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Sample records for campaign promotes doubling

  1. National promotional campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekevski Siniša

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking an attention to promotion as operational variable in marketing effort, author focused on so called ways of creating national images. As a case of very interesting activity paper discuss an experience of regional chamber of Croatia with activities in upgrading international recognition of national products as well as country as destination in such context.

  2. Do vegetarian marketing campaigns promote a vegan diet?

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    James, Waters

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines whether vegetarian marketing campaigns promote a vegan diet. Our trivariate model of omnivorous, vegetarian, and vegan consumption is estimated using twenty years of UK data. For short-lived campaigns, we find no persistent effect, but observe a rise and fall in vegan numbers during adjustment. For long-running campaigns, we find that for every person who adopts a vegetarian diet in such a campaign, around 0.34 people adopt a vegan diet. In a campaign to market veganis...

  3. Multimedia campaign on a shoestring: promoting 'Stay Active - Stay Independent' among seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John-Leader, Franklin; Van Beurden, Eric; Barnett, Lisa; Hughes, Karen; Newman, Beth; Sternberg, Jason; Dietrich, Uta

    2008-04-01

    This paper describes a multimedia campaign implemented in rural New South Wales on a budget smaller than that typical of many published campaigns. The 'To Be Young at Heart - Stay Active Stay Independent' (SASI) campaign was one arm of a multi-strategic program to reduce falls among seniors by promoting physical activity. This 18-month campaign used social marketing techniques. Central to this campaign was strong formative research, significant use of corporate, community and media partnerships and a detailed, strategic distribution plan. Campaign reach was evaluated by a community intercept survey. A variety of high-quality information, education and communication (IEC) resources were developed. Overall, the campaign cost was calculated at USD 191,000. The actual cost of USD 42,000 (excluding staff time) was used to generate almost double this amount in sponsorship (USD 82,000). In the mid-campaign reach survey, 36% recognised the campaign and attributed this to television (58%), newspaper (33%), poster (13%) and bus-back advertising (8%). Of these respondents, 21% reported seeking information about physical activity, 33% reported increased intention to be more active, and 22% reported becoming more active as a result of the campaign. It is possible to develop and deliver a well-designed, multi-media campaign on a limited budget by using sound formative research and engaging community and corporate partners to generate sponsorship. An effective distribution strategy is crucial and may require additional partnerships at State or national level.

  4. A marketing campaign to promote screening for oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Amid I; Jedele, Jenefer M; Lim, Sungwoo; Tellez, Marisol

    2012-09-01

    Organizers of the Detroit Oral Cancer Prevention Project at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, launched a multifaceted media campaign targeted toward a high-risk population to raise awareness about oral cancer, educate the public regarding the importance of early detection and increase screening rates. The authors present data about the effectiveness of the campaign with regard to the screening behaviors of medical and dental providers. Before the start of the campaign and during each of the three years of the campaign, the authors mailed surveys to random samples of physicians and dentists practicing in targeted and non-targeted areas. More dentists than physicians reported screening patients routinely, and dentists reported that they referred more patients for biopsy or further evaluation compared with physicians. A larger proportion of dentists and physicians in the targeted area than in the nontargeted area reported that their patients had seen or heard the advertisements. A larger proportion of dentists in the targeted area than in the nontargeted area reported an increase in patients' questions and requests for screening, even after the authors accounted for demographic characteristics (adjusted odds ratio = 2.47). The survey findings show that the media campaign was effective in influencing providers' screening for signs and symptoms of oral cancer. An increase in patients' requests for screening as a result of the implementation of mass media campaigns may promote oral cancer screening and improve patients' chances of survival.

  5. The promotion of phisical activity in shockvertising campaigns

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    Widawska-Stanisz Agnieszka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Preferring passive life style and the problems with obesity eventuating from this fact, have become very common in many countries. According to research, the physical activity of Poles turns out to be under the average for EU countries. (Sport activity of Poles, 2015, p.3 The promotion of physical activity is one of the most important tasks of public health. The publicity of physical activity, habits of caring for health and wellbeing should be realized by national and local authorities, media and organisations connected w sport and recreation. Next, there are subjects providing sport- recreation services, which use properly worked out marketing programs, apart from purely business goals, they can also become the promoters of physical activity. The aim of this article is to present shocking advertisement as the part of social campaigns influencing the changing the passive lifestyle for the active one. Shown in this article research was conducted among students of one university. The goal of research was the assessment of emotions which were aroused by showing examples of campaigns and their influence on the willingness to take up physical activities by the youth. The article contains the examples of campaigns and the results of research into using this kind of actions among young people. It was assumed, that the showing shocking messages concerning the consequences of lack physical activity, influences on taking up such activity by young people.

  6. The double jeopardy of sales promotions.

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    Jones, J P

    1990-01-01

    The maturing of most consumer markets in the United States has put great pressure on manufacturers in their search for growth. They have concentrated on building sales and expanding share proportions in the stagnant markets with devices like niche products, product extensions, mergers, and international ventures. They have shifted emphasis to sales promotions at the expense of advertising. But promotions, when you come right down to it, mean price reductions. Trade promotions are almost always rebates, and consumer promotions are usually temporary price reductions or coupons. The cost in reduced profit, demonstrated mathematically through calculations of price elasticity, is severe. Besides, when the promotion is over, the manufacturer has not moved forward an inch in shoring up the brand franchise. Promotions bring volatile demand, whereas the producer seeks stable demand. By sustaining a brand image and building customer loyalty, on the other hand, theme advertising can stabilize demand. Moreover, this type of advertising is less likely than promotion is to invite destructive competitive retaliation. Calculation of the advertising elasticity of a brand indicates that sometimes even modest sales increases can produce healthy profit improvement. In a well-planned marketing campaign, there is often good reason to include trade or consumer promotion--to counter a leading competitor's moves, for example. But there is no point in carrying out wild swings at rivals in a struggle for market share. Mathematical techniques can aid the efficiency of marketing planning and put on a more rational basis the decision on where to put the dollars.

  7. THE IMPACT OF PROMOTION CAMPAIGNS OVER THE COMPANIES IN THE CURRENT ECONOMIC CONTEXT

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    FRÂNCU LAURENȚIU GABRIEL

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In an increasingly competitive business environment, promotion campaigns have a great significance in terms of market positioning of companies. The promotion campaigns are having a key role, sometimes even vital, because the companies depend on their results. An remarkable promotion campaign will lead to an increase in company sales and a better market positioning. The brand awareness will increase and the customers will become more loyal and may even be attracted new customers. This paper aims to analyze the impact of promotion campaigns over the courier companies from Romania. Thus, will be analysed the courier companies market and the competitive advantage in this market when it is used an efficient strategy of promotion campaigns.

  8. Image Gently: A campaign to promote radiation protection for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the goal of raising awareness and developing stakeholder educational tools for the appropriate imaging of children, the Image Gently campaign was launched in 2007. This campaign is a product of a multidisciplinary alliance with international representation which now numbers nearly 100 medical and dental ...

  9. B Butterfly Campaign: A social marketing campaign to promote normal childbirth among first-time pregnant women.

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    Darsareh, Fatemeh; Aghamolaei, Teamur; Rajaei, Minoo; Madani, Abdoulhossain; Zare, Shahram

    2018-06-18

    The steep increase and inappropriateness of caesarean birth represent a healthcare problem in Iran. The purpose of study was to evaluate the effect of a campaign based on social marketing to promote normal childbirth. The study was designed as a prospective case control study. The social marketing campaign was implemented from March 2016 to January 2017. A demographic data questionnaire, obstetrical history questionnaire, maternal knowledge assessment questionnaire, and maternal health belief questionnaire comprised the instruments for this study. Only women planning a caesarean birth without any medical indications for the caesarean were enrolled in the study as a case. Those who met the same inclusion criteria and did not want to participate in the campaign were assigned to the control group. In total, 350 first-time pregnant women who composed the campaign group (n=194) and control group (n=156) completed the study. The mean baseline level of knowledge and Health Belief Model component score did not differ between the two groups at baseline. However, after the campaign, knowledge scores, perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, self-efficacy, and cues to action scores differed significantly between the campaign and control groups. The follow-up of all participants in both groups showed that 35.6% (n=69) of participants in the campaign group chose natural birth as their birth method, whereas only 13.5% (n=21) in the control group delivered their newborn vaginally. The B Butterfly social marketing campaign successfully targeted first-time pregnant women who chose to have unnecessary elective cesarean births. Copyright © 2018 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Image Gently: A campaign to promote radiation protection for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-14

    Dec 14, 2015 ... developing education materials that support the protection of children worldwide from unnecessary radiation ... Emory University School of. Medicine .... materials for the Image Gently campaign are provided free of charge (cf.

  11. Promotion and communication through e-mail marketing campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Dania TODOR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to try to emphasize the e-mail marketing campaigns importance and efficiency and the way they increase the interaction between a company and potential customers and to increase their interest in a company’s products and services and finally trigger the buying decision. Also the present paper’s aim is to exemplify how business can gain benefits by using marketing automation tools like e-mail marketing campaigns which is considered nowadays a form of direct marketing which is less expensive than the traditional direct marketing alternatives.

  12. Framing clean energy campaigns to promote civic engagement among parents

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    Hanus, Nichole; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; Hoyos, Lisa; Rauch, Molly

    2018-03-01

    Civic engagement is one important way citizens can influence the rate of decarbonization in the electricity sector. However, motivating engagement can be challenging even if people are affected and interested in participating. Here we employed a randomized controlled trial to assess the effect of clean energy campaigns emphasizing cost savings, health, climate, or health and climate, or no additional information at all (control) on civic engagement behaviors (signing a petition or making a phone call). We targeted parents as they have been shown to be powerful agents of political and business practice change in other contexts, and hence, could play an important role in the decarbonization of the electricity sector. In Study 1, we recruited n = 292 parents already engaged in climate advocacy; in Study 2, we recruited a representative sample of n = 1254 parents drawn from the general public. Both studies were conducted in Michigan, Florida, and California, as these states have sizable advocacy group membership, divergent energy profiles, and strategic importance to the climate movement. In both studies, we find the odds of taking action are reduced by over 90% when participants are asked to make a phone call and leave a voicemail message, versus signing an online petition. Among the parents already engaged in advocacy, we observe a ceiling effect regarding attitudes towards clean energy and find the cost campaign produces unintended consequences. Among our public sample, we find that participants who believe the campaign to be credible and comprehendible are more likely to take action than those who discredit the campaign or do not understand its message. Additionally, we find parents who have children under the age of 18 negatively adjust their attitudes towards fossil fuels after being presented with health information. Ultimately, we find that campaign messages can influence energy attitudes and parents are willing to take action on the topic if the

  13. [Social marketing and public policies for health: campaign to promote smoke-free spaces in Mexico].

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    Villalobos, Víctor; Ramírez, Olivia Ortiz; Thrasher, James F; Santillán, Edna Arillo; Hernández, Rosaura Pérez; Cedillo, Claudia; González, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    "Porque todos respiramos lo mismo" is a mass media campaign to promote smoke-free places (SFP). The development stages were: strategic planning; formative research; message development; media plan; and impact evaluation. Development involved formation of a coalition of key actors in various sectors. The target population was smokers and nonsmokers, with the aim of changing social norms around SFP. Nonsmokers were targeted because they comprised the majority and were most likely to appreciate the benefits of SFPs. Campaign materials were aired on television, radio, print and on billboards. One key limitation was the lack of evidence for previous campaigns, which increased the importance of formative research and of including a rigorous evaluation for this one. The campaign evaluation indicates a significant impact, which suggests that future campaigns use similar strategies in their development.

  14. Evaluation of a mass media campaign promoting using help to quit smoking.

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    Gibson, Laura A; Parvanta, Sarah A; Jeong, Michelle; Hornik, Robert C

    2014-05-01

    Although there is evidence that promoting individual cessation aids increases their utilization, mass media campaigns highlighting the benefit of using help to quit have not been evaluated. The effects of a Philadelphia adult smoking-cessation media campaign targeting using help in ad taglines were analyzed from March to November 2012. This study distinctively analyzed the campaign's impact at both the population level (effects on the average person) and the individual level (effects among those who reported exposure). The 16-month mass media campaign aired in Philadelphia PA from December 2010 to March 2012. A representative sample of adult Philadelphia smokers was interviewed by telephone at baseline (n=491) and new samples were interviewed monthly throughout the campaign (n=2,786). In addition, a subsample of these respondents was reinterviewed 3 months later (n=877). On average, participants reported seeing campaign ads four times per week. Among individual respondents, each additional campaign exposure per week increased the likelihood of later reporting using help (OR=1.08, p<0.01), adjusting for baseline use of help and other potential confounders. This corresponded to a 5% increase in the use of help for those with average exposure relative to those with no exposure. Cross-sectional associations between individual campaign exposure and intentions to use help were consistent with these lagged findings. However, there was no evidence of population-level campaign effects on use of help. Although the campaign was effective at the individual level, its effects were too small to have a population-detectable impact. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The promotion of phisical activity in shockvertising campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Widawska-Stanisz Agnieszka; Sowier-Kasprzyk Izabella

    2017-01-01

    Preferring passive life style and the problems with obesity eventuating from this fact, have become very common in many countries. According to research, the physical activity of Poles turns out to be under the average for EU countries. (Sport activity of Poles, 2015, p.3) The promotion of physical activity is one of the most important tasks of public health. The publicity of physical activity, habits of caring for health and wellbeing should be realized by national and local authorities, med...

  16. 100% ♥ Indonesia: Role of Government Campaign to Promote Local Products in Indonesia

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    Imam Salehudin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate the role of government buy-local campaign to increase consumer willingness to purchase local products in Indonesia. This paper also aims to identify relevant mediating variables between exposure to “buy local” campaign and willingness to purchase local products. This research use questionnaire data from 394 respondents selected using purposive sampling method. Product specific constructs are asked and analyzed separately in four different product categories (e.g. Produce, Leather, Culinary and Creative products. Data was analyzed using Structural Equation Model and compared further between product categories. The study found that exposure to the buy local promotion campaign does increase consumer ethnocentrism, attitude toward the campaign and toward domestic products. Consumer ethnocentrism does increase attitude toward domestic product and willingness to purchase local products.

  17. Correlates of Initial Recall of a Multimedia Communication Campaign to Promote Physical Activity among Tweens: the WIXX Campaign.

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    Bélanger-Gravel, Ariane; Cutumisu, Nicoleta; Gauvin, Lise; Lagarde, François; Laferté, Marilie

    2017-01-01

    This study examined factors associated with children's and parents' recall of a communication campaign aimed at promoting children's physical activity. A cross-sectional population-based telephone survey was conducted among 1001 children and their parents. Respondents were recruited through a random digit dialing procedure. Respondents' recall of the campaign, beliefs, sociodemographics as well as levels of physical activity and sedentary behaviors were self-reported. Logistic regression analyses were conducted for tweens and their parents separately. Girls (odds ratio [OR] = 2.1; 95%confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 3.5) were more likely to have unaided recall when compared to boys. Tweens in primary school (OR = 1.9; 95%CI: 1.0, 3.4 and OR = 2.1; 95%CI: 1.4, 3.0) and those speaking French (OR = 3.3; 95%CI: 1.4, 8.1 and OR = 2.9; 95%CI: 1.8, 4.7) were more likely to have unaided and aided recall, respectively. Among parents, tweens' unaided (OR = 12.0; 95%CI: 5.2, 28.1) and aided (OR = 3.3; 95%CI: 1.5, 7.3) recall, obesity status (OR = 2.6; 95%CI: 1.3, 5.3), and low income (OR = 5.2; 95%CI: 1.9, 14.3) were positively associated with recall. Additional beliefs were associated with tweens' and parents' recall of the campaign. The association between sex, language, and recall is in line with the branding strategy adopted and no clear evidence for communication inequalities was observed.

  18. The Behavioral Impact of an Advertising Campaign to Promote Safety Belt Use.

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    Cope, John G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Safety belt use with and without addition of an incentive strategy was observed among 8,635 drivers at a drive-through restaurant. During the promotional campaign, average rate of belt use tripled compared to baseline following the introduction of a contingent reward (a large soft drink), and declined during followup. (JW)

  19. The behavioral impact of an advertising campaign to promote safety belt use.

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    Cope, J G; Moy, S S; Grossnickle, W F

    1988-01-01

    Safety belt use was observed at one restaurant during McDonald's "Make It Click" promotional campaign. Following baseline, the program was monitored without intervention. During the final 2 weeks of the campaign an incentive strategy was added providing a large soft drink contingent on safety belt use. Safety belt use did not change from baseline levels before the incentive phase. The rate of belt use increased under contingent reward and declined during follow-up. The effects of a verbal prompt could not be assessed because of the almost nonexistent use of the "Make It Click" stickers throughout the study.

  20. A community-wide media campaign to promote walking in a Missouri town.

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    Wray, Ricardo J; Jupka, Keri; Ludwig-Bell, Cathy

    2005-10-01

    Engaging in moderate physical activity for 30 minutes five or more times per week substantially reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, colon cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure, and obesity, and walking is an easy and accessible way to achieve this goal. A theory-based mass media campaign promoted walking and local community-sponsored wellness initiatives through four types of media (billboard, newspaper, radio, and poster advertisements) in St Joseph, Mo, over 5 months during the summer of 2003. The Walk Missouri campaign was conducted in four phases: 1) formative research, 2) program design and pretesting, 3) implementation, and 4) impact assessment. Using a postcampaign-only, cross-sectional design, a telephone survey (N = 297) was conducted in St Joseph to assess campaign impact. Study outcomes were pro-walking beliefs and behaviors. One in three survey respondents reported seeing or hearing campaign messages on one or more types of media. Reported exposure to the campaign was significantly associated with two of four pro-walking belief scales (social and pleasure benefits) and with one of three community-sponsored activities (participation in a community-sponsored walk) controlling for demographic, health status, and environmental factors. Exposure was also significantly associated with one of three general walking behaviors (number of days per week walking) when controlling for age and health status but not when beliefs were introduced into the model, consistent with an a priori theoretical mechanism: the mediating effect of pro-walking beliefs on the exposure-walking association. These results suggest that a media campaign can enhance the success of community-based efforts to promote pro-walking beliefs and behaviors.

  1. Effectiveness of a Social Marketing Campaign Promoting Use of a Sexual Health Text Service by Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Jessica Fitts

    2015-01-01

    Sexual health text message services are becoming an increasingly popular way to provide adolescents with accurate sexual health information, but promotion of such services is often limited. This study uses three quantitative methods (service use data, a text message-based questionnaire, and an in-school online survey) to assess the effectiveness of an in-school social marketing campaign promoting a sexual health text message service that connects teens directly with a health educator. The 3-month campaign was associated with increased service use, but use was still relatively low. Follow-up qualitative work that included focus groups and interviews found a number of barriers to use. Teens indicated they did not have sexual health questions, did not think of the service, or were unsure how to use it. Teens also brought up additional barriers such as concern over parents seeing the messages. Implications for text message service providers and health educators are discussed.

  2. Socioeconomic variation in recall and perceived effectiveness of campaign advertisements to promote smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederdeppe, Jeff; Farrelly, Matthew C; Nonnemaker, James; Davis, Kevin C; Wagner, Lauren

    2011-03-01

    There are large disparities in cigarette smoking rates by socioeconomic status (SES) in many countries. There is mixed evidence about the relative effectiveness of smoking cessation media campaigns in promoting quitting between lower and higher SES populations, and studies suggest that some types of ad content may have differential effects by SES. We analyzed data from five waves of the New York Media Tracking Survey Online (MTSO), a web survey involving over 7000 adult smokers conducted between 2007 and 2009, to assess SES variation in response to smoking cessation ads. Smokers with low levels of education and income less often recalled ads focused on how to quit, and perceived them as less effective, than ads using graphic imagery or personal testimonials to convey why to quit. Contrary to predictions offered by the Stages of Change Model, we found no evidence that variation in readiness to quit smoking explained patterns of response by education. Results offer guidance for theorists and campaign planners in developing campaigns that are likely to promote cessation among less educated populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Social marketing campaigns that promote condom use among MSM: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Stephen; Adams, Jeffery; Holdershaw, Judith

    2014-03-01

    The turn of the century has seen an increase in reported cases of sexually transmitted infections including the human immunodeficiency virus, particularly in groups of men who have sex with men. Both internationally and in New Zealand the implementation of social marketing human immunodeficiency virus prevention programmes are identified as appropriate mechanisms to promote condom use in men who have sex with men. This paper presents a review of the literature on research-based social marketing initiatives designed to decrease sexually transmitted infections, including the human immunodeficiency virus, through an increase in condom use by men who have sex with men. Eleven quality assured articles met the inclusion criteria and were consequently included in the review. The review presented here strongly supports the utilisation of behaviourally based social marketing campaigns to increase condom use in men who have sex with men. Nurses are frequently first point of contact for consumers of health services. As such they need to have a sound understanding of not only Get it On!, a New Zealand social marketing campaign designed to promote condom use, but also about existing international campaigns. Nurses should also know about social marketing principles if they are to effect positive changes in condom use and address the complex challenges inherent in tackling increased rates of sexually transmitted infections, including the human immunodeficiency virus.

  4. Effectiveness of a national media campaign to promote parent-child communication about sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kevin C; Evans, W Douglas; Kamyab, Kian

    2013-02-01

    Although there is debate on the effectiveness of youth-focused abstinence education programs, research confirms that parents can influence their children's decisions about sexual behavior. To leverage parent-based approaches to adolescent sexual health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched the Parents Speak Up National Campaign (PSUNC) to encourage parent-child communication about sex. Previous experimental studies have found the campaign to be efficacious in increasing parent-child communication. But to date, the actual reach of the campaign and its real-world effectiveness in promoting parent-child communication has not been established. The present study addresses this gap. The authors surveyed 1,804 parents of 10- to14-year-old children from the nationally representative Knowledge Networks online panel. The survey included questions about parents' awareness of PSUNC ads and parent-child communication behaviors. The authors also analyzed market-level data on campaign gross rating points, a measure of market-level intensity of PSUNC advertising in the United States. Multivariate regressions were used to examine the association between PSUNC exposure and a three-item scale for parent-child communication. Overall, 59.4% of parents in the sample reported awareness of PSUNC. The authors found that higher market-level PSUNC gross rating points were associated with increased parent-child communication. Similar relationships were observed between self-reported awareness of PSUNC and increased frequency of communication and recommendations to wait. These associations were particularly strong among mothers. This study provides the first field-based data on the real-world reach and effectiveness of PSUNC among parents. The data support earlier experimental trials of PSUNC, showing that the campaign is associated with greater parent-child communication, primarily among mothers. Further research may be needed to develop additional messages for fathers.

  5. Techniques and Strategies for Successfully Promote your Web/Mail Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Ciovica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We live in an unstable global market, where companies must deal with daily changes and respond quickly to the customer demands and deliver products faster at higher quality than ever. This speed is dictated especially by the competition between producers and their delivered services, products. Beside the quality, the producers must deal also with the product design which is becoming the one of the important factors after which customers choose and uses products. In what concerns the web design and web campaigns, the best factor in selling is the user interface and how they are attracts customers and visitors. In this article we describe the best techniques and strategies for a successfully promotion of a web site or web campaign.

  6. Promoting consumption of fruit and vegetables for better health. Have campaigns delivered on the goals?

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    Rekhy, Reetica; McConchie, Robyn

    2014-08-01

    Daily intake of fruits and vegetables worldwide remains well below the recommended WHO levels, despite the established health benefits associated with fruit and vegetable consumption. A diversity of policy interventions designed to increase consumption have been conducted in the developed economies around the globe for over a decade, involving significant monetary outlays. The impact of these initiatives remains at best, modest to low, in effecting a significant increase in daily consumption on a sustained basis. Several factors have been identified in both promoting and impeding the increase in fruit and vegetable consumption, including the effects of consumer behaviour. This paper reviews several of the major promotional campaigns from around the world and provides analysis of their level of success, with a view to developing novel approaches for formulating more effective marketing and promotional interventions that will prompt significant change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Boosting restraint norms: a community-delivered campaign to promote booster seat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Stephens, Tyra; Garcia-Espana, J Felipe; Winston, Flaura K

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a theoretically grounded community-delivered marketing campaign to promote belt-positioning booster seat (BPB) use among vulnerable populations when disseminated by community members. A prospective, nonrandomized community intervention trial was conducted to evaluate the "Boosting Restraint Norms" social marketing campaign delivered by community partners in Norristown, Pennsylvania (intervention community), between October 2008 and November 2008. York, Pennsylvania, served as the comparison community. In total, 800 vehicles with 822 children aged 4 to 7 years were observed for BPB use, the primary outcome of interest, at baseline (September 2008) and at 6 months after intervention (April 2009). During the study period, a 28 percent increase in the prevalence of BPB use at 6 months was observed in the intervention community with no change in the prevalence of BPB use in the comparison community. After adjustment for child age and gender, vehicle type, driver gender, and driver level, BPB use increased from 39 to 50 percent in the intervention community. The "Boosting Restraint Norms" social marketing campaign, distributed through community organizations combined with caregiver education and a one-time free distribution of BPBs, was effective in increasing BPB use. This study demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing community organizations with established audiences to spread the "No Regrets" messaging of the campaign in the community. This study also indicates that spreading evidence-based messages in this manner may effectively change behavior in populations that are often hard to reach. Future studies are needed in which this methodology is tested in additional communities and rural settings.

  8. Social marketing campaign promoting the use of respiratory protection devices among farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounds, Lea; Duysen, Ellen; Romberger, Debra; Cramer, Mary E; Wendl, Mary; Rautiainen, Risto

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the formal use of marketing concepts in a systematic approach to influence farmers to voluntarily increase respiratory protective device (RPD) use. The planning process for the project incorporated six key decision or action points, each informed by formative research or health behavior theory. The planning process included developing behavior change strategies based on a 4P model (product, price, place, and promotion). The resulting campaign elements included print and e-mail messages that leveraged motivators related to family and health in order to increase farmers' knowledge about the risks of exposure to dusty environments, four instructional videos related to the primary barriers identified in using RPDs, and a brightly colored storage bag to address barriers to using RPDs related to mask storage. Campaign implementation included a series of e-mails using a bulk e-mail subscription service, use of social media in the form of posting instructional videos on a YouTube channel, and in-person interactions with members of the target audience at farm shows throughout the Central States Center for Agricultural Safety and Health seven-state region. Evaluation of the e-mail campaigns indicated increased knowledge about RPD use and intent to use RPDs in dusty conditions. YouTube analytic data indicated continuing exposure of the instructional videos beyond the life of the campaign. The project demonstrates the efficacy of a planning process that incorporates formative research and clear decision points throughout. This process could be used to plan health behavior change interventions to address other agriculture-related health and safety issues.

  9. Impact of non-clinical community-based promotional campaigns on bowel cancer screening engagement: An integrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Angelita; Morris, Julia N; Preen, David

    2016-10-01

    This paper reviewed the relationship between non-clinical, client-oriented promotional campaigns to raise bowel cancer awareness and screening engagement. An integrative literature review using predefined search terms was conducted to summarise the accumulated knowledge. Data was analysed by coding and categorising, then synthesized through development of themes. Eighteen of 116 studies met inclusion criteria. Promotional campaigns had varying impact on screening uptake for bowel cancer. Mass media was found to moderately increase screening, predominately amongst "worried well". Small media used in conjunction with other promotional activities, thus its effect on screening behaviours was unclear. One-on-one education was less effective and less feasible than group education in increasing intention to screen. Financial support was ineffective in increasing screening rates when compared to other promotional activities. Screening engagement increased because of special events and celebrity endorsement. Non-clinical promotional campaigns did impact uptake of bowel cancer screening engagement. However, little is evident on the effect of single types of promotion and most research is based on clinician-directed campaigns. Cancer awareness and screening promotions should be implemented at community and clinical level to maximize effectiveness. Such an approach will ensure promotional activities are targeting consumers, thus strengthening screening engagement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A social marketing campaign to promote low-fat milk consumption in an inner-city Latino community.

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    Wechsler, H; Wernick, S M

    1992-01-01

    The authors proposed the Lowfat Milk Campaign, a multifaceted social marketing campaign to promote the use of low-fat milk in the Washington Heights-Inwood neighborhood of New York City, a low-income, inner-city, Latino community. The campaign was designed for implementation by the Washington Heights-Inwood Health Heart Program, a community-based cardiovascular disease prevention agency. The first phase of the campaign began in November 1990. A followup phase for the period 1991-92 is in progress. The campaign focuses on a clear, relatively easily accomplished behavioral change, a switch by consumers of whole milk to low-fat milk, which may significantly reduce the fat consumption of persons in such a population, particularly children. The campaign strategy featured a mix of traditional health education methods, intensive local information media publicity, and innovative marketing techniques. In addition to increasing consumer demand for low-fat milk, the campaign successfully promoted institutional changes that are expected to facilitate healthy dietary choices in the future by members of the study population. Schools and other institutions that serve milk have been persuaded to begin offering low-fat milk in addition to, or instead of, whole milk. An essential component of campaign strategy was building support from key community organizations and leaders. Significant assistance was provided by the local school district, parents associations, churches, newspapers, radio stations, fraternal organizations, and a coalition of child care agencies. The campaign demonstrates a cost effective and culturally sensitive approach to promoting important cardiovascular health behavior changes by an underserved population.

  11. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. Objective The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. Methods At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Results Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project’s Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620

  12. An eHealth Project on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Comprehensive Evaluation of a Promotional Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Carozzo, Stefano; Signori, Alessio; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-12-02

    The recently launched Pneumo Rischio eHealth project, which consists of an app, a website, and social networking activity, is aimed at increasing public awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The launch of this project was prompted by the inadequate awareness of IPD among both laypeople and health care workers, the heavy socioeconomic burden of IPD, and the far from optimal vaccination coverage in Italy, despite the availability of safe and effective vaccines. The objectives of our study were to analyze trends in Pneumo Rischio usage before and after a promotional campaign, to characterize its end users, and to assess its user-rated quality. At 7 months after launching Pneumo Rischio, we established a 4-month marketing campaign to promote the project. This intervention used various approaches and channels, including both traditional and digital marketing strategies. To highlight usage trends, we used different techniques of time series analysis and modeling, including a modified Mann-Kendall test, change-point detection, and segmented negative binomial regression of interrupted time series. Users were characterized in terms of demographics and IPD risk categories. Customer-rated quality was evaluated by means of a standardized tool in a sample of app users. Over 1 year, the app was accessed by 9295 users and the website was accessed by 143,993 users, while the project's Facebook page had 1216 fans. The promotional intervention was highly effective in increasing the daily number of users. In particular, the Mann-Kendall trend test revealed a significant (P ≤.01) increasing trend in both app and website users, while change-point detection analysis showed that the first significant change corresponded to the start of the promotional campaign. Regression analysis showed a significant immediate effect of the intervention, with a mean increase in daily numbers of users of 1562% (95% CI 456%-4870%) for the app and 620% (95% CI 176%-1777%) for the website

  13. [Development of an evidence-based media campaign to promote walking among physically inactive women and increased physical activity among adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalon, Hélène; Serry, Anne-Juliette; Nguyen-Thanh, Viêt; Vuillemin, Anne; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Verlhiac, Jean-Francois; Salanave, Benoît; Simon, Chantal; Tausan, Simona; Dailly, Olivier; Arwidson, Pierre

    2016-06-08

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of developing a multimodal media campaign-based intervention to promote physical activity using theory, evidence and media campaign construction expertise. An evaluation of this media campaign and its various components is the next stage of this work..

  14. A Social Media Campaign to Promote Breastfeeding among Saudi Women: A Web-based Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahkali, Salwa; Alkharjy, Nora; Alowairdy, Maryam; Househ, Mowafa; Da'ar, Omar; Alsurimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged breastfeeding can prevent or limit the severity of a variety of diseases and conditions. Although evidence clearly shows that there are health benefits for breastfeeding, adherence to breastfeeding remains a key challenge facing maternal health providers in Saudi Arabia. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impacts of a social media platform (Twitter) to promote breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia. Between February 10 and March 25, 2015, a web-based questionnaire was administered to evaluate the impacts of a Twitter based educational campaign on the awareness, knowledge, and adherence to breastfeeding behavior for women in Saudi Arabia. The overall response rate among mothers with a newborn child was 83% (n=484). The results showed an increase in the knowledge and awareness of breastfeeding practices and adherence among Twitter followers. The initiation rate of breastfeeding had slightly increased among women who never had previously breastfed. More women reported their willingness to continue exclusive breastfeeding and to stop bottle-feeding. Results also show that an integration of professional breastfeeding support, public health education programs through social media could be an effective tool in promoting breastfeeding in Saudi Arabia. There is a need for further research on designing and implementing a social media based educational outreach program to increase women's awareness, knowledge, and adherence to breastfeeding behavior in Saudi Arabia.

  15. Public health campaign to promote hand hygiene before meals in a college of veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Ellen R E; KuKanich, Kate S; Davis, Elizabeth; White, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    Veterinary students can be exposed to environmental infectious agents in school that may include zoonotic pathogens. Encouraging effective hand hygiene can minimize the spread of zoonoses and promote public health and the One Health concept among veterinary students. The purpose of this study was to determine if a campaign could improve hand hygiene among veterinary students at extracurricular meetings serving meals. Nine Kansas State University College of Veterinary Medicine (KSU-CVM) extracurricular organizations participated in the study, sanitizer was provided at each meeting, and baseline hand-hygiene data were observed. A hand-hygiene opportunity was defined as any student observed to approach the buffet food line. Sanitizer use (yes/no) and gender (male/female) were recorded. Campaign interventions included a 3.5-minute educational video and a novel motivational poster. The video was presented to all first-year, second-year, and third-year veterinary students. Posters encouraging hand sanitization were displayed on doors and tables alongside sanitizers at each meeting. Observational hand-hygiene data were collected immediately after introduction of interventions and again 3 months later. Environmental sampling for presence of bacteria in and around meeting locations was also performed. Observed hand hygiene was lowest during baseline (11.0% ± 1.7), improved significantly post-intervention (48.8% ± 3.2), and remained improved at 3-month follow-up (33.5% ± 4.0). Females had higher probability of hand sanitizing (35.9% ± 2.2) than males (21.4% ± 2.4) (phand hygiene before meals.

  16. Determinants of success and sustainability of the WHO multimodal hand hygiene promotion campaign, Italy, 2007-2008 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Morsillo, Filomena; Nascetti, Simona; Parenti, Mita; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Pompa, Maria Grazia; Pittet, Didier

    2017-06-08

    A national hand hygiene promotion campaign based on the World Health Organization (WHO) multimodal, Clean Care is Safer Care campaign was launched in Italy in 2007. One hundred seventy-five hospitals from 14 of 20 Italian regions participated. Data were collected using methods and tools provided by the WHO campaign, translated into Italian. Hand hygiene compliance, ward infrastructure, and healthcare workers' knowledge and perception of healthcare-associated infections and hand hygiene were evaluated before and after campaign implementation. Compliance data from the 65 hospitals returning complete data for all implementation tools were analysed using a multilevel approach. Overall, hand hygiene compliance increased in the 65 hospitals from 40% to 63% (absolute increase: 23%, 95% confidence interval: 22-24%). A wide variation in hand hygiene compliance among wards was observed; inter-ward variability significantly decreased after campaign implementation and the level of perception was the only item associated with this. Long-term sustainability in 48 of these 65 hospitals was assessed in 2014 using the WHO Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework tool. Of the 48 hospitals, 44 scored in the advanced/intermediate categories of hand hygiene implementation progress. The median hand hygiene compliance achieved at the end of the 2007-2008 campaign appeared to be sustained in 2014. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  17. Determinants of success and sustainability of the WHO multimodal hand hygiene promotion campaign, Italy, 2007–2008 and 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Maria Luisa; Morsillo, Filomena; Nascetti, Simona; Parenti, Mita; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Pompa, Maria Grazia; Pittet, Didier

    2017-01-01

    A national hand hygiene promotion campaign based on the World Health Organization (WHO) multimodal, Clean Care is Safer Care campaign was launched in Italy in 2007. One hundred seventy-five hospitals from 14 of 20 Italian regions participated. Data were collected using methods and tools provided by the WHO campaign, translated into Italian. Hand hygiene compliance, ward infrastructure, and healthcare workers’ knowledge and perception of healthcare-associated infections and hand hygiene were evaluated before and after campaign implementation. Compliance data from the 65 hospitals returning complete data for all implementation tools were analysed using a multilevel approach. Overall, hand hygiene compliance increased in the 65 hospitals from 40% to 63% (absolute increase: 23%, 95% confidence interval: 22–24%). A wide variation in hand hygiene compliance among wards was observed; inter-ward variability significantly decreased after campaign implementation and the level of perception was the only item associated with this. Long-term sustainability in 48 of these 65 hospitals was assessed in 2014 using the WHO Hand Hygiene Self-Assessment Framework tool. Of the 48 hospitals, 44 scored in the advanced/intermediate categories of hand hygiene implementation progress. The median hand hygiene compliance achieved at the end of the 2007–2008 campaign appeared to be sustained in 2014. PMID:28661390

  18. "Testing is Healthy" TimePlay campaign: Evaluation of sexual health promotion gamification intervention targeting young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinya; Huhn, Kim J; Tan, Andy; Douglas, Rachel E; Li, Helen Guiyun; Murti, Michelle; Lee, Victoria

    2017-04-20

    The objectives of the study were to 1) describe the implementation of the "Testing is Healthy" campaign in four locations in British Columbia (BC) and 2) report process evaluation indicators for the campaign. Young adults ages 20-29 years, the age group with the highest reported rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea in BC. Movie theatres located in Langley, Burnaby, Coquitlam and Surrey, which are communities served by the Fraser Health Authority (FHA) in BC. The FHA launched the campaign in 2014 and 2015 to bring down the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV in the region. The campaign used the Cineplex TimePlay platform to engage moviegoers in answering STI/HIV-related questions, and to connect them to a clinic finder on the BC Centre for Disease Control Sex Smart Resource (SSR) website. TimePlay includes elements of gaming, is technology-based, and has been a successful advertisement platform for consumer products and services. However, this is the first time it has been used for sexual health promotion. The campaign was evaluated for 1) reach, based on theatre attendance and TimePlay participation, and 2) the effectiveness of connecting people to sexual health information using SSR web analytics. In total, the campaign received 548 410 views and 77 149 plays. SSR web analytics showed a significant increase in unique page views of the Clinic Finder page between the first and the second campaign. The campaign reached a large population at a low cost and was correlated with spikes in the unique page views for the Clinic Finder page.

