidine derivatives exhibited comparable cytotoxicity against KBvin, while 1 and 3 were less active against this cell line. Among them, compound 15c displayed much better cytotoxic activity than the controls 1, 3, and 9. Novel key structural features related to the antiproliferative activities were identified by structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis. In a molecular docking model, compounds 9 and 15c interacted with Topo I-DNA through a different binding mode from 1 and 3. The sulfonylamidine side chains of 9 and 15c could likely form direct hydrogen bonds with Topo I, while hydrophobic interaction with Topo I and π-π stacking with double strand DNA were also confirmed as binding driving forces. The results from docking models were consistent with the SAR conclusions. The introduction of bulky substituents at the 20-position contributed to the altered binding mode of the compound by allowing them to form new interactions with Topo I residues. The information obtained in this study will be helpful for the design of new derivatives of 1 with most promising anticancer activity.

  9. Sharks modulate their escape behavior in response to predator size, speed and approach orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamone, Scott; Blaine, Tristan; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-12-01

    Escape responses are often critical for surviving predator-prey interactions. Nevertheless, little is known about how predator size, speed and approach orientation impact escape performance, especially in larger prey that are primarily viewed as predators. We used realistic shark models to examine how altering predatory behavior and morphology (size, speed and approach orientation) influences escape behavior and performance in Squalus acanthias, a shark that is preyed upon by apex marine predators. Predator models induced C-start escape responses, and increasing the size and speed of the models triggered a more intense response (increased escape turning rate and acceleration). In addition, increased predator size resulted in greater responsiveness from the sharks. Among the responses, predator approach orientation had the most significant impact on escapes, such that the head-on approach, as compared to the tail-on approach, induced greater reaction distances and increased escape turning rate, speed and acceleration. Thus, the anterior binocular vision in sharks renders them less effective at detecting predators approaching from behind. However, it appears that sharks compensate by performing high-intensity escapes, likely induced by the lateral line system, or by a sudden visual flash of the predator entering their field of view. Our study reveals key aspects of escape behavior in sharks, highlighting the modulation of performance in response to predator approach. PMID:25041843

  10. Mechanism of E1A-mediated escape from ras-induced senescence in human fibraobIasts%E1A阻断ras诱导人成纤维细胞衰老机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亦蕾; 余乐

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of binding activities of the NH2 terminus of E1A to the proteins regulating cell growth on ras-induced cell senescence and explore the mechanism of ElA-mediated escape from ras-induced senescence by E1A in human fibroblast. Methods In primary human fibroblasts, the proteins regulating cell growth in association with E1A NH2 terminus, including the Rb family proteins, p300/CBP, and p400, were inactivated or interfered. The effect of alterations in the binding activities of these proteins on cell senescence bypass mediated by E1A was evaluated by cell growth curve. Results Inactivation of Rb family proteins alone was not sufficient to rescue ras-induced cell senescence, whereas inactivation of both the Rb proteins and p300/CBP blocked ras-induced senescence of human fibroblasts. Conclusion Rb and p300/CBP binding activities are both required for E1A to bypass ras-induced senescence in human fibroblasts.%目的 通过研究ElA氨基端细胞生长调节蛋白结合活性对其阻断ras诱导的细胞衰老的影响,以明确在人类成纤维细胞ElA阻断ras诱导的细胞衰老的机制.方法 采用原代培养的人类成纤维细胞,通过灭活或干扰与ElA氨基端相关的细胞生长调节蛋白,包括Rb家族蛋白、p300/CBP、p400,利用细胞生长曲线确定这些蛋白结合活性对于ElA阻断ras诱导的细胞衰老的作用.结果 单纯灭活Rb家族蛋白不能阻断ras诱导的细胞衰老,而同时灭活Rb和p300/CBP即可阻断r弱诱导的细胞衰老.结论 Rb和p300/CBP的结合活性均是EIA阻断ras诱导的人成纤维细胞细胞衰老所必需的.

  11. Escaping carbon lock-in

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unruh, G.C. [Instituto de Empresa, Madrid (Spain)

    2002-03-01

    This article explores the climate policy implications of the arguments made in ''Understanding carbon lock-in'' (Unruh, 2000), which posited that industrial countries have become locked-into fossil fuel-based energy systems through path dependent processes driven by increasing returns to scale. Carbon lock-in arises through technological, organizational, social and institutional co-evolution, ''culminating'' in what was termed as techno-institutional complex (TIC). In order to resolve the climate problem, an escape from the lock-in condition is required. However, due to the self-referential nature of TIC, escape conditions are unlikely to be generated internally and it is argued here that erogenous forces are probably required. (author)

  12. Formation of nanoparticles by cooperative inclusion between (S-camptothecin-modified dextrans and β-cyclodextrin polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorbjørn Terndrup Nielsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel (S-camptothecin–dextran polymers were obtained by “click” grafting of azide-modified (S-camptothecin and alkyne-modified dextrans. Two series based on 10 kDa and 70 kDa dextrans were prepared with a degree of substitution of (S-camptothecin between 3.1 and 10.2%. The binding properties with β-cyclodextrin and β-cyclodextrin polymers were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy, showing no binding with β-cyclodextrin but high binding with β-cyclodextrin polymers. In aqueous solution nanoparticles were formed from association between the (S-camptothecin–dextran polymers and the β-cyclodextrin polymers.

  13. How some T cells escape tolerance induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, G; Sercarz, E

    1989-11-01

    A feature common to many animal models of autoimmune disease, for example, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis and collagen-induced arthritis, is the presence of self-reactive T cells in healthy animals, which are activated to produce disease by immunization with exogenous antigen. It is unclear why these T cells are not deleted during ontogeny in the thymus and, having escaped tolerance induction, why they are not spontaneously activated by self-antigen. To investigate these questions, we have examined an experimental model in which mice are tolerant to an antigen despite the presence of antigen-reactive T cells. We find that the T cells that escape tolerance induction are specific for minor determinants on the antigen. We propose that these T cells evade tolerance induction because some minor determinants are only available in relatively low amounts after in vivo processing of the whole antigen. For the same reason, these T cells are not normally activated but can be stimulated under special circumstances to circumvent tolerance. PMID:2478888

  14. Molecular Dications in Planetary Atmospheric Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Falcinelli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental properties of multiply charged molecular ions, such as energetics, structure, stability, lifetime and fragmentation dynamics, are relevant to understand and model the behavior of gaseous plasmas as well as ionosphere and astrophysical environments. Experimental determinations of the Kinetic Energy Released (KER for ions originating from dissociations reactions, induced by Coulomb explosion of doubly charged molecular ions (molecular dications produced by double photoionization of CO2, N2O and C2H2 molecules of interest in planetary atmospheres, are reported. The KER measurement as a function of the ultraviolet (UV photon energy in the range of 28–65 eV was extracted from the electron-ion-ion coincidence spectra obtained by using tunable synchrotron radiation coupled with ion imaging techniques at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory Trieste, Italy. These experiments, coupled with a computational analysis based on a Monte Carlo trajectory simulation, allow assessing the probability of escape for simple ionic species in the upper atmosphere of Mars, Venus and Titan. The measured KER in the case of H+, C+, CH+, CH2+, N+, O+, CO+, N2+ and NO+ fragment ions range between 1.0 and 5.5 eV, being large enough to allow these ionic species to participate in the atmospheric escape from such planets into space. In the case of Mars, we suggest a possible explanation for the observed behavior of the O+ and CO22+ ion density profiles.

  15. Compound Specific Extraction of Camptothecin from Nothapodytes nimmoniana and Piperine from Piper nigrum Using Accelerated Solvent Extractor

    OpenAIRE

    Vinayak Upadhya; Pai, Sandeep R.; Sharma, Ajay K.; Hegde, Harsha V; Kholkute, Sanjiva D; Joshi, Rajesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of varying temperatures with constant pressure of solvent on extraction efficiency of two chemically different alkaloids were studied. Camptothecin (CPT) from stem of Nothapodytes nimmoniana (Grah.) Mabb. and piperine from the fruits of Piper nigrum L. were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extractor (ASE). Three cycles of extraction for a particular sample cell at a given temperature assured complete extraction. CPT and piperine were determined and quantified by using a simple and ...

  16. Synthesis and Self-Assembly of a Mikto-Arm Star Dual Drug Amphiphile Containing both Paclitaxel and Camptothecin

    OpenAIRE

    Cheetham, A.G.; Zhang, P.; Lin, Y.-A; Lin, R; Cui, H

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of anticancer therapeutics into discrete nanostructures provides an innovative way to develop a self-delivering nanomedicine with a high, quantitative drug loading. We report here the synthesis and assembly of a mikto-arm star dual drug amphiphile (DA) containing both a bulky paclitaxel (PTX) and a planar camptothecin (CPT). The two anti-cancer drugs of interest were stochastically conjugated to a β-sheet forming peptide (Sup35) and under physiologically-relevant conditions the ...

  17. Endophytic fungi harbored in Camptotheca acuminata, Hypericum perforatum and Juniperus communis plants as promising sources of camptothecin, hypericin and deoxypodophyllotoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Kusari, Souvik

    2010-01-01

    Endophytic microorganisms are a diverse group of microbes that colonize living, internal tissues of plants without causing any immediate, overt negative effects within the hosts. A number of novel endophytic microorganisms are capable of producing host plant-specific secondary metabolites with therapeutic potential. The main objective of this study was isolation, identification, biological and biochemical characterization of endophytic fungi capable of indigenously producing camptothecin (CPT...

  18. Anti-tumor activity of N-trimethyl chitosan-encapsulated camptothecin in a mouse melanoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Tao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptothecin (CPT has recently attracted increasing attention as a promising anticancer agent for a variety of tumors. But the clinical application is largely hampered by its extreme water insolubility and unpredictable side effect. It is essential to establish an efficient and safe protocol for the administration of CPT versus melanoma. Methods Camptothecin was encapsulated with N-trimethyl chitosan (CPT-TMC through microprecipitation and sonication. Its inhibition effect on B16-F10 cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis in vitro. The anti-tumor activity of CPT-TMC was evaluated in C57BL/6 mice bearing B16-F10 melanoma. Tumor volume, tumor weight and survival time were recorded. Assessment of apoptotic cells within tumor tissue was performed by TUNEL assay. Antiangiogenesis and antiproliferation effects of CPT-TMC in vivo were conducted via CD31 and PCNA immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results CPT-TMC efficiently inhibited B16-F10 cells proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro. Experiment group showed significant inhibition compared with free CPT-treated group (81.3% vs. 56.9% in the growth of B16-F10 melanoma xenografts and prolonged the survival time of the treated mice (P Conclusions Our data suggest that N-trimethyl chitosan-encapsulated camptothecin is superior to free CPT by overcoming its insolubility and finally raises the potential of its application in melanoma therapy.

  19. ESCAPE AS REINFORCEMENT AND ESCAPE EXTINCTION IN THE TREATMENT OF FEEDING PROBLEMS

    OpenAIRE

    LaRue, Robert H; Stewart, Victoria; Piazza, Cathleen C; Volkert, Valerie M; Patel, Meeta R; Zeleny, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Given the effectiveness of putative escape extinction as treatment for feeding problems, it is surprising that little is known about the effects of escape as reinforcement for appropriate eating during treatment. In the current investigation, we examined the effectiveness of escape as reinforcement for mouth clean (a product measure of swallowing), escape as reinforcement for mouth clean plus escape extinction (EE), and EE alone as treatment for the food refusal of 5 children. Results were si...

  20. Photochemical Escape of Oxygen from Early Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical escape is an important process for oxygen escape from present Mars. In this work, a 1-D Monte-Carlo Model is developed to calculate escape rates of energetic oxygen atoms produced from O2+ dissociative recombination reactions (DR) under 1, 3, 10, and 20 times present solar XUV fluxes. We found that although the overall DR rates increase with solar XUV flux almost linearly, oxygen escape rate increases from 1 to 10 times present solar XUV conditions but decreases when increasing solar XUV flux further. Analysis shows that atomic species in the upper thermosphere of early Mars increases more rapidly than O2+ when increasing XUV fluxes. While the latter is the source of energetic O atoms, the former increases the collision probability and thus decreases the escape probability of energetic O. Our results suggest that photochemical escape be a less important escape mechanism than previously thought for the loss of water and/or CO2 from early Mars.

  1. Energy-limited escape revised

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Czesla, S; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    Gas planets in close proximity to their host stars experience photoevaporative mass loss. The energy-limited escape concept is generally used to derive estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our photoionization hydrodynamics simulations of the thermospheres of hot gas planets show that the energy-limited escape concept is valid only for planets with a gravitational potential lower than $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) < 13.11~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ because in these planets the radiative energy input is efficiently used to drive the planetary wind. Massive and compact planets with $\\log_\\mathrm{10}\\left( -\\Phi_{\\mathrm{G}}\\right) \\gtrsim 13.6~$erg$\\,$g$^{-1}$ exhibit more tightly bound atmospheres in which the complete radiative energy input is re-emitted through hydrogen Ly$\\alpha$ and free-free emission. These planets therefore host hydrodynamically stable thermospheres. Between these two extremes the strength of the planetary winds rapidly declines as a result of a decreasing heating eff...

  2. 3D-QSAR study of 20 (S)-camptothecin analogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-jun LU; Zhen-shan ZHANG; Ming-yue ZHENG; Han-jun ZOU; Xiao-min LUO; Hua-liang JIANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To build up a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model of20 (S)-camptothecin (CPT) analogs for the prediction of the activity of new CPT analogs for drug design. Methods: A training set of 43 structurally diverse CPT analogs which were inhibitors of topoisomerase Ⅰ were used to construct a quan-titative structure-activity relationship model with a comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA). The QSAR model was optimized using partial least squares(PLS) analysis. A test set of 10 compounds was evaluated using the model. Results: The CoMFA model was constructed successfully, and a good cross-validated correlation was obtained in which q2 was 0.495. Then, the analysis of the non-cross-validated PLS model in which r2 was 0.935 was built and permitted demonstrations of high predictability for the activities of the 10 CPT analogs in the test set selected in random. Conclusion: The CoMFA model indicated that bulky negative-charged group at position 9, 10 and 11 of CPT would increase activity, but excessively increasing bulky group at position 10 is adverse to inhibi-tory activity; substituents that occupy position 7 with the bulky positive group will enhance the inhibitive activity. The model can be used to design new CPT analogs and understand the mechanism of action.

  3. Micropropagation and production of camptothecin form in vitro plants of Ophiorrhiza mungos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. G. Namdeo; Priya T.; B. B. Bhosale

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the biotechnological potential of Ophiorrhiza mungos for micropropagation and camptothecin (CPT) production from in vitro grown plants.Methods: Surface sterilized explants of O. mungos were transferred aseptically in MS media containing various combinations of phytohormones for callus initiation and multiple shoot proliferation. The content of CPT was quantified in the methanolic extract of O. mungos plants and in in vitro grown plants by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results: Maximum fresh weight and dry weight biomass of O. mungos callus was obtained from MS medium supplemented with IAA (2 ppm)+ BAP (2 ppm) + GA (1 ppm). The maximum shoot proliferation (25) and elongation (6.5 cm) was found in MS medium supplemented with Picloram + Thidiazuron + Gibberellic Acid in 1:2:1 ratio after four weeks of incubation. The maximum content of CPT (0.0768 % w/w) was found in wholein vitro plants whereas the minimum CPT was observed in adventitious buds (0.0026 % w/w) as compared to the naturally grown O. mungos plants (0.0030% w/w).Conclusions: Present findings indicate that O. mungos plants respond favourably for in vitro propagation and also produce higher amount of CPT as compared to naturally grown plants.

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Camptothecin against Rice Bacterial Brown Stripe Pathogen Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae RS-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiaolin; Luo, Ju; Qiu, Wen; Cai, Li; Anjum, Syed Ishtiaq; Li, Bin; Hou, Mingsheng; Xie, Guanlin; Sun, Guochang

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) has anticancer, antiviral, and antifungal properties. However, there is a dearth of information about antibacterial activity of CPT. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of CPT on Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae strain RS-2, the pathogen of rice bacterial brown stripe, by measuring cell growth, DNA damage, cell membrane integrity, the expression of secretion systems, and topoisomerase-related genes, as well as the secretion of effector protein Hcp. Results indicated that CPT solutions at 0.05, 0.25, and 0.50 mg/mL inhibited the growth of strain RS-2 in vitro, while the inhibitory efficiency increased with an increase in CPT concentration, pH, and incubation time. Furthermore, CPT treatment affected bacterial growth and replication by causing membrane damage, which was evidenced by transmission electron microscopic observation and live/dead cell staining. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that CPT treatment caused differential expression of eight secretion system-related genes and one topoisomerase-related gene, while the up-regulated expression of hcp could be justified by the increased secretion of Hcp based on the ELISA test. Overall, this study indicated that CPT has the potential to control the bacterial brown stripe pathogen of rice. PMID:27472315

  5. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of camptothecin from Camptotheca acuminata seeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Li-jia; LI Si-yang; CHANG Zui; WANG Yang; YAN Xiu-feng

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring camptothecin (CPT) is an important source of chemotherapeutic agents. The extraction from Camptotheca acuminata is still the main approach to obtain CPT compared with total synthesis. In the present study, ultrasound-assisted extractions (UAE) of CPT from C. acuminata seeds with alkaline solutions were investigated and CPT yield were determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. The conditions of alkaline species and concentrations, extraction time, extraction temperature and ultrasonic power were optimized.Results show that both Na3PO4 and Na2CO3 solutions gain good extraction yields, whereas Na3PO4 solution has stronger basicity and need higher concentration than Na2CO3 solution does, thus aqueous Na2CO3 is more beneficial for the extraction. The optimal condition was ultrasonically extracted with 0.5% aqueous Na2CO3 at 50℃ and ultrasonic power of 400 W for 60 min. Comparing with UAE with ethanol, the extraction with 0.5% Na2CO3 solution achieves higher yield. Moreover, aqueous Na2CO3 as a solvent has various advantages including non-toxicity, inflammable, non-corrosive and low cost, which ensure this UAE method is a superior method with high utilizing prospect.

  6. Intranasal Delivery of Camptothecin-Loaded Tat-Modified Nanomicells for Treatment of Intracranial Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuki Takashima

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier is a substantial obstacle for delivering anticancer agents to brain tumors, and new strategies for bypassing it are sorely needed for brain tumor therapy. Intranasal delivery provides a practical, noninvasive method for delivering therapeutic agents to the brain. Intranasal application of nano-sized micelles that have been modified with Tat peptide facilitates brain delivery of fluorescent model materials. In this study, we evaluated a nose-to-brain delivery system for brain tumor therapy. We nasally administered the anti-tumor drug camptothecin (CPT in solution and in methoxy poly(ethylene glycol (MPEG/poly(e-caprolactone (PCL amphiphilic block copolymers (MPEG-PCL and cell penetrating peptide, Tat analog-modified MPEG-PCL (MPEG-PCL-Tat MPEG-PCL-Tat to rats bearing intracranial glioma tumors and quantified the cytotoxicity against glioma cells, and the therapeutic effects. CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL-Tat micelles showed higher cytotoxicity than CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL. CPT-free MPEG-PCL-Tat didn’t show any cytotoxicity, even at high concentrations (2 mmol/mL. CPT-loaded MPEG-PCL-Tat micelles significantly prolonged the median survival of rats. These results indicate that intranasal delivery of anti-cancer drugs with cell penetrating peptide-modified nanomicelles might be an effective therapy for brain tumors.

  7. Effect of planting density on plant growth and camptothecin content of Camptotheca acuminata seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEIHuan-yong; WANGYang; WANGZhen-yue; YANXiu-feng

    2005-01-01

    C. acuminata seedlings cultivated in greenhouse were transplanted into the fields with 5 designed planting densities (11, 16, 25,44 and 100 plants·m-2) in May of 2004 and were harvested in the middle of September of 2004. The seedling growth indexes including plant height and crown width, biomass allocation, camptothecin (CPT) content and CPT yield of different organs (young leaf, old leaf, stem,and root) were studied. For the 5 selected planting densities, the plant biomass, height, crown width, and total leaf area of C. acuminata seedlings all showed highest values at the planting density of 25 plants ·m-2. CPT content in young leaves was higher than that in other organs of seedlings and presented an obvious change with the variation of planting densities and with the highest value at density of 100plants·m-2, while for other organs no significant variation in CPT content was found with change of planting density. The accumulation of CPT was enhanced significantly at the planting density of 25 plants·m-2. It is concluded that for the purpose to get raw materials with more CPT from C. acuminata, the optimal planting density of C. acuminata seedlings should be designed as 25 plants·m-2.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Camptothecin Intercalated into Mg/AI Layered Double Hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Chun-Xia; HOU,Wan-Guo; LI,Yan; LI,Li-Fang

    2008-01-01

    The intercalation of camptothecin(CPT)into a layered inorganic host,Mg-Al layered double hydroxide(LDH),was carried out using a coprecipitation method tO obtain CPT-LDH nanohybrids.It Was found that the intercalated amounts(Ain)of CPrr-LDH nanohybrids were remarkably dependent on the molar ratios(Rc,M)of CPT tO metal ions in raw materials.The Ain value increases with the RC/M value increasing.According to the gallery heights of CPT-LDH and sizes of CPT molecule,a probably morphology of CPT molecules in the gallery of LDH was suggested that the horizontal-arranged monolayer and vertical-arranged bilayer of CPT molecules coexisted in the interlayer region of LDH.An interesting result was found that the gallery height corresponding to the bilayer of CPT-LDH sample with a high Ain value was remarkably Iower than that with low Ain value.111e/n vitro CPT release examinations from the nanohybrids showed that the CPT-LDH nanohybrids were a potential drug controlled release system.The kinetic analysis showed that the release kinetics of CPT from the nanohybrids obeyed the pseudo-first order kinetic model and the diffusion Of CPT through the LDH particle Of CPT played an important role in controlling the drug release rate.

  9. New polymorphs of 9-nitro-camptothecin prepared using a supercritical anti-solvent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yinxia; Wang, Hongdi; Liu, Guijin; Jiang, Yanbin

    2015-12-30

    Recrystallization and micronization of 9-nitro-camptothecin (9-NC) has been investigated using the supercritical anti-solvent (SAS) technology in this study. Five operating factors, i.e., the type of organic solvent, the concentration of 9-NC in the solution, the flow rate of 9-NC solution, the precipitation pressure and the temperature, were optimized using a selected OA16 (4(5)) orthogonal array design and a series of characterizations were performed for all samples. The results showed that the processed 9-NC particles exhibited smaller particle size and narrower particle size distribution as compared with 9-NC raw material (Form I), and the optimum micronization conditions for preparing 9-NC with minimum particle size were determined by variance analysis, where the solvent plays the most important role in the formation and transformation of polymorphs. Three new polymorphic forms (Form II, III and IV) of 9-NC, which present different physicochemical properties, were generated after the SAS process. The predicted structures of the 9-NC crystals, which were consistent with the experiments, were performed from their experimental XRD data by the direct space approach using the Reflex module of Materials Studio. Meanwhile, the optimal sample (Form III) was proved to have higher cytotoxicity against the cancer cells, which suggested the therapeutic efficacy of 9-NC is polymorph-dependent.

  10. Preparation, formula optimization and antitumor actions of mannitol coupling camptothecin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhichao; Li, Qingyong; Zhao, Xiuhua; Sun, Baihe; Zhu, Qiaochu; Gao, Wenqing; Hua, Changlong

    2014-04-25

    The purpose of this work is to prepare a formulation using mannitol coupling Camptothecin (CPT) nanoparticles (CPT-NPs) to circumvent the difficult solubilization practice based on central composite experimental statistical design. CPT-NPs were prepared with a high-pressure homogenization technique method. The independent variables considered for the optimization of CPT-NPs were percentage of CPT in raw material (CPT and mannitol), concentration of CPT in working liquid, cycles numbers and homogenizer pressure for drug loading efficiency, particle size and polydispersity index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical test was used to assess the optimization. The optimized CPT-NPs showed an appropriate drug loading efficiency (18.09 ± 2.13%), a homogeneous particle size (165.33 ± 37.23 nm) and a low polydispersity index (0.29 ± 0.01). The CPT-NPs group show higher inhibition ratio (79.95%) of H22 tumor growth in vivo compared with TPT and CPT at the same dose. Changes in mice body weight demonstrate CPT-NPs have the lower toxicity. The results of biodistribution studies indicated the obviously superiority of CPT-NPs in increasing the accumulation of CPT within tumor. Overall, CPT-NPs under optimum conditions are considered to be potentially feasible to overcome formulation challenges for drug delivery.

  11. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel conjugates of camptothecin and 5-Flurouracil as cytotoxic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liu, E-mail: yqliu@lzu.edu.c [Lanzhou Jiaotong University (China). Environmental and Municipal Engineering School; Chun-Yan Zhaob; Ying-Qian Liu [Lanzhou University (China). School of Pharmacy

    2011-07-01

    A series of novel conjugates of camptothecin and 5-fluorouracil were first synthesized and their cytotoxic activities against two human tumor cell lines (SGC-7901 and A-549) as well as in vitro pharmacokinetic determination of lactone stability were studied. Among these compounds, most tested conjugates showed comparable or superior cytotoxic activities to 2, but less potent compared with 1. Particularly, conjugates 10b and 10d were highly active against A-549 with IC{sub 50} values of 0.45 and 0.38 {mu}mol L{sup -1}, respectively. Also, the in vitro pharmacokinetic determination of lactone levels of representative compound 10b showed that the biological life span of their lactone forms in human and mouse plasma significantly increased compared with their mother compound 1. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method was then applied for developing linear models to predict the cytotoxic activities of these derivatives that have not yet been synthesized or experimentally tested. In addition, molecular docking was used to clarify the binding mode of these derivatives to human DNA topoisomerase I. The important hydrogen-bonding interactions were observed between these derivatives and their receptor. The results from molecular modeling and QSAR study can guide the design of novel conjugates with higher antitumor activity. (author)

  12. [Interferon : antiviral mechanisms and viral escape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espert, Lucile; Gongora, Céline; Mechti, Nadir

    2003-02-01

    15 % of human cancers have virus origin, meaning that viruses are the second cause of cancers after tabagism. The knowledge of antiviral mechanisms is essential for treatment and prevention of infection evolution towards cancers. Interferons (IFNs) are a large family of multifunctional cytokines. They are involved in regulation of cell growth and modulation of immune response. But, all these functions seem to converge toward the most important of them : the antiviral activity. IFN secretion is the first event induced by viral infection, and will act on specific receptors on neighbour cells and prevent their infection by inducing numbers of antiviral genes. Although few of them are well known like the PKR, the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway and the Mx proteins, many others need extensive studies to understand the wide range of IFN effect. Viruses have evolved to circumvent the IFN antiviral activity, and are able not only to divert the cellular machinery but also to lure the antiviral mechanisms of the host cell. The purpose of this review is to describe the many antiviral pathways and proteins induced by IFNs and to summarize the strategies of viral escape. PMID:12660132

  13. Synergism of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors with Camptothecin Derivatives in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Hamilton

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Advanced small cell lung cancer (SCLC has a dismal prognosis. Modulation of the camptothecin topotecan, approved for second-line therapy, may improve response. Our recent finding of synergistic enhancement of the cytotoxic activity of camptothecin (CPT by cyclin-dependent kinase 4 inhibitors is extended here to a panel of camptothecin analogs comprising 10-hydroxy-CPT (HOCPT, topotecan (TPT; 9-[(dimethylamino-methyl]-10-hydroxy-CPT, 9-amino-CPT (9AC, 9-nitrocamptothecin (rubitecan, SN38 (7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin and 10-hydroxy-9-nitrocamptothecin (CPT109 in combination with PD0332991, CDK4I, roscovitine and olomoucine. SCLC cell lines employed are chemoresistant NCI-H417 and DMS153 and the chemosensitive SCLC26A line established at our institution. The CPT analogs exhibiting highest cytotoxicity towards the three SCLC lines tested were SN38 and 9AC, followed by rubitecan, HOCPT, TPT and CPT109. NCI-H417 and DMS153 revealed an approximately 25-fold and 7-fold higher resistance compared to the chemosensitive SCLC26A cell line. Whereas the CDK4/6 inhibitor PD0332991 proved less effective to chemosensitize SCLC cells to CPT analogs, the CDK inhibitors CDK4I, roscovitine and olomoucine gave comparable chemosensitization effects in combination with 9AC, SN38, rubitecan and to a lesser extent with TPT and CPT109, not directly related with topoisomerase mRNA expression. In conclusion, small chemical modifications of the parent CPT structure result in differing cytotoxicities and chemomodulatory effects in combination with CDKIs of the resulting analogs.

  14. Escape as Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Feeding Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, Robert H.; Stewart, Victoria; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Volkert, Valerie M.; Patel, Meeta R.; Zeleny, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Given the effectiveness of putative escape extinction as treatment for feeding problems, it is surprising that little is known about the effects of escape as reinforcement for appropriate eating during treatment. In the current investigation, we examined the effectiveness of escape as reinforcement for mouth clean (a product measure of…

  15. Submarine 'safe to escape' studies in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurd, K M; Seddon, F M; Thacker, J C; Blogg, S L; Stansfield, M R D; White, M G; Loveman, G A M

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Navy requires reliable advice on the safe limits of escape from a distressed submarine (DISSUB). Flooding in a DISSUB may cause a rise in ambient pressure, increasing the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) and decreasing the maximum depth from which it is safe to escape. The aim of this study was to investigate the pressure/depth limits to escape following saturation at raised ambient pressure. Exposure to saturation pressures up to 1.6 bar (a) (160 kPa) (n = 38); escapes from depths down to 120 meters of sea water (msw) (n = 254) and a combination of saturation followed by escape (n = 90) was carried out in the QinetiQ Submarine Escape Simulator, Alverstoke, United Kingdom. Doppler ultrasound monitoring was used to judge the severity of decompression stress. The trials confirmed the previously untested advice, in the Guardbook, that if a DISSUB was lying at a depth of 90 msw, then it was safe to escape when the pressure in the DISSUB was 1.5 bar (a), but also indicated that this advice may be overly conservative. This study demonstrated that the upper DISSUB saturation pressure limit to safe escape from 90 msw was 1.6 bar (a), resulting in two cases of DCS. PMID:25109084

  16. Escaping Homelessness: Anticipated and Perceived Facilitators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Allisha; Tweed, Roger

    2009-01-01

    One study with two distinct sections was conducted to identify factors facilitating escape from homelessness. In Section 1, 58 homeless individuals rated possible facilitators of escape (factors they believed would help them become more independent and self-sufficient). In Section 2, 80 participants who had already exited homelessness rated the…

  17. Escape of atmospheric gases from the Moon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Da Dao-an; Yang Ya-tian

    2005-12-01

    The escape rate of atmospheric molecules on the Moon is calculated.Based on the assumption that the rates of emission and escape of gases attain equilibrium, the ratio of molecular number densities during day and night, 0/0, can be explained. The plausible emission rate of helium and radioactive elements present in the Moon has also been calculated.

  18. Optimal escape theory predicts escape behaviors beyond flight initiation distance: risk assessment and escape by striped plateau lizards Sceloporus virgatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William E.COOPER Jr

    2009-01-01

    Escape theory predicts that flight initiation distance (FID=distance between predator and prey when escape begins) is longer when risk is greater and shorter when escape is more costly. A few tests suggest that escape theory applies to distance fled. Escape models have not addressed stochastic variables, such as probability of fleeing and of entering refuge, but their economic logic might be applicable. Experiments on several risk factors in the lizard Sceloporus virgatus confirmed all predictions for the above escape variables. FID was greater when approach was faster and more direct, for lizards on ground than on trees, for lizards rarely exposed to humans, for the second of two approaches, and when the predator turned toward lizards rather than away. Lizards fled further during rapid and second consecutive approaches. They were more likely to flee when approached directly, when a predator turned toward them, and during second approaches. They were more likely to enter refuge when approached rapidly. A novel finding is that perch height in trees was unrelated to FID because lizards escaped by moving out of sight, then moving up or down unpredictably. These findings add to a growing body of evidence supporting predictions of escape theory for FID and distance fled. They show that two probabilistic aspects of escape are predictable based on relative predation risk levels. Because individuals differ in boldness, the assessed optimal FID and threshold risks for fleeing and entering refuge are exceeded for an increasing proportion of individuals as risk increases[Current Zoology 55(2):123-131,2009].

  19. Langmuir monolayers and Differential Scanning Calorimetry for the study of the interactions between camptothecin drugs and biomembrane models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadó, Ana; Giuffrida, M Chiara; Sagristá, M Lluïsa; Castelli, Francesco; Pujol, Montserrat; Alsina, M Asunción; Mora, Margarita

    2016-02-01

    CPT-11 and SN-38 are camptothecins with strong antitumor activity. Nevertheless, their severe side effects and the chemical instability of their lactone ring have questioned the usual forms for its administration and have focused the current research on the development of new suitable pharmaceutical formulations. This work presents a biophysical study of the interfacial interactions of CPT-11 and SN-38 with membrane mimetic models by using monolayer techniques and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The aim is to get new insights for the understanding of the bilayer mechanics after drug incorporation and to optimize the design of drug delivery systems based on the formation of stable bilayer structures. Moreover, from our knowledge, the molecular interactions between camptothecins and phospholipids have not been investigated in detail, despite their importance in the context of drug action. The results show that neither CPT-11 nor SN-38 disturbs the structure of the complex liposome bilayers, despite their different solubility, that CPT-11, positively charged in its piperidine group, interacts electrostatically with DOPS, making stable the incorporation of a high percentage of CPT-11 into liposomes and that SN-38 establishes weak repulsive interactions with lipid molecules that modify the compressibility of the bilayer without affecting significantly neither the lipid collapse pressure nor the miscibility pattern of drug-lipid mixed monolayers. The suitability of a binary and a ternary lipid mixture for encapsulating SN-38 and CPT-11, respectively, has been demonstrated. PMID:26656185

  20. Quantifying Distributions of Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Cen, Renyue

    2015-01-01

    Simulations have indicated that most of the escaped Lyman continuum photons escape through a minority of solid angles with near complete transparency, with the remaining majority of the solid angles largely opaque, resulting in a very broad and skewed probability distribution function (PDF) of the escape fraction when viewed at different angles. Thus, the escape fraction of Lyman continuum photons of a galaxy observed along a line of sight merely represents the properties of the interstellar medium along that line of sight, which may be an ill-representation of true escape fraction of the galaxy averaged over its full sky. Here we study how Lyman continuum photons escape from galaxies at $z=4-6$, utilizing high-resolution large-scale cosmological radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. We compute the PDF of the mean escape fraction ($\\left$) averaged over mock observational samples, as a function of the sample size, compared to the true mean (had you an infinite sample size). We find that, when the sample size is...

  1. Ion Escape from the Ionosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, R.; Sittler, E.; Lipatov, A.

    2008-01-01

    Ions have been observed to flow away from Titan along its induced magnetic tail by the Plasma Science Instrument (PLS) on Voyager 1 and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) on Cassini. In both cases, the ions have been inferred to be of ionospheric origin. Recent plasma measurements made at another unmagnetized body, Venus, have also observed similar flow in its magnetic tail. Much earlier, the possibility of such flow was inferred when ionospheric measurements made from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) were used to derive upward flow and acceleration of H(+), D(+) and O(+) within the nightside ionosphere of Venus. The measurements revealed that the polarization electric field in the ionosphere produced the principal upward force on these light ions. The resulting vertical flow of H(+) and D(+) was found to be the dominant escape mechanism of hydrogen and deuterium, corresponding to loss rates consistent with large oceans in early Venus. Other electrodynamic forces were unimportant because the plasma beta in the nightside ionosphere of Venus is much greater than one. Although the plasma beta is also greater than one on Titan, ion acceleration is expected to be more complex, especially because the subsolar point and the subflow points can be 180 degrees apart. Following what we learned at Venus, upward acceleration of light ions by the polarization electric field opposing gravity in the ionosphere of Titan will be described. Additional electrodynamic forces resulting from the interaction of Saturn's magnetosphere with Titan's ionosphere will be examined using a recent hybrid model.

  2. Net escapement of Antartic krill in trawls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, B.A.; Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Herrmann, Bent;

    This document describes the aims and methodology of a three year project (commenced in 2012) entitled Net Escapement of Antarctic krill in Trawls (NEAT). The study will include a morphology based mathematical modeling (FISHSELECT) of different sex and maturity groups of Antarctic krill (Euphausia...... superba) to predict basic selective characteristics of different trawl gear and net designs. Results will be used to quantify the theoretic catch efficiency and escape mortality in different net designs and also to construct design guides, to minimize escape mortality, with descriptions of basis selective...

  3. Pyrosequencing of the Camptotheca acuminata transcriptome reveals putative genes involved in camptothecin biosynthesis and transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yongzhen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptotheca acuminata is a Nyssaceae plant, often called the "happy tree", which is indigenous in Southern China. C. acuminata produces the terpenoid indole alkaloid, camptothecin (CPT, which exhibits clinical effects in various cancer treatments. Despite its importance, little is known about the transcriptome of C. acuminata and the mechanism of CPT biosynthesis, as only few nucleotide sequences are included in the GenBank database. Results From a constructed cDNA library of young C. acuminata leaves, a total of 30,358 unigenes, with an average length of 403 bp, were obtained after assembly of 74,858 high quality reads using GS De Novo assembler software. Through functional annotation, a total of 21,213 unigenes were annotated at least once against the NCBI nucleotide (Nt, non-redundant protein (Nr, Uniprot/SwissProt, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG, and Arabidopsis thaliana proteome (TAIR databases. Further analysis identified 521 ESTs representing 20 enzyme genes that are involved in the backbone of the CPT biosynthetic pathway in the library. Three putative genes in the upstream pathway, including genes for geraniol-10-hydroxylase (CaPG10H, secologanin synthase (CaPSCS, and strictosidine synthase (CaPSTR were cloned and analyzed. The expression level of the three genes was also detected using qRT-PCR in C. acuminata. With respect to the branch pathway of CPT synthesis, six cytochrome P450s transcripts were selected as candidate transcripts by detection of transcript expression in different tissues using qRT-PCR. In addition, one glucosidase gene was identified that might participate in CPT biosynthesis. For CPT transport, three of 21 transcripts for multidrug resistance protein (MDR transporters were also screened from the dataset by their annotation result and gene expression analysis. Conclusion This study produced a large amount of transcriptome data from C. acuminata by 454 pyrosequencing. According to

  4. Mutation of Gly717Phe in human topoisomerase 1B has an effect on enzymatic function, reactivity to the camptothecin anticancer drug and on the linker domain orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhenxing; D'Annessa, Ilda; Tesauro, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    Human topoisomerase 1B controls the topological state of supercoiled DNA allowing the progression of fundamental cellular processes. The enzyme, which is the unique molecular target of the natural anticancer compound camptothecin, acts by cleaving one DNA strand and forming a transient protein...

  5. Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily transporter from Botrytis cinerea, provides tolerance towards the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin and towards fungicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily gene from Botrytis cinerea, was cloned, and replacement and overexpression mutants were constructed to study its function. Replacement mutants showed increased sensitivity to the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin, produced by the plant

  6. Escapes in Hamiltonian systems with multiple exit channels: Part II

    OpenAIRE

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the escape dynamics in open Hamiltonian systems with multiple channels of escape continuing the work initiated in Part I. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted distinguishing between trapped (ordered and chaotic) and escaping orbits. The determination of the location of the basins of escape towards the different escape channels and their correlations with the corresponding escape periods of the orbits is undoubtedly an issue of paramount importance. We consider four diffe...

  7. Polysaccharopeptides derived from Coriolus versicolor potentiate the S-phase specific cytotoxicity of Camptothecin (CPT on human leukemia HL-60 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Pingping

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polysaccharopeptide (PSP from Coriolus versicolor (Yunzhi is used as a supplementary cancer treatment in Asia. The present study aims to investigate whether PSP pre-treatment can increase the response of the human leukemia HL-60 cells to apoptosis induction by Camptothecin (CPT. Methods We used bivariate bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide (BrdUrd/PI flow cytometry analysis to measure the relative movement (RM of the BrdUrd positively labeled cells and DNA synthesis time (Ts on the HL-60 cell line. We used annexin V/PI flow cytometry analysis to quantify the viable, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The expression of cyclin E and cyclin B1 was determined with annexin V/PI flow cytometry and western blotting. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used to test the cytotoxicity of PSP and CPT. Results PSP reduced cellular proliferation; inhibited cells progression through both S and G2 phase, reduced 3H-thymidine uptake and prolonged DNA synthesis time (Ts in HL-60 cells. PSP-pretreated cells enhanced the cytotoxicity of CPT. The sensitivity of cells to the cytotoxic effects of CPT was seen to be the highest in the S-phase and to a small extent of the G2 phase of the cell cycle. On the other hand, no cell death (measured by annexin V/PI was evident with the normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with treatment of either PSP or CPT. Conclusion The present study shows that PSP increases the sensitization of the HL-60 cells to undergo effective apoptotic cell death induced by CPT. The pattern of sensitivity of cancer cells is similar to that of HL-60 cells. PSP rapidly arrests and/or kills cells in S-phase and did not interfere with the anticancer action of CPT. PSP is a potential adjuvant to treat human leukemia as rapidly proliferating tumors is characterized by a high proportion of S-phase cells.

  8. The escape velocity and Schwarzschild metric

    CERN Document Server

    Murzagalieva, A G; Murzagaliev, G Z

    2002-01-01

    The escape velocity value in the terms of general relativity by means Schwarzschild metric is provided to make of the motion equation with Friedman cosmological model behavior build in the terms of Robertson-Worker metric. (author)

  9. Biogeochemistry: Nocturnal escape route for marsh gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Katey Walter; MacIntyre, Sally

    2016-07-01

    A field study of methane emissions from wetlands reveals that more of the gas escapes through diffusive processes than was thought, mostly at night. Because methane is a greenhouse gas, the findings have implications for global warming.

  10. Karachi Commander Escapes Attack, 10 Dead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘志强

    2004-01-01

    KARACHI: The army commander in the Pakistani city of Karachi narrowly① escaped assassination② yesterday when gunmen attacked his convoy③ with gunfire and a bomb, killing at least 10 and wounding his driver, officials said.

  11. Development and evaluation of lipid nanoparticles for camptothecin de-livery: a comparison of solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid car-riers, and lipid emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zih-rou HUANG; Shu-chiou HUA; Yueh-lung YANG; Jia-you FANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:Camptothecin is an anticancer drug that acta against a broad spectrum of tumors. The clinical application of camptothecin is limited by its insolubility, instability, and toxicity problems. The aim of this study was to develop and characterize lipid nanoparticles with different lipid cores which can circumvent these problems. Methods: Lipid nanoparticles made of Precirol (solid lipid nanoparticles; SLN-P), Compritol (SLN-C), Precirol+squalene (nanostructured lipid carriers; NLC), and squalene (a lipid emulsion; LE) as the lipid core ma-terial were prepared. These systems were assessed and compared by evaluat-ing the mean diameter, surface charge, molecular environment, camptothecin release, and cell viability against a melanoma. The safety and storage stability of these systems were also preliminarily examined. Results: The particle size ranged from 190 to 310 nm, with the NLC and LE showing the smallest and largest sizes, respectively. The in vitro drug release occurred in a sustained manner in decreasing order as follows: LE>NLC>SLN-P>SLN-C. It was found that varying the type of inner phase had profound effects on cell viability. The SLN-P generally showed higher cytotoxicity than the free control. The treat-ment of melanomas with the camptothecin-loaded SLN-C and NLC yielded cytotoxicity comparable to that of the free form. The percentage of erythrocyte hemolysis by all nanoparticles was ≤5%, suggesting a good tolerance to lipid nanoparticles. Conclusion: The results collectively suggest that the SLN-P may have the potential to serve as a delivery system for parenteral camptothecin ad-ministration because of the sustained drug release, strong cytotoxicity, limited hemolysis, and good storage stability.

  12. Submarine tower escape decompression sickness risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveman, G A M; Seddon, E M; Thacker, J C; Stansfield, M R; Jurd, K M

    2014-01-01

    Actions to enhance survival in a distressed submarine (DISSUB) scenario may be guided in part by knowledge of the likely risk of decompression sickness (DCS) should the crew attempt tower escape. A mathematical model for DCS risk estimation has been calibrated against DCS outcome data from 3,738 exposures of either men or goats to raised pressure. Body mass was used to scale DCS risk. The calibration data included more than 1,000 actual or simulated submarine escape exposures and no exposures with substantial staged decompression. Cases of pulmonary barotrauma were removed from the calibration data. The calibrated model was used to estimate the likelihood of DCS occurrence following submarine escape from the United Kingdom Royal Navy tower escape system. Where internal DISSUB pressure remains at - 0.1 MPa, escape from DISSUB depths 60% DCS risk predicted for a 200-meter escape from saturation at 0.21 MPa. Using the calibrated model to predict DCS for direct ascent from saturation gives similar risk estimates to other published models. PMID:25109085

  13. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mökkönen, Harri, E-mail: harri.mokkonen@aalto.fi [Department of Applied Physics and COMP CoE, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík (Iceland); Ikonen, Timo [Department of Applied Physics and COMP CoE, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Jónsson, Hannes [Department of Applied Physics and COMP CoE, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Faculty of Physical Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavík (Iceland); Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843 (United States); Ala-Nissila, Tapio [Department of Applied Physics and COMP CoE, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FIN-00076 Aalto, Espoo (Finland); Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912-1843 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  14. Alpha-fetoprotein triggers hepatoma cells escaping from immune surveillance through altering the expression of Fas/FasL and tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand and its receptor of lymphocytes and liver cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-Sen Li; Qiu-Ling Ma; Qian Chen; Xin-Hua Liu; Ping-Feng Li; Guo-Guang Du; Gang Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of α-fetoprotein (AFP)in escaping from the host immune surveillance of hepatocellular carcinoma.METHODS: AFP purified from human umbilical blood was administrated into the cultured human lymphoma Jurkat T cell line or hepatoma cell line, Bel7402 in vitro. The expression of tumor necrosis factor related apoptosisinducing ligand (TRAIL) and its receptor (TRAILR) mRNA were analyzed by Northern blot and Western blot wasused to detect the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL)protein.RESULTS: AFP (20 mg/L) could promote the expression of FasL and TRAIL, and inhibit the expression of Fas and TRAILR of Bel7402 cells. For Jurkat cell line, AFP could suppress the expression of FasL and TRAIL, and stimulate the expression of Fas and TRAILR. AFP also could synergize with Bel7402 cells to inhibit the expression of FasL protein and TRAIL mRNA in Jurkat cells. The monoclonal antibody against AFP (anti-AFP) could abolish these functions of AFP.CONCLUSION: AFP is able to promote the expression of FasL and TRAIL in hepatoma cells and enhance the expression of Fas and TRAILR in lymphocytes. These could elicit the escape of hepatocellular carcinoma cells from the host's lymphocytes immune surveillance.

  15. On the escape of CH4 from Pluto's atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, T. T.; Erwin, J. T.; Yelle, R. V.

    2015-01-01

    We adapted a multi-species escape model, developed for close-in extrasolar planets, to calculate the escape rates of CH4 and N2 from Pluto. In the absence of escape, CH4 should overtake N2 as the dominant species below the exobase. The CH4 profile depends strongly on the escape rate, however, and the typical escape rates predicted for Pluto lead to a nearly constant mixing ratio of less than 1 % below the exobase. In this case the CH4 escape rate is only 5-10 % of the N2 escape rate. Observat...

  16. Escape statistics for parameter sweeps through bifurcations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nicholas J; Shaw, Steven W

    2012-04-01

    We consider the dynamics of systems undergoing parameter sweeps through bifurcation points in the presence of noise. Of interest here are local codimension-one bifurcations that result in large excursions away from an operating point that is transitioning from stable to unstable during the sweep, since information about these "escape events" can be used for system identification, sensing, and other applications. The analysis is based on stochastic normal forms for the dynamic saddle-node and subcritical pitchfork bifurcations with a time-varying bifurcation parameter and additive noise. The results include formulation and numerical solution for the distribution of escape events in the general case and analytical approximations for delayed bifurcations for which escape occurs well beyond the corresponding quasistatic bifurcation points. These bifurcations result in amplitude jumps encountered during parameter sweeps and are particularly relevant to nano- and microelectromechanical systems, for which noise can play a significant role.