  19. The Sharjah Baby-Friendly Campaign: A Community-Based Model for Breastfeeding Promotion, Protection, and Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghazal, Hessa; Rashid, Shehnaz; Ruf, Evelyne

    2015-11-01

    Breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support are one of the most cost-effective public health interventions to advance maternal and child health. The World Health Organization, the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, and numerous health organizations have recommended exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, which is a key indicator of breastfeeding promotion programs worldwide. Despite the recommendations and various initiatives to promote breastfeeding, most women do not reach the exclusive breastfeeding target in both developed and developing countries. Such has been the case in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Therefore, based on the decree for breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support by the ruler of the Emirate of Sharjah, UAE, H.H. Sheikh Doctor Sultan Al Qasimi, a multisectorial, multidirectional breastfeeding campaign--the Sharjah Baby-Friendly Campaign--was launched in March 2012 by H.E. Sheikha Bodour Al Qasimi, under her patronage. It consisted of four initiatives-namely, Baby-Friendly Health Facility, Mother-Friendly Workplace, Breastfeeding-Friendly Nursery, and Mother-Baby Friendly Public Place. Once an organization met the criteria for any of these initiatives, it was awarded the designation or accreditation of that initiative. The campaign initiatives worked through capacity building of healthcare workers, provided professional support and facilitation for the accreditation process, developed breastfeeding education content and resources, and organized and conducted breastfeeding promotion seminars in health facilities and community, as well as community outreach through social media and an innovative mobile mother' room. The positive impact of the campaign on breastfeeding promotion, protection, and support is evident by the increased exclusive breastfeeding rate at 6 months and decreased bottle feeding rates at both 4 and 6 months.

  20. No germs on me: a social marketing campaign to promote hand-washing with soap in remote Australian Aboriginal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Elizabeth; Slavin, Nicola; Bailie, Ross; Schobben, Xavier

    2011-03-01

    A social marketing campaign promoting hand-washing with soap was implemented to reduce the high burden of infection experienced by Australian Aboriginal children living in remote communities. Epidemiological evidence of effect and other evidence were used to identify the hygiene intervention and health promotion approach for the project. We drew on the findings of: (i) a systematic literature review to identify the intervention for which there is strong effect in similar populations and contexts; and (ii) a narrative literature review to determine our health promotion approach. This process provided practitioners with confidence and understanding so they could address a complex problem in a politically and otherwise sensitive context.

  1. POWER for reproductive health: results from a social marketing campaign promoting female and male condoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Sheana S; Posner, Samuel F; Ortiz, Charlene; Beaty, Brenda; Benton, Kathryn; Lin, Lillian; Pals, Sherri L; Evans, Tom

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate effects of a 6-month social marketing campaign on awareness of, attitudes toward and use of female as well as male condoms for 15-25 year-old-women. Using a time-space sampling methodology, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of 3407 women at pre-campaign in 12 western U.S. neighborhoods on female and male condom awareness, attitudes, and use. Six of the 12 study neighborhoods were randomly selected to receive the POWER social marketing campaign designed to impact condom knowledge, attitudes, and use. The campaign was followed with another cross-sectional survey of 3,003 women in all 12 study neighborhoods on condom knowledge, attitudes, use and awareness of POWER materials. We compared pre-and post-campaign surveys to determine the efficacy of POWER and conducted post hoc analyses on post-campaign data to determine if exposure to POWER was related to higher levels of positive condom attitudes and norms and condom use. We found no differences between neighborhoods with and without the POWER campaign with regard to our primary outcomes. To diagnose reasons for this null effect, we examined outcomes post hoc examining the influence of POWER exposure. Post hoc analyses show some evidence that exposure to POWER was associated with condom use. In the context of the nested trial, this raises concerns that post test only evaluations are limited. Establishing the efficacy of a social marketing campaign is challenging. This group randomized trial showed a null effect. Social marketing campaigns may need to have more media channels and saturation before they can show behavioral effects. Using a nested design with randomization at the community level and probability sampling introduces rigor not commonly seen in evaluations of social marketing campaigns.

  2. An evaluation of the Aerie Real campaign: Potential for promoting positive body image?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Alexandra D; Rodgers, Rachel F; Franko, Debra L; Jodoin, Adriana

    2016-11-01

    This study evaluated the impact on young women's body satisfaction of an advertising campaign: Aerie Real, which included images of models who were not digitally modified. In total, 200 female students were randomly allocated to view either Aerie Real images or digitally modified images from previous campaigns. In the total sample, no condition differences appeared. However, participants with high appearance comparison reported a smaller decrease in body satisfaction after viewing the Aerie Real images as compared to those viewing previous images ( p = .003). Findings provide preliminary support for the Aerie Real campaign as less deleterious form of media for body image.

  3. Maximizing the Impact of Digital Media Campaigns to Promote Smoking Cessation: A Case Study of the California Tobacco Control Program and the California Smokers' Helpline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn Ok; Momin, Behnoosh; Hansen, Heather; Duke, Jennifer; Harms, Kristin; McCartney, Amanda; Neri, Antonio; Kahende, Jennifer; Zhang, Lei; Stewart, Sherri L

    2014-01-01

    Digital media are often used to encourage smoking cessation by increasing quitline call volume through direct promotion to smokers or indirect promotion to smoker proxies. The documentation of a program's experiences utilizing digital media is necessary to develop both the knowledge base and a set of best practices. This case study highlights the use of digital media in a proxy-targeted campaign to promote the California Smokers' Helpline to health care professionals from October 2009 to September 2012. We describe the iterative development of the campaign's digital media activities and report campaign summaries of web metrics (website visits, webinar registrations, downloads of online materials, online orders for promotional materials) and media buy (gross impressions) tracking data. The campaign generated more than 2.7 million gross impressions from digital media sources over 3 years. Online orders for promotional materials increased almost 40% over the course of the campaign. A clearly defined campaign strategy ensured that there was a systematic approach in developing and implementing campaign activities and ensuring that lessons learned from previous years were incorporated. Discussion includes lessons learned and recommendations for future improvements reported by campaign staff to inform similar efforts using digital media.

  4. Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media: the ‘Get Randomised’ campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Isla S; Wei, Li; Rutherford, Daniel; Findlay, Evelyn A; Saywood, Wendy; Campbell, Marion K; MacDonald, Thomas M

    2010-01-01

    AIM To increase public awareness and understanding of clinical research in Scotland. METHODS A generic media campaign to raise public awareness of clinical research was launched in 2008. The ‘Get Randomised’ campaign was a Scotland-wide initiative led by the University of Dundee in collaboration with other Scottish universities. Television, radio and newspaper advertising showed leading clinical researchers, general practitioners and patients informing the public about the importance of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). ‘Get Randomised’ was the central message and interested individuals were directed to the http://www.getrandomised.org website for more information. To assess the impact of the campaign, cross-sectional surveys were conducted in representative samples of 1040 adults in Scotland prior to campaign launch and again 6 months later. RESULTS There was an improvement in public awareness of clinical trials following the campaign; 56.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 51.8, 61.6] of the sample recalled seeing or hearing advertising about RCTs following the campaign compared with 14.8% (10.8, 18.9) prior to the campaign launch (difference = 41.4%; 95% CI for difference 35.6, 48.3; P advertising, 49% felt that the main message was that people should take part more in medical research. However, on whether they would personally take part in a clinical trial if asked, there was little difference in response following the campaign [‘yes’ 31.3% (28.4, 34.1) prior; 30.4% (27.6, 33.2) following; difference =−0.9%; 95% CI for difference −4.8, 3.1%; P= 0.92]. CONCLUSIONS It is possible to raise public awareness of clinical research using the media, but further efforts may be required to influence individuals' decisions to take part in clinical research. PMID:20233175

  5. Development, Implementation, and Evaluation of Active Lions: A Campaign to Promote Active Travel to a University Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, Melissa; Sims, Dangaia; Matthews, Stephen A; Rovniak, Liza S; Poole, Erika; Colgan, Joanna

    2018-03-01

    To outline the development, implementation, and evaluation of a multistrategy intervention to promote active transportation, on a large university campus. Single group pilot study. A large university in the Northeastern United States. University students (n = 563), faculty and staff (employees, n = 999) were included in the study. The Active Lions campaign aimed to increase active transportation to campus for all students and employees. The campaign targeted active transport participation through the development of a smartphone application and the implementation of supporting social marketing and social media components. Component-specific measures included app user statistics, social media engagement, and reach of social marketing strategies. Overall evaluation included cross-sectional online surveys preintervention and postintervention of student and employee travel patterns and campaign awareness. Number of active trips to campus were summed, and the percentage of trips as active was calculated. T tests compared the differences in outcomes from preintervention to postintervention. Students had a higher percentage of active trips postintervention (64.2%) than preintervention (49.2%; t = 3.32, P = .001), although there were no differences for employees (7.9% and 8.91%). Greater awareness of Active Lions was associated with greater active travel. This multistrategy approach to increase active transportation on a college campus provided insight on the process of developing and implementing a campaign with the potential for impacting health behaviors among campus members.

  6. Ambient modal testing of a double-arch dam: the experimental campaign and model updating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Palacios, Jaime H.; Soria, José M.; Díaz, Iván M.; Tirado-Andrés, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A finite element model updating of a double-curvature-arch dam (La Tajera, Spain) is carried out hereof using the modal parameters obtained from an operational modal analysis. That is, the system modal dampings, natural frequencies and mode shapes have been identified using output-only identification techniques under environmental loads (wind, vehicles). A finite element model of the dam-reservoir-foundation system was initially created. Then, a testing campaing was then carried out from the most significant test points using high-sensitivity accelerometers wirelessly synchronized. Afterwards, the model updating of the initial model was done using a Monte Carlo based approach in order to match it to the recorded dynamic behaviour. The updated model may be used within a structural health monitoring system for damage detection or, for instance, for the analysis of the seismic response of the arch dam- reservoir-foundation coupled system. (paper)

  7. Promoting public awareness of randomised clinical trials using the media: the 'Get Randomised' campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Isla S; Wei, Li; Rutherford, Daniel; Findlay, Evelyn A; Saywood, Wendy; Campbell, Marion K; Macdonald, Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT * Recruitment is key to the success of clinical trials. * Many clinical trials fail to achieve adequate recruitment. * Public understanding and engagement in clinical research could be improved. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS * 'Get Randomised' is the first campaign of its kind in the UK. * It is possible to improve public awareness of clinical research using the media. * Further work is needed to determine whether improved public awareness leads to increased participation in clinical research in the future. AIM To increase public awareness and understanding of clinical research in Scotland. METHODS A generic media campaign to raise public awareness of clinical research was launched in 2008. The 'Get Randomised' campaign was a Scotland-wide initiative led by the University of Dundee in collaboration with other Scottish universities. Television, radio and newspaper advertising showed leading clinical researchers, general practitioners and patients informing the public about the importance of randomised clinical trials (RCTs). 'Get Randomised' was the central message and interested individuals were directed to the http://www.getrandomised.org website for more information. To assess the impact of the campaign, cross-sectional surveys were conducted in representative samples of 1040 adults in Scotland prior to campaign launch and again 6 months later. RESULTS There was an improvement in public awareness of clinical trials following the campaign; 56.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 51.8, 61.6] of the sample recalled seeing or hearing advertising about RCTs following the campaign compared with 14.8% (10.8, 18.9) prior to the campaign launch (difference = 41.4%; 95% CI for difference 35.6, 48.3; P advertising, 49% felt that the main message was that people should take part more in medical research. However, on whether they would personally take part in a clinical trial if asked, there was little difference in response following the campaign

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of a statewide media campaign to promote adolescent physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael; Chandlee, Margaret; Abraham, Avron

    2008-10-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis of a statewide social marketing campaign was performed using a statewide surveillance survey distributed to 6th through 12th graders, media production and placement costs, and 2000 census data. Exposure to all three advertisements had the highest impact on both intent and behavior with 65.6% of the respondents considering becoming more active and 58.3% reporting becoming more active. Average cost of the entire campaign was $4.01 per person to see an ad, $7.35 per person to consider being more active, and $8.87 per person to actually become more active, with billboards yielding the most positive cost-effectiveness. Findings highlight market research as an essential part of social marketing campaigns and the importance of using multiple marketing modalities to enhance cost-effectiveness and impact.

  9. Promoting seafood consumption: An evaluation of the Danish campaign for fresh fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2003-01-01

    was that preparing a tasty meal from fresh fish was actually not difficult. In supplementary materials consumers were provided with recipes for fresh fish. At the same time, major retail chains made MAP-packaged fresh fish filets available in Danish supermarkets. The influence of family expectations was harnessed......Before and after the 3-year generic advertising campaign for fresh fish in Denmark, representative consumer samples were surveyed with regard to their attitudes towards fresh fish, perceived family norms, availability of fresh fish in shops, meal preparation skills, intentions to buy fresh fish......, and actual consumption frequencies. In the pre-campaign survey (effective N = 641), significant determinants of consumption were availability in shops, meal preparation skills, and intentions to buy fresh fish. The campaign was especially designed to conquer these barriers. The key proposition...

  10. A Review of HIV Prevention Studies that Use Social Networking Sites: Implications for Recruitment, Health Promotion Campaigns, and Efficacy Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jamal; Salazar, Laura F

    2016-11-01

    This review describes the use of social networking sites (SNS) in the context of primary prevention of HIV. A review was conducted to assess the published literature for HIV interventions using SNS. Sixteen articles describing twelve interventions were included. SNS were instrumental in recruiting hard-to-reach populations within a short amount of time; were able to reach wide audiences beyond the targeted population for HIV prevention campaigns; and helped to significantly reduce sexual risk behaviors and increase HIV testing. SNS are a viable option to recruit hidden populations, engage the target audience, and disseminate HIV prevention messages. Researchers should use SNS to generate sampling frames that can be used to select participants. Practitioners should use SNS to post images of preventive behavior within health promotion campaigns. Researchers should use multiple SNS platforms to engage participants. As more studies are published using SNS for HIV prevention, meta-analyses will be needed.

  11. SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTIVE MARKETING CAMPAIGN TO RAISE AWARENESS AND PROMOTE PUBLIC TRANSPORT SERVICES IN RURAL AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna NOSAL

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents selected aspects of the implementation of the EU’s SmartMove project, which aims to promote feeder public transport systems in rural areas through the implementation of an active marketing campaign (AMC. Campaigns of this type are connected with providing general and personalized information concerning the functioning of public transport services. In the article, characteristics of one of the implementation areas of the project are presented, namely, the Liszki district near Cracow. Transport services were also evaluated. In addition, selected results are presented from a survey that was conducted among residents of the area from the point of view of the implementation of the AMC. The results concerned data about the means of transport that were currently used for travelling, the knowledge of bus services, the reasons for their use and the factors that might encourage residents to use public transport

  12. Changes in School Competitive Food Environments after a Health Promotion Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sarah H.; Mallya, Giridhar; Brensinger, Colleen; Tierney, Ann; Glanz, Karen

    2018-01-01

    Background: Schools can reduce student access to competitive foods and influence healthy food choices by improving the school nutrition environment. This study describes changes in competitive nutrition environments in 100 K-8 schools participating in the Philadelphia Campaign for Healthier Schools. Methods: Interviews with school staff were used…

  13. Media campaigns to promote smoking cessation among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations: what do we know, what do we need to learn, and what should we do now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederdeppe, Jeff; Kuang, Xiaodong; Crock, Brittney; Skelton, Ashley

    2008-11-01

    Little is known about whether media campaigns are effective strategies to promote smoking cessation among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations or whether media campaigns may unintentionally maintain or widen disparities in smoking cessation by socioeconomic status (SES). This paper presents a systematic review of the literature on the effectiveness of media campaigns to promote smoking cessation among low SES populations in the USA and countries with comparable political systems and demographic profiles such as Canada, Australia and Western European nations. We reviewed 29 articles, summarizing results from 18 studies, which made explicit statistical comparisons of media campaign effectiveness by SES, and 21 articles, summarizing results from 13 studies, which assessed the effectiveness of media campaigns targeted specifically to low SES populations. We find that there is considerable evidence that media campaigns to promote smoking cessation are often less effective, sometimes equally effective, and rarely more effective among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations relative to more advantaged populations. Disparities in the effectiveness of media campaigns between SES groups may occur at any of three stages: differences in meaningful exposure, differences in motivational response, or differences in opportunity to sustain long-term cessation. There remains a need to conduct research that examines the effectiveness of media campaigns by SES; these studies should employ research designs that are sensitive to various ways that SES differences in smoking cessation media effects might occur.

  14. Promoting HIV risk awareness and testing in Latinos living on the U.S.-Mexico border: the Tú No Me Conoces social marketing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshefsky, Alisa M; Zive, Michelle M; Scolari, Rosana; Zuñiga, María

    2007-10-01

    Increased incidence of HIV/AIDS in Latinos warrants effective social marketing messages to promote testing. The Tú No Me Conoces (You Don't Know Me) social marketing campaign promoted awareness of HIV risk and testing in Latinos living on the California-Mexico border. The 8-week campaign included Spanish-language radio, print media, a Web site, and a toll-free HIV-testing referral hotline. We documented an increase in HIV testing at partner clinics; 28% of testers who heard or saw an HIV advertisement specifically identified our campaign. Improved understanding of effective social marketing messages for HIV testing in the growing Latino border population is warranted.

  15. Design and evaluation of a campaign to promote the consumption of vegetables and fruits in Mexican school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Marcos; Ríos-Pérez, Fernanda; López-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Guzmán-Saldaña, Rebeca; Fernández-Cortés, Trinidad Lorena; Camacho-Bernal, Gloria; Robles-Acevedo, Manuel

    2016-09-20

    In Mexican school-age children the consumption of vegetables and fruits (V&F) is less than 25% of the amount recommended by the World Health Organization. Evaluate the effectiveness of a promotion campaign about the consumption of V&F in urban school children from Hidalgo, Mexico. A non controlled community trial in 226 school-age children from private and public schools was conducted, we designed and distributed printed material for promoting the consumption of V&F among the school population, access to V&F was provided through planning and sales at school stores, and consumption was supervised by the teachers. At the end of the intervention vegetable consumption increased by 50 g and plain water in 100 mL (T-test, p < 0.05); the proportion of school-age children who identified the health benefits of the consumption of V&F increased significantly (68% initial, 87% final) and greater support from parents (61% initial, 92 final%) was achieved. A promotion campaign and improved access to vegetables, fruits and water in the school environment which is supported by parents and teachers can encourage healthier eating at school.

  16. Evaluation of Behavior Change Communication Campaigns to Promote Modern Cookstove Purchase and Use in Lower Middle Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William Douglas; Johnson, Michael; Jagoe, Kirstie; Charron, Dana; Young, Bonnie N; Rahman, A S M Mashiur; Omolloh, Daniel; Ipe, Julie

    2017-12-22

    Nearly three billion people worldwide burn solid fuels and kerosene in open fires and inefficient stoves to cook, light, and heat their homes. Cleaner-burning stoves reduce emissions and can have positive health, climate, and women's empowerment benefits. This article reports on the protocol and baseline data from the evaluation of four behavior change communication (BCC) campaigns carried out in lower to middle income countries aimed at promoting the sale and use of cleaner-burning stoves. Interventions implemented in Bangladesh, Kenya, and Nigeria are using a range of BCC methods including mass media, digital media, outdoor advertising, and inter-personal communication. The mixed methods evaluation comprises three large-scale surveys: one pre-BCC and two follow-ups, along with smaller scale assessments of stove uptake and patterns of use. Baseline results revealed varying levels of awareness of previous promotions and positive attitudes and beliefs about modern (i.e., relatively clean-burning) cookstoves. Differences in cookstove preferences and behaviors by gender, socio-demographics, media use, and country/region were observed that may affect outcomes. Across all three countries, cost (lack of funds) a key perceived barrier to buying a cleaner-burning stove. Future multivariate analyses will examine potential dose-response effects of BCC on cookstove uptake and patterns of use. BCC campaigns have the potential to promote modern cookstoves at scale. More research on campaign effectiveness is needed, and on how to optimize messages and channels. This evaluation builds on a limited evidence base in the field.

  17. Hand hygiene promotion and the participation of infection control link nurses: an effective innovation to overcome campaign fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Wing Hong; Yuen, Shanny W S; Cheung, Christina W Y; Ching, Patricia T Y; Cowling, Benjamin J; Pittet, Didier

    2013-12-01

    Campaign fatigue was evident in a large hospital in Hong Kong when hand hygiene compliance remained just above 50% after 4 years of aggressive and varied promotional activities. A new innovative strategy was developed that directly involved the infection control link nurses both in formulating the strategy and in implementing the various proposed programs. The new strategy was successful in increasing hand hygiene compliance to 83%. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. "Cancer--Educate to Prevent"--high-school teachers, the new promoters of cancer prevention education campaigns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Barros

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and thus represents a priority for national public health programs. Prevention has been assumed as the best strategy to reduce cancer burden, however most cancer prevention programs are implemented by healthcare professionals, which constrain range and educational impacts. We developed an innovative approach for cancer prevention education focused on high-school biology teachers, considered privileged mediators in the socialization processes. A training program, "Cancer, Educate to Prevent" was applied, so that the teachers were able to independently develop and implement prevention campaigns focused on students and school-related communities. The program encompassed different educational modules, ranging from cancer biology to prevention campaigns design. Fifty-four teachers were empowered to develop and implement their own cancer prevention campaigns in a population up to five thousands students. The success of the training program was assessed through quantitative evaluation--questionnaires focused on teachers' cancer knowledge and perceptions, before the intervention (pre-test and immediately after (post-test. The projects developed and implemented by teachers were also evaluated regarding the intervention design, educational contents and impact on the students' knowledge about cancer. This study presents and discusses the results concerning the training program "Cancer, Educate to Prevent" and clearly shows a significant increase in teacher's cancer literacy (knowledge and perceptions and teachers' acquired proficiency to develop and deliver cancer prevention campaigns with direct impact on students' knowledge about cancer. This pilot study reinforces the potential of high-school teachers and schools as cancer prevention promoters and opens a new perspective for the development and validation of cancer prevention education strategies, based upon focused interventions in restricted

  19. Turning health research into health promotion: a study of causality and 'critical insights' in a United Kingdom health campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggin, Joe

    2012-10-01

    This article examines how important decisions about health can alter between public health policy formulation and eventual marketing implementation. Specifically, the article traces the development and production of a major United Kingdom social marketing campaign named Change4Life, and examines how ideas about the causes of and solutions to the obesity epidemic are produced in differing ways throughout the health promotion process. This study examines a variety of United Kingdom health research, policy, marketing strategy and marketing messages between 2008 and 2011. This research demonstrates that claims about causality oscillate and alter throughout the research, policy and Change4Life marketing process. These oscillations are problematic, since the Department of Health described the original consumer research as 'critical'. Given both the importance of the health issues being addressed and the amount of funding dedicated to Change4Life, that 'critical' research was directly contradicted in the campaign requires urgent review. To conclude, the article discusses the utility of social marketing when considering causal claims in health promotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A simple awareness campaign to promote food waste reduction in a University canteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Renata Soares; Pinto, Renata Machado Dos Santos; Melo, Felipe Fochat Silva; Campos, Suzana Santos; Cordovil, Cláudia Marques-Dos-Santos

    2018-03-01

    Food waste has important environmental, social and economic impacts and increasing attention has been given lately to the unparalleled scale of food waste in the food supply chain worldwide. An initiative aiming to reduce food waste was tested at the School of Agriculture canteen (University of Lisbon, Portugal). The "Clean dish, clean conscience!" initiative consisted of a simple and inexpensive education campaign to raise awareness of reducing plate waste, by establishing the connection between food waste and personal behaviour. As a first stage plate waste from canteen users was measured over a 10 day period. After this period, a waste consumption index and per capita waste consumption were calculated to evaluate the level of satisfaction of the consumer and the related concern about food wastage, and was classified as Bad. After this first stage it was concluded that the users did not have strong convictions about avoiding food waste. During the second stage of the project an education campaign was implemented with plate waste being monitored for a further 16 days to assess the effectiveness of the campaign. The approach consisted of displaying simple and affordable informative posters in strategic areas of the canteen with simple messages reminding not to accept food they knew they would not eat. This led to a mean reduction in the waste consumption index of ∼15%. A parallel action encouraging separation of organic and inorganic waste was implemented as well, with an active participation of >70% of the users. The initiative achieved its objective of reducing plate waste by raising awareness of the daily food waste problem at the institution's canteen and by suggesting "how-to" actions for reducing such waste. This study showed how avoidable waste can be reduced simply by making students aware of the topic of food waste. Simple strategies may be useful to improve behaviours and increase sustainability of the canteens at Universities although this proved

  1. THE ROLE OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND MARKETING IN PROMOTING OF ANTI-SMOKING CAMPAIGNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Costina LUCA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, according to official statistics (ec.europa.eu the percentage of smokers is about 29% of the population, and smoking still remains the main reason underlying the deaths and illnesses that could have been prevented. In the past 12 months, 31% of EU smokers have tried to quit smoking. In this gloomy context, the European Commission already has a tradition in preventing and stopping smoking, in addition to the broader tobacco control: in recent years have been organized numerous campaigns that aim to inform the European public about the problems caused by consumption tobacco, increasing awareness of the dangers of smoking, thus contributing to the long-term objective proposed by the Commission as "Europe free from tobacco smoke."

  2. Formative Research to Design a Promotional Campaign to Increase Drinking Water among Central American Latino Youth in an Urban Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Nicole; Colón-Ramos, Uriyoán; Elkins, Allison; Rivera, Ivonne; Evans, W Douglas; Edberg, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Latinos consume more sugary drinks and less water than other demographic groups. Our objective was to understand beverage choice motivations and test promotional concepts that can encourage Central American Latino urban youth to drink more water. Two rounds of focus group discussions were conducted (n = 10 focus groups, 61 participants, 6-18 years old). Data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using inductive and deductive coding approaches. Youth motivations for drinking water were shaped by level of thirst, weather, energy, and perceptions of health benefits. Youth were discouraged from drinking water due to its taste and perceptions of the safety and cleanliness of tap water. Youth beverage preference depended on what their friends were drinking. Availability of water versus other beverages at home and other settings influenced their choice. Promotional materials that included mixed language, informative messages about the benefits of drinking water, and celebrities or athletes who were active, energized, and drinking water were preferred. A promotional campaign to increase water consumption among these Latino youth should include bicultural messages to underscore the power of water to quench true thirst, highlight the health benefits of drinking water, and address the safety of tap water.

  3. Strategic messaging to promote taxation of sugar-sweetened beverages: lessons from recent political campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Judy; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Barry, Colleen L; Gollust, Sarah E

    2014-05-01

    This study explored the use of strategic messaging by proponents of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) taxation to influence public opinion and shape the policy process, emphasizing the experiences in El Monte and Richmond, California, with SSB tax proposals in 2012. We conducted 18 semistructured interviews with key stakeholders about the use and perceived effectiveness of messages supporting and opposing SSB taxation, knowledge sharing among advocates, message dissemination, and lessons learned from their messaging experiences. The protax messages most frequently mentioned by respondents were reinvesting tax revenue into health-related programs and linking SSB consumption to health outcomes such as obesity and diabetes. The most frequently mentioned antitax messages addressed negative economic effects on businesses and government restriction of personal choice. Factors contributing to perceived messaging success included clearly defining "sugar-sweetened beverage" and earmarking funds for obesity prevention, incorporating cultural sensitivity into messaging, and providing education about the health effects of SSB consumption. Sugar-sweetened beverage taxation has faced significant challenges in gaining political and public support. Future campaigns can benefit from insights gained through the experiences of stakeholders involved in previous policy debates.

  4. Conversations among Coal Miners in a Campaign to Promote Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Michael T.; Quick, Brian L.; Witte, Kim; Vaught, Charles; Booth-Butterfield, Steve; Patel, Dhaval

    2009-01-01

    Although working in a coal mine can diminish one's hearing capabilities by 50%, not until 2000 did federal laws require companies to establish noise standards in order to help prevent hearing loss among their employees. Since then, researchers have worked with safety administrators to develop effective messages promoting hearing protection and…

  5. Evaluation of an Online Campaign for Promoting Help-Seeking Attitudes for Depression Using a Facebook Advertisement: An Online Randomized Controlled Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Alison; Wong, Paul Wai-Ching; Fu, King-Wa

    2015-01-01

    enhance people's mental health literacy. It also demonstrates the practicality and effectiveness of an online depression awareness campaign using a Facebook-based recruitment strategy and distribution of educational materials through emails. It is important for future studies to take advantage of the popularity of online social media and conduct evaluative research on mental health promotion campaigns.

  6. 'Get an early check - Chrysanthemum tea': An outcome evaluation of a multimedia campaign promoting HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Nnm; Wong, Amh; Fang, Y; Wang, Z

    2018-05-01

    'Get an early check - chrysanthemum tea' was a multimedia campaign promoting HIV testing targeting Chinese-speaking men who have sex with men (MSM) in Hong Kong, China. It ran from October to December 2015. This study was carried out to investigate the level of campaign exposure among Chinese-speaking MSM in Hong Kong and the association between uptake of HIV testing in the last 6 months and campaign exposure. A cross-sectional survey was conducted 6 months after the campaign was launched. Participants were Hong Kong Chinese-speaking men aged ≥18 years who had had anal or oral sex with at least one man in their lifetime. A total of 153 eligible participants completed the anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Among the participants, 45.8% had been exposed to the campaign and 43.1% had taken up HIV testing in the last 6 months. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, exposure to the campaign [multivariate odds ratio (ORm) 2.55; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.25, 5.19] and having had anal intercourse with a nonregular sex partner (ORm 2.36; 95% CI 1.05, 5.31) in the last 6 months were significantly associated with uptake of HIV testing in the last 6 months. The campaign had relatively good reach in the target population and may have been useful to encourage them to take up HIV testing. Future campaigns promoting HIV testing among MSM in Hong Kong are still needed. Such programmes should consider making use of viral videos, having a longer project duration and developing culturally sensitive materials for non-Chinese-speaking MSM. © 2018 British HIV Association.

  7. Campaign of promoting the individual solar water heating; Campagne de promotion du chauffe-eau solaire individuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-14

    This document is the file of a press conference organized by Agency of Environment and Energy Management (ADEME) on 14 April 2000. The subject matter was re-launching the solar heat generation in metropolitan France. ADEME plans promoting in the frame of HELIOS 2006 program the heat production and solar water heating for individual and collective uses. Individual solar water heater was selected as the most available appliance as it appears to be the best product of interest for the public at large. The content of the document is: - objectives; - target regions; - communication means; - HELIOS, the program for 2000 - 2006; - QUALISOL map; - other capabilities of HELIOS; - additional information. Three important objectives are addressed: implementing a national-wide coherent communication; undertaking a progressive regional operations, adjustable for use in other regions; using the experience of regional ADEME delegations in regions with good market conditions and high qualification of personnel and industries. As a first stage, as targets, five metropolitan regions corresponding to the exposed criteria were selected: Corsica, Languedoc Roussillon, Midi-Pyrenees, PACA, Rhone Alpes. Objective and the structure of the program HELIOS 2006 are outlined.

  8. A study on the development of public campaign messages for organ donation promotion in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hye-Jin

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to find an effective method of expressing a message in public service ads by investigating whether or not a message framing type affects the outcome. Specifically, the study looks into the effects of messaging on organ donation by identifying how the type of message framing (positive vs. negative) and appeal type (rational vs. emotional) affect the attitude and behavioural intention of the consumer. The individual characteristics of each subject such as altruistic mind, level of self-monitoring and issue involvement were selected as intermediate variables that may affect the impact of a message. The study therefore tries to establish a proposition that can be used to generate an effective promotional message on organ donation in a systematic way. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Campus Solidarity Campaign: Developing a Program to Promote an Environment of Solidarity and Support on College Campuses for Students with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosyluk, Kristin A.; Corrigan, Patrick W.; Jones, Nev; James, Drexler; Abelson, Sara; Malmon, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a campaign to promote an environment of solidarity and support on college campuses for students with mental illnesses. Method: Data were gathered from 24 members of a Chicago university campus who were selected as representatives of key campus stakeholder groups including students, administrative staff,…

  10. Developing a Mass Media Campaign to Promote Mammography Awareness in African American Women in the Nation's Capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallington, Sherrie Flynt; Oppong, Bridget; Iddirisu, Marquita; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L

    2017-12-26

    This study developed and examined the reach and impact of a culturally appropriate mass media campaign pilot, designed to increase awareness about the importance of mammography screening and the available community mammography services for low-income African American women ages 40 and above. We conducted formative research using focus groups to inform campaign development, resulting in five emergent themes-good breast health, holistic views of healthiness, cancer fatalism, fear of mammogram machines, and mammogram affordability. The campaign targeted specific low-income African American communities in the District of Columbia via print ads in Metro stations and on buses, print ads in the Washington Informer, and online ads on a local TV network website. Data were collected before, during, and after campaign implementation to assess reach and impact. Reach was measured by number of impressions (number of people exposed to the campaign), while impact was assessed via online ad click-through rates, website use and referrals, and mammography center calls. The campaign was successful in reaching the target audience, with a total combined reach from all media of 9,479,386 impressions. In addition, the mammography center received significant increases in new website visitors (1482 during the campaign, compared to 24 during the preceding period) as well as 97 calls to the dedicated phone line. Further research involving a more long-term investment in terms of funding and campaign run time, coupled with a more robust evaluation, is needed to assess if culturally appropriate mass media campaigns can generate increased mammography screening rates and decrease breast-cancer-related mortality.

  11. Controlling antibiotic misuse and overuse: a review of campaigns that promote the rational use of antibiotics in the Americas and Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, James Ian

    2009-01-01

    The project’s objective was to review what types of community educational interventions have been conducted by health ministries, non-governmental organizations, and research teams to improve antibiotic use in countries with significant Spanish-speaking populations. I conducted a web-based survey to retrieve educational campaign materials promoting the appropriate use of antibiotics in communities in the Americas and Spain. Public health agencies in 10 countries (Bolivia, Chile, Ecuador, Nica...

  12. You've got mail! An examination of a statewide direct-mail marketing campaign to promote deceased organ donor registrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Brian L; LaVoie, Nicole R; Morgan, Susan E; Bosch, Dave

    2015-11-01

    This study extends previous direct-mail campaigns by evaluating the effectiveness of a marketing campaign promoting organ donation message strategies from the vantage point of organ donors, organ recipients, individuals on the waiting list, or a combination of these three frames. Illinois residents were randomly assigned to one of four organ donation brochures disseminated via U.S. postal mail. Registrations occurred via the Internet and U.S. postal mail. Individuals register at a greater rate following exposure to the combination framed message compared to organ donor, organ recipient, and waiting list narratives. The campaign revealed that individuals are more likely to register via U.S. postal mail than the Internet. Direct-mail marketing efforts were shown to be an effective approach to promote organ and tissue donation registrations. The results demonstrated a preference for the combination framed brochure. The results are discussed with an emphasis on the practical implications of utilizing direct-mail marketing efforts to promote organ donation among young adults. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Image Gently in Dentistry campaign: promotion of responsible use of maxillofacial radiology in dentistry for children

    OpenAIRE

    White, SC; Scarfe, WC; Schulze, RKW; Lurie, AG; Douglass, JM; Farman, AG; Law, CS; Levin, MD; Sauer, RA; Valachovic, RW; Zeller, GG; Goske, MJ

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc. The Image Gently in Dentistry campaign to be launched in September 2014 is a specific initiative of the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging, supported by organized dentistry and dental education as well as many dental specialty organizations. The objective of the campaign is to change practice by increasing awareness of the opportunities to improve radiation protection when imaging children in dental practices. Six practical steps are provided ...

  14. A multi-component stair climbing promotional campaign targeting calorific expenditure for worksites; a quasi-experimental study testing effects on behaviour, attitude and intention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eves Frank F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accumulation of lifestyle physical activity is a current aim of health promotion, with increased stair climbing one public health target. While the workplace provides an opportunity for regular stair climbing, evidence for effectiveness of point-of-choice interventions is equivocal. This paper reports a new approach to worksite interventions, aimed at changing attitudes and, hence, behaviour. Methods Pre-testing of calorific expenditure messages used structured interviews with members of the public (n = 300. Effects of multi-component campaigns on stair climbing were tested with quasi-experimental, interrupted time-series designs. In one worksite, a main campaign poster outlining the amount of calorific expenditure obtainable from stair climbing and a conventional point-of-choice prompt were used (Poster alone site. In a second worksite, additional messages in the stairwell about calorific expenditure reinforced the main campaign (Poster + Stairwell messages site. The outcome variables were automated observations of stair and lift ascent (28,854 and descent (29,352 at baseline and for three weeks after the intervention was installed. Post-intervention questionnaires for employees at the worksites assessed responses to the campaign (n = 253. Analyses employed Analysis of Variance with follow-up Bonferroni t-tests (message pre-testing, logistic regression of stair ascent and descent (campaign testing, and Bonferroni t-tests and multiple regression (follow-up questionnaire. Results Pre-testing of messages based on calorific expenditure suggested they could motivate stair climbing if believed. The new campaign increased stair climbing, with greater effects at the Poster + Stairwell messages site (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.40-1.66 than Posters alone (OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.15-1.34. Follow-up revealed higher agreement with two statements about calorific outcomes of stair climbing in the site where they

  15. Toscana virus NSs protein promotes degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalveram, Birte; Ikegami, Tetsuro

    2013-04-01

    Toscana virus (TOSV), which is transmitted by Phlebotomus spp. sandflies, is a major etiologic agent of aseptic meningitis and encephalitis in the Mediterranean. Like other members of the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae, TOSV encodes a nonstructural protein (NSs) in its small RNA segment. Although the NSs of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has been identified as an important virulence factor, which suppresses host general transcription, inhibits transcription from the beta interferon promoter, and promotes the proteasomal degradation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR), little is known about the functions of NSs proteins encoded by less-pathogenic members of this genus. In this study we report that TOSV is able to downregulate PKR with similar efficiency as RVFV, while infection with the other phleboviruses-i.e., Punta Toro virus, sandfly fever Sicilian virus, or Frijoles virus-has no effect on cellular PKR levels. In contrast to RVFV, however, cellular transcription remains unaffected during TOSV infection. TOSV NSs protein promotes the proteasome-dependent downregulation of PKR and is able to interact with kinase-inactive PKR in infected cells.

  16. Improving understanding, promoting social inclusion, and fostering empowerment related to epilepsy: Epilepsy Foundation public awareness campaigns--2001 through 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, P; Kobau, R; Buelow, J; Austin, J; Lowenberg, K

    2015-03-01

    It is a significant public health concern that epilepsy, the fourth most common neurological disorder in the United States, is generally poorly understood by both the public and those living with the condition. Lack of understanding may magnify the challenges faced by those with epilepsy, including limiting treatment opportunities, effective management of symptoms, and full participation in daily life activities. Insufficient awareness of epilepsy and appropriate seizure first aid among the public and professionals can result in insufficient treatment, inappropriate seizure response, physical restraint, social exclusion, or other negative consequences. To address the need for increased public education and awareness about epilepsy, the national Epilepsy Foundation, supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has conducted yearly multifaceted public education and awareness campaigns designed to reach the broad population and targeted segments of the population including youth, young adults, racial/ethnic groups (i.e., African-, Hispanic-, and Asian-Americans), and people with epilepsy and their caregivers. Campaign channels have included traditional media, social media, and community opinion leaders and celebrity spokespersons. The key activities of these campaigns, conducted from 2001 to 2013, are summarized in this report. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in double-strand DNA break repair and cancer promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarski, Roni; Kotler, Moshe

    2013-06-15

    High frequency of cytidine to thymidine conversions was identified in the genome of several types of cancer cells. In breast cancer cells, these mutations are clustered in long DNA regions associated with single-strand DNA (ssDNA), double-strand DNA breaks (DSB), and genomic rearrangements. The observed mutational pattern resembles the deamination signature of cytidine to uridine carried out by members of the APOBEC3 family of cellular deaminases. Consistently, APOBEC3B (A3B) was recently identified as the mutational source in breast cancer cells. A3G is another member of the cytidine deaminases family predominantly expressed in lymphoma cells, where it is involved in mutational DSB repair following ionizing radiation treatments. This activity provides us with a new paradigm for cancer cell survival and tumor promotion and a mechanistic link between ssDNA, DSBs, and clustered mutations. Cancer Res; 73(12); 3494-8. ©2013 AACR. ©2013 AACR.

  18. Conditional punishment is a double-edged sword in promoting cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Chen, Xiaojie; Wang, Long

    2018-01-11

    Punishment is widely recognized as an effective approach for averting from exploitation by free-riders in human society. However, punishment is costly, and thus rational individuals are unwilling to take the punishing action, resulting in the second-order free-rider problem. Recent experimental study evidences that individuals prefer conditional punishment, and their punishing decision depends on other members' punishing decisions. In this work, we thus propose a theoretical model for conditional punishment and investigate how such conditional punishment influences cooperation in the public goods game. Considering conditional punishers only take the punishing action when the number of unconditional punishers exceeds a threshold number, we demonstrate that such conditional punishment induces the effect of a double-edged sword on the evolution of cooperation both in well-mixed and structured populations. Specifically, when it is relatively easy for conditional punishers to engage in the punishment activity corresponding to a low threshold value, cooperation can be promoted in comparison with the case without conditional punishment. Whereas when it is relatively difficult for conditional punishers to engage in the punishment activity corresponding to a high threshold value, cooperation is inhibited in comparison with the case without conditional punishment. Moreover, we verify that such double-edged sword effect exists in a wide range of model parameters and can be still observed in other different punishment regimes.

  19. Political Campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Lilleker, Darren

    2017-01-01

    Political campaigns are orchestrated attempts by political organizations to garner public support through persuasive communication in order to influence public policy in their favor. This broad definition encapsulates all forms of campaigns from those of neighborhood organizations seeking to influence local politicians to the campaigns of political parties and candidates who seek election to office in order to shape policy themselves. In pluralist democracies, campaigns are crucial for repres...

  20. Doubling the referral rate of monogenic diabetes through a nationwide information campaign--update on glucokinase gene mutations in a Polish cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, M; Fendler, W; Antosik, K; Baranowska, A; Gnys, P; Zmyslowska, A; Malecki, M; Mlynarski, W

    2012-12-01

    In order to improve recruitment efficiency of patients with monogenic diabetes in Poland, in September 2010 a nationwide advertising campaign was launched to inform multiple target groups interested or participating in pediatric diabetologic care. Promotional actions aimed at informing physicians, patients, parents and educators were carried out through nationwide newspapers, medical and patient-developed websites and educational conference presentations. Recruitment efficiency was compared between September 2010 (publication of the first report on project's results) and the following 12 months. The number of families and patients referred to genetic screening was increased by 92% and 96% respectively nearly reaching the numbers recruited throughout the initial 4 years of the project. Participation of non-academic centers was also significantly increased from 2.3% to 7.5% (p = 0.0005). DNA sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-dependant Probe Amplification of the glucokinase gene resulted in finding 50 different mutations. Among those mutations, 19 were novel variants, which included: 17 missense mutations (predicted to be pathogenic according to bioinformatic analysis), 1 nonsense mutation and 1 mutation affecting a consensus intronic splice site. Advertising actions directed at increasing recruitment efficiency are a powerful and possibly neglected tool in screening for rare genetic disorders with a clinically defined phenotype. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Lessons and implications from a mass immunization campaign in squatter settlements of Karachi, Pakistan: an experience from a cluster-randomized double-blinded vaccine trial [NCT00125047

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Elyazeed Remon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the safety and logistic feasibility of a mass immunization strategy outside the local immunization program in the pediatric population of urban squatter settlements in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods A cluster-randomized double blind preventive trial was launched in August 2003 in 60 geographic clusters covering 21,059 children ages 2 to 16 years. After consent was obtained from parents or guardians, eligible children were immunized parenterally at vaccination posts in each cluster with Vi polysaccharide or hepatitis A vaccine. Safety, logistics, and standards were monitored and documented. Results The vaccine coverage of the population was 74% and was higher in those under age 10 years. No life-threatening serious adverse events were reported. Adverse events occurred in less than 1% of all vaccine recipients and the main reactions reported were fever and local pain. The proportion of adverse events in Vi polysaccharide and hepatitis A recipients will not be known until the end of the trial when the code is broken. Throughout the vaccination campaign safe injection practices were maintained and the cold chain was not interrupted. Mass vaccination in slums had good acceptance. Because populations in such areas are highly mobile, settlement conditions could affect coverage. Systemic reactions were uncommon and local reactions were mild and transient. Close community involvement was pivotal for information dissemination and immunization coverage. Conclusion This vaccine strategy described together with other information that will soon be available in the area (cost/effectiveness, vaccine delivery costs, etc will make typhoid fever control become a reality in the near future.

  2. Exploring the potential for a mass media campaign to influence support for a ban on tobacco promotion at the point of sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jane A; Davis, K C; Kamyab, K; Farrelly, M C

    2015-02-01

    This study explores whether exposure to advertisements that focus on the negative effects of tobacco industry advertising and promotion at the point of sale (anti-POS advertising) influence: (i) attitude toward POS advertising; (ii) perceived impact of POS advertising on youth smoking; and (iii) support for a ban on tobacco promotion at the POS among adult non-smokers in New York. Data are from a split-sample, experimental study, using an online media tracking survey with embedded TV, radio and print advertising. Exposure to anti-POS advertising was associated with higher odds of holding a negative attitude toward POS advertising (OR 2.43, P promotion at the POS (OR 1.77, P advertisements on youth smoking. Findings suggest the possibility that a mass media campaign could be used to influence public attitude toward POS advertising and support for a ban on tobacco promotion at the POS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Hydrocracking of Cerbera manghas Oil with Co-Ni/HZSM-5 as Double Promoted Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenny Marlinda

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of various reaction temperature on the hydrocracking of Cerbera manghas oil to produce a paraffin-rich mixture of hydrocarbons with Co-Ni/HZSM-5 as doubled promoted catalyst were studied. The Co-Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst with various metal loading and metal ratio was prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, AAS, and N2 adsorption-desorption. Surface area, pore diameter, and pore volume of catalysts decreased with the increasing of metals loading. The hydrocracking process was conducted under hydrogen initial pressure in batch reactor equipped with a mechanical stirrer. The reaction was carried out at a temperature of 300-375 oC for 2 h.  Depending on the experimental condition, the reaction pressure changed between 10 bar and 15 bar.   Several parameters were used to evaluate biofuel produced, including oxygen removal, hydrocarbon composition and gasoline/kerosene/diesel yields. Biofuel was analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic (FTIR and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The composition of hydrocarbon compounds in liquid products was similar to the compounds in the gasoil sold in unit of Pertamina Gas Stations, namely pentadecane, hexadecane, heptadecane, octadecane, and nonadecane with different amounts for each biofuel produced at different reaction temperatures. However, isoparaffin compounds were not formed at all operating conditions. Pentadecane (n-C15 and heptadecane (n-C17 were the most abundant composition in gasoil when Co-Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst was used. Cerbera Manghas oil can be recommended as the source of non-edible vegetable oil to produce gasoil as an environmentally friendly transportation fuel. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 20th May 2016; Revised: 30th January 2017; Accepted: 10th February 2017 How to Cite: Marlinda, L., Al-Muttaqii, M., Gunardi, I., Roesyadi, A., Prajitno, D.H. (2017. Hydrocracking of Cerbera manghas Oil

  4. Low levels of awareness of suboptimal health conditions in a high-risk working population: the "better health for better Hong Kong" health promotion campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gary T C; Chan, Juliana C N; Chan, Amy W Y; Wong, Patrick T S; Hui, Stanley S C; Tong, Spencer D Y; Chow, Ferrie; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2007-01-01

    The incidences of cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity and diabetes are rising in many Asian populations. In April 2000, a 5-year territory-wide health promotion campaign supported by Li Ka Shing Foundation was launched in Hong Kong by the Health InfoWorld of Hospital Authority. From the general working class, 4,832 Chinese people were randomly recruited into this campaign. There were 2,370 men (49.0%) and 2,462 women (51.0%; median age = 43.0 years, range = 17-83 years). Of these, 37.5% were obese (BMI > or = 25 kg/m2 or waist circumference > or = 80 cm in women and > or = 90 cm in men), 22.3% had hypertension, 11.6% were smokers, 31.0% had hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol > or = 5.2 mmol/l), 2.2% had diabetes, and 0.7% had a past history of cardiovascular disease. There were 1,338 participants (27.7%) who had 2 or more risk factors (more men than women: 36.9% vs. 18.9%, p Hong Kong people. Massive public education is an important and essential, although it may not be self-sufficient, factor to reduce the socioeconomic impacts of this epidemic.

  5. [Health promoting messages posted in Facebook by the health ministries of Brazil and Peru during an AIDS awareness campaign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadaxa, Aedê Gomes; Sousa, Maria Fátima de; Mendonça, Ana Valéria Machado

    2015-12-01

    To identify health promoting contents (information that can be transformed into decision-making resources to improve quality of life and the health of individuals or groups) in Facebook postings by the ministries of health in Brazil and Peru. This case study compared the messages published in Facebook by the ministries of health from Brazil and Peru during World AIDS Day. Content analysis was employed to identify health promoting contents in the messages posted between November 2013 and February 2014. A total of 105 messages were published on the topic of interest (37 from Peru and 68 from Brazil). In both cases, most messages focused on individuals, addressing the change or adoption of personal behaviors relating to the prevention and detection of HIV - 34 messages (50.0%) for Brazil and 17 (45.9%) for Peru. Twenty-one (30.9%) messages with a structural emphasis were published by Brazil and 14 (37.8%) by Peru, addressing the context of health care system organization, including HIV/ AIDS health policies, available services, access to HIV testing and initiatives to promote testing. Hybrid messages, including both emphases, were less frequent: 13 (19.1%) for Brazil and six (16.2%) for Peru. Health promoting contents were identified in hybrid messages, which provided resources to expand the understanding of individuals about the susceptibility to AIDS.

  6. Community-Based Promotional Campaign to Improve Uptake of Intermittent Preventive Antimalarial Treatment in Pregnancy in Burkina Faso

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gies, Sabine; Coulibaly, Sheick O.; Ky, Clotilde; Ouattara, Florence T.; Brabin, Bernard J.; d'Alessandro, Umberto

    2009-01-01

    Malaria preventive strategies in pregnancy were assessed in a health center randomized trial comparing intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP) with and without community based promotional activities in rural Burkina Faso. The study involved 2,240 secundigravidae

  7. Formative Research on a Social Marketing Campaign to Promote the Consumption of Healthy Breakfast and Snacks: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Bastami

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The elimination of breakfast and the high consumption of low-value snacks are becoming more frequent and common among adolescents. Nutrition is a complex behavioral phenomenon that is associated with the specific cultural and environmental issues of each society as well as psychological features.This qualitative research was conducted to identify factors affecting breakfast consumption behavior in adolescents using the social marketing framework. Materials and Methods: A qualitative research based on the social marketing framework was conducted through directed content analysis in the high schools of Isfahan and Khorramabad, Iran, in 2016. Data were collected through seven focus group discussions and 33 in-depth, semi-structured; interviews conducted in person with both male and female students, the parents, and the teachers and were analyzed simultaneously in three phases, namely preparation, organization and reporting. Results: The results obtained in the present study within the social marketing framework were coded into the four categories of product, place, price and promotion. The product category had four subcategories, including favorite taste sought in breakfast, breakfast preparation, breakfast serving style, variety and the healthful features of breakfast. The price category had four subcategories, including time, psychological, social and financial prices. The promotion category had three subcategories, including official channels, unofficial channels, and educational materials and equipment. The place category had two subcategories, including having breakfast at school or having breakfast in an outdoor space. Conclusion: The promotion of healthy breakfast as a product, requires that first its important features be considered, including the favorite taste sought in breakfast, second that it be promoted through channels most popular with students, and most importantly, that its price be reduced by using incentives such as

  8. The effect of a soap promotion and hygiene education campaign on handwashing behaviour in rural India: a cluster randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biran, Adam; Schmidt, Wolf-Peter; Wright, Richard; Jones, Therese; Seshadri, M; Isaac, Pradeep; Nathan, N A; Hall, Peter; McKenna, Joeleen; Granger, Stewart; Bidinger, Pat; Curtis, Val

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a hygiene promotion intervention based on germ awareness in increasing handwashing with soap on key occasions (after faecal contact and before eating) in rural Indian households. Cluster randomised trial of a hygiene promotion intervention in five intervention and five control villages. Handwashing was assessed through structured observation in a random sample of 30 households per village. Additionally, soap use was monitored in a sub-sample of 10 households per village using electronic motion detectors embedded in soap bars. The intervention reached 40% of the target population. Germ awareness increased as well as reported handwashing (a possible indicator of perceived social norms). Observed handwashing with soap on key occasions was rare (6%), especially after faecal contact (2%). Observed handwashing with soap on key occasions did not change 4 weeks after the intervention in either the intervention arm (-1%, 95% CI -2%/+0.3%), or the control arm (+0.4%, 95% CI -1%/+2%). Data from motion detectors indicated a significant but small increase in overall soap use in the intervention arm. We cannot confidently identify the nature of this increase except to say that there was no change in a key measure of handwashing after defecation. The intervention proved scalable and effective in raising hygiene awareness. There was some evidence of an impact on soap use but not on the primary outcome of handwashing at key times. However, the results do not exclude that changes in knowledge and social norms may lay the foundations for behaviour change in the longer term.

  9. Campaigns Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Møller; Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2014-01-01

    and the external efficacy increase over the course of the campaign, with gains found across different demographic groups, particularly narrowing the gaps in internal efficacy. The news media play a crucial role, as increased knowledge and efficacy are partly driven by media use, although tabloids actually decrease...... external efficacy. The findings suggest that positive campaign effects are universal across various media and party systems.......Election campaigns are more than simple competitions for votes; they also represent an opportunity for voters to become politically knowledgeable and engaged. Using a large-scale web panel (n≈5,000), we track the development of political knowledge, internal efficacy and external efficacy among...

  10. In a campaign to conserve energy, Jamaica calls for promotion of rail transport and study of peak power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renwick, D

    1979-04-01

    Prime Minister M. Manley's government in Jamaica has included, in its 1978-1982 Five-Year Development Plan, a National Energy Plan that seeks to conserve energy and reduce dependence on imported oil by accelerating exploration for indigenous oil, instituting peak-load pricing for electricity used during certain daylight hours, phasing out subsidies on petroleum products other than kerosene over 12 mo, introducing taxes on petroleum fuels, promoting rail transportation, requiring a minimum 22 mpg fuel economy in imported cars, and encouraging use of alternative energy sources including hydropower, peat from local deposits, and sugarcane bagasse. In a study sponsored by the Norwegian Government, the Norwegian company, Geco, in collaboration with Petrojam, the Jamaican Government's corporation responsible for oil industry activities, has surveyed areas off the island's northwest, west, and southwest coasts. Imported oil presently costs Jamaica more than $200 million a year, which is 25Vertical Bar3< of the total import bill. In 1990, even with energy reduction, Jamaica will need $1.4 billion for imported oil.

  11. Evaluation of an Online Campaign for Promoting Help-Seeking Attitudes for Depression Using a Facebook Advertisement: An Online Randomized Controlled Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Alison; Wong, Paul Wai-Ching; Fu, King-Wa

    2015-01-01

    Background A depression-awareness campaign delivered through the Internet has been recommended as a public health approach that would enhance mental health literacy and encourage help-seeking attitudes. However, the outcomes of such a campaign remain understudied. Objective The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an online depression awareness campaign, which was informed by the theory of planned behavior, to encourage help-seeking attitudes for depression and to enhan...

  12. Double-dealing behavior potentially promotes cooperation in evolutionary prisoner's dilemma games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qionglin; Li, Haihong; Cheng, Hongyan; Li, Yuting; Yang, Junzhong

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the effects of double-dealing behavior on cooperation in evolutionary games. Each individual in a population has two attributes: character and action. One's action may be consistent with one's character or not. We provide analytical results by a mean-field description of evolutionary prisoner's dilemma games (PDGs). Moreover, we give numerical results on different networks, ranging from square lattices to scale-free networks (SFNs). Two important conclusions have been drawn from the results on SFNs. Firstly, if only non-influential individuals (those with low degrees) have chances of becoming double-dealers, cooperation is certain to deteriorate. Secondly, when influential individuals (those with high degrees) adopt double-dealing behavior moderately, cooperation would be enhanced, which is in opposition to the traditional belief. These results help us to understand better the social phenomenon of the existence of double-dealers. In addition to the PDG, other types of games including the snowdrift game, the stag-hunt game and the harmony game have also been studied on our model. The results for these three games are also presented, which are consistent with the results for the PDG qualitatively. Furthermore, we consider our model under the co-evolution framework, in which the probability of an individual changing into a double-dealer and the individual strategy both could evolve during the evolutionary process.

  13. The U.S. National "Tips from Former Smokers" Antismoking Campaign: Promoting Awareness of Smoking-Related Risks, Cessation Resources, and Cessation Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Ling; Thrasher, James F.; Abad, Erika Nayeli; Cummings, K. Michael; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Brown, Abraham; Nagelhout, Gera E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Evaluate the second flight of the U.S. "Tips From Former Smokers" (Tips) campaign. Method: Data were analyzed from an online consumer panel of U.S. adult smokers before (n = 1,404) and after (n = 1,401) the 2013 Tips campaign launch. Generalized estimating equation models assessed whether the Tips advertisement recall was…

  14. The campaign “De pé no chão também se aprende a ler” and the promotion of the educaction through the Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliny Dayany Pereira de Medeiros Pranto

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present the different strategies of promotion of education by popular culture from the activities of the Campaign "De pé no chão também se aprende a ler". In order to reach this goal, we carried out a literature review considering classical authors in the discussion of the theme, such as José Willington Germano, Moacyr de Góes and Djalma Maranhão; Theses and dissertations; Other written sources, such as newspapers, and testimonials from people who have experienced the activities of the Campaign, such as alumni and teachers. After analyzed separately, the sources were crossed, following the guidelines of Paul Thompson, and allowed us to make some initial considerations about the Campaign. We realized that there were diverse strategies for the promotion of education through popular culture, ranging from the construction of squares, theaters and libraries, to the development of cultural circles, spaces for critical literacy, based on the Paulo Freire System. We consider, then, that the Campaign was not constituted in a homogeneous way, otherwise, it acted in a diversified way, with a view to achieving the goal of the dissemination of education through Popular Culture.

  15. Television campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Hospital Center embarked on a branding effort in hopes of raising customer awareness of the hospital's state-of-the-art technologies in advanced medical care. The campaign launched a new phase of TV spots that highlight the facility's advanced services, such as the computed tomography angiogram, the argon plasma coagulator, and heart valve replacement surgery.

  16. IknowUshould2: Feasibility of a Youth-Driven Social Media Campaign to Promote STI and HIV Testing Among Adolescents in Philadelphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowshen, Nadia; Lee, Susan; Matty Lehman, B; Castillo, Marné; Mollen, Cynthia

    2015-06-01

    A youth-driven, social media-based campaign aimed at improving knowledge about and increasing testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs)/HIV among youth 13-17 years old was assessed by: tracking website/social media use throughout the campaign; online survey of knowledge of and attitudes towards STI testing 9 months after campaign launch; and comparing rates of STI testing at affiliated family planning clinics during the 1 year period immediately prior versus 1 year immediately after campaign launch. Over 1,500 youth were reached via social media. Survey results showed 46 % of youth had never been tested, but 70 % intended to test in the next 6 months. While the total number of GC/CT tests conducted and positive results were not significantly different pre- and post-campaign, there was a large increase in the proportion of visits at which Syphilis (5.4 vs. 18.8 %; p campaign launch. Future campaigns should incorporate lessons learned about engaging younger adolescents, social media strategies, and specific barriers to testing in this age group.

  17. Impact of the Swap It, Don't Stop It Australian National Mass Media Campaign on Promoting Small Changes to Lifestyle Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Blythe J; Grunseit, Anne; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Bellew, William; Briggs, Megan; Bauman, Adrian E

    2016-12-01

    Mass media campaigns aimed at influencing lifestyle risk factors are one way that governments are attempting to address chronic disease risk. In Australia, a national campaign aimed at encouraging Australians to make changes in lifestyle-related behaviors was implemented from 2008 to 2011. The first phase, Measure Up (2008-2009), focused on why lifestyle changes are needed by increasing awareness of the link between waist circumference and chronic disease risk. The second phase, Swap It, Don't Stop It (2011), emphasized how adults can change their behaviors. Cross-sectional telephone surveys (after the campaign) were undertaken in July and November 2011 to evaluate the Swap It, Don't Stop It campaign and included measures of campaign awareness and lifestyle-related behavior change. Survey participants (N = 5,097) were similar across the two survey periods. Prompted campaign awareness was 62% (16% for unprompted awareness); females, younger respondents (18-44 years), those in paid employment, and those who spoke English at home were more likely to report prompted/unprompted campaign awareness. Moreover, 16% of survey respondents reported any swapping behavior in the previous 6 months, with the majority (14%) reporting only one swap; younger respondents and those in paid employment were significantly more likely to report having implemented a swapping behavior. The campaign achieved modest population awareness but demonstrated limited effect in terms of nudging behaviors. This evaluation indicates that encouraging swapping behaviors as a prelude to lifestyle change may not result from a mass media campaign alone; a comprehensive multicomponent population approach may be required.

  18. Association between sleeping hours, working hours and obesity in Hong Kong Chinese: the 'better health for better Hong Kong' health promotion campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, G T C; Chan, J C N; Chan, A W Y; Wong, P T S; Hui, S S C; Tong, S D Y; Ng, S-M; Chow, F; Chan, C L W

    2007-02-01

    To study the inter-relationships between sleeping hours, working hours and obesity in subjects from a working population. A cross-sectional observation study under the 'Better Health for Better Hong Kong' Campaign, which is a territory-wide health awareness and promotion program. 4793 subjects (2353 (49.1%) men and 2440 (50.9%) women). Their mean age (+/-s.d.) was 42.4+/-8.9 years (range 17-83 years, median 43.0 years). Subjects were randomly selected using computer-generated codes in accordance to the distribution of occupational groups in Hong Kong. The mean daily sleeping time was 7.06+/-1.03 h (women vs men: 7.14+/-1.08 h vs 6.98+/-0.96 h, Pworking hours reaching significance in the whole group as well as among male subjects. Those with short sleeping hour (6 h or less) and long working hours (>9 h) had the highest BMI and waist in both men and women. Based on multiple regression analysis with age, smoking, alcohol drinking, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean daily sleeping hours and working hours as independent variables, BMI was independently associated with age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure in women, whereas waist was associated with age, smoking and blood pressure. In men, blood pressure, sleeping hours and working hours were independently associated with BMI, whereas waist was independently associated with age, smoking, blood pressure, sleeping hours and working hours in men. Obesity is associated with reduced sleeping hours and long working hours in men among Hong Kong Chinese working population. Further studies are needed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this relationship and its potential implication on prevention and management of obesity.

  19. Construction and expression of secreting type human TRAIL gene vector mediated by hypoxia/radiation double sensitive promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yanming; Jia Xiaojing; Qu Yaqin; Li Yanbo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To construct secreting type human TRAIL (shTRAIL) gene vector pcDNA3.1-HRE/Egr1-shTRAIL mediated by hypoxia/radiation double sensitive promoter, and observe the effect of hypoxia and radiation on shTRAIL. Methods: HRE upper and lower strands were gotten by chemical synthesis, double strands HRE was gotten by PCR; pMD19T-Egr1 was digested by Sac I and Hind III, then Egr1 was obtained, pshuttle-shTRAIL was digested by Kpn I and BamH I, then shTRAIL was obtained; HRE/Egr1 double sensitive promoter mediated shTRAIL expression vector pcDNA3.1-HRE/Egr1-shTRAIL was constructed by gene recombination technique, it was identified correctly by enzyme digestion, PCR and sequencing. A549 cells were divided into normal, hypoxia (0.1%), irradiation (6 Gy) and hypoxia + irradiation groups. Results: After enzyme digestion by BamH I and Sma I, the fragments which lengths were 1284 bp and 4 998 bp, 2 292 bp and 3 990 bp were obtained; the vector was amplified by PCR with Egr1 and shTRAIL primer, the products which lengthens were 469 bp and 820 bp were obtained; pcDNA3.1-HRE/Egr1-shTRAIL was sequenced, the result was same to designed, this demonstrated that the construction was right. The vectors were transfected into A549 cells of adenocarcinoma of lung, the expression levels of shTRAIL mRNA and protein were increased after treated with hypoxia and radiation, it had statistically significant differences compared with normal group (P<0.05), and when they were combinated, the effect was more obvious. Conclusion: Secreting type human TRAIL gene vector pcDNA3.1-HRE/Egr1-shTRAIL mediated by hypoxia/radiation double sensitive promoter is constructed successfully, and hypoxia and radiation could increase the expression of TRAIL, and they have synergetic effect. (authors)

  20. Recruiting Minority Men Who Have Sex With Men for HIV Research: Results From a 4-City Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Anthony J.; Hylton, John B.; Johnson, Lisette M.; Houston, Carmoncelia; Witt, Mallory; Jacobson, Lisa; Ostrow, David

    2006-01-01

    We describe the efforts of a 4-city campaign to recruit Black and Hispanic men who have sex with men into an established HIV epidemiological study. The campaign used community organizing principles and a social marketing model that focused on personnel, location, product, costs and benefits, and promotion. The campaign was developed at the community, group, and individual levels to both increase trust and reduce barriers. The proportion of Hispanic men recruited during the 2002–2003 campaign doubled compared with the 1987 campaign, and the proportion and number of White men decreased by 20%. The proportion of Black men decreased because of the large increase in Hispanic men, although the number of Black men increased by 56%. Successful recruitment included training recruitment specialists, involving knowledgeable minority community members during planning, and having an accessible site with convenient hours. PMID:16670218

  1. (Re)framing school as a setting for promoting health and wellbeing: a double translation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordin, Lone Lindegard; Jourdan, Didier; Simovska, Venka

    2018-01-01

    , but entangled, processes of translation. At the national level, despite resistance by a number of actors with differing priorities, the translation resulted in the integration of selected key principles of the setting approach to health promotion in the national curriculum for health education. At the municipal......The aim of this article is to discuss the ways in which the setting approach to health promotion in schools, as part of knowledge-based international policies and guidelines, is embedded in the Danish policy landscape and enacted at the local governance level. The study draws on the sociology...... level, however, the principles seem to be ‘lost in translation’, as the treatment of schools as settings for promoting health and wellbeing remains largely subordinate to the discourses of disease prevention and individual behaviour regulation, dominated by the agenda of actors in the health sector....

  2. New computer security campaign

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    A new campaign is taking shape to promote computer security. The slogan “SEC_RITY is not complete without U!” reminds users of the importance of their contribution. The campaign kicks off on 10 June with a public awareness day in the Council Chamber.   The new campaign, organised by CERN’s computer security team, will focus on prevention and involving the user. “This is an education and awareness-raising campaign for all users at CERN,” explains Stefan Lueders, in charge of computer security. “Every day, we register thousands of computer attacks against CERN: there are attempts to tamper with web pages, hack into user accounts, take over servers, and much more. A successful attack could mean confidential user information being divulged, services being interrupted or data being lost. It could even affect operations at CERN. Another factor is the damage that a successful attack could inflict on the Organization’s reputation. &...

  3. Radhealth campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Tony.

    1985-01-01

    The report by the National Radiological Protection Board in the Medical Research Council's study of some of the UKAEA workers is criticized. It is argued that the cancer risk estimates of the International Commission on Radiological Protection are seriously wrong, and that as they are used as a basis for radiation protection standards in the UK, these standards now need revising. The subject is discussed under the headings: broad-based campaign; all radiation is a hazard; building networks (of scientific and medical expertise). (U.K.)

  4. Promotion of double-duplex invasion of peptide nucleic acids through conjugation with nuclear localization signal peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Yuichiro; Honda, Yuta; Komiyama, Makoto

    2015-03-02

    Pseudo-complementary peptide nucleic acid (pcPNA), as one of the most widely used synthetic DNA analogues, invades double-stranded DNA according to Watson-Crick rules to form invasion complexes. This unique mode of DNA recognition induces structural changes at the invasion site and can be used for a range of applications. In this paper, pcPNA is conjugated with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide, and its invading activity is notably promoted both thermodynamically and kinetically. Thus, the double-duplex invasion complex is formed promptly at low pcPNA concentrations under high salt conditions, where the invasion otherwise never occurs. Furthermore, NLS-modified pcPNA is successfully employed for site-selective DNA scission, and the targeted DNA is selectively cleaved under conditions that are not conducive for DNA cutters using unmodified pcPNAs. This strategy of pcPNA modification is expected to be advantageous and promising for a range of in vitro and in vivo applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Double standards for community sports: promoting active lifestyles but unhealthy diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bridget; Chapman, Kathy; King, Lesley; Hardy, Louise; Farrell, Louise

    2008-12-01

    Overweight and obesity in Australia is an emerging health concern. Obesity prevention initiatives must consider both physical activity and nutrition to be effective. Community sports venues have the capacity to promote healthy lifestyles through physical activity as well as healthy food choices. A telephone survey was conducted on parents of children aged 5-17 years in NSW to determine the nature of food and beverages purchased by children at community sporting venues and to determine parent's perception of the role that government should play in regulating the types of food and beverages sold at these outlets. The majority of canteens at children's sporting venues were considered to sell mostly unhealthy food and beverages (53%). Very few parents reported that canteens sold mostly healthy food and beverages. Parents reported that their child's most frequently purchased food and beverage items at outdoor sports fields were water, chocolate and confectionery, soft drink and sports drinks, and ice cream. At community swimming pools the most frequently purchased items were ice cream, followed by snack foods, including chips, cakes and biscuits. Most parents (63%) agreed that government should restrict the types of food and beverages that can be sold at children's sporting venues. Children are receiving inconsistent health messages at sporting venues, with healthy lifestyles being promoted through sports participation, but unhealthy dietary choices being provided at sports canteens.

  6. SCAI promotes DNA double-strand break repair in distinct chromosomal contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rebecca Kring; Mund, Andreas; Poulsen, Sara Lund

    2016-01-01

    cell invasion) as a 53BP1-interacting chromatin-associated protein that promotes the functionality of several DSB repair pathways in mammalian cells. SCAI undergoes prominent enrichment at DSB sites through dual mechanisms involving 53BP1-dependent recruitment to DSB-surrounding chromatin and 53BP1...... in repressive chromatin environments. Moreover, we establish an important role of SCAI in meiotic recombination, as SCAI deficiency in mice leads to germ cell loss and subfertility associated with impaired retention of the DMC1 recombinase on meiotic chromosomes. Collectively, our findings uncover SCAI...... as a physiologically important component of both NHEJ- and HR-mediated pathways that potentiates DSB repair efficiency in specific chromatin contexts....

  7. Organizational Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    This conference paper will explore the difference between communicating changes and changing communication. Based on a case study in which a manager applies two quite different approaches to organizational communication in order to change the organization he is leading. The first and failing...... approach will in be named: organizational campaigning and means (e.g. Kotter, 2012, p. 9 and Clegg, Kornberger & Pitsis, 2009) that the manager takes control with communication and communication cannels in order to ensure successful organizational changes. Since the changes were not succeeding the approach...... is replaced with a new approach which will be named organizing communication. During the case analysis we will see that this change in approach not only change the managers perception of communication but also his perception of the organization he is leading....

  8. The double bromodomain protein Brd2 promotes B cell expansion and mitogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C; Blanton, Wanda P; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S; Denis, Gerald V

    2014-03-01

    Bromodomain-containing transcriptional regulators represent new epigenetic targets in different hematologic malignancies. However, bromodomain-mediated mechanisms that couple histone acetylation to transcription in lymphopoiesis and govern mature lymphocyte mitogenesis are poorly understood. Brd2, a transcriptional coregulator that contains dual bromodomains and an extraterminal domain (the BET family), couples chromatin to cell-cycle progression. We reported previously the first functional characterization of a BET protein as an effector of mammalian mitogenic signal transduction: Eμ-Brd2 Tg mice develop "activated B cell" diffuse large B cell lymphoma. No other animal models exist for genetic or lentiviral expression of BET proteins, hampering testing of novel anti-BET anticancer drugs, such as JQ1. We transduced HSCs with Brd2 lentivirus and reconstituted recipient mice to test the hypothesis that Brd2 regulates hematopoiesis in BM and mitogenesis in the periphery. Forced expression of Brd2 provides an expansion advantage to the donor-derived B cell compartment in BM and increases mature B cell mitogenic responsiveness in vitro. Brd2 binds the cyclin A promoter in B cells, shown by ChIP, and increases cyclin A mRNA and protein levels, and S-phase progression in vitro in mitogen-stimulated primary B cells, but not T cells, reinforcing results from Eμ-Brd2 mice. The small molecule BET inhibitor JQ1 reduces B cell mitogenesis, consistent with the interpretation that BET inhibitors are antiproliferative. Brd2-specific knockdown experiments show that Brd2 is also required for hematopoiesis. We conclude that Brd2 plays a critical, independent role in regulation of mitogenic response genes, particularly cyclin A, in B cells.

  9. Implementing a Mentally Healthy Schools Framework Based on the Population Wide Act-Belong-Commit Mental Health Promotion Campaign: A Process Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar-McHenry, Julia; Donovan, Robert John; Nicholas, Amberlee; Kerrigan, Simone; Francas, Stephanie; Phan, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Mentally Healthy WA developed and implemented the Mentally Healthy Schools Framework in 2010 in response to demand from schools wanting to promote the community-based Act-Belong-Commit mental health promotion message within a school setting. Schools are an important setting for mental health promotion, therefore, the Framework encourages…

  10. Framatome's 1997 advertisement campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonnac, Alain de

    1998-01-01

    As many other companies involved in the nuclear business, Framatome was initially concentrating on corporate advertisements in business newspapers and magazines. The first goal was to concentrate on our traditional nuclear core business, while selecting the protection of the environment at large, and particularly the greenhouse effect, one of the most sensible issues of the moment. The 1997 campaign was shaped around the need to motivate European decision makers, while maintaining a domestic consensus towards nuclear power for the future resumption of constructions. The brief elaborated for Ad agencies was roughly threefold: elaborate simple messages, unquestionable, and explained with serenity; put emphasis on the benefits of nuclear power for the environment; establish a balanced comparison between nuclear and fossil fuels. A pre-test was conducted with about 100 people, half of which from the energy sector, and politicians, mainly members of the French and European Parliaments, the other half from the general public. Being accustomed to a usually discrete, if not 'ashamed' nuclear communication, people were generally surprised by such an optimistic tone about nuclear power, but agreed, on average. The campaign lasted one month (spread over June-July 97), and the three selected ads appeared successively in the form of a colour double page. Beyond nuclear magazines, the media plan included French daily newspapers le Figaro, le Monde, les Echos, Liberation, and weekly magazines: le Point, le Nouvel Observateur, I'Express, etc. All of them are intended for middle to high social class readers. In addition, some advertisements were inserted in The European Voice, a weekly publication reaching Brussels Commission and European parliament members. As an average, the campaign was perceived as dynamic (69%), and original (61%). But credibility and conviction were poor (resp 33%, 26%), probably because it was coincident with La Hague being on the carpet. On the other hand

  11. Layered double hydroxide nanoparticles promote self-renewal of mouse embryonic stem cells through the PI3K signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Youjun; Zhu, Rongrong; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Wenrui; Sun, Xiaoyu; Wu, Xianzheng; Cheng, Liming; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Shilong

    2015-06-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) hold great potential for regenerative medicine due to their two unique characteristics: self-renewal and pluripotency. Several groups of nanoparticles have shown promising applications in directing the stem cell fate. Herein, we investigated the cellular effects of layered double hydroxide nanoparticles (LDH NPs) on mouse ESCs (mESCs) and the associated molecular mechanisms. Mg-Al-LDH NPs with an average diameter of ~100 nm were prepared by hydrothermal methods. To determine the influences of LDH NPs on mESCs, cellular cytotoxicity, self-renewal, differentiation potential, and the possible signaling pathways were explored. Evaluation of cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, ROS generation and apoptosis demonstrated the low cytotoxicity of LDH NPs. The alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of pluripotency genes in mESCs were examined, which indicated that exposure to LDH NPs could support self-renewal and inhibit spontaneous differentiation of mESCs under feeder-free culture conditions. The self-renewal promotion was further proved to be independent of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Furthermore, cells treated with LDH NPs maintained the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo through formation of embryoid bodies and teratomas. In addition, we observed that LDH NPs initiated the activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, while treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 could block the effects of LDH NPs on mESCs. The results confirmed that the promotion of self-renewal by LDH NPs was associated with activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Altogether, our studies identified a new role of LDH NPs in maintaining self-renewal of mouse ES cells which could potentially be applied in stem cell research.Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) hold great potential for regenerative medicine due to their two unique characteristics: self-renewal and pluripotency. Several groups of nanoparticles

  12. Energy efficiency public service advertising campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson-Grant, Amanda [Advertising Council, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-06-12

    The Advertising Council (“the Ad Council”) and The United States Department of Energy (DOE) created and launched a national public service advertising campaign designed to promote energy efficiency. The objective of the Energy Efficiency campaign was to redefine how consumers approach energy efficiency by showing that saving energy can save homeowners money.