  17. Unexpected variability of Martian hydrogen escape

    OpenAIRE

    Chaffin, Michael S.; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stewart, Ian; Montmessin, Franck; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    International audience Mars today is much drier than the Earth, though they likely began with similar relative amounts of water. One potential cause for this discrepancy is hydrogen loss to space, which may have removed a large fraction of Mars' initial water. Here we demonstrate an order-of-magnitude change in the Martian hydrogen escape rate in 2007, inconsistent with established models for the source of escaping hydrogen. We analyze 121.6 nm (hydrogen Lyman-α) airglow observations made ...

  18. Martian Atmospheric and Ionospheric plasma Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Rickard

    2016-04-01

    Solar forcing is responsible for the heating, ionization, photochemistry, and erosion processes in the upper atmosphere throughout the lifetime of the terrestrial planets. Of the four terrestrial planets, the Earth is the only one with a fully developed biosphere, while our kin Venus and Mars have evolved into arid inhabitable planets. As for Mars, there are ample evidences for an early Noachian, water rich period on Mars. The question is, what made Mars evolve so differently compared to the Earth? Various hydrosphere and atmospheric evolution scenarios for Mars have been forwarded based on surface morphology, chemical composition, simulations, semi-empiric (in-situ data) models, and the long-term evolution of the Sun. Progress has been made, but the case is still open regarding the changes that led to the present arid surface and tenuous atmosphere at Mars. This presentation addresses the long-term variability of the Sun, the solar forcing impact on the Martian atmosphere, and its interaction with the space environment - an electromagnetic wave and particle interaction with the upper atmosphere that has implications for its photochemistry, composition, and energization that governs thermal and non-thermal escape. Non-thermal escape implies an electromagnetic upward energization of planetary ions and molecules to velocities above escape velocity, a process governed by a combination of solar EUV radiation (ionization), and energy and momentum transfer by the solar wind. The ion escape issue dates back to the early Soviet and US-missions to Mars, but the first more accurate estimates of escape rates came with the Phobos-2 mission in 1989. Better-quality ion composition measurement results of atmospheric/ionospheric ion escape from Mars, obtained from ESA Mars Express (MEX) instruments, have improved our understanding of the ion escape mechanism. With the NASA MAVEN spacecraft orbiting Mars since Sept. 2014, dual in-situ measurement with plasma instruments are now

  19. Induction of apoptosis in the human Leukemic U937 cell line by Kaempferia parviflora Wall.ex.Baker extract and effects of paclitaxel and camptothecin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjerdpongchai, Ratana; Chanwikruy, Yupa; Rattanapanone, Viboon; Sripanidkulchai, Bungorn

    2009-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora Wall.ex.Baker is a Thai medicinal herb that has high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Apoptotic effects of the herbal extract alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs, paclitaxel and camptothecin, were here studied in the human promonocytic leukemic U937 cell line. K. parviflora extract suppressed cell proliferation and decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner as assessed using the trypan blue exclusion assay. Staining of extract-treated cells with propidium iodide and examination under a fluorescence microscope showed condensed nuclei and apoptotic bodies. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) decreased after treatment and the number of cells with decreased MTP also increased. Furthermore, activation of caspase-3 was found in herbal extract-treated cells. When the extract was combined with paclitaxel, an additive effect on U937 cell apoptosis was obtained, whereas camptothecin exerted an antagonistic effect. PMID:20192599

  20. Effects of Serotonergic and Opioidergic Drugs on Escape Behaviors and Social Status of Male Crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonova, V. E.; Schürmann, F.-W.; Sakharov, D. A.

    We examined the effects of selective serotonin depletion and opioid ligands on social rank and related escape behavior of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Establishment of social rank in a pair of males affected their escape reactions. Losers showed a lower and dominants a higher percentage of jumps in response to tactile cercal stimulation than before a fight. The serotonin-depleting drug α-methyltryptophan (AMTP) caused an activation of the escape reactivity in socially naive crickets. AMTP-treated animals also showed a lower ability to become dominants. With an initial 51.6+/-3.6% of wins in the AMTP group, the percentage decreased to 26+/-1.6% on day 5 after injection. The opiate receptor antagonist naloxone affected fight and escape similarly as AMTP. In contrast to naloxone, the opioid agonist [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin decreased escape responsiveness to cercal stimulation in naive and subordinate crickets. We suggest that serotonergic and opioid systems are involved in the dominance induced depression of escape behavior.

  1. On the escape of CH4 from Pluto's atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Koskinen, T T; Yelle, R V

    2015-01-01

    We adapted a multi-species escape model, developed for close-in extrasolar planets, to calculate the escape rates of CH4 and N2 from Pluto. In the absence of escape, CH4 should overtake N2 as the dominant species below the exobase. The CH4 profile depends strongly on the escape rate, however, and the typical escape rates predicted for Pluto lead to a nearly constant mixing ratio of less than 1 % below the exobase. In this case the CH4 escape rate is only 5-10 % of the N2 escape rate. Observations of the CH4 profile by the New Horizons/ALICE spectrograph can constrain the CH4 escape rate and provide a unique test for escape models.

  2. Centrifugally Stimulated Exospheric Ion Escape at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcourt, Dominique; Seki, K.; Terada, N.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the transport of ions in the low-altitude magnetosphere magnetosphere of Mercury. We show that, because of small spatial scales, the centrifugal effect due to curvature of the E B drift paths can lead to significant particle energization in the parallel direction. We demonstrate that because of this effect, ions with initial speed smaller than the escape speed such as those produced via thermal desorption can overcome gravity and escape into the magnetosphere. The escape route of this low-energy exosphere originating material is largely controlled by the magnetospheric convection rate. This escape route spreads over a narrower range of altitudes when the convection rate increases. Bulk transport of low-energy planetary material thus occurs within a limited region of space once moderate magnetospheric convection is established. These results suggest that, via release of material otherwise gravitationally trapped, the E B related centrifugal acceleration is an important mechanism for the net supply of plasma to the magnetosphere of Mercury.

  3. Mixed Micelles made of Poly(ethylene glycol)-Phosphatidylethanolamine Conjugate and D-α-tocopheryl Polyethylene Glycol 1000 Succinate as Pharmaceutical Nanocarriers for Camptothecin

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, L; Elbayoumi, T.A.; Torchilin, V.P.

    2005-01-01

    Micelles from the mixture of poly(ethylene glycol)-phosphatidyl ethanolamine conjugate (PEG-PE) and D-α-tocopheryl polyetheyene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) were prepared loaded with the poorly soluble anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT). The solubilization of CPT by the mixed micelles was more efficient than with earlier described micelles made of PEG-PE alone. CPT-loaded mixed micelles were stable upon storage and dilution and firmly retained the incorporated drug. The cytotoxicity of the CP...

  4. Effects of camptothecin on double-strand break repair by non-homologous end-joining in DNA mismatch repair-deficient human colorectal cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Sandrine; Miquel, Catherine; Sarasin, Alain; Praz, Françoise

    2005-01-01

    Loss of a functional mismatch repair (MMR) system in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells is associated with microsatellite instability and increased sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. In this study, we have investigated whether a defect in double-strand break (DSB) repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) could explain why MMR-deficient CRC cells are hypersensitive to camptothecin (CPT), a topoisomerase I inhibitor. To evaluate the efficiency and the fidelity of DSB repair, we have transie...

  5. RKIP phosphorylation and STAT3 activation is inhibited by oxaliplatin and camptothecin and are associated with poor prognosis in stage II colon cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major obstacle in treating colorectal cancer (CRC) is the acquired resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. An important protein in the regulation of cancer cell death and clinical outcome is Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP). In contrast, activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a protein that promotes tumor cell survival by inhibiting apoptosis and has an important role in cancer progression in many of cancer types. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulation of RKIP and STAT3 after treatment with clinically relevant chemotherapeutic agents (camptothecin (CPT) and oxaliplatin (OXP)) and the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in HCT116 colon cancer cells as well as evaluate the association between RKIP and STAT3 with clinical outcome of Stage II colon cancer patients. HCT-116 colon cancer cells were treated with CPT, OXP, and IL-6 separately or in combination in a time and dose-dependent manner and examined for phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated RKIP and STAT3 via Western blot analysis. STAT3 transcriptional activity was measured via a luciferase reporter assay in HCT116 cells treated with CPT, IL-6 or transfected with JAK 1, 2 separately or in combination. We extended these observations and determined STAT3 and RKIP/ pRKIP in tumor microarrays (TMA) in stage II colon cancer patients. We demonstrate IL-6-mediated activation of STAT3 occurs in conjunction with the phosphorylation of RKIP in vitro in human colon cancer cells. OXP and CPT block IL-6 mediated STAT3 activation and RKIP phosphorylation via the inhibition of the interaction of STAT3 with gp130. We determined that STAT3 and nuclear pRKIP are significantly associated with poor patient prognosis in stage II colon cancer patients. In the analysis of tumor samples from stage II colon cancer patients and the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, pRKIP and STAT3, 2 proteins potentially involved in the resistance to conventional treatments were detected. The

  6. [Escape mutants of hepatitis B virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Carlos Mario; Navas, María-Cristina

    2015-04-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a public health problem worldwide. Considering HBV morbidity and mortality and the economic consequences .of this infection, policies and strategies to control it have been implemented, especially in regions where HBV infection is endemic, with high rates of vertical and horizontal infection. One of these strategies is the development of the recombinant vaccine. A 92% of the countries in the world have implemented the vaccine with a global coverage of 69%. The escape variants of HBV correspond to isolates with mutations in the sequence coding for the "a" determinant; these mutations result in changes in the amino acid sequence of the surface antigen (HBsAg) that prevent neutralization of viral particles by antibodies generated in response to vaccination or infection. The escape variants can infect vaccinated individuals and have been identified in the population of countries with different epidemiological patterns. PMID:26065452

  7. Escape and Stand of the Pluto Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chong-Yi

    2002-01-01

    Molar mass μmin of the lightest gas, which will exist "forever" in the atmosphere at the planet surface,can be evaluated by Jeans rule. The μmin of Pluto is 17.3 g@ mol-1. It is evident that both N2 and CO can be major atmospheric composition at the Pluto surface, and will exist "forever". CH4 can only be escaping slowly from Pluto atmosphere, and still holds quite a proportion in current Pluto atmosphere. However, it will not escape from Titan (or Jupiter, Saturn) atmosphere largely, and will exist "forever". Given the quantitylevelof partial pressure of CH4 in Pluto and Titan (or Jupiter, Saturn) original atmosphere is the same, it will be clear that the current partial pressure of CH4 in Pluto surface atmosphere is 10-3 Pa.

  8. Designing an escape room with the Experience Pyramid model

    OpenAIRE

    Heikkinen, Outi; Shumeyko, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The concept of real life room escape, although relatively new, has been constantly gaining popularity and spreading across countries and continents. Despite the ever-growing appeal and widespread appreciation, the phenomenon is highly underresearched. The authors of this paper, employed at InsideOut Escape Games – the first room escape company of Finland – decided to explore the question of applicability of available experience design tools in the context of room escape. The Experience Py...

  9. How inflation hawks escape expectations traps

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvain Leduc

    2003-01-01

    Why did inflation increase so dramatically from the 1960s to the 1970s? One possible theory is that once people started believing inflation would rise, the Fed was forced to validate those expectations by increasing the money supply. In "How Inflation Hawks Escape Expectations Traps," Sylvain Leduc discusses this "expectations trap" hypothesis and uses a direct measure of expectations to see if the theory is consistent with the data.

  10. Cold ion escape from the Martian ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fränz, M.; Dubinin, E.; Andrews, D.; Barabash, S.; Nilsson, H.; Fedorov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We here report on new measurements of the escape flux of oxygen ions from Mars by combining the observations of the ASPERA-3 and MARSIS experiments on board the European Mars Express spacecraft. We show that in previous estimates of the total heavy ion escape flow the contribution of the cold ionospheric outflow with energies below 10 eV has been underestimated. Both case studies and the derived flow pattern indicate that the cold plasma observed by MARSIS and the superthermal plasma observed by ASPERA-3 move with the same bulk speed in most regions of the Martian tail. We determine maps of the tailside heavy ion flux distribution derived from mean ion velocity distributions sampled over 7 years. If we assume that the superthermal bulk speed derived from these long time averages of the ion distribution function represent the total plasma bulk speed we derive the total tailside plasma flux. Assuming cylindrical symmetry we determine the mean total escape rate for the years 2007-2014 at 2.8 ± 0.4 ×1025 atoms / s which is in good agreement with model estimates. A possible mechanism to generate this flux can be the ionospheric pressure gradient between dayside and nightside.

  11. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  12. Preparation and characterization of inclusion complexes of antitumor camptothecin with cucurbit[n=7,8]urils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The slightly water-soluble anticancer drug camptothecin(CPT) and its inclusion complexes with cucurbit[n = 7,8]uril(Q[n](n = 7,8)) were investigated.The formation of 1:2 complexes with Q[n](n = 7,8) in aqueous solution was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and the apparent stability constants were determined to be higher than 3.01 × 1012 L2/mol2.The solid inclusion complexes of CPT and Q[n](n = 7,8) were also prepared by the co-evaporation method and characterized by Fourier transformation-infrared spectroscopy,differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction.Aqueous solubility and dissolution studies indicate that the complexes exhibited significantly increased dissolution rates compared with the pure drug and physical mixtures.The potential of Q[7] or Q[8] for stabilizing lactone modality of CPT was investigated by the High Performance Liquid Chromatography(HPLC) method.The results reveal more than 63% CPT lactone form(active form) in CPT-Q[7] or Q[8] complexes compared to only 36% CPT lactone form in the absence of Q[7] or Q[8] after being incubated in the phosphate buffer solution(pH 7.4 at 37 °C) for 5h.

  13. Compound Specific Extraction of Camptothecin from Nothapodytes nimmoniana and Piperine from Piper nigrum Using Accelerated Solvent Extractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinayak Upadhya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of varying temperatures with constant pressure of solvent on extraction efficiency of two chemically different alkaloids were studied. Camptothecin (CPT from stem of Nothapodytes nimmoniana (Grah. Mabb. and piperine from the fruits of Piper nigrum L. were extracted using Accelerated Solvent Extractor (ASE. Three cycles of extraction for a particular sample cell at a given temperature assured complete extraction. CPT and piperine were determined and quantified by using a simple and efficient UFLC-PDA (245 and 343 nm method. Temperature increased efficiency of extraction to yield higher amount of CPT, whereas temperature had diminutive effect on yield of piperine. Maximum yield for CPT was achieved at 80∘C and for piperine at 40∘C. Thus, the study determines compound specific extraction of CPT from N. nimmoniana and piperine from P. nigrum using ASE method. The present study indicates the use of this method for simple, fast, and accurate extraction of the compound of interest.

  14. Co-overexpression of geraniol-10-hydroxylase and strictosidine synthase improves anti-cancer drug camptothecin accumulation in Ophiorrhiza pumila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lijie; Ni, Xiaoling; Ji, Qian; Teng, Xiaojuan; Yang, Yanru; Wu, Chao; Zekria, David; Zhang, Dasheng; Kai, Guoyin

    2015-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) belongs to a group of monoterpenoidindole alkaloids (TIAs) and its derivatives such as irinothecan and topothecan have been widely used worldwide for the treatment of cancer, giving rise to rapidly increasing market demands. Genes from Catharanthus roseus encoding strictosidine synthase (STR) and geraniol 10-hydroxylase (G10H), were separately and simultaneously introduced into Ophiorrhiza pumila hairy roots. Overexpression of individual G10H (G lines) significantly improved CPT production with respect to non-transgenic hairy root cultures (NC line) and single STR overexpressing lines (S lines), indicating that G10H plays a more important role in stimulating CPT accumulation than STR in O. pumila. Furthermore, co-overexpression of G10H and STR genes (SG Lines) caused a 56% increase on the yields of CPT compared to NC line and single gene transgenic lines, showed that simultaneous introduction of G10H and STR can produce a synergistic effect on CPT biosynthesis in O. pumila. The MTT assay results indicated that CPT extracted from different lines showed similar anti-tumor activity, suggesting that transgenic O. pumila hairy root lines could be an alternative approach to obtain CPT. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the enhancement of CPT production in O. pumila employing a metabolic engineering strategy. PMID:25648209

  15. Ab initio study on the noncovalent adsorption of camptothecin anticancer drug onto graphene, defect modified graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Nabanita; Deka, Ramesh C

    2013-09-01

    The application of graphene and related nanomaterials like boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, BN-graphene hybrid nanomaterials, and graphene oxide (GO) for adsorption of anticancer chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CPT) along with the effect on electronic properties prior to functionalization and after functionalization has been reported using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The inclusion of dispersion correction to DFT is instrumental in accounting for van der Waals π-π stacking between CPT and the nanomaterial. The adsorption of CPT exhibits significant strain within the nanosheets and noncovalent adsorption of CPT is thermodynamically favoured onto the nanosheets. In case of GO, surface incorporation of functional groups result in significant crumpling along the basal plane and the interaction is basically mediated by H-bonding rather than π-π stacking. Docking studies predict the plausible binding of CPT, CPT functionalized graphene and GO with topoisomerase I (top 1) signifying that CPT interacts through π stacking with AT and GC base pairs of DNA and in presence of nano support, DNA bases preferentially gets bound to the basal plane of graphene and GO rather than the edges. At a theoretical level of understanding, our studies point out the noncovalent interaction of CPT with graphene based nanomaterials and GO for loading and delivery of anticancer chemotherapeutic along with active binding to Top1 protein.

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of New Cathepsin B-Sensitive Camptothecin Nanoparticles Equipped with a Novel Multifuctional Linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Tang, Kaiyong; Wang, Hong; Liu, Yaqian; Bao, Bin; Fang, Yanfen; Zhang, Xiongwen; Lu, Wei

    2016-05-18

    Traditional antitumor drugs such as camptothecin and paclitaxel derivatives are widely used in cancer chemotherapy. However, the major defects of those agents include severe toxicity and poor water solubility. With these in mind, a novel multifunctional linker was designed and two Cathepsin B (CTB) sensitive CPT conjugates (9a and 9b) were synthesized. Through click chemistry, additional functional group mPEG2000 can be easily introduced into these conjugates. The introduction of mPEG2000 fragment resulted in the formation of nanoparticles 1a and 1b (average particle sizes were 216.9 and 257.9 nm, respectively) with significantly increased water solubility (more than 19 000-fold). The release of therapeutic drug SN-38 in the presence of CTB was confirmed by HPLC and prodrug 1a showed potent in vitro cytotoxicity against all tested cell lines. Impressively, compared with irinotecan, CTB sensitive prodrug 1a displayed similar in vivo efficacy with remarkable decreased in vivo toxicity. PMID:27070848

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Therapeutic Evaluation of Camptothecin-Encapsulated β-Cyclodextrin Nanosponges in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Minelli, Rosalba; Cavalli, Roberta; Occhipinti, Sergio; Barrera, Giuseppina; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Boggio, Elena; Conti, Laura; Fantozzi, Roberto; Giovarelli, Mirella; Trotta, Francesco; Dianzani, Umberto; Dianzani, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), a pentacyclic alkaloid, is an inhibitor of DNA Topoisomerase-I and shows a wide spectrum of anti-cancer activities. The use of CPT has been hampered by poor aqueous solubility and a high degradation rate. Previously, it has been reported that CPT encapsulated in β-cyclodextrin-nanosponges (CN-CPT) overcomes these disadvantages and improves the CPT's inhibitory effect on DU145 prostate tumor cell lines, and PC-3 growth in vitro. This work extends these observations by showing that CN-CPT significantly inhibits the adhesion and migration of these tumor cells and their STAT3 phosphorylation. The anti-adhesive effect is exerted also in human endothelial cells, in which CN-CPT also inhibits the angiogenic activity as assessed by the tubulogenesis and sprouting assays. Finally, CN-CPT substantially delays the growth of PC-3 cell engraftment in SCID mice in vivo without apparent toxic effects. These results support the use of β-cyclodextrin nanosponge nanotechnology as a potential nanocarrier for delivery of anticancer drugs in the treatment of prostate cancers. PMID:27301177

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of spin-labeled camptothecin derivatives: a different look of the ternary complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Antonio; Marinello, Jessica; Bortolus, Marco; Sánchez, Albert; Grandas, Anna; Pedroso, Enrique; Pommier, Yves; Capranico, Giovanni; Maniero, Anna Lisa; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2011-02-24

    Camptothecin (CPT) derivatives are clinically effective poisons of DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) able to form a ternary complex with the Top1-DNA complex. The aim of this investigation was to examine the dynamic aspects of the ternary complex formation by means of site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance (SDSL-EPR). Two semisynthetic CPT derivatives bearing the paramagnetic moiety were synthesized, and their biological activity was tested. A 22-mer DNA oligonucleotide sequence with high affinity cleavage site for Top1 was also synthesized. EPR experiments were carried out on modified CPT in the presence of DNA, of Top1, or of both. In the last case, a slow motion component in the EPR signal appeared, indicating the formation of the ternary complex. Deconvolution of the EPR spectrum allowed to obtain the relative drug amounts in the complex. It was also possible to demonstrate that the residence time of CPT "trapped" in the ternary complex is longer than hundreds of microseconds. PMID:21254781

  19. The escape of natural satellites from Mercury and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar's (1977) suggestion that the slow rotations of Mercury and Venus are in part due to natural satellites that subsequently escaped is discussed. A more useful criterion for the escape of such satellites than the previously proposed is derived, and it is shown that this distance is sufficiently small for Mercury and Venus to make the escape of satellites a likely possibility. (Auth.)

  20. 30 CFR 75.382 - Mechanical escape facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.382 Mechanical escape facilities. (a) Mechanical escape facilities shall be provided with overspeed, overwind, and automatic stop... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mechanical escape facilities. 75.382 Section...

  1. 46 CFR 177.500 - Means of escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of escape. 177.500 Section 177.500 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Escape Requirements § 177.500 Means of escape. (a) Except as otherwise provided...

  2. Risks incurred by hydrogen escaping from containers and conduits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.R.; Grilliot, E.S. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States); Swain, M.N. [Analytical Technologies, Inc., Miami, FL (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This paper is a discussion of a method for hydrogen leak classification. Leaks are classified as; gas escapes into enclosed spaces, gas escapes into partially enclosed spaces (vented), and gas escapes into unenclosed spaces. Each of the three enclosure classifications is further divided into two subclasses; total volume of hydrogen escaped and flow rate of escaping hydrogen. A method to aid in risk assessment determination in partially enclosed spaces is proposed and verified for several enclosure geometries. Examples are discussed for additional enclosure geometries.

  3. Sputtering at Mars: MAVEN observations of precipitating and escaping oxygen during nominal and extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Shannon; Luhmann, Janet; Dong, Chuanfei; Ma, Yingjuan; Leblanc, Francois; Modolo, Ronan; Brain, David; Gruesbeck, Jacob; Hara, Takuya; Halekas, Jasper; Dong, Yaxue; Williamson, Hayley N.; Johnson, Robert E.; McFadden, James; Espley, Jared R.; Mitchell, David; Connerney, Jack; Eparvier, Frank; Lillis, Robert J.; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Sputtering is believed to be one of the dominant escape mechanisms during the early epochs of our solar system when the solar activity and EUV intensities were much higher than the present day. Mars lacks a global dynamo magnetic field, which creates a scenario where the solar wind directly interacts with the upper atmosphere and newly created ions can be picked up and swept away by the background convection electric field. These pick-up ions can directly escape or precipitate back into the atmosphere and induce atmospheric sputtering of neutrals.The MAVEN spacecraft has observed the Mars upper atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetic topology and interactions with the Sun and solar wind during numerous Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) impacts spanning from March 2015 to June 2016. ICMEs are associated with enhanced solar wind velocities, densities and magnetic field strength, and often drive heavy ion precipitation at much higher rates than during nominal conditions. Thus, ICMEs provide a unique environment for observing sputtering. We will compare MAVEN observations of heavy ion precipitation during nominal conditions as well as during ICMEs. Additionally, we will present global MHD and test particle simulations of the ICMEs in order to calculate sputtering escape rates for oxygen. Finally, we will use the observed and modeled sputtering escape rates to provide an initial estimate of the total sputtered atmospheric escape from Mars over billions of years.

  4. The cost of the sword: escape performance in male swordtails.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Baumgartner

    Full Text Available The handicap theory of sexual selection posits that male display traits that are favored in mate choice come at a significant cost to performance. We tested one facet of this hypothesis in the green swordtail (Xiphophorus helleri. In this species, the lower ray of male caudal fin is extended into a 'sword', which serves to attract potential mates. However, bearing a long sword may increase drag and thus compromise a male's ability to swim effectively. We tested escape performance in this species by eliciting C-start escape responses, an instinctive escape behavior, in males with various sword lengths. We then removed males' swords and retested escape performance. We found no relationship between escape performance and sword length and no effect of sword removal on escape performance. While having a large sword may attract a predator's attention, our results suggest that sword size does not compromise a male's escape performance.

  5. Influence of Sae-regulated and Agr-regulated factors on the escape of Staphylococcus aureus from human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzenmayer, Lisa; Geiger, Tobias; Daiber, Ellen; Schulte, Berit; Autenrieth, Stella E; Fraunholz, Martin; Wolz, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is not a classical intracellular pathogen, it can survive within phagocytes and many other cell types. However, the pathogen is also able to escape from cells by mechanisms that are only partially understood. We analysed a series of isogenic S. aureus mutants of the USA300 derivative JE2 for their capacity to destroy human macrophages from within. Intracellular S. aureus JE2 caused severe cell damage in human macrophages and could efficiently escape from within the cells. To obtain this full escape phenotype including an intermittent residency in the cytoplasm, the combined action of the regulatory systems Sae and Agr is required. Mutants in Sae or mutants deficient in the Sae target genes lukAB and pvl remained in high numbers within the macrophages causing reduced cell damage. Mutants in the regulatory system Agr or in the Agr target gene psmα were largely similar to wild-type bacteria concerning cell damage and escape efficiency. However, these strains were rarely detectable in the cytoplasm, emphasizing the role of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) for phagosomal escape. Thus, Sae-regulated toxins largely determine damage and escape from within macrophages, whereas PSMs are mainly responsible for the escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. Damage of macrophages induced by intracellular bacteria was linked neither to activation of apoptosis-related caspase 3, 7 or 8 nor to NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation.

  6. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc;

    2013-01-01

    is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed......, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans...

  7. The Fastest Saccadic Responses Escape Visual Masking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    M. Crouzet, Sébastien; Overgaard, Morten; Busch, Niko A.

    2014-01-01

    visual processing while the initial feedforward processing is thought to be left intact. We tested a prediction derived from this hypothesis: the fastest responses, being triggered before the beginning of reentrant processing, should escape the OSM interference. In a saccadic choice reaction time task......, which gives access to very early stages of visual processing, target visibility was reduced either by OSM, conventional backward masking, or low stimulus contrast. A general reduction of performance was observed in all three conditions. However, the fastest saccades did not show any sign of interference...

  8. Escape distribution for an inclined billiard

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Alan

    2014-01-01

    H${\\acute{e}}$non [8] used an inclined billiard to investigate aspects of chaotic scattering which occur in satellite encounters and in other situations. His model consisted of a piecewise mapping which described the motion of a point particle bouncing elastically on two disks. A one parameter family of orbits, named h-orbits, was obtained by starting the particle at rest from a given height. We obtain an analytical expression for the escape distribution of the h-orbits, which is also compared with results from numerical simulations. Finally, some discussion is made about possible applications of the h-orbits in connection with Hill's problem.

  9. Escape distribution for an inclined billiard

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Alan; Georgakarakos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    H${\\acute{e}}$non [8] used an inclined billiard to investigate aspects of chaotic scattering which occur in satellite encounters and in other situations. His model consisted of a piecewise mapping which described the motion of a point particle bouncing elastically on two disks. A one parameter family of orbits, named h-orbits, was obtained by starting the particle at rest from a given height. We obtain an analytical expression for the escape distribution of the h-orbits, which is also compare...

  10. Suicide as escape from psychotic panic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Mark J; Ronningstam, Elsa; Schechter, Mark; Herbstman, Benjamin; Maltsberger, John T

    2016-01-01

    Suicides of patients in states of acute persecutory panic may be provoked by a subjective experience of helpless terror threatening imminent annihilation or dismemberment. These patients are literally scared to death and try to run away. They imagine suicide is survivable and desperately attempt to escape from imaginary enemies. These states of terror occur in a wide range of psychotic illnesses and are often associated with command hallucinations and delusions. In this article, the authors consider the subjective experience of persecutory panic and the suicide response as an attempt to flee from danger. PMID:27294586

  11. Tectonically controlled methane escape in Lake Baikal

    OpenAIRE

    Klerkx, J.; De Batist, M.; J. Poort; Hus, R.; Van Rensbergen, P.; Khlystov, O.; Granin, N.

    2006-01-01

    Methane, which is at least partly stored in the bottom sediments of Lake Baikal as gas hydrates, is released on the lake floor in the deeper parts of the basin along major faults, forming venting structures similar to small mud volcanoes. The CH4 venting structures are considered to be the surface expression of escape pathways for excess CH4 generated by the dissociation of pre-existing hydrates. The existence of a local heat flow anomaly associated with the seep area is most likely due to a ...

  12. Arduino adventures escape from Gemini station

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, James Floyd

    2013-01-01

    Arduino Adventures: Escape from Gemini Station provides a fun introduction to the Arduino microcontroller by putting you (the reader) into the action of a science fiction adventure story.  You'll find yourself following along as Cade and Elle explore Gemini Station-an orbiting museum dedicated to preserving and sharing technology throughout the centuries. Trouble ensues. The station is evacuated, including Cade and Elle's class that was visiting the station on a field trip. Cade and Elle don't make it aboard their shuttle and are trapped on the station along with a friendly artificial intellig

  13. Core–shell hybrid nanocapsules for oral delivery of camptothecin: formulation development, in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ünal, Hale, E-mail: unalhale@gmail.com [Hacettepe University, Division of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Institute of Pure and Applied Science (Turkey); D’Angelo, Ivana [Second University of Napoli, Di.S.T.A.Bi.F. (Italy); Pagano, Ester; Borrelli, Francesca; Izzo, Angelo; Ungaro, Francesca; Quaglia, Fabiana [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Pharmacy (Italy); Bilensoy, Erem [Hacettepe University, Division of Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine, Institute of Pure and Applied Science (Turkey)

    2015-01-15

    The objective of this study was to design and in vitro–in vivo evaluate oral nanocapsules prepared from amphiphilic cyclodextrins (CDs) or poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) for the effective oral delivery of an anticancer agent, camptothecin (CPT). CPT-loaded anionic and Chitosan (CS)-coated cationic nanocapsules were prepared and characterized in vitro. Morphological analysis was performed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). CPT release profile was evaluated using dialysis method under sink conditions. To determine the protective effect and drug stability provided by nanocapsules, all the formulations were incubated in simulated gastrointestinal media. Measurement of mucoadhesive tendency of CPT-loaded nanocapsules was realized by turbidimetric method. Penetration of nanocapsules was performed through an artificial mucus model. The permeability of CPT in solution form and bound to nanocapsule formulations were demonstrated across Caco-2 cell line. Finally, the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was evaluated in vivo, in a mouse model. Both anionic and cationic formulations were in the range of 180–220 nm with a narrow size distribution and desired zeta potential values. CPT-loaded nanocapsules were found to be stable in simulated gastrointestinal media. Turbidimetric measurements confirmed the interaction between nanoparticles and mucin. Penetration of CPT through an artificial mucus gel layer was higher with CS-coated nanocapsules in accordance with the results obtained from permeability studies across Caco-2 cell line. In vivo animal studies confirmed that the intestinal uptake of nanocapsules was significantly higher with cationic nanocapsules. CPT-loaded positively charged CD nanocapsules might be an attractive and promising treatment for oral chemotherapy.

  14. Blockade of the PD-1/PD-L1 axis augments lysis of AML cells by the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct AMG 330: reversing a T-cell-induced immune escape mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupka, C; Kufer, P; Kischel, R; Zugmaier, G; Lichtenegger, F S; Köhnke, T; Vick, B; Jeremias, I; Metzeler, K H; Altmann, T; Schneider, S; Fiegl, M; Spiekermann, K; Bauerle, P A; Hiddemann, W; Riethmüller, G; Subklewe, M

    2016-02-01

    Bispecific T-cell engagers (BiTEs) are very effective in recruiting and activating T cells. We tested the cytotoxicity of the CD33/CD3 BiTE antibody construct AMG 330 on primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells ex vivo and characterized parameters contributing to antileukemic cytolytic activity. The E:T ratio and the CD33 expression level significantly influenced lysis kinetics in long-term cultures of primary AML cells (n=38). AMG 330 induced T-cell-mediated proinflammatory conditions, favoring the upregulation of immune checkpoints on target and effector cells. Although not constitutively expressed at the time of primary diagnosis (n=123), PD-L1 was strongly upregulated on primary AML cells upon AMG 330 addition to ex vivo cultures (n=27, Pcheckpoint molecules in upcoming clinical trials with AMG 330 to enhance BiTE antibody construct-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26239198

  15. The effects of steady swimming on fish escape performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Sanam B; Cathcart, Kelsey; Darakananda, Karin; Gaing, Ashley N; Shin, Seo Yim; Vronay, Xena; Wright, Dania N; Ellerby, David J

    2016-06-01

    Escape maneuvers are essential to the survival and fitness of many animals. Escapes are frequently initiated when an animal is already in motion. This may introduce constraints that alter the escape performance. In fish, escape maneuvers and steady, body caudal fin (BCF) swimming are driven by distinct patterns of curvature of the body axis. Pre-existing muscle activity may therefore delay or diminish a response. To quantify the performance consequences of escaping in flow, escape behavior was examined in bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) in both still-water and during steady swimming. Escapes executed during swimming were kinematically less variable than those made in still-water. Swimming escapes also had increased response latencies and lower peak velocities and accelerations than those made in still-water. Performance was also lower for escapes made up rather than down-stream, and a preference for down-stream escapes may be associated with maximizing performance. The constraints imposed by pre-existing motion and flow, therefore, have the potential to shape predator-prey interactions under field conditions by shifting the optimal strategies for both predators and prey. PMID:27161016

  16. Uremic escape of renal allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Schilfgaarde, R. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); van Breda Vriesman, P.J.C. (Rijksuniversiteit Limburg Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. of Immunopathology)

    1981-10-01

    It is demonstrated in rats that, in the presence of early postoperative severe but transient uremia, the survival of first set Brown-Norway (BN) renal allografts in Lewis (LEW) recipients is at least three times prolonged when compared to non-uremic controls. This phenomenon is called 'uremic escape of renal allograft rejection'. By means of lethal X-irradiation of donors of BN kidneys transplanted into transiently uremic and non-uremic LEW recipients, the presence of passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence is demonstrated to be obilgatory for this phenomenon to occur. As a result of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence, a graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction is elicited in the spleens of LEW recipients of BN kidneys which amplifies the host response. The splenomegaly observed in LEW recipients of BN kidneys is caused not only by this GVH reaction, which is shown to be exquisitely sensitive to even mild uremia. It is also contributed to by a proliferative response of the host against the graft (which latter response is equated with an in vivo equivalent of a unilateral mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR)), since the reduction in spleen weights caused by abrogation of mobile passenger lymphocyte immunocompetence brought about by lethal donor X-irradiation is increased significantly by early postoperative severe but transient uremia. It is concluded that in uremic escape of renal allograft rejection both reactions are suppressed by uremia during the early post-operative period.

  17. Escape from X inactivation varies in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel B Berletch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI silences most genes on one X chromosome in female mammals, but some genes escape XCI. To identify escape genes in vivo and to explore molecular mechanisms that regulate this process we analyzed the allele-specific expression and chromatin structure of X-linked genes in mouse tissues and cells with skewed XCI and distinguishable alleles based on single nucleotide polymorphisms. Using a binomial model to assess allelic expression, we demonstrate a continuum between complete silencing and expression from the inactive X (Xi. The validity of the RNA-seq approach was verified using RT-PCR with species-specific primers or Sanger sequencing. Both common escape genes and genes with significant differences in XCI status between tissues were identified. Such genes may be candidates for tissue-specific sex differences. Overall, few genes (3-7% escape XCI in any of the mouse tissues examined, suggesting stringent silencing and escape controls. In contrast, an in vitro system represented by the embryonic-kidney-derived Patski cell line showed a higher density of escape genes (21%, representing both kidney-specific escape genes and cell-line specific escape genes. Allele-specific RNA polymerase II occupancy and DNase I hypersensitivity at the promoter of genes on the Xi correlated well with levels of escape, consistent with an open chromatin structure at escape genes. Allele-specific CTCF binding on the Xi clustered at escape genes and was denser in brain compared to the Patski cell line, possibly contributing to a more compartmentalized structure of the Xi and fewer escape genes in brain compared to the cell line where larger domains of escape were observed.

  18. Early low-titer neutralizing antibodies impede HIV-1 replication and select for virus escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine J Bar

    Full Text Available Single genome sequencing of early HIV-1 genomes provides a sensitive, dynamic assessment of virus evolution and insight into the earliest anti-viral immune responses in vivo. By using this approach, together with deep sequencing, site-directed mutagenesis, antibody adsorptions and virus-entry assays, we found evidence in three subjects of neutralizing antibody (Nab responses as early as 2 weeks post-seroconversion, with Nab titers as low as 1∶20 to 1∶50 (IC(50 selecting for virus escape. In each of the subjects, Nabs targeted different regions of the HIV-1 envelope (Env in a strain-specific, conformationally sensitive manner. In subject CH40, virus escape was first mediated by mutations in the V1 region of the Env, followed by V3. HIV-1 specific monoclonal antibodies from this subject mapped to an immunodominant region at the base of V3 and exhibited neutralizing patterns indistinguishable from polyclonal antibody responses, indicating V1-V3 interactions within the Env trimer. In subject CH77, escape mutations mapped to the V2 region of Env, several of which selected for alterations of glycosylation. And in subject CH58, escape mutations mapped to the Env outer domain. In all three subjects, initial Nab recognition was followed by sequential rounds of virus escape and Nab elicitation, with Nab escape variants exhibiting variable costs to replication fitness. Although delayed in comparison with autologous CD8 T-cell responses, our findings show that Nabs appear earlier in HIV-1 infection than previously recognized, target diverse sites on HIV-1 Env, and impede virus replication at surprisingly low titers. The unexpected in vivo sensitivity of early transmitted/founder virus to Nabs raises the possibility that similarly low concentrations of vaccine-induced Nabs could impair virus acquisition in natural HIV-1 transmission, where the risk of infection is low and the number of viruses responsible for transmission and productive clinical

  19. The atmospheric escape at Mars: complementing the scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, Jean; Simon, Cyril; Barthélémy, Mathieu; Thissen, Roland; Ehrenreich, David; Gronoff, Guillaume; Witasse, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly ener- getic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. This study assesses the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions.We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a 2 case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering ...), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished but complement the other processes and allow writing the scenario of the Mars escape. We show that the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible.When simulating the hot Jupiter HD209458b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+.

  20. RpoS controls the Vibrio cholerae mucosal escape response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Toftgaard Nielsen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae causes a severe diarrhoeal disease by secreting a toxin during colonization of the epithelium in the small intestine. Whereas the initial steps of the infectious process have been intensively studied, the last phases have received little attention. Confocal microscopy of V. cholerae O1-infected rabbit ileal loops captured a distinctive stage in the infectious process: 12 h post-inoculation, bacteria detach from the epithelial surface and move into the fluid-filled lumen. Designated the "mucosal escape response," this phenomenon requires RpoS, the stationary phase alternative sigma factor. Quantitative in vivo localization assays corroborated the rpoS phenotype and showed that it also requires HapR. Expression profiling of bacteria isolated from ileal loop fluid and mucus demonstrated a significant RpoS-dependent upregulation of many chemotaxis and motility genes coincident with the emigration of bacteria from the epithelial surface. In stationary phase cultures, RpoS was also required for upregulation of chemotaxis and motility genes, for production of flagella, and for movement of bacteria across low nutrient swarm plates. The hapR mutant produced near-normal numbers of flagellated cells, but was significantly less motile than the wild-type parent. During in vitro growth under virulence-inducing conditions, the rpoS mutant produced 10- to 100-fold more cholera toxin than the wild-type parent. Although the rpoS mutant caused only a small over-expression of the genes encoding cholera toxin in the ileal loop, it resulted in a 30% increase in fluid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Together, these results show that the mucosal escape response is orchestrated by an RpoS-dependent genetic program that activates chemotaxis and motility functions. This may furthermore coincide with reduced virulence gene expression, thus preparing the organism for the next stage in its life cycle.

  1. The humanitarians' tragedy: escapable and inescapable cruelties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Paradoxically, elements of cruelty are intrinsic to the humanitarian enterprise.(1) This paper focuses on some of these. Escapable cruelties arise from technical failings, but the gradual professionalisation of the field and improvements in relief technologies mean that they have been significantly reduced in comparison to earlier eras. Other cruelties arise from clashes among rights, and the tensions inherent in trying to promote humanity amid the horrors of war. These are inescapable and constitute the 'humanitarians' tragedy'. Among them is the individual cruelty of failing to do good at the margin: a clash between the individual's impulses and ideals and the constraints of operating in constrained circumstances. This is a version of triage. In addition, there is the cruelty of compromising dearly-held principles when faced with other competing or overriding demands. There is also the cruelty whereby humanitarians feed victims' dreams that there is an alternative reality, which in fact cannot be attained.

  2. UV-vis spectra of the anticancer camptothecin family drugs in aqueous solution: specific spectroscopic signatures unraveled by a combined computational and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Nico; Chillemi, Giovanni; Gontrani, Lorenzo; Grandi, Andrea; Mancini, Giordano; Castelli, Silvia; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Zazza, Costantino; Barone, Vincenzo; Desideri, Alessandro

    2009-04-23

    The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrum of camptothecin (CPT) has been been recorded in aqueous solution at pH 5.3, where the equilibrium among the different CPT forms is shifted toward the lactonic one. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) computations lead to a remarkable reproduction of the experimental spectrum only upon addition of explicit water molecules in interaction with specific moieties of the camptothecin molecule. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enforcing boundary periodic conditions for CPT embedded with 865 water molecules, with a force field derived from DFT computations, show that the experimental spectrum is due to the contributions of CPT molecules with different solvation patterns. A similar solvent effect is observed for several CPT derivatives, including the clinically relevant SN-38 and topotecan drugs. The quantitative agreement between TD-DFT/MD computations and experimental data allow us to identify specific spectroscopic signatures diagnostic of the drug environment and to develop procedures that can be used to monitor the drug-DNA/protein interaction. PMID:19334673

  3. Formulation development, stability and anticancer efficacy of core-shell cyclodextrin nanocapsules for oral chemotherapy with camptothecin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Ünal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to design and evaluate hybrid cyclodextrin (CD nanocapsules intended for the oral delivery of the anticancer agent camptothecin (CPT in order to maintain drug stability in the body and to improve its eventual bioavailability. For this reason, an amphiphilic cyclodextrin (CD derivative per-modified on the primary face 6OCAPRO was used as core molecule to form nanocapsules with the nanoprecipitation technique. Nanocapsules were further coated with the cationic polymer chitosan to improve the cellular uptake and interaction with biological membranes through positive surface charge. Nanocapsules were evaluated for their in vitro characteristics such as particle size, zeta potential, drug loading and release profiles followed by cell culture studies with the MCF-7 and Caco-2 cell line evaluating their anticancer efficacy and permeability. The CD nanocapsules were imaged by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The concentration of CPT entrapped in nanocapsules was determined by reversed phase HPLC. The in vitro release study of CPT was performed with a dialysis bag method under sink conditions mimicking the gastric and intestinal pH. The hydrolytic stability of CPT in nanocapsules was investigated in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF, SIF.Results: The mean particle sizes of both anionic and cationic CPT-loaded nanocapsules were in the range of 180–200 nm with polydispersity indices lower than 0.400 indicating monodisperse size distribution of nanocapsules with favourable potential for intracellular drug delivery to tumour cells. Surface charges of anionic and cationic nanocapsules were demonstrated as −21 mV and +18 mV, respectively. The stability of CPT in simulated release media, SGF and SIF were maintained suggesting the improved protection of the drug molecule from rapid hydrolysis degradation or gastrointestinal pH in nanocapsule oily core. Furthermore CD nanocapsules showed higher anticancer

  4. Co-lethality studied as an asset against viral drug escape: the HIV protease case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollivier Emmanuelle

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Co-lethality, or synthetic lethality is the documented genetic situation where two, separately non-lethal mutations, become lethal when combined in one genome. Each mutation is called a "synthetic lethal" (SL or a co-lethal. Like invariant positions, SL sets (SL linked couples are choice targets for drug design against fast-escaping RNA viruses: mutational viral escape by loss of affinity to the drug may induce (synthetic lethality. Results From an amino acid sequence alignment of the HIV protease, we detected the potential SL couples, potential SL sets, and invariant positions. From the 3D structure of the same protein we focused on the ones that were close to each other and accessible on the protein surface, to possibly bind putative drugs. We aligned 24,155 HIV protease amino acid sequences and identified 290 potential SL couples and 25 invariant positions. After applying the distance and accessibility filter, three candidate drug design targets of respectively 7 (under the flap, 4 (in the cantilever and 5 (in the fulcrum amino acid positions were found. Conclusions These three replication-critical targets, located outside of the active site, are key to our anti-escape strategy. Indeed, biological evidence shows that 2/3 of those target positions perform essential biological functions. Their mutational variations to escape antiviral medication could be lethal, thus limiting the apparition of drug-resistant strains. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Shamil Sunyaev and Claus Wilke.

  5. Cellular Inhibition of Checkpoint Kinase 2 (Chk2) and Potentiation of Camptothecins and Radiation by the Novel Chk2 Inhibitor PV1019 [7-Nitro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid {4-[1-(guanidinohydrazone)-ethyl]-phenyl}-amide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobson, Andrew G.; Lountos, George T.; Lorenzi, Philip L.; Llamas, Jenny; Connelly, John; Cerna, David; Tropea, Joseph E.; Onda, Akikazu; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Kondapaka, Sudhir; Zhang, Guangtao; Caplen, Natasha J.; Cardellina, II, John H.; Yoo, Stephen S.; Monks, Anne; Self, Christopher; Waugh, David S.; Shoemaker, Robert H.; Pommier, Yves; (NIH)

    2010-04-05

    Chk2 is a checkpoint kinase involved in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated pathway, which is activated by genomic instability and DNA damage, leading to either cell death (apoptosis) or cell cycle arrest. Chk2 provides an unexplored therapeutic target against cancer cells. We recently reported 4,4'-diacetyldiphenylurea-bis(guanylhydrazone) (NSC 109555) as a novel chemotype Chk2 inhibitor. We have now synthesized a derivative of NSC 109555, PV1019 (NSC 744039) [7-nitro-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid {l_brace}4-[1-(guanidinohydrazone)-ethyl]-phenyl{r_brace}-amide], which is a selective submicromolar inhibitor of Chk2 in vitro. The cocrystal structure of PV1019 bound in the ATP binding pocket of Chk2 confirmed enzymatic/biochemical observations that PV1019 acts as a competitive inhibitor of Chk2 with respect to ATP. PV1019 was found to inhibit Chk2 in cells. It inhibits Chk2 autophosphorylation (which represents the cellular kinase activation of Chk2), Cdc25C phosphorylation, and HDMX degradation in response to DNA damage. PV1019 also protects normal mouse thymocytes against ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and it shows synergistic antiproliferative activity with topotecan, camptothecin, and radiation in human tumor cell lines. We also show that PV1019 and Chk2 small interfering RNAs can exert antiproliferative activity themselves in the cancer cells with high Chk2 expression in the NCI-60 screen. These data indicate that PV1019 is a potent and selective inhibitor of Chk2 with chemotherapeutic and radiosensitization potential.

  6. How many ions have escaped the Martian atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, David; McFadden, James; Halekas, Jasper; Connerney, J. E. P.; Eparvier, Frank; Mitchell, David; Bougher, Stephen W.; Bowers, Charlie; Curry, Shannon; Dong, Chuanfei; Dong, Yaxue; Egan, Hilary; Fang, Xiaohua; Harada, Yuki; Jakosky, Bruce; Lillis, Robert; Luhmann, Janet; Ma, Yingjuan; Modolo, Ronan; Weber, Tristan

    2016-10-01

    The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission has been making science measurements of the Martian upper atmosphere and its escape to space since November 2014. A key part of this effort is the measurement of the escape rates of charged particles (ions) at present and over solar system history. The lack of a global dynamo magnetic field at Mars leaves its upper atmosphere more directly exposed to the impinging solar wind than magnetized planets such as Earth. For this reason it is thought that ion escape at Mars may have played a significant role in long term climate change. MAVEN measures escaping planetary ions directly, with high energy, mass, and time resolution.With nearly two years of observations in hand, we will report the average ion escape rate and the spatial distribution of escaping ions as measured by MAVEN and place them in context with previous measurements of ion loss by other spacecraft (e.g. Phobos 2 and Mars Express). We will then report on the measured variability in ion escape rates with different drivers (e.g. solar EUV, solar wind pressure, etc.). Finally, we will use these results to provide an initial estimate of the total ion escape from Mars over billions of years.