  13. NODAL and SHH dose-dependent double inhibition promotes an HPE-like phenotype in chick embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mercier

    2013-03-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE is a common congenital defect that results from failed or incomplete forebrain cleavage. HPE is characterized by a wide clinical spectrum, with inter- and intrafamilial variability. This heterogeneity is not well understood and it has been suggested that HPE involves a combination of multiple gene mutations. In this model, several mutated alleles or modifying factors are presumed to act in synergy to cause and determine the severity of HPE. This could explain the various clinical phenotypes. Screening for HPE-associated genes in humans suggests the involvement of NODAL or SHH signaling, or both. To test this multigenic hypothesis, we investigated the effects of chemical inhibition of these two main HPE signaling pathways in a chick embryo model. SB-505124, a selective inhibitor of transforming growth factor-B type I receptors was used to inhibit the NODAL pathway. Cyclopamine was used to inhibit the SHH pathway. We report that both inhibitors caused HPE-like defects that were dependent on the drug concentration and on the developmental stage at the time of treatment. We also investigated double inhibition of NODAL and SHH pathways from the onset of gastrulation by using subthreshold inhibitor concentrations. The inhibitors of the NODAL and SHH pathways, even at low concentration, acted synergistically to promote an HPE-like phenotype. These findings support the view that genetic heterogeneity is important in the etiology of HPE and may contribute to the phenotypic variability.

  14. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint

  15. How to Promote a Technology Education Program: An Effective Campaign Will Increase Student Enrollment, Spread Goodwill, Reflect a Positive Image, and Grow Positive Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The advertising, marketing, promotion, and positioning of technology education programs have become increasingly important. Yet the rewards of promoting a program will not only bring more students and resources to the classroom, it will also bring support on a larger scale, resulting in added resources to help all students become more successful.…

  16. Field Campaign Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, J. W. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States); Chapman, L. A. [DOE ARM Climate Research Facility, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document establishes a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking System and are specifically tailored to meet the scope of each field campaign.

  17. Evaluation of educational materials from a social marketing campaign to promote folic acid use among Hispanic women: insight from Cuban and Puerto Rican ethnic subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Thomas, Kamilah B; Hauser, Kimberlea; Rodríguez, Nydia Y; Rodriguez-Snapp, Nazach

    2009-10-01

    Current data indicate significant disparities in awareness and use of folic acid between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women. Hispanic women are less likely to have heard about folic acid, to know that folic acid can prevent birth defects, to take folic acid daily, and to take folic acid before pregnancy. "Three Sisters/Las Tres Hermanos" is a folic acid social marketing campaign designed for Mexican-American women. To determine the effectiveness of the materials on other Hispanic sub groups, women of childbearing age from Cuba and Puerto Rico were recruited to evaluate the materials. Participants were asked five pre-test questions about folic acid knowledge and were then provided with the folic acid educational materials that included either a photo-novella and a low literacy brochure, or a video-novella in English or Spanish. Once the participants reviewed the materials, they were asked 10 post-test questions about the materials. The results of the evaluation are discussed.

  18. European symposium on the awareness of allergy: report of the promotional campaign in the European Parliament (26-28 April 2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, A; Steelant, B; Pietikainen, S; Borrelli, D; Childers, N; Callebaut, I; Kortekaas Krohn, I; Martens, K; Pugin, B; Popescu, F-D; Vieru, M; Jutel, M; Agache, I; Hellings, P W

    2017-02-01

    From 26 to 28 of April 2016, an allergy awareness campaign was organized by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and the European Federation of Allergy and Airway Diseases Patients Associations in the European Parliament in Brussels, with support of the European Parliament's Interest group on Allergy and Asthma and was co-hosted by the Members of the European Parliament David Borrelli, Sirpa Pietikainen and Nessa Childers. Skin prick tests (SPTs) were performed to gain attention for the increasing prevalence of allergic airway diseases in Europe. Since more than 30% of the total European population suffers from airway allergies and asthma, reaching a higher level of awareness and elaboration of an active prevention plan is mandatory. Of the 406 individuals undergoing SPT in the European Parliament, 211 participants (52%) reported to have suffered from an allergy in the past, with allergic symptoms being present in the nose and eyes (40% and 36%, respectively), the skin (27%), lower airways (14%) and the gut (8%). Of the 381 SPT with reliable results, cutaneous hypersensitivity was found in 201 (53%) participants. Of those with positive SPT (n = 201), 70 participants (35%) were monosensitized while 131 participants (65%) were polysensitized. The positive skin reactions were found mostly for grass pollen (n = 108), followed by Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (n = 105), Dermatophagoides farina (n = 96) and birch pollen (n = 85). Of note, 54 individuals (14% of the total tested population) without reported allergy or allergic symptoms showed a positive SPT without clinical relevance. This report summarizes the main idea and goals of the symposium: chronic airway diseases are a major and growing health problem in Europe. Therefore, a joint preventive action plan needs to be developed for a better health status of European citizens. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  20. The "Know Stroke" Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section The "Know Stroke" Campaign Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table of Contents For ... Javascript on. NINDS is conducting a public awareness campaign across the United States to educate people about ...

  1. PERBANDINGAN IMPLEMENTASI ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN

    OpenAIRE

    Francisca Hanna , Febrianti

    2013-01-01

    Advertising campaign merupakan serangkaian bentuk iklan melalui berbagai media dan berpusat pada satu tema dalam satu waktu. Tujuan utama advertising campaign adalah menyampaikan pesan dalam suatu tema yang diluncurkan kepada masyarakat sehingga tema tersebut menjadi ciri khas produk. Peluncuran tema campaign oleh Coca Cola dan Pepsi yang merupakan rival dalam kategori beverage merupakan obyek dari penelitian ini. Kesuksesan sebuah tema advertising campaign dilihat dengan menggunakan paramet...

  2. Disruption of Aneuploidy and Senescence Induced by Aurora Inhibition Promotes Intrinsic Apoptosis in Double Hit or Double Expressor Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Shariful; Qi, Wenqing; Morales, Carla; Cooke, Laurence; Spier, Catherine; Weterings, Eric; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2017-10-01

    Double hit (DH) or double expressor (DE) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) with translocations and/or overexpressions of MYC and BCL-2 , which are difficult to treat. Aurora kinase (AK) inhibition with alisertib in DH/DE-DLBCL induces cell death in ∼30%, while ∼70% are aneuploid and senescent cells (AASC), a mitotic escape mechanism contributing to drug resistance. These AASCs elaborated a high metabolic rate by increased AKT/mTOR and ERK/MAPK activity via BTK signaling through the chronic active B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway. Combinations of alisertib + ibrutinib or alisertib + ibrutinib + rituximab significantly reduced AASCs with enhanced intrinsic cell death. Inhibition of AK + BTK reduced phosphorylation of AKT/mTOR and ERK-1/2, upregulated phospho-H2A-X and Chk-2 (DNA damage), reduced Bcl-6, and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and induced apoptosis by PARP cleavage. In a DE-DLBCL SCID mouse xenograft model, ibrutinib alone was inactive, while alisertib + ibrutinib was additive with a tumor growth inhibition (TGI) rate of ∼25%. However, TGI for ibrutinib + rituximab was ∼50% to 60%. In contrast, triple therapy showed a TGI rate of >90%. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that 67% of mice were alive at day 89 with triple therapy versus 20% with ibrutinib + rituximab. All treatments were well tolerated with no changes in body weights. A novel triple therapy consisting of alisertib + ibrutinib + rituximab inhibits AASCs induced by AK inhibition in DH/DE-DLBCL leading to a significant antiproliferative signal, enhanced intrinsic apoptosis and may be of therapeutic potential in these lymphomas. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2083-93. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. The Sprite 2003 Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neubert, T.; Laursen, S.; Rasmussen, I. L.

    2003-01-01

    During the northern hemisphere summer of 2003, from July 18 to September 18, a sprite observation campaign was conducted with measurements from Southern Europe, coordinated with measurements from the magnetically conjugate region in South Africa. The goal of the campaign was to investigate...... emissions. The presentation will give an overview of the campaign, the meteorological conditions, and present some first results....

  4. Radon campaigns. Status report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Valmari, T.; Reisbacka, H.; Niemelae, H.; Oinas, T.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Laitinen-Sorvari, R.

    2008-12-01

    Radon campaigns aim at activating citizens to make indoor radon measurements and remediation as well as increasing the common awareness of indoor radon questions. Indoor radon increases the risk of lung cancer. Through radon campaigns Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) also promotes the attainment of those goals that the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health has set for municipal authorities in Finland for prevention of the harmful effects of radon. The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health supports this campaign. Radon campaigns were started in autumn 2003. By autumn 2008 the campaigns have been organised already in 64 regions altogether in 160 municipalities. In some municipalities they have already arranged two campaigns. Altogether 14 100 houses have been measured and in 2 100 of these the action limit of radon remediation 400 Bq / m 3 has been exceeded. When participating in radon campaigns the house owners receive a special offer on radon detectors with a reduced price. In 2008 a new practice was introduced where the campaign advertisements were distributed by mail to low-rise residential houses in a certain region. The advertisement includes an order / deposit slip with postage paid that the house owner can send directly to STUK to easily make an order for radon measurement. In the previous radon campaigns in 2003 - 2007 the municipal authorities collected the orders from house owners and distributed later the radon detectors. The radon concentrations measured in the campaign regions have exceeded the action limit of 400 Bq / m 3 in 0 - 39% of houses, depending on the region. The total of 15% of all measurements made exceeded this limit. The remediation activities have been followed by sending a special questionnaire on remedies performed to the house owners. In 2006 - 2007 a questionnaire was sent to those households where the radon concentration of 400 Bq / m 3 was exceeded during the two first campaign seasons. Among the households that replied

  5. The Ocean Literacy Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoedinger, S. E.; Strang, C.

    2008-12-01

    "Ocean Literacy is an understanding of the ocean's influence on you and your influence on the ocean." This simple statement captures the spirit of a conceptual framework supporting ocean literacy (COSEE et al., 2005). The framework comprises 7 essential principles and 44 fundamental concepts an ocean literate person would know (COSEE et al., 2005). The framework is the result of an extensive grassroots effort to reach consensus on (1) a definition for ocean literacy and (2) an articulation of the most important concepts to be understood by ocean-literate citizen (Cava et al., 2005). In the process of reaching consensus on these "big ideas" about the ocean, what began as a series of workshops has emerged as a campaign "owned" by an ever-expanding community of individuals, organizations and networks involved in developing and promoting the framework. The Ocean Literacy Framework has provided a common language for scientists and educators working together and serves as key guidance for the ocean science education efforts. This presentation will focus on the impact this Ocean Literacy Campaign has had to date as well as efforts underway to provide additional tools to enable educators and educational policy makers to further integrate teaching and learning about the ocean and our coasts into formal K-12 education and informal education. COSEE, National Geographic Society, NOAA, College of Exploration (2005). Ocean Literacy: The Essential Principles of Ocean Sciences Grades K-12, a jointly published brochure, URL: http://www.coexploration.org/oceanliteracy/documents/OceanLitChart.pdf Cava, F., S. Schoedinger , C. Strang, and P. Tuddenham (2005). Science Content and Standards for Ocean Literacy: A Report on Ocean Literacy, URL: http://www.coexploration.org/oceanliteracy/documents/OLit2004-05_Final_Report.pdf.

  6. Challenges and opportunities for dietary campaigns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Verbeke, Wim

    2013-01-01

    The objective of our research was to explore and discuss the challenges and opportunities inherent to the management of public healthy eating campaigns. The discussion is based on a study of campaign managers’ perceptions of nine successfully implemented European healthy eating campaigns. Based...... on these interviews, we suggest that social marketing compared to commercial food marketing is not necessarily at a disadvantage; rather, social marketers working to promote healthy eating can benefit from the formation of alliances with public and private partners, the empowerment of their targets and of those who...... influence the targets, the development of credible and emotive messages and relationships with media and public institutions....

  7. Social Media-Promoted Weight Loss Among an Occupational Population: Cohort Study Using a WeChat Mobile Phone App-Based Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Wu, Shiyan; Zhao, Yingying; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Yanyan; Le, Jia; Wang, Lei; Wan, Siyang; Li, Changqing; Li, Yindong; Sun, Xinying

    2017-10-23

    likely to be associated with weight loss. The more active participants were in the weight loss program via WeChat, the more weight they lost. The weight loss intervention campaign based on an official WeChat account focused on an occupation-based population in Shunyi District was effective for males. The more active male participants were in using WeChat, the more weight they lost. There might be no effect or there may even be a negative effect on weight loss for females. Future research should focus on how to improve adherence to the WeChat weight loss interventions, to improve and refine the WeChat content such as developing a variety of materials to attract interest, and to protect personal privacy, especially for females. ©Chao He, Shiyan Wu, Yingying Zhao, Zheng Li, Yanyan Zhang, Jia Le, Lei Wang, Siyang Wan, Changqing Li, Yindong Li, Xinying Sun. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 23.10.2017.

  8. Social Media–Promoted Weight Loss Among an Occupational Population: Cohort Study Using a WeChat Mobile Phone App-Based Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingying; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Yanyan; Le, Jia; Wang, Lei; Wan, Siyang; Li, Changqing; Li, Yindong

    2017-01-01

    0 to 1 kg. Being active in WeChat was likely to be associated with weight loss. The more active participants were in the weight loss program via WeChat, the more weight they lost. Conclusions The weight loss intervention campaign based on an official WeChat account focused on an occupation-based population in Shunyi District was effective for males. The more active male participants were in using WeChat, the more weight they lost. There might be no effect or there may even be a negative effect on weight loss for females. Future research should focus on how to improve adherence to the WeChat weight loss interventions, to improve and refine the WeChat content such as developing a variety of materials to attract interest, and to protect personal privacy, especially for females. PMID:29061555

  9. A Political Campaign Strategy and Campaign Theme : How to Win a Political Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    河村, 直幸; Kawamura, Naoyuki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this research paper is to introduce a political campaign strategy. A political campaign should do on a scientific system and needs effective strategy. Before political campaign begin, a candidate and its campaigner needs to analyze election district and sample voter opinion. An election campaign needs campaign theme. The creation of campaign theme needs careful and elaborate planning. A style of campaign varies according to incumbent or challenger. The developing of an effective po...

  10. Associations between dietary habits and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in a Hong Kong Chinese working population--the "Better Health for Better Hong Kong" (BHBHK) health promotion campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gary T C; Chan, Juliana C N; Tong, Spencer D Y; Chan, Amy W Y; Wong, Patrick T S; Hui, Stanley S C; Kwok, Ruby; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2007-01-01

    Diet and nutritional status have been shown to play pivotal roles in the occurrence of many chronic diseases. In this study, we examined the patterns of dietary habits and their relationships with risk factors for cardiovascular and chronic diseases in Hong Kong working populations. In April 2000, a 5-year territory-wide health promotion campaign supported by the Li Ka Shing Foundation was launched in Hong Kong by the Health InfoWorld of Hospital Authority. Between July 2000 and March 2002, 4841 Chinese subjects [2375 (49.1%) men and 2466 (50.9%) women, mean age: 42.4 +/- 8.9 years (median: 43.0 years, range: 17-83 years)] from the general working class were recruited. Subjects were randomly selected using computer generated codes according to the distribution of occupational groups. A dietary questionnaire was used to assess 6 core dietary habits: daily fruit intake, vegetable intake, fluid intake, sugary drinks, regularity of daily meals and number of dining out each day. Overall, men had a worse cardiovascular risk profile and less desirable dietary habits than women. Those who had more unhealthy dietary habits were more likely to be obese and current smokers. Using logistic regression analysis with the dietary habits as independent variables, we found that obesity, smoking and constipation were independently associated with various unhealthy dietary patterns. In conclusion, there were close associations between dietary habits and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in Hong Kong. More effective community education about healthy lifestyle is required in Hong Kong.

  11. Human RECQ5 helicase promotes repair of DNA double-strand breaks by synthesis-dependent strand annealing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paliwal, S.; Kanagaraj, R.; Sturzenegger, A.; Burdová, Kamila; Janščák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2014), s. 2380-2390 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/0565; GA ČR GAP305/10/0281 Grant - others:Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A-129747; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 31003A_146206 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Human RECQ5 helicase * DNA double-strand breaks * mitotic homologous recombination Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.112, year: 2014

  12. The Eurosprite 2005 campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnone, Enrico; Berg, Peter; Boberg, Fredrik

    2008-01-01

    In this report we give an overview of the Eurosprite observation programme and present the results of the Eurosprite 2005 campaign. These campaigns search for occurrences of transient luminous events, such as red sprites, above thunderstorms in France, Spain, northern Italy, Switzerland and south...

  13. Third world campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpin, P

    1988-10-22

    Your readers may be interested in knowing that VSO will be holding a publicity campaign in Scotland in November and December. The campaign is a chance for people to come and talk to us about the opportunities available to them to work in Third World countries. We have a wide range of interesting and challenging jobs in long-term development in health work.

  14. HDAC4 and HDAC6 sustain DNA double strand break repair and stem-like phenotype by promoting radioresistance in glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marampon, Francesco; Megiorni, Francesca; Camero, Simona; Crescioli, Clara; McDowell, Heather P; Sferra, Roberta; Vetuschi, Antonella; Pompili, Simona; Ventura, Luca; De Felice, Francesca; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Dominici, Carlo; Maggio, Roberto; Festuccia, Claudio; Gravina, Giovanni Luca

    2017-07-01

    The role of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4 and 6 in glioblastoma (GBM) radioresistance was investigated. We found that tumor samples from 31 GBM patients, who underwent temozolomide and radiotherapy combined treatment, showed HDAC4 and HDAC6 expression in 93.5% and 96.7% of cases, respectively. Retrospective clinical data analysis demonstrated that high-intensity HDAC4 and/or HDAC6 immunostaining was predictive of poor clinical outcome. In vitro experiments revealed that short hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of HDAC4 or HDAC6 radiosensitized U87MG and U251MG GBM cell lines by promoting DNA double-strand break (DSBs) accumulation and by affecting DSBs repair molecular machinery. We found that HDAC6 knock-down predisposes to radiation therapy-induced U251MG apoptosis- and U87MG autophagy-mediated cell death. HDAC4 silencing promoted radiation therapy-induced senescence, independently by the cellular context. Finally, we showed that p53 WT expression contributed to the radiotherapy lethal effects and that HDAC4 or HDAC6 sustained GBM stem-like radioresistant phenotype. Altogether, these observations suggest that HDAC4 and HDAC6 are guardians of irradiation-induced DNA damages and stemness, thus promoting radioresistance, and may represent potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in GBM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Proposal and realization advertising campaign

    OpenAIRE

    RYCHLÁ, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The Bachelor Paper contains proposal and realization advertising campaign, including make charge for cost amount. The advertising campaign is made for chosen product of firm. Advertising campaign is planning by the medium of broadsheet and advertising on the Internet.

  16. Providence Sponsors Diocesan Teacher Recruiting Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dygert, William

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the issue of teacher recruitment in Providence, Rhode Island. Explains that the Catholic education staff designed a campaign that involved creating marketing materials, advertising in daily newspapers, and holding job fairs and open houses. Stresses the importance of promoting teaching at Catholic schools as both rewarding and…

  17. Japanese campaign to enthuse young scientists

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Japan's Science and Technology Agency has launched a 3-year campaign to promote the public understanding of science and revive the interest in science subjects in schools. Plans include a science-only television channel and a 'virtual science museum' on the Internet (2 paragraphs).

  18. Campaigns and cliques: variations in effectiveness of an antismoking campaign as a function of adolescent peer group identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Meghan Bridgid; Murphy, Sheila T; Sussman, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Identity-based strategies have been suggested as a way to promote healthy behaviors when traditional approaches fall short. The truth® campaign, designed to reduce smoking in adolescents, is an example of a campaign that uses such a strategy to reach youth described as being outside the mainstream. This article examines the effectiveness of this strategy in promoting antitobacco company beliefs among youth. Survey data from 224 adolescents between 14 and 15 years of age were used to examine whether the truth® campaign was more or less effective at reaching and promoting antitobacco company beliefs among youth who identify with nonmainstream crowds (deviants and counterculture) versus those who identify with mainstream crowds (elites and academics). Analyses revealed that adolescents who identified as deviants and counterculture were more likely to have been persuaded by the truth® campaign. Social identity theory is used as a theoretical framework to understand these effects and to make recommendations for future health campaigns.

  19. [Research on China railway health campaign in 1930s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huaping

    2015-01-01

    The motivation factors of China's railway health campaign in 1930s included avocation by the government, mass media mobilization, railway authorities' hygiene awareness and the systematization of the construction of organization. During the health campaign, the railway authorities adopted various approaches for its formation, including the rally speeches, distribution of materials, cleaning and vaccination etc. Unfortunately, the actual effect of railway health campaign was not satisfactory, yet, it enhanced theoretically railway employees' health knowledge and contributed to the promotion of modernization of hygienic knowledge. Meanwhile, there still existed many problems in the railway health campaign, for example, lack of funds, formalism and uneven development among the railway bureaus.

  20. Dogs Are Talking: San Francisco's social marketing campaign to increase syphilis screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Sally C; Bernstein, Kyle T; McCright, Jacqueline E; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2010-03-01

    To promote regular syphilis testing among men who have sex with men in San Francisco, a social marketing campaign, Dogs Are Talking, was created. An evaluation of the campaign found no difference in syphilis testing among men who recalled the campaign and those that did not. A significant difference was seen among HIV-infected men.

  1. CRA-1 uncovers a double-strand break-dependent pathway promoting the assembly of central region proteins on chromosome axes during C. elegans meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolikov, Sarit; Schild-Prüfert, Kristina; Colaiácovo, Mónica P

    2008-06-06

    The synaptonemal complex (SC), a tripartite proteinaceous structure that forms between homologous chromosomes during meiosis, is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation. Here we identify CRA-1, a novel and conserved protein that is required for the assembly of the central region of the SC during C. elegans meiosis. In the absence of CRA-1, central region components fail to extensively localize onto chromosomes at early prophase and instead mostly surround the chromatin at this stage. Later in prophase, central region proteins polymerize along chromosome axes, but for the most part fail to connect the axes of paired homologous chromosomes. This defect results in an inability to stabilize homologous pairing interactions, altered double-strand break (DSB) repair progression, and a lack of chiasmata. Surprisingly, DSB formation and repair are required to promote the polymerization of the central region components along meiotic chromosome axes in cra-1 mutants. In the absence of both CRA-1 and any one of the C. elegans homologs of SPO11, MRE11, RAD51, or MSH5, the polymerization observed along chromosome axes is perturbed, resulting in the formation of aggregates of the SC central region proteins. While radiation-induced DSBs rescue this polymerization in cra-1; spo-11 mutants, they fail to do so in cra-1; mre-11, cra-1; rad-51, and cra-1; msh-5 mutants. Taken together, our studies place CRA-1 as a key component in promoting the assembly of a tripartite SC structure. Moreover, they reveal a scenario in which DSB formation and repair can drive the polymerization of SC components along chromosome axes in C. elegans.

  2. INTEGRATED ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina Claudia NEAMŢU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Campaign and especially advertising campaign represents one of the variables of the marketing mix, an important one, being difficult to separate its contribution from the one of the other elements. Irrespective of the specific object that is behind an advertising company, the investment will be retrieved only if the right information is transmitted to the right persons in the right way. This is difficult to accomplish if the advertising responsible in that firm do not understand appropriately: the market nature; the product nature; the distribution channels nature; the communication channels nature – available advertising supports and their features

  3. Social marketing campaigns and children's media use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, W Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Media-related commercial marketing aimed at promoting the purchase of products and services by children, and by adults for children, is ubiquitous and has been associated with negative health consequences such as poor nutrition and physical inactivity. But, as Douglas Evans points out, not all marketing in the electronic media is confined to the sale of products. Increasingly savvy social marketers have begun to make extensive use of the same techniques and strategies used by commercial marketers to promote healthful behaviors and to counter some of the negative effects of conventional media marketing to children and adolescents. Evans points out that social marketing campaigns have been effective in helping to prevent and control tobacco use, increase physical activity, improve nutrition, and promote condom use, as well as other positive health behaviors. He reviews the evidence from a number of major recent campaigns and programming in the United States and overseas and describes the evaluation and research methods used to determine their effectiveness. He begins his review of the field of social marketing by describing how it uses many of the strategies practiced so successfully in commercial marketing. He notes the recent development of public health brands and the use of branding as a health promotion strategy. He then goes on to show how social marketing can promote healthful behavior, how it can counter media messages about unhealthful behavior, and how it can encourage discussions between parents and children. Evans concludes by noting some potential future applications to promote healthful media use by children and adolescents and to mitigate the effects of exposure to commercial marketing. These include adapting lessons learned from previous successful campaigns, such as delivering branded messages that promote healthful alternative behaviors. Evans also outlines a message strategy to promote "smart media use" to parents, children, and adolescents and

  4. Anti-idling campaign : Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-11-01

    The efficient use of transportation fuels and other petroleum products is being promoted by the Canadian Petroleum Products Institute. The Institute was busy during the past year in attempting to gain an understanding of the measures that could be adopted to assist motorists clearly identify the relationship between fuel consumption, personal transportation spending, and environmental impacts. The Institute undertook these efforts with Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Office of Energy Efficiency (which both provided funding) and the Public Policy Forum. A first step proposed was the development of an anti-idling public awareness campaign. It was recognized that idling a vehicle for more than ten seconds costs money and wastes fuel, while simultaneously contributing to air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions, and climate change. The campaign also involved Esso, Shell, Petro-Canada, Canadian Tire and Sunoco for the development and implementation phases over the last two weeks of August 2002. A pilot campaign was tested in Mississauga, Ontario. Various materials were used for this campaign, such as posters, banners, cling vinyl window decals, air fresheners and information cards. The main successes of the campaign were: testing the methods of communicating the anti-idling message to drivers at gasoline retailing sites, increasing awareness among the driving public concerning the problems resulting from excessive idling, and encouraging the reduction of idling whenever and wherever it takes place. 1 tab.

  5. No drama: key elements to the success of an HIV/STI-prevention mass-media campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrana, Alisa E; Hellard, Margaret E; Higgs, Peter; Asselin, Jason; Batrouney, Colin; Stoovè, Mark

    2014-05-01

    We qualitatively examined gay men's reactions to the national "Drama Downunder" HIV/STI social marketing campaign targeting gay men in Australia to identify key campaign elements that underpinned the demonstrated effectiveness of the campaign. We present findings from six qualitative focus groups held with 49 participants as part of the evaluation of the sexual-health-promotion campaign over 2008-2009. Participants identified attention-grabbing images, a humorous approach, positive and simple tailored messaging, and the use of mainstream media as campaign features crucial in normalizing sexual health testing, driving campaign engagement, and ensuring high message exposure. Our results suggest that designers of future campaigns should strive to balance positive and negative campaign images and messages, and find new ways to engage men with sexual health topics, particularly younger gay men. We discuss the implications of our findings about campaign effectiveness for future health-promotion campaigns and message design.

  6. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    Tuesday 19 March 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion sanguine of Geneva If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  7. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion Sanguine of Geneva will be held at CERN on Tuesday 13 March 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  8. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Wednesday 13 November 2002 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs will be held a blood donors campaign, organized by the Etablissement de Transfusion de Haute-Savoie If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  9. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Établissement de Transfusion de Rhône-Alpes will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2000 in restaurant nr 2, from 8.30 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  10. BLOOD DONORS CAMPAIGN

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    A blood donors campaign, organized by the Centre de Transfusion d'Annemasse will be held at CERN on Tuesday 14 November 2001 in restaurant nr 2, from 9.00 to 16.30 hrs If you already have a card giving your blood group, please bring this with you.

  11. Campaign Finance: Reporter Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Campaign finance might seem like the exclusive province of political reporters, but there are many good reasons why authors should be paying attention--both in races for education positions and in other key races at the local, state, and federal levels with implications for education. Basic math is a necessary skill and familiarity with a…

  12. The Movember campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik B; Mikkelsen, Marta K; Hansen, Rikke B

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of the present study were to investigate referral patterns and the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) before and after the Movember campaign was initiated in Denmark. METHODS: All men (n=2817) referred to the Department of Urology at Frederiksberg Hospital with suspicion of having ...

  13. GRIP CAMPAIGN REPORTS V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Campaign Reports dataset consists of various reports filed by scientists during the GRIP campaign which took place 8/15/2010 - 9/30/2010; however, several...

  14. Inoculation in Political Campaign Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Michael; Burgoon, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Posits a strategy of resistance to the influence of attack messages in political campaigns. Finds that political campaign messages can be designed to inoculate supporters of candidates against subsequent attack messages of opposing candidates. (MS)

  15. Leadership Transitions during Fundraising Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Capital campaigns are intense efforts to build the financial assets of an institution in a specified amount of time. This study provides an empirical view of how changes in leadership affected concomitant capital campaigns at ten colleges and universities. The transitions during these 10 campaigns influenced morale on campus, altered timing of the…

  16. Internet Explorers: the online campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wall, M.; Sudulich, M.L.; Gallagher, M.; Marsh, M.

    2011-01-01

    The idea of an ‘internet election’ was initially put forward in 1997. However, there is little evidence to date that online campaigning has supplanted more traditional campaign practices. This is particularly true of Irish campaigns, which are hardware-rich affairs characterised by substantial

  17. Repair of exogenous DNA double-strand breaks promotes chromosome synapsis in SPO11-mutant mouse meiocytes, and is altered in the absence of HORMAD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carofiglio, Fabrizia; Sleddens-Linkels, Esther; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Inagaki, Akiko; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Grootegoed, J Anton; Toth, Attila; Baarends, Willy M

    2018-03-01

    Repair of SPO11-dependent DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via homologous recombination (HR) is essential for stable homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis during meiotic prophase. Here, we induced radiation-induced DSBs to study meiotic recombination and homologous chromosome pairing in mouse meiocytes in the absence of SPO11 activity (Spo11 YF/YF model), and in the absence of both SPO11 and HORMAD1 (Spo11/Hormad1 dko). Within 30 min after 5 Gy irradiation of Spo11 YF/YF mice, 140-160 DSB repair foci were detected, which specifically localized to the synaptonemal complex axes. Repair of radiation-induced DSBs was incomplete in Spo11 YF/YF compared to Spo11 +/YF meiocytes. Still, repair of exogenous DSBs promoted partial recovery of chromosome pairing and synapsis in Spo11 YF/YF meiocytes. This indicates that at least part of the exogenous DSBs can be processed in an interhomolog recombination repair pathway. Interestingly, in a seperate experiment, using 3 Gy of irradiation, we observed that Spo11/Hormad1 dko spermatocytes contained fewer remaining DSB repair foci at 48 h after irradiation compared to irradiated Spo11 knockout spermatocytes. Together, these results show that recruitment of exogenous DSBs to the synaptonemal complex, in conjunction with repair of exogenous DSBs via the homologous chromosome, contributes to homology recognition. In addition, the data suggest a role for HORMAD1 in DNA repair pathway choice in mouse meiocytes. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Caries-preventive effectiveness of fluoride varnish as adjunct to oral health promotion and supervised tooth brushing in preschool children: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouropoulos, A; Twetman, S; Pandis, N; Kavvadia, K; Papagiannoulis, L

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of biannual fluoride varnish applications in preschool children as an adjunct to school-based oral health promotion and supervised tooth brushing with 1000ppm fluoride toothpaste. 424 preschool children, 2-5 year of age, from 10 different pre schools in Athens were invited to this double-blind randomized controlled trial and 328 children completed the 2-year programme. All children received oral health education with hygiene instructions twice yearly and attended supervised tooth brushing once daily. The test group was treated with fluoride varnish (0.9% diflurosilane) biannually while the control group had placebo applications. The primary endpoints were caries prevalence and increment; secondary outcomes were gingival health, mutans streptococci growth and salivary buffer capacity. The groups were balanced at baseline and no significant differences in caries prevalence or increment were displayed between the groups after 1 and 2 years, respectively. There was a reduced number of new pre-cavitated enamel lesions during the second year of the study (p=0.05) but the decrease was not statistically significant. The secondary endpoints were unaffected by the varnish treatments. Under the present conditions, biannual fluoride varnish applications in preschool children did not show significant caries-preventive benefits when provided as an adjunct to school-based supervised tooth brushing with 1000ppm fluoride toothpaste. In community based, caries prevention programmes, for high caries risk preschool children, a fluoride varnish may add little to caries prevention, when 1000ppm fluoride toothpaste is used daily. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A 6-month, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the ability of a marine complex supplement to promote hair growth in men with thinning hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablon, Glynis

    2016-12-01

    Male pattern baldness, or androgenetic alopecia, affects approximately 50% of the adult population and can cause poor self-image, low self-esteem and have a significant negative impact on the quality of life. An oral nutraceutical supplement based on a marine complex formulation has previously been reported to significantly increase the number of terminal hairs in women with thinning hair. The objective of this double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to confirm the beneficial effects of a similar marine complex supplement in adult male subjects with thinning hair (Viviscal ® Man; Lifes2good, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Healthy adult male subjects with thinning hair associated with clinically diagnosed male pattern hair loss were enrolled and randomized to receive study drug or placebo twice daily. At Day 90, subjects indicated a significant improvement in three of six quality of life measures as well as a significant overall improvement in quality of life. After 180 days, significant increases were observed for total hair count, total hair density, and terminal hair density (for each, P = 0.001). The investigator assessments revealed significant improvements in terminal and vellus hair count and terminal hair density. Hair pull test results were significantly lower (fewer hairs removed) for study drug vs. placebo at Days 90 (P < 0.05) and 180 (P < 0.01). There were no reports of treatment-emergent adverse events. The results of this study showed for the first time that a dietary supplement containing a marine complex and other ingredients can decrease hair shedding and promote hair growth in men with thinning hair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Safety Campaign Continues

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    If you see this poster, stop and read it! This is the third poster produced by TIS Division as part of its information campaign on health and safety in the workplace. It provides statistics on occupational accidents at CERN. You will see that, as in the rest of Europe, falls, slips and trips continue to be the main cause of accident. So, eyes open and take care! For more information : http://safety.cern.ch/

  1. Strategic campaigns and redistributive politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The article investigates strategic, informative campaigning by two parties when politics concern redistribution. Voters are uncertain about whether parties favour special groups. Parties will target campaigns on groups where most votes are gained by informing about policies. In equilibrium......, campaigning will be most intensive in groups where the uncertainty is largest and where voters are most mobile, most likely to vote, most receptive to campaigns and relatively uninformed initially. These groups will become more informed about policy. Parties will therefore gain more votes by treating...... these groups well so these groups will gain from strategic campaigning. Welfare effects are assessed...

  2. How campaigns polarize the electorate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper M.; Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina

    2017-01-01

    The minimal effect theory of campaign studies stipulates that intense political competition during campaigns assures and reinforces the initial party choice of the electorate. We find that this reinforcement is two-fold. During the campaign, the party preference of the voters’ in-group party...... an increase in their preference for their most preferred party and a decrease for their least liked party as the campaign progresses. These trends show that the political campaign polarizes the electorate by increasing the affective distance between in-group party and out-group party preferences, thereby...... resulting in stronger political polarization after the campaign than before the campaign. The data utilized in this study is a large six-wave panel-study of Danish voters’ party preferences during the Danish parliamentary election of 2011. Thus, the analysis provides evidence of the minimal effect theory...

  3. Campaign Country Going Green?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    justification. This paper finally discusses the reason for this greening of government initiated Danish energy saving campaigns, which is seen as an indirect result of the 1987 UN report, Our Common Future. The 1988 general election in Denmark led to the formation of a new center-right government coalition...... economics and not least a significant portion of patriotism. Environmental justification was almost entirely absent throughout the 1970s and 1980s. This changed only from 1989 onwards, as government initiatives to curb the ever rising consumption of energy commenced an extensive use of environmental...

  4. Does Digital Video Advertising Increase Population-Level Reach of Multimedia Campaigns? Evidence From the 2013 Tips From Former Smokers Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Kevin C; Shafer, Paul R; Rodes, Robert; Kim, Annice; Hansen, Heather; Patel, Deesha; Coln, Caryn; Beistle, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Background Federal and state public health agencies in the United States are increasingly using digital advertising and social media to promote messages from broader multimedia campaigns. However, little evidence exists on population-level campaign awareness and relative cost efficiencies of digital advertising in the context of a comprehensive public health education campaign. Objective Our objective was to compare the impact of increased doses of digital video and television advertising fro...

  5. Mercadotecnia social y políticas públicas de salud: campaña para promover espacios libres de humo de tabaco en México Social marketing and public policies for health: campaign to promote smoke-free spaces in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Villalobos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available "Porque todos respiramos lo mismo" es una campaña en medios masivos de comunicación para promover espacios libres de humo de tabaco (ELHT. Las etapas de diseño fueron: planeación estratégica, investigación formativa, desarrollo de mensajes, plan de medios y evaluación de impacto. Se formó una coalición de actores sociales para su desarrollo. La población blanco fueron fumadores y no fumadores y el objetivo modificar la norma social sobre ELHT. Se utilizaron televisión, radio, prensa y vallas en vía pública. Se corroboró que una gran parte de la defensa de los espacios libres de humo de tabaco depende de los no fumadores. Una limitante en el desarrollo de esta campaña fue el carecer de evidencia del impacto de campañas similares previas, por lo que esta incluyó un componente de evaluación riguroso. La campaña parece haber tenido un impacto social significativo, por lo que se sugiere utilizar estrategias similares para el desarrollo de futuras campañas."Porque todos respiramos lo mismo" is a mass media campaign to promote smoke-free places (SFP. The development stages were: strategic planning; formative research; message development; media plan; and impact evaluation. Development involved formation of a coalition of key actors in various sectors. The target population was smokers and nonsmokers, with the aim of changing social norms around SFP. Nonsmokers were targeted because they comprised the majority and were most likely to appreciate the benefits of SFPs. Campaign materials were aired on television, radio, print and on billboards. One key limitation was the lack of evidence for previous campaigns, which increased the importance of formative research and of including a rigorous evaluation for this one. The campaign evaluation indicates a significant impact, which suggests that future campaigns use similar strategies in their development.

  6. An evaluation of a heroin overdose prevention and education campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horyniak, Danielle; Higgs, Peter; Lewis, Jennifer; Winter, Rebecca; Dietze, Paul; Aitken, Campbell

    2010-01-01

    Following detection of an upward trend in the frequency of fatal heroin overdoses in Victoria between 2001 and 2003, Victoria's Department of Human Services planned a campaign aimed at increasing injecting drug users' (IDU) awareness of overdose risks and prevention strategies. Stickers, wallet cards and posters featuring five key messages were distributed via needle and syringe programs (NSP) and other drug and alcohol services between November 2005 and April 2006. An evaluation of the campaign was commissioned to be conducted in late 2006. The evaluation consisted of analysis of three independent data sets--quantitative data collected from IDU during the campaign period (n = 855 at baseline; and a range of 146-656 at follow up); qualitative interviews with IDU who were NSP clients during the campaign period (n = 16) and qualitative interviews with NSP staff and other key stakeholders (n = 9). While key experts felt that the campaign messages had engendered lasting impact for at least some IDU, these positive impressions were not borne out by the NSP client data, with less than one quarter of all campaign messages being mentioned by a significantly higher proportion of clients during the post-campaign period compared with baseline. Key experts perceived the greatest weakness of the campaign to be the delay between issue identification and the introduction of campaign materials. While IDU are generally responsive to health promotion campaigns, future initiatives in this domain should be designed and implemented rapidly and in ways that are sufficiently flexible to cope with shifts in drug markets which could influence the reception of key messages.

  7. Physical Activity Mass Media Campaigns and Their Evaluation: A Systematic Review of the Literature 2003-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Justine E.; Bull, Fiona C.; Rosenberg, Michael; Bauman, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Internationally, mass media campaigns to promote regular moderate-intensity physical activity have increased recently. Evidence of mass media campaign effectiveness exists in other health areas, however the evidence for physical activity is limited. The purpose was to systematically review the literature on physical activity mass media campaigns,…

  8. Promoting Health, Producing Moralisms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard Kristensen, Dorthe; Askegaard, Søren; Hauge Jeppesen, Lene

    2010-01-01

    Based on an ethnographic study of 25 Danish consumers, the aim of this paper is threefold. Firstly, based on a critique of traditional approaches to consumer health campaigning, it argues for a more socially diversified approach for understanding consumer construction and pursuit of healthy...... behaviour. Secondly, it presents a typology of discourses that are employed by consumers in constructing their (health oriented) food consumption. Thirdly, it addresses certain social and moral dilemmas inherent in consumer health promotional campaigns....

  9. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012." DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings...... (for those committee members attending the conference). A formal conflict-of-interest (COI) policy was developed at the onset of the process and enforced throughout. A stand-alone meeting was held for all panel members in December 2015. Teleconferences and electronic-based discussion among subgroups......, and evidence profiles were generated. Each subgroup generated a list of questions, searched for best available evidence, and then followed the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to assess the quality of evidence from high to very low...

  10. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings...... (for those committee members attending the conference). A formal conflict-of-interest (COI) policy was developed at the onset of the process and enforced throughout. A stand-alone meeting was held for all panel members in December 2015. Teleconferences and electronic-based discussion among subgroups......, and evidence profiles were generated. Each subgroup generated a list of questions, searched for best available evidence, and then followed the principles of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to assess the quality of evidence from high to very low...

  11. Evaluation of a social marketing campaign to support Mexico City's comprehensive smoke-free law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrasher, James F; Huang, Liling; Pérez-Hernández, Rosaura; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Arillo-Santillán, Edna; Alday, Jorge

    2011-02-01

    We aimed to assess the level of awareness and impact of a social marketing campaign to promote Mexico City's 2008 comprehensive smoke-free law. Four months after the smoke-free law was implemented but before the campaign launch, we collected data from a population-based, random sample of 961 inhabitants of Mexico City. We analyzed data from 786 respondents who completed follow-up at the end of the campaign to determine campaign exposure and the association between campaign exposure and changes in campaign-targeted knowledge and attitudes. Recall of any of the 5 campaign materials was 69%, with a uniform distribution of exposure to 1, 2, and 3 or more campaign materials (25%, 25%, and 19%, respectively). Exposure to a greater number of campaign materials was associated in a monotonic relation with campaign-targeted knowledge of ammonia and arsenic in cigarette smoke. In models assessing support for, perceived benefits of, and perceived right to smoke-free places, campaign exposure accounted for a positive change in half of the indicators within each of these domains. Social marketing campaigns can reinforce knowledge and attitudes that favor smoke-free laws, thereby helping to establish smoke-free norms.

  12. Process Control Plan for 242-A Evaporator Campaign January 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LE, E.Q.

    2001-01-01

    Wastewater stored in 104-AW that was generated during the terminal cleanout of the PUREX facility is the primary feed to be processed during the 242-A Evaporator Campaign 01-01, Approximately 801,600 gallons of 104-AW waste was transferred to feed tank 102-AW at the end of January 2001, in preparation for the campaign. The total feed volume that will be processed during Campaign 01-01 is 8 15,200 gallons, which includes the waste from 104-AW and residual waste from the previous evaporator campaign, 00-01, Additional feed will be generated during the pre-campaign cold run and processed during campaign 01-01. Based on characterization data from 104-AW feed waste 'and the evaluation of waste processability presented in Section 5 of this PCP, Campaign 01-01 does not pose any unacceptable risks to the facility, safety, environmental, human health offsite, or onsite personnel. Evaporator Campaign 01-01 is essential in supporting the River Protection Project (RPP) to maintaining its critical mission schedule and regulator commitments for tank waste systems. Several of RPP critical activities requiring completion of Campaign 01-01 by April 1, 2001 are highlighted below. Availability of DST space: Additional tank space that will be made available by this campaign is needed to support the continued interim stabilization of Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs). This additional space will also be used to move waste among Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) to support the demonstrations of SST waste retrieval. DST life extension: An electrical outage in the AW Tank Farm is scheduled to begin following completion of the Campaign 01-01. This outage is a critical step in identifying and completing life extension upgrades to the DST systems. DST upgrades: Project W-314 plans significant upgrades to the AW Tank Farm to retrieve and supply waste feed to the Waste Treatment (Vitrification) Plant using a system that complies with current environmental requirements. These upgrades will commence on

  13. IMPACT OF THE “GIVING CIGARETTES IS GIVING HARM” CAMPAIGN ON KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF CHINESE SMOKERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Ling; Thrasher, James F.; Jiang, Yuan; Li, Qiang; Fong, Geoffrey T.; Chang, Yvette; Walsemann, Katrina M.; Friedman, Daniela B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To date there is limited published evidence on the efficacy of tobacco control mass media campaigns in China. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of a mass media campaign “Giving Cigarettes is Giving Harm” (GCGH) on Chinese smokers’ knowledge of smoking-related harms and attitudes toward cigarette gifts. Methods Population-based, representative data were analyzed from a longitudinal cohort of 3,709 adult smokers who participated in the International Tobacco Control China Survey conducted in six Chinese cities before and after the campaign. Logistic regression models were estimated to examine associations between campaign exposure and attitudes about cigarettes as gifts measured post-campaign. Poisson regression models were estimated to assess the effects of campaign exposure on post-campaign knowledge, adjusting for pre-campaign knowledge. Findings Fourteen percent (n=335) of participants recalled the campaign within the cities where the GCGH campaign was implemented. Participants in the intervention cities who recalled the campaign were more likely to disagree that cigarettes are good gifts (71% vs. 58%, pcampaign-targeted knowledge than those who did not recall the campaign (Mean=1.97 vs. 1.62, pcampaign-targeted knowledge were similar in both cities, perhaps due to a secular trend, low campaign recall, or contamination issues. Conclusions These findings suggest that the GCGH campaign increased knowledge of smoking harms, which could promote downstream cessation. Findings provide evidence to support future campaign development to effectively fight the tobacco epidemic in China. PMID:24813427

  14. Effects of Find Thirty every day(R): cross-sectional findings from a Western Australian population-wide mass media campaign, 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Justine E; Rosenberg, Michael; Bauman, Adrian E; Bull, Fiona C; Giles-Corti, Billie; Shilton, Trevor; Maitland, Clover; Barnes, Rosanne

    2013-08-01

    Internationally, over the last four decades large-scale mass media campaigns have been delivered to promote physical activity and its associated health benefits. In 2002-2005, the first Western Australian statewide adult physical activity campaign Find Thirty. It's Not a Big Exercise was launched. In 2007, a new iteration of the campaign was proposed with new objectives, executions, and tag line Find Thirty every day(®). This article reports on the population-level effects of the Find Thirty every day (®) campaign from 2008 to 2010, with a focus on changes in awareness, intention, and physical activity. Evaluation of the campaign involved pre- and posttest serial cross-sectional surveys. Baseline data were collected in May 2008, and subsequent surveys in 2009 and 2010. Samples sizes were as follows: baseline (n = 972), first follow-up (n = 938), and second follow-up (n = 937). Data were derived from self-reported responses to a random-sample computer-assisted telephone interview. Total awareness increased from 30.4% at baseline to 48.5% at second follow-up. Total awareness was higher in women and low socioeconomic status adults. Intention was 21.0%, double that reported at baseline. There were positive significant changes from baseline to first follow-up across all four categories: walking, moderate, vigorous, and total physical activity. There also were positive significant changes for self-reported walking from baseline to second follow-up. Find Thirty every day (®) resulted in an increase in awareness, intention, walking, vigorous intensity, and total level of physical activity in priority target groups. Campaign effects should be further examined by subgroups to identify the most receptive population segments.

  15. PERSON DEIXIS IN USA PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN SPEECHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Anggarani Putri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the use of person deixis in presidential campaign speeches. This study is important because the use of person deixis in political speeches has been proved by many studies to give significant effects to the audience. The study largely employs a descriptive qualitative method. However, it also employs a simple quantitative method in calculating the number of personal pronouns used in the speeches and their percentages. The data for the study were collected from the transcriptions of six presidential campaign speeches of Barack Obama and Mitt Romney during the campaign rally in various places across the United States of America in July, September, and November 2012. The results of this study show that the presidential candidates make the best use of pronouns as a way to promote themselves and to attack their opponents. The results also suggest that the use of pronouns in the speeches enables the candidates to construct positive identity and reality, which are favorable to them and make them appear more eligible for the position.

  16. Solar Energy Campaign. 2008 Norwegian student-based web campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, Scott

    2009-07-01

    Student research campaigns (forskningskampanjer) have been an annual event in connection to Research Days (Forskningsdagene) since 2003 in Norway. The campaigns invite students from all over the country to participate in a common scientific research event, always connected to a special environmentally related theme - for example Air Quality in the Classroom (2003), Pollution along Roads (2004), Bacteria in Drinking Water (2005), and The Rain Check (2006). The year 2008, as with previous years, was overshadowed by the topic of climate change, and the specific role of humans. The research campaign theme for 2008 fit well into this focus: the potential benefits of solar energy as an alternative energy source. The campaign also was aligned with the Research Days theme of alternative energy sources and technologies. The campaign included the hands-on activity of assembling a solar panel and taking measurements with the device to determine efficiency, as well as a questionnaire to record the results and ask deeper questions regarding alternative energy and climate change. The results gained from data analysis of the campaign show that students were able to gain maximum efficient solar power from the devices they constructed, which gave them a solid understanding of solar power technology. Analysis of the campaign questionnaire in regards to the activity shows that students believe that solar energy should be better utilized as an energy source in Norway. (Also in Norwegian OR 24/2009). (Author)

  17. Project LEAN--lessons learned from a national social marketing campaign.

    OpenAIRE

    Samuels, S E

    1993-01-01

    The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation initiated a social marketing campaign in 1987 to reduce the nation's risk for heart disease and some cancers. Consensus on recommendations for dietary change have stimulated the development of a variety of social marketing campaigns to promote behavior change. Project LEAN (Low-Fat Eating for America Now) is a national campaign whose goal is to reduce dietary fat consumption to 30 percent of total calories through public service advertising, publicity, an...

  18. Tweets Win Votes: A Persuasive Communication Perspective on Donald Trump’s Twitter Use During the 2016 US Presidential Election Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Twitter, a microblogging platform, has been increasingly used as a tool for political election campaigns. In an attempt to persuade people to vote for them, candidates and political parties worldwide have begun to incorporate Twitter in their campaigns to disseminate campaign information, promote themselves, and mobilize voters. In the 2016 U.S presidential election, Donald Trump had actively utilized Twitter to promote his campaign and convince voters to support him, which helped him earn a ...

  19. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN CENTRALIZED AND STATE-WISE TOURISM CAMPAIGNS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunaina AHUJA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to distinguish the initiatives taken by the state authorities and Central authorities to promote tourism in India. Gaps in the centralized promotional campaign, "Incredible India" are identified in this study. The methodology includes collection of secondary data and discursive analysis. Information relevance, Promotion strategy, and Key events and places were used for the comparative analysis for the purposes of the research paper. Above mentioned three factors need to be added to the centralized campaign, to give a holistic picture of India. The paper is unique as it is the first time that identification of gaps in the centralized campaign is done.

  20. Is this health campaign really social marketing? A checklist to help you decide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Josephine Y; McGill, Bronwyn; Thomas, Margaret M; Carroll, Tom E; Bellew, William; Bauman, Adrian; Grunseit, Anne C

    2018-04-01

    Social marketing (SM) campaigns can be a powerful disease prevention and health promotion strategy but health-related campaigns may simply focus on the "promotions" communication activities and exclude other key characteristics of the SM approach. This paper describes the application of a checklist for identifying which lifestyle-related chronic disease prevention campaigns reported as SM actually represent key SM principles and practice. A checklist of SM criteria was developed, reviewed and refined by SM and mass media campaign experts. Papers identified in searches for "social marketing" and "mass media" for obesity, diet and physical activity campaigns in the health literature were classified using the checklist. Using the checklist, 66.6% of papers identified in the "SM" search and 39% of papers identified from the "mass media" search were classified as SM campaigns. Inter-rater agreement for classification using the abstract only was 92.1%. Health-related campaigns that self-identify as "social marketing" or "mass media" may not include the key characteristics of a SM approach. Published literature can provide useful guidance for developing and evaluating health-related SM campaigns, but health promotion professionals need to be able to identify what actually comprises SM in practice. SO WHAT?: SM could be a valuable strategy in comprehensive health promotion interventions, but it is often difficult for non-experts to identify published campaigns that represent a true SM approach. This paper describes the application of a checklist to assist policy makers and practitioners in appraising evidence from campaigns reflecting actual SM in practice. The checklist could also guide reporting on SM campaigns. © 2017 Australian Health Promotion Association.

  1. Best Practices for Suicide Prevention Messaging and Evaluating California's "Know the Signs" Media Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Joie; Ramchand, Rajeev; Becker, Amariah

    2017-09-01

    Although communication is a key component of US strategies to prevent suicide and there are a number of marketing campaigns promoting messages that suicide is a preventable public health problem, there has been little evaluation of these campaigns. The study describes the development of a checklist of best practices for suicide prevention communication campaigns and the use of the checklist to evaluate California's investment in "Know the Signs" (KTS-M), a suicide prevention mass media campaign. We conducted a literature review and solicited expert feedback to identify best practices and then used the RAND/UCLA appropriateness method to assess whether KTS-M was consistent with the identified best practices. Overall, experts agreed that KTS-M adhered to most of the 46 checklist items and suggested that the campaign was among the best suicide prevention media campaigns they had observed. The checklist was developed through expert input and literature review and focuses only on media campaigns. Given the nascent state of the evidence about what makes an effective suicide prevention message and the growing number of campaigns, the checklist of best practices reflects one way of promoting quality in this evolving field. The consistency between the experts' comments and their ratings of KTS-M suggests that the checklist may provide important guidance to inform the development of future campaigns and the evaluation of ongoing campaigns.

  2. Associations Between the Department of Veterans Affairs' Suicide Prevention Campaign and Calls to Related Crisis Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossarte, Robert M.; Lu, Naiji; Tu, Xin; Stephens, Brady; Draper, John; Kemp, Janet E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Transit Authority Suicide Prevention (TASP) campaign was launched by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in a limited number of U.S. cities to promote the use of crisis lines among veterans of military service. Methods We obtained the daily number of calls to the VCL and National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL) for six implementation cities (where the campaign was active) and four control cities (where there was no TASP campaign messaging) for a 14-month period. To identify changes in call volume associated with campaign implementation, VCL and NSPL daily call counts for three time periods of equal length (pre-campaign, during campaign, and post-campaign) were modeled using a Poisson log-linear regression with inference based on the generalized estimating equations. Results Statistically significant increases in calls to both the VCL and the NSPL were reported during the TASP campaign in implementation cities, but were not reported in control cities during or following the campaign. Secondary outcome measures were also reported for the VCL and included the percentage of callers who are veterans, and calls resulting in a rescue during the study period. Conclusions Results from this study reveal some promise for suicide prevention messaging to promote the use of telephone crisis services and contribute to an emerging area of research examining the effects of campaigns on help seeking. PMID:25364053

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of an Australian obesity mass-media campaign: how did the 'Measure-Up' campaign measure up in New South Wales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E L; Grunseit, A C; O'Hara, B J; Bauman, A E

    2013-12-01

    In 2008, the Australian Government launched a mass-media campaign 'Measure-Up' to reduce lifestyle-related chronic disease risk. Innovative campaign messages linked waist circumference and chronic disease risk. Communication channels for the campaign included television, press, radio and outdoor advertising and local community activities. This analysis examines the impact of the campaign in the state of New South Wales, Australia. Cross-sectional telephone surveys (n = 1006 adults pre- and post-campaign) covered self-reported diet and physical activity, campaign awareness, knowledge about waist circumference, personal relevance of the message, perceived confidence to make lifestyle changes and waist-measuring behaviours. The campaign achieved high unprompted (38%) and prompted (89%) awareness. From pre- to post-campaign, knowledge and personal relevance of the link between waist circumference and chronic disease and waist measuring behaviour increased, although there were no significant changes in reported fruit and vegetable intake nor in physical activity. Knowledge of the correct waist measurement threshold for chronic disease risk increased over 5-fold, adjusted for demographic characteristics. 'Measure-Up' was successful at communicating the new campaign messages. Continued long-term investment in campaigns such as 'Measure-Up', supplemented with community-based health promotion, may contribute to population risk factor understanding and behaviour change to reduce chronic disease.

  4. Education campaigns: pointers and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariasy, J

    1988-01-01

    The best protection from AIDS is prevention, and this fact makes AIDS awareness campaigns a high priority. Since there are cases of well informed groups that still do not alter their sexual behavior (i.e. teenagers in the UK and San Francisco), fact forcing campaigns cannot be the method of AIDS education. Facts along with behavioral motivation are needed. AIDS awareness campaigns must recognize denial factors that must be overcome before the campaign is even taken seriously. On the other end of the spectrum, exaggerated fears leading to irrational behavior and stigmatization must be prevented by supplying counselling programs to dispel these fears. A campaign must build trust and not underestimate its target population so that their self respect remains high enough to motivate them towards assertive action. Cultural problems, such as women who cannot discuss sexual options for fear of being socially stigmatized, need to have programs that instruct as well as develop a environment that supports change. School women's groups, work places, clinics, community networks, and religious organizations know a local temperament and beliefs, and therefore should be consulted on designing messages that best fit their peers language, literacy, and economic circumstances. Their is no single answer for an AIDS awareness campaign, but a mixture of facts, explanation, persuasion, and reassurance for each targeted community must be well planned. Since each campaign is an experiment, it should be carefully regulated.

  5. Awareness campaign. Orthopedic Hospital of Oklahoma launches awareness campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Orthopedic Hospital of Oklahoma is a 25-bed inpatient and outpatient center with one focus: Orthopedics. To acquaint people with its services and build brand awareness to drive market share, the hospital launched a print campaign featuring actual patients.

  6. 78 FR 34109 - ``Script Your Future'' Medication Adherence Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... the public far beyond what FDA would be able to do alone to promote increased understanding and... can significantly increase awareness and outreach far beyond what FDA would be able to do on its own... and family caregiver testimonials to the campaign Web site; (2) creation of a custom ``I Will'' tab on...

  7. Cyber-campaigning in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Møller; Kosiara-Pedersen, Karina

    2014-01-01

    sites and Facebook sites are popular among candidates but other features such as blogs, feeds, newsletter, video uploads, SMS and twitter are used by less than half the candidates. Second, only age and possibly education seem to matter when explaining the uptake of cyber-campaigning. The prominent...... candidates are not significantly more likely to use cyber-campaigning tools and activities. Third, the analysis of the effect of cyber-campaigning shows that the online score has an effect on the inter-party competition for personal votes, but it does not have a significant effect when controlling for other...

  8. The articulation of transnational campaigns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, Michael Stewart

    2011-01-01

    The article traces the complex series of relations that are constitutive of transnational campaigning through empirical research, focusing on political campaigning critical of the WTO's General Agreement on Trade-in-Services. Applying the methodology of post-structuralist discourse theory......, as developed by Laclau and Mouffe, the article is able to move beyond the search for a ‘Global Civil Society' or ‘Transnational Advocacy Network', and instead focus on the articulatory process in which the relations central to transnational campaigning are produced. This empowers an analysis that is able...

  9. Accounting for Sitting and Moving: An Analysis of Sedentary Behavior in Mass Media Campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Emily; Biddle, Stuart; Esliger, Dale W; Piggin, Joe; Sherar, Lauren

    2015-09-01

    Mass media campaigns are an important tool for promoting health-related physical activity. The relevance of sedentary behavior to public health has propelled it to feature prominently in health campaigns across the world. This study explored the use of messages regarding sedentary behavior in health campaigns within the context of current debates surrounding the association between sedentary behavior and health, and messaging strategies to promote moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). A web-based search of major campaigns in the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, and Australia was performed to identify the main campaign from each country. A directed content analysis was then conducted to analyze the inclusion of messages regarding sedentary behavior in health campaigns and to elucidate key themes. Important areas for future research were illustrated. Four key themes from the campaigns emerged: clinging to sedentary behavior guidelines, advocating reducing sedentary behavior as a first step on the activity continuum and the importance of light activity, confusing the promotion of MVPA, and the demonization of sedentary behavior. Strategies for managing sedentary behavior as an additional complicating factor in health promotion are urgently required. Lessons learned from previous health communication campaigns should stimulate research to inform future messaging strategies.

  10. "Consent Is Good, Joyous, Sexy": A Banner Campaign to Market Consent to College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kristie A.; Sorenson, Susan B.; Joshi, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the recall of, reaction to, and understanding of a brief campus banner campaign promoting consent in sexual relationships, and determined whether campaign exposure was associated with subsequent engagement in activities related to sexual assault education, awareness, and prevention. Participants: A stratified random…

  11. Norplant campaign in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Indian government's plan to introduce the new long-acting contraceptive Norplant in the National Family Planning Program under pressure from the US government is opposed because Norplant has not been adequately tested. The government has reduced the funding for the national program for eradication of malaria and tuberculosis, but it is proposing to finance a Norplant based population project for the State of Uttar Pradesh. The powers that can turn a deaf ear to the possible hazards of Norplant. Implanted in the arm of a woman, the chemical is released into the bloodstream providing contraception for 5 years. Severe adverse reactions include depression, heart disease thromboembolism, high blood pressure, and ovarian cysts. Many such long-acting contraceptives are being developed including injectables, vaccines, nasal sprays, and vaginal rings with potential permanent impairment to fertility. One of the major objectives of the Family Planning Program is the improvement of the health status of women, but the introduction of Norplant would harm healthy young women. Therefore, the group Saheli and others in the campaign demand: 1) that plans for introduction of Norplant in the Family Planning Program be halted immediately; 2) that the introduction of any other long acting invasive contraceptive such as Net-En, vaginal ring, nasal spray, and anti-fertility vaccine be banned, both on the grounds of inadequacy of the health services and loss of user controls; 3) that information on the safety aspects of Norplant and the basis on which the Drugs Controller has granted his approval be made public; 4) that each and every one of the hundreds of women who still have the implant should be located, and the implant removed; and 5) that all hormonal contraceptive preparations be banned in the social marketing program as their use involves extensive monitoring.

  12. About the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA developed the Collision Repair Campaign to focus on meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source sector to complement ongoing community air toxics work and attain reductions at a faster rate.

  13. Categorization of Mobile Advertising Campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Pousttchi, Key; Wiedemann, Dietmar Georg

    2006-01-01

    The result of this contribution is a categorization and thus a description model for mobile advertising campaigns using the morphological method. For identification of the characteristics 32 case studies were analysed and relevant literature was sighted.

  14. Political Reputations and Campaign Promises

    OpenAIRE

    Aragones, Enriqueta; Palfrey, Thomas R.; Postlewaite, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    We analyze conditions under which candidates' reputations may affect voters' beliefs over what policy will be implemented by the winning candidate of an election. We develop a model of repeated elections with complete information in which candidates are purely ideological. We analyze an equilibrium in which voters' strategies involve a credible threat to punish candidates who renege on their campaign promises and in which all campaign promises are believed by voters and honored by candidates....

  15. 242-A Campaign 94-1 post run document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this post-run document is to summarize the results of 242-A Evaporator Campaign 94-1 as required. Campaign 94-1 represents the first Evaporator operation since 1989, following completion of the B-534 upgrades and Liquid Effluent Retention Facility (LERF) construction. The purpose of Campaign 94-1 was to concentrate dilute waste from TK-102-AW, TK-106-AW, and TK-103-AP. From an available 2.87 million gallon feedstock of dilute waste contained in 102-AW, 106-AW and 103-AP, an overall Waste Volume Reduction (WVR) of 2.39 million gallons (83% WVRF) was achieved. At the completion of the campaign, approximately 477,000 gallons of dilute double-shell slurry feed (DDSSF) was produced with a SpG. of 1.25--1.30. Total process condensate discharged to LERF was 3.09 million gallons, achieving a condensate/WVR ratio of 1.29. Throughput for Campaign 94-1 was 5.27 million gallons. Total steam condensate and cooling water discharge to B-pond was 4.7 and 216 million gallons respectively. The evaporator operated approximately 43 days of the 60 day campaign for a total operating efficiency of 73%. Campaign 94-1 was completed without any discharge limit, Operating Specification Document, or Operational Safety Requirement violations. Major problems encountered during the run included the following: (1) high CA1 deentrainment pad dP's caused by foaming, (2) condensate pump P-C100 failure, and (3) ion exchange column dP's and efficiency

  16. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent A Traag

    Full Text Available Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50,000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find that the diffusion of donations is driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the viability of candidates, possibly opposing candidates in response to local support. Our findings suggest that theories of complex contagions need refinement and that political campaigns should target multiple communities.

  17. Complex Contagion of Campaign Donations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traag, Vincent A

    2016-01-01

    Money is central in US politics, and most campaign contributions stem from a tiny, wealthy elite. Like other political acts, campaign donations are known to be socially contagious. We study how campaign donations diffuse through a network of more than 50,000 elites and examine how connectivity among previous donors reinforces contagion. We find that the diffusion of donations is driven by independent reinforcement contagion: people are more likely to donate when exposed to donors from different social groups than when they are exposed to equally many donors from the same group. Counter-intuitively, being exposed to one side may increase donations to the other side. Although the effect is weak, simultaneous cross-cutting exposure makes donation somewhat less likely. Finally, the independence of donors in the beginning of a campaign predicts the amount of money that is raised throughout a campaign. We theorize that people infer population-wide estimates from their local observations, with elites assessing the viability of candidates, possibly opposing candidates in response to local support. Our findings suggest that theories of complex contagions need refinement and that political campaigns should target multiple communities.

  18. Radium diagnosis campaign - 59327

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabillaud Poillion, Florence

    2012-01-01

    In line with the approaches already adopted in France during the 90's on various sites where research and/or radium-extraction activities were mostly conducted in the past, the French public authorities wish from now on to pursue their prevention and site-rehabilitation approach inherited from the French craftsman and medical sectors that used that radioelement. As a matter of fact, radium has been in use in several medical activities, notably in the initial methods of cancer therapy. Similarly, it was also used in some craftsman activities, such as the clock industry, for its radioluminescent properties, the fabrication of lightning conductors or cosmetics until the 60's. Those activities have generated various traces of pollution that have remained today. On the basis of the different inventories of industrial sites where radium may have been held or used, and notably the inventory updated by the French Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety (Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire - IRSN) in 2007 at the request of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (Autorite de surete nucleaire - ASN), French State services have potentially identified 134 sites that hosted radium-related activities in France. The radiological status of those sites is either unknown or very partially known by State services. Sites include both dwellings or commercial premises and derelict lands. The 'Radium Diagnosis Campaign' (Operation Diagnostic Radium), consists of a radiological survey carried out by the IRSN. In cases where traces of radium are detected, plans call for the implementation of precautionary measures and of a medical follow-up of the relevant populations. Lastly, radium-contaminated sites are rehabilitated by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs - Andra). That voluntary and positive approach on the part of public authorities is fully financed by public funds, and consequently

  19. Comparing the effectiveness of monetary versus moral motives in environmental campaigning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, L.; Geller, E. S.; Lehman, P. K.; Postmes, T.

    Environmental campaigns often promote energy conservation by appealing to economic (for example, lower electricity bills) rather than biospheric concerns (for example, reduced carbon emissions), assuming that people are primarily motivated by economic self-interest. However, people also care about

  20. Surgery as a Double-Edged Sword: A Clinically Feasible Approach to Overcome the Metastasis-Promoting Effects of Surgery by Blunting Stress and Prostaglandin Responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benish, Marganit; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2010-01-01

    Surgery remains an essential therapeutic approach for most solid malignancies, including breast cancer. However, surgery also constitutes a risk factor for promotion of pre-existing micrometastases and the initiation of new metastases through several mechanisms, including the release of prostaglandins and stress hormones (e.g., catecholamines and glucocorticoids). However, the perioperative period also presents an opportunity for cell mediated immunity (CMI) and other mechanisms to eradicate or control minimal residual disease, provided that the deleterious effects of surgery are minimized. Here, we discuss the key role of endogenous stress hormones and prostaglandins in promoting the metastatic process through their direct impact on malignant cells, and through their deleterious impact on anti-cancer CMI. We further discuss the effects of anesthetic techniques, the extent of surgery, pain alleviation, and timing within the menstrual cycle with respect to their impact on tumor recurrence and physiological stress responses. Last, we suggest an attractive perioperative drug regimen, based on a combination of a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor and a β-adrenergic blocker, which we found effective in attenuating immune suppression and the metastasis-promoting effects of surgery in several tumor models. This regimen is clinically applicable, and could potentially promote disease free survival in patients operated for breast and other types of cancer

  1. Surgery as a Double-Edged Sword: A Clinically Feasible Approach to Overcome the Metastasis-Promoting Effects of Surgery by Blunting Stress and Prostaglandin Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benish, Marganit; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar, E-mail: shamgar@post.tau.ac.il [Neuroimmunology Research Unit, Department of Psychology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2010-11-24

    Surgery remains an essential therapeutic approach for most solid malignancies, including breast cancer. However, surgery also constitutes a risk factor for promotion of pre-existing micrometastases and the initiation of new metastases through several mechanisms, including the release of prostaglandins and stress hormones (e.g., catecholamines and glucocorticoids). However, the perioperative period also presents an opportunity for cell mediated immunity (CMI) and other mechanisms to eradicate or control minimal residual disease, provided that the deleterious effects of surgery are minimized. Here, we discuss the key role of endogenous stress hormones and prostaglandins in promoting the metastatic process through their direct impact on malignant cells, and through their deleterious impact on anti-cancer CMI. We further discuss the effects of anesthetic techniques, the extent of surgery, pain alleviation, and timing within the menstrual cycle with respect to their impact on tumor recurrence and physiological stress responses. Last, we suggest an attractive perioperative drug regimen, based on a combination of a cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor and a β-adrenergic blocker, which we found effective in attenuating immune suppression and the metastasis-promoting effects of surgery in several tumor models. This regimen is clinically applicable, and could potentially promote disease free survival in patients operated for breast and other types of cancer.

  2. The African American Women and Mass Media (AAMM) campaign in Georgia: quantifying community response to a CDC pilot campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ingrid J; Johnson-Turbes, Ashani; Berkowitz, Zahava; Zavahir, Yasmine

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether a culturally appropriate campaign using "Black radio" and print media increased awareness and utilization of local mammography screening services provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program among African American women. The evaluation used a quasi-experimental design involving data collection during and after campaign implementation in two intervention sites in GA (Savannah with radio and print media and Macon with radio only) and one comparison site (Columbus, GA). We used descriptive statistics to compare mammography uptake for African American women during the initial months of the campaign (8/08-1/09) with the latter months (2/09-8/09) and a post-campaign (9/09-12/09) period in each of the study sites. Comparisons of monthly mammogram uptake between cities were performed with multinomial logistic regression. We assumed a p value campaign to the later period. However, the increase did not persist in the post-campaign period. Analysis comparing monthly mammogram uptake in Savannah and Macon with Columbus showed a significant increase in uptake from the first to the second period in Savannah only (OR 1.269, 95 % CI (1.005-1.602), p = 0.0449). Dissemination of health promotion messages via a culturally appropriate, multicomponent campaign using Black radio and print media was effective in increasing mammogram uptake in Savannah among low-income, African American women. Additional research is needed to quantify the relative contribution of campaign radio, print media, and community components to sustain increased mammography uptake.

  3. Catalyzing community action within a national campaign: VERB community and national partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretthauer-Mueller, Rosemary; Berkowitz, Judy M; Thomas, Melonie; McCarthy, Susan; Green, Lula Anna; Melancon, Heidi; Courtney, Anita H; Bryant, Carol A; Dodge, Kristin

    2008-06-01

    The VERB campaign used a social marketing approach to deliver its message through the mass media, school and community promotions, and partnerships to encourage children aged 9-13 years (tweens) to be physically active every day. This paper presents the VERB campaign's community and national partnership strategy, highlights three successful partnerships, and discusses challenges associated with the efforts. The national advertising generated awareness of and affinity for the product's brand and motivated the primary audience to seek out the product. The campaign's national and community partners were engaged to facilitate a product-distribution channel. The campaign developed a three-pronged partnership strategy to integrate the promotion with the placement of the campaign's product (physical activity): (1) reframe the way physical activity is positioned and delivered; (2) connect the brand to the point-of-purchase; and (3) refer (or drive) the audience to the action outlets, opportunities, places, spaces and programs to purchase the product. The VERB campaign provided partners with marketing training and resources to assist them as they leveraged tweens' brand awareness and supported regular physical activity among tweens. The method of technical assistance and the types of marketing tools were provided in relationship to four characteristics of the partner: (1) partner's network, (2) leaders and champions in the network, (3) partner's financial resources for community campaigns; and (4) partner's understanding of the marketing mindset. Coordinated, collaborative, and strong mass-media and community-based interventions within a national social marketing campaign can sustain the immediate effects of such campaigns.

  4. 5 CFR 950.801 - Campaign schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaign schedule. 950.801 Section 950... VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS CFC Timetable § 950.801 Campaign schedule. (a) The Combined Federal Campaign will be.../International and International parts of the Charity List to all local campaigns by a date to be determined by...

  5. Impact of French advertising campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussade, Jean-Pierre; Ansel, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    'Today, some 75 % of France's electricity is generated by nuclear plants'. This was the theme of the advertising campaign launched for the second time in May 1992 by Electricite de France in national daily newspapers and magazines, in regional publications, on cinema and on TV. Compared to 1991 the second campaign was a new step in communication: first, was the wish to inform better the public. A Minitel program '3614 EDF' was created and connected by general public including a lot of information about nuclear energy and the way to visit a nuclear plant; secondly, was the use of TV media to target a larger population. The TV spot, 'the nuclear drill', uses humor to get more impact on the public. The campaign received an encouraging reception from the press, which admired its boldness and originality. As far as the general public is concerned, the campaign achieved its goals, as illustrated by the results of post-campaign surveys carried out to measure its effect. The segment of population targeted by campaign was mainly the so called 'pragmatics'. 'Pragmatics', who account for 25 % of the French population, are young, have a good education and are well informed. This category was selected as it shows a subtle attitude towards nuclear power, with more doubts than certainties. Moreover, this segment of the population has proven to be open to information issued by EDF and also plays a key role in influencing social trends. 63% of the segment targeted by the campaign (pragmatics) and 56% of the whole french population saw the ads

  6. Gas information campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthold, D.

    The second Federal German experts' meeting on Gas Consulting from 2nd to 5th June 1981 in Saarbruecken documents the importance attached by the gas industry to a qualified energy consulting. The consumers are informed of natural gas by country-wide and regional PR- and marketing activities. This information is the basis for sales promotion measures in the regional and local sphere. All communicative measures end with the consulting. It is the most important sales-political instrument which helps the supply companies to win interested and informed customers. The action gas consulting shows possibilities of how to effect an advisory service in cooperation between Information on Natural Gas and local suppliers.

  7. Safety campaigns. TIS Launches New Safety Information Campaign

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Need to start a new installation and worried about safety aspects? Or are you newly responsible for safety matters in a CERN building? Perhaps you're simply interested in how to make the working environment safer for yourself and your colleagues. Whatever the case, a new information campaign launched by TIS this week can help. The most visible aspects of the new campaign will be posters distributed around the Laboratory treating a different subject each month. The Web site - http://safety.cern.ch/ - which provides all safety related information. But these are not the only aspects of the new campaign. Members of the TIS/GS group, whose contact details can be found on the safety web site, are available to give information and advice on a one-to-one basis at any time. The campaign's launch has been timed to coincide with European Safety Week, organized by the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work and the subject treated in the first posters is safety inspection. This particular topic only concerns thos...