  7. Green Pea Galaxies Reveal Secrets of Lyα Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Gronke, Max; Rhoads, James E.; Dijkstra, Mark; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya; Wang, Junxian

    2016-04-01

    We analyze archival Lyα spectra of 12 “Green Pea” galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, model their Lyα profiles with radiative transfer models, and explore the dependence of the Lyα escape fraction on various properties. Green Pea galaxies are nearby compact starburst galaxies with [O iii] λ5007 equivalent widths (EWs) of hundreds of Å. All 12 Green Pea galaxies in our sample show Lyα lines in emission, with an Lyα EW distribution similar to high-redshift Lyα emitters. Combining the optical and UV spectra of Green Pea galaxies, we estimate their Lyα escape fractions and find correlations between Lyα escape fraction and kinematic features of Lyα profiles. The escape fraction of Lyα in these galaxies ranges from 1.4% to 67%. We also find that the Lyα escape fraction depends strongly on metallicity and moderately on dust extinction. We compare their high-quality Lyα profiles with single H i shell radiative transfer models and find that the Lyα escape fraction anticorrelates with the derived H i column densities. Single-shell models fit most Lyα profiles well, but not the ones with the highest escape fractions of Lyα. Our results suggest that low H i column density and low metallicity are essential for Lyα escape and make a galaxy an Lyα emitter.

  8. Teachers Offering Healthy Escape Options for Teenagers in Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaywell, Joan F.

    2005-01-01

    "[T]wenty-five percent of today's teenagers have inordinate emotional baggage beyond the normal angst of adolescence." This burden can lead to unhealthy escapes, including substance abuse, sexual activity, violence, eating disorders, and suicide. One healthy escape, however, lies in books, where students can read about teenagers living in painful…

  9. Escaping in couples facilitates evacuation: Experimental study and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ning; Hu, Mao-Bin; Ding, Jian-Xun; Ding, Zhong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of escaping in couples on the evacuation dynamics has been investigated via experiments and modeling. Two sets of experiments have been implemented, in which pedestrians are asked to escape either in individual or in couples. The experiments show that escaping in couples can decrease the average evacuation time. Moreover, it is found that the average evacuation time gap is essentially constant, which means that the evacuation speed essentially does not depend on the number of pedestrians that have not yet escaped. To model the evacuation dynamics, an improved social force model has been proposed, in which it is assumed that the driving force of a pedestrian cannot be fulfilled when the composition of physical forces exceeds a threshold because the pedestrian cannot keep his/her body balance under this circumstance. To model the effect of escaping in couples, attraction force has been introduced between the partners. Simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  10. Split-second escape decisions in blue tits (Parus caeruleus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Johan; Kaby, Ulrika; Jakobsson, Sven

    2002-07-01

    Bird mortality is heavily affected by birds of prey. Under attack, take-off is crucial for survival and even minor mistakes in initial escape response can have devastating consequences. Birds may respond differently depending on the character of the predator's attack and these split-second decisions were studied using a model merlin (Falco columbarius) that attacked feeding blue tits (Parus caeruleus) from two different attack angles in two different speeds. When attacked from a low attack angle they took off more steeply than when attacked from a high angle. This is the first study to show that escape behaviour also depends on predator attack speed. The blue tits responded to a high-speed attack by dodging sideways more often than when attacked at a low speed. Escape speed was not significantly affected by the different treatments. Although they have only a split-second before escaping an attack, blue tits do adjust their escape strategy to the prevailing attack conditions.

  11. Immune Escape Strategies of Malaria Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Pollyanna S.; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Rivera-Correa, Juan; Freire-De-Lima, Celio G.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most life-threatening infectious diseases worldwide. Immunity to malaria is slow and short-lived despite the repeated parasite exposure in endemic areas. Malaria parasites have evolved refined machinery to evade the immune system based on a range of genetic changes that include allelic variation, biomolecular exposure of proteins, and intracellular replication. All of these features increase the probability of survival in both mosquitoes and the vertebrate host. Plasmodium species escape from the first immunological trap in its invertebrate vector host, the Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites have to pass through various immunological barriers within the mosquito such as anti-microbial molecules and the mosquito microbiota in order to achieve successful transmission to the vertebrate host. Within these hosts, Plasmodium species employ various immune evasion strategies during different life cycle stages. Parasite persistence against the vertebrate immune response depends on the balance among virulence factors, pathology, metabolic cost of the host immune response, and the parasites ability to evade the immune response. In this review we discuss the strategies that Plasmodium parasites use to avoid the vertebrate host immune system and how they promote successful infection and transmission. PMID:27799922

  12. Escaping the resource curse in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shixiong; Li, Shurong; Ma, Hua; Sun, Yutong

    2015-02-01

    Many societies face an income gap between rich regions with access to advanced technology and regions that are rich in natural resources but poorer in technology. This "resource curse" can lead to a Kuznets trap, in which economic inequalities between the rich and the poor increase during the process of socioeconomic development. This can also lead to depletion of natural resources, environmental degradation, social instability, and declining socioeconomic development. These problems will jeopardize China's achievements if the current path continues to be pursued without intervention by the government to solve the problems. To mitigate the socioeconomic development gap between western and eastern China, the government implemented its Western Development Program in 2000. However, recent data suggest that this program has instead worsened the resource curse. Because each region has its own unique strengths and weaknesses, China must escape the resource curse by accounting for this difference; in western China, this can be done by improving education, promoting high-tech industry, adjusting its economic strategy to balance regional development, and seeking more sustainable approaches to socioeconomic development.

  13. Pregabalin attenuates place escape/avoidance behavior in a rat model of spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baastrup, Cathrine; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2011-01-25

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) pain in humans is difficult to treat, and the lack of valid methods to measure behavior comparable to the complex human pain experience preclinically represents an important obstacle to finding better treatments for this type of central pain. The place escape/avoidance paradigm (PEAP) relies on the active choice of an animal between its natural preference for a dark environment or pain relief, and it has been suggested to measure the affective-motivational component of pain. We have modified the method to a T10 spinal cord contusion model (SCC) of at-level central neuropathic pain in Sprague-Dawley rats. In order to demonstrate sensitivity to change in escape/avoidance behavior and thus the applicability of the PEAP method to predict drug efficacy, we investigated the effect of pregabalin (30 mg/kg) treatment in a randomized design. SCC animals displayed increased escape/avoidance behavior postinjury, indicating at-level mechanical hypersensitivity. Second, we found no correlation between state anxiety levels in SCC animals (elevated plus maze) and PEAP behavior, suggesting that the PEAP measurement is not biased by differences in anxiety levels. Third, we demonstrated a decrease in escape/avoidance behavior in response to treatment with the analgesic drug pregabalin. Thus, the PEAP may be applicable as a surrogate correlate of human pain. In conclusion, the primary finding in this study was a sensitivity to change in escape/avoidance behavior induced by pharmacological modulation with analgesics, supporting the use of the PEAP as a central outcome measure in preclinical SCI pain research. PMID:21070753

  14. Dications and thermal ions in planetary atmospheric escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilensten, J.; Simon Wedlund, C.; Barthélémy, M.; Thissen, R.; Ehrenreich, D.; Gronoff, G.; Witasse, O.

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, the presence of dications in the atmospheres of Mars, Venus, Earth and Titan has been modeled and assessed. These studies also suggested that these ions could participate to the escape of the planetary atmospheres because a large fraction of them is unstable and highly energetic. When they dissociate, their internal energy is transformed into kinetic energy which may be larger than the escape energy. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of the doubly-charged ions in the escape of CO2-dominated planetary atmospheres and to compare it to the escape of thermal photo-ions. We solve a Boltzmann transport equation at daytime taking into account the dissociative states of CO2++ for a simplified single constituent atmosphere of a case-study planet. We compute the escape of fast ions using a Beer-Lambert approach. We study three test-cases. On a Mars-analog planet in today's conditions, we retrieve the measured electron escape flux. When comparing the two mechanisms (i.e. excluding solar wind effects, sputtering, etc.), the escape due to the fast ions issuing from the dissociation of dications may account for up to 6% of the total and the escape of thermal ions for the remaining. We show that these two mechanisms cannot explain the escape of the atmosphere since the magnetic field vanished and even contribute only marginally to this loss. We show that with these two mechanisms, the atmosphere of a Mars analog planet would empty in another giga years and a half. At Venus orbit, the contribution of the dications in the escape rate is negligible. When simulating the hot Jupiter HD 209458 b, the two processes cannot explain the measured escape flux of C+. This study shows that the dications may constitute a source of the escape of planetary atmospheres which had not been taken into account until now. This source, although marginal, is not negligible. The influence of the photoionization is of course large, but cannot explain alone the loss of Mars

  15. Escape of Particles from an Open Square-Shaped Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG De-Hua; LIU Sheng; WANG Bing

    2013-01-01

    The escape of particles in an open square-shaped cavity has been examined.We consider a family of trajectories launched from the left bottom lead of the square cavity and escaped from the right boundary.For each escaping trajectories,we record the propagation time and the detector position.We find that the escape time graph exhibits a regular sawtooth structure.For a set of detector points,we search for the classical trajectories from the source point to the detector points.Then we use semiclassical theory to construct the wave function at different given points.The calculation results suggest that the escape probability density depends on the detector position and the momentum of the particle sensitively.The Fourier transform of the semiclassical wave function gives the path length spectrum.Each peak in the path length spectrum corresponds to the length of one escape trajectory of the particle.We hope that our results will be useful in understanding the escape and transport process of particles inside a microcavity.

  16. Evolutionary escape on complex genotype-phenotype networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Marcelo, Esther; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    We study the problem of evolutionary escape that is the process whereby a population under sudden changes in the selective pressures acting upon it try to evade extinction by evolving from previously well-adapted phenotypes to those that are favoured by the new selective pressure. We perform a comparative analysis between results obtained by modelling genotype space as a regular hypercube (H-graphs), which is the scenario considered in previous work on the subject, to those corresponding to a complex genotype-phenotype network (B-graphs). In order to analyse the properties of the escape process on both these graphs, we apply a general theory based on multi-type branching processes to compute the evolutionary dynamics and probability of escape. We show that the distribution of distances between phenotypes in B-graphs exhibits a much larger degree of heterogeneity than in H-graphs. This property, one of the main structural differences between both types of graphs, causes heterogeneous behaviour in all results associated to the escape problem. We further show that, due to the heterogeneity characterising escape on B-graphs, escape probability can be underestimated by assuming a regular hypercube genotype network, even if we compare phenotypes at the same distance in H-graphs. Similarly, it appears that the complex structure of B-graphs slows down the rate of escape.

  17. Xenon Fractionation, Hydrogen Escape, and the Oxidation of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.; Catling, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Xenon in Earth's atmosphere is severely mass fractionated and depleted compared to any plausible solar system source material, yet Kr is unfractionated. These observations seem to imply that Xe has escaped from Earth. Vigorous hydrodynamic hydrogen escape can produce mass fractionation in heavy gases. The required hydrogen flux is very high but within the range permitted by solar EUV heating when Earth was 100 Myrs old or younger. However this model cannot explain why Xe escapes but Kr does not. Recently, what appears to be ancient atmospheric xenon has been recovered from several very ancient (3-3.5 Ga) terrestrial hydrothermal barites and cherts (Pujol 2011, 2013). What is eye-catching about this ancient Xe is that it is less fractionated that Xe in modern air. In other words, it appears that a process was active on Earth some 3 to 3.5 billion years ago that caused xenon to fractionate. By this time the Sun was no longer the EUV source that it used to be. If xenon was being fractionated by escape — currently the only viable hypothesis — it had to be in Earth's Archean atmosphere and under rather modest levels of EUV forcing. It should be possible for Xe, but not Kr, to escape from Earth as an ion. In a hydrodynamically escaping hydrogen wind the hydrogen is partially ionized. The key concepts are that ions are much more strongly coupled to the escaping flow than are neutrals (so that a relatively modest flow of H and H+ to space could carry Xe+ along with it, the flux can be small enough to be consistent with diffusion-limited flux), and that Xe alone among the noble gases is more easily ionized than hydrogen. This sort of escape is possible along the polar field lines, although a weak or absent magnetic field would likely work as well. The extended history of hydrogen escape implicit in Xe escape in the Archean is consistent with other suggestions that hydrogen escape in the Archean was considerable. Hydrogen escape plausibly played the key role in creating

  18. Escape angles in bulk chi((2)) soliton interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Steffen Kjær; Bang, Ole; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2002-01-01

    We develop a theory for nonplanar interaction between two identical type I spatial solitons propagating at opposite, but arbitrary transverse angles in quadratic nonlinear (or so-called chi((2))) bulk, media. We predict quantitatively the outwards escape angle, below which the solitons turn around...... and collide, and above which they continue to move-away from each other. For in-plane interaction, the theory allows prediction of the Outcome of a collision through the inwards escape angle, i.e., whether the solitons fuse or cross. We find an analytical expression determining the inwards escape angle using...... Gaussian approximations for the solitons. The theory is verified numerically....

  19. Resonant phase escape in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ surface intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H. F.; Zhu, X. B.; Ren, J. K.; Peng, Z. H.; Cui, D. J.; Deng, H.; Cao, W. H.; Tian, Ye; Chen, G. H.; Zheng, D. N.; Jing, X. N.; Lu, Li; Zhao, S. P.

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of phase escape in surface Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ intrinsic Josephson junctions in the presence of microwave radiation. The measured switching current distributions display clear double-peak structures in the microwave field, which result from the single- and two-photon resonant escape processes accompanied by microwave-induced potential barrier suppression. We show that these results can be well explained by a quantum-mechanical model proposed by Fistul et al (2003 Phys. Rev. B 68 060504), from which the power and frequency dependences of the switching current distributions can be reproduced.

  20. Theoretical Study on Ion Escape in Martian Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian-Kui; LIU Zhen-Xing; Klaus TORKAR; Tielong ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    @@ Based on the observation that Martian magnetic moment is gradually reducing from the ancient to the present,we investigate the O+ ion flux distribution along magnetic field lines and the ion escaping flux in Martian tail with different assumed Martian magnetic moments. The results show that the O+ ion flux along magnetic field lines decreases with distance from Mars; the ion flux along the field line decreases more quickly if the magnetic moment is larger; the larger the magnetic moment, the smaller the ion escaping flux in the Martian tail. The ion escaping flux depends on Z-coordinate in the Martian tail. With decrease of the magnetic moment, the ion escaping flux in the Martian tail increases. The results are significant for studying the water loss from Mars surface.

  1. Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) Ionosphere Evidence for Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Hoegy, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    An early estimate of escape of H2O from Venus [McElroy et al., 1982] using observed hot oxygen densities inferred by Nagy et al. [1981] from PVO OUVS 1304 Å dayglow and using ionization rates from photoionization and electron impact. This resulted in an estimated oxygen ionization rate planet-wide above the plasmapause of 3x1025 atoms/s. Based on the energetic O+ being swept up and removed by solar wind, McElroy et al. [1982] gave an estimate of a loss rate for O of 6x106 atoms/cm2/s. Using a different method of estimating escape based data in the ionotail of Venus, Brace et al. [1987] estimated a total planetary O+ escape rate of 5x1025 ions/s. Their estimate was based on PVO measurements of superthermal O+ (energy range 9-16 eV) in the tail ray plasma between 2000 and 3000 km. Their estimated global mean flux was 107 atoms/cm2/s. The two escape rates are remarkably close considering all the errors involved in such estimates of escape. A study of escape by Luhmann et al. [2008] using VEX observations at low solar activity finds modest escape rates, prompting the authors to reconsider the evidence from both PVO and VEX of the possibility of enhanced escape during extreme interplanetary conditions. We reexamine the variation of escape under different solar wind conditions using ion densities and plasma content in the dayside and nightside of Venus using PVO ionosphere density during times of high solar activity. Citations: Brace, L.H., W. T. Kasprzak, H.A. Taylor, R. F. Theis, C. T. Russess, A. Barnes, J. D. Mihalov, and D. M. Hunten, "The Ionotail of Venus: Its Configuration and Evidence for Ion Escape", J. Geophys. Res. 92, 15-26, 1987. Luhmann, J.G., A. Fedorov, S. Barabash, E. Carlsson, Y. Futaana, T.L. Zhang, C.T. Russell, J.G. Lyon, S.A. Ledvina, and D.A. Brain, “Venus Express observations of atmospheric oxygen escape during the passage of several coronal mass ejections”, J. Geophys. Res., 113, 2008. McElroy, M. B., M. J. Prather, J. M. Rodiquez, " Loss

  2. Speed kills: ineffective avian escape responses to oncoming vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Travis L DeVault; Blackwell, Bradley F.; Seamans, Thomas W.; Lima, Steven L.; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    Animal–vehicle collisions cause high levels of vertebrate mortality worldwide, and what goes wrong when animals fail to escape and ultimately collide with vehicles is not well understood. We investigated alert and escape behaviours of captive brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) in response to virtual vehicle approaches of different sizes and at speeds ranging from 60 to 360 km h−1. Alert and flight initiation distances remained similar across vehicle speeds, and accordingly, alert and flig...

  3. GREEN PEA GALAXIES REVEAL SECRETS OF Lyα ESCAPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huan; Wang, Junxian [CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China (China); Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E. [Arizona State University, School of Earth and Space Exploration (United States); Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo (Norway); Jaskot, Anne [Smith College, Northampton, MA (United States); Zheng, Zhenya, E-mail: yanghuan@mail.ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: huan.y@asu.edu, E-mail: Sangeeta.Malhotra@asu.edu, E-mail: James.Rhoads@asu.edu [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-04-01

    We analyze archival Lyα spectra of 12 “Green Pea” galaxies observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, model their Lyα profiles with radiative transfer models, and explore the dependence of the Lyα escape fraction on various properties. Green Pea galaxies are nearby compact starburst galaxies with [O iii] λ5007 equivalent widths (EWs) of hundreds of Å. All 12 Green Pea galaxies in our sample show Lyα lines in emission, with an Lyα EW distribution similar to high-redshift Lyα emitters. Combining the optical and UV spectra of Green Pea galaxies, we estimate their Lyα escape fractions and find correlations between Lyα escape fraction and kinematic features of Lyα profiles. The escape fraction of Lyα in these galaxies ranges from 1.4% to 67%. We also find that the Lyα escape fraction depends strongly on metallicity and moderately on dust extinction. We compare their high-quality Lyα profiles with single H i shell radiative transfer models and find that the Lyα escape fraction anticorrelates with the derived H i column densities. Single-shell models fit most Lyα profiles well, but not the ones with the highest escape fractions of Lyα. Our results suggest that low H i column density and low metallicity are essential for Lyα escape and make a galaxy an Lyα emitter.

  4. Folding and escape of nascent proteins at ribosomal exit tunnel

    OpenAIRE

    Thuy, Bui Phuong; Hoang, Trinh Xuan

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the interplay between post-translational folding and escape of two small single-domain proteins at the ribosomal exit tunnel by using Langevin dynamics with coarse-grained models. It is shown that at temperatures lower or near the temperature of the fastest folding, folding proceeds concomitantly with the escape process, resulting in vectorial folding and enhancement of foldability of nascent proteins. The concomitance between the two processes, however, deteriorates as tempera...

  5. Green Pea Galaxies Reveal Secrets of Ly$\\alpha$ Escape

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Gronke, Max; Rhoads, James E; Jaskot, Anne; Zheng, Zhenya; Dijkstra, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Star-formation in galaxies generates a lot of Ly$\\alpha$ photons. Understanding the escape of Ly$\\alpha$ photons from galaxies is a key issue in studying high redshift galaxies and probing cosmic reionization with Ly$\\alpha$. To understand Ly$\\alpha$ escape, it is valuable to study analogs of high redshift Ly$\\alpha$ emitters in nearby universe. However, most nearby analogs have too small a Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent width and escape fraction compared to high redshift Ly$\\alpha$ emitters. One different group of nearby analogs are "Green Pea" galaxies, selected by their high equivalent width optical emission lines. Here we show that Green Pea galaxies have strong Ly$\\alpha$ emission lines and high Ly$\\alpha$ escape fraction (see also Henry et al. 2015), providing an opportunity to solve Ly$\\alpha$ escape problem. Green Peas have a Ly$\\alpha$ equivalent width distribution similar to high redshift Ly$\\alpha$ emitters. The Ly$\\alpha$ escape fraction correlates with many quantities of Ly$\\alpha$ profile, especially the...

  6. Escape dynamics and fractal basin boundaries in Seyfert galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The escape dynamics in a simple analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a Seyfert galaxy is investigated in detail. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion, we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the physical $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the considered escape basins with the...

  7. Initial transcribed sequence mutations specifically affect promoter escape properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lilian M; Cobb, Ingrid M; Ozmore, Jillian R; Khoo, Maureen; Nahm, Grace; Xia, Lulin; Bao, Yeran; Ahn, Colette

    2006-07-25

    Promoter escape efficiency of E. coli RNA polymerase is guided by both the core promoter and the initial transcribed sequence (ITS). Here, we quantitatively examined the escape properties of 43 random initial sequence variants of the phage T5 N25 promoter. The position for promoter escape on all N25-ITS variants occurred at the +15/+16 juncture, unlike the +11/+12 juncture for the wild type N25. These variants further exhibited a 25-fold difference in escape efficiency. ITS changes favoring promoter escape showed a compositional bias that is unrelated to nucleotide substrate binding affinity for the initial positions. Comparing all variants, the natural N25 promoter emerges as having evolved an ITS optimal for promoter escape, giving a high level of productive synthesis after undergoing the shortest abortive program. We supplemented GreB to transcription reactions to better understand abortive initiation and promoter escape in vivo. GreB supplementation elevated productive RNA synthesis 2-5-fold by altering the abortive RNA pattern, decreasing the abundance of the medium (6-10 nt) to long (11-15 nt) abortive RNAs without changing the levels of short (2-5 nt) and very long abortive RNAs (16-20 nt). The GreB-refractive nature of short abortive RNA production may reflect a minimum length requirement of 4-5 bp of the RNA-DNA hybrid for maintaining the stability of initial or backtracked complexes. That the very long abortive RNAs are unaffected by GreB suggests that they are unlikely to be products of polymerase backtracking. How the ITS might influence the course of early transcription is discussed within the structural context of an initial transcribing complex. PMID:16846227

  8. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape.

  9. Tandem CAR T cells targeting HER2 and IL13Rα2 mitigate tumor antigen escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Mukherjee, Malini; Grada, Zakaria; Pignata, Antonella; Landi, Daniel; Navai, Shoba A; Wakefield, Amanda; Fousek, Kristen; Bielamowicz, Kevin; Chow, Kevin K H; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Gottschalk, Stephen; Wels, Winfried S; Baker, Matthew L; Dotti, Gianpietro; Mamonkin, Maksim; Brenner, Malcolm K; Orange, Jordan S; Ahmed, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    In preclinical models of glioblastoma, antigen escape variants can lead to tumor recurrence after treatment with CAR T cells that are redirected to single tumor antigens. Given the heterogeneous expression of antigens on glioblastomas, we hypothesized that a bispecific CAR molecule would mitigate antigen escape and improve the antitumor activity of T cells. Here, we created a CAR that joins a HER2-binding scFv and an IL13Rα2-binding IL-13 mutein to make a tandem CAR exodomain (TanCAR) and a CD28.ζ endodomain. We determined that patient TanCAR T cells showed distinct binding to HER2 or IL13Rα2 and had the capability to lyse autologous glioblastoma. TanCAR T cells exhibited activation dynamics that were comparable to those of single CAR T cells upon encounter of HER2 or IL13Rα2. We observed that TanCARs engaged HER2 and IL13Rα2 simultaneously by inducing HER2-IL13Rα2 heterodimers, which promoted superadditive T cell activation when both antigens were encountered concurrently. TanCAR T cell activity was more sustained but not more exhaustible than that of T cells that coexpressed a HER2 CAR and an IL13Rα2 CAR, T cells with a unispecific CAR, or a pooled product. In a murine glioblastoma model, TanCAR T cells mitigated antigen escape, displayed enhanced antitumor efficacy, and improved animal survival. Thus, TanCAR T cells show therapeutic potential to improve glioblastoma control by coengaging HER2 and IL13Rα2 in an augmented, bivalent immune synapse that enhances T cell functionality and reduces antigen escape. PMID:27427982

  10. Rømt regnbueørret blir i fjorden : Behaviour of escaped rainbow trout

    OpenAIRE

    Skilbrei, Ove

    2009-01-01

    Rainbow trout are mainly farmed in fjords. They are thought to be more sedentary after escaping than escaped salmon, however this has not previously been well documented. The behaviour of escaped rainbow trout is now being studied in the fjords around the island of Osterøy in Hordaland in order to increase our understanding of escaped fish and to develop recapture strategies.

  11. History of oxygen and carbon escape from the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Zhang, M. H. G.; Johnson, R. E.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    A fraction of the oxygen in the Martian atmosphere continually escapes to space because dissociative recombination of the O2(+) ions in the ionosphere can impart sufficient energy to the product O atoms. In addition, ionization of the extended atomic oxygen corona resulting from the above process adds to escape since the solar wind can carry away O(+) ions born above a few hundred km altitude. A further by-product of this ion-pickup by the solar wind is an additional population of escaping oxygen atoms that are sputtered from the atmosphere near the exobase by pickup ions that are on reentry rather than escaping trajectories. This sputtering process can also remove carbon in the form of intact or dissociated CO2 since all atoms and molecules in the 'target' gas are subject to the collisional energy transfer that characterizes sputtering. We have estimated the present rates of escape of oxygen and carbon due to these mechanisms, as well as the rates at several epochs in the history of the solar system.

  12. Escape dynamics in a binary system of interacting galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    The escape dynamics in an analytical gravitational model which describes the motion of stars in a binary system of interacting dwarf spheroidal galaxies is investigated in detail. We conduct a numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. In order to distinguish safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion, we apply the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins through the openings around the collinear Lagrangian points $L_1$ and $L_2$ and relate them with the corresponding spatial distribution of the escape times of the orbits. Our exploration takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the galactic system. Our numerical analysis reveals the strong dependence of the properties of the con...

  13. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-15

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10^{-15}  N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions. PMID:27472142

  14. Single-File Escape of Colloidal Particles from Microfluidic Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Emanuele; Pierno, Matteo; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Tan, Yizhou; Pagliara, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    Single-file diffusion is a ubiquitous physical process exploited by living and synthetic systems to exchange molecules with their environment. It is paramount to quantify the escape time needed for single files of particles to exit from constraining synthetic channels and biological pores. This quantity depends on complex cooperative effects, whose predominance can only be established through a strict comparison between theory and experiments. By using colloidal particles, optical manipulation, microfluidics, digital microscopy, and theoretical analysis we uncover the self-similar character of the escape process and provide closed-formula evaluations of the escape time. We find that the escape time scales inversely with the diffusion coefficient of the last particle to leave the channel. Importantly, we find that at the investigated microscale, bias forces as tiny as 10-15 N determine the magnitude of the escape time by drastically reducing interparticle collisions. Our findings provide crucial guidelines to optimize the design of micro- and nanodevices for a variety of applications including drug delivery, particle filtering, and transport in geometrical constrictions.

  15. The Escape Fraction of Ionizing Radiation from Primordial Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Andrew; Shull, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    The escape of ionizing radiation from galaxies plays a critical role in the evolution of gas in galaxies, and the heating and ionization history of the intergalactic medium. Here, we present semi-analytic calculations of the escape fraction of ionizing radiation for both hydrogen and helium from primordial galaxies, as well as analytic derivations of these quantities. We consider variations in the galaxy density profile, source type, location, and spectrum, and gas clumping/distribution factors. For sufficiently hard first-light sources, the helium ionization fronts closely track or even advance beyond that of hydrogen. Key new results in this work include calculations of the escape fractions for He I and He II ionizing radiation, and the impact of partial ionization from X-rays from early AGN or stellar clusters on the escape fractions from primordial halos. When factoring in frequency-dependent effects, we find that X-rays play an important role in boosting the escape fractions for both hydrogen and helium,...

  16. Extreme hydrodynamic atmospheric loss near the critical thermal escape regime

    CERN Document Server

    Erkaev, N V; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Kislyakova, K G

    2015-01-01

    By considering martian-like planetary embryos inside the habitable zone of solar-like stars we study the behavior of the hydrodynamic atmospheric escape of hydrogen for small values of the Jeans escape parameter $\\beta < 3$, near the base of the thermosphere, that is defined as a ratio of the gravitational and thermal energy. Our study is based on a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model that calculates the volume heating rate in a hydrogen dominated thermosphere due to the absorption of the stellar soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) flux. We find that when the $\\beta$ value near the mesopause/homopause level exceeds a critical value of $\\sim$2.5, there exists a steady hydrodynamic solution with a smooth transition from subsonic to supersonic flow. For a fixed XUV flux, the escape rate of the upper atmosphere is an increasing function of the temperature at the lower boundary. Our model results indicate a crucial enhancement of the atmospheric escape rate, when the Jeans escape parameter $\\beta$ decr...

  17. MAVEN measurements of photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Fox, J. L.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T. E.; Lee, Y.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Benna, M.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; McFadden, J.

    2015-10-01

    One of the primary goals of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers [1]. One of the major escape processes is known as photochemical escape, which is broadly defined as a process by which a) an exothermic reaction in the atmosphere/ionosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions[2].At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher[3]. Thus characterizing this escape process is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution.

  18. Escape for System with Non-Fluctuating Potential Barrier Only Driven by Three-State Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-Hui

    2007-01-01

    We study the escape for the mean first passage time (MFPT) over a potential barrier for a system with non-fluctuating potential barrier and only driven by a three-state noise. It is shown that in some circumstances, the three-state noise can induce the resonant activation for the MFPT over the potential barrier; but in other circumstances, it can not. There are three resonant activations for the MFPT over the potential barrier, which are respectively as the functions of the transition rates of the three-state noise.

  19. Escape probability of the super-Penrose process

    CERN Document Server

    Ogasawara, Kota; Miyamoto, Umpei; Igata, Takahisa; Patil, Mandar

    2016-01-01

    We consider a head-on collision of two massive particles that move in the equatorial plane of an extremal Kerr black hole, which results in the production of two massless particles. Focusing a typical case, where both of the colliding particles have zero angular momenta, we show that a massless particle produced in such a collision can escape to infinity with arbitrarily large energy in the near-horizon limit of the collision point. Furthermore, if we assume that the emission of the produced massless particles is isotropic in the center-of-mass frame but confined to the equatorial plane, the escape probability of the produced massless particle approaches $5/12$ and almost all escaping massless particles have arbitrarily large energy at infinity and an impact parameter approaching $2M$.

  20. Characterization of escape times of Josephson Junctions for signal detection

    CERN Document Server

    Addesso, Paolo; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive. We show that the prescriptions for the experimental set-up and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploiting the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance/activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance are essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and samp...

  1. Can transgenic rice cause ecological risks through transgene escape?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Alien transgene escape from genetically engineered rice to non-transgenic varieties or close wild relatives (including weedy rice) may lead to unpredictable ecological risks. However, for transgene escape to occur three conditions need to be met: (i) spatially, transgenic rice and its non-transgenic counterparts or wild relatives should have sympatric distributions; (ii) temporally, the flowering time of transgenic rice and the non-transgenic varieties or wild relatives should overlap; and (iii) biologically, transgenic rice and its wild relative species should have such a sufficiently close relationship that their interspecific hybrids can have normal generative reproduction. This paper presents research data on the geographic distribution, flowering habits, interspecific hybridization, and gene flow of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) and its closely related wild relatives containing the AA genome. The objective is to estimate the possibility of transgene escape to non-transgenic rice varieties and wild relatives of rice, which may result in unpredictable ecological risks.

  2. Water-escape velocities in jumping blacktip sharks

    OpenAIRE

    Juerg M. Brunnschweiler

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the first determination of water-escape velocities in free-ranging sharks. Two approximations are used to estimate the final swimming speed at the moment of penetrating the water surface. Blacktip sharks were videotaped from below the surface and parameters were estimated by analysing the sequences frame by frame. Water-escape velocities averaged 6.3 m s−1. These velocities for blacktip sharks seem accurate and are similar to estimates obtained for other shark species of ...

  3. Water-escape velocities in jumping blacktip sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnschweiler, Juerg M

    2005-09-22

    This paper describes the first determination of water-escape velocities in free-ranging sharks. Two approximations are used to estimate the final swimming speed at the moment of penetrating the water surface. Blacktip sharks were videotaped from below the surface and parameters were estimated by analysing the sequences frame by frame. Water-escape velocities averaged 6.3 ms(-1). These velocities for blacktip sharks seem accurate and are similar to estimates obtained for other shark species of similar size. PMID:16849197

  4. Rapid endosomal escape of prickly nanodiamonds: implications for gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhiqin; Miu, Kaikei; Lung, Pingsai; Zhang, Silu; Zhao, Saisai; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Lin, Ge; Li, Quan

    2015-06-01

    The prickly nanodiamonds easily entered cells via endocytosis followed by unique intracellular translocation characteristics—quick endosomal escape followed by stable residence in cytoplasm. Endosomal membrane rupturing is identified as the major route of nanodiamonds’ escaping the vesicle confinement and to the cytoplasm. Little cytotoxicity is observed to associate with the nanodiamonds’ cytosolic release. Such features enable its application for gene delivery, which requires both effective cellular uptake and cytosolic release of the gene. Taking green fluorescent protein gene as an example, we demonstrate the successful cytosolic delivery and expression of such a gene using the prickly nanodiamonds as carrier.

  5. Escape probability based routing for ad hoc networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xuanping; Qin Zheng; Li Xin

    2006-01-01

    Routes in an ad hoc network may fail frequently because of node mobility. Stability therefore can be an important element in the design of routing protocols. The node escape probability is introduced to estimate the lifetime and stability of link between neighboring nodes and the escape probability based routing (EPBR) scheme to discover stable routes is proposed. Simulation results show that the EPBR can discover stable routes to reduce the number of route rediscovery, and is applicable for the situation that has highly dynamic network topology with broad area of communication.

  6. The escaping "pneuma" - gas of ancient earthquake concepts in relation to animal, atmospheric and thermal precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmut, Tributsch

    2013-04-01

    anomalies matches that of reported unusual animal behaviour. It may indeed be caused by the same geophysical phenomenon, a pressure-change induced liberation of "pneuma" -gas. The latter may simply be understood as the consequence of pressure dependent changes of the chemical equilibrium constants within the condensed phases of the underground. They will be proportional to the reaction molar volume of interfacial and bulk geochemical mechanisms and may lead to the desorption and emission of chemical species, which finally reach the earth surface. The nature of reported animal behaviour is supporting such conclusion. Straightforward experimental strategies will be required for characterization of the escaping gas in terms of chemical and nano- and micro- particle composition. Non-linear irreversible thermodynamic models may be invoked for understanding energy turnover during the geophysical precursor activity.

  7. Effects of alpha fetoprotein on escape of Bel 7402 cells from attack of lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Involvement of AFP against apoptosis of tumor cell has been implicated in its evasion of immune surveillance. However, the molecular events of immune escape mechanisms are still unknown. The major observations reported here relate to a possible mechanism by which heptoloma Bel 7402 cells escape immune surveillance in vitro. Western blotting and a well-characterized cofocal scanning image were performed to analyze the expression of Fas/FasL and caspase-3 in co-cultured Bel 7402 and Jurkat cells. After co-culture with Jurkat cells, up-regulated Fas and reduced FasL expression could be observed. Treatment with AFP could remarkably inhibit the elevated Fas and, whereas, induce the FasL expression in co-cultured Bel 7402 cells. Cells co-culture could induce the expression of caspase-3 in both cells line. The elevated caspase-3 in Bel 7402 cells was abolished following the treatment of AFP. The expression of caspase-3 was elevated in co-cultured Jurkat cells treated with AFP. No detectable change on the expression of survivin was examined in both cells line. Monoclonal antibody against AFP treatment alone did not obviously influence the growth of cells, as well as the expression of Fas/FasL and caspase-3. However, the effect of AFP could be blocked by antibody. our results provide evidence that AFP could promote the escape of liver cancer cells from immune surveillance through blocking the caspase signal pathway of tumor cells and triggering the Fas/FasL interaction between tumor cells and lymphocytes

  8. Nano scale self-emulsifying oil based carrier system for improved oral bioavailability of camptothecin derivative by P-Glycoprotein modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Lalit Mohan; Tariq, Mohammad; Talegaonkar, Sushama

    2013-11-01

    Irinotecan is a camptothecin derivative with low oral bioavailability due to active efflux by intestinal P-glycoprotein receptors. Hence, no oral formulation is marketed for Irinotecan till date. However, an optimized Self micro emulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS), formulated to produce nano range oil droplets by using P-gp modulator excipients can tackle the issue and elevate the systemic availability of Irinotecan. The present work focuses on the development of SMEDDS for Irinotecan and evaluation of its in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo potentials. The SMEDDS were developed using Capmul MCM-C8, Cremophor EL and Pluronic L-121 as oil, surfactant and co-surfactant respectively and has good oil carrying capacity (30%) with competence to produce nano-scale oil droplets (130 ± 2.13 nm) on spontaneous emulsification. A much deeper penetration to the intestine was observed with SMEDDS by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Flow-cytometric studies also revealed the greater uptake of fluorescent probe in Caco-2 cell-lines with the use of SMEDDS. Biochemical estimation of LDH from the intestinal tissues treated with SMEDDS and free drug suspension confirmed that the developed formulation is safe for use. Furthermore, the AUC0 → t of Irinotecan from the optimized SMEDDS formulation was found to be 4 folds higher than that from Irinotecan suspension on oral administration. The optimized SMEDDS formulation was found to be capable of maintaining the sustained plasma drug level of Irinotecan with better bioavailability. PMID:23850745

  9. Genotoxic profile of inhibitors of topoisomerases I (camptothecin) and II (etoposide) in a mitotic recombination and sex-chromosome loss somatic eye assay of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sortibrán, América Nitxin Castañeda; Téllez, María Guadalupe Ordaz; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2006-04-30

    Genotoxic carcinogens which interact with DNA may produce double-strand breaks as normal intermediates of homologous mitotic recombination, and may give rise to structural chromosome aberrations and inter-chromosomal deletion-recombination. The genotoxic profile of two inhibitors of DNA topoisomerases were evaluated using an in vivo somatic w/w+ eye assay of Drosophila melanogaster for the detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) by homologous mitotic recombination, intra-chromosomal recombination and structural chromosomal aberrations. We studied camptothecin (CPT) as a topoisomerase-I-interactive agent and etoposide (ETOP) as a topoisomerase II inhibitor. These drugs act by stabilizing a ternary complex consisting of topoisomerases covalently linked to DNA at single-strand or at double-strand breaks, thereby preventing the relegation step of the breakage/rejoining reaction mediated by the enzyme. The genotoxic profiles were determined from the appearance of eye tissue in adult flies, in which LOH and expression of the reporter gene white produced light clones. The results demonstrated that both compounds were significantly genotoxic, with CPT being more effective than ETOP. Inter-chromosomal mitotic recombination was the major mechanism responsible for the induction of light spots by both compounds in XX females. Loss of the ring X chromosome (rX), was significantly enhanced by CPT, and this topoisomerase blocker also produced intra-chromosomal recombination (XY males). PMID:16529987

  10. Controlled release of 9-nitro-20(S)-camptothecin from methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(D,L-lactide) micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, J M [College of Material Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Ming, J [Department of Medicament, The Second People' s Hospital of Sichuan, Chengdu 610041 (China); He, B; Gu, Z W; Zhang, X D [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)], E-mail: zwgu@scu.edu.cn

    2008-03-01

    9-nitro-20(S)-camptothecin (9-NC) is a potent topoisomerase-I inhibitor, and it was applied for clinical trials in cancer treatment. However, the applications of 9-NC were limited by its poor solubility and instability. In order to overcome these disadvantages, 9-NC was encapsulated in amphiphilic copolymer micelles composed of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(D,L-lactide) (mPEG-PDLLA, PELA). Three diblock copolymers with different PDLLA chain lengths were synthesized. The critical micelle concentration was varied from 10{sup -4} g L{sup -1} to 10{sup -2} g L{sup -1}. The 9-NC loaded micelles were nanospheres with diameters ranging from 30 nm to 60 nm. The relationship between the composition of copolymers and the drug loading content was discussed. The encapsulation of micelles improved the solubility of 9-NC greatly. The solubility of 9-NC in micelle M1 was about 250 times higher than that of 9-NC in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). The stability of 9-NC in micelles was also promoted. After being incubated in PBS for 160 min, 80% of 9-NC in micelles existed as an active lactone form, while 85% of 9-NC in PBS were transferred to an inactive carboxylate salt form. The release experiments were carried out in PBS and the results showed that the release processes were controllable.

  11. Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily transporter from Botrytis cinerea, provides tolerance towards the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin and towards fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Keisuke; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; De Waard, Maarten A

    2002-10-01

    Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily gene from Botrytis cinerea, was cloned, and replacement and overexpression mutants were constructed to study its function. Replacement mutants showed increased sensitivity to the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin, produced by the plant Camptotheca acuminata and the plant pathogenic fungus Cercospora kikuchii, respectively. Overexpression mutants displayed decreased sensitivity to these compounds and to structurally unrelated fungicides, such as sterol demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). A double-replacement mutant of Bcmfs1 and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene BcatrD was more sensitive to DMI fungicides than a single-replacement mutant of BcatrD, known to encode an important ABC transporter of DMIs. The sensitivity of the wild-type strain and mutants to DMI fungicides correlated with Bcmfs1 expression levels and with the initial accumulation of oxpoconazole by germlings of these isolates. The results indicate that Bcmfs1 is a major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter involved in protection against natural toxins and fungicides and has a substrate specificity that overlaps with the ABC transporter BcatrD. Bcmfs1 may be involved in protection of B. cinerea against plant defense compounds during the pathogenic phase of growth on host plants and against fungitoxic antimicrobial metabolites during its saprophytic phase of growth.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of stem wood of Nothapodytes nimmoniana (Graham) Mabb. identifies genes associated with biosynthesis of camptothecin, an anti-carcinogenic molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BL Manjunatha; HR Singh; G Ravikanth; Karaba N Nataraja; Ravi Shankar; Sanjay Kumar; R Uma Shaanker

    2016-03-01

    Camptothecin (CPT), a monoterpene indole alkaloid, is a potent inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase I and has applications in treating ovarian, small lung and refractory ovarian cancers. Stem wood tissue of Nothapodytes nimmoniana (Graham) Mabb. (family Icacinaceae) is one of the richest sources of CPT. Since there is no genomic or transcriptome data available for the species, the present work sequenced and analysed transcriptome of stem wood tissue on an Illumina platform. From a total of 77,55,978 reads, 9,187 transcripts were assembled with an average length of 255 bp. Functional annotation and categorization of these assembled transcripts unraveled the transcriptome architecture and also a total of 13 genes associated with CPT biosynthetic pathway were identified in the stem wood tissue. Four genes of the pathway were cloned to full length by RACE to validate the transcriptome data. Expression analysis of 13 genes associated with CPT biosynthetic pathway in 11 different tissues vis-a-vis CPT content analysis suggested an important role of NnPG10H, NnPSLS and NnPSTR genes in the biosynthesis of CPT. These results indicated that CPT might be synthesized in the leaves and then perhaps exported to stem wood tissue for storage.

  13. Escaping Embarrassment: Face-Work in the Rap Cipher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jooyoung

    2009-01-01

    How do individuals escape embarrassing moments in interaction? Drawing from ethnographic fieldwork, in-depth interviews, and video recordings of weekly street corner ciphers (impromptu rap sessions), this paper expands Goffman's theory of defensive and protective face-work. The findings reveal formulaic and indirect dimensions of face-work. First,…

  14. Comparing the escape dynamics in tidally limited star cluster models

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to compare the orbital dynamics in three different models describing the properties of a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. In particular, we use the isochrone and the Hernquist potentials to model the spherically symmetric star cluster and we compare our results with the corresponding ones of a previous work in which the Plummer model was applied for the same purpose. Our analysis takes place both in the configuration $(x,y)$ and in the phase $(x,\\dot{x})$ space in order to elucidate the escape process as well as the overall orbital properties of the tidally limited star cluster. We restrict our investigation into two dimensions and we conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels above the critical escape energy. It is of particular interest to determine the escape basins towards the two exit channels (n...

  15. The spectrum of Cosmic Rays escaping from relativistic shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    We derive expressions for the time integrated spectrum of Cosmic Rays (CRs) that are accelerated in a decelerating relativistic shock wave and escape ahead of the shock. It is assumed that at any given time the CRs have a power law form, carry a constant fraction of the energy E_tot of the shocked plasma, and escape continuously at the maximal energy attainable. The spectrum of escaping particles is highly sensitive to the instantaneous spectral index due to the fact that the minimal energy, E_min ~ \\Gamma^2 m_pc^2 where \\Gamma is the shock Lorentz factor, changes with time. In particular, the escaping spectrum may be considerably harder than the canonical N(E)\\propto E^-2 spectrum. For a shock expanding into a plasma of density n, a spectral break is expected at the maximal energy attainable at the transition to non relativistic velocities, E ~ 10^19 (\\epsilon_B/0.1)(n/1 cm^-3)^(1/6)(E_tot/10^51 erg)^(1/3) eV where \\epsilon_B is the fraction of the energy flux carried by the magnetic field. If ultra-high ene...

  16. Spatial and Nonspatial Escape Strategies in the Barnes Maze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona E.; Reiserer, Randall S.; Tomarken, Andrew J.; McDonald, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    The Barnes maze is a spatial memory task that requires subjects to learn the position of a hole that can be used to escape the brightly lit, open surface of the maze. Two experiments assessed the relative importance of spatial (extra-maze) versus proximal visible cues in solving the maze. In Experiment 1, four groups of mice were trained either…

  17. 46 CFR 169.313 - Means of escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Means of escape. 169.313 Section 169.313 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Construction... apart, uniform for the length of the ladder; (3) At least 3 inches from the nearest permanent object...

  18. The Dutch approach to the escape from large compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, E.W.; Leur, P.H.E. van de

    1999-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the building regulations have no design mies for large fire compartments (over 1000 m2). With respect to the ability of people to escape from a fire in such large spaces, the Centre for Fire Research of TNO Building and Construction Research has developed a guideline that integra

  19. A Structural Soundness Proof for Shivers's Escape Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtgaard, Jan; Adams, Michael D.; Matthew, Might

    2012-01-01

    Shivers’s escape technique enables one to analyse the control flow of higher-order program fragments. It is widely used, but its soundness has never been proven. In this paper, we present the first soundness proof for the technique. Our proof is structured as a composition of Galois connections and...

  20. MAVEN in situ measurements of photochemical escape of oxygen from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Robert; Deighan, Justin; Fox, Jane; Bougher, Stephen; Lee, Yuni; Cravens, Thomas; Rahmati, Ali; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Groller, Hannes; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through subsequent collisions. At Mars, photochemical escape of oxygen is expected to be a significant channel for atmospheric escape, particularly in the early solar system when extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluxes were much higher. Thus characterizing this escape process and its variability with solar drivers is central to understanding the role escape to space has played in Mars' climate evolution. We use near-periapsis (Mars history is not very useful to calculate from such escape fluxes derived over a limited area and under limited conditions. A thicker atmosphere and much higher solar EUV in the past may change the dynamics of escape dramatically. In the future, we intend to use 3-D Monte Carlo models of global atmospheric escape, in concert with our in situ and remote measurements, to fully characterize photochemical escape under current conditions and carefully extrapolate back in time using further simulations with new boundary conditions.

  1. Formulation of a Cooperative-Confinement-Escape problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose and formulate the Cooperative-Confinement-Escape (CCE) problem of multiple cooperative defenders against an evader escaping from a circular region, in which the defenders are moving on the circle with attempt to prevent possible escape of a single evader who is initially located inside the circle. The main contributions are summarized as follows: (1) we first provide an effective formulation of the CCE problem, which is an emphasis of this paper, with design of two nonlinear control strategies for the cooperative defenders and the adversarial evader, respectively. Particularly, we consider to include a proper interaction between each pair of the nearest-neighbor defenders, and an adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism in the strategies of the defenders to increase the chance of successful confinement. (2) For the first attempt on analyzing the CCE dynamics which is unavoidably strongly nonlinear, we analyze the minimum energy of the evader for possible escape. (3) For understanding of the behaviors of the system under different parameters, (i) we illustrate the effectiveness of the confinement strategy using the adaptive trajectory prediction mechanism, and (ii) the physical roles of the system parameters with respect to the system dynamics, some of which may be unexpected or not straightforward. A separate paper will be presented for systematic analysis of the agents' behaviors with respect to the large intervals of the parameter settings.

  2. An Empirical Investigation of Time-Out with and without Escape Extinction to Treat Escape-Maintained Noncompliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Gregory E.; Olmi, D. Joe; Edwards, Ron P.; Tingstrom, Daniel H.; Sterling-Turner, Heather E.; Christ, Theodore J.

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of two time-out (TO) procedures in reducing escape-maintained noncompliance of 4 children. Noncompliant behavioral function was established via a functional assessment (FA), including indirect and direct descriptive procedures and brief confirmatory experimental analyses. Following FA, parents were…

  3. Towards an understanding of escape rate and state dependent diffusion for a quantum dissipative system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The present work demonstrates that the temperature dependence of the escape rate is not only embedded in the so-called Arrhenius type factor, the second exponential factor also includes the temperature dependence which has a purely quantum origin that is entangled with dissipation. Display Omitted Highlights: → We explore the noise-induced barrier crossing dynamics of an open quantum system. → The bath coupled with the system is driven out of equilibrium by an external noise. → Nonlinear system-bath coupling and modulation of the bath affect the escape rate. → An additional exponential factor, other than Arrhenius is also temperature dependent. → This temperature dependence is purely quantum in origin. - Abstract: We address the stochastic dynamics of an open quantum system coupled to a heat reservoir that is driven out of thermal equilibrium by an external noise. By constructing Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations, we obtain the rate of decay from a metastable state of the system when the dissipation is state dependent. We discuss the effects and consequences of the non-linear interaction(s) stemming out of the system-bath coupling alongside the modulation of the bath by an external noise on the rate expression. We demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the escape rate is not only embedded in the so-called Arrhenius type factor, the second exponential factor also includes the temperature dependence. The last effect has a purely quantum origin. Interestingly, we also envisage that this quantum effect is entangled with dissipation. The results offer a basis for clarifying the relationship between the dissipation and exponential factor of the obtained rate expression.

  4. Towards an understanding of escape rate and state dependent diffusion for a quantum dissipative system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shit, Anindita [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103 (India); Chattopadhyay, Sudip, E-mail: sudip_chattopadhyay@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103 (India); Ray Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim, E-mail: jprc_8@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Katwa College, Katwa, Burdwan 713 130 (India)

    2011-07-28

    Graphical abstract: The present work demonstrates that the temperature dependence of the escape rate is not only embedded in the so-called Arrhenius type factor, the second exponential factor also includes the temperature dependence which has a purely quantum origin that is entangled with dissipation. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} We explore the noise-induced barrier crossing dynamics of an open quantum system. {yields} The bath coupled with the system is driven out of equilibrium by an external noise. {yields} Nonlinear system-bath coupling and modulation of the bath affect the escape rate. {yields} An additional exponential factor, other than Arrhenius is also temperature dependent. {yields} This temperature dependence is purely quantum in origin. - Abstract: We address the stochastic dynamics of an open quantum system coupled to a heat reservoir that is driven out of thermal equilibrium by an external noise. By constructing Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations, we obtain the rate of decay from a metastable state of the system when the dissipation is state dependent. We discuss the effects and consequences of the non-linear interaction(s) stemming out of the system-bath coupling alongside the modulation of the bath by an external noise on the rate expression. We demonstrate that the temperature dependence of the escape rate is not only embedded in the so-called Arrhenius type factor, the second exponential factor also includes the temperature dependence. The last effect has a purely quantum origin. Interestingly, we also envisage that this quantum effect is entangled with dissipation. The results offer a basis for clarifying the relationship between the dissipation and exponential factor of the obtained rate expression.

  5. Biomechanics and thermodynamics of nanoparticle interactions with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids in cellular uptake and endosomal escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Jin, Shihua; Weimer, Jonathan; Elegbede, Adekunle; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2014-07-01

    To be effective for cytoplasmic delivery of therapeutics, nanoparticles (NPs) taken up via endocytic pathways must efficiently transport across the cell membrane and subsequently escape from the secondary endosomes. We hypothesized that the biomechanical and thermodynamic interactions of NPs with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids are involved in these processes. Using model plasma and endosomal lipid membranes, we compared the interactions of cationic NPs composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) modified with the dichain surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) or the single-chain surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) vs anionic unmodified NPs of similar size. We validated our hypothesis in doxorubicin-sensitive (MCF-7, with relatively fluid membranes) and resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR, with rigid membranes). Despite their cationic surface charges, DMAB- and CTAB-modified NPs showed different patterns of biophysical interaction: DMAB-modified NPs induced bending of the model plasma membrane, whereas CTAB-modified NPs condensed the membrane, thereby resisted bending. Unmodified NPs showed no effects on bending. DMAB-modified NPs also induced thermodynamic instability of the model endosomal membrane, whereas CTAB-modified and unmodified NPs had no effect. Since bending of the plasma membrane and destabilization of the endosomal membrane are critical biophysical processes in NP cellular uptake and endosomal escape, respectively, we tested these NPs for cellular uptake and drug efficacy. Confocal imaging showed that in both sensitive and resistant cells DMAB-modified NPs exhibited greater cellular uptake and escape from endosomes than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs. Further, paclitaxel-loaded DMAB-modified NPs induced greater cytotoxicity even in resistant cells than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs or drug in solution, demonstrating the potential of DMAB-modified NPs to overcome the transport barrier in resistant cells. In

  6. Stream life of spawning pink salmon and the method of escapement enumeration by aerial survey: Draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys are currently used as the method tor escapement enumeration of pink salmon throughout Alaska. Other escapement enumeration methods cannot be...

  7. Parameter Optimization on Experimental Study to Reduce Ammonia Escape in CO2 Absorption by Ammonia Scrubbing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Leng; Jianmin Gao; Mingyue He; Min Xie; Qian Du; Rui Sun; Shaohua Wu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research ammonia escape in CO2 absorption by ammonia scrubbing, ammonia escape was studied in CO2 absorption process using the bubbling reactor in different conditions as gas flow rate, CO2 ratio, absorbent temperature and ammonia concentration and quantity of escaped ammonia was measured by chemical titration. The results indicated that, the amount of ammonia escape can be around 20% of original amount in 90 min and the escaped amount will increase with the rise of gas flow rate, absorbent temperature, concentration of ammonia while decrease as CO2 ratio goes up. Through the analysis of the law of ammonia escape, at the same time, combined with ammonia escape and the influence of the relationship between the CO2 absorption efficiency, reducing ammonia escape working condition parameter optimization is given.

  8. Bacillus anthracis Factors for Phagosomal Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Zornetta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of phagosome escape by intracellular pathogens is an important step in the infectious cycle. During the establishment of anthrax, Bacillus anthracis undergoes a transient intracellular phase in which spores are engulfed by local phagocytes. Spores germinate inside phagosomes and grow to vegetative bacilli, which emerge from their resident intracellular compartments, replicate and eventually exit from the plasma membrane. During germination, B. anthracis secretes multiple factors that can help its resistance to the phagocytes. Here the possible role of B. anthracis toxins, phospholipases, antioxidant enzymes and capsules in the phagosomal escape and survival, is analyzed and compared with that of factors of other microbial pathogens involved in the same type of process.

  9. Quantum and thermal phase escape in extended Josephson systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work I examine phase escape in long annular Josephson tunnel junctions. The sine-Gordon equation governs the dynamics of the phase variable along the junction. This equation supports topological soliton solutions, which correspond to quanta of magnetic flux trapped in the junction barrier. For such Josephson vortices an effective potential is formed by an external magnetic field, while a bias current acts as a driving force. Both together form a metastable potential well, which the vortex is trapped in. When the driving force exceeds the pinning force of the potential, the vortex escapes and the junction switches to the voltage state. At a finite temperature the driving force fluctuates. If the junction's energy scale is small, the phase variable can undergo a macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) process at temperatures below the crossover temperature. Without a vortex trapped, the metastable state is not a potential minimum in space, but a potential minimum at zero phase difference. (orig.)

  10. Quantum and thermal phase escape in extended Josephson systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, A.

    2006-07-12

    In this work I examine phase escape in long annular Josephson tunnel junctions. The sine-Gordon equation governs the dynamics of the phase variable along the junction. This equation supports topological soliton solutions, which correspond to quanta of magnetic flux trapped in the junction barrier. For such Josephson vortices an effective potential is formed by an external magnetic field, while a bias current acts as a driving force. Both together form a metastable potential well, which the vortex is trapped in. When the driving force exceeds the pinning force of the potential, the vortex escapes and the junction switches to the voltage state. At a finite temperature the driving force fluctuates. If the junction's energy scale is small, the phase variable can undergo a macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) process at temperatures below the crossover temperature. Without a vortex trapped, the metastable state is not a potential minimum in space, but a potential minimum at zero phase difference. (orig.)

  11. Kuiper Prize Lecture - Escape of atmospheres, ancient and modern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunten, D.M. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A development history is presented for theories concerning planetary atmosphere gas-escape phenomena, which although firmly grounded in the kinetics of gases achieved truly productive results only after spacecraft remote sensing data for both the earth atmosphere and the planets became widely available. The most significant initial advances, encompassing diffusion-limited flow, nonthermal escape mechanisms, bound nonthermal coronas, and mass fractionation during early blowoff, followed from sounding rocket studies of the earth upper atmosphere, Mariner 5 results on hydrogen near Venus, and the nitrogen isotopic composition discovered by Viking in Mars. Attention has more recently been given to the xenon isotopic patterns in various atmospheres, as well as to the puzzling behavior of the Io atmosphere and plasma torus. 126 refs.

  12. Escape Time of Josephson Junctions for Signal Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Addesso, P; Pierro, V

    2014-01-01

    In this Chapter we investigate with the methods of signal detection the response of a Josephson junction to a perturbation to decide if the perturbation contains a coherent oscillation embedded in the background noise. When a Josephson Junction is irradiated by an external noisy source, it eventually leaves the static state and reaches a steady voltage state. The appearance of a voltage step allows to measure the time spent in the metastable state before the transition to the running state, thus defining an escape time. The distribution of the escape times depends upon the characteristics of the noise and the Josephson junction. Moreover, the properties of the distribution depends on the features of the signal (amplitude, frequency and phase), which can be therefore inferred through the appropriate signal processing methods. Signal detection with JJ is interesting for practical purposes, inasmuch as the superconductive elements can be (in principle) cooled to the absolute zero and therefore can add (in practi...

  13. Behavioral analysis of the escape response in larval zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruopei; Girdhar, Kiran; Chemla, Yann; Gruebele, Martin

    The behavior of larval zebrafish is of great interest because the limited number of locomotor neurons in larval zebrafish couples with its rich repertoire of movements as a vertebrate animal. Current research uses a priori-selected parameters to describe their swimming behavior while our lab has built a parameter-free model based on singular value decomposition analysis to characterize it. Our previous work has analyzed the free swimming of larval zebrafish and presented a different picture from the current classification of larval zebrafish locomotion. Now we are extending this work to the studies of their escape response to acoustic stimulus. Analysis has shown intrinsic difference in the locomotion between escape response and free swimming.

  14. Fractionation of noble gases by thermal escape from accreting planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, T. M.

    1986-01-01

    Assuming solar initial elemental and isotopic ratios and a determination of the degree of fractionation occurring by competition between gravitational binding and escape, a model is developed for selective noble gas loss through escape during the growth of planetesimals to form the terrestrial planets. Of the two classes of planetesimals that can form on a time scale that is consistent with modern accretion models, one is depleted in neon while the other is neon-rich. The mechanism is noted to be capable of accounting for all known properties of the noble gas volatiles on the terrestrial planets, with only one exception, namely the Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios for Mars and the earth, which are much lower than observed.

  15. Kuiper Prize Lecture - Escape of atmospheres, ancient and modern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A development history is presented for theories concerning planetary atmosphere gas-escape phenomena, which although firmly grounded in the kinetics of gases achieved truly productive results only after spacecraft remote sensing data for both the earth atmosphere and the planets became widely available. The most significant initial advances, encompassing diffusion-limited flow, nonthermal escape mechanisms, bound nonthermal coronas, and mass fractionation during early blowoff, followed from sounding rocket studies of the earth upper atmosphere, Mariner 5 results on hydrogen near Venus, and the nitrogen isotopic composition discovered by Viking in Mars. Attention has more recently been given to the xenon isotopic patterns in various atmospheres, as well as to the puzzling behavior of the Io atmosphere and plasma torus. 126 refs

  16. Escape of Mars atmospheric carbon through time by photochemical means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, J. G.; Kim, J.; Nagy, A. F.

    Luhmann et al. recently suggested that sputtering of the Martian atmosphere by re-entering O(+) pickup ions could have provided a significant route of escape for CO2 and its products throughout Mars' history. They estimated that the equivalent of C in an approximately 140-mbar CO2 atmosphere should have been lost this way if the Sun and solar wind evolved according to available models. Another source of escaping C (and O) that is potentially important is the dissociative recombination of ionospheric CO(+) near the exobase. We have evaluated the loss rates due to this process for 'ancient' solar EUV radiation fluxes of 1, 3, and 6 times the present flux in order to calculate the possible cumulative loss over the last 3.5 Gyr.

  17. Synthesis and self-assembly of amphiphilic poly(acrylicacid)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-poly(acrylicacid) block copolymer as novel carrier for 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurdjic, Beti; Dimchevska, Simona; Geskovski, Nikola; Petrusevska, Marija; Gancheva, Valerya; Georgiev, Georgi; Petrov, Petar; Goracinova, Katerina

    2015-01-01

    The process of molecular self-assembly plays a crucial role in formulation of polymeric nanoparticulated drug delivery carriers as it creates the possibility for enhanced drug encapsulation and carrier surface engineering. This study aimed to develop a novel self-assembled polymeric micelles for targeted delivery in tumor cells in order to overcome not only various drawbacks of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin (SN-38) but also various reported limitations of other drug delivery systems, especially low drug loading and premature release. Custom synthesized amphiphilic triblock copolymer poly(acrylic acid)-poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-poly(acrylic acid) (PAA(13)-PCL(35)-PAA(13)) was used to prepare kinetically stable micelles by nanoprecipitation and modified nanoprecipitation procedure. Core-shell micelles with diameter of 120-140 nm, negative zeta potential and satisfactory drug loading were produced. The prepared formulations were stable in pH range of 3-12 and in media with NaCl concentration <1 mol/l. Screening mixed level factorial 3 × 2(2) design identified that the process temperature as well as the type of organic solvent has influence upon the efficacy of encapsulation, particle size, dissolution rate and burst release. Fourier transform infrared and differential scanning calorimetry analyses confirmed the entrapment of the active substance into the micelles. The kinetic analysis of dissolution studies revealed that the main mechanism of drug release from the prepared formulations is Fickian diffusion. Growth inhibition studies as well as DNA fragmentation assay performed on SW-480 cell lines clearly demonstrated increased growth inhibition effect and presence of fragmented DNA in cells treated with loaded micelles compared to SN-38 solution. Altogether, these results point out to potential biomedical and clinical application of PAA-PCL-PAA systems in the future.

  18. Cell-specific expression of tryptophan decarboxylase and 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, key genes involved in camptothecin biosynthesis in Camptotheca acuminata Decne (Nyssaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaria Anna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptotheca acuminata is a major natural source of the terpenoid indole alkaloid camptothecin (CPT. At present, little is known about the cellular distribution of the biosynthesis of CPT, which would be useful knowledge for developing new strategies and technologies for improving alkaloid production. Results The pattern of CPT accumulation was compared with the expression pattern of some genes involved in CPT biosynthesis in C. acuminata [i.e., Ca-TDC1 and Ca-TDC2 (encoding for tryptophan decarboxylase and Ca-HGO (encoding for 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase]. Both CPT accumulation and gene expression were investigated in plants at different degrees of development and in plantlets subjected to drought-stress. In all organs, CPT accumulation was detected in epidermal idioblasts, in some glandular trichomes, and in groups of idioblast cells localized in parenchyma tissues. Drought-stress caused an increase in CPT accumulation and in the number of glandular trichomes containing CPT, whereas no increase in epidermal or parenchymatous idioblasts was observed. In the leaf, Ca-TDC1 expression was detected in some epidermal cells and in groups of mesophyll cells but not in glandular trichomes; in the stem, it was observed in parenchyma cells of the vascular tissue; in the root, no expression was detected. Ca-TDC2 expression was observed exclusively in leaves of plantlets subjected to drought-stress, in the same sites described for Ca-TDC1. In the leaf, Ca-HGO was detected in all chlorenchyma cells; in the stem, it was observed in the same sites described for Ca-TDC1; in the root, no expression was detected. Conclusions The finding that the sites of CPT accumulation are not consistently the same as those in which the studied genes are expressed demonstrates an organ-to-organ and cell-to-cell translocation of CPT or its precursors.

  19. Escape rates for rotor walk in Z^d

    OpenAIRE

    Florescu, Laura; Ganguly, Shirshendu; Levine, Lionel; Peres, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Rotor walk is a deterministic analogue of random walk. We study its recurrence and transience properties on Z^d for the initial configuration of all rotors aligned. If n particles in turn perform rotor walks starting from the origin, we show that the number that escape (i.e., never return to the origin) is of order n in dimensions d>=3, and of order n/log(n) in dimension 2.

  20. The escape of natural satellites from Mercury and Venus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is suggested that the slow rotations of Mercury and Venus may be connected with the absence of natural satellites around them. If Mercury or Venus possessed a satellite at the time of formation, the tidal evolution would have caused the satellite to recede. At a sufficiently large distance from the planet, the Sun's gravitational influence makes the satellite orbit unstable. The natural satellites of Mercury and Venus might have escaped as a consequence of this instability. (Auth.)

  1. Brain size as a driver of avian escape strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Samia, Diogo S. M.; Pape Møller, Anders; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    After detecting an approaching predator, animals make a decision when to flee. Prey will initiate flight soon after detecting a predator so as to minimize attentional costs related to on-going monitoring of the whereabouts of the predator. Such costs may compete with foraging and other maintenance activities and hence be larger than the costs of immediate flight. The drivers of interspecific variation in escape strategy are poorly known. Here we investigated the morphological, life history an...

  2. Transcriptional control of behavior: Engrailed knockout changes cockroach escape trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, David; Marie, Bruno; Domenici, Paolo; Blagburn, Jonathan M.; Bacon, Jonathan P.

    2009-01-01

    The cerci of the cockroach are covered with identified sensory hairs, which detect air movements. The sensory neurons which innervate these hairs synapse with giant interneurons (GIs) in the terminal ganglion which in turn synapse with interneurons and leg motorneurons in thoracic ganglia. This neural circuit mediates the animal's escape behavior. The transcription factor Engrailed (En) is expressed only in the medially born sensory neurons, which suggested it could work as a positional deter...

  3. Amygdala involvement in human avoidance, escape and approach behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Schlund, Michael W.; Cataldo, Michael F

    2010-01-01

    Many forms of psychopathology and substance abuse problems are characterized by chronic ritualized forms of avoidance and escape behavior that are designed to control or modify external or internal (i.e, thoughts, emotions, bodily sensations) threats. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation, we examined amygdala reactivity to threatening cues when avoidance responding consistently prevented contact with an upcoming aversive event (money loss). In addition, we examined esca...

  4. Escape of Ionizing Radiation from High-Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, K; Wood, Kenneth; Loeb, Abraham

    1999-01-01

    We use a three-dimensional radiation transfer code to calculate the steady-state escape fraction of ionizing photons from disk galaxies as a function of redshift and galaxy mass. The gaseous disks are assumed to be isothermal (with a sound speed of 10 km/s) and radially exponential. Their scale-radius is related to the characteristic spin parameter and virial radius of their host halos, and their vertical structure is dictated by their self-gravity. The sources of radiation are taken to be either stars embedded in the disk, or a central quasar. The predicted increase in the disk density with redshift results in an overall decline of the escape fraction with increasing redshift. For typical parameters we find that the escape fraction at z=10 is less than 1% for stars, but greater than 30% for mini-quasars. Unless the smooth gas content of high-redshift disks was depleted by more than an order of magnitude due to supernove-driven outflows or fragmentation, the reionization of the universe was most likely domina...

  5. The RAVE Survey: Constraining the Local Galactic Escape Speed

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M C; Helmi, A; Wyse, R F G; Fulbright, J P; Freeman, K C; Navarro, J F; Seabroke, G M; Steinmetz, M; Williams, M; Bienaymé, O; Binney, J; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Dehnen, W; Gibson, B K; Gilmore, G; Grebel, E K; Munari, U; Parker, Q A; Scholz, R D; Siebert, A; Watson, F G; Zwitter, T

    2006-01-01

    We report new constraints on the local escape speed of our Galaxy. Our analysis is based on a sample of high velocity stars from the RAVE survey and two previously published datasets. We use cosmological simulations of disk galaxy formation to motivate our assumptions on the shape of the velocity distribution, allowing for a significantly more precise measurement of the escape velocity compared to previous studies. We find that the escape velocity lies within the range $498\\kms < \\ve < 608 \\kms$ (90 per cent confidence), with a median likelihood of $544\\kms$. The fact that $\\ve^2$ is significantly greater than $2\\vc^2$ (where $\\vc=220\\kms$ is the local circular velocity) implies that there must be a significant amount of mass exterior to the Solar circle, i.e. this convincingly demonstrates the presence of a dark halo in the Galaxy. For a simple isothermal halo, one can calculate that the minimum radial extent is $\\sim58$ kpc. We use our constraints on $\\ve$ to determine the mass of the Milky Way halo f...

  6. Fleeing to refuge: Escape decisions in the race for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, William E

    2016-10-01

    Economic escape theory that predicts that flight initiation distance (FID=predator-prey distance when a prey begins to flee from an approaching predator) increases as predation risk increases has been overwhelmingly supported. However, the vast majority of empirical tests have focused on effects of single predation risk factors. Even studies that have included multiple risk factors have not predicted how they jointly affect FID. I present a model that predicts joint effects of several predation risk factors that affect the outcome of a race between predator and prey to the prey's refuge. As a prey's distance to refuge and predator attack speed increase, and as the prey's location forces it to flee more toward a predator to reach refuge, FID increases. A published model proposed and experiment showed that FID is longer when prey flee directly toward than directly away from a predator to a refuge. We present a new geometric model that predicts FID for all angles between the prey's and predator's paths to refuge, distance of the prey from refuge when escape begins, predator and prey speeds, and a margin of safety allowing the prey to reach refuge before the predator. The model provides many new, testable predictions about relationships among its variables and FID. Most notably, it predicts that FID increases sigmoidally as the angle between predator and prey paths to refuge increases. Although the model is not economic (cost-benefit), we discuss its relationship to economic escape theory. PMID:27343624

  7. 46 CFR 108.155 - Restrictions on means of escape utilized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Restrictions on means of escape utilized. 108.155 Section 108.155 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE... means of escape utilized. A required means of escape may not be a vertical ladder or deck...

  8. On the Relative Contributions of Noncontingent Reinforcement and Escape Extinction in the Treatment of Food Refusal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Gregory K.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Patel, Meeta R.; Layer, Stacy A.; Bachmeyer, Melanie H.; Bethke, Stephanie D.; Gutshall, Katharine A.

    2004-01-01

    In the current investigation, we evaluated the relative effects of noncontingent reinforcement (NCR), escape extinction, and a combination of NCR and escape extinction as treatment for the feeding problems exhibited by 4 children. For each participant, consumption increased only when escape extinction was implemented, independent of whether NCR…

  9. 46 CFR 56.50-25 - Safety and relief valve escape piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Safety and relief valve escape piping. 56.50-25 Section 56.50-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-25 Safety and relief valve escape piping. (a) Escape piping...

  10. Augmenting the Efficacy of Immunotoxins and Other Targeted Protein Toxins by Endosomal Escape Enhancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Fuchs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The toxic moiety of almost all protein-based targeted toxins must enter the cytosol of the target cell to mediate its fatal effect. Although more than 500 targeted toxins have been investigated in the past decades, no antibody-targeted protein toxin has been approved for tumor therapeutic applications by the authorities to date. Missing efficacy can be attributed in many cases to insufficient endosomal escape and therefore subsequent lysosomal degradation of the endocytosed toxins. To overcome this drawback, many strategies have been described to weaken the membrane integrity of endosomes. This comprises the use of lysosomotropic amines, carboxylic ionophores, calcium channel antagonists, various cell-penetrating peptides of viral, bacterial, plant, animal, human and synthetic origin, other organic molecules and light-induced techniques. Although the efficacy of the targeted toxins was typically augmented in cell culture hundred or thousand fold, in exceptional cases more than million fold, the combination of several substances harbors new problems including additional side effects, loss of target specificity, difficulties to determine the therapeutic window and cell type-dependent variations. This review critically scrutinizes the chances and challenges of endosomal escape enhancers and their potential role in future developments.

  11. Background intercomparison with escape-suppressed germanium detectors in underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key requirement for underground nuclear astrophysics experiments is the very low background level in germanium detectors underground. The reference for these purposes is the world's so far only underground accelerator laboratory for nuclear astrophysics, LUNA. LUNA is located deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, shielded from cosmic rays by 1400 m of rock. The background at LUNA was studied in detail using an escape-suppressed Clover-type HPGe detector. Exactly the same detector was subsequently transported to the Felsenkeller underground laboratory in Dresden, shielded by 45 m of rock, and the background was shown to be only a factor of three higher than at LUNA when comparing the escape-suppressed spectra, with interesting consequences for underground nuclear astrophysics. As the next step of a systematic study of the effects of a combination of active and passive shielding on the cosmic ray induced background, this detector is now being brought to the ''Reiche Zeche'' mine in Freiberg/Sachsen, shielded by 150 m of rock. The data from the Freiberg measurement are shown and discussed.

  12. Background intercomparison with escape-suppressed germanium detectors in underground mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szuecs, Tamas; Bemmerer, Daniel [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A key requirement for underground nuclear astrophysics experiments is the very low background level in germanium detectors underground. The reference for these purposes is the world's so far only underground accelerator laboratory for nuclear astrophysics, LUNA. LUNA is located deep underground in the Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, shielded from cosmic rays by 1400 m of rock. The background at LUNA was studied in detail using an escape-suppressed Clover-type HPGe detector. Exactly the same detector was subsequently transported to the Felsenkeller underground laboratory in Dresden, shielded by 45 m of rock, and the background was shown to be only a factor of three higher than at LUNA when comparing the escape-suppressed spectra, with interesting consequences for underground nuclear astrophysics. As the next step of a systematic study of the effects of a combination of active and passive shielding on the cosmic ray induced background, this detector is now being brought to the ''Reiche Zeche'' mine in Freiberg/Sachsen, shielded by 150 m of rock. The data from the Freiberg measurement are shown and discussed.

  13. [Contribution to tumor escape and chemotherapy response: A choice between senescence and apoptosis in heterogeneous tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonchère, Barbara; Vétillard, Alexandra; Toutain, Bertrand; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Understanding adaptive signaling pathways in response to chemotherapy is one of the main challenges of cancer treatment. Activated in response to DNA damage, cell cycle and mitotic checkpoints activate the p53-p21 and p16-Rb pathways and induce apoptosis or senescence. Since senescent cells survive and produce a secretome that influences neighbouring cells, it is not particularly clear whether these responses are equivalent and if tumor cells escape these two suppressive pathways to the same extent. Predicting escape is also complicated by the fact that cancer cells adapt to treatments by activating the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and by producing clones with cancer-initiating cells features. Dedifferentiation pathways used in stressful conditions reconstitute dividing and sometimes more aggressive populations in response to chemotherapy. These observations illustrate the importance of tumor heterogeneity and the adaptation capacities of different intra-tumoral subclones. Depending on their oncogenic profile, on their localisation within the tumor and on their interaction with stromal cells, these subclones are expected to have different responses and adaptation capacities to chemotherapy. A complete eradication will certainly rely on combination therapies that can kill at the same time the bulk of the sensitive tumor but can also prevent plasticity and the generation of persistent clones. PMID:26762946

  14. Making sense of the local Galactic escape speed estimates in direct dark matter searches

    CERN Document Server

    Lavalle, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Direct detection (DD) of dark matter (DM) candidates in the $\\lesssim$10 GeV mass range is very sensitive to the tail of their velocity distribution. The important quantity is the maximum WIMP speed in the observer's rest frame, i.e. in average the sum of the local Galactic escape speed $v_{\\rm esc}$ and of the circular velocity of the Sun $v_c$. While the latter has been receiving continuous attention, the former is more difficult to constrain. The RAVE Collaboration has just released a new estimate of $v_{\\rm esc}$ (Piffl {\\em et al.}, 2014 --- P14) that supersedes the previous one (Smith {\\em et al.}, 2007), which is of interest in the perspective of reducing the astrophysical uncertainties in DD. Nevertheless, these new estimates cannot be used blindly as they rely on assumptions in the dark halo modeling which induce tight correlations between the escape speed and other local astrophysical parameters. We make a self-consistent study of the implications of the RAVE results on DD assuming isotropic DM velo...

  15. Augmenting the Efficacy of Immunotoxins and Other Targeted Protein Toxins by Endosomal Escape Enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander; Gilabert-Oriol, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The toxic moiety of almost all protein-based targeted toxins must enter the cytosol of the target cell to mediate its fatal effect. Although more than 500 targeted toxins have been investigated in the past decades, no antibody-targeted protein toxin has been approved for tumor therapeutic applications by the authorities to date. Missing efficacy can be attributed in many cases to insufficient endosomal escape and therefore subsequent lysosomal degradation of the endocytosed toxins. To overcome this drawback, many strategies have been described to weaken the membrane integrity of endosomes. This comprises the use of lysosomotropic amines, carboxylic ionophores, calcium channel antagonists, various cell-penetrating peptides of viral, bacterial, plant, animal, human and synthetic origin, other organic molecules and light-induced techniques. Although the efficacy of the targeted toxins was typically augmented in cell culture hundred or thousand fold, in exceptional cases more than million fold, the combination of several substances harbors new problems including additional side effects, loss of target specificity, difficulties to determine the therapeutic window and cell type-dependent variations. This review critically scrutinizes the chances and challenges of endosomal escape enhancers and their potential role in future developments. PMID:27376327

  16. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  17. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E;

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...... of neutralizing antibodies to the primary virus isolates was detected 13-45 weeks after seroconversion. Emergence of escape virus with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by autologous sera was demonstrated. The patients subsequently developed neutralizing antibodies against the escape virus but after a delay....... Titers of neutralizing antibodies against late virus isolates were generally low compared to initial neutralizing titers against primary virus isolates. The delay in appearance of neutralizing antibodies to the dominant viral strain at any time in the patient and the emergence of neutralization resistant...

  18. Alveolar Type II Cells Escape Stress Failure Caused by Tonic Stretch through Transient Focal Adhesion Disassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yang Liu, Xiao-Fei Chen, Yan-Hong Ren, Qing-Yuan Zhan, Chen Wang, Chun Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation-induced excessive stretch of alveoli is reported to induce cellular stress failure and subsequent lung injury, and is therefore an injurious factor to the lung. Avoiding cellular stress failure is crucial to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI treatment. In the present study, primary rat alveolar type II (ATII cells were isolated to evaluate their viability and the mechanism of their survival under tonic stretch. By the annexin V/ PI staining and flow cytometry assay, we demonstrated that tonic stretch-induced cell death is an immediate injury of mechanical stress. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoblots assay showed that the cells experienced an expansion-contraction-reexpansion process, accompanied by partial focal adhesion (FA disassembly during contraction. Manipulation of integrin adherent affinity by altering bivalent cation levels in the culture medium and applying an integrin neutralizing antibody showed that facilitated adhesion affinity promoted cell death under tonic stretch, while lower level of adhesion protected the cells from stretch-induced stress failure. Finally, a simplified numerical model was established to reveal that adequate disassembly of FAs reduced the forces transmitting throughout the cell. Taken together, these results indicate that ATII cells escape stress failure caused by tonic stretch via active cell morphological remodeling, during which cells transiently disassemble FAs to unload mechanical forces.

  19. Kramers escape rate in overdamped systems with the power-law distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanjun; Du, Jiulin

    2014-01-01

    Kramers escape rate in the overdamped systems with the power-law distribution is studied. By using the mean first passage time, we derive the escape rate for the power-law distribution and obtain the Kramers' infinite barrier escape rate in this case. It is shown that the escape rate for the power-law distribution extends the Kramers' overdamped result to the relatively low barrier. Furthermore, we apply the escape rate for the power-law distribution to the unfolding of titin and show a bette...

  20. The mitochondria-mediate apoptosis of Lepidopteran cells induced by azadirachtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfei Huang

    Full Text Available Mitochondria have been shown to play an important role in apoptosis using mammalian cell lines. However, this seems not to be the case in Drosophila, an insect model organism; thus more in-depth studies of insect cell apoptosis are necessary. In the present study, mitochondrial involvement during azadirachtin- and camptothecin-induced apoptosis in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells (isolated from Spodoptera frugiperda pupal ovarian tissue was investigated. The results showed that both azadirachtin and camptothecin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, activation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTPs and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP were observed very early during apoptosis and were followed subsequently by the release of cytochrome-c from the mitochondria. Furthermore, the results also revealed that the opening of MPTPs and the loss of MMP induced by azadirachtin could be significantly inhibited by the permeability transition pore (PTP inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, which was used to identify the key role of mitochondria in the apoptosis of Sf9 cells. However, in camptothecin-treated Sf9 cells, CsA could not suppress the opening of MPTPs and the loss of MMP when apoptosis was induced. The data from caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity assays and detection of apoptosis by morphological observation and flow cytometry also uncovered the different effect of CsA on the two botanical apoptosis inducers. Although different mechanisms of apoptosis induction exist, our study revealed that mitochondria play a crucial role in insect cell line apoptosis.

  1. Escaping stars from young low-N clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Weidner, Carsten; Bonnell, Ian A.; Moeckel, Nickolas

    2010-01-01

    With the use of N-body calculations the amount and properties of escaping stars from low-N (N = 100 and 1000) young embedded star clusters prior to gas expulsion are studied over the first 5 Myr of their existence. Besides the number of stars also different initial radii and binary populations are examined as well as virialised and collapsing clusters. It is found that these clusters can loose substantial amounts (up to 20%) of stars within 5 Myr with considerable velocities up to more than 1...

  2. Experimental study of subsonic microjet escaping from a rectangular nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniskin, V. M.; Maslov, A. A.; Mukhin, K. A.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments on the subsonic laminar microjets escaping from the nozzles of rectangular shape are carried out. The nozzle size is 83.3x3823 microns. Reynolds number calculated by the nozzle height and the average flow velocity at the nozzle exit ranged from 58 to 154. The working gas was air at room temperature. The velocity decay and velocity fluctuations along the center line of the jet are determined. The fundamental difference between the laminar microjets characteristics and subsonic turbulent jets of macro size is shown. Based on measurements of velocity fluctuations it is shown the presence of laminar-turbulent transition in microjets and its location is determined.

  3. Test of time: what if little Albert had escaped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Andy P; Nightingale, Zoë C

    2009-04-01

    Watson and Rayner's (1920) ;Little Albert' experiment has become one of the most famous studies in psychology. It is a staple of many general psychology textbooks and is part of the very fabric of the discipline's folklore. Despite this fame, the study has been widely criticized in the nearly 90 years since it was published for its lack of methodological rigour. This article attempts to evaluate the contribution of the ;little Albert' study to modern clinical psychology by speculating on what theories and treatments of child anxiety would look like in a parallel universe in which the study never took place because ;little Albert' escaped from the hospital in which Watson tested him.

  4. Chases and escapes the mathematics of pursuit and evasion

    CERN Document Server

    Nahin, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    We all played tag when we were kids. What most of us don't realize is that this simple chase game is in fact an application of pursuit theory, and that the same principles of games like tag, dodgeball, and hide-and-seek are also at play in military strategy, high-seas chases by the Coast Guard, and even romantic pursuits. In Chases and Escapes, Paul Nahin gives us the first complete history of this fascinating area of mathematics, from its classical analytical beginnings to the present day. Drawing on game theory, geometry, linear algebra, target-tracking algorithms, and much

  5. Readout of a superconducting qubit. A problem of quantum escape processes for driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    density in the rotating frame. We found that a position-position interaction between system and bath in the laboratory frame translates into additional momentum-momentum couplings in the rotating frame. We introduced the concept of an effective temperature to analyze the energy exchange between system and bath. For a structured environment we found a negative effective temperature physically corresponding to the fact that absorption becomes more probable than emission and a population inversion is induced. This effect can explain recent experimental observations of enhanced relaxation in a quantronium circuit coupled to a cavity bifurcation amplifier. Finally we applied the approach on the new master equation in the rotating frame to calculate the quantum escape rate for the Duffing oscillator. We discovered that there is an additional quantum effect compared to the case of a static barrier. In the rotating frame the quantum fluctuations that accompany relaxation of the system coupled to a bath lead to diffusion away from one stationary state and to a transition over the dynamic barrier to the second stationary state. This mechanism is due to the particular form of the interaction between system and bath. We found also that by tuning the bifurcation parameter we can change the effective friction. So, we easily can move from the underdamped regime, studied in this work, to the classical overdamped regime and finally to the quantum overdamped regime. (orig.)

  6. Ultra-fast Escape of a Octopus-inspired Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2013-11-01

    The octopus, squid, and other cephalopods inflate with water and then release a jet to accelerate in the opposite direction. This escape mechanism is particularly interesting in the octopus because they become initially quite bluff, yet this does not hinder them in achieving impressive bursts of speed. We examine this somewhat paradoxical maneuver using a simple deflating spheroid model in both potential and viscous flow. We demonstrate that the dynamic reduction of the width of the body completely changes the flow and forces acting on the escaping rocket in three ways. First, a body which reduces in size can generate an added mass thrust which counteracts the added mass inertia. Second, the motion of the shrinking wall acts similar to suction on a static wall, reducing separation and drag forces in a viscous fluid, but that this effects depends on the rate of size change. Third, using a combination of these two features it is possible to initially load the fluid with kinetic energy when heavy and bluff and then recover that energy when streamlined and light, enabling ultra-fast accelerations. As a notable example, these mechanisms allow a shrinking spheroid rocket in a heavy inviscid fluid to achieve speeds greater than an identical rocket in the vacuum of space. Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute.

  7. FEM analysis of escape capsule suffered to gas explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-lu; Mei, Rui-bin; Li, Chang-sheng; Cai, Ban; Liu, Xiang-hua

    2013-05-01

    Escape capsules are new devices for underground coal mines that provide air, water, food and supplies in the event of an emergency in where miners are unable to escape. It is difficult to carry out the experiments of explosion and safety because the danger and nonrepeatability of explosion. The structure deformation and distribution of equivalent stress has been investigated under different impact pressure conditions including unimodal and bimodal loads based on the FEM and software LS-DYNA. The results show that the distribution of deformation and equivalent stress has the same trend on the same surface with the increment of explosion pressure. The deformation and stress are larger with side impact pressure compared with that of the same front impact pressure. Furthermore, the maximum equivalent stress is 246MPa and 260MPa on the front and sides of capsule with five times for national standard impact pressure 1.5MPa. Under these conditions, the deformation is less than about 9.97mm and 10.47mm, respectively. When the front impact pressure is 2.0MPa, the deformation of capsule still belongs to elasticity but the less plastic deformation occurs on the Ushape stiffening channels with the same side impact pressure. However, it is safe for capsule structure because the equivalent stress 283MPa is much less than the tensile strength. It is noted that bimodal load accelerates the capsule deformation so that it is more dangerous compared with unimodal load.

  8. Pair interaction of catalytically active colloids: from assembly to escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Mozaffari, Ali; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics and pair trajectory of two self-propelled colloids are reported. The autonomous motions of the colloids are due to a catalytic chemical reaction taking place asymmetrically on their surfaces that generates a concentration gradient of interactive solutes around the particles and actuate particle propulsion. We consider two spherical particles with symmetric catalytic caps extending over the local polar angles $\\theta^1_{cap}$ and $\\theta^2_{cap}$ from the centers of active sectors in an otherwise quiescent fluid. A combined analytical-numerical technique was developed to solve the coupled mass transfer equation and the hydrodynamics in the Stokes flow regime. The ensuing pair trajectory of the colloids is controlled by the reacting coverages $\\theta^j_{cap}$ and their initial relative orientation with respect to each other. Our analysis indicates two possible scenarios for pair trajectories of catalytic self-propelled particles: either the particles approach, come into contact and assemble or they interact and move away from each other (escape). For arbitrary motions of the colloids, it is found that the direction of particle rotations is the key factor in determining the escape or assembly scenario. Based on the analysis, a phase diagram is sketched for the pair trajectory of the catalytically active particles as a function of active coverages and their initial relative orientations. We believe this study has important implications in elucidation of collective behaviors of auotophoretically self-propelled colloids.

  9. Characterization of escape times of Josephson junctions for signal detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addesso, Paolo; Filatrella, Giovanni; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when use of standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive due to the extreme weakness of the source or to the huge amount of data. In this paper we show that the prescriptions for the experimental setup and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploitation of the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance or activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. Furthermore, detection performance in the geometric resonance region is maximized at the prescribed value of the bias current. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance is essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and sample mean detector for different values of incoming signal to noise ratio is discussed, and a relationship with the error probability is found. Detectors based on the likelihood ratio test could be employed also to estimate unknown parameters in the applied input signal. As a prototypical example we study the phase estimation problem of a sinusoidal current, which is accomplished by using the filter bank approach. Finally we show that for a physically feasible detector the performances are found to be very close to the Cramer-Rao theoretical bound. Applications might be found, for example, in some astronomical detection problems (where the all-sky gravitational and/or radio wave search for pulsars requires the analysis of nearly sinusoidal

  10. Characterization of escape times of Josephson junctions for signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addesso, Paolo; Filatrella, Giovanni; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the escape time of a Josephson junction might be used to detect the presence of a sinusoidal signal embedded in noise when use of standard signal processing tools can be prohibitive due to the extreme weakness of the source or to the huge amount of data. In this paper we show that the prescriptions for the experimental setup and some physical behaviors depend on the detection strategy. More specifically, by exploitation of the sample mean of escape times to perform detection, two resonant regions are identified. At low frequencies there is a stochastic resonance or activation phenomenon, while near the plasma frequency a geometric resonance appears. Furthermore, detection performance in the geometric resonance region is maximized at the prescribed value of the bias current. The naive sample mean detector is outperformed, in terms of error probability, by the optimal likelihood ratio test. The latter exhibits only geometric resonance, showing monotonically increasing performance as the bias current approaches the junction critical current. In this regime the escape times are vanishingly small and therefore performance is essentially limited by measurement electronics. The behavior of the likelihood ratio and sample mean detector for different values of incoming signal to noise ratio is discussed, and a relationship with the error probability is found. Detectors based on the likelihood ratio test could be employed also to estimate unknown parameters in the applied input signal. As a prototypical example we study the phase estimation problem of a sinusoidal current, which is accomplished by using the filter bank approach. Finally we show that for a physically feasible detector the performances are found to be very close to the Cramer-Rao theoretical bound. Applications might be found, for example, in some astronomical detection problems (where the all-sky gravitational and/or radio wave search for pulsars requires the analysis of nearly sinusoidal

  11. Vaccination and timing influence SIV immune escape viral dynamics in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyen Loh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL can be effective at controlling HIV-1 in humans and SIV in macaques, but their utility is partly offset by mutational escape. The kinetics of CTL escape and reversion of escape mutant viruses upon transmission to MHC-mismatched hosts can help us understand CTL-mediated viral control and the fitness cost extracted by immune escape mutation. Traditional methods for following CTL escape and reversion are, however, insensitive to minor viral quasispecies. We developed sensitive quantitative real-time PCR assays to track the viral load of SIV Gag164-172 KP9 wild-type (WT and escape mutant (EM variants in pigtail macaques. Rapid outgrowth of EM virus occurs during the first few weeks of infection. However, the rate of escape plateaued soon after, revealing a prolonged persistence of WT viremia not detectable by standard cloning and sequencing methods. The rate of escape of KP9 correlated with levels of vaccine-primed KP9-specific CD8+ T cells present at that time. Similarly, when non-KP9 responder (lacking the restricting Mane-A*10 allele macaques were infected with SHIVmn229 stock containing a mixture of EM and WT virus, rapid reversion to WT was observed over the first 2 weeks following infection. However, the rate of reversion to WT slowed dramatically over the first month of infection. The serial quantitation of escape mutant viruses evolving during SIV infection shows that rapid dynamics of immune escape and reversion can be observed in early infection, particularly when CD8 T cells are primed by vaccination. However, these early rapid rates of escape and reversion are transient and followed by a significant slowing in these rates later during infection, highlighting that the rate of escape is significantly influenced by the timing of its occurrence.

  12. On the relative contributions of positive reinforcement and escape extinction in the treatment of food refusal.

    OpenAIRE

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Patel, Meeta R; Gulotta, Charles S; Sevin, Bari M; Layer, Stacy A

    2003-01-01

    We compared the effects of positive reinforcement alone, escape extinction alone, and positive reinforcement with escape extinction in the treatment of the food and fluid refusal of 4 children who had been diagnosed with a pediatric feeding disorder. Consumption did not increase when positive reinforcement was implemented alone. By contrast, consumption increased for all participants when escape extinction was implemented, independent of the presence or absence of positive reinforcement. Howe...

  13. When a Fish is a Fish: The Economic Impacts of Escaped Farmed Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Yajie Liu; Jon Olaf Olaussen; Anders Skonhoft

    2011-01-01

    The escape of cultured fish from a marine aquaculture facility is a type of biological invasion that may lead to a variety of potential ecological and economic effects on native fish. This paper develops a general invasive species impact model to capture explicitly both the ecological and economic effects of invasive species, especially escaped farmed fish, on native stocks and harvests. First, the possible effects of escaped farmed fish on the growth and stock size of a native fish are exami...

  14. Evaluation of immunological escape mechanisms in a mouse model of colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Detlef

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The local and systemic activation and regulation of the immune system by malignant cells during carcinogenesis is highly complex with involvement of the innate and acquired immune system. Despite the fact that malignant cells do have antigenic properties their immunogenic effects are minor suggesting tumor induced mechanisms to circumvent cancer immunosurveillance. The aim of this study is the analysis of tumor immune escape mechanisms in a colorectal liver metastases mouse model at different points in time during tumor growth. Methods CT26.WT murine colon carcinoma cells were injected intraportally in Balb/c mice after median laparotomy using a standardized injection technique. Metastatic tumor growth in the liver was examined by standard histological procedures at defined points in time during metastatic growth. Liver tissue with metastases was additionally analyzed for cytokines, T cell markers and Fas/Fas-L expression using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Comparisons were performed by analysis of variance or paired and unpaired t test when appropriate. Results Intraportal injection of colon carcinoma cells resulted in a gradual and time dependent metastatic growth. T cells of regulatory phenotype (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ which might play a role in protumoral immune response were found to infiltrate peritumoral tissue increasingly during carcinogenesis. Expression of cytokines IL-10, TGF-β and TNF-α were increased during tumor growth whereas IFN-γ showed a decrease of the expression from day 10 on following an initial increase. Moreover, liver metastases of murine colon carcinoma show an up-regulation of FAS-L on tumor cell surface with a decreased expression of FAS from day 10 on. CD8+ T cells express FAS and show an increased rate of apoptosis at perimetastatic location. Conclusions This study describes cellular and macromolecular changes contributing to immunological escape mechanisms during metastatic

  15. On the relative contributions of positive reinforcement and escape extinction in the treatment of food refusal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Cathleen C; Patel, Meeta R; Gulotta, Charles S; Sevin, Bari M; Layer, Stacy A

    2003-01-01

    We compared the effects of positive reinforcement alone, escape extinction alone, and positive reinforcement with escape extinction in the treatment of the food and fluid refusal of 4 children who had been diagnosed with a pediatric feeding disorder. Consumption did not increase when positive reinforcement was implemented alone. By contrast, consumption increased for all participants when escape extinction was implemented, independent of the presence or absence of positive reinforcement. However, the addition of positive reinforcement to escape extinction was associated with beneficial effects (e.g., greater decreases in negative vocalizations and inappropriate behavior) for some participants.