  8. Folate deficiency facilitates recruitment of upstream binding factor to hot spots of DNA double-strand breaks of rRNA genes and promotes its transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qiu; Li, Caihua; Song, Xiaozhen; Wu, Lihua; Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Zhiyong; Cao, Haiyan; Yu, Kaihui; Wan, Chunlei; Li, Jianting; Yang, Feng; Huang, Zebing; Niu, Bo; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Ting

    2017-03-17

    The biogenesis of ribosomes in vivo is an essential process for cellular functions. Transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes is the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis controlled by environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the role of folate antagonist on changes of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) landscape in mouse embryonic stem cells. A significant DSB enhancement was detected in the genome of these cells and a large majority of these DSBs were found in rRNA genes. Furthermore, spontaneous DSBs in cells under folate deficiency conditions were located exclusively within the rRNA gene units, representing a H3K4me1 hallmark. Enrichment H3K4me1 at the hot spots of DSB regions enhanced the recruitment of upstream binding factor (UBF) to rRNA genes, resulting in the increment of rRNA genes transcription. Supplement of folate resulted in a restored UBF binding across DNA breakage sites of rRNA genes, and normal rRNA gene transcription. In samples from neural tube defects (NTDs) with low folate level, up-regulation of rRNA gene transcription was observed, along with aberrant UBF level. Our results present a new view by which alterations in folate levels affects DNA breakage through epigenetic control leading to the regulation of rRNA gene transcription during the early stage of development. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Stereoselective synthesis of diazaspiro[5.5]undecane derivatives via base promoted [5+1] double Michael addition of N,N-dimethylbarbituric acid to diaryliedene acetones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shahidul Islam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen containing spiro-heterocycle is one of the privileged synthetic motif that constitutes various naturally occurring molecules and displays a broad range of pharmaceutical and biological activities. A new methodology was developed for the synthesis of 2,4-diazaspiro[5.5]undecane-1,3,5,9-tetraones spiro-heterocyclic derivatives via cascade cyclization of [5+1] double Michael addition reaction of N,N-dimethylbarbituric acid with the derivatives of diaryldivinylketones in the presence of diethylamine at ambient temperature. The developed protocol is highly capable of furnishing diazaspiro[5.5]undecane derivatives 3a–m in excellent yields (up to 98%, from easily accessible symmetric and non-symmetric divinylketones 2a–m, containing aryl and heteroaryl substituents. The diazaspiro-heterocyclic structure was mainly elucidated by NMR and X-ray crystallographic techniques. The single-crystal X-ray studies revealed that, the cyclohexanone unit of spirocycles often prefers a chair conformation rather than twisted conformation. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding and CArH⋯π, π–π stacking interactions driving forces are mainly responsible for the crystal packing.

  10. Double Trouble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsaesser, Thomas; Kievit, Robert; Simons, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Double Trouble highlights the career of Dutch scriptwriter and television producer Chiem van Houweninge, well-known for his long-running TV comedy series and as author of episodes for TV detective series. Double Trouble gives Van Houweninge's own views on writing and filming in television prime

  11. 242-A campaign 95-1 post run document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    The 242-A Evaporator Campaign 95-1 was started on June 6, 1995 and finished July 27, 1995. An overall Waste Volume Reduction (WVR) of 8.18 million liters (2.16 mGAL OR 87.6% WVRF) was achieved from 9.35 million liters (2.47 Mgal) of processable waste contained in 108-AP, 107-AP, 106-AW and 102-AW. Slurry generated from Campaign 95-1 consisted of 1.05 million liters (278,000 gal) of dilute double-shell slurry feed (DDSSF) with a SpG of approximately 1.34. Total process condensate discharged to LERF was 10.3 million liters (2.72 Mgal), achieving a condensate/WVR efficiency ratio of 1.26. Total throughout for Campaign 95-1 was 18.1 million liters (4.79 Mgal). B Pond discharges from steam condensate and cooling water were 15.8 and 583 million liters (4.17 and 154 Mgal) respectively. Based on 145 hours of unplanned downtime, the 242-A Evaporator maintained an operating efficiency of 86% during the 49 day campaign

  12. Campaign Advertising and Voter Welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prat, A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of campaign advertising and the opportunity of legal restrictions on it. An electoral race is modeled as a signalling game with three classes of players: a continuum of voters, two candidates, and one interest group. The group has non-verifiable insider information

  13. The Effect of Political Campaigns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kasper Møller

    between the theoretical considerations and empirical data. Finally, the paper presents how these models are operationalized in the questionnaires and experiments of the project Online Panel of Electoral Campaigning (OPEC). The paper is part of a five years research project, OPEC, which is set out...

  14. Successful Strategies for Capital Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Stuart R.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty five years ago, few community or technical colleges considered launching capital campaigns. They lacked community standing, professional fundraising staff, and the related institutional foundation structure to manage charitable efforts. Gradually, as public funding eroded, bond issues became harder to pass, and colleges recognized the need…

  15. Advanced Fuels Campaign 2012 Accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2012-11-01

    The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is responsible for developing fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the DOE Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. The fiscal year 2012 (FY 2012) accomplishments are highlighted below. Kemal Pasamehmetoglu is the National Technical Director for AFC.

  16. Double-stranded RNA promotes CTL-independent tumor cytolysis mediated by CD11b+Ly6G+ intratumor myeloid cells through the TICAM-1 signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shime, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2017-01-01

    PolyI:C, a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, acts as an immune-enhancing adjuvant that regresses tumors in cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-dependent and CTL-independent manner, the latter of which remains largely unknown. Tumors contain CD11b+Ly6G+ cells, known as granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSCs) or tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) that play a critical role in tumor progression and development. Here, we demonstrate that CD11b+Ly6G+ cells respond to polyI:C and exhibit tumoricidal activity in an EL4 tumor implant model. PolyI:C-induced inhibition of tumor growth was attributed to caspase-8/3 cascade activation in tumor cells that occurred independently of CD8α+/CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) and CTLs. CD11b+Ly6G+ cells was essential for the antitumor effect because depletion of CD11b+Ly6G+ cells totally abrogated tumor regression and caspase activation after polyI:C treatment. CD11b+Ly6G+ cells that had been activated with polyI:C showed cytotoxicity and inhibited tumor growth through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS). These responses were abolished in either Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1)−/− or interferon (IFN)-αβ receptor 1 (IFNAR1)−/− mice. Thus, our results suggest that polyI:C activates the TLR3/TICAM-1 and IFNAR signaling pathways in CD11b+Ly6G+ cells in tumors, thereby eliciting their antitumor activity, independent of those in CD8α+/CD103+ DCs that prime CTLs. PMID:27834952

  17. The effect of public awareness campaigns on suicides: evidence from Nagoya, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Tetsuya; Ueda, Michiko; Sawada, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Public awareness campaigns about depression and suicide have been viewed as highly effective strategies in preventing suicide, yet their effectiveness has not been established in previous studies. This study evaluates the effectiveness of a public-awareness campaign by comparing suicide counts before and after a city-wide campaign in Nagoya, Japan, where the city government distributed promotional materials that were aimed to stimulate public awareness of depression and promote care-seeking behavior during the period of 2010-2012. In each of the sixteen wards of the city of Nagoya, we count the number of times that the promotional materials were distributed per month and then examine the association between the suicide counts and the frequency of distributions in the months following such distributions. We run a Poisson regression model that controls for the effects of ward-specific observed and unobserved heterogeneities and temporal shocks. Our analysis indicates that more frequent distribution of the campaign material is associated with a decrease in the number of suicides in the subsequent months. The campaign was estimated to have been especially effective for the male residents of the city. The underlying mechanism of how the campaign reduced suicides remains to be unclear. Public awareness campaigns can be an effective strategy in preventing suicide. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Romanian Campaigns on Corporate Social Responsibility – Signs of Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Patrut; Camelia Cmeciu

    2016-01-01

    Organizations play an important role in the development of the modern society since managers have become aware that financial profit highly depends on community involvement. The active participation of organizations in community life implies to adapt global strategies to local issues or to promote local issues at a global level. Actually this is the essence of glocalization. The means by which organizations can achieve these glocal objectives is CSR campaigns.  CSR represents an instrument us...

  19. Tips From Former Smokers – 2013 Campaign

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-28

    Tim McAfee, MD, MPH, of CDC’s Office on Smoking and Health, discusses the 2013 Tips campaign, and his personal experience as a doctor treating people with diseases caused by smoking, or made worse by it. He also offers advice on how people can quit smoking.  Created: 3/28/2013 by Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.   Date Released: 3/28/2013.

  20. News Media Framing of Negative Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    2014-01-01

    that news coverage of negative campaigning does apply the strategic game frame to a significantly larger degree than articles covering positive campaigning. This finding has significant implications for campaigning politicians and for scholars studying campaign and media effects.......News media coverage of election campaigns is often characterized by use of the strategic game frame and a focus on politicians’ use of negative campaigning. However, the exact relationship between these two characteristics of news coverage is largely unexplored. This article theorizes that consumer...... demand and norms of journalistic independence might induce the news media outlets to cover negative campaigning with a strategic game frame. A comprehensive content analysis based on several newspaper types, several election campaigns, and several different measurements of media framing confirms...

  1. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  2. Effects of a mass media campaign to increase physical activity among children: year-1 results of the VERB campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhman, Marian; Potter, Lance D; Wong, Faye L; Banspach, Stephen W; Duke, Jennifer C; Heitzler, Carrie D

    2005-08-01

    To determine the effects of a mass media campaign on the levels of physical activity among children 9 to 13 years of age. A prospective, longitudinal, quasi-experimental design was used. A baseline survey was conducted in April to June 2002, before the launch of VERB advertising. Random-digit-dialing methods were used to survey a nationally representative sample of children and parents. The follow-up survey was repeated with the same cohort of children and parents in April to June 2003. Propensity scoring was used to determine the campaign's effects on awareness and physical activity behaviors. United States. A total of 3120 parent-child dyads. Intervention. The VERB campaign is a multiethnic campaign that combines paid advertisements with school and community promotions and Internet activities to encourage children 9 to 13 years of age to be physically active every day. Launched in 2002 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, VERB uses commercial marketing methods to advertise being physically active as cool, fun, and a chance to have a good time with friends. Using the VERB brand, paid advertising ran nationally from June 2002 through June 2003, targeting 9- to 13-year-old youths. Children's awareness of the campaign and self-reported estimates of free-time and organized physical activity sessions during nonschool hours in the week before the interview. After 1 year, 74% of children surveyed were aware of the VERB campaign. Levels of reported sessions of free-time physical activity increased for subgroups of children 9 to 13 years of age. A pattern of effects across 2 measures was observed for younger children (9-10 years of age), girls, children whose parents had less than a high school education, children from urban areas that were densely populated, and children who were low active at baseline. These subgroups engaged in more median weekly sessions of free-time physical activity than did children who were unaware of VERB and, as the children's level

  3. Pea proteins oral supplementation promotes muscle thickness gains during resistance training: a double-blind, randomized, Placebo-controlled clinical trial vs. Whey protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babault, Nicolas; Païzis, Christos; Deley, Gaëlle; Guérin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Saniez, Marie-Hélène; Lefranc-Millot, Catherine; Allaert, François A

    2015-01-01

    The effects of protein supplementation on muscle thickness and strength seem largely dependent on its composition. The current study aimed at comparing the impact of an oral supplementation with vegetable Pea protein (NUTRALYS®) vs. Whey protein and Placebo on biceps brachii muscle thickness and strength after a 12-week resistance training program. One hundred and sixty one males, aged 18 to 35 years were enrolled in the study and underwent 12 weeks of resistance training on upper limb muscles. According to randomization, they were included in the Pea protein (n = 53), Whey protein (n = 54) or Placebo (n = 54) group. All had to take 25 g of the proteins or placebo twice a day during the 12-week training period. Tests were performed on biceps muscles at inclusion (D0), mid (D42) and post training (D84). Muscle thickness was evaluated using ultrasonography, and strength was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Results showed a significant time effect for biceps brachii muscle thickness (P Pea, Whey and Placebo, respectively; P Pea group as compared to Placebo whereas there was no difference between Whey and the two other conditions. Muscle strength also increased with time with no statistical difference between groups. In addition to an appropriate training, the supplementation with pea protein promoted a greater increase of muscle thickness as compared to Placebo and especially for people starting or returning to a muscular strengthening. Since no difference was obtained between the two protein groups, vegetable pea proteins could be used as an alternative to Whey-based dietary products. The present trial has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02128516).

  4. Ash Stabilization Campaign Blend Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winstead, M.L.

    1995-01-01

    This Stabilization Blend Plan documents the material to be processed and the processing order for the FY95 Ash Stabilization Campaign. The primary mission of this process is to reduce the inventory of unstable plutonium bearing ash. The source of the ash is from Rocky Flats and the 232-Z incinerator at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The ash is currently being stored in Room 235B and Vault 174 in building 234-5Z. The sludge is to be thermally stabilized in a glovebox in room 230A of the 234-5Z building and material handling for the process will be done in room 230B of the same building. The campaign is scheduled for approximately 12--16 weeks. A total of roughly 4 kg of Pu will be processed

  5. Radon campaigns. Status report 2008; Radontalkoot. Tilannekatsaus 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvela, H.; Valmari, T.; Reisbacka, H.; Niemelae, H.; Oinas, T.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Laitinen-Sorvari, R.

    2008-12-15

    Radon campaigns aim at activating citizens to make indoor radon measurements and remediation as well as increasing the common awareness of indoor radon questions. Indoor radon increases the risk of lung cancer. Through radon campaigns Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) also promotes the attainment of those goals that the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health has set for municipal authorities in Finland for prevention of the harmful effects of radon. The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health supports this campaign. Radon campaigns were started in autumn 2003. By autumn 2008 the campaigns have been organised already in 64 regions altogether in 160 municipalities. In some municipalities they have already arranged two campaigns. Altogether 14 100 houses have been measured and in 2 100 of these the action limit of radon remediation 400 Bq / m3 has been exceeded. When participating in radon campaigns the house owners receive a special offer on radon detectors with a reduced price. In 2008 a new practice was introduced where the campaign advertisements were distributed by mail to low-rise residential houses in a certain region. The advertisement includes an order / deposit slip with postage paid that the house owner can send directly to STUK to easily make an order for radon measurement. In the previous radon campaigns in 2003 - 2007 the municipal authorities collected the orders from house owners and distributed later the radon detectors. The radon concentrations measured in the campaign regions have exceeded the action limit of 400 Bq / m3 in 0 - 39% of houses, depending on the region. The total of 15% of all measurements made exceeded this limit. The remediation activities have been followed by sending a special questionnaire on remedies performed to the house owners. In 2006 - 2007 a questionnaire was sent to those households where the radon concentration of 400 Bq / m3 was exceeded during the two first campaign seasons. Among the households that replied

  6. Carbohydrates Alone or Mixing With Beef or Whey Protein Promote Similar Training Outcomes in Resistance Training Males: A Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naclerio, Fernando; Seijo-Bujia, Marco; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Earnest, Conrad P

    2017-10-01

    Beef powder is a new high-quality protein source scarcely researched relative to exercise performance. The present study examined the impact of ingesting hydrolyzed beef protein, whey protein, and carbohydrate on strength performance (1RM), body composition (via plethysmography), limb circumferences and muscular thickness (via ultrasonography), following an 8-week resistance-training program. After being randomly assigned to one of the following groups: Beef, Whey, or Carbohydrate, twenty four recreationally physically active males (n = 8 per treatment) ingested 20 g of supplement, mixed with orange juice, once a day (immediately after workout or before breakfast). Post intervention changes were examined as percent change and 95% CIs. Beef (2.0%, CI, 0.2-2.38%) and Whey (1.4%, CI, 0.2-2.6%) but not Carbohydrate (0.0%, CI, -1.2-1.2%) increased fat-free mass. All groups increased vastus medialis thickness: Beef (11.1%, CI, 6.3-15.9%), Whey (12.1%, CI, 4.0, -20.2%), Carbohydrate (6.3%, CI, 1.9-10.6%). Beef (11.2%, CI, 5.9-16.5%) and Carbohydrate (4.5%, CI, 1.6-7.4%), but not Whey (1.1%, CI, -1.7-4.0%), increased biceps brachialis thickness, while only Beef increased arm (4.8%, CI, 2.3-7.3%) and thigh (11.2%, 95%CI 0.4-5.9%) circumferences. Although the three groups significantly improved 1RM Squat (Beef 21.6%, CI 5.5-37.7%; Whey 14.6%, CI, 5.9-23.3%; Carbohydrate 19.6%, CI, 2.2-37.1%), for the 1RM bench press the improvements were significant for Beef (15.8% CI 7.0-24.7%) and Whey (5.8%, CI, 1.7-9.8%) but not for carbohydrate (11.4%, CI, -0.9-23.6%). Protein-carbohydrate supplementation supports fat-free mass accretion and lower body hypertrophy. Hydrolyzed beef promotes upper body hypertrophy along with similar performance outcomes as observed when supplementing with whey isolate or maltodextrin.

  7. Prevention is still the best medicine. Condom social marketing campaign changes attitudes and actions in Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, L L

    1993-09-01

    In Guinea, jingles promoting Prudence condoms are heard on radio and television in 4 different national languages 5 times a day. This has produced an attitudinal change through an intense national media campaign orchestrated by the USAID-financed Social Marketing of Contraceptives Project carried out by Population Services International (PSI), which provides family planning information, products and services through public and private outlets for 500,000 sexually active couples. PSI's paid media campaign has sponsored call-in talk shows on women and AIDS and religion and AIDS at the rural radio station in Labe. Billboards placed in key locations remind people that using condoms helps prevent AIDS. PSI organized a team of 10 Prudence condom marketing agents in March 1992 to establish 400 nontraditional retail and 50 traditional retail and wholesale outlets for condoms. Outlets include pharmacies, restaurants, hotels, grocery stores, and nightclubs. The distributors sell the condoms at a profit. In the first 6 months, PSI distributed 2.3 million condoms. Young women want to space their children and limit the number of children, said the chief midwife for the Guinean Association for Family Well Being clinic in Conakry. Guinea's population growth rate is 2.8%, which will result in a doubling of the population in 25 years. In May 1992, Guinea's government ratified a national population policy supporting family planning. One of the primary goals is to increase contraceptive use to 25% of all couples. PSI works with the Ministry of Health and the Guinean Association for Family Well Being to integrate family planning and sexually transmitted disease prevention activities into 32 primary health care centers in Guinea's Forest Region. To combat the spread of HIV infection, PSI provides technical assistance to the National AIDS Committee to carry out AIDS information activities throughout the country, targeting the military, police, truck drivers, and students.

  8. A critical look at residential electricity conservation campaigns in a developing country environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martino Jannuzzi, G. de; Ferreira Santos, V. dos

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyse survey results of the effectiveness of information campaigns to promote energy efficiency among residential consumers in Brazil. The survey found that consumers have a relatively good knowledge of conservation measures to improve electricity usage. Nevertheless, other approaches are needed to promote energy conservation in the household sector. (author). 3 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Cost effective campaigning in social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnis, Bhushan; Kuri, Joy

    2016-05-01

    Campaigners are increasingly using online social networking platforms for promoting products, ideas and information. A popular method of promoting a product or even an idea is incentivizing individuals to evangelize the idea vigorously by providing them with referral rewards in the form of discounts, cash backs, or social recognition. Due to budget constraints on scarce resources such as money and manpower, it may not be possible to provide incentives for the entire population, and hence incentives need to be allocated judiciously to appropriate individuals for ensuring the highest possible outreach size. We aim to do the same by formulating and solving an optimization problem using percolation theory. In particular, we compute the set of individuals that are provided incentives for minimizing the expected cost while ensuring a given outreach size. We also solve the problem of computing the set of individuals to be incentivized for maximizing the outreach size for given cost budget. The optimization problem turns out to be non trivial; it involves quantities that need to be computed by numerically solving a fixed point equation. Our primary contribution is, that for a fairly general cost structure, we show that the optimization problems can be solved by solving a simple linear program. We believe that our approach of using percolation theory to formulate an optimization problem is the first of its kind.

  10. Television and the promotion of mental health

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Current media campaigns, realized within national campaigns and actions on mental health prevention and promotion, are considered in this paper, in the context of expert public relation, as well as the whole society, towards mental health. Mental health promotion is determined as a range of activities by which individuals, community and society are being enabled to take control over mental health determinants and to improve it, but also as an action for improvement of mental health posi...

  11. Trust us Trust Thorp Campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, John

    1995-01-01

    The history of the nuclear industry in the UK has been dominated by Sellafield reprocessing site in west Cumbria. The site, formerly owned by the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority was transferred to the newly-formed British Nuclear Fuels plc in 1971. Although trade union representation existed at Sellafield before the emergence of BNFL, it is only after this date that collective trade union activity began to emerge. In 1977, after a long running dispute with management about the issue of radiation dose uptake, the workforce went on strike, forcing the management to question their previous 'need to know' attitude and to improve industrial relations. In 1984, it was recognised that the lobbying influence of trade unions within politics, and especially the Labour party could be used to greater effect to challenge potentially -damaging influence of anti-nuclear campaigners. The National Campaign for the Nuclear Industry (NCNI) was born, combining nine industrial and non-industrial trade unions within the nuclear industry. Its task during the last ten years has been to put forward the interests of its members collectively and to secure the, role of nuclear power. within a balanced energy policy in the political arena. In dome so, it has gained a credible voice within both the trade union movement and the Labour party. The new Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) received strong support from the NCNI during its construction and commissioning phases. When it became clear that the anti-nuclear lobby had gained the upper hand and were beginning to seriously delay the necessary legal instruments required to start the plant, the power of collective action was once again recognised, and the TRUST US campaign was born. The campaign was run and organised by a clerks committee and fronted by the Trade Unions at Sellafield., and turned out to be one of the most successful] trade union campaigns in recent history. The first task involved getting, the entire workforce on

  12. [Pathology in social media networks. Recruitment campaign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz Mateos, Eduardo; Guerra Pastrián, Laura; Pijuan Andújar, Lara; López Solache, Laura; Zucchiatti, Adriana; García Ángel, Rubén; Prieto Cuadra, Juan Daniel; Labiano Miravalles, Tania; Carvalho, Rita; Gardner, Jerad M; Terrádez, Cristina; de Álava, Enrique

    Pathology is a speciality that is often poorly understood, not only by the general public, but also by clinicians. However, the recent widespread use of social media provides an opportunity to increase the visibility and comprehension of our profession. A working group was formed to carry out this task. The members of the Spanish Society of Pathology were contacted through its Communication and Social Projection Subcommittee to engage in the campaign #IWantYouForSEAP, to form a network on Twitter. The recruitment period was one month (August, 2016). The resulting project, developed during the XXVIII Congress of the SEAP-IAP, was registered using the analytical tools Symplur and Tweet Binder. 32 applications (29 pathologists, 2 histotechnicians, 1 administrative personnel) were received from all over Spain, including participants from 14 of the 17 Autonomous Regions, from 22 cities and 25 medical centres. The activity in relation to the hashtag #SEAP2017V used in the congress included 685 participants with 6704 tweets and 8,837,435 impressions. 28 of the 32 recruited by the #IWantYouForSEAP campaign participated, contributing with 2410 tweets, and generating 2,090,423 impressions (36% and 24% of the total, respectively). It is possible to promote and motivate teamwork within our discipline through social media networks. This preliminary experience of the use of social media networks in our scientific community has had encouraging results which have raised high expectations among participants. An appropriate use of social media networks could help to narrow the gap between pathologists and society. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anatomía Patológica. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Do social marketing campaigns in health work? A critical analysis of four UK campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Coope, David

    2007-01-01

    This management project looks at four recent social marketing campaigns in the field of health in the UK to determine whether such campaigns work. The project critically analyses the marketing campaigns used, and aims to determine the range of factors that create a successful social marketing campaign in health. There is analysis of four case studies undertaken after secondary research into social marketing campaigns run by a range of different organisations. The case studies are the ...

  14. Does a TV Public Service Advertisement Campaign for Suicide Prevention Really Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In Han; You, Jung-Won; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Jung-Soo; Kwon, Se Won; Park, Jong-Ik

    2017-05-01

    One of the critical measures in suicide prevention is promoting public awareness of crisis hotline numbers so that individuals can more readily seek help in a time of crisis. Although public service advertisements (PSA) may be effective in raising the rates of both awareness and use of a suicide hotline, few investigations have been performed regarding their effectiveness in South Korea, where the suicide rate is the highest among OECD countries. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a television PSA campaign. We analyzed a database of crisis phone calls compiled by the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare to track changes in call volume to a crisis hotline that was promoted in a TV campaign. We compared daily call counts for three periods of equal length: before, during, and after the campaign. The number of crisis calls during the campaign was about 1.6 times greater than the number before or after the campaign. Relative to the number of suicide-related calls in the previous year, the number of calls during the campaign period surged, displaying a noticeable increase. The findings confirmed that this campaign had a positive impact on call volume to the suicide hotline.

  15. It's Your Place: Development and Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Bystander Intervention Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrom, Beth; Ferrara, Merissa; DeMaria, Andrea L; Gabel, Colby; Booth, Kathleen; Cabot, Jeri

    2017-06-28

    Preventing sexual assault on college campuses is a national priority. Bystander intervention offers a promising approach to change social norms and prevent sexual misconduct. This study presents the implementation and evaluation of a theory-based campaign to promote active bystander intervention. The theory of planned behavior (TPB) served as a conceptual framework throughout campaign development and evaluation. Formative research published elsewhere was used to develop campaign strategies, communication channels, and messages, including "It is your place to prevent sexual assault: You're not ruining a good time." The It's Your Place multi-media campaign fosters a culture of bystander intervention through peer-to-peer facilitation and training, as well as traditional and new media platforms. A cross-sectional post-test only web-based survey was designed to evaluate the campaign and test the TPB's ability to accurately predict intention to intervene. Survey data were collected from 1,505 currently enrolled students. The TPB model predicted intention to intervene. There was a significant effect of campaign exposure on attitude, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral intention. This theory-based communication campaign offers implications for promoting active bystander intervention and reducing sexual assault.

  16. Participatory and Social Media to Engage Youth: From the Obama Campaign to Public Health Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Jordi; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Springgate, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    Barack Obama’s successful campaign for the presidency has been widely attributed to the use of social networking sites, mobile devices, and interactive websites to engage previously hard-to-reach populations in political activity. Campaign communication strategies may be applicable for youth health promotion efforts, particularly for the highly stigmatized issue of mental health. In this article, we examine elements of the 2008 Obama presidential campaign’s use of social media technologies an...

  17. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: Where have we been and where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, R Phillip

    2015-04-01

    The Surviving Sepsis Campaign develops and promotes evidence-based guidelines and performance-improvement practices aimed at reducing deaths from sepsis worldwide. The most recent guidelines, published in 2013, provide detailed management strategies for acute care, fluid resuscitation, and vasopressor use. In addition, the campaign has developed simple, short protocols for what to do within 3 and 6 hours of recognition of sepsis. These protocols are associated with reduced mortality rates. Copyright © 2015 Cleveland Clinic.

  18. Communicating Georgia : Georgia's information campaign in the 2008 war with Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Jugaste, Artur

    2011-01-01

    During the 2008 South Ossetia war, Georgia and Russia fought what the English-language media called "a public relations war“. This was an interesting example of modern information warfare where governments allied with public relations agencies battled for symbolic power on the media field. This study investigates the information campaign that the Georgian government launched to promote their framing of the conflict in the English-language media. First-hand information about the campaign strat...

  19. Detecting Changes in Newspaper Reporting of Suicide after a Statewide Social Marketing Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Michele; Ramchand, Rajeev; Chamberlin, Margaret; Marcellino, William

    2018-06-01

    A social marketing campaign was introduced in California in 2012, promoting media adherence to consensus-based guidelines on reporting about suicide. We examine adherence to these guidelines by applying quantitative scores to articles in California and a national control group in two six-month intervals prior to and following campaign implementation. Utilizing a difference-in-difference approach, we found no significant effect of the campaign, though the type of article content was a significant indicator of the overall score. Findings also demonstrated a nation-wide downward trend in the quality of reporting. Qualitative results suggest a need for more flexible guidelines in light of a technologically driven news culture.

  20. Spokespersons in media campaigns of non-profit organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this research is how spokespersons can be used in campaigns of non-profit organizations, with a goal to increase their visibility and gain public support. Namely, many companies employ celebrities for their media campaigns as protagonists and promoters of brand values. With their appearance and engagement, celebrities transfer part of their image and credibility to the brand, which widens and enriches the field of associations which brands trigger in consumers' conscience. Non-profit organizations could get similar benefits out of these campaigns. In a society where there is a certain level of fascination with celebrities, i.e. celebrity culture, their influence can be used not only to attract attention to the goods, but also to ideas. The goal of the paper is to show how spokespersons can influence behavior and attitudes of the public by participating in media campaigns, and also the important aspects of choosing a spokesperson. The paper is supposed to be a starting point for practitioners,so they can design creative ideas based on this technique on the non-profit organizations market, especially in Serbia.

  1. Creating a movement for active living via a media campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Jennifer; Dodge, Tammie; Peterson, Kerri R; Balluff, Mary

    2012-11-01

    Activate Omaha (AO), a community-wide health initiative, was awarded a grant by Active Living by Design in 2003. To establish credibility of the partners in AO and increase awareness of active living in the community by emphasizing promotions (branding, logo recognition). Media, including billboards, TV and radio ads, high-profile spokespersons, grassroots efforts, and worksite "toolkits" featuring tips and creative messaging on physical activity were combined to incentivize people to be physically active. Campaign surveys were conducted by the Market Survey Research Group each year from 2005 to 2008. Survey data based on the first campaign indicated that 86% of Omahans wanted to be part of an active community and to be active with younger generations. The second campaign focused on getting families physically active together, and this survey data showed that citizens wanted to be a part of an active community. A third campaign added practical examples of citizens being active within the community and efforts expanded to worksites with consistent messaging for employees. The final survey indicated that 78% of respondents found Omaha to be an active community compared to 63% who had that response 3 years earlier. Activate Omaha was successful in gaining credibility and leveraging additional funding to implement complementary programming and physical projects, and as a result, changing community perceptions and influencing policy decisions. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The British Nuclear Industry Forum's public affairs campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Keith

    2000-01-01

    the view of promoting a balanced and persuasive case for nuclear energy and the achievements of the nuclear industry. There are indications that the messages are being heard and acknowledged by those whose opinions and decisions could determine the future shape of energy and environmental policy. There is, though, still a long way to go to change the prevailing climate of public and political opinion towards nuclear energy. Despite some modest successes in the first year of the Campaign, the degree of support and active involvement BNIF had hoped for from its member companies has not materialised. Therefore, the ways in which BNIF has sought to orchestrate the delivery of the Campaign will need to be reviewed and revised. (author)

  3. Social Media as a Tool for Online Advocacy Campaigns: Greenpeace Mediterranean’s Anti Genetically Engineered Food Campaign in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Pınar Özdemir

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Advocacy has been one of the main fields of study in public relations and is established amongst the main functions of public relations. The strong need of non-governmental organizations for public support in order to reach their goals locates public relations and advocacy at a central position for these organizations. Social media, which have been introduced by the further development of Internet technology, especially Web 2.0, has had a significant impact upon public relations and advocacy activities of non-governmental organizations in particular. This development also led non-governmental organizations towards online advocacy campaigns that promote active participation of supporters with more cost effective methods that can easily become widespread. The aim of this study is to place the advocacy campaigns of non-governmental organizations into the context of public relations and to discuss how social media can be utilized in online advocacy through the case study of the Yemezler! (We do not buy it! campaign by Greenpeace Mediterranean that has been significantly successful in a short period in Turkey. The Dragonfly Effect model developed by Aaker and Smith (2010 is employed as a framework in the analysis of the Yemezler! campaign.

  4. The Influence of the Self-Regulatory Focus on the Effectiveness of Stop-Smoking Campaigns for Young Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    L. ADAMS; T. FASEUR; M. GEUENS

    2010-01-01

    People’s self-regulatory focus may determine the effectiveness of stop-smoking campaigns. An experiment with 226 young smokers investigated the persuasiveness of different emotional appeals (fear-relief versus sadness-joy) for different self-regulatory foci (prevention versus promotion). A congruency effect emerges for attitude toward the advertisement and behavioral intentions: Young smokers with a promotion focus are more persuaded by sadness-joy than fear-relief campaigns, and the opposite...

  5. The Sprite 2005 Observation Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chanrion, Olivier Arnaud; Crosby, Norma; Armone, Enrico

    2007-01-01

    The four year "Coupling of Atmospheric Layers (CAL)" EU FP5 Research Training Network project studied unanswered questions related to transient luminous events (sprites, jets and elves) in the upper atmosphere. Consisting of ten scientific work-packages CAL also included intensive training and ou......, to develop their organisational skills, and to enhance their ability to communicate their activities. The campaign was a unique opportunity to train and strengthen skills that will be an asset to their future careers and, overall, was most successful....

  6. Sludge Stabilization Campaign blend plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vries, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    This sludge stabilization blend plan documents the material to be processed and the order of processing for the FY95 Sludge Stabilization Campaign. The primary mission of this process is to reduce the inventory of unstable plutonium bearing sludge. The source of the sludge is residual and glovebox floor sweepings from the production of material at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The reactive sludge is currently being stored in various gloveboxes at PFP. There are two types of the plutonium bearing material that will be thermally stabilized in the muffle furnace: Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) sludge and Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line material

  7. Romanian Campaigns on Corporate Social Responsibility – Signs of Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Patrut

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizations play an important role in the development of the modern society since managers have become aware that financial profit highly depends on community involvement. The active participation of organizations in community life implies to adapt global strategies to local issues or to promote local issues at a global level. Actually this is the essence of glocalization. The means by which organizations can achieve these glocal objectives is CSR campaigns.  CSR represents an instrument used to solve diverse issues, such as: human rights, environment and climate change, education, support for vulnerable groups, sustainable development, or establishment of moral capitalism. Within the context of the ever-rising internet access of all audiences, CSR campaigns have become more visible and have capitalized on the advantages of collective intelligence, internet users’ participation and their user generated contents. The purpose of our study is to provide an insight into (1 the prominence of Romanian organizations which are the most socially responsible, (2 the domains in which Romanian organizations have invested; (3 the salience of CSR 1.0 and CSR 2.0 tools used in the promotion of CSR campaigns in Romania. 

  8. Reliability engineering analysis of ATLAS data reprocessing campaigns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniachine, A; Golubkov, D; Karpenko, D

    2014-01-01

    During three years of LHC data taking, the ATLAS collaboration completed three petascale data reprocessing campaigns on the Grid, with up to 2 PB of data being reprocessed every year. In reprocessing on the Grid, failures can occur for a variety of reasons, while Grid heterogeneity makes failures hard to diagnose and repair quickly. As a result, Big Data processing on the Grid must tolerate a continuous stream of failures, errors and faults. While ATLAS fault-tolerance mechanisms improve the reliability of Big Data processing in the Grid, their benefits come at costs and result in delays making the performance prediction difficult. Reliability Engineering provides a framework for fundamental understanding of the Big Data processing on the Grid, which is not a desirable enhancement but a necessary requirement. In ATLAS, cost monitoring and performance prediction became critical for the success of the reprocessing campaigns conducted in preparation for the major physics conferences. In addition, our Reliability Engineering approach supported continuous improvements in data reprocessing throughput during LHC data taking. The throughput doubled in 2011 vs. 2010 reprocessing, then quadrupled in 2012 vs. 2011 reprocessing. We present the Reliability Engineering analysis of ATLAS data reprocessing campaigns providing the foundation needed to scale up the Big Data processing technologies beyond the petascale.

  9. Yielding impressive results. The Egyptian experience in family planning communication campaign has been an exemplary model for many developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafai, M

    1994-09-01

    In Egypt the current use of family planning methods nearly doubled from 1980 to 1992. The toughest obstacles to the promotion of family planning are the deeply rooted pronatalism, the high rate of illiteracy, and low use of print media. The early efforts of the 1960s through the 1970s helped raise people's awareness of the problem, but traditional attitudes to family planning persisted. The Information, Education and Communication (IEC) Center established in 1979 in the State Information Service (SIS) of the Ministry of Information spearheaded the IEC efforts for family planning throughout the country. The Egyptian Contraceptives Prevalence Survey conducted in 1984 showed that the current use of family planning methods had increased 6.1% from the 1980 level, and that 56% of married women wished to stop having children, but were afraid of side effects of contraceptive use. The SIS/IEC Center launched a creative mass media campaign using TV spots and dramas. It also pioneered community-based public communication activities on population and family planning by organizing population communication forums. The local communication work is implemented by each of the 60 regional offices of SIS. Other government agencies, such as Health Insurance Organization, also launched IEC campaigns promoting their own services. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) such as the Family of the Future and the Clinical Service Improvement Project also engaged in social marketing of contraceptives. The use of family planning methods mounted between 1980 and 1992 from 24% to nearly 48%, and the method of choice shifted from the pill to the IUD. The country's crude birth rate declined steadily from 40 per 1000 population in 1985 down to 29/1000 in 1992. The six major factors for success included an innovative communication program, religious support, political commitment, an improved service delivery system, involvement of NGOs, and the economic influence. The Egyptian experience in family

  10. Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption: success of the Western Australian Go for 2&5 campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Christina M; Miller, Margaret R; Daly, Alison M; Crouchley, Kathy E; O'Donoghue, Kathy J; Lang, Anthea J; Binns, Colin W

    2008-03-01

    The Western Australian Health Department's Go for 2&5 campaign aimed to increase adults' awareness of the need to eat more fruit and vegetables and encourage increased consumption of one serving over five years. The multi-strategy fruit and vegetable social marketing campaign, conducted from 2002 to 2005, included mass media advertising (television, radio, press and point-of-sale), public relations events, publications, a website (www.gofor2and5.com), and school and community activities. Campaign development and the evaluation framework were designed using health promotion theory, and assessed values, beliefs, knowledge and behaviour. Two independent telephone surveys evaluated the campaign: the Campaign Tracking Survey interviewed 5032 adults monitoring fruit and vegetable attitudes, beliefs and consumption prior to, during and 12 months after the campaign; and the Health & Wellbeing Surveillance System surveyed 17,993 adults between 2001 and 2006, continuously monitoring consumption. Population public health intervention-social marketing campaign in Western Australia, population of 2,010,113 in 2005. Adults in the Perth metropolitan area. The campaign reached the target audience, increasing awareness of the recommended servings of fruit and vegetables. There was a population net increase of 0.8 in the mean number of servings of fruit and vegetables per day over three years (0.2 for fruit (1.6 in 2002 to 1.8 in 2005) and 0.6 for vegetables (2.6 in 2002 to 3.2 in 2005), significant at P < 0.05). Sustained, well-executed social marketing is effective in improving nutrition knowledge, attitudes and consumption behaviour. The Go for 2&5 campaign provides guidance to future nutrition promotion through social marketing.