  16. On the hydrodynamic model of thermal escape from planetary atmospheres and its comparison with kinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Parkers' model of thermal escape implies the search of solutions of one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations for an inviscid but thermally conducting gas with a critical point and vanishing temperature far from the source. The properties of solutions of this model are studied for neutral mon- and diatomic gases with the viscosity index varying from 1/2 to 1. The domains of existence and uniqueness of solutions in terms of the source Jeans escape parameter and Knudsen number are established. The solutions are found to exist only in a narrow range of the critical point Jeans parameter. The lower and upper limits of this range correspond to solutions that are dominated by either heat conduction or adiabatic expansion. Thermal escape described by Parker's model occurs in two asymptotic regimes: the low-density (LD) regime, when escape is dominated by heat conduction, and the high-density (HD) regime, when escape is dominated by adiabatic expansion. Expressions for the mass and energy escape rates in these regimes are found theoretically. The comparison of results of hydrodynamic and kinetic simulations performed in identical conditions shows that Parker's model is capable of describing thermal escape only in the HD regime, providing decent agreement with the kinetic model in terms of the atmospheric structure below the exobase and the mass and energy escape rates. In the LD regime, Parker's model predicts a much faster drop in atmospheric temperature and less extended atmospheres, and can both over- and underestimate the escape rates in orders of magnitude.

  17. Test of time: what if little Albert had escaped?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Andy P; Nightingale, Zoë C

    2009-04-01

    Watson and Rayner's (1920) ;Little Albert' experiment has become one of the most famous studies in psychology. It is a staple of many general psychology textbooks and is part of the very fabric of the discipline's folklore. Despite this fame, the study has been widely criticized in the nearly 90 years since it was published for its lack of methodological rigour. This article attempts to evaluate the contribution of the ;little Albert' study to modern clinical psychology by speculating on what theories and treatments of child anxiety would look like in a parallel universe in which the study never took place because ;little Albert' escaped from the hospital in which Watson tested him. PMID:19293325

  18. Energetic particle recurrence and escape during solar cycle 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Roelof, E. C.

    1980-10-01

    Low-energy solar particle data have been combined from a multi-spacecraft near-earth data set covering most of solar cycle 20 (1966-1976). Particle intensity profiles have been ordered in the natural heliographic coordinate system of the estimated high coronal connection longitude of the foot point of the interplanetary field line. The recurrence trends of approximately 1-MeV solar particles become more apparent in this coordinate system than when plotted versus time, and thereby extend the evidence for regions of continual injection and escape from the corona. Intercomparison of solar particles and solar wind streams in heliographic longitude suggests that the origin of stream-associated spatial particle events seen at 1 AU is solar rather than interplanetary.

  19. Escape and avoidance learning in the earthworm Eisenia hortensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jeffrey Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in instrumental learning in earthworms dates back to 1912 when Yerkes concluded that they can learn a spatial discrimination in a T-maze. Rosenkoetter and Boice determined in the 1970s that the “learning” that Yerkes observed was probably chemotaxis and not learning at all. We examined a different form of instrumental learning: the ability to learn both to escape and to avoid an aversive stimulus. Freely moving “master” worms could turn off an aversive white light by increasing their movement; the behavior of yoked controls had no effect on the light. We demonstrate that in as few as 12 trials the behavior of the master worms comes under the control of this contingency.

  20. The resonance escape probability during the neutron slowing down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different methods were used to calculate the neutron resonance escape probability during neutron slowing down in homogeneous media : two Monte Carlo simulations and a determinist method. The first simulation is based on a natural process intervening in neutron transport, the second is a nonanalog simulation while the determinist method is based on an iterative solution of the neutron slowing down equation. The results are in a good agreement for the three methods . The second simulation was found to be more efficient than the first one for high dilutions . In fact we have attained a better figure of merite ( FOM = 1/ (sigma sup 2 ) T) by the second simulation than by the first one . 2 figs. ; 2 refs ( author )

  1. Nosema Tolerant Honeybees (Apis mellifera) Escape Parasitic Manipulation of Apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurze, Christoph; Le Conte, Yves; Dussaubat, Claudia;

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is not only pivotal for development, but also for pathogen defence in multicellular organisms. Although numerous intracellular pathogens are known to interfere with the host’s apoptotic machinery to overcome this defence, its importance for host-parasite coevolution has been neglected. We...... apoptotic processes in the gut epithelium, we visualised apoptotic cells using TUNEL assays and measured the relative expression levels of subset of candidate genes involved in the apoptotic machinery using qPCR. Our results suggest that N. ceranae reduces apoptosis in sensitive honeybees by enhancing...... inhibitor of apoptosis protein-(iap)-2 gene transcription. Interestingly, this seems not be the case in Nosema tolerant honeybees. We propose that these tolerant honeybees are able to escape the manipulation of apoptosis by N. ceranae, which may have evolved a mechanism to regulate an anti-apoptotic gene...

  2. Will 3552 Don Quixote escape from the Solar System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryadi Siregar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Asteroid 1983 SA, well known as 3552 Don Quixote, is one of Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs which is the most probable candidate for the cometary origin, or otherwise as Jupiter-Family-Comets (JFCs. The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of 3552 Don Quixote to be ejected from the Solar System. This paper presents an orbital evolution of 100 hypothetical asteroids generated by cloning 3552 Don Quixote. Investigation of its orbital evolution is conducted by using the SWIFT subroutine package, where the gravitational perturbations of eight major planets in the Solar System are considered. Over very short time scales (220 kyr relative to the Solar System life time (10 Gyr, the asteroid 3552 Don Quixote gave an example of chaotic motion that can cause asteroid to move outward and may be followed by escaping from the Solar System. Probability of ejection within the 220 kyr time scale is 50%.

  3. Escaping Antiangiogenic Therapy: Strategies Employed by Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio P. Pinto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor angiogenesis is widely recognized as one of the “hallmarks of cancer”. Consequently, during the last decades the development and testing of commercial angiogenic inhibitors has been a central focus for both basic and clinical cancer research. While antiangiogenic drugs are now incorporated into standard clinical practice, as with all cancer therapies, tumors can eventually become resistant by employing a variety of strategies to receive nutrients and oxygen in the event of therapeutic assault. Herein, we concentrate and review in detail three of the principal mechanisms of antiangiogenic therapy escape: (1 upregulation of compensatory/alternative pathways for angiogenesis; (2 vasculogenic mimicry; and (3 vessel co-option. We suggest that an understanding of how a cancer cell adapts to antiangiogenic therapy may also parallel the mechanisms employed in the bourgeoning tumor and isolated metastatic cells delivering responsible for residual disease. Finally, we speculate on strategies to adapt antiangiogenic therapy for future clinical uses.

  4. Phenotypic mismatches reveal escape from arms-race coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T Hanifin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Because coevolution takes place across a broad scale of time and space, it is virtually impossible to understand its dynamics and trajectories by studying a single pair of interacting populations at one time. Comparing populations across a range of an interaction, especially for long-lived species, can provide insight into these features of coevolution by sampling across a diverse set of conditions and histories. We used measures of prey traits (tetrodotoxin toxicity in newts and predator traits (tetrodotoxin resistance of snakes to assess the degree of phenotypic mismatch across the range of their coevolutionary interaction. Geographic patterns of phenotypic exaggeration were similar in prey and predators, with most phenotypically elevated localities occurring along the central Oregon coast and central California. Contrary to expectations, however, these areas of elevated traits did not coincide with the most intense coevolutionary selection. Measures of functional trait mismatch revealed that over one-third of sampled localities were so mismatched that reciprocal selection could not occur given current trait distributions. Estimates of current locality-specific interaction selection gradients confirmed this interpretation. In every case of mismatch, predators were "ahead" of prey in the arms race; the converse escape of prey was never observed. The emergent pattern suggests a dynamic in which interacting species experience reciprocal selection that drives arms-race escalation of both prey and predator phenotypes at a subset of localities across the interaction. This coadaptation proceeds until the evolution of extreme phenotypes by predators, through genes of large effect, allows snakes to, at least temporarily, escape the arms race.

  5. Initiating a watch list for Ebola virus antibody escape mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin L.; Burke, Aran Z.; Martin, Kyle P.; Miura, Tanya A.; Wichman, Holly A.; Brown, Celeste J.

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa is the largest in recorded history and resulted in over 11,000 deaths. It is essential that strategies for treatment and containment be developed to avoid future epidemics of this magnitude. With the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapies using the envelope glycoprotein (GP) of the 1976 Mayinga strain, one important strategy is to anticipate how the evolution of EBOV might compromise these efforts. In this study we have initiated a watch list of potential antibody escape mutations of EBOV by modeling interactions between GP and the antibody KZ52. The watch list was generated using molecular modeling to estimate stability changes due to mutation. Every possible mutation of GP was considered and the list was generated from those that are predicted to disrupt GP-KZ52 binding but not to disrupt the ability of GP to fold and to form trimers. The resulting watch list contains 34 mutations (one of which has already been seen in humans) at six sites in the GP2 subunit. Should mutations from the watch list appear and spread during an epidemic, it warrants attention as these mutations may reflect an evolutionary response from the virus that could reduce the effectiveness of interventions such as vaccination. However, this watch list is incomplete and emphasizes the need for more experimental structures of EBOV interacting with antibodies in order to expand the watch list to other epitopes. We hope that this work provokes experimental research on evolutionary escape in both Ebola and other viral pathogens. PMID:26925318

  6. Initiating a watch list for Ebola virus antibody escape mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig R; Johnson, Erin L; Burke, Aran Z; Martin, Kyle P; Miura, Tanya A; Wichman, Holly A; Brown, Celeste J; Ytreberg, F Marty

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak in West Africa is the largest in recorded history and resulted in over 11,000 deaths. It is essential that strategies for treatment and containment be developed to avoid future epidemics of this magnitude. With the development of vaccines and antibody-based therapies using the envelope glycoprotein (GP) of the 1976 Mayinga strain, one important strategy is to anticipate how the evolution of EBOV might compromise these efforts. In this study we have initiated a watch list of potential antibody escape mutations of EBOV by modeling interactions between GP and the antibody KZ52. The watch list was generated using molecular modeling to estimate stability changes due to mutation. Every possible mutation of GP was considered and the list was generated from those that are predicted to disrupt GP-KZ52 binding but not to disrupt the ability of GP to fold and to form trimers. The resulting watch list contains 34 mutations (one of which has already been seen in humans) at six sites in the GP2 subunit. Should mutations from the watch list appear and spread during an epidemic, it warrants attention as these mutations may reflect an evolutionary response from the virus that could reduce the effectiveness of interventions such as vaccination. However, this watch list is incomplete and emphasizes the need for more experimental structures of EBOV interacting with antibodies in order to expand the watch list to other epitopes. We hope that this work provokes experimental research on evolutionary escape in both Ebola and other viral pathogens. PMID:26925318

  7. ESCAP holds expert group meeting on population issues facing adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This article summarizes the activities at the ESCAP Population Division Expert Group Meeting on Adolescents that was held during September-October 1997 in Bangkok, Thailand. The meeting was a follow-up to the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). The meeting considered 1) the ICPD recommendations; 2) the recommendations contained in the Jakarta Plan of Action on Human Resource Development; and 3) the Proposals for Action on Human Resources Development for Youth in Asia and the Pacific. Participants included about 25 people from Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The conference relied on 8 invited experts, two resource persons, advisors from the UNFPA Country Support Team for East and Southeast Asia, and representatives of UNFPA, the Population Council, and the East-West Center. A concern was the declining age of menarche of girls in the ESCAP region and the increasing age of marriage. During the time of menarche and marriage, girls are migrating and moving away from their family and community in rural areas. Family structure and relationships are changing. Increases are observed in adolescent premarital sexual activity, the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, teenage pregnancy, and abortion. The mass media and information technologies have both a positive and a negative influence on adolescents. Parent-child communication exchanges and teacher-student exchanges are "less than ideal." Old traditions and practices change slower than people change. Boys and girls are affected differently by the sociocultural and economic environment. The societal norms set expectations for behavior that may conflict with individual beliefs and practices. Changes brought by globalization and rapid economic growth provide greater opportunity for young girls and women to obtain employment and autonomy.

  8. The HIV-1 V3 domain on field isolates: participation in generation of escape virus in vivo and accessibility to neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Akerblom, L; Heegaard, P M;

    1995-01-01

    The V3 domain is highly variable and induces HIV neutralizing antibodies (NA). Here we addressed the issues of 1) the participation of mutations in V3 in generation of neutralization resistant escape virus in vivo and 2) the applicability of synthetic V3 peptides corresponding to field isolates...... to induce neutralizing immune sera. Seven peptides corresponding to the V3 region of primary and escape virus from 3 HIV-1 infected patients were synthesized and used for antibody (Abs) studies and immunizations. The anti-V3 Abs titre in patient serum was generally low against peptides corresponding...... to autologous virus isolated later than the serum sample in contrast to the titre against peptides corresponding to virus isolated earlier than the serum sample. Furthermore, neutralizing anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against V3 peptides from laboratory strains of HIV-1 showed distinct binding...

  9. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91%) and tissues (90%). RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis

  10. Loss of runt-related transcription factor 3 expression leads hepatocellular carcinoma cells to escape apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3 is known as a tumor suppressor gene for gastric cancer and other cancers, this gene may be involved in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Methods RUNX3 expression was analyzed by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry in HCC cells and tissues, respectively. Hep3B cells, lacking endogenous RUNX3, were introduced with RUNX3 constructs. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay and apoptosis was evaluated using DAPI staining. Apoptosis signaling was assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results RUNX3 protein expression was frequently inactivated in the HCC cell lines (91% and tissues (90%. RUNX3 expression inhibited 90 ± 8% of cell growth at 72 h in serum starved Hep3B cells. Forty-eight hour serum starvation-induced apoptosis and the percentage of apoptotic cells reached 31 ± 4% and 4 ± 1% in RUNX3-expressing Hep3B and control cells, respectively. Apoptotic activity was increased by Bim expression and caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation. Conclusion RUNX3 expression enhanced serum starvation-induced apoptosis in HCC cell lines. RUNX3 is deleted or weakly expressed in HCC, which leads to tumorigenesis by escaping apoptosis.

  11. Neuroethological validation of an experimental apparatus to evaluate oriented and non-oriented escape behaviours: Comparison between the polygonal arena with a burrow and the circular enclosure of an open-field test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Ullah, Farhad; Fisher, Isaac René; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of GABAergic neural inputs to dorsal columns of the periaqueductal grey matter (dPAG), posterior (PH) and dorsomedial (DMH) hypothalamic nuclei elicits distinct types of escape behavioural reactions. To differentiate between the variety and intensity of panic-related behaviours, the pattern of defensive behaviours evoked by blockade of GABAA receptors in the DMH, PH and dPAG were compared in a circular open-field test and in a recently designed polygonal arena. In the circular open-field, the defensive behaviours induced by microinjection of bicuculline into DMH and PH were characterised by defensive alertness behaviour and vertical jumps preceded by rearing exploratory behaviour. On the other hand, explosive escape responses interspersed with horizontal jumps and freezing were observed after the blockade of GABAA receptors on dPAG neurons. In the polygonal arena apparatus, the escape response produced by GABAergic inhibition of DMH and PH neurons was directed towards the burrow. In contrast, the blockade of GABAA receptors in dPAG evoked non-oriented escape behaviour characterised by vigorous running and horizontal jumps in the arena. Our findings support the hypothesis that the hypothalamic nuclei organise oriented escape behavioural responses whereas non-oriented escape is elaborated by dPAG neurons. Additionally, the polygonal arena with a burrow made it easy to discriminate and characterise these two different patterns of escape behavioural responses. In this sense, the polygonal arena with a burrow can be considered a good methodological tool to discriminate between these two different patterns of escape behavioural responses and is very useful as a new experimental animal model of panic attacks. PMID:26545831

  12. Neuroethological validation of an experimental apparatus to evaluate oriented and non-oriented escape behaviours: Comparison between the polygonal arena with a burrow and the circular enclosure of an open-field test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Ullah, Farhad; Fisher, Isaac René; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of GABAergic neural inputs to dorsal columns of the periaqueductal grey matter (dPAG), posterior (PH) and dorsomedial (DMH) hypothalamic nuclei elicits distinct types of escape behavioural reactions. To differentiate between the variety and intensity of panic-related behaviours, the pattern of defensive behaviours evoked by blockade of GABAA receptors in the DMH, PH and dPAG were compared in a circular open-field test and in a recently designed polygonal arena. In the circular open-field, the defensive behaviours induced by microinjection of bicuculline into DMH and PH were characterised by defensive alertness behaviour and vertical jumps preceded by rearing exploratory behaviour. On the other hand, explosive escape responses interspersed with horizontal jumps and freezing were observed after the blockade of GABAA receptors on dPAG neurons. In the polygonal arena apparatus, the escape response produced by GABAergic inhibition of DMH and PH neurons was directed towards the burrow. In contrast, the blockade of GABAA receptors in dPAG evoked non-oriented escape behaviour characterised by vigorous running and horizontal jumps in the arena. Our findings support the hypothesis that the hypothalamic nuclei organise oriented escape behavioural responses whereas non-oriented escape is elaborated by dPAG neurons. Additionally, the polygonal arena with a burrow made it easy to discriminate and characterise these two different patterns of escape behavioural responses. In this sense, the polygonal arena with a burrow can be considered a good methodological tool to discriminate between these two different patterns of escape behavioural responses and is very useful as a new experimental animal model of panic attacks.

  13. Modeling the endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides using a transmembrane pH gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Fatemeh; Abdo, Rania; Lindberg, Staffan; Hirose, Hisaaki; Futaki, Shiroh; Langel, Ulo; Gräslund, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can internalize into cells with covalently or non-covalently bound biologically active cargo molecules, which by themselves are not able to pass the cell membrane. Direct penetration and endocytosis are two main pathways suggested for the cellular uptake of CPPs. Cargo molecules which have entered the cell via an endocytotic pathway must be released from the endosome before degradation by enzymatic processes and endosomal acidification. Endosomal entrapment seems to be a major limitation in delivery of these molecules into the cytoplasm. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) asymmetrically introduced into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) was used to induce a pH gradient across the lipid bilayer. By measuring pH outside the LUVs, we observed light-induced proton pumping mediated by BR from the outside to the inside of the LUVs, creating an acidic pH inside the LUVs, similar to the late endosomes in vivo. Here we studied the background mechanism(s) of endosomal escape. 20% negatively charged LUVs were used as model endosomes with incorporated BR into the membrane and fluorescein-labeled CPPs entrapped inside the LUVs, together with a fluorescence quencher. The translocation of different CPPs in the presence of a pH gradient across the membrane was studied. The results show that the light-induced pH gradient induced by BR facilitates vesicle membrane translocation, particularly for the intermediately hydrophobic CPPs, and much less for hydrophilic CPPs. The presence of chloroquine inside the LUVs or addition of pyrenebutyrate outside the LUVs destabilizes the vesicle membrane, resulting in significant changes of the pH gradient across the membrane.

  14. Microenvironmental interactions in classical Hodgkin lymphoma and their role in promoting tumor growth, immune escape and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldinucci, Donatella; Celegato, Marta; Casagrande, Naike

    2016-09-28

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by few tumor cells surrounded by immune cells, fibroblasts, specialized mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial cells, representing together with their products an active part of the disease. Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells can secrete cytokines/chemokines and angiogenic factors capable of recruiting and/or inducing the proliferation of the surrounding cells and can also interact with distant sites of the microenvironment by secreting exosomes. To escape from a useful anti-tumor response due to the recognition by T and NK cells, HRS cells down-regulate HLA molecules, produce immune suppressive cytokines that inhibit cytotoxic responses, and induce an immunosuppressive phenotype on T lymphocytes and Monocytes. HRS cells survive, proliferate and are protected from the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy agents by soluble factors or by the direct contact with inflammatory and stromal cells of the tumor microenvironment (TME). A summary of the current knowledge about classical Hodgkin Lymphoma focusing on the cross-talk between tumor cells and the microenvironment leading to immune-escape, angiogenesis tumor growth/survival and drug resistance will be reviewed here. PMID:26474544

  15. Escape from transcriptional shutoff during poliovirus infection: NF-κB-responsive genes IκBa and A20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, Tammy; Sarnow, Peter

    2011-10-01

    It has been known for a long time that infection of cultured cells with poliovirus results in the overall inhibition of transcription of most host genes. We examined whether selected host genes can escape transcriptional inhibition by thiouridine marking newly synthesized host mRNAs during viral infection. Using cDNA microarrays hybridized to cDNAs made from thiolated mRNAs, a small set of host transcripts was identified and their expression verified by quantitative PCR and Northern and Western blot analyses. These transcripts were synthesized from genes that displayed enrichment for NF-κB binding sites in their promoter regions, suggesting that some NF-κB-regulated promoters can escape the virus-induced inhibition of transcription. In particular, two negative regulators of NF-κB, IκBa and A20, were upregulated during viral infection. Depletion of A20 enhanced viral RNA abundance and viral yield, arguing that cells respond to virus infection by counteracting NF-κB-induced proviral effects.

  16. Treatment of Escape-Maintained Behavior with Positive Reinforcement: The Role of Reinforcement Contingency and Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvarsson, Einar T.; Hanley, Gregory P.; Welter, Katherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional analyses suggested that the disruptive behavior of three preschool children was maintained by escape from demands. While keeping the escape contingency intact, we conducted (a) a density analysis in which the children earned preferred items for task completion according to two schedules that varied in reinforcement density, and (b) a…

  17. Anticipating and blocking HIV-1 escape by second generation antiviral shRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is an evolutionary conserved gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific breakdown of target mRNAs. RNAi can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by targeting the viral RNA genome. However, the error-prone replication machinery of HIV-1 can generate RNAi-resistant variants with specific mutations in the target sequence. For durable inhibition of HIV-1 replication the emergence of such escape viruses must be controlled. Here we present a strategy that anticipates HIV-1 escape by designing 2nd generation short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs that form a complete match with the viral escape sequences. Results To block the two favorite viral escape routes observed when the HIV-1 integrase gene sequence is targeted, the original shRNA inhibitor was combined with two 2nd generation shRNAs in a single lentiviral expression vector. We demonstrate in long-term viral challenge experiments that the two dominant viral escape routes were effectively blocked. Eventually, virus breakthrough did however occur, but HIV-1 evolution was skewed and forced to use new escape routes. Conclusion These results demonstrate the power of the 2nd generation RNAi concept. Popular viral escape routes are blocked by the 2nd generation RNAi strategy. As a consequence viral evolution was skewed leading to new escape routes. These results are of importance for a deeper understanding of HIV-1 evolution under RNAi pressure.

  18. Computer Self-Efficacy, Competitive Anxiety and Flow State: Escaping from Firing Online Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Pei-Yu, Chiu; Shih, Hsiao-Feng; Lin, Pei-Shin; Hong, Jon-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Flow state in game playing affected by computer self-efficacy and game competitive anxiety was studied. In order to examine the effect of those constructs with high competition, this study select "Escaping from firing online game" which require college students to escape from fire and rescue people and eliminate the fire damage along the way of…

  19. Competing Contingencies for Escape Behavior: Effects of Negative Reinforcement Magnitude and Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has shown that problem behavior maintained by social-negative reinforcement can be treated without escape extinction by enhancing the quality of positive reinforcement for an appropriate alternative response such as compliance. By contrast, negative reinforcement (escape) for compliance generally has been ineffective in the…

  20. 50 CFR Figure 13 to Part 223 - Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening 13 Figure 13 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND.... 223, Fig. 13 Figure 13 to Part 223—Single Grid Hard TED Escape Opening EC01JY91.060...

  1. 77 FR 28601 - Announcement of an Opportunity for Manufacturers and Designers of Closed Circuit Escape...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ...://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-03-08/pdf/2012-4691.pdf ), Approval Tests and Standards for Closed-Circuit Escape Respirators (CCERs) on March 8th 2012. This final rule revised and updated the requirements... Manufacturers and Designers of Closed Circuit Escape Respirators To Participate in Performance Testing Within...

  2. The use of an escape contingency and a token economy to increase food acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, SungWoo; Boscoe, James H; Byrne, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Escape (termination of a meal) and token-based differential reinforcement of alternative behavior were used as reinforcement to increase acceptance of food. Using a changing criterion design, the number of bites accepted and consumed was gradually increased to 15 bites per meal. These data suggest that, in some cases, escape may be a potent reinforcer for food acceptance. PMID:14596575

  3. The use of an escape contingency and a token economy to increase food acceptance.

    OpenAIRE

    Kahng, SungWoo; Boscoe, James H; Byrne, Shannon

    2003-01-01

    Escape (termination of a meal) and token-based differential reinforcement of alternative behavior were used as reinforcement to increase acceptance of food. Using a changing criterion design, the number of bites accepted and consumed was gradually increased to 15 bites per meal. These data suggest that, in some cases, escape may be a potent reinforcer for food acceptance.

  4. Plasma clouds and snowplows: Bulk plasma escape from Mars observed by MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Brain, D. A.; Ruhunusiri, S.; McFadden, J. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Mazelle, C.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Harada, Y.; Hara, T.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present initial Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) observations and preliminary interpretation of bulk plasma loss from Mars. MAVEN particle and field measurements show that planetary heavy ions derived from the Martian atmosphere can escape in the form of discrete coherent structures or "clouds." The ions in these clouds are unmagnetized or weakly magnetized, have velocities well above the escape speed, and lie directly downstream from magnetic field amplifications, suggesting a "snowplow" effect. This postulated escape process, similar to that successfully used to explain the dynamics of active gas releases in the solar wind and terrestrial magnetosheath, relies on momentum transfer from the shocked solar wind protons to the planetary heavy ions, with the electrons and magnetic field acting as intermediaries. Fluxes of planetary ions on the order of 107 cm-2 s-1 can escape by this process, and if it operates regularly, it could contribute 10-20% of the current ion escape from Mars.

  5. Photochemical escape of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere: new insights from MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, R. J.; Deighan, J.; Bougher, S. W.; Cravens, T.; Fox, J. L.; Lee, Y.; Rahmati, A.; McFadden, J. P.; Benna, M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Elrod, M. K.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Curry, S.; Gröller, H.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the primary goals of the MAVEN mission is to characterize rates of atmospheric escape from Mars at the present epoch and relate those escape rates to solar drivers. One of the known escape processes is photochemical escape, where a) an exothermic chemical reaction in the atmosphere results in an upward-traveling neutral particle whose velocity exceeds planetary escape velocity and b) the particle is not prevented from escaping through any subsequent collisions. Because escaping hot atoms are not directly measured, models of production and transport (through the atmosphere) of such atoms must be used to constrain photochemical escape rates. These models require altitude profiles of neutral densities and electron and ion densities and temperatures, as well as compositional information, all of which are measured by MAVEN instruments at the relevant altitudes (150-300 km). For every altitude profile: Profiles of O2+ dissociative recombination (DR) rates will be calculated from electron temperature, electron density and O2+ density. Profiles of energy distributions of hot O atoms will be calculated from profiles of electron and ion temperatures. Profiles of all neutral densities will be input into models of hot O transport in order to calculate photochemical escape fluxes from DR of O2+. We will present photochemical escape fluxes as a function of several factors, in particular solar zenith angle and EUV flux. This, combined with further simulations with progressively higher EUV fluxes, will eventually enable a total integrated loss estimate over the course of Martian history and hence a determination of the impact of this loss process on the evolution of the Martian climate.

  6. Modified guidance laws to escape microbursts with turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogan Atilla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces Modified Altitude- and Dive-Guidance laws for escaping a microburst with turbulence. The goal is to develop a procedure to estimate the highest altitude at which an aircraft can fly through a microburst without running into stall. First, a new metric is constructed that quantifies the aircraft upward force capability in a microburst encounter. In the absence of turbulence, the metric is shown to be a decreasing function of altitude. This suggests that descending to a low altitude may improve safety in the sense that the aircraft will have more upward force capability to maintain its altitude. In the presence of stochastic turbulence, the metric is treated as a random variable and its probability distribution function is analytically approximated as a function of altitude. This approximation allows us to determine the highest safe altitude at which the aircraft may descend, hence avoiding to descend too low. This highest safe altitude is used as the commanded altitude in Modified Altitude- and Dive-Guidance. Monte Carlo simulations show that these Modified Altitude- and Dive-Guidance strategies can decrease the probability of minimum altitude being lower than a given value without significantly increasing the probability of crash.

  7. Nosema Tolerant Honeybees (Apis mellifera Escape Parasitic Manipulation of Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kurze

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is not only pivotal for development, but also for pathogen defence in multicellular organisms. Although numerous intracellular pathogens are known to interfere with the host's apoptotic machinery to overcome this defence, its importance for host-parasite coevolution has been neglected. We conducted three inoculation experiments to investigate in the apoptotic respond during infection with the intracellular gut pathogen Nosema ceranae, which is considered as potential global threat to the honeybee (Apis mellifera and other bee pollinators, in sensitive and tolerant honeybees. To explore apoptotic processes in the gut epithelium, we visualised apoptotic cells using TUNEL assays and measured the relative expression levels of subset of candidate genes involved in the apoptotic machinery using qPCR. Our results suggest that N. ceranae reduces apoptosis in sensitive honeybees by enhancing inhibitor of apoptosis protein-(iap-2 gene transcription. Interestingly, this seems not be the case in Nosema tolerant honeybees. We propose that these tolerant honeybees are able to escape the manipulation of apoptosis by N. ceranae, which may have evolved a mechanism to regulate an anti-apoptotic gene as key adaptation for improved host invasion.

  8. ESCAPE. Energy Security and ClimAte Policy Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change and energy supply security policy are currently not integrated in most countries, despite possible synergies. The ESCAPE approach suggests that linking climate change policy with security of energy supply could improve climate change policy at both a national and international level. The report explores the interaction between policies of energy security and climate change and the options of inclusion of energy security issues into national and international post-2012 climate negotiations. It emphasises the importance of the US in this regard and takes a close look at US energy policy documents. It appears that current US energy policy is not directed towards reducing its reliance on imported fossil fuel, even though the government has a strong preference for this. This study shows that measures to reduce import dependency are mostly synergetic with climate policy and gives some options that can be implemented. On an international level, linkages of energy security into post-2012 climate policy may be possible in sectoral bottom-up approaches or technology frameworks. As well, inclusion of a security of supply criterion in international emission trading instruments may provide potential benefits

  9. Dynamical correlations in the escape strategy of Influenza A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taggi, L.; Colaiori, F.; Loreto, V.; Tria, F.

    2013-03-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of human Influenza A virus presents a challenging theoretical problem. An extremely high mutation rate allows the virus to escape, at each epidemic season, the host immune protection elicited by previous infections. At the same time, at each given epidemic season a single quasi-species, that is a set of closely related strains, is observed. A non-trivial relation between the genetic (i.e., at the sequence level) and the antigenic (i.e., related to the host immune response) distances can shed light into this puzzle. In this paper we introduce a model in which, in accordance with experimental observations, a simple interaction rule based on spatial correlations among point mutations dynamically defines an immunity space in the space of sequences. We investigate the static and dynamic structure of this space and we discuss how it affects the dynamics of the virus-host interaction. Interestingly we observe a staggered time structure in the virus evolution as in the real Influenza evolutionary dynamics.

  10. Escape of the martian protoatmosphere and initial water inventory

    CERN Document Server

    Erkaev, N V; Elkins-Tanton, L; Stökl, A; Odert, P; Marcq, E; Dorfi, E A; Kislyakova, K G; Kulikov, Yu N; Leitzinger, M; Güdel, M

    2013-01-01

    Latest research in planet formation indicate that Mars formed within a few million years (Myr) and remained a planetary embryo that never grew to a more massive planet. It can also be expected from dynamical models, that most of Mars' building blocks consisted of material that formed in orbital locations just beyond the ice line which could have contained ~0.1-0.2 wt. % of H2O. By using these constraints, we estimate the nebula-captured and catastrophically outgassed volatile contents during the solidification of Mars' magma ocean and apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model for the study of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven thermal escape of the martian protoatmosphere during the early active epoch of the young Sun. The amount of gas that has been captured from the protoplanetary disk into the planetary atmosphere is calculated by solving the hydrostatic structure equations in the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties such as the dust grain depletion factor, planetesimal...

  11. Orientia tsutsugamushi subverts dendritic cell functions by escaping from autophagy and impairing their migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hye Choi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DCs are the most potent antigen-presenting cells that link innate and adaptive immune responses, playing a pivotal role in triggering antigen-specific immunity. Antigen uptake by DCs induces maturational changes that include increased surface expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC and costimulatory molecules. In addition, DCs actively migrate to regional lymph nodes and activate antigen-specific naive T cells after capturing antigens. We characterize the functional changes of DCs infected with Orientia tsutsugamushi, the causative agent of scrub typhus, since there is limited knowledge of the role played by DCs in O. tsutsugamushi infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: O. tsutsugamushi efficiently infected bone marrow-derived DCs and induced surface expression of MHC II and costimulatory molecules. In addition, O. tsutsugamushi induced autophagy activation, but actively escaped from this innate defense system. Infected DCs also secreted cytokines and chemokines such as IL-6, IL-12, MCP5, MIP-1α, and RANTES. Furthermore, in vitro migration of DCs in the presence of a CCL19 gradient within a 3D collagen matrix was drastically impaired when infected with O. tsutsugamushi. The infected cells migrated much less efficiently into lymphatic vessels of ear dermis ex vivo when compared to LPS-stimulated DCs. In vivo migration of O. tsutsugamushi-infected DCs to regional lymph nodes was significantly impaired and similar to that of immature DCs. Finally, we found that MAP kinases involved in chemotactic signaling were differentially activated in O. tsutsugamushi-infected DCs. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that O. tsutsugamushi can target DCs to exploit these sentinel cells as replication reservoirs and delay or impair the functional maturation of DCs during the bacterial infection in mammals.

  12. H Escape Rates Inferred from MAVEN/IUVS Observations of the Mars Hydrogen Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael S.; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Deighan, Justin; Schneider, Nicholas M.; McClintock, William; Stewart, A. Ian F.; Thiemann, E. M.; Clarke, John T.; Holsclaw, Gregory; Jain, Sonal Kumar; Crismani, Matteo; Stiepen, Arnaud; Montmessin, Franck; Eparvier, Francis; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    H escape oxidizes and dessicates the Mars atmosphere and surface, providing a key control on the present-day chemistry and long-term evolution of the planet. Recently, large variations in the escape rate of H as a function of season have been reported by several studies, making continued observation of the variation a high priority. We present escape rates derived from Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) observations of the extended atmosphere of Mars at H Lyman alpha (121.6 nm), which must be interpreted with a coupled density/radiative transfer model owing to the optically thick nature of the emission and the small fraction of H present in the corona on escaping trajectories. We recover densities, temperatures, and escape rates under the assumption of spherical symmetry for multiple periods across MAVEN's mission so far, beginning in December 2014 (escape rates ~4e8/cm2/s). We describe the observed variation and compare it with previously observed seasonal variation in retrieved H escape rates, providing a necessary input for future photochemical modeling studies and estimates of water loss from Mars over its history.

  13. Reporter Assay for Endo/Lysosomal Escape of Toxin-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Gilabert-Oriol

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters—horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa and ricin A-chain (RTA—were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates—saporin-HRP, Alexasaporin and saporin-KQ-RTA—were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of Alexasaporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10–1000 nM.

  14. Quantifying the impact of human immunodeficiency virus-1 escape from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich D Kadolsky

    Full Text Available HIV-1 escape from the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL response leads to a weakening of viral control and is likely to be detrimental to the patient. To date, the impact of escape on viral load and CD4(+ T cell count has not been quantified, primarily because of sparse longitudinal data and the difficulty of separating cause and effect in cross-sectional studies. We use two independent methods to quantify the impact of HIV-1 escape from CTLs in chronic infection: mathematical modelling of escape and statistical analysis of a cross-sectional cohort. Mathematical modelling revealed a modest increase in log viral load of 0.051 copies ml(-1 per escape event. Analysis of the cross-sectional cohort revealed a significant positive association between viral load and the number of "escape events", after correcting for length of infection and rate of replication. We estimate that a single CTL escape event leads to a viral load increase of 0.11 log copies ml(-1 (95% confidence interval: 0.040-0.18, consistent with the predictions from the mathematical modelling. Overall, the number of escape events could only account for approximately 6% of the viral load variation in the cohort. Our findings indicate that although the loss of the CTL response for a single epitope results in a highly statistically significant increase in viral load, the biological impact is modest. We suggest that this small increase in viral load is explained by the small growth advantage of the variant relative to the wildtype virus. Escape from CTLs had a measurable, but unexpectedly low, impact on viral load in chronic infection.

  15. The impact of escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. on catch statistics in Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren M Green

    Full Text Available In Scotland and elsewhere, there are concerns that escaped farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. may impact on wild salmon stocks. Potential detrimental effects could arise through disease spread, competition, or inter-breeding. We investigated whether there is evidence of a direct effect of recorded salmon escape events on wild stocks in Scotland using anglers' counts of caught salmon (classified as wild or farmed and sea trout (Salmo trutta L.. This tests specifically whether documented escape events can be associated with reduced or elevated escapes detected in the catch over a five-year time window, after accounting for overall variation between areas and years. Alternate model frameworks were somewhat inconsistent, however no robust association was found between documented escape events and higher proportion of farm-origin salmon in anglers' catch, nor with overall catch size. A weak positive correlation was found between local escapes and subsequent sea trout catch. This is in the opposite direction to what would be expected if salmon escapes negatively affected wild fish numbers. Our approach specifically investigated documented escape events, contrasting with earlier studies examining potentially wider effects of salmon farming on wild catch size. This approach is more conservative, but alleviates some potential sources of confounding, which are always of concern in observational studies. Successful analysis of anglers' reports of escaped farmed salmon requires high data quality, particularly since reports of farmed salmon are a relatively rare event in the Scottish data. Therefore, as part of our analysis, we reviewed studies of potential sensitivity and specificity of determination of farmed origin. Specificity estimates are generally high in the literature, making an analysis of the form we have performed feasible.

  16. Ultra-fast escape maneuver of an octopus-inspired robot

    CERN Document Server

    Weymouth, G D; Triantafyllou, M S

    2014-01-01

    We design and test an octopus-inspired flexible hull robot that demonstrates outstanding fast-starting performance. The robot is hyper-inflated with water, and then rapidly deflates to expel the fluid so as to power the escape maneuver. Using this robot we verify for the first time in laboratory testing that rapid size-change can be used to induce separation elimination in bluff bodies travelling several body lengths, and recover fluid energy which can be employed to improve the propulsive performance. The robot is found to experience extraordinary speeds, over ten body lengths per second, exceeding that of a similarly propelled optimally streamlined rigid rocket. The net thrust force on the robot is over 30\\% \\textit{larger} than the theoretical value for a rocket in vacuo, resulting in the rapid acceleration. Finally, over 53\\% of the initial energy is converted into payload kinetic energy, a performance that exceeds the estimated energy conversion efficiency of fast-starting fish. The Reynolds number based...

  17. Differentiation of Human Malignant Melanoma Cells that Escape Apoptosis After Treatment with 9-Nitrocamptothecin In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panayotis Pantazis

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available After in-vitro exposure to 0.05 μmol/L 9-nitrocamptothecin (9NC for periods of time longer than 5 days, 65% to 80% of the human malignant melanoma SB1 B cells die by apoptosis, whereas the remaining cells are arrested at the G2-phase of the cell cycle. Upon discontinuation of exposure to 9NC the G2-arrested cells resume cell cycling or remain arrested depending on the duration of 9NC exposure. In contrast to cycling malignant cells, the cells irreversibly arrested at G2 exhibit features of normal-like cells, the melanocytes, as assessed by the appearance of dendrite-like structures; loss of proliferative activity; synthesis of the characteristic pigment, melanin; and, particularly, loss of tumorigenic ability after xenografting in immunodeficient mice. Further, the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16 is upregulated in the 9NC-treated, G1-arrested, but downregulated in density G1-arrested cells, whereas the reverse is observed in the expression of another cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21. These results suggest that malignant melanoma SB1B cells that escape 9NC-induced death by apoptosis undergo differentiation toward nonmalignant, normal-like cells.

  18. Water Vapor Permeability of the Advanced Crew Escape Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant; Kuzneth, Larry; Gillis, David; Jones, Jeffery; Daniel, Brian; Gernhardt, Michael; Hamilton, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) crewmembers are expected to return to earth wearing a suit similar to the current Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES). To ensure optimum cognitive performance, suited crewmembers must maintain their core body temperature within acceptable limits. There are currently several options for thermal maintenance in the post-landing phase. These include the current baseline, which uses an ammonia boiler, purge flow using oxygen in the suit, accessing sea water for liquid cooling garment (LCG) cooling and/or relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit. These options vary significantly in mass, power, engineering and safety factors, with relying on the evaporative cooling capacity of the suit being the least difficult to implement. Data from previous studies indicates that the evaporative cooling capacity of the ACES was much higher than previously expected, but subsequent tests were performed for longer duration and higher metabolic rates to better define the water vapor permeability of the ACES. In these tests five subjects completed a series of tests performing low to moderate level exercise in order to control for a target metabolic rate while wearing the ACES in an environmentally controlled thermal chamber. Four different metabolic profiles at a constant temperature of 95 F and relative humidity of 50% were evaluated. These tests showed subjects were able to reject about twice as much heat in the permeable ACES as they were in an impermeable suit that had less thermal insulation. All of the heat rejection differential is attributed to the increased evaporation capability through the Gortex bladder of the suit.

  19. Fractional extension of Kramers rate and barrier escaping from metastable potential well

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Chun-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The reactive process of barrier escaping from the metastable potential well is studied together with the extension of Kramers' rate formula to the fractional case. Characteristic quantities are computed for an thimbleful of insight into the near barrier escaping and recrossing dynamics. Where the stationary transmission coefficient is revealed to be larger than the usual cases which implies less barrier recrossing. And the non-monotonic varying of it reveals a close dependence to the fractional exponent $\\alpha$. In most cases, the near barrier behavior of the escaping dynamics is equivalent to the diffusion in the two-dimensional non-Ohmic damping system.

  20. The calculation of the resonance escape factor of helium for Lorentzian and Voigt profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jian [School of Science, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China)]. E-mail: hejian405@163.com; Zhang Qingguo [School of Science, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471003 (China)

    2006-11-27

    The resonance escape factors of helium 10830.34 A, 10830.25 A and 10829.08 A that making up the 10830 A emission lines are calculated, for both Lorentzian profile and Voigt profile. The total number of absorbing atoms in the ground state is calculated. The dependence of the escape factors on the optical depth in the line center is considered. The resonance escape factors of helium 3889 and 3118 emission lines are discussed also. This calculation is useful in the research on the helium in the sun and remote stars from the helium emission lines.

  1. Mean Exit Time and Escape Probability for a Tumor Growth System under Non-Gaussian Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Jian; Gao, Ting; Kan, Xingye; Duan, Jinqiao

    2011-01-01

    Effects of non-Gaussian $\\alpha-$stable L\\'evy noise on the Gompertz tumor growth model are quantified by considering the mean exit time and escape probability of the cancer cell density from inside a safe or benign domain. The mean exit time and escape probability problems are formulated in a differential-integral equation with a fractional Laplacian operator. Numerical simulations are conducted to evaluate how the mean exit time and escape probability vary or bifurcates when $\\alpha$ changes. Some bifurcation phenomena are observed and their impacts are discussed.

  2. 78 FR 20388 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision that Nonconforming 2007 Ford Escape Multi-Purpose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-04

    ... Nonconforming 2007 Ford Escape Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicles are Eligible for Importation AGENCY: National... nonconforming 2007 Ford Escape Multi-Purpose Passenger Vehicles that were not originally manufactured to comply... safety standards (the U.S.-certified version of the same 2007 Ford Escape Multi-Purpose...

  3. CTL escape mediated by proteasomal destruction of an HIV-1 cryptic epitope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Cardinaud

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs play a critical role in controlling viral infections. HIV-infected individuals develop CTL responses against epitopes derived from viral proteins, but also against cryptic epitopes encoded by viral alternative reading frames (ARF. We studied here the mechanisms of HIV-1 escape from CTLs targeting one such cryptic epitope, Q9VF, encoded by an HIVgag ARF and presented by HLA-B*07. Using PBMCs of HIV-infected patients, we first cloned and sequenced proviral DNA encoding for Q9VF. We identified several polymorphisms with a minority of proviruses encoding at position 5 an aspartic acid (Q9VF/5D and a majority encoding an asparagine (Q9VF/5N. We compared the prevalence of each variant in PBMCs of HLA-B*07+ and HLA-B*07- patients. Proviruses encoding Q9VF/5D were significantly less represented in HLA-B*07+ than in HLA-B*07- patients, suggesting that Q9FV/5D encoding viruses might be under selective pressure in HLA-B*07+ individuals. We thus analyzed ex vivo CTL responses directed against Q9VF/5D and Q9VF/5N. Around 16% of HLA-B*07+ patients exhibited CTL responses targeting Q9VF epitopes. The frequency and the magnitude of CTL responses induced with Q9VF/5D or Q9VF/5N peptides were almost equal indicating a possible cross-reactivity of the same CTLs on the two peptides. We then dissected the cellular mechanisms involved in the presentation of Q9VF variants. As expected, cells infected with HIV strains encoding for Q9VF/5D were recognized by Q9VF/5D-specific CTLs. In contrast, Q9VF/5N-encoding strains were neither recognized by Q9VF/5N- nor by Q9VF/5D-specific CTLs. Using in vitro proteasomal digestions and MS/MS analysis, we demonstrate that the 5N variation introduces a strong proteasomal cleavage site within the epitope, leading to a dramatic reduction of Q9VF epitope production. Our results strongly suggest that HIV-1 escapes CTL surveillance by introducing mutations leading to HIV ARF-epitope destruction by proteasomes.

  4. Action and mechanism of Fas and Fas ligand in immune escape of gallbladder carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ning Xu; Sheng-Quan Zou; Jian-Ming Wang

    2005-01-01

    in Nevin Ⅳ-Ⅴ carcinoma (t = 1.42, P>0.05). Apoptosis of infiltrating lymphocytes was not discovered in adenoma and chronic cholecystitis. CONCLUSION: FasL expressed in gallbladder carcinoma cells permits tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance of organism by inducing apoptosis in infiltrating lymphocytes of carcinoma tissues. Up-regulation of FasL expression plays an important role in invasive depth, histological classification and metastasis of gallbladder carcinoma.

  5. Escape rate for a quantum particle moving in a time-periodic rapidly oscillating potential: a time-independent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2012-05-01

    We explore, in the quantum regime, the stochastic dynamics of a time-periodic, rapidly oscillating potential (having a characteristic frequency of ω) within the framework of a time-dependent system-reservoir Hamiltonian. We invoke the idea of a quantum gauge transformation in light of the standard Floquet theorem in an attempt to construct a Langevin equation (bearing a time-independent effective potential) by employing a systematic perturbative expansion in powers of ω^{-1} using the natural time-scale separation. The time-independent effective potential (corrected to ω^{-2} in leading order) that acts on the slow motion of the driven particle can be employed for trapping. We proceed further to evaluate the rate of escape of the driven particle from the metastable state in the high-temperature limit. We also envisage a resonance phenomena, a true hallmark of the system-reservoir quantization. This development would thus serve as a model template to investigate the trapping mechanism, as well as an appropriate analog to understand the dynamics of a fluctuation-induced escape process from the trap. PMID:23004698

  6. Reduced transcapillary escape of albumin during acute blood pressure-lowering in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parving, H H; Kastrup, J; Smidt, U M

    1985-01-01

    The effect of acute arterial blood pressure lowering upon albumin extravasation was studied in 10 patients with nephropathy and retinopathy due to long-standing Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. The following variables were measured: transcapillary escape rate of albumin (initial disappearance...... induced the following changes: arterial blood pressure decreased from 134/87 to 107/73 mmHg (p less than 0.01), transcapillary escape rate of albumin declined from 8.1 to 6.7% of the intravascular mass of albumin/h (p less than 0.01), albuminuria diminished from 1434 to 815 micrograms/min (p less than 0.......01), and plasma volume raised slightly from 2916 to 2995 ml (p less than 0.05). Our findings demonstrate that the enhanced albumin passage through the wall of the microvasculature characteristically found in long-term Type 1 diabetic patients with clinical microangiopathy is pressure-dependent to a large extent...