  11. Breastfeeding social marketing: lessons learned from USDA's "Loving Support" campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Social marketing involves the application of commercial marketing principles to advance the public good. Social marketing calls for much more than health communications campaigns. It involves four interrelated tasks: audience benefit, target behavior, essence (brand, relevance, positioning), and developing the "4Ps" (product, price, place, promotion) marketing mix. The ongoing U.S. Department of Agriculture "Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work" campaign was launched in 1997 based on social marketing principles to increase breastfeeding initiation rates and breastfeeding duration among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) participants. Since then there have been improvements in breastfeeding duration in the country, and the majority of WIC women now initiate breastfeeding. Breastfeeding in public places is still not well accepted by society at large, and any and exclusive breastfeeding durations remain exceedingly low. Lessons learned from "Loving Support" and other campaigns indicate that it is important to design social marketing campaigns to target the influential societal forces (e.g., family and friends, healthcare providers, employers, formula industry, legislators) that affect women's decision and ability to breastfeed for the recommended amount of time. This will require formative research that applies the social-ecological model to different population segments, taking and identifying the right incentives to nudge more women to breastfeed for longer. Any new breastfeeding campaign needs to understand and take into account the information acquisition preferences of the target audiences. The vast majority of WIC women have mobile devices and are accessing social media. The Brazilian experience indicates that making breastfeeding the social norm can be done with a solid social marketing strategy. This is consistent with the recently released "Six Steps to Achieve Breastfeeding Goals for WIC Clinics," which identifies

  12. Do mass media campaigns improve physical activity? a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abioye, Ajibola I; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Danaei, Goodarz

    2013-08-02

    Mass media campaigns are frequently used to influence the health behaviors of various populations. There are currently no quantitative meta-analyses of the effect of mass media campaigns on physical activity in adults. We searched six electronic databases from their inception to August 2012 and selected prospective studies that evaluated the effect of mass media campaigns on physical activity in adults. We excluded studies that did not have a proper control group or did not report the uncertainties of the effect estimates. Two reviewers independently screened the title/abstracts and full articles. We used random-effects models to pool effect estimates across studies for 3 selected outcomes. Nine prospective cohorts and before-after studies that followed-up 27,601 people over 8 weeks to 3 years met the inclusion criteria. Based on the pooled results from these studies, mass media campaigns had a significant effect on promoting moderate intensity walking (pooled relative risk (RR) from 3 studies=1.53, 95% Confidence Interval: 1.25 to 1.87), but did not help participants achieve sufficient levels of physical activity [4 studies pooled RR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.14)]. The apparent effect of media campaigns on reducing sedentary behavior (pooled RR=1.15, 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.30) was lost when a relatively low-quality study with large effects was excluded in a sensitivity analysis. In subgroup analyses, campaigns that promoted physical activity as a 'social norm' seemed to be more effective in reducing sedentary behavior. Mass media campaigns may promote walking but may not reduce sedentary behavior or lead to achieving recommended levels of overall physical activity. Further research is warranted on different campaign types and in low- and middle- income countries.

  13. Mass media campaigns and organ donation: managing conflicting messages and interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; McGregor, Joan L; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2012-05-01

    Mass media campaigns are widely and successfully used to change health decisions and behaviors for better or for worse in society. In the United States, media campaigns have been launched at local offices of the states' department of motor vehicles to promote citizens' willingness to organ donation and donor registration. We analyze interventional studies of multimedia communication campaigns to encourage organ-donor registration at local offices of states' department of motor vehicles. The media campaigns include the use of multifaceted communication tools and provide training to desk clerks in the use of scripted messages for the purpose of optimizing enrollment in organ-donor registries. Scripted messages are communicated to customers through mass audiovisual entertainment media, print materials and interpersonal interaction at the offices of departments of motor vehicles. These campaigns give rise to three serious concerns: (1) bias in communicating information with scripted messages without verification of the scientific accuracy of information, (2) the provision of misinformation to future donors that may result in them suffering unintended consequences from consenting to medical procedures before death (e.g, organ preservation and suitability for transplantation), and (3) the unmanaged conflict of interests for organizations charged with implementing these campaigns, (i.e, dual advocacy for transplant recipients and donors). We conclude the following: (1) media campaigns about healthcare should communicate accurate information to the general public and disclose factual materials with the least amount of bias; (2) conflicting interests in media campaigns should be managed with full public transparency; (3) media campaigns should disclose the practical implications of procurement as well as acknowledge the medical, legal, and religious controversies of determining death in organ donation; (4) organ-donor registration must satisfy the criteria of informed

  14. Campaign rhetoric: A model of reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Aragonés, Enriqueta; Postlewaite, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    We analyze conditions under which a candidate's campaign rhetoric may affect the beliefs of the voters over what policy the candidate will implement in case he wins the election. We develop a model of repeated elections with complete information in which candidates are purely ideological. Voter's strategies involve a credible threat to punish candidates that renege of their campaign promises, and in equilibrium all campaign promises are believed by voters, and honore...

  15. Campaigns and disability: When an incumbent president questions his potential successor's mental health status during the campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukakis, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Former Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis knows about the damage that disability can cause--even its mere mention. In this keynote address given to the symposium on Presidential Disability and Succession held at Northeastern University in Boston last spring, Dukakis reflected on his famous 1988 presidential campaign that, largely at his expense, redefined negativity in presidential politics, in particular the fictitious allegation that he had a history of mental illness. A distinguish professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Northeastern University, Dukakis also spends each winter quarter at UCLA as a visiting professor in the Luskin School of Public Affairs. He remains active in both politics and public policy, canvassing for Democratic candidates such as Elizabeth Warren during her 2012 Senate campaign and promoting policy initiatives through the Dukakis Center for Urban and Regional Policy at Northeastern, which he affectionately calls a "think and do tank." The three-term governor (1975-1979 and 1983-1991) was voted Most Effective Governor by the National Governor's Association in 1986. After his first term in the late 1970s he lost a nasty primary election to Ed King, whom he would later defeat to reclaim office. Though it wasn't apparent at the time, for Dukakis, that 1978 campaign would serve as a precursor for the attack politics that were unloosed during the 1988 presidential campaign. In the remarks that follow, he offers a candid assessment of how not going negative may have cost him the presidency, and how an offhand remark by President Reagan (quickly retracted) caused the press to obsess over Dukakis' health record for the better part of a week--enough to slow his momentum during a crucial stage of campaigning.

  16. Eco-Schools campaign. The European projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchini, P.; Marino, G.

    1999-01-01

    The Foundation for Environmental Education in Europe (FEEE) was established in 1981; since then it was been actively promoting and delivering education through a series of successful internationals programmes launched in 21 different European nations. The Eco-School Campaign aims to raise students' awareness of environment issues through classroom study, and provide an integrated system for environmental management of schools based on EMAS (with waste, water and energy management as priority areas). As a process of facilitating sustainable developpement at a local level, pupils are encouraged to take an active role in mental impact of the schools. The Eco-Schools Green Flag, awarded to schools with high achievement in their Programme, is a recognised and respected eco-label for environmental education and performance. In Italy the National Eco-Schools operator was asked to set up a ten-schools pilot programme in the region Friuli Venezia Giulia: these are very first national schools that are likely to become 'Eco-Schools'

  17. Double Chooz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Christian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    The goal of the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment is to search for the neutrino mixing parameter {theta}{sub 13}. Double Chooz will use two identical detectors at 150 m and 1.05 km distance from the reactor cores. The near detector is used to monitor the reactor {nu}-bar {sub e} flux while the second is dedicated to the search for a deviation from the expected (1/distance){sup 2} behavior. This two detector concept will allow a relative normalization systematic error of ca. 0.6 %. The expected sensitivity for sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13} is then in the range 0.02 - 0.03 after three years of data taking. The antineutrinos will be detected in a liquid scintillator through the capture on protons followed by a gamma cascade, produced by the neutron capture on Gd.

  18. Double supergeometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederwall, Martin [Division for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Chalmers University of Technology,SE 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-06-27

    A geometry of superspace corresponding to double field theory is developed, with type I I supergravity in D=10 as the main example. The formalism is based on an orthosymplectic extension OSp(d,d|2s) of the continuous T-duality group. Covariance under generalised super-diffeomorphisms is manifest. Ordinary superspace is obtained as a solution of the orthosymplectic section condition. A systematic study of curved superspace Bianchi identities is performed, and a relation to a double pure spinor superfield cohomology is established. A Ramond-Ramond superfield is constructed as an infinite-dimensional orthosymplectic spinor. Such objects in minimal orbits under the OSp supergroup (“pure spinors”) define super-sections.

  19. Double ambidexterity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaulio, Matti; Thorén, Kent; Rohrbeck, René

    2017-01-01

    We leverage the business model innovation and ambidexterity literature to investigate a contradictory case, the Swedish-Finnish Telecom operator TeliaSonera. Despite being challenged by three major disruptions, the company not only still exists but also enjoys remarkably good financial performance....... Building on extant archival data and interviews, we carefully identify and map 26 organizational responses during 1992–2016. We find that the firm has overcome three critical phases by experimenting and pioneering with portfolios of business models and/or technological innovations. We describe...... this behaviour as double ambidexterity. We use an in-depth case study to conceptualize double ambidexterity and discuss its impact on the business's survival and enduring success....

  20. Recent Science Campaigns at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, R. P.; Bristow, W. A.; Fallen, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    Experiments in HF ionospheric heating using the High­frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities have tremendous potential for informing our investigation of the Earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere, and magnetosphere. They provide a unique opportunity for quantifying and modeling the multi­scale coupled processes that characterize the interactions between the plasma in near­Earth space, the Earth's magnetic field, and the neutral gasses of the atmosphere. Physical parameters of the region are often difficult to measure with ground­based instruments, and the measurements that are possible are often poorly resolved in range or time or unavailable outside narrow altitude regimes. HF ionospheric modification experiments allow us to measure ionospheric and thermospheric state parameters more systematically and over a broader range of conditions than would otherwise be possible. HAARP is the world's most powerful and most flexible HF transmitting facility, capable of generating 3.6 MW of RF power over a frequency range from about 2 MHz to about 10 MHz. The electronic phased array antenna provides the ability to direct the RF energy to a large region of the sky above Alaska. HAARP was constructed through a research program managed by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), and the Office of Naval Research (ONR). It was jointly funded by AFRL, ONR, and the Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency (DARPA). These agencies ended of their program of HAARP research in 2014, and donated the site equipment to the University of Alaska, Fairbanks (UAF), in the summer of 2015, who now operate the facility as an international observatory for radio plasma heating and subauroral physics. Since taking control of HAARP, UAF has carried out research campaigns in February 2017, and September 2017. The topics investigated in the campaigns included the physics of ionospheric irregularities (FAI), the stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE), generation of optical

  1. Contextual Influences and Campaign Awareness Among Young Adults: Evidence from the National truth® Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Donna M; Ilakkuvan, Vinu; Xiao, Haijun; Cantrell, Jennifer; Rath, Jessica; Hair, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Mass media campaigns have been found to shape the public's knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behavior around tobacco. This study examines the influence of contextual factors with respect to awareness of the national truth® campaign, a mass media, branded tobacco use prevention campaign, among a sample of young adults (n = 2,804) aged 24-34 years old; these respondents were within the age range for both the primary and secondary targets of the campaign during the period (2000-2007) when the campaign was airing television advertising at consistently high levels. Mulitvariable models reveal lower educational attainment and Hispanic ethnicity as significant contextual factors predictive of lower campaign awareness, controlling for media use. In contrast, gender, state tobacco control policy, sensation-seeking, current smoking status, and community-level SES variables were not significantly associated with campaign awareness. Further research is needed to identify the mechanisms through which public education campaigns operate, particularly among disadvantaged communities.

  2. Complete mucosal healing of distal lesions induced by twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam promoted clinical remission of mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with distal active inflammation: double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganuma, Makoto; Aoyama, Nobuo; Tada, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Kiyonori; Hirai, Fumihito; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Mamoru; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2018-04-01

    Budesonide foam is used for the topical treatment of distal ulcerative colitis. This phase III study was performed to confirm mucosal healing and other therapeutic effects of twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam in patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis including left-sided colitis and pancolitis. This was a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. A total of 126 patients with mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with active inflammation in the distal colon were randomized to two groups receiving twice-daily budesonide 2 mg/25 ml foam or placebo foam. The primary endpoint was the percentage of complete mucosal healing of distal lesions (endoscopic subscore of 0) at week 6. Some patients continued the treatment through week 12. Drug efficacy and safety were evaluated. The percentages of both complete mucosal healing of distal lesions and clinical remission were significantly improved in the budesonide as compared with the placebo group (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.0035). Subgroup analysis showed similar efficacy of budesonide foam for complete mucosal healing of distal lesions and clinical remission regardless of disease type. The clinical remission percentage tended to be higher in patients achieving complete mucosal healing of distal lesions than in other patients. There were no safety concerns with budesonide foam. This study confirmed for the first time complete mucosal healing with twice-daily budesonide 2-mg foam in mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis with distal active inflammation. The results also indicated that complete mucosal healing of distal lesions by budesonide foam promotes clinical remission of ulcerative colitis. Clinical trial registration no.: Japic CTI-142704.

  3. World campaign for the biosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worthington, E.B.

    1982-07-01

    Four aims are included in the Draft Declaration about the Champaign for The Biosphere; 1) education and allied activities, 2) scientific understanding, 3) practical activities, and 4) accommodation of humanity to The Biosphere. There is a strong case for application to practical affairs of what is already known. The campaign might focus initially on problems that illustrate changing attitudes which are the result of research and experience. Examples include the Green revolution in agriculture and, in engineering, the swing of changing attitudes to the primary and ancillary effects of large projects for hydro-power and irrigation. The need for conservation of natural resources by rational, ecologically wise use is stressed. Educational and medical programs for planned parenthood are already available. The problem will be to boost them to top priority in the countries that need them most. (JMT)

  4. Advanced Fuels Campaign Execution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Execution Plan is to communicate the structure and management of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. Included in this document is an overview of the FCRD program, a description of the difference between revolutionary and evolutionary approaches to nuclear fuel development, the meaning of science-based development of nuclear fuels, and the “Grand Challenge” for the AFC that would, if achieved, provide a transformational technology to the nuclear industry in the form of a high performance, high reliability nuclear fuel system. The activities that will be conducted by the AFC to achieve success towards this grand challenge are described and the goals and milestones over the next 20 to 40 year period of research and development are established.

  5. Advanced Fuels Campaign Execution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) Execution Plan is to communicate the structure and management of research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program. Included in this document is an overview of the FCRD program, a description of the difference between revolutionary and evolutionary approaches to nuclear fuel development, the meaning of science-based development of nuclear fuels, and the 'Grand Challenge' for the AFC that would, if achieved, provide a transformational technology to the nuclear industry in the form of a high performance, high reliability nuclear fuel system. The activities that will be conducted by the AFC to achieve success towards this grand challenge are described and the goals and milestones over the next 20 to 40 year period of research and development are established.

  6. Using a Media Campaign to Increase Engagement With a Mobile-Based Youth Smoking Cessation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Amy; Robinson, Cendrine; Taylor, Shani C; Post, Samantha D; Goldfarb, Jeffrey; Shi, Rui; Hunt, Yvonne M; Augustson, Erik M

    2018-06-01

    To describe the impact of the National Cancer Institute's promotion of its youth smoking cessation program, Smokefree Teen (SFT). We provide a description of campaign strategies and outcomes as a means to engage a teen audience in cessation resources using a cost-effective approach. The campaign occurred nationally, using traditional (TV and radio), online, and social media outreach. Ads targeted adolescent smokers (aged 14-17). The baseline population was 42 586 and increased to 464 357 during the campaign. Metrics used to assess outcomes include (1) visits to SFT website from traditional and online ads, (2) cost to get an online ad clicked (cost-per-click), and (3) SmokefreeTXT program enrollments during the 8-week campaign period. We conducted a quantitative performance review of all tactics. The SFT campaign achieved an online ad click-through rate of 0.33%, exceeding industry averages of 0.15%. Overall, web traffic to teen.smokefree.gov increased by 980%, and the online cost-per-click for ads, including social media actions, was approximately $1 as compared with $107 for traditional ads. Additionally, the campaign increased the SmokefreeTXT program teen sign-ups by 1334%. The campaign increased engagement with evidence-informed cessation resources for teen smokers. Results show the potential of using multiple, online channels to help increase engagement with core resources.

  7. A national mass media smoking cessation campaign: effects by race/ethnicity and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, Donna M; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Richardson, Amanda Kalaydjian; Patwardhan, Pallavi; Niaura, Raymond; Cullen, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a large-scale, national smoking cessation media campaign, the EX campaign, across racial/ethnic and educational subgroups. A longitudinal random-digit-dial panel study conducted prior to and 6 months following the national launch of the campaign. The sample was drawn from eight designated media markets in the United States. The baseline survey was conducted on 5616 current smokers, aged 18 to 49 years, and 4067 (73% follow-up response rate) were resurveyed at the 6-month follow-up. The primary independent variable is confirmed awareness of the campaign advertising, and the outcome variables are follow-up cessation-related cognitions index score and quit attempts. Multivariable logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted within racial/ethnic and educational strata to assess the strength of association between confirmed awareness of campaign advertising and cessation-related outcomes. Confirmed awareness of campaign advertising increased favorable cessation-related cognitions among Hispanics and quit attempts among non-Hispanic blacks, and increased favorable cessation-related cognitions and quit attempts among smokers with less than a high school education. These results suggest that the EX campaign may be effective in promoting cessation-related cognitions and behaviors among minority and disadvantaged smokers who experience a disproportionate burden of tobacco-related illness and mortality.

  8. Adapting the Get Yourself Tested Campaign to Reach Black and Latino Sexual-Minority Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbers, Samantha; Friedman, Allison; Martinez, Omar; Scheinmann, Roberta; Bermudez, Dayana; Silva, Manel; Silverman, Jen; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2016-09-01

    Culturally appropriate efforts are needed to increase sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing and care among Black and Latino sexual-minority youth, who are at high risk for STDs. Get Yourself Tested, a national testing campaign, has demonstrated success among youth, but it has yet to be assessed for relevance or impact among this population. This effort included (1) formative and materials-testing research through focus groups; (2) adaptation of existing Get Yourself Tested campaign materials to be more inclusive of Black and Latino sexual-minority youth; (3) a 3-month campaign in four venues of New York City, promoting STD testing at events and through mobile testing and online and social media platforms; (4) process evaluation of outreach activities; and (5) an outcome evaluation of testing at select campaign venues, using a preexperimental design. During the 3-month campaign period, the number of STD tests conducted at select campaign venues increased from a comparable 3-month baseline period. Although testing uptake through mobile vans remained low in absolute numbers, the van drew a high-prevalence sample, with positivity rates of 26.9% for chlamydia and 11.5% for gonorrhea. This article documents the process and lessons learned from adapting and implementing a local campaign for Black and Latino sexual-minority youth. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Influencing the Conversation About Masculinity and Suicide: Evaluation of the Man Up Multimedia Campaign Using Twitter Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kylie; Turnure, Jackie; Sukunesan, Suku; Phelps, Andrea; Pirkis, Jane

    2018-01-01

    . Strongest engagement was found with content related to help-seeking, masculinity, and expressing emotions. A number of followers tweeted personal stories that revealed overwhelmingly positive perceptions of the content of the documentary and strongly endorsed its messages. Conclusions The Man Up Twitter campaign triggered conversations about masculinity and suicide that otherwise may not have happened. For some, this may have been game-changing in terms of shifting attitudes toward expressing emotions and reaching out to others for help. The campaign was particularly effective in disseminating information and promoting conversations in real time, an advantage that it had over more traditional health promotion campaigns. This sort of approach could well be adapted to other areas of mental (and physical) health promotion campaigns to increase their reach and effectiveness. PMID:29449203

  10. Twitter Campaigns Around the Fifth IPCC Report: Campaign Spreading, Shared Hashtags, and Separate Communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmberg, K.; Hellsten, I.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we analyzed campaigning on Twitter around the publication of the fifth Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Working Group 1 report in September, 2013. In particular, we analyzed how participation in a specific campaign and use of hashtags connected to the campaign

  11. 11 CFR 106.3 - Allocation of expenses between campaign and non-campaign related travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Allocation of expenses between campaign and non-campaign related travel. 106.3 Section 106.3 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION GENERAL ALLOCATIONS OF CANDIDATE AND COMMITTEE ACTIVITIES § 106.3 Allocation of expenses between campaign and non...

  12. A campaign encouraging dental attendance among adolescents in Scotland: the barriers to behaviour change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craven, R C; Blinkhorn, A S; Schou, L

    1994-01-01

    Qualitative consumer research was used to develop a health promotion campaign for school pupils aged 15-17 years to encourage them to attend a dentist for examination. The campaign used a combination of conventional health education about the benefits of dental care together with incentives...... for attending. The emphasis throughout was to establish an association with young style and group norms of social attractiveness. This study was part of the evaluation of the campaign. The aim was to identify the characteristics of those who responded positively to the campaign and to identify barriers...... to behaviour change. Those who responded were mainly female, intended to stay on at school beyond the age of 16 years and were more likely to be frequent attenders. Apathy and a lack of felt need were the main barriers to responding. Easier access to care and targeting a younger age group might enhance...

  13. Development and pretest of key visual imagery in a campaign for the prevention of child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Émilie; Gagné, Marie-Hélène; Goulet, Julie

    2017-08-01

    This article discusses the development and pretesting of key visual imagery in a promotional campaign developed in Quebec, Canada. This campaign is the media-based component of a broader prevention strategy involving the use of the Triple P program (Sanders, 1999). The purpose was to pretest with parents the preliminary version of a poster that uses the campaign's key visual imagery prior to final production. In total, 26 parents from the regions of Quebec City and Montreal participated in four focus groups. Two general themes emerged from the focus groups: (i) emotions and reactions arising from the key visual imagery; and (ii) comprehension of the message being conveyed. Based on this information, recommendations were made to the marketing agency, which then modified the campaign's key visual imagery and proposed a final layout.

  14. "Consent is Good, Joyous, Sexy": A banner campaign to market consent to college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kristie A; Sorenson, Susan B; Joshi, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the recall of, reaction to, and understanding of a brief campus banner campaign promoting consent in sexual relationships, and determined whether campaign exposure was associated with subsequent engagement in activities related to sexual assault education, awareness, and prevention. A stratified random sample of 1,200 undergraduates was recruited during fall of 2010; 628 (52.3%) participated. To account for history and maturation, an experimental research design was employed with an online survey. Direct and indirect campaign exposure was associated with increased action. Students expressed primarily positive reactions to and appeared to understand the consent message. The campaign appealed to and was associated with increased activity among a wide range of students with one exception: a negative effect was observed for business students. Colorful banners with pithy, upbeat messages hold promise for engaging undergraduates in conversations and proactive activities related to sexual assault prevention.

  15. Lessons Learned During the Recent ɛ Aurigae Eclipse Observing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, R. E.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) The eighteen-month-long eclipse of the third-magnitude star, epsilon Aurigae, is forecast to end during May 2011, based on six eclipse events, in 2010, 1982, 1955, 1930, 1902, and 1874. In partnership with AAVSO, Hopkins Phoenix Observatory, and others, we have organized observing campaigns during the past several years in order to maximize data acquired during this rare event and to promote reporting and analysis of observations of all kinds. Hundreds of registered participants have signed up for alert notices and newsletters, and many dozens of observers have contributed photometry, spectra, and ideas to the ongoing effort - see websites: www.CitizenSky.org and www.hposoft.com/Campaign09.html. In this presentation, I will provide an update on the participation leading to extensive photometric results. Similarly, bright star spectroscopy has greatly benefited from small telescope plus spectrometer capabilities, now widely available, that complement traditional but less-frequent large telescope high dispersion work. Polarimetry provided key insights during the last eclipse, and we promoted the need for new data using this method. Finally, interferometry has come of age since the last eclipse, leading to the direct detection of the transiting dark disk causing the eclipse. Along with these traditional measurements, I will outline campaign-related efforts to promote Citizen Science opportunities among the public. Support for these efforts derives in part from AAVSO/NSF-Informal Science Education, NSF AAG grant 10-16678, and a bequest to the University of Denver Astronomy Program by alumnus William Herschel Womble, for which I am grateful.

  16. Lessons Learned During the Recent Epsilon Aurigae Eclipse Observing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stencel, Robert E.

    2011-05-01

    The 18 month long eclipse of the 3rd magnitude star, epsilon Aurigae, is forecast to end during May 2011, based on six eclipse events, in 2010, 1982, 1955, 1930, 1902 and 1874. In partnership with AAVSO, Hopkins Phoenix Observatory and others, we have organized observing campaigns during the past several years in order to maximize data acquired during this rare event and to promote reporting and analysis of observations of all kinds. Hundreds of registered participants have signed up for alert notices and newsletters, and many dozens of observers have contributed photometry, spectra and ideas to the ongoing effort - see websites: www.CitizenSky.org and www.hposoft.com/Campaign09.html . In this presentation, I will provide an update on the participation leading to extensive photometric results. Similarly, bright star spectroscopy has greatly benefited from small telescope plus spectrometer capabilities, now widely available, that complement traditional but less-frequent large telescope high dispersion work. Polarimetry provided key insights during the last eclipse, and we promoted the need for new data using this method. Finally, interferometry has come of age since the last eclipse, leading to the direct detection of the transiting dark disk causing the eclipse. Along with these traditional measurements, I will outline campaign-related efforts to promote Citizen Science opportunities among the public. Support for these efforts derives in part from AAVSO/NSF-Informal Science Education, NSF AAG grant 10-16678 and a bequest to the University of Denver Astronomy Program by alumnus William Herschel Womble, for which I am grateful.

  17. Teaching the Public Relations Campaigns Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Debra A.

    2001-01-01

    Argues for a Campaign Planning Course in the undergraduate public relations major. Discusses nine course objectives. Describes five phases of campaign planning and implementation, how the phase approach includes important course topics, and how it fulfills course objectives. Describes how student groups work with actual clients throughout the…

  18. Political Campaigns Get Personal with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    On Election Day in 2006, some students at the University of Texas at Austin were prodded by startlingly personal calls from Democratic Party supporters. As political campaigns look to corral young voters, those calls could be a harbinger of things to come in 2008: campaigns going after students through contact information that public colleges are…

  19. Politics and Radio in the 1924 Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, Dave

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the relation between radio broadcasting and politics in the 1924 presidential campaign, focusing on newspaper and magazine coverage. Notes radio's influence on candidate image, the aspect of censorship, and the use of radio during the campaign and after the election. (MM)

  20. Promoting breast screening in Glasgow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, L; Dobson, H; McGuire, F

    2000-03-01

    To establish whether there is a role for advertising in the promotion of the Breast Screening Programme and what the role of advertising might be. Four hundred and sixty questionnaires were completed by women attending their breast screening appointment. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from the static unit at Calder Street and the mobile unit in Govan. The advertising (budget 30,000 Pounds) campaign ran over an eight week period in the Govan, Paisley Road West and Cardonald areas of Glasgow. Media used included press advertising, The Glasgow Underground, adshells, bus advertising (interiors) and poster distribution via local outlets. Forty-two per cent of the sample were aware of the campaign. Ninety-seven per cent liked the campaign images. Eighty eight per cent felt that breast screening should be advertised more. Screening uptake increased in the areas covered by the advertising campaign. Govan -58%-71% and Ibrox (Paisley Road West and Cardonald) -59%-61%. Women were very supportive of the role of advertising for the Breast Screening Programme. In particular they found the campaign images and messages reassuring, supportive and credible. Their views suggest that the role of advertising should be: To raise awareness of the service To make women more conscious of the benefits of screening To change public perceptions of the screening process However, it is recognised that a fully integrated approach is required for the promotion of the service to account for the improvement in uptake, as advertising cannot be expected to work in isolation.

  1. Discourses of masculinity, femininity and sexuality in Uganda's Stand Proud, Get Circumcised campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudrum, Sarah; Oliffe, John L; Benoit, Cecilia

    2017-02-01

    This paper analyses discourses of masculinity, femininity and sexuality in Stand Proud, Get Circumcised, a public health campaign promoting circumcision as an HIV-prevention strategy in Uganda. The campaign includes posters highlighting the positive reactions of women to circumcised men, and is intended to support the national rollout of voluntary medical male circumcision. We offer a critical discourse analysis of representations of masculinity, femininity and sexuality in relation to HIV prevention. The campaign materials have a playful feel and, in contrast to ABC (Abstain, Be faithful, Use condoms) campaigns, acknowledge the potential for pre-marital and extra-marital sex. However, these posters exploit male anxieties about appearance and performance, drawing on hegemonic masculinity to promote circumcision as an idealised body aesthetic. Positioning women as the campaign's face reasserts a message that women are the custodians of family health and simultaneously perpetuates a norm of estrangement between men and their health. The wives' slogan, 'we have less chance of getting HIV', is misleading, because circumcision only directly prevents female-to-male HIV transmission. Reaffirming hegemonic notions of appearance- and performance-based heterosexual masculinity reproduces existing unsafe norms about masculinity, femininity and sexuality. In selling male circumcision, the posters fail to promote an overall HIV-prevention message.

  2. Energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis army installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AH McMakin; RE Lundgren; EL Malone

    2000-02-23

    In FY1999, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis Army Installation near Tacoma, Washington. Preliminary weather-corrected calculations show energy savings of 10{percent} from FY98 for energy use in family housing. This exceeded the project's goal of 3{percent}. The work was funded by the U.S. DOEs Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The project adapted FEMP's national ``You Have the Power Campaign'' at the local level, tailoring it to the military culture. The applied research project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tailored, research-based strategies to promote energy conservation in military family housing. In contrast to many energy efficiency efforts, the campaign focused entirely on actions residents could take in their own homes, as opposed to technology or housing upgrades. Behavioral change was targeted because residents do not pay their own utility bills; thus other motivations must drive personal energy conservation. This campaign augments ongoing energy savings from housing upgrades carried out by Fort Lewis. The campaign ran from September 1998 through August 1999. The campaign strategy was developed based on findings from previous research and on input from residents and officials at Fort Lewis. Energy use, corrected to account for weather differences, was compared with the previous year's use. Survey responses from 377 of Fort Lewis residents of occupied housing showed that the campaign was moderately effective in promoting behavior change. Of those who were aware of the campaign, almost all said they were now doing one or more energy-efficient things that they had not done before. Most people were motivated by the desire to do the right thing and to set a good example for their children. They were less motivated by other factors.

  3. Live and trending: the next step for public health campaigns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dheepa Jeyapalan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Marketing strategies used by large corporations are rapidly evolving, through the development of novel technologies and multiple marketing channels favoured by young consumers. Formerly small-scale marketing approaches, such as providing free samples at local events, may now have a global reach when paired with live streaming on popular social media sites. The regulation of these live streaming platforms is hugely challenging and likely to remain so in the foreseeable future. To ensure that ‘unhealthy’ messages are not the only content seen by social media users, public health campaigns should invest in similar technologies in disseminating health promoting messages.

  4. Testing the hierarchy of effects model: ParticipACTION's serial mass communication campaigns on physical activity in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, C L; Bauman, A; Reger-Nash, B

    2010-03-01

    The hierarchy of effects (HOE) model is often used in planning mass-reach communication campaigns to promote health, but has rarely been empirically tested. This paper examines Canada's 30 year ParticipACTION campaign to promote physical activity (PA). A cohort from the nationally representative 1981 Canada Fitness Survey was followed up in 1988 and 2002-2004. Modelling of these data tested whether the mechanisms of campaign effects followed the theoretical framework proposed in the HOE. Campaign awareness was measured in 1981. Outcome expectancy, attitudes, decision balance and future intention were asked in 1988. PA was assessed at all time points. Logistic regression was used to sequentially test mediating and moderating variables adjusting for age, sex and education. No selection bias was observed; however, relatively fewer respondents than non-respondents smoked or were underweight at baseline. Among those inactive at baseline, campaign awareness predicted outcome expectancy which in turn predicted positive attitude to PA. Positive attitudes predicted high decision balance, which predicted future intention. Future intention mediated the relationship between decision balance and sufficient activity. Among those sufficiently active at baseline, awareness was unrelated to outcome expectancy and inversely related to positive attitude. These results lend support to the HOE model, in that the effects of ParticipACTION's serial mass media campaigns were consistent with the sequential rollout of its messages, which in turn was associated with achieving an active lifestyle among those initially insufficiently active. This provides support to an often-used theoretical framework for designing health promotion media campaigns.

  5. The 2016 iodine pill distribution campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmestre, A.; Le Guen, B.

    2016-01-01

    The last iodine pills were distributed in february 2009, they are now outdated and a new campaign has been launched. Each family will receive a voucher to recover iodine pills from the nearby pharmacy. The aim of this new campaign is of course to protect people in case of severe nuclear accident but also to develop a radiation protection culture among the population. During the previous campaign only 51% of the concerned people went to the pharmacy to get the pills. The 2016 campaign will involve the public and all the establishments open to the public in a range of 10 km around each of the 19 nuclear power plants. It concerns 500 municipalities, 375.000 households, 55.000 enterprises and public utilities and 275 pharmacies are involved in the campaign. (A.C.)

  6. Teaching environmental physics with a field measurement campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, Johan; Dynefors, Bertil; Kuehlmann-Berenzon, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    With 15 years of experience of teaching environmental physics, we still need to develop our curriculum. In this paper we present our findings from teaching environmental physics in close association with mathematical statistics in an applied field measurement campaign. Here not only environmental physics is taught, but also the concept of experimental planning, design, implementation, and evaluation of a field measurement campaign. The field measurement gives the students the opportunity to follow the whole process starting from experimental planning, including formulating the questions to answer, through design of the experiment, sample collection, analysis, and evaluation, together with the writing of a final report. All possible aspects of the problem that the students are working on can be carefully investigated, but the emphasis has been on understanding the whole process of carrying out a field campaign. This holistic view gives the students more interest in and better motivation for exploring the subject. This course gave the students insight into the field of interdisciplinary environmental research, promoted their creativity, and also gave the teachers a feeling of satisfaction

  7. Clean Hands for Life: results of a large, multicentre, multifaceted, social marketing hand-hygiene campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, L A; Bryce, E A; Mediaa, A K

    2010-03-01

    A year-long multifaceted hand-hygiene campaign entitled Clean Hands for Life targeting individual, environmental and organisational factors that influence healthcare worker (HCW) hand-hygiene behaviour was implemented in 36 acute and long-term care facilities in Vancouver Coastal Health region. The campaign involved rotation of ten novel posters, two poster contests, and distribution of multiple promotional items. A social marketing approach was used to implement and monitor the effectiveness of the campaign. Evaluation included quality assurance surveys, staff surveys (baseline, mid- and post-campaign), and focus groups. A total of 141 poster contest submissions was received, 5452 staff surveys completed and 14 focus groups conducted. Overall knowledge of the importance of hand-hygiene and intention to clean hands was high at baseline. No significant differences were observed when mid- and post-campaign scores were compared to baseline. The majority (89.5%) of HCWs reported that they preferred soap and water over alcohol hand gel. A significant increase in the self-reported use of hand-hygiene products was observed particularly among HCWs not providing direct patient care. Barriers to hand-hygiene included inappropriate placement of sinks, traffic flow issues, inadequately stocked washrooms, workload and time constraints. Organisational support was visible throughout the campaign. The results showed that social marketing is an effective approach in engaging HCWs. Hand-hygiene campaigns that focus almost exclusively on increasing awareness among HCWs may not be as successful as multifaceted campaigns or campaigns that target identified barriers to hand-hygiene. Copyright 2009 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Campaigning on behalf of the party? Party constraints on candidate campaign personalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Troels; Pedersen, Helene Helboe

    2017-01-01

    This article analyses what makes political candidates run a party-focused or personalised election campaign. Prior work shows that candidates face incentives from voters and the media to personalise their campaign rhetoric and promises at the expense of party policy. This has raised concerns about...... that party control over the candidate nomination process and campaign financing constrains most political candidates in following electoral incentives for campaign personalisation. Using candidate survey data from the 2009 EP election campaign in 27 countries, we show how candidates from parties in which...... party officials exerted greater control over the nomination process and campaign finances were less likely to engage in personalised campaigning at the expense of the party programme. The findings imply that most parties, as central gatekeepers and resource suppliers, hold important control mechanisms...

  9. Health Communication and Social Marketing Campaigns for Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and Control: What Is the Evidence of their Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allison L; Kachur, Rachel E; Noar, Seth M; McFarlane, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Despite the ubiquity of sex in the media, a culture of silence surrounds sexual health in the United States, serving as a barrier to sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention, testing, and treatment. Campaigns can increase STD-related knowledge, communication, and protective behaviors. This review assesses the effectiveness of STD prevention and testing campaigns in the United States to inform the field on their use as a strategy for affecting behavior change. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify original research articles, published between 2000 and 2014, which report on US media campaigns promoting community- or population-level STD testing or prevention behaviors and are evaluated for impact on one or more behavioral outcomes. Titles and abstracts were independently reviewed by 2 researchers. The review yielded 26 articles representing 16 unique STD testing and/or prevention campaigns. Most campaigns were developed using formative research and social marketing or behavioral theory. Most campaigns (68.75%) used posttest-only or pretest-posttest designs without comparison groups for evaluation; only 5 campaigns used control groups, and these proved challenging (i.e., achieving necessary exposure and avoiding contamination). Nearly all campaigns found differences between exposed and unexposed individuals on one or more key behavioral outcomes. Several campaigns found dose-response relationships. Among evaluations with uncontaminated control groups whose campaigns achieved sufficient exposure, sustained campaign effects were observed among targeted populations. Current findings suggest that campaigns can impact targeted STD-related behaviors and add to the evidence that greater exposure is associated with greater behavior change.