  7. Filamentary Infall of Cold Gas and Escape of Lyman Alpha and Hydrogen Ionizing Radiation from an Interacting High-Redshift Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Rauch, Michael; Haehnelt, Martin G; Gauthier, Jean-Rene; Ravindranath, Swara; Sargent, Wallace L W

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of a peculiar Lyman alpha-emitting galaxy at redshift 3.344, discovered in a deep, blind spectroscopic survey for faint Lyman alpha emitters with the Magellan II telescope in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF). The galaxy exhibits complex Lyman alpha emission, including an extended, asymmetric component that is partially suppressed by damped Lyman alpha absorption, and two spatially elongated, narrow emission features. Archival HST ACS imaging shows evidence for tidal disruption of the stellar component. This V=27 galaxy appears to give us unprecedented insights into two fundamental stages in the formation of structure at high redshift: the inflow of gas into ordinary galaxies, and the escape of ionizing radiation into the intergalactic medium. Neutral hydrogen, falling in partly in form of a narrow filament, appears to emit fluorescent Lyman alpha photons induced by the stellar ionizing flux escaping from the disturbed galaxy. The in-falling material may represent primary cold accreti...

  8. Mitochondrial DNA that escapes from autophagy causes inflammation and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takafumi; Hikoso, Shungo; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Taneike, Manabu; Takeda, Toshihiro; Tamai, Takahito; Oyabu, Jota; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Akira, Shizuo; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Komuro, Issei; Otsu, Kinya

    2012-05-10

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. Although infection with microorganisms is not involved in the development of heart failure in most cases, inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure. However, the mechanisms responsible for initiating and integrating inflammatory responses within the heart remain poorly defined. Mitochondria are evolutionary endosymbionts derived from bacteria and contain DNA similar to bacterial DNA. Mitochondria damaged by external haemodynamic stress are degraded by the autophagy/lysosome system in cardiomyocytes. Here we show that mitochondrial DNA that escapes from autophagy cell-autonomously leads to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9-mediated inflammatory responses in cardiomyocytes and is capable of inducing myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Cardiac-specific deletion of lysosomal deoxyribonuclease (DNase) II showed no cardiac phenotypes under baseline conditions, but increased mortality and caused severe myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy 10 days after treatment with pressure overload. Early in the pathogenesis, DNase II-deficient hearts showed infiltration of inflammatory cells and increased messenger RNA expression of inflammatory cytokines, with accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deposits in autolysosomes in the myocardium. Administration of inhibitory oligodeoxynucleotides against TLR9, which is known to be activated by bacterial DNA, or ablation of Tlr9 attenuated the development of cardiomyopathy in DNase II-deficient mice. Furthermore, Tlr9 ablation improved pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction and inflammation even in mice with wild-type Dnase2a alleles. These data provide new perspectives on the mechanism of genesis of chronic inflammation in failing hearts.

  9. Ceramide formation mediated by acid sphingomyelinase facilitates endosomal escape of caliciviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanna, Vinay; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2015-09-01

    Our recent results demonstrated that bile acids facilitate virus escape from the endosomes into the cytoplasm for successful replication of porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC). We report a novel finding that bile acids can be substituted by cold treatment for endosomal escape and virus replication. This endosomal escape by cold treatment or bile acids is associated with ceramide formation by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). ASM catalyzes hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide, which is known to destabilize lipid bilayer. Treatment of LLC-PK cells with bile acids or cold led to ceramide formation, and small molecule antagonists or siRNA of ASM blocked ceramide formation in the endosomes and significantly reduced PEC replication. Inhibition of ASM resulted in the retention of PEC, feline calicivirus or murine norovirus in the endosomes in correlation with reduced viral replication. These results suggest the importance of viral escape from the endosomes for the replication of various caliciviruses. PMID:25985440

  10. Sensitivity to initial conditions, entropy production, and escape rate at the onset of chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, Miguel Angel, E-mail: fuentesm@santafe.edu [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro and CONICET, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Center for Advanced Studies in Ecology and Biodiversity, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 114-D, Santiago CP 6513677 (Chile); Sato, Yuzuru [Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Tsallis, Constantino, E-mail: tsallis@cbpf.br [Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro-RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-01

    We analytically link three properties of nonlinear dynamical systems, namely sensitivity to initial conditions, entropy production, and escape rate, in z-logistic maps for both positive and zero Lyapunov exponents. We unify these relations at chaos, where the Lyapunov exponent is positive, and at its onset, where it vanishes. Our result unifies, in particular, two already known cases, namely (i) the standard entropy rate in the presence of escape, valid for exponential functionality rates with strong chaos, and (ii) the Pesin-like identity with no escape, valid for the power-law behavior present at points such as the Feigenbaum one. -- Highlights: → We study sensitivity, entropy production and escape rate. → We focus on one-dimensional simple nonlinear maps. → We discuss both strong and weak chaos. → Our results unify two cases that are already known in the literature. → The results are consistent with nonextensive statistics.

  11. Escaping the poverty trap: modeling the interplay between economic growth and the ecology of infectious disease

    CERN Document Server

    Goerg, Georg M; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Althouse, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics of economies and infectious disease are inexorably linked: economic well-being influences health (sanitation, nutrition, treatment capacity, etc.) and health influences economic well-being (labor productivity lost to sickness and disease). Often societies are locked into ``poverty traps'' of poor health and poor economy. Here, using a simplified coupled disease-economic model with endogenous capital growth we demonstrate the formation of poverty traps, as well as ways to escape them. We suggest two possible mechanisms of escape both motivated by empirical data: one, through an influx of capital (development aid), and another through changing the percentage of GDP spent on healthcare. We find that a large influx of capital is successful in escaping the poverty trap, but increasing health spending alone is not. Our results demonstrate that escape from a poverty trap may be possible, and carry important policy implications in the world-wide distribution of aid and within-country healthcare spending.

  12. Escape of photons from two fixed extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Daniel; Sánchez-Hernández, Manuel; 10.1103/PhysRevD.78.104024

    2008-01-01

    We study the scattering of light (null geodesics) by two fixed extreme Reissner-Nordstr\\"om black holes, in which the gravitational attraction of their masses is exactly balanced with the electrostatic repulsion of their charges, allowing a static spacetime. We identify the set of unstable periodic orbits that constitute the fractal repeller that completely describes the chaotic escape dynamics of photons. In the framework of periodic orbit theory, the analysis of the linear stability of the unstable periodic orbits is used to obtain the main quantities of chaos that characterize the escape dynamics of the photons scattered by the black holes. In particular, the escape rate which is compared with the result obtained from numerical simulations that consider statistical ensembles of photons. We also analyze the dynamics of photons in the proximity of a perturbed black hole and give an analytical estimation for the escape rate in this system.

  13. Pizza or Pancake? Formation Models of Gas Escape Biosignatures in Terrestrial and Martian Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Fairen, A. G.; Baker, L.; McKay, C. P.; Willson, D.

    2016-05-01

    Fine-grained sedimentary hollowed structures were imaged in Gale Crater, but no biomarkers identified to support biology. Our observation-based (gas escape) terrestrial model could inform on possible martian paleoenvironments at time of formation.

  14. The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, R

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region including southeast and south Asian countries and the Pacific island of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Samoa, and the Solomon Islands is discussed in terms of mobility transition and origin and destination factors. The changing patterns of mobility in Asia are further delineated in the discussion of internal movements and international movement. Emigration in the smaller countries of the Pacific are treated separately. Future predictions are that the Asia Pacific region will experience continued fertility decline and stabilization of low rates over the next 20 years. The declines will result in slow labor force growth, and increased demand for labor in traditional core and neocore countries as defined and presented in table form by Friedman will be heightened. International movements are likely to increase in large urban areas within destination countries. Tokyo and Singapore are the principal cities in Asia. Tokyo by restrictive government policy has limited immigration, but future labor shortages of unskilled labor from southeast Asia and China are expected. Singapore is already dependent on foreign labor by 10%. Current labor shortages have led to the creation of a growth triangle between Singapore, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Other cities expected to emerge as primary cities in international regional complexes with spillover into the hinterlands include the Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Macau triangle in the Pearl River delta, Taipei and Seoul, and possibly Kuala Lumpur. Internal migration is expected to increase in the capital cities of Bangkok, Manila,j and centers such as Shanghai, Beijing, and other large cities of southeast Asia. These cities will be linked through the flows of skilled international migrants, which began in the 1960s and is expected to become a future major flow. Recreational and resource niches will be left in much of the Pacific, the Himalayan Kingdoms, and

  15. The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeldon, R

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between migration and development in the ESCAP region including southeast and south Asian countries and the Pacific island of Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu, Kiribati, Samoa, and the Solomon Islands is discussed in terms of mobility transition and origin and destination factors. The changing patterns of mobility in Asia are further delineated in the discussion of internal movements and international movement. Emigration in the smaller countries of the Pacific are treated separately. Future predictions are that the Asia Pacific region will experience continued fertility decline and stabilization of low rates over the next 20 years. The declines will result in slow labor force growth, and increased demand for labor in traditional core and neocore countries as defined and presented in table form by Friedman will be heightened. International movements are likely to increase in large urban areas within destination countries. Tokyo and Singapore are the principal cities in Asia. Tokyo by restrictive government policy has limited immigration, but future labor shortages of unskilled labor from southeast Asia and China are expected. Singapore is already dependent on foreign labor by 10%. Current labor shortages have led to the creation of a growth triangle between Singapore, Indonesia, and Malaysia. Other cities expected to emerge as primary cities in international regional complexes with spillover into the hinterlands include the Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Macau triangle in the Pearl River delta, Taipei and Seoul, and possibly Kuala Lumpur. Internal migration is expected to increase in the capital cities of Bangkok, Manila,j and centers such as Shanghai, Beijing, and other large cities of southeast Asia. These cities will be linked through the flows of skilled international migrants, which began in the 1960s and is expected to become a future major flow. Recreational and resource niches will be left in much of the Pacific, the Himalayan Kingdoms, and

  16. Parameterizing Convective Organization to Escape the Entrainment Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian; Neale, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Lateral mixing parameters in buoyancy-driven deep convection schemes are among the most sensitive and important unknowns in atmosphere models. Unfortunately, there is not a true optimum value for plume mixing rate, but rather a dilemma or tradeoff: Excessive dilution of updrafts leads to unstable stratification bias in the mean state, while inadequate dilution allows deep convection to occur too easily, causing poor space and time distributions and variability. In this too-small parameter space, compromises are made based on competing metrics of model performance. We attempt to escape this “entrainment dilemma” by making bulk plume parameters (chiefly entrainment rate) depend on a new prognostic variable (“organization,” org) meant to reflect the rectified effects of subgrid-scale structure in meteorological fields. We test an org scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with a new unified shallow-deep convection scheme (UW-ens, a 2-plume version of the University of Washington scheme). Since buoyant ascent involves natural selection, subgrid structure makes convection systematically deeper and stronger than the pure unorganized case: plumes of average (or randomly sampled) air rising in the average environment. To reflect this, org is nonnegative, but we leave it dimensionless. A time scale characterizes its behavior (here ˜3 h for a 2o model). Currently its source is rain evaporation, but other sources can be added easily. We also let org be horizontally transported by advection, as a mass-weighted mean over the convecting layer. Linear coefficients link org to a plume ensemble, which it assists via: 1) plume base warmth above the mean temperature 2) plume radius enhancement (reduced mixing), and 3) increased probability of overlap in a multi-plume scheme, where interactions benefit later generations (this part has only been implemented in an offline toy column model). Since rain evaporation is a source for org, it functions as a time-lagged but

  17. Progesterone After Estradiol Modulates Shuttle-Cage Escape by Facilitating Volition

    OpenAIRE

    Mayeaux, Darryl J.; Tandle, Sarah M.; Cilano, Sean M.; Fitzharris, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    In animal models of depression, depression is defined as performance on a learning task. That task is typically escaping a mild electric shock in a shuttle cage by moving from one side of the cage to the other. Ovarian hormones influence learning in other kinds of tasks, and these hormones are associated with depressive symptoms in humans. The role of these hormones in shuttle-cage escape learning, however, is less clear. This study manipulated estradiol and progesterone in ovariectomized fem...

  18. Inhibition of chaotic escape from a potential well using small parametric modulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown theoretically for the first time that, depending on its period, amplitude, and initial phase, a periodic parametric modulation can suppress a chaotic escape from a potential well. The instance of the Helmholtz oscillator is used to demonstrate, by means of Melnikov close-quote s method, that parametric modulations of the linear or quadratic potential terms inhibit chaotic escape when certain resonance conditions are met. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. CRISPR-Cas9 Can Inhibit HIV-1 Replication but NHEJ Repair Facilitates Virus Escape

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Gang; Zhao, Na; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T.

    2016-01-01

    Several recent studies demonstrated that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease Cas9 can be used for guide RNA (gRNA)-directed, sequence-specific cleavage of HIV proviral DNA in infected cells. We here demonstrate profound inhibition of HIV-1 replication by harnessing T cells with Cas9 and antiviral gRNAs. However, the virus rapidly and consistently escaped from this inhibition. Sequencing of the HIV-1 escape variants revealed nucleotide...

  20. Swimming and escape behavior of copepod nauplii: implications for predator-prey interactions among copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titelman, Josefin

    2001-01-01

    This study focuses on how prey behavior may affect predation risk through encounter rates and the escape success of the prey given an encounter. Temora longicornis nauplii require stronger hydrodynamic signals to elicit escape than Acartia tonsa nauplii (critical fluid deformation rates, Delta* o...... behavior of A. tonsa acts predominantly at the post-encounter stage where its sensitivity to hydrodynamic signals (i,e., low Delta*) effectively compensates for the high predator encounter rate generated by its motility....

  1. Choices between positive and negative reinforcement during treatment for escape-maintained behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    DeLeon, I G; Neidert, P L; Anders, B M; Rodriguez-Catter, V

    2001-01-01

    Positive reinforcement was more effective than negative reinforcement in promoting compliance and reducing escape-maintained problem behavior for a child with autism. Escape extinction was then added while the child was given a choice between positive or negative reinforcement for compliance and the reinforcement schedule was thinned. When the reinforcement requirement reached 10 consecutive tasks, the treatment effects became inconsistent and reinforcer selection shifted from a strong prefer...

  2. Escape-Route Planning of Underground Coal Mine Based on Improved Ant Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwei Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When a mine disaster occurs, to lessen disaster losses and improve survival chances of the trapped miners, good escape routes need to be found and used. Based on the improved ant algorithm, we proposed a new escape-route planning method of underground mines. At first, six factors which influence escape difficulty are evaluated and a weight calculation model is built to form a weighted graph of the underground tunnels. Then an improved ant algorithm is designed and used to find good escape routes. We proposed a tunnel network zoning method to improve the searching efficiency of the ant algorithm. We use max-min ant system method to optimize the meeting strategy of ants and improve the performance of the ant algorithm. In addition, when a small part of the mine tunnel network changes, the system may fix the optimal routes and avoid starting a new processing procedure. Experiments show that the proposed method can find good escape routes efficiently and can be used in the escape-route planning of large and medium underground coal mines.

  3. Quantifying the Escape Mortality of Trawl Caught Antarctic Krill (Euphausia superba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Bjørn A.; Krag, Ludvig A.; Engås, Arill; Nordrum, Sigve; Bruheim, Inge; Herrmann, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is an abundant fishery resource, the harvest levels of which are expected to increase. However, many of the length classes of krill can escape through commonly used commercial trawl mesh sizes. A vital component of the overall management of a fishery is to estimate the total fishing mortality and quantify the mortality rate of individuals that escape from fishing gear. The methods for determining fishing mortality in krill are still poorly developed. We used a covered codend sampling technique followed by onboard observations made in holding tanks to monitor mortality rates of escaped krill. Haul duration, hydrological conditions, maximum fishing depth and catch composition all had no significant effect on mortality of krill escaping 16 mm mesh size nets, nor was any further mortality associated with the holding tank conditions. A non- parametric Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to model the relationship between mortality rates of escapees and time. There was a weak tendency, though not significant, for smaller individuals to suffer higher mortality than larger individuals. The mortality of krill escaping the trawl nets in our study was 4.4 ± 4.4%, suggesting that krill are fairly tolerant of the capture-and-escape process in trawls. PMID:27622510

  4. Quantifying the Escape Mortality of Trawl Caught Antarctic Krill (Euphausia superba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Bjørn A; Krag, Ludvig A; Engås, Arill; Nordrum, Sigve; Bruheim, Inge; Herrmann, Bent

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is an abundant fishery resource, the harvest levels of which are expected to increase. However, many of the length classes of krill can escape through commonly used commercial trawl mesh sizes. A vital component of the overall management of a fishery is to estimate the total fishing mortality and quantify the mortality rate of individuals that escape from fishing gear. The methods for determining fishing mortality in krill are still poorly developed. We used a covered codend sampling technique followed by onboard observations made in holding tanks to monitor mortality rates of escaped krill. Haul duration, hydrological conditions, maximum fishing depth and catch composition all had no significant effect on mortality of krill escaping 16 mm mesh size nets, nor was any further mortality associated with the holding tank conditions. A non- parametric Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to model the relationship between mortality rates of escapees and time. There was a weak tendency, though not significant, for smaller individuals to suffer higher mortality than larger individuals. The mortality of krill escaping the trawl nets in our study was 4.4 ± 4.4%, suggesting that krill are fairly tolerant of the capture-and-escape process in trawls. PMID:27622510

  5. Lobelia siphilitica plants that escape herbivory in time also have reduced latex production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Parachnowitsch

    Full Text Available Flowering phenology is an important determinant of a plant's reproductive success. Both assortative mating and niche construction can result in the evolution of correlations between phenology and other reproductive, functional, and life history traits. Correlations between phenology and herbivore defence traits are particularly likely because the timing of flowering can allow a plant to escape herbivory. To test whether herbivore escape and defence are correlated, we estimated phenotypic and genetic correlations between flowering phenology and latex production in greenhouse-grown Lobelia siphilitica L. (Lobeliaceae. Lobelia siphilitica plants that flower later escape herbivory by a specialist pre-dispersal seed predator, and thus should invest fewer resources in defence. Consistent with this prediction, we found that later flowering was phenotypically and genetically correlated with reduced latex production. To test whether herbivore escape and latex production were costly, we also measured four fitness correlates. Flowering phenology was negatively genetically correlated with three out of four fitness estimates, suggesting that herbivore escape can be costly. In contrast, we did not find evidence for costs of latex production. Generally, our results suggest that herbivore escape and defence traits will not evolve independently in L. siphilitica.

  6. Orbital and escape dynamics in barred galaxies - I. The 2D system

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Christof

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use the two-dimensional (2D) version of a new analytical gravitational model in order to explore the orbital as well as the escape dynamics of the stars in a barred galaxy composed of a spherically symmetric central nucleus, a bar, a flat disk and a dark matter halo component. A thorough numerical investigation is conducted for distinguishing between bounded and escaping motion. Furthermore bounded orbits are further classified into non-escaping regular and trapped chaotic using the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method. Our aim is to determine the basins of escape through the two symmetrical escape channels around the Lagrange points $L_2$ and $L_3$ and also to relate them with the corresponding distribution of the escape rates of the orbits. We integrate initial conditions of orbits in several types of planes so as to obtain a more complete view of the overall orbital properties of the dynamical system. We also present evidence that the unstable manifolds which guide the orbits in and out t...

  7. Chaotic escape from an open vase-shaped cavity. I. Numerical and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Jaison; Keeler, Matthew L.; Giefer, Joshua; Delos, John B.

    2012-01-01

    We present part I in a two-part study of an open chaotic cavity shaped as a vase. The vase possesses an unstable periodic orbit in its neck. Trajectories passing through this orbit escape without return. For our analysis, we consider a family of trajectories launched from a point on the vase boundary. We imagine a vertical array of detectors past the unstable periodic orbit and, for each escaping trajectory, record the propagation time and the vertical detector position. We find that the escape time exhibits a complicated recursive structure. This recursive structure is explored in part I of our study. We present an approximation to the Helmholtz equation for waves escaping the vase. By choosing a set of detector points, we interpolate trajectories connecting the source to the different detector points. We use these interpolated classical trajectories to construct the solution to the wave equation at a detector point. Finally, we construct a plot of the detector position versus the escape time and compare this graph to the results of an experiment using classical ultrasound waves. We find that generally the classical trajectories organize the escaping ultrasound waves.

  8. A phase I study of concurrent 9-nitro-20(s)-camptothecin (9NC/Orathecin) and radiation therapy in the treatment of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: In vitro studies have suggested that 9-nitro-20(s)-Camptothecin (9NC/Orathecin/Rubitecan) can enhance the effects of radiation. We conducted a phase I study to assess the toxicity and determine the maximum tolerated dose of 9NC when combined with radiation in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Patients and methods: Eleven patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas received 9NC, orally during radiation. Radiation therapy consisted of 45 Gy in 25 fractions given over 5 weeks. The starting dose of 9NC was 1 mg/m2/day. Results: Eight patients received 9NC at a dose of 1 mg/m2/day and three patients received a dose of 1.25 mg/m2/day. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as ≥grade 3 non-hematologic toxicity and ≥grade 4 hematologic toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity of grade 3 nausea/vomiting developed in one patient at the first dose level. At dose level 2, two of three patients developed DLT. Both developed grade 3 nausea, fatigue, and anorexia. Additionally, one of these patients had grade 3 dehydration and the other had grade 4 leukopenia, grade 3 vomiting, and grade 3 weakness. Conclusions: 9NC, 1 mg/m2/day, can be given concurrently with radiation with acceptable toxicity

  9. Testing a Simple Recipe for Estimating Thermal Hydrodynamic Escape Rates in Primitive Terrestrial Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, A. J.; Yung, Y. L.; Chen, P.

    2014-12-01

    During the first billion years of the Sun's history, the emission of ultraviolet and X-ray radiation varied from ~100 to ~6 times greater than its present level. The absorption of this intense radiation in the upper atmospheres of the terrestrial planets is believed to have driven rapid hydrodynamic escape, either in the form of energy-limited escape or transonic blow-off. The calculation of escape rates under these circumstances, and in particular the nature of the correct condition to apply at the upper boundary, depends on whether or not the flow remains subsonic below the exobase. If the flow remains subsonic, the kinetic Jeans equations may be applied at the exobase; otherwise, the radius of the sonic point must be located and then appropriate boundary conditions applied at this radius. This seems to suggest that the full hydrodynamic escape problem needs to be solved iteratively to determine where the sonic radius falls and the type of boundary conditions that should be applied. Such an arduous undertaking is generally impractical for standard application in chemical evolution models or related studies. Fortunately, a much easier but still accurate approach to determining whether the flow remains subsonic below the exobase for a given amount of energy deposition has been provided by Johnson et al. (2013, Ap. J. Lett. 768:L4), who base their results on rigorous Discrete Simulation Monte Carlo models. Their model provides the ratio of the escape rate to the energy-limited value as a function of the total XUV heating. The XUV heating, however, is itself coupled to the escape rate through the radial structure of the upper atmosphere, which can become greatly distended for large heating rates. Here we present a simple recipe for estimating the hydrodynamic escape rate that includes the coupling between the escape rate, the radial structure, and the XUV heating while avoiding the use of demanding numerical calculations. The approach involves an iterative semi

  10. Immunoproteasomes edit tumors, which then escapes immune recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    In 1985, John Monaco--the discoverer of LMP-2 and -7, the inducible components of the immunoproteasome--asked his advanced immunology class as to why the MHC region contained not only structural genes, but several others as well, whose functions were then unknown. As we drew a blank, he quipped: perchance because many of the MHC genes are induced by IFN-γ! The ensuing three decades have witnessed the unveiling of the profound fundamental and clinical implications of that classroom tête-à-tête. Amongst its multitudinous effects, IFN-γ induces genes enhancing antigen processing and presentation to T cells; such as those encoding cellular proteases and activators of proteases. In this issue, Keller et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 3257-3268] demonstrate that the limited success of MART-1/Melan-A-targeted immunotherapy in melanoma patients could be due to inefficient MART-1(26-35) presentation, owing to the proteolytic activities of IFN-γ-inducible β2i/MECL-1, proteasome activator 28 (PA28), and endoplasmic reticulum-associated aminopeptidase-associated with antigen processing (ERAP). Specifically, whilst β2i and PA28 impede MART-1(26-35) liberation from its precursor protein, ERAP-1 degrades this epitope. Hence, critical to effective cancer immunotherapy is deep knowledge of T-cell-targeted tumor antigens and how cellular proteases generate protective epitope(s) from them, or destroy them. PMID:26527367

  11. Relationship between NF-κB, MMP-9, and MICA expression in pituitary adenomas reveals a new mechanism of pituitary adenomas immune escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng; Li, Zhenzhu; Chang, Yingwei; Ma, Lixin; Xu, Wenhu; Li, Meng; Li, Jianmin; Zhang, Wensheng; Sun, Qikai; An, Xiaojing; Li, Zefu

    2015-06-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the expression levels of NF-κB, MMP-9, and MICA and their relationship between each other in pituitary adenomas as a histological basis for the study of the expression and shedding mechanism of MICA and mechanism of immune escape of pituitary adenomas. Our study indicated that MICA, MMP-9 and NF-κB mRNA and protein levels were more highly expressed in pituitary adenomas than healthy tissues. The expression levels of NF-κB, MMP-9, and MICA were positively related in patients with pituitary adenomas. In conclusion, the activation of NF-κB can up-regulate the expression of MICA and induce the expression of MMP-9, which hydrolyzes MICA into sMICA to promote tumor immune escape. The interactions of NF-κB, MMP-9, and MICA play an important role in the development of pituitary adenomas, and MMP-9 could be used as a new target for inhibiting tumor cell immune escape.

  12. MAVEN Imaging UV Spectrograph Results on the Mars Atmosphere and Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael; Schneider, Nick; McClintock, Bill; Stewart, Ian; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Clarke, John; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefevre, Franck; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stiepen, Arnaud; Crismani, Matteo; Mayyasi, Majd; Evans, Scott; Stevens, Mike; Yelle, Roger; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft, whose payload is dedicated to exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars and understanding the magnitude and drivers of Mars' atmospheric escape rate. IUVS uses ultraviolet light to investigate the lower and upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. The instrument is among the most powerful spectrographs sent to another planet, with several key capabilities: (1) separate Far-UV & Mid-UV channels for stray light control, (2) a high resolution echelle mode to resolve deuterium and hydrogen emission, (3) internal instrument pointing and scanning capabilities to allow complete mapping and nearly continuous operation, and (4) optimization for airglow studies. IUVS, along with other MAVEN instruments, obtains a comprehensive picture of the current state of the Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere and the processes that control atmospheric escape. We present an overview of selected IUVS results, including (1) the discovery of diffuse aurora at Mars, and its contrast with previously detected discrete aurora localized near crustal magnetic fields; (2) widespread detection of mesospheric clouds; (3) Significant seasonal and short-timescale variability in thermospheric composition; (4) Global ozone maps spanning six months of seasonal evolution; and (5) mapping of the Mars H and O coronas, deriving the escape rates of H and O and their variability. This last is of particular importance for understanding the long term evolution of Mars and its atmosphere, with the observed preset escape of H potentially capable of removing a large fraction of Mars' initial water inventory, and the differential escape of O relative to H potentially providing a net source of oxidizing power to the atmosphere and planet at present, in contrast with a photochemical theory that predicts stoichiometrically balanced escape. The atmospheric and escape

  13. Two cases of atmospheric escape in the Solar System: Titan and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandouras, I.

    2012-01-01

    Escape into space of the constituents of a planetary upper atmosphere can occur either in the form of neutral gas (thermal escape or non-thermal escape), or in the form of plasma. The long-term stability of an atmosphere results from the balance between source and escape rates. Two cases will be examined: Titan and Earth. Titan is the second largest planetary satellite in the Solar System and is the only one that has an atmosphere as substantial as that of the Earth. Titan's nitrogen rich atmosphere is embedded within Saturn's magnetosphere, and is directly bombarded by energetic ions due to Titan's lack of a significant intrinsic magnetic field. In addition to thermal escape, energy input from Saturn's magnetosphere and from Solar UV radiation can drive several non-thermal escape mechanisms in Titan's upper atmosphere: sputtering, dissociation and dissociative ionization of molecular nitrogen producing pick-up ions, photochemical production of fast neutrals etc. Earth also constantly loses matter, mostly in the form of H+ and O+ ions, through various outflow processes from the upper atmosphere and ionosphere. Most of the ions are low-energy (plasma reservoir is the plasmasphere, which is a toroidal region encircling the Earth and containing cold and dense plasma. Plasma plumes, forming in the outer plasmasphere and released outwards, constitute a well-established mode for plasmaspheric material release to the magnetosphere. They are associated to geomagnetically active periods and the related electric field change. In 1992 Lemaire and Shunk proposed the existence of an additional mode for plasmaspheric material release and escape: a plasmaspheric wind, steadily transporting cold plasmaspheric plasma outwards across the geomagnetic field lines. This has been proposed on a theoretical basis. Direct detection of this wind has, however, eluded observation in the past. Analysis of ion measurements, acquired in the outer plasmasphere by the CIS experiment onboard the

  14. Temporal and ontogenetic variation in the escape response of Ameiva festiva (Squamata, Teiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lattanzio

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Several factors have been shown to affect lizard escape behavior (flight initiation distance or FID, the distance between predator and prey when the prey initiates escape. Patterns of daily activity, such as foraging or movement behavior, vary with respect to time of day, supporting that escape responses may vary temporally as well. However, there remains scant information regarding the effects of time of day on FID. During peak activity, FID may decrease due to increased cost of giving up resources (e.g., prey or potential mates. An alternative hypothesis is that FID may increase because lizard activity in general may serve to alert a predator in advance of its approach. A lizard in this scenario may be favored to flee sooner rather than later. Moreover, juvenile and adult lizards of multiple species may differ in behavioral, ecological, and morphological traits that could influence escape decisions. I tested the effects of time of day (in 30-min intervals and age (juvenile or adult on the FID of a tropical whiptail lizard, Ameiva festiva in Costa Rica. I found that A. festiva escape responses varied with time of day such that in general, their FID decreased throughout the day. In addition, I observed a peak in FID from mid to late-morning that matches published estimates of peak activity times for A. festiva. Overall, juvenile A. festiva initiated an escape response sooner than adults, which may be related to differences in perceived risk associated with differences in size and predator experience between the two age groups. I conclude that escape responses may be contingent on both the activity level of the animal at the time of approach and its age.

  15. Hypoxia promotes tumor growth in linking angiogenesis to immune escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem eCHOUAIB

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the impressive progress over the past decade, in the field of tumor immunology, such as the identification of tumor antigens and antigenic peptides as potential targets, there are still many obstacles in eliciting an effective immune response to eradicate cancer. It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role in the control of immune protection and contains many overlapping mechanisms to evade antigen specific immunotherapy. Obviously, tumors have evolved to utilize hypoxic stress to their own advantage by activating key biochemical and cellular pathways that are important in progression, survival and metastasis. Among the hypoxia-induced genes, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF play a determinant role in promoting tumor cell growth and survival. In this regard, hypoxia is emerging as an attractive target for cancer therapy. How the microenvironmental hypoxia poses both obstacles and opportunities for new therapeutic immune interventions will be discussed.

  16. Natural Killer Cells and Neuroblastoma: tumor recognition, escape mechanisms and possible novel immunotherapeutic approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eBottino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of childhood and arises from developing sympathetic nervous system. Most primary tumors localize in the abdomen, the adrenal gland or lumbar sympathetic ganglia. Amplification in tumor cells of MYCN, the major oncogenic driver, patients’ age over 18 months and the presence at diagnosis of a metastatic disease (stage IV, M identify NB at high risk of treatment failure. Conventional therapies did not significantly improve the overall survival of these patients. Moreover, the limited landscape of somatic mutations detected in NB is hampering the development of novel pharmacological approaches. Major efforts aim to identify novel NB-associated surface molecules that activate immune responses and/or direct drugs to tumor cells and tumor-associated vessels. PVR (Poliovirus Receptor and B7-H3 are promising targets, since they are expressed by most high-risk NB, are upregulated in tumor vasculature and are essential for tumor survival/invasiveness. PVR is a ligand of DNAM-1 activating receptor that triggers the cytolytic activity of Natural Killer (NK cells against NB. In animal models targeting of PVR with an attenuated oncolytic poliovirus induced tumor regression and elimination. Also B7-H3 was successfully targeted in preclinical studies and is now being tested in phase I/II clinical trials. B7-H3 down-regulates NK cytotoxicity, providing NB with a mechanism of escape from immune response. The immunosuppressive potential of NB can be enhanced by the release of soluble factors that impair NK cell function and/or recruitment. Among these, TGF-β1 modulates the cytotoxicity receptors and the chemokine receptor repertoire of NK cells.Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the main cell surface molecules and soluble mediators that modulate the function of NK cells in NB, considering the pros and cons that must be taken into account in the design of novel NK cell-based immunotherapeutic

  17. Role of AmiA in the morphological transition of Helicobacter pylori and in immune escape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Chaput

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is responsible for peptic ulcers and neoplasia. Both in vitro and in the human stomach it can be found in two forms, the bacillary and coccoid forms. The molecular mechanisms of the morphological transition between these two forms and the role of coccoids remain largely unknown. The peptidoglycan (PG layer is a major determinant of bacterial cell shape, and therefore we studied H. pylori PG structure during the morphological transition. The transition correlated with an accumulation of the N-acetyl-D-glucosaminyl-beta(1,4-N-acetylmuramyl-L-Ala-D-Glu (GM-dipeptide motif. We investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for the GM-dipeptide motif accumulation, and studied the role of various putative PG hydrolases in this process. Interestingly, a mutant strain with a mutation in the amiA gene, encoding a putative PG hydrolase, was impaired in accumulating the GM-dipeptide motif and transforming into coccoids. We investigated the role of the morphological transition and the PG modification in the biology of H. pylori. PG modification and transformation of H. pylori was accompanied by an escape from detection by human Nod1 and the absence of NF-kappaB activation in epithelial cells. Accordingly, coccoids were unable to induce IL-8 secretion by AGS gastric epithelial cells. amiA is, to our knowledge, the first genetic determinant discovered to be required for this morphological transition into the coccoid forms, and therefore contributes to modulation of the host response and participates in the chronicity of H. pylori infection.

  18. Modeling the endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides: transmembrane pH gradient driven translocation across phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzoub, Mazin; Pramanik, Aladdin; Gräslund, Astrid

    2005-11-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to mediate the efficient cellular uptake of a wide range of cargoes. Internalization of a number of CPPs requires uptake by endocytosis, initiated by binding to anionic cell surface heparan sulfate (HS), followed by escape from endosomes. To elucidate the endosomal escape mechanism, we have modeled the process for two CPPs: penetratin (pAntp) and the N-terminal signal peptide of the unprocessed bovine prion protein (bPrPp). Large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) were produced encapsulating either peptide, and an ionophore, nigericin, was used to create a transmembrane pH gradient (DeltapH(mem), inside acidic) similar to the one arising in endosomes in vivo. In the absence of DeltapH(mem), no pAntp escape from the LUVs is observed, while a fraction of bPrPp escapes. In the presence of DeltapH(mem), a significant amount of pAntp escapes and an even higher degree of bPrPp escape takes place. These results, together with the differences in kinetics of escape, indicate different escape mechanisms for the two peptides. A minimum threshold peptide concentration exists for the escape of both peptides. Coupling of the peptides to a cargo reduces the fraction escaping, while complexation with HS significantly hinders the escape. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy results show that during the escape process the LUVs are intact. Taken together, these results suggest a model for endosomal escape of CPPs: DeltapH(mem)-mediated mechanism, following dissociation from HS of the peptides, above a minimum threshold peptide concentration, in a process that does not involve lysis of the vesicles.

  19. Escape Distance in Ground-Nesting Birds Differs with Individual Level of Camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Aggarwal, Jared K; Troscianko, Jolyon T; Stevens, Martin; Spottiswoode, Claire N

    2016-08-01

    Camouflage is one of the most widespread antipredator strategies in the animal kingdom, yet no animal can match its background perfectly in a complex environment. Therefore, selection should favor individuals that use information on how effective their camouflage is in their immediate habitat when responding to an approaching threat. In a field study of African ground-nesting birds (plovers, coursers, and nightjars), we tested the hypothesis that individuals adaptively modulate their escape behavior in relation to their degree of background matching. We used digital imaging and models of predator vision to quantify differences in color, luminance, and pattern between eggs and their background, as well as the plumage of incubating adult nightjars. We found that plovers and coursers showed greater escape distances when their eggs were a poorer pattern match to the background. Nightjars sit on their eggs until a potential threat is nearby, and, correspondingly, they showed greater escape distances when the pattern and color match of the incubating adult's plumage-rather than its eggs-was a poorer match to the background. Finally, escape distances were shorter in the middle of the day, suggesting that escape behavior is mediated by both camouflage and thermoregulation. PMID:27420787

  20. Fluctuating bottleneck model studies on kinetics of DNA escape from α-hemolysin nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Yukun; Wang, Zilin; Chen, Anpu; Zhao, Nanrong

    2015-11-14

    We have proposed a fluctuation bottleneck (FB) model to investigate the non-exponential kinetics of DNA escape from nanometer-scale pores. The basic idea is that the escape rate is proportional to the fluctuating cross-sectional area of DNA escape channel, the radius r of which undergoes a subdiffusion dynamics subjected to fractional Gaussian noise with power-law memory kernel. Such a FB model facilitates us to obtain the analytical result of the averaged survival probability as a function of time, which can be directly compared to experimental results. Particularly, we have applied our theory to address the escape kinetics of DNA through α-hemolysin nanopores. We find that our theoretical framework can reproduce the experimental results very well in the whole time range with quite reasonable estimation for the intrinsic parameters of the kinetics processes. We believe that FB model has caught some key features regarding the long time kinetics of DNA escape through a nanopore and it might provide a sound starting point to study much wider problems involving anomalous dynamics in confined fluctuating channels. PMID:26567685

  1. Ion-induced gamma-ray detection of fast ions escaping from fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiura, M., E-mail: nishiura@ppl.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Mushiake, T. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Doi, K.; Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe 610-0321 (Japan); Taniike, A.; Matsuki, T. [Graduate School of Maritime Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 658-0022 (Japan); Shimazoe, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan); Yoshino, M. [Furukawa Co. Ltd., Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan); Nagasaka, T.; Tanaka, T.; Kisaki, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Fujimoto, Y.; Fujioka, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yamaoka, H. [RIKEN SPring-8 center, RIKEN, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y. [Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima 770-8514 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A 12 × 12 pixel detector has been developed and used in a laboratory experiment for lost fast-ion diagnostics. With gamma rays in the MeV range originating from nuclear reactions {sup 9}Be(α, nγ){sup 12}C, {sup 9}Be(d, nγ){sup 12}C, and {sup 12}C(d, pγ){sup 13}C, a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector measured a fine-energy-resolved spectrum of gamma rays. The HPGe detector enables the survey of background-gamma rays and Doppler-shifted photo peak shapes. In the experiments, the pixel detector produces a gamma-ray image reconstructed from the energy spectrum obtained from total photon counts of irradiation passing through the detector's lead collimator. From gamma-ray image, diagnostics are able to produce an analysis of the fast ion loss onto the first wall in principle.

  2. Fast-starting after a breath: air-breathing motions are kinematically similar to escape responses in the catfish Hoplosternum littorale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domenici, Paolo; Norin, Tommy; Bushnell, Peter G.;

    2015-01-01

    acceleration away from the stimulus. Recently, similar C-starts have been recorded in fish aiming at a prey. Little is known about C-starts outside the context of predator–prey interactions, though recent work has shown that escape response can also be induced by high temperature. Here, we test the hypothesis...... that air-breathing fish may use C-starts in the context of gulping air at the surface. Hoplosternum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish found in South America. Field video observations reveal that their air-breathing behaviour consists of air-gulping at the surface, followed by a fast turn...

  3. Escape and collision dynamics in the planar equilateral restricted four-body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    We consider the planar circular equilateral restricted four body-problem where a test particle of infinitesimal mass is moving under the gravitational attraction of three primary bodies which move on circular orbits around their common center of gravity, such that their configuration is always an equilateral triangle. The case where all three primaries have equal masses is numerically investigated. A thorough numerical analysis takes place in the configuration $(x,y)$ as well as in the $(x,C)$ space in which we classify initial conditions of orbits into four main categories: (i) bounded regular orbits, (ii) trapped chaotic orbits, (iii) escaping orbits and (iv) collision orbits. Interpreting the collision motion as leaking in the phase space we related our results to both chaotic scattering and the theory of leaking Hamiltonian systems. We successfully located the escape and the collision basins and we managed to correlate them with the corresponding escape and collision times of orbits. We hope our contribut...

  4. Mass fractionation of noble gases in diffusion-limited hydrodynamic hydrogen escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The theory of mass fractionation by hydrogen is presently extended to atmospheres in which hydrogen is not the major constituent. This theoretical framework is applied to three different cases. In the first, it is shown that the fractionation of terrestrial atmospheric neon with respect to mantle neon is explainable as a consequence of diffusion-limited hydrogen escape from a steam atmosphere toward the end of the accretion process. In the second, the anomalously high Ar-38/Ar-36 ratio of Mars is shown to be due to hydrodynamic fractionation by a vigorously escaping and very pure hydrogen wind. In the last case, it is speculated that the currently high Martian D/H ratio emerged during the hydrodynamic escape phase which fractionated Ar.

  5. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells.

  6. Intermittent cold water swim stress increases immobility and interferes with escape performance in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, John P; Drugan, Robert C

    2005-11-30

    The behavioral consequences of intermittent, 5 s cold-water swims (15 degrees C) or confinement were assessed 24 h after stress in a 5 min forced swim test or an instrumental swim escape test (SET). The SET was conducted with temporal and instrumental parameters similar to the shock-motivated shuttle escape test. The tests detected significantly increased immobility in the forced swim test and increased latency to escape in the SET. These results extend previous findings with intermittent swim stress and provide evidence that intermittent swim stress produces behavioral deficits similar to other stress models. This new model may be a useful tool for exploring the physiological mechanisms underlying the stress response.

  7. Ambipolar escape from Venus, Mars and Titan, and negative ions at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Ionospheric photoelectrons are a natural product of the photo-ionisation of planetary atmospheres. Their energy spectrum is distinctive and depends on the solar spectrum in the EUV and X-ray region. On production, the energetic electrons move along the magnetic field (open or draped), setting up an ambipolar electric field which can extract ions. This provides an escape mechanism similar to Earth's 'polar wind'. As these objects are unmagnetised, this produces an extended escape mechanism over the whole sunlit ionosphere. Here, we review recent measurements of photoelectrons far from the parent objects at Venus, Mars and Titan, from Venus Express, Mars Express, Maven and Cassini, and discuss similarities and related escape rates. We also review the pioneering observations of the remarkably heavy negative ions discovered in Titan's ionosphere.

  8. Thymidine selectively enhances growth suppressive effects of camptothecin/irinotecan in MSI+ cells and tumors containing a mutation of MRE11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Rene; Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg; Phear, Geraldine;

    2008-01-01

    is not a direct result of MMR, p53, or p21 status. However MMR-deficient cell lines containing an intronic frameshift mutation of MRE11 show greatest sensitivity to these agents. Increased sensitivity to this combination is also evident in vivo as thymidine enhances irinotecan-induced growth suppression of MMR...

  9. Resveratrol-3-O-glucuronide and resveratrol-4’-O-glucuronide reduce DNA strand breakage but not apoptosis in Jurkat T cells treated with camptothecin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resveratrol has been reported to inhibit or induce DNA damage depending upon the type of cell and experimental conditions. Dietary resveratrol is present in the body mostly as metabolites and little is known about the activities of these metabolic products. We evaluated physiologically obtainable ...

  10. The great escape: the role of self-esteem and self-related cognition in terror management

    OpenAIRE

    Wisman, Arnaud; Heflick, Nathan A; Goldenberg, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating terror management theory and objective self-awareness theory, we propose the existential escape hypothesis, which states that people with low self-esteem should be especially prone to escaping self-awareness as a distal response to thoughts of death. This is because they lack the means to bolster the self as a defense, and the propensity to bolster the self reduces the motivation to escape from self-awareness. Five studies supported this hypothesis. Individuals low,...

  11. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, M W

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. AIM: To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. SPECIMENS: Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. METHODS: FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). RESULTS: Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. CONCLUSIONS: Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer.

  12. GSK-3β inhibition by lithium confers resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis through the repression of CD95 (Fas/APO-1) expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium exerts neuroprotective actions that involve the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Otherwise, recent studies suggest that sustained GSK-3β inhibition is a hallmark of tumorigenesis. In this context, the present study was undertaken to examine whether lithium modulated cancer cell sensitivity to apoptosis induced by chemotherapy agents. We observed that, in different human cancer cell lines, lithium significantly reduced etoposide- and camptothecin-induced apoptosis. In HepG2 cells, lithium repressed drug induction of CD95 expression and clustering at the cell surface as well as caspase-8 activation. Lithium acted through deregulation of GSK-3β signaling since (1) it provoked a rapid and sustained phosphorylation of GSK-3β on the inhibitory serine 9 residue; (2) the GSK-3β inhibitor SB-415286 mimicked lithium effects by repressing drug-induced apoptosis and CD95 membrane expression; and (3) lithium promoted the disruption of nuclear GSK-3β/p53 complexes. Moreover, the overexpression of an inactivated GSK-3β mutant counteracted the stimulatory effects of etoposide and camptothecin on a luciferase reporter plasmid driven by a p53-responsive sequence from the CD95 gene. In conclusion, we provide the first evidence that lithium confers resistance to apoptosis in cancer cells through GSK-3β inhibition and subsequent repression of CD95 gene expression. Our study also highlights the concerted action of GSK-3β and p53 on CD95 gene expression

  13. Generalized Jeans' Escape of Pick-Up Ions in Quasi-Linear Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. E.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    Jeans escape is a well-validated formulation of upper atmospheric escape that we have generalized to estimate plasma escape from ionospheres. It involves the computation of the parts of particle velocity space that are unbound by the gravitational potential at the exobase, followed by a calculation of the flux carried by such unbound particles as they escape from the potential well. To generalize this approach for ions, we superposed an electrostatic ambipolar potential and a centrifugal potential, for motions across and along a divergent magnetic field. We then considered how the presence of superthermal electrons, produced by precipitating auroral primary electrons, controls the ambipolar potential. We also showed that the centrifugal potential plays a small role in controlling the mass escape flux from the terrestrial ionosphere. We then applied the transverse ion velocity distribution produced when ions, picked up by supersonic (i.e., auroral) ionospheric convection, relax via quasi-linear diffusion, as estimated for cometary comas [1]. The results provide a theoretical basis for observed ion escape response to electromagnetic and kinetic energy sources. They also suggest that super-sonic but sub-Alfvenic flow, with ion pick-up, is a unique and important regime of ion-neutral coupling, in which plasma wave-particle interactions are driven by ion-neutral collisions at densities for which the collision frequency falls near or below the gyro-frequency. As another possible illustration of this process, the heliopause ribbon discovered by the IBEX mission involves interactions between the solar wind ions and the interstellar neutral gas, in a regime that may be analogous [2].

  14. Large-scale microarray profiling reveals four stages of immune escape in non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosolini, Marie; Algans, Christelle; Pont, Frédéric; Ycart, Bernard; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) are aggressive lymphoid malignancies that develop in patients due to oncogenic activation, chemo-resistance, and immune evasion. Tumor biopsies show that B-NHL frequently uses several immune escape strategies, which has hindered the development of checkpoint blockade immunotherapies in these diseases. To gain a better understanding of B-NHL immune editing, we hypothesized that the transcriptional hallmarks of immune escape associated with these diseases could be identified from the meta-analysis of large series of microarrays from B-NHL biopsies. Thus, 1446 transcriptome microarrays from seven types of B-NHL were downloaded and assembled from 33 public Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets, and a method for scoring the transcriptional hallmarks in single samples was developed. This approach was validated by matching scores to phenotypic hallmarks of B-NHL such as proliferation, signaling, metabolic activity, and leucocyte infiltration. Through this method, we observed a significant enrichment of 33 immune escape genes in most diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) samples, with fewer in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) samples. Comparing these gene expression patterns with overall survival data evidenced four stages of cancer immune editing in B-NHL: non-immunogenic tumors (stage 1), immunogenic tumors without immune escape (stage 2), immunogenic tumors with immune escape (stage 3), and fully immuno-edited tumors (stage 4). This model complements the standard international prognostic indices for B-NHL and proposes that immune escape stages 3 and 4 (76% of the FL and DLBCL samples in this data set) identify patients relevant for checkpoint blockade immunotherapies. PMID:27622044

  15. Synchronous activity lowers the energetic cost of nest escape for sea turtle hatchlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, Mohd Uzair; Booth, David T; Joseph, Juanita

    2016-05-15

    A potential advantage of group movement in animals is increased locomotion efficiency. This implies a reduced energetic cost for individuals that occur in larger groups such as herds, flocks and schools. When chelonian hatchlings hatch in the underground nest with finite energy for their post-hatching dispersal phase, they face the challenge of minimizing energetic expenditure while escaping the nest. The term 'social facilitation' has been used to describe the combined digging effort of sea turtle hatchlings during nest escape. Given that in a normal clutch, a substantial part of the energy reserve within the residual yolk is used by hatchlings in the digging out process, a decreased cohort size may reduce the energy reserve available to cross the beach and sustain the initial swimming frenzy. This hypothesis was experimentally tested by varying cohort size in hatchling green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and measuring energy expenditure during the nest escape process using open-flow respirometry. The energetic cost of escaping through 40 cm of sand was calculated to vary between 4.4 and 28.3 kJ per individual, the cost decreasing as the number of individuals in the cohort increased. This represents 11-68% of the energy contained in a hatchling's residual yolk at hatching. The reduced energetic cost associated with large cohorts resulted from both a lower metabolic rate per individual and a shortened nest escape time. We conclude that synchronous digging activity of many hatchlings during nest escape evolved not only to facilitate rapid nest emergence but also to reduce the energetic cost to individuals. PMID:27207954

  16. Unsteady motion: escape jumps in planktonic copepods, their kinematics and energetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Andersen, Anders Peter; Langlois, Vincent J.;

    2010-01-01

    estimate the force and power output needed to accelerate and overcome drag. Both are very high compared with those of other organisms, as are the escape velocities in comparison to startle velocities of other aquatic animals. Thus, the maximum weight-specific force, which for muscle motors of other animals...... arrangement of the latter probably adapted for high force production during short-lasting bursts. The resulting escape velocities scale with body length to power 0.65, different from the size-scaling of both similar sized and larger animals moving at constant velocity, but similar to that found for startle...

  17. Escape rate of an active Brownian particle over a potential barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burada, P S; Lindner, B

    2012-03-01

    We study the dynamics of an active Brownian particle with a nonlinear friction function located in a spatial cubic potential. For strong but finite damping, the escape rate of the particle over the spatial potential barrier shows a nonmonotonic dependence on the noise intensity. We relate this behavior to the fact that the active particle escapes from a limit cycle rather than from a fixed point and that a certain amount of noise can stabilize the sojourn of the particle on this limit cycle. PMID:22587135

  18. "We are free, you are slaves. Come on, let's run away": Escape from Constantia, 1712.

    OpenAIRE

    Paulse, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Slaves were imported to the Cape from 1658 to 1808. The majority of the captives lived in Cape Town and many other slaves lived on farms. Added to this captive population were political exiles. In 1712, 23 slaves and exiles gathered at Constantia, a renowned wine farm, to run away. Since the holding was an important homestead, one would expect that this escape would have been reconstructed in the histories of the farm and slavery at the Cape. At the time, the escape raised s...

  19. Escape of a driven particle from a metastable state: A semiclassical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pradipta; Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2010-06-28

    In this article we explore the dynamics of escape of a particle in the semiclassical regime by driving the particle externally. We demonstrate that under suitable approximations the semiclassical escape rate essentially assumes the structure of classical Kramers rate. Both internal (due to thermal bath) as well as external noises (due to driving) are being considered. The noises are stationary, Gaussian, and are characterized by arbitrary decaying memory kernel. Finally, we subject our formulation to rigorous numerical test under variedly changing conditions of the parameters. PMID:20590205

  20. Escape from intermittent repellers: periodic orbit theory for crossover from exponential to algebraic decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, P

    1999-12-01

    We apply periodic orbit theory to study the asymptotic distribution of escape times from an intermittent map. The dynamical zeta function exhibits a branch point which is associated with an asymptotic power law escape. By an analytic continuation technique we compute a pair of complex conjugate zeroes beyond the branch point, associated with a preasymptotic exponential decay. The crossover time from an exponential to a power law is also predicted. The theoretical predictions are confirmed by numerical simulation. Applications to conductance fluctuations in quantum dots are discussed.

  1. Increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1986-01-01

    The transcapillary escape rate, intravascular mass and outflux of albumin were measured in 75 Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. The groups were defined as: group 1: normal urinary albumin excretion, less than 30 mg/24 h (n = 21); group 2: microalbuminuria, 30-300 mg/24 h (n = 36); group...... 3: diabetic nephropathy, less than 300 mg/24 h (n = 18). Fifteen sex- and age-matched non-diabetic persons served as control subjects. The diabetes duration was: group 1: 20 +/- 9 years, group 2: 17 +/- 5 years, group 3: 19 +/- 7 years. The transcapillary escape rate of albumin was similar...

  2. Rate of escape of random walks on wreath products and related groups

    OpenAIRE

    Revelle, David

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the rate of escape for a random walk on $G\\wr \\Z$ and proves laws of the iterated logarithm for both the inner and outer radius of escape. The class of G for which these results hold includes finite, G as well as groups of the form $H\\wr \\Z$, so the construction can be iterated. Laws of the iterated logarithm are also found for random walk on Baumslag--Solitar groups and a discrete version of the Sol geometry.

  3. Scaling analysis for the European heavy liquid metal scaled pool facility escape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Tichelen, K.; Vanderhaegen, M. [SCK CEN, Mol (Belgium); Jajarayu, S. [NRG, Petten (Netherlands); Keijers, S. [SCK CEN, Mol (Belgium); Roelofs, F. [NRG, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    The understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena occurring in the reactor pool is a critical issue in the design of the MYRRHA system, the European Technology Pilot Plant for the Lead Fast Reactor. The E-SCAPE facility is a thermal-hydraulic scale model of the MYRRHA reactor using lead-bismuth as coolant. Non-dimensional analysis and CFD simulations are used to determine the scaling factors and transposition of the experimental results to the real scale situation. The joint efforts of SCK·CEN and NRG within the European project THINS in applying CFD to fix the design parameters of E-SCAPE is reported. (author)

  4. Quantifying the escape mortality of trawl caught Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, Bjørn A; Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Engås, Arill;

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is an abundant fishery resource, the harvest levels of which are expected to increase. However, many of the length classes of krill can escape through commonly used commercial trawl mesh sizes. A vital component of the overall management of a fishery is to esti......Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is an abundant fishery resource, the harvest levels of which are expected to increase. However, many of the length classes of krill can escape through commonly used commercial trawl mesh sizes. A vital component of the overall management of a fishery...

  5. The combined application of biological therapy and methotrexate in case of escape phenomenon progressing

    OpenAIRE

    Ponich E.S.; Kruglova L.S.; Babushkin A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: the study of the efficacy of methotrexate in patients with the "escape effect" during the ustekinumab therapy. Materials and Methods. The results of methotrexate at a dose of 15-20mg/week in treatment of 4 patients receiving biologic and developed "escape effect". Ustekinumab is used as a hypodermic injection at a dose of 45 mg for a body weight of a patient no more than 100 kg, and 90 mg of body weight over 100 kg, at the zero week, the 4th week and then every 12 weeks. Patients control...

  6. Antarctic krill; assessment of mesh size selectivity and escape mortality from trawls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, Bjørn A.; Krag, Ludvig Ahm; Herrmann, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    This working paper presents the aims and methodology for a three-year-project (commenced in 2015) assessing size selectivity and escape mortality of Antarctic krill from trawl nets. The project is widely based on acquired experiences from a completed study Net Escapement of Antarctic krill...... in Trawls (NEAT), presented in WG-EMM 2012/24, WGEMM 2013/34, WG-EMM 2014/14 and WG-EMM 2014/16. Funding is provided by the Norwegian Research Council and ship-time for executing the field-experiments is offered free-of-charge by two Norwegian commercial fishing companies; Olympic Seafood AS and Aker Bio...

  7. Enhancing endosomal escape of transduced proteins by photochemical internalisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Mellert

    Full Text Available Induced internalisation of functional proteins into cultured cells has become an important aspect in a rising number of in vitro and in vivo assays. The endo-lysosomal entrapment of the transduced proteins remains the major problem in all transduction protocols. In this study we compared the efficiency, cytotoxicity and protein targeting of different commercially available transduction reagents by transducing a well-studied fluorescently labelled protein (Atto488-bovine serum albumin into cultured human sarcoma cells. The amount of internalised protein and toxicity differed between the different reagents, but the percentage of transduced cells was consistently high. Furthermore, in all protocols the signals of the transduced Atto488-BSA were predominantly punctual consistent with an endosomal localisation. To overcome the endosomal entrapment, the transduction protocols were combined with a photochemical internalisation (PCI treatment. Using this combination revealed that an endosomal disruption is highly effective in cell penetrating peptide (CPP mediated transduction, whereas lipid-mediated transductions lead to a lower signal spreading throughout the cytosol. No change in the signal distribution could be achieved in treatments using non-lipid polymers as a transduction reagent. Therefore, the combination of protein transduction protocols based on CPPs with the endosomolytic treatment PCI can facilitate protein transduction experiments in vitro.

  8. Spiders do not escape reproductive manipulations by Wolbachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrickx Frederik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternally inherited bacteria that reside obligatorily or facultatively in arthropods can increase their prevalence in the population by altering their hosts' reproduction. Such reproductive manipulations have been reported from the major arthropod groups such as insects (in particular hymenopterans, butterflies, dipterans and beetles, crustaceans (isopods and mites. Despite the observation that endosymbiont bacteria are frequently encountered in spiders and that the sex ratio of particular spider species is strongly female biased, a direct relationship between bacterial infection and sex ratio variation has not yet been demonstrated for this arthropod order. Results Females of the dwarf spider Oedothorax gibbosus exhibit considerable variation in the sex ratio of their clutches and were infected with at least three different endosymbiont bacteria capable of altering host reproduction i.e. Wolbachia, Rickettsia and Cardinium. Breeding experiments show that sex ratio variation in this species is primarily maternally inherited and that removal of the bacteria by antibiotics restores an unbiased sex ratio. Moreover, clutches of females infected with Wolbachia were significantly female biased while uninfected females showed an even sex ratio. As female biased clutches were of significantly smaller size compared to non-distorted clutches, killing of male embryos appears to be the most likely manipulative effect. Conclusions This represents to our knowledge the first direct evidence that endosymbiont bacteria, and in particular Wolbachia, might induce sex ratio variation in spiders. These findings are pivotal to further understand the diversity of reproductive phenotypes observed in this arthropod order.

  9. Exosomes as a tumor immune escape mechanism: possible therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Harold H

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in cancer therapy have been substantial in terms of molecular understanding of disease mechanisms, however these advances have not translated into increased survival in the majority of cancer types. One unsolved problem in current cancer therapeutics is the substantial immune suppression seen in patients. Conventionally, investigations in this area have focused on antigen-nonspecific immune suppressive molecules such as cytokines and T cell apoptosis inducing molecules such as Fas ligand. More recently, studies have demonstrated nanovesicle particles termed exosomes are involved not only in stimulation but also inhibition of immunity in physiological conditions. Interestingly, exosomes secreted by cancer cells have been demonstrated to express tumor antigens, as well as immune suppressive molecules such as PD-1L and FasL. Concentrations of exosomes from plasma of cancer patients have been associated with spontaneous T cell apoptosis, which is associated in some situations with shortened survival. In this paper we place the "exosome-immune suppression" concept in perspective of other tumor immune evasion mechanisms. We conclude by discussing a novel therapeutic approach to cancer immune suppression by extracorporeal removal of exosomes using hollow fiber filtration technology

  10. Avian Bornaviruses Escape Recognition by the Innate Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Reuter

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Like other pathogens that readily persist in animal hosts, members of the Bornaviridae family have evolved effective mechanisms to evade the innate immune response. The prototype of this virus family, Borna disease virus employs an unusual replication strategy that removes the triphosphates from the 5’ termini of the viral RNA genome. This strategy allows the virus to avoid activation of RIG-I and other innate immune response receptors in infected cells. Here we determined whether the newly discovered avian bornaviruses (ABV might use a similar strategy to evade the interferon response. We found that de novo infection of QM7 and CEC32 quail cells with two different ABV strains was efficiently inhibited by exogenous chicken IFN-α. IFN-α also reduced the viral load in QM7 and CEC32 cells persistently infected with both ABV strains, suggesting that ABV is highly sensitive to type I IFN. Although quail cells persistently infected with ABV contained high levels of viral RNA, the supernatants of infected cultures did not contain detectable levels of biologically active type I IFN. RNA from cells infected with ABV failed to induce IFN-β synthesis if transfected into human cells. Furthermore, genomic RNA of ABV was susceptible to 5’-monophosphate-specific RNase, suggesting that it lacks 5’-triphospates like BDV. These results indicate that bornaviruses of mammals and birds use similar strategies to evade the host immune response.

  11. Quantifying factors determining the rate of CTL escape and reversion during acute and chronic phases of HIV infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganusov, Vitaly V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often evades cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses by generating variants that are not recognized by CTLs. However, the importance and quantitative details of CTL escape in humans are poorly understood. In part, this is because most studies looking at escape of HIV from CTL responses are cross-sectional and are limited to early or chronic phases of the infection. We use a novel technique of single genome amplification (SGA) to identify longitudinal changes in the transmitted/founder virus from the establishment of infection to the viral set point at 1 year after the infection. We find that HIV escapes from virus-specific CTL responses as early as 30-50 days since the infection, and the rates of viral escapes during acute phase of the infection are much higher than was estimated in previous studies. However, even though with time virus acquires additional escape mutations, these late mutations accumulate at a slower rate. A poor correlation between the rate of CTL escape in a particular epitope and the magnitude of the epitope-specific CTL response suggests that the lower rate of late escapes is unlikely due to a low efficacy of the HIV-specific CTL responses in the chronic phase of the infection. Instead, our results suggest that late and slow escapes are likely to arise because of high fitness cost to the viral replication associated with such CTL escapes. Targeting epitopes in which virus escapes slowly or does not escape at all by CTL responses may, therefore, be a promising direction for the development of T cell based HIV vaccines.

  12. Escape fraction of ionizing photons during reionization: effects due to supernova feedback and runaway OB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Taysun

    2014-01-01

    The fraction of hydrogen ionizing photons escaping from galaxies into the intergalactic medium is a critical ingredient in the theory of reionization. We use two zoomed-in, high-resolution (4 pc), cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive mesh refinement to investigate the impact of two physical mechanisms (supernova feedback and runaway OB stars) on the escape fraction (f_esc) at the epoch of reionization (z>7). We implement a new, physically motivated supernova feedback model that can approximate the Sedov solutions at all (from the free expansion to snowplow) stages. We find that there is a significant time delay of about ten million years between the peak of star formation and that of escape fraction, due to the time required for the build-up and subsequent destruction of the star-forming cloud by supernova feedback. Consequently, the photon number-weighted mean escape fraction for dwarf galaxies in halos of mass 10^8-10^10.5 Msun is found to be ~11%, although instantaneous values of f...

  13. Using Stimulus Fading without Escape Extinction to Increase Compliance with Toothbrushing in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michele R.; Kenzer, Amy L.; Coffman, Christine M.; Tarbox, Courtney M.; Tarbox, Jonathan; Lanagan, Taira M.

    2013-01-01

    Routine toothbrushing is an essential part of good oral hygiene. This study investigated the use of stimulus fading without escape extinction to increase compliance with toothbrushing with three children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A 30-step stimulus fading hierarchy was implemented; gradually increasing the proximity of the toothbrush to…

  14. Escape from Management Hell: 12 Tales of Horror, Humor, and Heroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, Robert D.

    This book offers a set of stories in which corporate executives demonstrate the folly and futility of their own business practices. In the stories, 12 executives are trying to escape from a hell of their own making. The tales provide insights into the management woes with which people at all levels deal on a daily basis. Topics include: the…

  15. Panic escape polyethism in worker and soldier Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai; Henderson, Gregg; Gautam, Bal K; Chen, Jie; Bhatta, Dependra

    2016-04-01

    Termites were the first animal to form societies. Two hundred million years of evolution provide for a multitude of innate social behaviors that can be experimentally dissected. These fine-tuned patterns of behavior are especially interesting when observing group decision making in the panic mode. In this study, we examined behavioral patterns of termites under panic conditions to gain insight into how an escape flow self-organizes. One hundred worker and 10 soldier Coptotermes formosanus were released into agar plates. After a disturbance was created most workers followed each other and ran along the wall of dishes, thus forming a unidirectional escape flow, whereas soldiers showed a significantly higher frequency of moving to the center of the arena or on periphery of the escape flow as compared to workers. Agonistic behavior was usually observed as soldiers moved to center or periphery. This is the first report on the behavioral repertoire of termites when panicked, with details on the behavioral polymorphism of workers and soldiers during an escape. PMID:25630524

  16. Queer(y)ing and Recrafting Agency: Moving Away from a Model of Coercion versus Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowlett, Christina

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies a Butlerian-inspired "queer(y)ing" methodology to disrupt the utility of agency being framed within the binary of escape and coercion. In particular, it uses Butler's concept of performative resignification to analyse how Simon, a 16-year-old white male student, maneouvres his way through the social conventions of…

  17. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects

  18. The decline of the European eel Anguilla anguilla: quantifying and managing escapement to support conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, G S; Sibley, P; Hateley, J; Don, A

    2011-01-01

    A method was developed to quantify the number and biomass of European eels Anguilla anguilla escaping to the ocean for breeding. The non-intrusive method, involving a fixed-position, high-frequency multi-beam sonar, permitted constant surveillance of A. anguilla movements throughout their 5 month escapement season (July to December). During this period, >1000 individuals were monitored escaping to the Atlantic Ocean from their freshwater habitat in the River Huntspill study site (Somerset, U.K.). The total length of each fish was measured using the sonar software. These measurements were then converted to an estimate of mass using a length:mass regression relationship derived from historical fyke-net data from this site, comprising c. 500 A. anguilla length:mass measurements collected over a 10 year period. The net biomass of escapement from the study site was equivalent to c. 6 kg ha⁻¹ year⁻¹, lower than the present European target which would require at least 7 kg ha⁻¹ year⁻¹ from this habitat. These findings demonstrate the capabilities of this monitoring technique and its usefulness both as a tool to assess the compliance with conservation targets and as a tool to evaluate the success of conservation measures for elusive aquatic species such as A. anguilla. PMID:21235544

  19. Self-consciousness and binge eating in college women : an escape from rumination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalley, Simon; Donofrio, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    Background: Binge-eating is a highly distressing symptom that has been found to co-occur with other symptoms of eating disorders such as bulimia nervosa. One perspective of binge eating is that it is an attempt to escape high levels of aversive self-consciousness. A primary aim of this study is to e

  20. Tumor cell survival and immune escape mechanisms in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell survival and immune escape mechanisms in classical Hodgkin lymphoma The nature of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a minority of tumor cells in a reactive background and loss of B cell phenotype, decides its dependence on the microenvironment for signals to contribute to survival and prol

  1. Revealing the escape mechanism of three-dimensional orbits in a tidally limited star cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the escape process of three-dimensional orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. The gravitational field of the cluster is represented by a smooth, spherically symmetric Plummer potential, while the tidal approximation was used to model the steady tidal field of the galaxy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins towards the two exit channels and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits. For this purpose, we split our investigation into three cases depending on the initial value of the $z$ coordinate which was used for launching the stars. The most noticeable finding is that the majority of stars initiated very close to the primary $(x,y)$ plane move in chaotic orbits and they remain trapped for vast ti...

  2. Hot Oxygen and Carbon Escape from the Early Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerstorfer, U.; Gröller, H.; Lichtenegger, H.; Lammer, H.; Tian, F.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, the atmosphere of Mars is commonly assumed to be much different than in the early times of its evolution. Especially, the escape of water and carbon dioxide is thought to have formed its shape during millions of years. Also the Sun emitted a higher EUV flux in former times, influencing the particle environment around Mars.We study the escape of oxygen and carbon from the early Martian atmosphere for different EUV fluxes with a Monte-Carlo model. We consider different possible sources of hot oxygen and carbon atoms in the thermosphere, e.g. dissociative recombination of O2+ , CO+ and CO2+ , photodissociation of O2 and CO, and other reactions like charge transfer. From the calculated production rate profiles we can get insights into the importance of the different source reactions. The resulting energy distribution functions at the exobase level are used to study the exospheric densities and the escape of hot oxygen and carbon. We discuss the escape rates of those atoms and the importance of different source processes compared to the present situation at Mars.This work receives funding from the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): P 24247.

  3. Assessment of mortality of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) escaping from a trawl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krafft, Bjørn A.; Krag, Ludvig Ahm

    2015-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to estimate the mortality of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) that escape from the most common mesh size used for codends (16mm) in the current commercial fishery. The experiment was carried out off the South Orkney Islands (60°35′S, 45°30′W) using a covered...

  4. Feedback-regulated escape of LyC photons from mini-haloes during reionisation

    CERN Document Server

    Kimm, Taysun; Haehnelt, Martin; Rosdahl, Joakim; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne

    2016-01-01

    Reionisation in the early Universe is likely driven by dwarf galaxies. Using cosmological, zoom-in, radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we study the escape of Lyman continuum (LyC) photons from mini-haloes with $M_{\\rm halo} \\le 10^8\\,M_\\odot$. Our simulations include a new thermo-turbulent star formation model, non-equilibrium chemistry, and relevant stellar feedback processes (photoionisation by young massive stars, radiation pressure, and mechanical supernova explosions). We find that the photon number-weighted mean escape fraction in mini-haloes is higher ($\\sim20$-$40\\%$) than that in atomic-cooling haloes, although the instantaneous fraction in individual haloes varies significantly. The escape fraction from Pop III stars is found to be significant ($\\ge10\\%$) only when the mass is greater than $\\sim$100\\,\\msun. Because star formation is stochastic and dominated by a few gas clumps, the escape fraction is generally determined by radiation feedback (heating due to photo-ionisation), rather than supernova...

  5. The dynamics of a rapidly escaping atmosphere - Applications to the evolution of earth and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A. J.; Donahue, T. M.; Walker, J. C. G.

    1981-01-01

    A simple model for the rapid escape of a hydrogen thermosphere is presented in order to establish the energy-limited flux of escaping particles. The model assumes that the atmosphere is tightly bound by gravity at the lower boundary, that all the EUV is absorbed in a narrow region where the optical depth is unity, and that the main source of heating is solar EUV. The flux is limited by the amount of EUV energy absorbed, which is in turn controlled by the radial extent of the thermosphere. It is found that, regardless of the amount of hydrogen in the thermosphere, the low temperatures which accompany rapid escape limit its extent and thus constrain the flux. The results are applied to the earth and Venus, showing that the escape of hydrogen from these planets would have been energy-limiting if their primordial atmospheres contained total hydrogen mixing ratios exceeding only a few percent. This conclusion places a constraint on the theory of the origin and evolution of the planets.

  6. Function-Based Modification of Check-In/Check-Out to Influence Escape-Maintained Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgus, Stephen P.; Fallon, Lindsay M.; Feinberg, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has suggested Check-In/Check-Out (CICO) effectiveness is linked to the function of problem behavior. Though effective for students whose misbehavior occurs to gain attention, findings are equivocal for behavior that occurs to escape academic tasks. The purpose of this study was to therefore evaluate a modification to CICO, wherein…

  7. The interaction between Aegean back-arc extension and Anatolia escape since Middle Miocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippon, M.; Brun, J.-P.; Gueydan, F.; Sokoutis, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Aegean domain is a key area for understanding the processes of back-arc extension. Observed deformation pattern and present day kinematics result from the interaction between the southward retreat of the Hellenic trench and the westward escape of Anatolia. Lithosphere-scale analogue models were

  8. Self-awareness review Part 2: Changing or escaping the self

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, Alain

    2003-01-01

    When we become self-aware we see who we are and what we would like to be. What do we do? Do we change who we are? Or do we escape self-awareness by watching TV—or worst, by drinking alcohol, doing drugs, or committing suicide?

  9. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S. [D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ilyushina, Natalia A., E-mail: Natalia.Ilyushina@fda.hhs.gov [FDA CDER, 29 Lincoln Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kaverin, Nikolai V., E-mail: nik.kaverin@gmail.com [D.I. Ivanovsky Institute of Virology, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects.

  10. Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus serotype 1: Genetic composition and envelope protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chem, Y K; Chua, K B; Malik, Y; Voon, K

    2015-06-01

    Monoclonal antibody-escape variant of dengue virus type 1 (MabEV DEN-1) was discovered and isolated in an outbreak of dengue in Klang Valley, Malaysia from December 2004 to March 2005. This study was done to investigate whether DEN152 (an isolate of MabEV DEN-1) is a product of recombination event or not. In addition, the non-synonymous mutations that correlate with the monoclonal antibody-escape variant were determined in this study. The genomes of DEN152 and two new DEN-1 isolates, DENB04 and DENK154 were completely sequenced, aligned, and compared. Phylogenetic tree was plotted and the recombination event on DEN152 was investigated. DEN152 is sub-grouped under genotype I and is closely related genetically to a DEN-1 isolated in Japan in 2004. DEN152 is not a recombinant product of any parental strains. Four amino acid substitutions were unique only to DEN 152. These amino acid substitutions were (Ser)[326](Leu), (Ser)[340](Leu) at the deduced E protein, (Ile)[250](Thr) at NS1 protein, and (Thr)[41](Ser) at NS5 protein. Thus, DEN152 is an isolate of the emerging monoclonal antibody-escape variant DEN-1 that escaped diagnostic laboratory detection. PMID:26691263

  11. Dwarf Galaxies with Ionizing Radiation Feedback. I: Escape of Ionizing Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Wise, John H; Turk, Matthew J; Goldbaum, Nathan J; Abel, Tom

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new method for simulating ionizing radiation and supernova feedback in galaxy simulations. In this method, which we call star-forming molecular cloud (SFMC) particles, we use a ray-tracing technique to solve the radiative transfer equation for ultraviolet photons emitted by thousands of distinct particles on the fly. Joined with high numerical resolution of 3.8 pc, the realistic description of stellar feedback helps to self-regulate star formation. This new feedback scheme also enables us to study the escape of ionizing photons from star-forming clumps and from a galaxy, and to examine the evolving environment of star-forming gas clumps. By simulating a galactic halo of 2.3e11 Msun, we find that the galactic escape fraction, f_esc, fluctuates between 0.08% to 5.9% during a ~20 Myr period with a mean value of 1.1%. The flux of escaped photons is not strongly beamed, but manifests a large opening angle of more than 60 degree from the galactic pole. Further, we investigate the escape fraction per S...

  12. Effect of Brief Clinic-Based Training on the Ability of Caregivers to Implement Escape Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartney, Ellen J.; Anderson, Cynthia M.; English, Carie L.

    2005-01-01

    Escape extinction has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for children exhibiting food refusal. To date, most studies have been conducted in inpatient treatment settings by trained clinicians. Few studies have evaluated the extent to which caregivers are able to implement efficacious interventions in their home for their food-selective…

  13. 78 FR 54585 - Safety Zone; Escape to Miami Triathlon, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Escape to Miami Triathlon, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...

  14. The effects of differential negative reinforcement of other behavior and noncontingent escape on compliance.

    OpenAIRE

    Kodak, Tiffany; Miltenberger, Raymond G.; Romaniuk, Cathryn

    2003-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of noncontingent escape and differential negative reinforcement of other behavior in reducing problem behaviors and increasing compliance in 2 children with disabilities. Results showed that both methods reduced problem behavior and increased compliance for both children.

  15. Optogenetics Based Rat-Robot Control: Optical Stimulation Encodes "Stop" and "Escape" Commands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, SiCong; Zhou, Hong; Guo, SongChao; Zhang, JiaCheng; Qu, Yi; Feng, ZhouYan; Xu, KeDi; Zheng, XiaoXiang

    2015-08-01

    Electric brain stimulation is frequently used in bio-robot control. However, one possible limitation of electric stimulation is the resultant wide range of influences that may lead to unexpected side-effects. Although there has been prior research done towards optogenetics based brain activation, there has not been much development regarding the comparisons between electric and optical methods of brain activation. In this study, we first encode "Stop" and "Escape" commands by optical stimulation in the dorsal periaqueductal grey (dPAG). The rats behavioral comparisons are then noted down under these two methods. The dPAG neural activity recorded during optical stimulation suggests rate and temporal coding mechanisms in behavioral control. The behavioral comparisons show that rats exhibit anxiety under the "Stop" command conveyed through both optical and electric methods. However, rats are able to recover more quickly from freezing only under optical "Stop" command. Under "Escape" commands, also conveyed through optical means, the rat would move with lessened urgency but the results are more stable. Moreover, c-Fos study shows the optical stimulation activates restricted range in midbrain: the optical stimulation affected only dPAG and its downstreams but electric stimulation activates both the upstream and downstream circuits, in which the glutamatergic neurons are largely occupied and play important role in "Stop" and "Escape" behavior controls. We conclude that optical stimulation is more suited for encoding "Stop" and "Escape" commands for rat-robot control.

  16. Hydrodynamics of C-Start Escape Responses of Fish as Studied with Simple Physical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, William C; Wen, Li; Lauder, George V

    2015-10-01

    One of the most-studied unsteady locomotor behaviors exhibited by fishes is the c-start escape response. Although the kinematics of these responses have been studied extensively and two well-defined kinematic stages have been documented, only a few studies have focused on hydrodynamic patterns generated by fishes executing escape behaviors. Previous work has shown that escape responses by bluegill sunfish generate three distinct vortex rings, each with central orthogonal jet flows, and here we extend this conclusion to two other species: stickleback and mosquitofish. Jet #1 is formed by the tail during Stage 1, and moves in the same direction as Stage-2 movement of the fish, thereby reducing final escape-velocity but also rotating the fish. Jet #2, in contrast, moves approximately opposite to the final direction of the fish's motion and contains the bulk of the total fluid-momentum powering the escape response. Jet #3 forms during Stage 2 in the mid-body region and moves in a direction approximately perpendicular to jets 1 and 2, across the direction of movement of the body. In this study, we used a mechanical controller to impulsively move passively flexible plastic panels of three different stiffnesses in heave, pitch, and heave + pitch motions to study the effects of stiffness on unsteady hydrodynamics of escape. We were able to produce kinematics very similar to those of fish c-starts and also to reproduce the 3-jet hydrodynamic pattern of the c-start using a panel of medium flexural stiffness and the combined heave + pitch motion. This medium-stiffness panel matched the measured stiffness of the near-tail region of fish bodies. This motion also produced positive power when the panel straightened during stage 2 of the escape response. More flexible and stiffer panels resulted in non-biological kinematics and patterns of flow for all motions. The use of simple flexible models with a mechanical controller and program of fish-like motion is a promising approach

  17. From Rio to Rio: a global carbon price signal to escape the great climate inconsistency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two decades after the 1992 Rio Conference, we must admit to collective failure in combating human-induced climate change. The problem is not that no efforts have been undertaken, but that these efforts have just not been enough. We cannot escape serious climate disruption - which, to some extent, has already begun - if we keep going down that road. We must change direction, and we must move quickly. To this end, we call in this paper for a fine-tuning of the international negotiations on climate. We propose refocusing these international efforts on negotiating a global carbon price signal, harmonized in principle but flexible in practice, instead of doggedly spending the next few years attempting to convince countries to accept stricter national targets for quantitative reduction of their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We cannot afford to spend the next few years missing the wrong targets. Simply put, we must move away, collectively, from an ineffective logic of constraint to a pragmatic logic of price incentives. The December 2011 Durban Conference proved, once again, that the 'to each their own target' approach does not work. We must instead adopt a 'one price signal for all' strategy. If there were a single reason to improve the current mitigation logic, it would be this evident fact: developing countries, which now account for 60% of emissions worldwide, cannot accept what they perceive as an obstacle to their economic development, when developed countries have been able to get rich on unlimited use of fossil fuel energy. Indeed, in the foreseeable future, emerging economies, particularly China and India with Gross Domestic Product (GDP) annual growth rates of between 8% and 10%, will not accept absolute reduction targets for GHG emissions. On the other hand, these countries might be more open to the idea of a flexible levy of a price per tonne of carbon dioxide, a price from which they would derive revenues, and which their economic

  18. Changing the habitat: the evolution of intercorrelated traits to escape from predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajewski, D J; Scharnweber, K; Jiang, B; Leicht, S; Mauersberger, R; Johansson, F

    2016-07-01

    Burst escape speed is an effective and widely used behaviour for evading predators, with burst escape speed relying on several different morphological features. However, we know little about how behavioural and underlying morphological attributes change in concert as a response to changes in selective predation regime. We studied intercorrelated trait differentiation of body shape and burst-swim-mediating morphology in response to a habitat shift-related reduction in burst escape speed using larvae of the dragonfly genus Leucorrhinia. Species in this genus underwent a well-known habitat shift from predatory fish lakes (fish lakes) to predatory fish-free lakes dominated by large predatory dragonflies (dragonfly lakes) accompanied by relaxed selection on escape burst speed. Results revealed that species from fish lakes that possess faster burst speed have evolved a suite of functionally intercorrelated traits, expressing a wider abdomen, a higher abdominal muscles mass and a larger branchial chamber compared with species from dragonfly lakes. In contrast, populations within species did not show significant differences in muscle mass and branchial chamber size between lake types in three of the species. High multicollinearity among variables suggests that traits have evolved in concert rather than independently when Leucorrhinia shifted from fish lakes to dragonfly lakes. Thus, relaxed selection on burst escape speed in dragonfly-lake species resulted in a correlated reduction of abdominal muscles and a smaller branchial chamber, likely to save production and/or maintenance costs. Our results highlight the importance of studying integrated behavioural and morphological traits to fully understand the evolution of complex phenotypes.

  19. Vaccine escape recombinants emerge after pneumococcal vaccination in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela B Brueggemann

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was introduced in the United States (US in 2000 and has significantly reduced invasive pneumococcal disease; however, the incidence of nonvaccine serotype invasive disease, particularly due to serotype 19A, has increased. The serotype 19A increase can be explained in part by expansion of a genotype that has been circulating in the US prior to vaccine implementation (and other countries since at least 1990, but also by the emergence of a novel "vaccine escape recombinant" pneumococcal strain. This strain has a genotype that previously was only associated with vaccine serotype 4, but now expresses a nonvaccine serotype 19A capsule. Based on prior evidence for capsular switching by recombination at the capsular locus, the genetic event that resulted in this novel serotype/genotype combination might be identifiable from the DNA sequence of individual pneumococcal strains. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the putative recombinational event(s at the capsular locus that resulted in the change from a vaccine to a nonvaccine capsular type. Sequencing the capsular locus flanking regions of 51 vaccine escape (progeny, recipient, and putative donor pneumococci revealed a 39 kb recombinational fragment, which included the capsular locus, flanking regions, and two adjacent penicillin-binding proteins, and thus resulted in a capsular switch and penicillin nonsusceptibility in a single genetic event. Since 2003, 37 such vaccine escape strains have been detected, some of which had evolved further. Furthermore, two new types of serotype 19A vaccine escape strains emerged in 2005. To our knowledge, this is the first time a single recombinational event has been documented in vivo that resulted in both a change of serotype and penicillin nonsusceptibility. Vaccine escape by genetic recombination at the capsular locus has the potential to reduce PCV7 effectiveness in the longer term.

  20. Oxygen escape from the Earth during geomagnetic reversals: Implications to mass extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yong; Pu, Zuyin; Zong, Qiugang; Wan, Weixing; Ren, Zhipeng; Fraenz, Markus; Dubinin, Eduard; Tian, Feng; Shi, Quanqi; Fu, Suiyan; Hong, Minghua

    2014-05-01

    The evolution of life is affected by variations of atmospheric oxygen level and geomagnetic field intensity. Oxygen can escape into interplanetary space as ions after gaining momentum from solar wind, but Earth's strong dipole field reduces the momentum transfer efficiency and the ion outflow rate, except for the time of geomagnetic polarity reversals when the field is significantly weakened in strength and becomes Mars-like in morphology. The newest databases available for the Phanerozoic era illustrate that the reversal rate increased and the atmospheric oxygen level decreased when the marine diversity showed a gradual pattern of mass extinctions lasting millions of years. We propose that accumulated oxygen escape during an interval of increased reversal rate could have led to the catastrophic drop of oxygen level, which is known to be a cause of mass extinction. We simulated the oxygen ion escape rate for the Triassic-Jurassic event, using a modified Martian ion escape model with an input of quiet solar wind inferred from Sun-like stars. The results show that geomagnetic reversal could enhance the oxygen escape rate by 3-4 orders only if the magnetic field was extremely weak, even without consideration of space weather effects. This suggests that our hypothesis could be a possible explanation of a correlation between geomagnetic reversals and mass extinction. Therefore, if this causal relation indeed exists, it should be a "many-to-one" scenario rather the previously considered "one-to-one", and planetary magnetic field should be much more important than previously thought for planetary habitability.

  1. Changing the habitat: the evolution of intercorrelated traits to escape from predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajewski, D J; Scharnweber, K; Jiang, B; Leicht, S; Mauersberger, R; Johansson, F

    2016-07-01

    Burst escape speed is an effective and widely used behaviour for evading predators, with burst escape speed relying on several different morphological features. However, we know little about how behavioural and underlying morphological attributes change in concert as a response to changes in selective predation regime. We studied intercorrelated trait differentiation of body shape and burst-swim-mediating morphology in response to a habitat shift-related reduction in burst escape speed using larvae of the dragonfly genus Leucorrhinia. Species in this genus underwent a well-known habitat shift from predatory fish lakes (fish lakes) to predatory fish-free lakes dominated by large predatory dragonflies (dragonfly lakes) accompanied by relaxed selection on escape burst speed. Results revealed that species from fish lakes that possess faster burst speed have evolved a suite of functionally intercorrelated traits, expressing a wider abdomen, a higher abdominal muscles mass and a larger branchial chamber compared with species from dragonfly lakes. In contrast, populations within species did not show significant differences in muscle mass and branchial chamber size between lake types in three of the species. High multicollinearity among variables suggests that traits have evolved in concert rather than independently when Leucorrhinia shifted from fish lakes to dragonfly lakes. Thus, relaxed selection on burst escape speed in dragonfly-lake species resulted in a correlated reduction of abdominal muscles and a smaller branchial chamber, likely to save production and/or maintenance costs. Our results highlight the importance of studying integrated behavioural and morphological traits to fully understand the evolution of complex phenotypes. PMID:27062155

  2. 77 FR 50165 - Escape and Evacuation Plans for Surface Coal Mines, Surface Facilities and Surface Work Areas of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Administration. Title: Escape and Evacuation Plans for Surface Coal Mines, Surface Facilities ] and Surface Work... Safety and Health Administration Escape and Evacuation Plans for Surface Coal Mines, Surface Facilities and Surface Work Areas of Underground Coal Mines AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration,...

  3. Differential reinforcement of alternative behavior and demand fading in the treatment of escape-maintained destructive behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Piazza, C C; Moes, D R; Fisher, W W

    1996-01-01

    The escape-maintained destructive behavior of a boy with autism was reduced during instructional sequences with differential reinforcement of compliance (DRA), escape extinction without physical guidance, and demand fading. The procedure decreased destructive behaviors to near-zero levels and greatly increased compliance.

  4. Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior and Demand Fading in the Treatment of Escape-Maintained Destructive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Cathleen C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of an 11-year-old boy with autism and mild mental retardation found that his escape-maintained destructive behavior was reduced during instructional sequences with differential reinforcement of compliance, escape extinction without physical guidance, and demand fading. The procedure decreased destructive behaviors to near-zero levels and…

  5. The general circulation of Titan and the topside escape rates of N2, CH4, and H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. M.; Waite, J. H.; Magee, B. A.; Gell, D.; Westlake, J. H.; Mandt, K. E.

    2009-12-01

    The general circulation of the atmosphere can have a significant impact on the escape of species from the upper atmospheres of planets (cf. Hartle and Mayer [1976]). Recently, Bell et al. [2009] used a one-dimensional (1-D) model to constrain mass loss rates from Titan’s upper atmosphere for both CH4 and H2. We report on the impacts of the 3-D circulation of Titan on the estimated escape fluxes of nitrogen, methane, and hydrogen. We present two scenarios for CH4 escape from Titan’s upper atmosphere: (1) a hydrodynamic escape scenario (Strobel [2009]) and (2) a low escape scenario (Bell et al [2009]). The composition, dynamics, and energetics of these two configurations will be discussed within the context of recent INMS measurements in the thermosphere and recent magnetospheric carbon ion measurements.

  6. Inspired by nonenveloped viruses escaping from endo-lysosomes: a pH-sensitive polyurethane micelle for effective intracellular trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nijia; Zhou, Lijuan; Li, Jiehua; Pan, Zhicheng; He, Xueling; Tan, Hong; Wan, Xinyuan; Li, Jianshu; Ran, Rong; Fu, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    A multifunctional drug delivery system (DDS) for cancer therapy still faces great challenges due to multiple physiological barriers encountered in vivo. To increase the efficacy of current cancer treatment a new anticancer DDS mimicking the response of nonenveloped viruses, triggered by acidic pH to escape endo-lysosomes, is developed. Such a smart DDS is self-assembled from biodegradable pH-sensitive polyurethane containing hydrazone bonds in the backbone, named pHPM. The pHPM exhibits excellent micellization characteristics and high loading capacity for hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs. The responses of the pHPM in acidic media, undergoing charge conversion and hydrophobic core exposure, resulting from the detachment of the hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell, are similar to the behavior of a nonenveloped virus when trapped in acidic endo-lysosomes. Moreover, the degradation mechanism was verified by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The endo-lysosomal membrane rupture induced by these transformed micelles is clearly observed by transmission electron microscopy. Consequently, excellent antitumor activity is confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. The results verify that the pHPM could be a promising new drug delivery tool for the treatment of cancer and other diseases.A multifunctional drug delivery system (DDS) for cancer therapy still faces great challenges due to multiple physiological barriers encountered in vivo. To increase the efficacy of current cancer treatment a new anticancer DDS mimicking the response of nonenveloped viruses, triggered by acidic pH to escape endo-lysosomes, is developed. Such a smart DDS is self-assembled from biodegradable pH-sensitive polyurethane containing hydrazone bonds in the backbone, named pHPM. The pHPM exhibits excellent micellization characteristics and high loading capacity for hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drugs. The responses of the pHPM in acidic media, undergoing charge conversion and hydrophobic core

  7. Germ line transmission of the Cdk4(R24C) mutation facilitates tumorigenesis and escape from cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Sushil G; Cosenza, Stephen C; Mettus, Richard V; Reddy, E Premkumar

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in CDK4 and its key kinase inhibitor p16(INK4a) have been implicated in the genesis and progression of familial human melanoma. The importance of the CDK4 locus in human cancer first became evident following the identification of a germ line CDK4-Arg24Cys (R24C) mutation, which abolishes the ability of CDK4 to bind to p16(INK4a). To determine the role of the Cdk4(R24C) germ line mutation in the genesis of other cancer types, we introduced the R24C mutation in the Cdk4 locus of mice by using Cre-loxP-mediated "knock-in" technology. Cdk4(R24C/R24C) mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) displayed increased Cdk4 kinase activity resulting in hyperphosphorylation of all three members of the Rb family, pRb, p107, and p130. MEFs derived from Cdk4(R24C/R24C) mice displayed decreased doubling times, escape from replicative senescence, and escape sensitivity to contact-induced growth arrest. These MEFs also exhibited a high degree of susceptibility to oncogene-induced transformation, suggesting that the Cdk4(R24C) mutation can serve as a primary event in the progression towards a fully transformed phenotype. In agreement with the in vitro data, homozygous Cdk4(R24C/R24C) mice developed tumors of various etiology within 8 to 10 months of their life span. The majority of these tumors were found in the pancreas, pituitary, brain, mammary tissue, and skin. In addition, Cdk4(R24C/R24C) mice showed extraordinary susceptibility to carcinogens and developed papillomas within the first 8 to 10 weeks following cutaneous application of the carcinogens 9,10-di-methyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). This report formally establishes that the activation of Cdk4 is sufficient to promote cancer in many tissues. The observation that a wide variety of tumors develop in mice harboring the Cdk4(R24C) mutation offers a genetic proof that Cdk4 activation may constitute a central event in the genesis of many types of cancers in addition to melanoma.

  8. Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction of Star-forming Dwarf Galaxies at z ˜ 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Michael J.; Scarlata, Claudia; Haardt, Francesco; Siana, Brian; Henry, Alaina; Rafelski, Marc; Hayes, Matthew; Salvato, Mara; Pahl, Anthony J.; Mehta, Vihang; Beck, Melanie; Malkan, Matthew; Teplitz, Harry I.

    2016-03-01

    To date, no direct detection of Lyman continuum emission has been measured for intermediate-redshift (z˜ 1) star-forming galaxies. We combine Hubble Space Telescope grism spectroscopy with GALEX UV and ground-based optical imaging to extend the search for escaping Lyman continuum to a large (˜600) sample of z˜ 1 low-mass ({log}(\\bar{M}) ≃ 9.3{M}⊙ ), moderately star-forming (\\bar{{{\\Psi }}} ≲ 10{M}⊙ yr-1) galaxies selected initially on Hα emission. The characteristic escape fraction of LyC from star-forming galaxies (SFGs) that populate this parameter space remains weakly constrained by previous surveys, but these faint (sub-L⋆) SFGs are assumed to play a significant role in the reionization of neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshift z\\gt 6. We do not make an unambiguous detection of escaping LyC radiation from this z˜ 1 sample, individual non-detections to constrain the absolute Lyman continuum escape fraction, {f}{esc} \\lt 2.1% (3σ). We measure an upper limit of {f}{esc} \\lt 9.6% from a sample of SFGs selected on high Hα equivalent width (EW \\gt 200 {{\\mathringA }}), which are thought to be close analogs of high redshift sources of reionization. For reference, we also present an emissivity-weighted escape fraction that is useful for measuring the general contribution SFGs to the ionizing UV background. In the discussion, we consider the implications of these intermediate redshift constraints for the reionization of hydrogen in the IGM at high (z\\gt 6) redshift. If we assume our z˜ 1 SFGs, for which we measure this emissivity-weighted {f}{esc}, are analogs to the high redshift sources of reionization, we find it is difficult to reconcile reionization by faint ({M}{UV}≲ -13) SFGs with a low escape fraction ({f}{esc} \\lt 3%), with constraints from independent high redshift observations. If {f}{esc} evolves with redshift, reionization by SFGs may be consistent with observations from Planck.

  9. Human monoclonal antibody combination against SARS coronavirus: synergy and coverage of escape mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan ter Meulen

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental animal data show that protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV infection with human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs is feasible. For an effective immune prophylaxis in humans, broad coverage of different strains of SARS-CoV and control of potential neutralization escape variants will be required. Combinations of virus-neutralizing, noncompeting mAbs may have these properties. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Human mAb CR3014 has been shown to completely prevent lung pathology and abolish pharyngeal shedding of SARS-CoV in infected ferrets. We generated in vitro SARS-CoV variants escaping neutralization by CR3014, which all had a single P462L mutation in the glycoprotein spike (S of the escape virus. In vitro experiments confirmed that binding of CR3014 to a recombinant S fragment (amino acid residues 318-510 harboring this mutation was abolished. We therefore screened an antibody-phage library derived from blood of a convalescent SARS patient for antibodies complementary to CR3014. A novel mAb, CR3022, was identified that neutralized CR3014 escape viruses, did not compete with CR3014 for binding to recombinant S1 fragments, and bound to S1 fragments derived from the civet cat SARS-CoV-like strain SZ3. No escape variants could be generated with CR3022. The mixture of both mAbs showed neutralization of SARS-CoV in a synergistic fashion by recognizing different epitopes on the receptor-binding domain. Dose reduction indices of 4.5 and 20.5 were observed for CR3014 and CR3022, respectively, at 100% neutralization. Because enhancement of SARS-CoV infection by subneutralizing antibody concentrations is of concern, we show here that anti-SARS-CoV antibodies do not convert the abortive infection of primary human macrophages by SARS-CoV into a productive one. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of two noncompeting human mAbs CR3014 and CR3022 potentially controls immune escape and extends the breadth of protection. At

  10. Non-thermal escape of H2 and OH from the upper atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, Marko; Kharchenko, Vasili

    2016-10-01

    Two major sources of energetic O atoms in the upper atmosphere of Mars are photochemical production, via dissociative recombination (DR) of O2+ and CO2+ molecular ions, and energizing collisions with fast energetic neutral atoms (ENA) produced by the precipitating solar wind ions. The non-thermal O atoms can either directly escape to space, forming a hot oxygen corona, or participate in collisions with background thermal atmospheric gases, such as H2. In this study we present a theoretical analysis of formation and kinetics of hot OH molecules in the upper atmosphere of Mars, produced in reactions of thermal molecular hydrogen and suprathermal oxygen atoms energized by both DR and ENAs. The non-thermal chemical reaction O + H2(v',j') → H + OH(v',j') is described using recent quantum-mechanical state-to-state cross sections[1], which allow us to predict non-equilibrium distributions of excited rotational and vibrational states (v',j') of OH and expected emission spectra for different geometry and solar activity conditions. A potential consequence is appearance or enhancement of faint Meinel bands in the upper atmosphere of Mars. Moreover, a fraction of produced translationally hot H2 and OH are sufficiently energetic to overcome Mars' gravitational potential and escape into space, contributing to the hot corona. The described non-thermal mechanisms produce estimated total escape fluxes of OH and H2 from dayside of Mars, for low solar activity conditions, equal to about 5×1022 s-1 for OH, or about 0.1% of the total escape rate of atomic O and H, and 1023 s-1 for H2 [2]. If HD molecules are considered instead of H2, the non-thermal mechanisms are about 30 times more efficient than Jeans escape, contribute about 5-10% of the total D escape rate, potentially of interest in atmospheric models of water evolution on Mars.[1] M. Gacesa and V. Kharchenko, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 4324 (2014)[2] M. Gacesa, P. Zhang, V. Kharchenko, Geophys. Res. Lett. 39, L10203 (2012).

  11. Modelling rip current flow and bather escape strategies across a transverse bar and rip channel morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, R. Jak; Castelle, Bruno; Brander, Robert W.; Scott, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    Rip currents are a hazard to bathers on surf beaches worldwide, yet due to logistical and ethical concerns there has been minimal examination of how bathers caught in them should attempt to escape. This study presents the first numerical model of simulated bathers escaping from a rip current. An understanding of the underlying coastal geomorphology and hydrodynamics form a critical basis for the model, with the intention that outcomes of the model should be evaluated from a physical science perspective. Field observations of a transverse bar rip channel were used as model inputs. Escape simulations were performed with moderate energy (Hs ≈ 1 m), oblique offshore wave forcing, used to generate two non-stationary, asymmetric flow fields (dominant surfzone exits and dominant recirculation). The model treats bathers as particles that move with the underlying flow, with an additional swimming velocity added, iterating until a safety condition, based on depth and current speed, is satisfied or until a maximum time limit is reached. Simulations compared the strategies of "stay afloat" and various fixed swim directions, using two bather heights and four swim speeds (up to 0.4 m/s). The overall optimal escape strategy was to swim parallel in the direction of alongshore flow. Time to safety was less for: (i) recirculating flow; (ii) taller bathers; and (iii) greater swim speeds. Across all simulations, 44% of "floaters" reached safety within 10 min, while 80% of slow swimmers (0.2 m/s) succeeded in the same time interval. This suggests that slow sustainable swimming may be a preferable escape action to floating. Optimal swim direction varied with start location, from onshore (near the shoreline), parallel to shore (mid-rip channel) and diagonally onshore (outer rip channel). At lower swim speeds, the optimal swim direction had greater dependence on the underlying flow field, as opposed to distance to safety, therefore choice of direction is more complex for slower swimmers

  12. Escape process in systems characterized by stable noises and position-dependent resting times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srokowski, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic systems characterized by a random driving in a form of the general stable noise are considered. The particle experiences long rests due to the traps the density of which is position dependent and obeys a power-law form attributed to the underlying self-similar structure. Both the one- and two-dimensional cases are analyzed. The random walk description involves a position-dependent waiting time distribution. On the other hand, the stochastic dynamics is formulated in terms of the subordination technique where the random time generator is position dependent. The first passage time problem is addressed by evaluating a first passage time density distribution and an escape rate. The influence of the medium nonhomogeneity on those quantities is demonstrated; moreover, the dependence of the escape rate on the stability index and the memory parameter is evaluated. Results indicate essential differences between the Gaussian case and the case involving Lévy flights. PMID:27415243

  13. Simulación mediante APPLETS de Java de Sistemas Dinámicos con Escape

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Sánchez, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Proyecto Fin de Carrera leído en la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos en el curso académico 2009/2010. Tutores del Proyecto: Jesús M. Seoane Sepúlveda e Inés Pérez Mariño En este documento se va describir el comportamiento de tres sistemas físicos que pueden presentar comportamiento caótico y que están enmarcados dentro de los sistemas dinámicos con escape, que son modelos prototipo en Dinámica Galáctica. Los sistemas dinámicos con escape que se van a describir serán los Sistemas de Hén...

  14. Escape of Lyα and continuum photons from star-forming galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Li, Yuexing; Zhu, Qirong; Abel, Tom; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin

    2014-05-01

    A large number of high-redshift galaxies have been discovered via their narrow-band Lyα line or broad-band continuum colours in recent years. The nature of the escaping process of photons from these early galaxies is crucial to understand galaxy evolution and the cosmic reionization. Here, we investigate the escape of Lyα, non-ionizing UV-continuum (λ = 1300-1600 Å in rest frame), and ionizing photons (λ emissivity of Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs). By combining this relation with the observed luminosity functions of LAEs at different redshift, we estimate the contribution from LAEs to the reionization of intergalactic medium (IGM). Our result suggests that ionizing photons from LAEs alone are not sufficient to ionize IGM at z ≳ 6, but they can maintain the ionization of IGM at z ˜ 0-5.

  15. Calculation of the escape probabilities of Fe ⅹⅦ resonance lines for the Voigt profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian HE; Qing-guo ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Using the Voigt profile we obtained, we cal-culate the escape probabilities of Fe ⅹⅦ resonance lines at 15.02, 13.28, 12.12, 11.13, 11.02 and 10.12 A for op-tically thick plasma, both for slab and cylindrical ge-ometry. The oscillator strength, the number density of the absorbing atoms in the ground state, and the optical depth in the line center are discussed in this calculation. Results show that the escape probabilities for the slab geometry are larger than that for the cylindrical geom-etry. This calculation is useful for the study of the Fe ⅹⅦ resonance lines.

  16. Escape Kinetics of Self-Propelled Janus Particles from a Cavity: Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We numerically investigate the escape kinetics of elliptic Janus particles from narrow two-dimensional cavities with reflecting walls. The self-propulsion velocity of the Janus particle is directed along either their major (prolate) or minor axis (oblate). We show that the mean exit time is very sensitive to the cavity geometry, particle shape and self-propulsion strength. The mean exit time is found to be a minimum when the self-propulsion length is equal to the cavity size. We also find the optimum mean escape time as a function of the self-propulsion velocity, translational diffusion, and particle shape. Thus, effective transport control mechanisms for Janus particles in a channel can be implemented.

  17. Transcapillary escape rate of albumin in hypertensive patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Jensen, T; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1993-01-01

    . The systemic blood pressure and the transcapillary escape rate of albumin were measured in the following groups after 4 weeks without antihypertensive treatment: Group 1--eleven healthy control subjects. Group 2--ten Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with incipient nephropathy (urinary albumin...... excretion rate: 30-300 mg/24 h) and normal blood pressure. Group 3--eleven non-diabetic patients with essential hypertension. Group 4--nine Type 1 diabetic patients with hypertension but normal urinary albumin excretion (Group 5--eleven Type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy (urinary......Diabetic patients with elevated urinary albumin excretion rate (incipient or clinical nephropathy) also have an increased transcapillary escape rate of albumin. This study was designed to clarify whether this is caused by a general vascular dysfunction or by elevated systemic blood pressure...

  18. Simulating the escaping atmospheres of hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Salz, M; Schneider, P C; Schmitt, J H M M

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of high-energy radiation in planetary thermospheres is believed to lead to the formation of planetary winds. The resulting mass-loss rates can affect the evolution, particularly of small gas planets. We present 1D, spherically symmetric hydrodynamic simulations of the escaping atmospheres of 18 hot gas planets in the solar neighborhood. Our sample only includes strongly irradiated planets, whose expanded atmospheres may be detectable via transit spectroscopy. The simulations were performed with the PLUTO-CLOUDY interface, which couples a detailed photoionization and plasma simulation code with a general MHD code. We study the thermospheric escape and derive improved estimates for the planetary mass-loss rates. Our simulations reproduce the temperature-pressure profile measured via sodium D absorption in HD 189733 b, but show unexplained differences in the case of HD 209458 b. In contrast to general assumptions, we find that the gravitationally more tightly bound thermospheres of massive and compact...

  19. Elliptic Anisotropy $v_2$ May Be Dominated by Particle Escape instead of Hydrodynamic Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Edmonds, Terrence; Liu, Feng; Molnar, Denes; Wang, Fuqiang

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly believed that azimuthal anisotropies in relativistic heavy ion collisions are generated by hydrodynamic evolution of the strongly interacting quark-gluon plasma. Here we use transport models to study how azimuthal anisotropies depend on the number of collisions that each parton suffers. We find that the majority of $v_2$ comes from the anisotropic escape of partons, not from the parton collective flow, for semi-central Au+Au collisions at 200A GeV. As expected, the fraction of $v_2$ from the anisotropic particle escape is even higher for smaller systems such as d+Au. Our transport model results also confirm that azimuthal anisotropies would be dominated by hydrodynamic flow at unrealistically-high parton cross sections. Our finding thus naturally explains the similarity of azimuthal anisotropies in small and large systems; however, it presents a challenge to the paradigm of anisotropic flow.

  20. Escape Fraction of Ionizing Radiation from Starburst Galaxies at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, A

    2012-01-01

    Recent data indicates that the cosmic UV emissivity decreased with decreasing redshift z near the end of reionization. Lacking evidence for very massive early stars, this could signal a decline with time in the mass-averaged escape fraction of ionizing radiation from galaxies at z > 6. We calculate the evolution of ionization fronts in dark matter halos which host gas in hydrostatic equilibrium at its cooling temperature floor (T~10^4 K for atomic hydrogen). We find a high escape fraction only for the lowest mass halos (with M 10^-3. Since the low-mass galaxy population is depleted by radiative feedback, we find that indeed decreases with time during reionization.

  1. Stochastic narrow escape in molecular and cellular biology analysis and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Holcman, David

    2015-01-01

    This book covers recent developments in the non-standard asymptotics of the mathematical narrow escape problem in stochastic theory, as well as applications of the narrow escape problem in cell biology. The first part of the book concentrates on mathematical methods, including advanced asymptotic methods in partial equations, and is aimed primarily at applied mathematicians and theoretical physicists who are interested in biological applications. The second part of the book is intended for computational biologists, theoretical chemists, biochemists, biophysicists, and physiologists. It includes a summary of output formulas from the mathematical portion of the book and concentrates on their applications in modeling specific problems in theoretical molecular and cellular biology. Critical biological processes, such as synaptic plasticity and transmission, activation of genes by transcription factors, or double-strained DNA break repair, are controlled by diffusion in structures that have both large and small sp...

  2. Anisotropic parton escape is the dominant source of azimuthal anisotropy from A Multi-Phase Transport

    CERN Document Server

    He, Liang; Lin, Zi-Wei; Liu, Feng; Molnar, Denes; Wang, Fuqiang

    2015-01-01

    We trace the development of azimuthal anisotropy ($v_n$) in A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model using parton-parton collision history. The parton $v_n$ is studied as a function of the number of collisions of each parton in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}$=200~GeV. It is found that the majority of $v_n$ comes from the anisotropic escape probability of partons, with no fundamental difference at low and high transverse momenta. The contribution to $v_n$ from the parton collective flow appears small; however, it is this small anisotropy from the collective flow, not that from the anisotropic escape probability, that is most relevant for medium properties in heavy ion collisions.

  3. Prior individual training and self-organized queuing during group emergency escape of mice from water pool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caesar Saloma

    Full Text Available We study the impact of prior individual training during group emergency evacuation using mice that escape from an enclosed water pool to a dry platform via any of two possible exits. Experimenting with mice avoids serious ethical and legal issues that arise when dealing with unwitting human participants while minimizing concerns regarding the reliability of results obtained from simulated experiments using 'actors'. First, mice were trained separately and their individual escape times measured over several trials. Mice learned quickly to swim towards an exit-they achieved their fastest escape times within the first four trials. The trained mice were then placed together in the pool and allowed to escape. No two mice were permitted in the pool beforehand and only one could pass through an exit opening at any given time. At first trial, groups of trained mice escaped seven and five times faster than their corresponding control groups of untrained mice at pool occupancy rate ρ of 11.9% and 4%, respectively. Faster evacuation happened because trained mice: (a had better recognition of the available pool space and took shorter escape routes to an exit, (b were less likely to form arches that blocked an exit opening, and (c utilized the two exits efficiently without preference. Trained groups achieved continuous egress without an apparent leader-coordinator (self-organized queuing-a collective behavior not experienced during individual training. Queuing was unobserved in untrained groups where mice were prone to wall seeking, aimless swimming and/or blind copying that produced circuitous escape routes, biased exit use and clogging. The experiments also reveal that faster and less costly group training at ρ = 4%, yielded an average individual escape time that is comparable with individualized training. However, group training in a more crowded pool (ρ = 11.9% produced a longer average individual escape time.

  4. Damage Escape and Repair in Dried Chroococcidiopsis spp. from Hot and Cold Deserts Exposed to Simulated Space and Martian Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, Daniela; Viaggiu, Emanuela; Cockell, Charles S.; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Onofri, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis, overlain by 3mm of Antarctic sandstone, was exposed as dried multilayers to simulated space and martian conditions. Ground-based experiments were conducted in the context of Lichens and Fungi Experiments (EXPOSE-E mission, European Space Agency), which were performed to evaluate, after 1.5 years on the International Space Station, the survival of cyanobacteria (Chroococcidiopsis), lichens, and fungi colonized on Antarctic rock. The survival potential and the role played by protection and repair mechanisms in the response of dried Chroococcidiopsis cells to ground-based experiments were both investigated. Different methods were employed, including evaluation of the colony-forming ability, single-cell analysis of subcellular integrities based on membrane integrity molecular and redox probes, evaluation of the photosynthetic pigment autofluorescence, and assessment of the genomic DNA integrity with a PCR-based assay. Desiccation survivors of strain CCMEE 123 (coastal desert, Chile) were better suited than CCMEE 134 (Beacon Valley, Antarctica) to withstand cellular damage imposed by simulated space and martian conditions. Exposed dried cells of strain CCMEE 123 formed colonies, maintained subcellular integrities, and, depending on the exposure conditions, also escaped DNA damage or repaired the induced damage upon rewetting.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Immune Escape via Exploitation of a Hole in the T cell Repertoire

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfl, Matthias; Rutebemberwa, Alleluiah; Mosbruger, Timothy; Mao, Qing; Li, Hongmei; Netski, Dale; Ray, Stuart C.; Pardoll, Drew; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Allen, Todd; Kuntzen, Thomas; Kavanagh, Daniel G.; Kuball, Jurgen; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection frequently persists despite eliciting substantial virus-specific immune responses. Thus, HCV infection provides a setting in which to investigate mechanisms of immune escape that allow for viral persistence. Viral amino acid substitutions resulting in decreased MHC binding or impaired antigen processing of T cell epitopes reduce antigen density on the cell surface, permitting evasion of T cell responses in chronic viral infection. Substitutions in viral epito...

  6. Fires in hospital buildings: knowledge held by nursing professionals regarding prevention, combat and escape

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Santiago Costa Rodrigues; Ana Elisa Bauer de Camargo Silva; Lizete Malagoni de Almeida Cavalcante Oliveira; Virginia Visconde Brasil; Katarinne Lima Moraes; Jacqueline Andréia Bernardes Leão Cordeiro

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the knowledge and conduct of nursing professionals regarding hospital fire prevention, combat and escape. A descriptive study conducted in a public teaching hospital in Goiânia/GO, Brazil, with 109 nursing professionals. Data was collected in 2011 using structured interviews with questionnaires, and descriptive statistics for analysis. Most subjects were female, nursing technicians/assistants (67.9%), knew the Fire Department’s number (85.3%) and the extinguisher’s locatio...

  7. Molecular pathology of mismatch repair deficient tumours with emphasis on immune escape mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Dierssen, Jan Willem Frederik

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes molecular methods to distinguish separate colon tumour entities. Furthermore, it shows that distinct immune escape mechanisms, in particular distinct mechanisms of corrupting the HLA system, are operational in subsets of colon tumours. The apparent necessity of some colon tumours to circumvent the immune system might underscore the potential of immune based therapy approaches. Alternatively, it may suggest that such therapies will only lead to selection of tumour cells w...

  8. On the Roles of Escape Erosion and the Relaxation of Craters on Pluto

    OpenAIRE

    Stern, S. Alan; Porter, Simon; Zangari, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Pluto and its satellites will be the most distant objects ever reconnoitered when NASA's New Horizons spacecraft conducts its intensive flyby of this system in 2015. The size-frequency distribution (SFD) of craters on the surfaces in the Pluto system have long been expected to provide a useful measure of the size distribution of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) down to much smaller size scales than presently observed. However, currently predicted escape rates of Pluto's atmosphere suggest that of o...

  9. Low LET radiolysis escape yields for reducing radicals and H2 in pressurized high temperature water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterniczuk, Marcin; Yakabuskie, Pamela A.; Wren, J. Clara; Jacob, Jasmine A.; Bartels, David M.

    2016-04-01

    Low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiolysis escape yields (G values) are reported for the sum (G(radH)+G(e-)aq) and for G(H2) in subcritical water up to 350 °C. The scavenger system 1-10 mM acetate/0.001 M hydroxide/0.00048 M N2O was used with simultaneous mass spectroscopic detection of H2 and N2 product. Temperature-dependent measurements were carried out with 2.5 MeV electrons from a van de Graaff accelerator, while room temperature calibration measurements were done with a 60Co gamma source. The concentrations and dose range were carefully chosen so that initial spur chemistry is not perturbed and the N2 product yield corresponds to those reducing radicals that escape recombination in pure water. In comparison with a recent review recommendation of Elliot and Bartels (AECL report 153-127160-450-001, 2009), the measured reducing radical yield is seven percent smaller at room temperature but in fairly good agreement above 150 °C. The H2 escape yield is in good agreement throughout the temperature range with several previous studies that used much larger radical scavenging rates. Previous analysis of earlier high temperature measurements of Gesc(radOH) is shown to be flawed, although the actual G values may be nearly correct. The methodology used in the present report greatly reduces the range of possible error and puts the high temperature escape yields for low-LET radiation on a much firmer quantitative foundation than was previously available.

  10. Longitudinal asymmetry of the Jovian magnetosphere and the periodic escape of energetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, T.W.; Dessler, A.J.

    1976-07-01

    We utilize an earlier model of the Jovian magnetosphere in which the centrifugal stress of corotating plasma distends the outer magnetosphere and opens the tail field. Because of a longitudinal asymmetry in the ionospheric plasma source strength, caused principally by the nonaxisymmetric surface field, the closed field region in the tail expands and contracts with the rotation period, resulting in a 10-hour modulation of the flux of energetic particles escaping from the magnetosphere into interplanetary space. (AIP)

  11. Longitudinal asymmetry of the Jovian magnetosphere and the periodic escape of energetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. W.; Dessler, A. J.

    1976-01-01

    An earlier model of the Jovian magnetosphere is utilized in which the centrifugal stress of corotating plasma distends the outer magnetosphere and opens the tail field. Because of a longitudinal asymmetry in the ionospheric plasma source strength, caused principally by the nonaxisymmetric surface field, the closed-field region in the tail expands and contracts with the rotation period, resulting in a 10-hour modulation of the flux of energetic particles escaping from the magnetosphere into interplanetary space.

  12. Approach for Service Life Extension of Explosive Devices for Aircraft Escape Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, L. J.; Schimmel, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The service life evaluation of explosive devices used in a wide variety of aircraft escape systems is described. The purpose was to develop a service extension approach, supported by tests on candidate devices, to evaluate the effects of service, age, and degradation, and allow responsible, conservative, service life determinations. An overview is given on the recommended approach and experimental procedures for accurate service evaluations with test results on rigid and flexible explosive transfer lines, one-way transfers, and flexible linear shaped charges.

  13. First escaping fast ion mesurements in ITER-like geometry using an activation probe

    OpenAIRE

    BONHEURE Georges; Hult, Mikael; Fenyvesi, A.; ÄKÄSLOMPOLO S.; Carralero, D.; DEGERING Detlef; DE-VISMES OTT A.; Garcia-Munoz, M; Gmeiner, B.; Herrmann, A.; Laubenstein, Matthias; LUTTER GUILLAUME; Mlynar, J.; Mueller, H. W.; ROHDE V.

    2015-01-01

    More research is needed to develop suitable diagnostics for measuring alpha particle confinement in ITER and techniques relevant for fusion reactor conditions need further development. Based on nuclear reactions, the activation probe is a novel concept first tested in JET. It may offer a more robust solution for performing alpha particle measurements in ITER. This paper describes the first escaping fast ion measurements performed at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak using an activation probe. A det...

  14. The Relationship between Endorsing Gambling as an Escape and the Display of Gambling Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has reported a strong relationship between endorsing gambling as an escape and problem/pathological gambling as measured by the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS). The present study recruited 249 university students to complete the Gambling Functional Assessment-Revised (GFA-R), which measures the function of the respondent’s gambling, as well as the SOGS and the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI), which was designed to identify gambling problems in the general population...

  15. Comparison of cap lamp and laser illumination for detecting visual escape cues in smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Lutz, T.J.; Sammarco, J.J.; Srednicki, J.R.; Gallagher, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Illuminating Engineering Society of North America reports that an underground mine is the most difficult environment to illuminate (Rea, 2000). Researchers at the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) are conducting ongoing studies designed to explore different lighting technologies for improving mine safety. Underground miners use different visual cues to escape from a smoke-filled environment. Primary and sec...

  16. Escaping Dante’s hell with an informed virtual environment for interactive bodies in movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rousseaux Francis

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the question of Informed Virtual Environments from the point of view of some philosophical and ethical key-issues. By browsing some eclectic experiences like dancing, serving Asturian cider, trying to escape Dante’s Hell or manufacturing a tyre, important questions are raised, and some answers are sketched about some possible ways of designing our future environments: but gestures have then to be considered as cultural objects too, being not reducible to their physical traces.

  17. Viral Escape in the Central Nervous System with Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1

    OpenAIRE

    Béguelin, Charles Antoine; Vázquez, Miriam; Bertschi, Manuel; Yerly, S; de Jong, Denise; Gutbrod, Klemens; Rauch, Andri; Cusini, Alexia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the case of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 who developed ataxia and neurocognitive impairment due to viral escape within the central nervous system (CNS) with a multidrug-resistant HIV-1 despite long-term viral suppression in plasma. Antiretroviral therapy optimization with drugs with high CNS penetration led to viral suppression in the CSF, regression of ataxia, and improvement of neurocognitive symptoms.

  18. Viral Escape in the Central Nervous System with Multidrug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguelin, C; Vázquez, M; Bertschi, M; Yerly, S; de Jong, D; Gutbrod, K; Rauch, A; Cusini, A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report the case of a patient infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 who developed ataxia and neurocognitive impairment due to viral escape within the central nervous system (CNS) with a multidrug-resistant HIV-1 despite long-term viral suppression in plasma. Antiretroviral therapy optimization with drugs with high CNS penetration led to viral suppression in the CSF, regression of ataxia, and improvement of neurocognitive symptoms. PMID:26885540

  19. Ultra-fast escape maneuver of an octopus-inspired robot

    OpenAIRE

    Weymouth, G D; Subramaniam, V.; Triantafyllou, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    We design and test an octopus-inspired flexible hull robot that demonstrates outstanding fast-starting performance. The robot is hyper-inflated with water, and then rapidly deflates to expel the fluid so as to power the escape maneuver. Using this robot we verify for the first time in laboratory testing that rapid size-change can substantially reduce separation in bluff bodies traveling several body lengths, and recover fluid energy which can be employed to improve the propulsive performance....

  20. New constraints on the escape of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies using ionization-parameter mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zastrow, Jordan; Oey, M. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Veilleux, Sylvain [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); McDonald, Michael, E-mail: jazast@umich.edu [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    The fate of ionizing radiation in starburst galaxies is key to understanding cosmic reionization. However, the galactic parameters on which the escape fraction of ionizing radiation depend are not well understood. Ionization-parameter mapping provides a simple, yet effective, way to study the radiative transfer in starburst galaxies. We obtain emission-line ratio maps of [S III]/[S II] for six, nearby, dwarf starbursts: NGC 178, NGC 1482, NGC 1705, NGC 3125, NGC 7126, and He 2-10. The narrowband images are obtained with the Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter at Las Campanas Observatory. Using these data, we previously reported the discovery of an optically thin ionization cone in NGC 5253, and here we also discover a similar ionization cone in NGC 3125. This latter cone has an opening angle of 40° ± 5° (0.4 sr), indicating that the passageways through which ionizing radiation may travel correspond to a small solid angle. Additionally, there are three sample galaxies that have winds and/or superbubble activity, which should be conducive to escaping radiation, yet they are optically thick. These results support the scenario that an orientation bias limits our ability to directly detect escaping Lyman continuum in many starburst galaxies. A comparison of the star formation properties and histories of the optically thin and thick galaxies is consistent with the model that high escape fractions are limited to galaxies that are old enough (≳3 Myr) for mechanical feedback to have cleared optically thin passageways in the interstellar medium, but young enough (≲5 Myr) that the ionizing stars are still present.

  1. Thermal Escape from a Metastable State in Periodically Driven Josephson Junctions

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Guozhu; Jian CHEN; Xu, Weiwei; Ji, Zhengming; Kang, Lin; Wu, Peiheng; Mao, Guangfeng; Dong, Ning; Yu, Yang; Xing, Dingyu

    2006-01-01

    Resonant activation and noise-enhanced stability were observed in an underdamped real physical system, i.e., Josephson tunnel junctions. With a weak sinusoidal driving force applied, the thermal activated escape from a potential well underwent resonance-like behavior as a function of the driving frequency. The resonance also crucially depended on the initial condition of the system. Numerical simulations showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Accounting for escape mortality in fisheries: implications for stock productivity and optimal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew R; Schindler, Daniel E; Essington, Timothy E; Hilborn, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have considered the management implications of mortality to target fish stocks caused by non-retention in commercial harvest gear (escape mortality). We demonstrate the magnitude of this previously unquantified source of mortality and its implications for the population dynamics of exploited stocks, biological metrics, stock productivity, and optimal management. Non-retention in commercial gillnet fisheries for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) is common and often leads to delayed mortality in spawning populations. This represents losses, not only to fishery harvest, but also in future recruitment to exploited stocks. We estimated incidence of non-retention in Alaskan gillnet fisheries for sockeye salmon (O. nerka) and found disentanglement injuries to be extensive and highly variable between years. Injuries related to non-retention were noted in all spawning populations, and incidence of injury ranged from 6% to 44% of escaped salmon across nine river systems over five years. We also demonstrate that non-retention rates strongly correlate with fishing effort. We applied maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches to stock-recruitment analyses, discounting estimates of spawning salmon to account for fishery-related mortality in escaped fish. Discounting spawning stock estimates as a function of annual fishing effort improved model fits to historical stock-recruitment data in most modeled systems. This suggests the productivity of exploited stocks has been systematically underestimated. It also suggests that indices of fishing effort may be used to predict escape mortality and correct for losses. Our results illustrate how explicitly accounting for collateral effects of fishery extraction may improve estimates of productivity and better inform management metrics derived from estimates of stock-recruitment analyses. PMID:24640534

  3. Quantum and classical resonant escapes of a strongly driven Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H. F.; Zhu, X. B.; Peng, Z. H.; Cao, W. H.; Cui, D. J.; Tian, Ye; Chen, G. H.; Zheng, D. N.; Jing, X. N.; Lu, Li; Zhao, S. P.; Han, Siyuan

    2010-04-01

    The properties of phase escape in a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) at 25 mK, which is well below quantum-to-classical crossover temperature Tcr , in the presence of strong resonant ac driving have been investigated. The SQUID contains two Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb tunnel junctions with Josephson inductance much larger than the loop inductance so it can be viewed as a single junction having adjustable critical current. We find that with increasing microwave power W and at certain frequencies ν and ν/2 , the single primary peak in the switching current distribution, which is the result of macroscopic quantum tunneling of the phase across the junction, first shifts toward lower bias current I and then a resonant peak develops. These results are explained by quantum resonant phase escape involving single and two photons with microwave-suppressed potential barrier. As W further increases, the primary peak gradually disappears and the resonant peak grows into a single one while shifting further to lower I . At certain W , a second resonant peak appears, which can locate at very low I depending on the value of ν . Analysis based on the classical equation of motion shows that such resonant peak can arise from the resonant escape of the phase particle with extremely large oscillation amplitude resulting from bifurcation of the nonlinear system. Our experimental result and theoretical analysis demonstrate that at T≪Tcr , escape of the phase particle could be dominated by classical process, such as dynamical bifurcation of nonlinear systems under strong ac driving.

  4. Escaping Poverty

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ While the global economic crisis still threatens to trap tens of millions of people in extreme poverty, alleviation initiatives in China are gaining new momentum and increasing recognition from the international community. From lifting innumerable people out of poverty by satisfying basic needs of food, clothes and shelter during the past three decades, the Chinese Government's antipoverty drive is now to focus more on helping rural poor to start small businesses and guaranteeing access to public services and social welfare.

  5. Semi-automatic inspecting instrument for watch escape wheel based on machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong; Wang, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Jin; Cai, Zhen-xing; Liu, Xin-bo

    2011-12-01

    Escape wheel as a typical precision micro-machinery part is one of the most precision parts in one mechanical watch. A new inspecting instrument based on machine vision technology used to achieve semi-automatic inspection of watch escape wheel is introduced in this paper. This instrument makes use of high resolution CCD sensor and independent designed lens as the imaging system. It can not only achieve to image an area with 7mm diameter once, but also has the resolving power in micrometer and cooperates with two-dimensional moving station to achieve a continuous and automatic measurement of the work pieces placed in array type. In which, the following aspects are highlighted: measuring princeple and process, the basic components of array type measuring workbench, positioning process and verticality, parallelism and other precision adjusting mechanism. Cooperating with novelty escape wheel preparation tool this instrument forms an array type semi-automatic measuring mode. At present, the instrument has been successfully running in the industry field.

  6. The Lyman Continuum Escape Fraction of The Cosmic Horseshoe: A Test of Indirect Estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Vasei, Kaveh; Shapley, Alice E; Quider, Anna M; Alavi, Anahita; Rafelski, Marc; Steidel, Charles C; Pettini, Max; Lewis, Geraint F

    2016-01-01

    High redshift star-forming galaxies are likely responsible for the reionization of the Universe, yet direct detection of their escaping ionizing (Lyman continuum) photons has proven to be extremely challenging. In this study, we search for escaping Lyman continuum of the Cosmic Horseshoe, a gravitationally lensed, star-forming galaxy at z=2.38 with a large magnification of $\\sim24$. Transmission at wavelengths of low ionization interstellar absorption lines in the rest-frame ultraviolet suggest a patchy, partially transparent interstellar medium. This makes it an ideal candidate for direct detection of the Lyman continuum. We obtained a 10-orbit Hubble near-UV image using the WFC3/UVIS F275W filter that probes wavelengths just below the Lyman limit at the redshift of the Horseshoe in an attempt to detect escaping Lyman continuum radiation. After fully accounting for the uncertainties in the opacity of the intergalactic medium as well as accounting for the charge transfer inefficiency in the WFC3 CCDs, we find...

  7. TAP-independent self-peptides enhance T cell recognition of immune-escaped tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduijn, Elien M; Sluijter, Marjolein; Querido, Bianca J; Oliveira, Cláudia C; Achour, Adnane; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; van Hall, Thorbald

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells frequently escape from CD8+ T cell recognition by abrogating MHC-I antigen presentation. Deficiency in processing components, like the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), results in strongly decreased surface display of peptide/MHC-I complexes. We previously identified a class of hidden self-antigens known as T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing (TEIPP), which emerge on tumor cells with such processing defects. In the present study, we analyzed thymus selection and peripheral behavior of T cells with specificity for the prototypic TEIPP antigen, the "self" TRH4 peptide/Db complex. TEIPP T cells were efficiently selected in the thymus, egressed with a naive phenotype, and could be exploited for immunotherapy against immune-escaped, TAP-deficient tumor cells expressing low levels of MHC-I (MHC-Ilo). In contrast, overt thymus deletion and functionally impaired TEIPP T cells were observed in mice deficient for TAP1 due to TEIPP antigen presentation on all body cells in these mice. Our results strongly support the concept that TEIPPs derive from ubiquitous, nonmutated self-antigens and constitute a class of immunogenic neoantigens that are unmasked during tumor immune evasion. These data suggest that TEIPP-specific CD8+ T cells are promising candidates in the treatment of tumors that have escaped from conventional immunotherapies. PMID:26784543

  8. TAP-independent self-peptides enhance T cell recognition of immune-escaped tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorduijn, Elien M.; Sluijter, Marjolein; Querido, Bianca J.; Oliveira, Cláudia C.; Achour, Adnane; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van Hall, Thorbald

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells frequently escape from CD8+ T cell recognition by abrogating MHC-I antigen presentation. Deficiency in processing components, like the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), results in strongly decreased surface display of peptide/MHC-I complexes. We previously identified a class of hidden self-antigens known as T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing (TEIPP), which emerge on tumor cells with such processing defects. In the present study, we analyzed thymus selection and peripheral behavior of T cells with specificity for the prototypic TEIPP antigen, the “self” TRH4 peptide/Db complex. TEIPP T cells were efficiently selected in the thymus, egressed with a naive phenotype, and could be exploited for immunotherapy against immune-escaped, TAP-deficient tumor cells expressing low levels of MHC-I (MHC-Ilo). In contrast, overt thymus deletion and functionally impaired TEIPP T cells were observed in mice deficient for TAP1 due to TEIPP antigen presentation on all body cells in these mice. Our results strongly support the concept that TEIPPs derive from ubiquitous, nonmutated self-antigens and constitute a class of immunogenic neoantigens that are unmasked during tumor immune evasion. These data suggest that TEIPP-specific CD8+ T cells are promising candidates in the treatment of tumors that have escaped from conventional immunotherapies. PMID:26784543

  9. Escape dynamics and fractal basins boundaries in the three-dimensional Earth-Moon system

    CERN Document Server

    Zotos, Euaggelos E

    2016-01-01

    The orbital dynamics of a spacecraft, or a comet, or an asteroid in the Earth-Moon system in a scattering region around the Moon using the three dimensional version of the circular restricted three-body problem is numerically investigated. The test particle can move in bounded orbits around the Moon or escape through the openings around the Lagrange points $L_1$ and $L_2$ or even collide with the surface of the Moon. We explore in detail the first four of the five possible Hill's regions configurations depending on the value of the Jacobi constant which is of course related with the total orbital energy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis on the phase space mixing by classifying initial conditions of orbits in several two-dimensional types of planes and distinguishing between four types of motion: (i) ordered bounded, (ii) trapped chaotic, (iii) escaping and (iv) collisional. In particular, we locate the different basins and we relate them with the corresponding spatial distributions of the escape and c...

  10. The Hyades Cluster: Identification of a Planetary System and Escaping White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, B.; Xu, S.; Klein, B.; Jura, M.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, some hot DA-type white dwarfs have been proposed to plausibly be escaping members of the Hyades. We used hydrogen Balmer lines to measure the radial velocities of seven such stars and confirm that three, and perhaps two others, are/were indeed cluster members and one is not. The other candidate Hyad is strongly magnetic and its membership status remains uncertain. The photospheres of at least one quarter of field white dwarf stars are "polluted" by elements heavier than helium that have been accreted. These stars are orbited by extended planetary systems that contain both debris belts and major planets. We surveyed the seven classical single Hyades white dwarfs and the newly identified (escaping) Hyades white dwarfs and found calcium in the photosphere of LP 475-242 of type DBA (now DBAZ), thus implying the presence of an orbiting planetary system. The spectrum of white dwarf GD 31, which may be, but probably is not, an escaping member of the Hyades, displays calcium absorption lines; these originate either from the interstellar medium or, less likely, from a gaseous circumstellar disk. If GD 31 was once a Hyades member, then it would be the first identified white dwarf Hyad with a cooling age >340 Myr.

  11. Two Escape Mechanisms of Influenza A Virus to a Broadly Neutralizing Stalk-Binding Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Ning; Swem, Lee R.; Reichelt, Mike; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Luis, Elizabeth; Park, Summer; Fouts, Ashley; Lupardus, Patrick; Wu, Thomas D.; Li, Olga; McBride, Jacqueline; Lawrence, Michael; Xu, Min; Tan, Man-Wah

    2016-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the stalk region of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA) are effective in blocking virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The highly conserved epitopes recognized by these antibodies are critical for the membrane fusion function of HA and therefore less likely to be permissive for virus mutational escape. Here we report three resistant viruses of the A/Perth/16/2009 strain that were selected in the presence of a broadly neutralizing stalk-binding antibody. The three resistant viruses harbor three different mutations in the HA stalk: (1) Gln387Lys; (2) Asp391Tyr; (3) Asp391Gly. The Gln387Lys mutation completely abolishes binding of the antibody to the HA stalk epitope. The other two mutations, Asp391Tyr and Asp391Gly, do not affect antibody binding at neutral pH and only slightly reduce binding at low pH. Interestingly, they enhance the fusion ability of the HA, representing a novel mechanism that allows productive membrane fusion even in the presence of antibody and hence virus escape from antibody neutralization. Therefore, these mutations illustrate two different resistance mechanisms used by IAV to escape broadly neutralizing stalk-binding antibodies. Compared to the wild type virus, the resistant viruses release fewer progeny viral particles during replication and are more sensitive to Tamiflu, suggesting reduced viral fitness. PMID:27351973

  12. Residual Rate and Escape Route Preference of Juvenile Carassius auratus grandoculis Reared in Paddy Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehata, Masayoshi; Ohtsuka, Taisuke; Mizuno, Toshiaki; Kanao, Shigefumi

    Gathering paddy-reared juvenile fish (0-year fish) at the paddy's drain outlet at the time of the mid-summer drainage often results in many unharvested fish being left behind. To devise ways of reducing this wastage as much as possible, we performed two experiments during the irrigation season in modernized, consolidated paddy fields as follows. Experiment I: an investigation into the numbers of juvenile Carassius auratus grandoculis that succeeded in leaving a paddy field through the drain outlet. Experiment II: an investigation into their preferred route of escape from the paddy, either via the drain outlet or the water inlet, when both were available. In Experiment I, more than 39.1% of the number of fish that escaped from the paddy were still left behind in the paddy more than three days after the mid-summer drainage had begun. In Experiment II, most of the juveniles, i.e., 99.8% of the fish that escaped from the paddy, left from the water inlet. These results suggest that greater efficiency in reducing the numbers of unharvested juvenile fish in paddy culture may be achieved by first capturing fish at the drain outlet with the irrigation water shut off, and then partially refilling the paddy while using traps or other gear to catch the remaining fish that are attracted towards the water inlet.

  13. Outgassing History and Escape of the Martian Atmosphere and Water Inventory

    CERN Document Server

    Lammer, H; Karatekin, Ö; Morschhauser, A; Niles, P B; Mousis, O; Odert, P; Möstl, U V; Breuer, D; Dehant, V; Grott, M; Gröller, H; Hauber, E; Pham, L B S

    2015-01-01

    The evolution and escape of the martian atmosphere and the planet's water inventory can be separated into an early and late evolutionary epoch. The first epoch started from the planet's origin and lasted $\\sim$500 Myr. Because of the high EUV flux of the young Sun and Mars' low gravity it was accompanied by hydrodynamic blow-off of hydrogen and strong thermal escape rates of dragged heavier species such as O and C atoms. After the main part of the protoatmosphere was lost, impact-related volatiles and mantle outgassing may have resulted in accumulation of a secondary CO$_2$ atmosphere of a few tens to a few hundred mbar around $\\sim$4--4.3 Gyr ago. The evolution of the atmospheric surface pressure and water inventory of such a secondary atmosphere during the second epoch which lasted from the end of the Noachian until today was most likely determined by a complex interplay of various nonthermal atmospheric escape processes, impacts, carbonate precipitation, and serpentinization during the Hesperian and Amazon...

  14. Indirect Evidence for Escaping Ionizing Photons in Local Lyman Break Galaxy Analogs

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandroff, Rachael; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Overzier, Roderik; Leitherer, Claus

    2015-01-01

    A population of early star-forming galaxies is the leading candidate for the re-ionization of the universe. It is still unclear what conditions and physical processes would enable a significant fraction of the ionizing photons to escape from these gas-rich galaxies. In this paper we present the results of the analysis of HST COS far-UV spectroscopy plus ancillary multi-waveband data of a sample of 22 low-redshift galaxies that are good analogs to typical star-forming galaxies at high-redshift. We measure three parameters that provide indirect evidence of the escape of ionizing radiation: (1) the residual intensity in the cores of saturated interstellar low-ionization absorption-lines. (2) The relative amount of blue-shifted Lyman alpha line emission, and (3) the relative weakness of the [SII] optical emission lines. We use these diagnostics to rank-order our sample in terms of likely leakiness, noting that a direct measure of escaping Lyman continuum has recently been made for one of the leakiest members of o...

  15. Neurological effects on startle response and escape from predation by medaka exposed to organic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, R.; Drummond, R.; Hammermeister, D.; Bradbury, S. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1995-12-31

    Simultaneous electrophysiological and behavioral studies were performed on juvenile Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) exposed to representative neurotoxic organic chemicals at sublethal concentrations. Non-invasive recordings were made of the electrical impulses generated within giant neuronal Mauthner cells, associated interneurons or motoneurons, and musculature, all of which initiate the startle or escape response in fish. Timing in milliseconds between these electrical sequelae was measured for each fish before and at 24 and 48 hours exposure to a chemical. Also noted was the number of startle responses to number of stimuli ratio (R/S). Other groups of medaka were fed to bluegills and consumption times recorded to assess their ability to escape predation. These results were compared to neurophysiological effect levels. Phenol, 2,4-dinitrophenol, chlorpyrifos, fenvalerate, and 1-octanol impaired the ability of medaka to escape predation at all concentrations. Medaka were more susceptible to predation in high concentrations of carbaryl and strychnine, but less susceptible at low concentrations, whereas the reverse was true for endosulfan. The variety of neurological effects detected at these concentrations suggest that different mechanisms may be responsible. Phenol and strychnine affected Mauthner cell to motoneuron transmission, chlorpyrifos and carbaryl showed neuromuscular effects, and R/S was affected by most chemicals. Although a variety of neurotoxic mechanisms were examined, the exposure threshold for significant effects for each specific compound was found to be consistent for both the neurophysiological and behavioral endpoints.

  16. Alternative strategies of seed predator escape by early-germinating oaks in Asia and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xianfeng; Yang, Yueqin; Curtis, Rachel; Bartlow, Andrew W; Agosta, Salvatore J; Steele, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    Early germination of white oaks is widely viewed as an evolutionary strategy to escape rodent predation; yet, the mechanism by which this is accomplished is poorly understood. We report that chestnut oak Quercus montana (CO) and white oak Q. alba (WO) (from North America), and oriental cork oak Q. variabilis (OO) and Mongolian oak Q. mongolica (MO) (from Asia) can escape predation and successfully establish from only taproots. During germination in autumn, cotyledonary petioles of acorns of CO and WO elongate and push the plumule out of the cotyledons, whereas OO and MO extend only the hypocotyls and retain the plumule within the cotyledons. Experiments showed that the pruned taproots (>6 cm) of CO and WO acorns containing the plumule successfully germinated and survived, and the pruned taproots (≥12 cm) of OO and MO acorns without the plumule successfully regenerated along with the detached acorns, thus producing two seedlings. We argue that these two distinct regeneration morphologies reflect alternative strategies for escaping seed predation.

  17. Finite escape fraction for ultrahigh energy collisions around Kerr naked singularity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mandar Patil; Pankaj S Joshi

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the issue of observability of high-energy collisions around Kerr naked singularity and show that results are in contrast with the Kerr black hole case. We had shown that it would be possible to have ultrahigh energy collisions between the particles close to the location = M around the Kerr naked singularity if the Kerr spin parameter transcends unity by an infinitesimally small amount → 1+. The collision is between initially ingoing particle that turns back as an outgoing particle due to angular momentum barrier, with another ingoing particle. We assume that two massless particles are produced in such a collision and their angular distribution is isotropic in the centre-of-mass frame. We calculated the escape fraction for the massless particles to reach infinity. We showed that the escape fraction is finite and approximately equal to half for the ultrahigh energy collisions. Therefore, the particles produced in high-energy collisions would escape to infinity providing the signature of the nature of basic interactions at those energies. This result is in contrast with the case of extremal Kerr black hole where almost all particles produced in high-energy collisions are absorbed by the black hole rendering collisions unobservable.

  18. Symmetry breaking on density in escaping ants: experiment and alarm pheromone model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Li

    Full Text Available The symmetry breaking observed in nature is fascinating. This symmetry breaking is observed in both human crowds and ant colonies. In such cases, when escaping from a closed space with two symmetrically located exits, one exit is used more often than the other. Group size and density have been reported as having no significant impact on symmetry breaking, and the alignment rule has been used to model symmetry breaking. Density usually plays important roles in collective behavior. However, density is not well-studied in symmetry breaking, which forms the major basis of this paper. The experiment described in this paper on an ant colony displays an increase then decrease of symmetry breaking versus ant density. This result suggests that a Vicsek-like model with an alignment rule may not be the correct model for escaping ants. Based on biological facts that ants use pheromones to communicate, rather than seeing how other individuals move, we propose a simple yet effective alarm pheromone model. The model results agree well with the experimental outcomes. As a measure, this paper redefines symmetry breaking as the collective asymmetry by deducing the random fluctuations. This research indicates that ants deposit and respond to the alarm pheromone, and the accumulation of this biased information sharing leads to symmetry breaking, which suggests true fundamental rules of collective escape behavior in ants.

  19. Comparing Effective Treatments for Attention-Maintained and Escape- Maintained Behaviors in Children with Behavior Disorders: Brief Review and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Worcester

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This literature review compares treatment for attention-maintainedversus escape maintained aberrant behavior in children with behavior disorders. Specifically, studies utilizing time out procedures, differential reinforcement procedures, noncontingent reinforcement, and functional communication training are discussed. It was found that these are effective treatments for attention-maintained behaviors; while escape extinction, positive and negative reinforcement, functional communication training, breaks, and altering the non-preferred stimulus are discussed as effective treatments for escape-maintained behaviors. Similarities between treatment and implications for practitioners are discussed.

  20. Antigenic mapping of an H9N2 avian influenza virus reveals two discrete antigenic sites and a novel mechanism of immune escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Thomas; Reddy, Kolli; James, Joe; Adamiak, Beata; Barclay, Wendy; Shelton, Holly; Iqbal, Munir

    2016-01-01

    H9N2 avian influenza virus is a major cause of poultry production loss across Asia leading to the wide use of vaccines. Efficacy of vaccines is often compromised due to the rapid emergence of antigenic variants. To improve the effectiveness of vaccines in the field, a better understanding of the antigenic epitopes of the major antigen, hemagglutinin, is required. To address this, a panel of nine monoclonal antibodies were generated against a contemporary Pakistani H9N2 isolate, which represents a major Asian H9N2 viral lineage. Antibodies were characterized in detail and used to select a total of 26 unique ‘escape’ mutants with substitutions across nine different amino acid residues in hemagglutinin including seven that have not been described as antigenic determinants for H9N2 viruses before. Competition assays and structural mapping revealed two novel, discrete antigenic sites “H9-A” and “H9-B”. Additionally, a second subset of escape mutants contained amino acid deletions within the hemagglutinin receptor binding site. This constitutes a novel method of escape for group 1 hemagglutinins and could represent an alternative means for H9N2 viruses to overcome vaccine induced immunity. These results will guide surveillance efforts for arising antigenic variants as well as evidence based vaccine seed selection and vaccine design. PMID:26738561