  10. Happy trails: the effect of a media campaign on urban trail use in southern Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sheila; Bungum, Tim J; Meacham, Mindy; Coker, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Many Americans do not meet recommendations for physical activity (PA). Communities are building trail networks to encourage PA, but the relationship between trails and PA is not well understood. We monitored usage of urban trails (N = 10) in Las Vegas, NV, before and after a promotional marketing campaign (October 2011 and April 2012). The media campaign featured print, online, and radio ads, as well as billboards and signage on gas pumps. Data were collected with infrared monitors that were placed on the trails for periods of 7 days. We compared preintervention and postintervention usage rates. Mean usage increased (P trails, significant declines at 2 trails, and no change at 1 trail. Promotional campaigns may be an effective way to increase trail usage and encourage PA.

  11. Advertising Campaign Strategy Based on The Communication Objective: A Case Study at Tokobagus Advertising Campaigns (2011-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Oscario

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Article focused on advertising as one of the most important parts of marketing communication in one of the online shop, TokoBagus. Advertising communicated a message from a certain brand to the target audience through a particular medium. The aim of this research was making advertising with a powerful message, so it was able to become a captain of consciousness that could play an important role in economic and social systems of modern society. Because of its potential power, the creative advertising workers had a big responsibility in their hands. It was not only to explore the creativity visually or verbally to a creative worker, but also, they should understand the purpose of communication, the communication strategy, and the creative strategy. In this case, TokoBagus run this in making advertisement campaign to promote its brand. The method used in this research was the qualitative method and inductive model. Data were collected through an interview, literature, and visual data. Those collected data were analyzed using a qualitative-verificative strategy and case study method. The case study was Toko Bagus advertising campaign from the year 2011 to the year 2014 when finally its name changes into OLX. It finds that the advertisements only become beautiful works of art, but it does not solve the problem of the brand. Therefore, this research is important to document the communication strategy and the creative strategy of an advertising campaign so it can be a reference for a young designers or students. 

  12. Seeing Stars: A GLOBE at Night Campaign Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R. T.; Newhouse, M.

    2012-01-01

    The emphasis in the international citizen-science, star-hunting campaign, GLOBE at Night, is in bringing awareness to the public on issues of light pollution. Light pollution threatens not only observatory sites and our "right to starlight", but can affect energy consumption, wildlife and health. GLOBE at Night has successfully reached a few 100,000 citizen-scientists. What has done in the last year to contribute to its success? • To promote the campaign via popular social media, GLOBE at Night created Facebook and Twitter pages. • Videos have been created for 4 out of 8 Dark Skies Rangers activities. • Sky brightness measurements can be submitted in real time with smart phones or tablets using the new Web application at www.globeatnight.org/webapp/. The location, date and time register automatically. • As a proto-type, an adopt-a-street program had people in Tucson take measurements every mile for the length of the street. Grid measurements canvassed the town, allowing for comparisons of light levels over time. • The increase to 2 campaigns in 2011 re-enforces these studies. In 2012, the campaign will be offered 4 times for 10 days a month: January 14-23, February 12-21, March 13-22 and April 11-20. • A new Web application (www.globeatnight.org/mapapp/) allows for mapping GLOBE at Night data points within a specified distance around a city or area of choice. The resulting maps are bookmarkable and shareable. • NOAO and Arizona Game and Fish Department started a project with GLOBE at Night data and bat telemetry to examine a dark skies corridor in Tucson where endangered bats fly. While providing these updates to the GLOBE at Night program, the presentation will highlight the education and outreach value of the program's resources and outcomes, lessons learned, successes and pitfalls in communicating awareness with the public and attracting young people to study science.

  13. The replanting campaign has begun

    CERN Multimedia

    GS-SEM Group - General Infrastructure and Services Department

    2010-01-01

    The poplars on the border of CERN's Prévessin site were felled, according to plan, on Friday, 26 February. The work was essential as the trees were showing signs of serious ageing problems (broken and dead branches, weakened trunks and root systems, etc.) and needed to be felled to ensure the safety of drivers on the D35 The trees that have been cut will be transformed into renewable energy wood chips and used to heat local schools and crèches. They will be replaced by a hedge of hornbeams, a native fast-growing tree, which will be planted in the spring.     The felling operation was entrusted to the French national forestry authorities, with the support of the Bellegarde-Pays de Gex Agence Routière et Technique. It marks the start of a vast poplar-felling and replanting campaign, which will be extended to CERN's Meyrin site.  The work is part of CERN's general renovation and site planning scheme for the future.    

  14. Advanced fuels campaign 2013 accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hamelin, Doug [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This includes development of a state-of-the art Research and Development (R&D) infrastructure to support the use of “goal-oriented science-based approach.” In support of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program, AFC is responsible for developing advanced fuels technologies to support the various fuel cycle options defined in the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap, Report to Congress, April 2010. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY) 2013 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section.

  15. Evaluation of Kentucky's "Click It or Ticket" 2008 campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this report was to document the results of the "Click It or Ticket" 2008 campaign in Kentucky. The campaign involved a combination of earned media, paid media, and enforcement. : The evaluation of the campaign included documenting th...

  16. What do health-promoting schools promote?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2012-01-01

    -promotion interventions. Directly or indirectly the articles reiterate the idea that health promotion in schools needs to be linked with the core task of the school – education, and to the values inherent to education, such as inclusion, democracy, participation and influence, critical literacy and action competence......Purpose – The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research relating to the health-promoting schools initiative in Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The members of the Schools...... for Health in Europe Research Group were invited to submit their work addressing processes and outcomes in school health promotion to this special issue of Health Education. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education web site. Following the traditional double blind peer...

  17. Jumpin’ Jacks: Social Marketing Campaign Aimed to Increase Awareness of Healthful Behavior in South Dakota Fourth Grade Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan N. Olesen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of utilizing a collegiate mascot as a marketing tool for the promotion of fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity among 4th grade students. The program utilized service learning and formative research for the development of a social marketing campaign comprised of nutrition education and brand marketing. A pre-test/post-test design was used to measure fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity in participants in intervention and control schools. Awareness and understanding of the campaign was assessed post-intervention. There were no changes in fruit and vegetable intake or physical activity. However, 91% of the intervention students were able to correctly report understanding of the campaign messages, and approximately one-third of the participants were able to recall the campaign without any prompts. Results demonstrated how a social marketing campaign can utilize branding techniques to bring about awareness, which is an essential step in initiating behavior change.

  18. The making of a nation-wide campaign fighting the nursing caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanden-Stoelinga, van M.S.E.; Koelen, M.A.; Hielkema-de Meij, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    Although, in the Netherlands, the fight against tooth decay has been successful over the past decades, in 1994, the incidence of nursing caries made the Ivory Cross*, the Dutch National Association for the Promotion of Oral Hygiene, decide to develop and implement a campaign to address the

  19. How to Measure Consumer Awareness of Mass-Media Campaigns for Public Health Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetz-Schou, Mette

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of "consumer awareness" in health promotion campaigns is discussed. Seven effectiveness evaluations are reviewed. Problem areas, including interpretation of differently phrased awareness questions and response bias, are discussed. Recommendations for overcoming common problems are made, and an open discussion based on…

  20. How to Campaign and Win When the Union Is Against You.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Don

    1982-01-01

    Board members running for reelection against teacher union opposition should differentiate classroom teachers from the union, promote their board experience, research the issues, prepare early for the campaign, analyze the reasons for union opposition, anticipate psychological warfare, mount a positive defense, admit mistakes, and turn union…

  1. Campaign To Reduce Child Poverty. Progress Report [and] Policy Briefs 1-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico Advocates for Children & Families, Albuquerque.

    This document is comprised of a progress report and five policy briefs related to the New Mexico Advocates for Children and Families' Campaign To Reduce Child Poverty. This multi-year initiative educates the public and policymakers about child poverty and promotes public policy changes that would reduce poverty. The progress report presents…

  2. FDR's 'Four Freedoms' Campaign: The Rhetorical Contribution of Norman Rockwell's Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lester C.

    Rhetorical criticism focusing on Norman Rockwell's paintings of the "Four Freedoms" provides reasons for the paintings' effectiveness within the context of Franklin Roosevelt's campaign to educate Americans about participation in World War II. The epideictic icons in Rockwell's paintings promoted identifications that constitute the…

  3. A Rhetorical Approach to Non-Discursive Messages in Information Campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kathleen

    Public information campaigns serve a primary role in contemporary American society to promote more active citizen involvement. When the U.S. government seeks to influence its citizens, it can use mass media to help produce systematic social change, particularly visual communication derived from rhetoric. Rhetorical criticism includes…

  4. Marketing plan and campaign for Riosol Oy

    OpenAIRE

    Toivonen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to create an efficient marketing plan and a working marketing campaign for the case company. The aspects of the marketing plan and campaign were adjusted to fit the company size, field of business and aims of the case company. To get a better view on the aspects of the marketing plan and campaign, theoretical frameworks are inspected, such as marketing mix, company stages and SWOT-analysis. This thesis consists of theoretical framework as well as practical implem...

  5. AAU-DLR 2010 Indoor Measurement Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinböck, Gerhard; Pedersen, Troels; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    A measurement campaign, not part of the WHERE2 project, with the focus on indoor multilink and reverberant in-room channels was conducted by DLR and AAU. The measurement data is used from both parties within the WHERE2 project and can be shared upon request. The measurement campaign has two main...... Channels". For the measurement campaign the measurement platform for time-variant wireless channels from DLR was used. The high spatial resolution of the platform allows for combining several transmitter positions to a virtual array. Together with the circular receiver array, this enables a bi...

  6. Effects of "Find Thirty Every Day [R]": Cross-Sectional Findings from a Western Australian Population-Wide Mass Media Campaign, 2008-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Justine E.; Rosenberg, Michael; Bauman, Adrian E.; Bull, Fiona C.; Giles-Corti, Billie; Shilton, Trevor; Maitland, Clover; Barnes, Rosanne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Internationally, over the last four decades large-scale mass media campaigns have been delivered to promote physical activity and its associated health benefits. In 2002-2005, the first Western Australian statewide adult physical activity campaign "Find Thirty. It's Not a Big Exercise" was launched. In 2007, a new iteration…

  7. Peeling Lead Paint Turns into Poisonous Dust. Guess Where It Ends Up? A Media Campaign to Prevent Childhood Lead Poisoning in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Danielle; Tehranifar, Parisa; DeMartini, Diana P.; Faciano, Andrew; Nagin, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Successful public health media campaigns promote messages, increase awareness, engage the public, and encourage behavior change. Between 2004 and 2006, the Lead Poisoning Prevention Program of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene conducted a media campaign grounded in social learning theory and the social marketing model to…

  8. Evaluation of a brief anti-stigma campaign in Cambridge: do short-term campaigns work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderson Claire

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of the high costs of mass-media campaigns, it is important to understand whether it is possible for a media campaign to have significant population effects over a short period of time. This paper explores this question specifically in reference to stigma and discrimination against people with mental health problems using the Time to Change Cambridge anti-stigma campaign as an example. Methods 410 face-to-face interviews were performed pre, during and post campaign activity to assess campaign awareness and mental health-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Results Although campaign awareness was not sustained following campaign activity, significant and sustained shifts occurred for mental health-related knowledge items. Specifically, there was a 24% (p If a friend had a mental health problem, I know what advice to give them to get professional help, following the campaign. Additionally, for the statement: Medication can be an effective treatment for people with mental health problems, there was a 10% rise (p = 0.05 in the proportion of interviewees responding 'agree' or 'strongly agree' following the campaign. These changes, however, were not evident for attitudinal or behaviour related questions. Conclusions Although these results only reflect the impact of one small scale campaign, these preliminary findings suggest several considerations for mass-media campaign development and evaluation strategies such as: (1 Aiming to influence outcomes pertaining to knowledge in the short term; (2 Planning realistic and targeted outcomes over the short, medium and long term during sustained campaigns; and (3 Monitoring indirect campaign effects such as social discourse or other social networking/contact in the evaluation.

  9. Evaluation of a brief anti-stigma campaign in Cambridge: do short-term campaigns work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Lacko, Sara; London, Jillian; Little, Kirsty; Henderson, Claire; Thornicroft, Graham

    2010-06-14

    In view of the high costs of mass-media campaigns, it is important to understand whether it is possible for a media campaign to have significant population effects over a short period of time. This paper explores this question specifically in reference to stigma and discrimination against people with mental health problems using the Time to Change Cambridge anti-stigma campaign as an example. 410 face-to-face interviews were performed pre, during and post campaign activity to assess campaign awareness and mental health-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviours. Although campaign awareness was not sustained following campaign activity, significant and sustained shifts occurred for mental health-related knowledge items. Specifically, there was a 24% (p mental health problem, I know what advice to give them to get professional help, following the campaign. Additionally, for the statement: Medication can be an effective treatment for people with mental health problems, there was a 10% rise (p = 0.05) in the proportion of interviewees responding 'agree' or 'strongly agree' following the campaign. These changes, however, were not evident for attitudinal or behaviour related questions. Although these results only reflect the impact of one small scale campaign, these preliminary findings suggest several considerations for mass-media campaign development and evaluation strategies such as: (1) Aiming to influence outcomes pertaining to knowledge in the short term; (2) Planning realistic and targeted outcomes over the short, medium and long term during sustained campaigns; and (3) Monitoring indirect campaign effects such as social discourse or other social networking/contact in the evaluation.

  10. Exploring the role of communications in quality improvement: A case study of the 1000 Lives Campaign in NHS Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Andrew; Gray, Jonathon; Willson, Alan; Lines, Chris; McCannon, Joe; McHardy, Karina

    2015-03-01

    Effective communication is critical to successful large-scale change. Yet, in our experience, communications strategies are not formally incorporated into quality improvement (QI) frameworks. The 1000 Lives Campaign ('Campaign') was a large-scale national QI collaborative that aimed to save an additional 1000 lives and prevent 50 000 episodes of harm in Welsh health care over a 2-year period. We use the Campaign as a case study to describe the development, application, and impact of a communications strategy embedded in a large-scale QI initiative. A comprehensive communications strategy guided communications work during the Campaign. The main aims of the communications strategy were to engage the hearts and minds of frontline National Health Service (NHS) staff in the Campaign and promote their awareness and understanding of specific QI interventions and the wider patient safety agenda. We used qualitative and quantitative measures to monitor communications outputs and assess how the communications strategy influenced awareness and knowledge of frontline NHS staff. The communications strategy facilitated clear and consistent framing of Campaign messages and allowed dissemination of information related to the range of QI interventions. It reaffirmed the aim and value of the Campaign to frontline staff, thereby promoting sustained engagement with Campaign activities. The communications strategy also built the profile of the Campaign both internally with NHS organizations across Wales and externally with the media, and played a pivotal role in improving awareness and understanding of the patient safety agenda. Ultimately, outcomes from the communications strategy could not be separated from overall Campaign outcomes. Systematic and structured communications can support and enhance QI initiatives. From our experience, we developed a 'communications bundle' consisting of six core components. We recommend that communications bundles be incorporated into existing QI

  11. Does Digital Video Advertising Increase Population-Level Reach of Multimedia Campaigns? Evidence From the 2013 Tips From Former Smokers Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kevin C; Shafer, Paul R; Rodes, Robert; Kim, Annice; Hansen, Heather; Patel, Deesha; Coln, Caryn; Beistle, Diane

    2016-09-14

    Federal and state public health agencies in the United States are increasingly using digital advertising and social media to promote messages from broader multimedia campaigns. However, little evidence exists on population-level campaign awareness and relative cost efficiencies of digital advertising in the context of a comprehensive public health education campaign. Our objective was to compare the impact of increased doses of digital video and television advertising from the 2013 Tips From Former Smokers (Tips) campaign on overall campaign awareness at the population level. We also compared the relative cost efficiencies across these media platforms. We used data from a large national online survey of approximately 15,000 US smokers conducted in 2013 immediately after the conclusion of the 2013 Tips campaign. These data were used to compare the effects of variation in media dose of digital video and television advertising on population-level awareness of the Tips campaign. We implemented higher doses of digital video among selected media markets and randomly selected other markets to receive similar higher doses of television ads. Multivariate logistic regressions estimated the odds of overall campaign awareness via digital or television format as a function of higher-dose media in each market area. All statistical tests used the .05 threshold for statistical significance and the .10 level for marginal nonsignificance. We used adjusted advertising costs for the additional doses of digital and television advertising to compare the cost efficiencies of digital and television advertising on the basis of costs per percentage point of population awareness generated. Higher-dose digital video advertising was associated with 94% increased odds of awareness of any ad online relative to standard-dose markets (Pdigital advertising was associated with a marginally nonsignificant increase (46%) in overall campaign awareness regardless of media format (P=.09). Higher

  12. Does Digital Video Advertising Increase Population-Level Reach of Multimedia Campaigns? Evidence From the 2013 Tips From Former Smokers Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Paul R; Rodes, Robert; Kim, Annice; Hansen, Heather; Patel, Deesha; Coln, Caryn; Beistle, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Background Federal and state public health agencies in the United States are increasingly using digital advertising and social media to promote messages from broader multimedia campaigns. However, little evidence exists on population-level campaign awareness and relative cost efficiencies of digital advertising in the context of a comprehensive public health education campaign. Objective Our objective was to compare the impact of increased doses of digital video and television advertising from the 2013 Tips From Former Smokers (Tips) campaign on overall campaign awareness at the population level. We also compared the relative cost efficiencies across these media platforms. Methods We used data from a large national online survey of approximately 15,000 US smokers conducted in 2013 immediately after the conclusion of the 2013 Tips campaign. These data were used to compare the effects of variation in media dose of digital video and television advertising on population-level awareness of the Tips campaign. We implemented higher doses of digital video among selected media markets and randomly selected other markets to receive similar higher doses of television ads. Multivariate logistic regressions estimated the odds of overall campaign awareness via digital or television format as a function of higher-dose media in each market area. All statistical tests used the .05 threshold for statistical significance and the .10 level for marginal nonsignificance. We used adjusted advertising costs for the additional doses of digital and television advertising to compare the cost efficiencies of digital and television advertising on the basis of costs per percentage point of population awareness generated. Results Higher-dose digital video advertising was associated with 94% increased odds of awareness of any ad online relative to standard-dose markets (Pdigital advertising was associated with a marginally nonsignificant increase (46%) in overall campaign awareness regardless of

  13. Training community health students to develop community-requested social marketing campaigns: an innovative partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Billie J; Hawk, Carol Wetherill

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a sustained partnership between a university community health program and local and regional community health agencies. As a key component of the Health Communication and Social Marketing course, the partnership involves undergraduate community health students working for and with community agencies and community members to design social marketing campaigns based on community-identified health needs. The goals of the course are to (1) provide students with the opportunity to work within the community to apply their skills in program planning, evaluation, and communication and (2) provide community agencies with a tailored campaign that can be implemented in their communities. Throughout the 10-week quarter, teams of students follow the principles of community participation in planning a social marketing campaign. These include (1) audience segmentation and formative assessment with the intended audience to determine campaign content and strategies and (2) pretesting and revisions of campaign messages and materials based on community feedback. This partnership contributes to the promotion of health in the local community and it builds the skills and competencies of future health educators. It demonstrates a successful and sustainable combination of community-based participatory research and experiential learning. From 2005 to 2011, 35 campaigns have been developed, many which have been implemented.

  14. Avoiding a knowledge gap in a multiethnic statewide social marketing campaign: is cultural tailoring sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchthal, O Vanessa; Doff, Amy L; Hsu, Laura A; Silbanuz, Alice; Heinrich, Katie M; Maddock, Jay E

    2011-03-01

    In 2007, the State of Hawaii, Healthy Hawaii Initiative conducted a statewide social-marketing campaign promoting increased physical activity and nutrition. The campaign included substantial formative research to develop messages tailored for Hawaii's multiethnic Asian and Pacific Islander populations. The authors conducted a statewide random digital dialing telephone survey to assess the campaign's comparative reach among individuals with different ethnicities and different levels of education and income. This analysis suggests that the intervention was successful in reaching its target ethnic audiences. However, a knowledge gap related to the campaign appeared among individuals with incomes less than 130% of the poverty level and those with less than a high school education. These results varied significantly by message and the communication channel used. Recall of supermarket-based messages was significantly higher among individuals below 130% of the poverty level and those between 18 and 35 years of age, 2 groups that showed consistently lower recall of messages in other channels. Results suggest that cultural tailoring for ethnic audiences, although important, is insufficient for reaching low-income populations, and that broad-based social marketing campaigns should consider addressing socioeconomic status-related channel preferences in formative research and campaign design.

  15. Kick the habit: a social marketing campaign by Aboriginal communities in NSW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M A; Finlay, S; Lucas, K; Neal, N; Williams, R

    2014-01-01

    Tackling smoking is an integral component of efforts to improve health outcomes in Aboriginal communities. Social marketing is an effective strategy for promoting healthy attitudes and influencing behaviours; however, there is little evidence for its success in reducing smoking rates in Aboriginal communities. This paper outlines the development, implementation and evaluation of Kick the Habit Phase 2, an innovative tobacco control social marketing campaign in Aboriginal communities in New South Wales (NSW). The Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council worked with three Aboriginal communities and a creative agency to develop locally tailored, culturally relevant social marketing campaigns. Each community determined the target audience and main messages, and identified appropriate local champions and marketing tools. Mixed methods were used to evaluate the campaign, including surveys and interviews with community members and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service staff. Community survey participants demonstrated high recall of smoking cessation messages, particularly for messages and images specific to the Kick the Habit campaign. Staff participating in interviews reported an increased level of interest from community members in smoking cessation programs, as well as increased confidence and skills in developing further social marketing campaigns. Aboriginal community-driven social marketing campaigns in tobacco control can build capacity, are culturally relevant and lead to high rates of recall in Aboriginal communities.

  16. Evaluation of a Public Awareness Campaign to Prevent High School Dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babinski, Leslie M; Corra, Ashley J; Gifford, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-01

    Many advocacy organizations devote time and resources to increasing community awareness and educating the public in an effort to gain support for their issue. One such effort, the Dropout Prevention Campaign by America's Promise Alliance, aimed to increase the visibility of the high school dropout problem and mobilize the community to take action. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the framing of the Dropout Prevention Campaign in television news media. To evaluate this campaign, television news coverage about high school dropout in 12 U.S. communities (N = 982) was examined. A content analysis of news transcripts was conducted and coded to determine the definition of the problem, the reasons for dropout and the possible solutions. Findings indicated that the high school dropout problem was most often framed (30 % of news segments) in terms of the economic and societal implications for the community. Individual student factors as well as broader societal influences were frequently discussed as possible reasons for dropout. The most commonly mentioned solutions were school-based interventions. News segments that mentioned America's Promise Alliance were more likely to frame the issue as a crisis and to use statistics to illustrate that point. Solutions that were more likely to appear in America's Promise segments promoted community and cross-sector involvement, consistent with the messages promoted by the Dropout Prevention Campaign. The findings suggest that a media content analysis can be an effective framework for analyzing a prevention campaign.

  17. Reprint of "Persuasive appeals in road safety communication campaigns: Theoretical frameworks and practical implications from the analysis of a decade of road safety campaign materials".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Nurit

    2016-12-01

    Communication campaigns are employed as an important tool to promote road safety practices. Researchers maintain road safety communication campaigns are more effective when their persuasive appeals, which are central to their communicative strategy, are based on explicit theoretical frameworks. This study's main objectives were to develop a detailed categorization of persuasive appeals used in road safety communication campaigns that differentiate between appeals that appear to be similar but differ conceptually, and to indicate the advantages, limitations and ethical issues associated with each type, drawing on behavior change theories. Materials from over 300 campaigns were obtained from 41 countries, mainly using road safety organizations' websites. Drawing on the literature, five types of main approaches were identified, and the analysis yielded a more detailed categorizations of appeals within these general categories. The analysis points to advantages, limitations, ethical issues and challenges in using different types of appeals. The discussion summarizes challenges in designing persuasive-appeals for road safety communication campaigns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Persuasive appeals in road safety communication campaigns: Theoretical frameworks and practical implications from the analysis of a decade of road safety campaign materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttman, Nurit

    2015-11-01

    Communication campaigns are employed as an important tool to promote road safety practices. Researchers maintain road safety communication campaigns are more effective when their persuasive appeals, which are central to their communicative strategy, are based on explicit theoretical frameworks. This study's main objectives were to develop a detailed categorization of persuasive appeals used in road safety communication campaigns that differentiate between appeals that appear to be similar but differ conceptually, and to indicate the advantages, limitations and ethical issues associated with each type, drawing on behavior change theories. Materials from over 300 campaigns were obtained from 41 countries, mainly using road safety organizations' websites. Drawing on the literature, five types of main approaches were identified, and the analysis yielded a more detailed categorizations of appeals within these general categories. The analysis points to advantages, limitations, ethical issues and challenges in using different types of appeals. The discussion summarizes challenges in designing persuasive-appeals for road safety communication campaigns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Outreach Materials for the Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign offers outreach materials to help collision repair shops reduce toxic air exposure. Materials include a DVD, poster, training video, and materials in Spanish (materiales del outreach en español).

  20. Tragedy prompts depression awareness, suicide prevention campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, T

    1998-01-01

    The tragic suicide of Robert C. Goltz prompted associates at the integrated marketing and communications company he founded in Green Bay, Wis., to develop two multimedia campaigns, one focusing on depression awareness and the other on suicide prevention.

  1. Nuclear lobby group launches television ad campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear power is the green wave of the future, according to a television advertising campaign launched by Canada's nuclear industry and designed to help counter the anti-nuclear messages delivered by groups such as Green peace and Energy Probe

  2. Ecuador's Healthy Food Campaign: An Effectiveness Assessment ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This would trigger changes in food production, retail, and marketing. ... assess and document the actual and potential impact of the social marketing campaign. ... IDRC and the United Kingdom's Global AMR Innovation Fund—managed by the ...

  3. Brand experiences in engaging marketing campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Reisegg, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    This research examines the effects from engaging marketing campaigns on brand experiences and the potential outcome on affective commitment and loyalty. In doing this, it also test the validity of the brand experience scale in a new setting during a short term marketing campaign. The research was conducted as a natural experiment during a marketing event arranged by Litago. Data were collected from participants and a control group, and the survey was sent out through the online survey tool...

  4. Theoretical Approaches on Successful Email Marketing Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Budac

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to bring some clarifications on what could bring success to email marketingcampaigns. Responses are related to how sent emails can draw the attention of people (ie how theycan be observed, given that, users’ inboxes are invaded by messages of all kinds, how to measurethe results of a campaign and which are the best practices through which we can get higher returnsfrom email marketing campaigns.

  5. SEPARATIONS AND WASTE FORMS CAMPAIGN IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, John D.; Todd, Terry A.; Peterson, Mary E.

    2012-11-26

    This Separations and Waste Forms Campaign Implementation Plan provides summary level detail describing how the Campaign will achieve the objectives set-forth by the Fuel Cycle Reasearch and Development (FCRD) Program. This implementation plan will be maintained as a living document and will be updated as needed in response to changes or progress in separations and waste forms research and the FCRD Program priorities.

  6. Social media in advertising campaigns: examining the effects on perceived persuasive intent, campaign and brand responses

    OpenAIRE

    Voorveld, H.A.M.; van Noort, G.

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the increasing popularity of advertising on social media, and especially on social network sites (SNSs), the aim of this study is to give insight into the effectiveness of SNS advertising. The first experimental study compares consumer responses to advertising on SNSs and television (TV) and demonstrates that while TV campaigns are evaluated more positively, SNS campaigns result in more favourable cognitive responses. Moreover, the persuasive intent of SNS campaigns is less recogn...

  7. ‘Get Your Life Back’: process and impact evaluation of an asthma social marketing campaign targeting older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma in older adults is underdiagnosed and poorly self-managed. This population has little knowledge about the key symptoms, the prevalence among older adults, and the serious consequences of untreated asthma. The purpose of this study was to undertake a multifaceted evaluation of a social marketing campaign to increase asthma awareness among older adults in a regional Australian community. Methods A cohort of older adults in an intervention region (n = 316) and a control region (n = 394) were surveyed immediately prior to and following the social marketing campaign. Campaign awareness, message recall, materials recognition, and actions taken as a result of the campaign were assessed in both regions. Asthma knowledge and perceptions, experience of asthma symptoms, and general health were also assessed in both regions at baseline and follow-up. Analyses were conducted to explore the effects of the campaign in the intervention region, and to examine outcomes among different audience segments. Results The survey data showed that those in the target segments (Wheezers and Strugglers) had better message recall, and were more likely to report having taken action to control their respiratory symptoms. The campaign significantly increased the number of calls to an asthma information line from the target audience in the intervention community. Conclusions A theory-based social marketing campaign conducted over 3-months increased the asthma information seeking behaviours of older adults in the intervention community compared to the control community. Recommendations are outlined for future community health promotion campaigns targeting older adults. PMID:23947479

  8. 'Get Your Life Back': process and impact evaluation of an asthma social marketing campaign targeting older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Uwana; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don; Caputi, Peter

    2013-08-15

    Asthma in older adults is underdiagnosed and poorly self-managed. This population has little knowledge about the key symptoms, the prevalence among older adults, and the serious consequences of untreated asthma. The purpose of this study was to undertake a multifaceted evaluation of a social marketing campaign to increase asthma awareness among older adults in a regional Australian community. A cohort of older adults in an intervention region (n = 316) and a control region (n = 394) were surveyed immediately prior to and following the social marketing campaign. Campaign awareness, message recall, materials recognition, and actions taken as a result of the campaign were assessed in both regions. Asthma knowledge and perceptions, experience of asthma symptoms, and general health were also assessed in both regions at baseline and follow-up. Analyses were conducted to explore the effects of the campaign in the intervention region, and to examine outcomes among different audience segments. The survey data showed that those in the target segments (Wheezers and Strugglers) had better message recall, and were more likely to report having taken action to control their respiratory symptoms. The campaign significantly increased the number of calls to an asthma information line from the target audience in the intervention community. A theory-based social marketing campaign conducted over 3-months increased the asthma information seeking behaviours of older adults in the intervention community compared to the control community. Recommendations are outlined for future community health promotion campaigns targeting older adults.

  9. Florida's "truth" campaign: a counter-marketing, anti-tobacco media campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, D; Hopkins, R S; Sly, D F; Urich, J; Kershaw, J M; Solari, S

    2000-05-01

    The "truth" campaign was created to change youth attitudes about tobacco and to reduce teen tobacco use throughout Florida by using youth-driven advertising, public relations, and advocacy. Results of the campaign include a 92 percent brand awareness rate among teens, a 15 percent rise in teens who agree with key attitudinal statements about smoking, a 19.4 percent decline in smoking among middle school students, and a 8.0 percent decline among high school students. States committed to results-oriented youth anti-tobacco campaigns should look to Florida's "truth" campaign as a model that effectively places youth at the helm of anti-tobacco efforts.

  10. Pakistan embarks on new campaign to reduce fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    There was both international and domestic significance in a plea for population stabilization issued by Pakistan's Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif in his address at the recent Earth Summit conference in Rio de Janeiro. Speaking as both a national leader and chairman of the Group of 77, a coalition of developing countries, Sharif said that to eradicate the abject poverty under which more than a billion people in the world live today "developing countries must assume their full responsibility in limiting population growth to manageable levels." Those words may seem odd coming from the leader of a country that has been indifferent about population problems for the past 2 decades. Until Prime Minister Sharif made a public commitment to a population program last July, the last leader of Pakistan to take such action was the late President Ayub Khan in 1969. With an annual 3.1% growth rate, Pakistan's population of 122 million is projected to double in only 23 years. The average Pakistani woman has 6.1 children in her reproductive lifetime. Reduction of population growth was an issue in the October 1990 election campaign. After his Islamic Democratic Alliance won, the government named Syeda Abida Hussain, a prominent and popular politician, to the cabinet post of Minister of Family Welfare. Hussain, who is now Pakistan's Ambassador to the US, recalls that many experts felt that starting a population program would be "an impossible undertaking, "that" attitudes were not conducive to family planning and government would never support it." In a speech on World Population Day in Rio, organized by the Population Institute, she said she soon found that "the problems were managerial, not attitudinal." She maintained that the relatively low acceptance of contraception among the people of Pakistan, Bangladesh and India is not because of religion or ideology "but because they are too poor to have access to birth control." Shortly after Hussain was names Minister of Family Welfare, she

  11. Double inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-04-01

    The Zel'dovich spectrum of adiabatic density perturbations is a generic prediction of inflation. There is increasing evidence that when the spectrum is normalized by observational data on small scales, there is not enough power on large scales to account for the observed large-scale structure in the Universe. Decoupling the spectrum on large and small scales could solve this problem. As a means of decoupling the large and small scales we propose double inflation (i.e., two episodes of inflation). In this scenario the spectrum on large scales is determined by the first episode of inflation and those on small scales by a second episode of inflation. We present three models for such a scenario. By nearly saturating the large angular-scale cosmic microwave anisotropy bound, we can easily account for the observed large-scale structure. We take the perturbations on small scales to be very large, deltarho/rho approx. = 0.1 to 0.01, which results in the production of primordial black holes (PBHs), early formation of structure, reionization of the Universe, and a rich array of astrophysical events. The Ω-problem is also addressed by our scenario. Allowing the density perturbations produced by the second episode of inflation to be large also lessens the fine-tuning required in the scalar potential and makes reheating much easier. We briefly speculate on the possibility that the second episode of inflation proceeds through the nucleation of bubbles, which today manifest themselves as empty bubbles whose surfaces are covered with galaxies. 37 refs., 1 fig

  12. Vaccination campaigns against poliomyelitis in Spain in 1963

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez Sánchez, Juan Antonio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Two anti-poliomyelitic vaccination campaigns coexisted in 1963: the Salk vaccine used by the Compulsory Health Insurance and the pilot experience with the oral Sabin vaccine promoted by the Health General Office. This simultaneity of campaigns was due to the interest that both bodies had to control the Preventive Medicine in Spain. The Compulsory Sickness Insurance used the antipolio vaccine to promote itself socially in a time when the Basic Law on Social Security was being developed. Under these circumstances, the Health General Office allegedly brought forward its vaccine campaign by using a test of an innovative oral trivalent vaccine in the province of León, something which was hidden to the public. The Health General Office’s claim of competence in prevention and the need of a massive response to a voluntary vaccine led to a singular advertising campaign with old messages in innovative means of communication.

    En 1963 coexistieron en el tiempo dos campañas de vacunación antipoliomielítica: la llevada a cabo con vacuna Salk por el Seguro Obligatorio de Enfermedad y la experiencia piloto con vacuna oral Sabin que promovió la Dirección General de Sanidad. La simultaneidad obedecía a la pugna entre ambos organismos por controlar la Medicina Preventiva en España. El Seguro Obligatorio de Enfermedad utilizó la vacunación antipolio para promocionarse socialmente en unos momentos de gestación de la Ley de Bases de la Seguridad Social. En estas circunstancias, la Dirección General de Sanidad debió anticipar su campaña de vacunación mediante un ensayo de una novedosa vacuna trivalente oral en la provincia de León, aspectos que fueron ocultados a la población. La reivindicación de su competencia en la prevención y la necesidad de una respuesta masiva ante una vacunación voluntaria originaron una singular campaña publicitaria de añejos mensajes pero en novedosos medios de comunicación.

  13. Double Outlet Right Ventricle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Ventricle Menu Topics Topics FAQs Double Outlet Right Ventricle Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital heart disease. En español Double outlet right ventricle (DORV) is a rare form of congenital ...

  14. Let's talk sex on the air: ReachOut launches radio campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article reports on the launching of the National Radio and Public Relations Campaign to Promote Modern Methods of Contraception by the ReachOut AIDS Foundation Incorporated in the Philippines. ReachOut has tapped radio veteran Tiya Dely Magpayo as the official campaign spokesperson, thus, putting a mother's touch to a serious promotional drive to reach the far-flung areas of the country. It is noted that the project promotes the wider use of modern methods of contraception as its contribution to the Philippines Population Program goals of controlling the population rate. Since radio is the most patronized media in the country, ReachOut hopes that the radio soap opera format will attract the listeners to use contraceptives. The campaign encourages men and women of reproductive age to seek information and services regarding modern methods of contraception from health service providers in their respective areas. The Department of Health will provide the technical support to ensure that the campaign is keeping with the government's programs.

  15. 29 CFR 452.79 - Opportunity to campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Opportunity to campaign. 452.79 Section 452.79 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Campaign Safeguards § 452.79 Opportunity to campaign. There must be a reasonable... prior to the election so that he was denied an equal opportunity to campaign. Similarly, in a mail...

  16. 11 CFR 9002.11 - Qualified campaign expense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified campaign expense. 9002.11 Section 9002.11 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: GENERAL ELECTION FINANCING DEFINITIONS § 9002.11 Qualified campaign expense. (a) Qualified campaign expense means...

  17. 5 CFR 950.701 - DoD overseas campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DoD overseas campaign. 950.701 Section... VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS DoD Overseas Campaign § 950.701 DoD overseas campaign. (a) A Combined Federal Campaign is authorized for all Department of Defense (DoD) activities in the overseas areas during a 6-week...

  18. 26 CFR 701.9006-1 - Presidential Election Campaign Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presidential Election Campaign Fund. 701.9006-1...) INTERNAL REVENUE PRACTICE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND § 701.9006-1 Presidential Election Campaign Fund. (a) Transfer of amounts to the Presidential Election Campaign Fund. The Secretary shall determine...

  19. 11 CFR 9032.9 - Qualified campaign expense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Qualified campaign expense. 9032.9 Section 9032.9 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY MATCHING FUND DEFINITIONS § 9032.9 Qualified campaign expense. (a) Qualified campaign expense...

  20. Campaign contributions and the desirability of full disclosure laws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a signaling game model of costly political campaigning in which a candidate is dependent on a donor for campaign funds it is verified whether the electorate may benefit from campaign contributions being directly observed. By purely focusing on the informational role of campaign contributions the

  1. 29 CFR 452.67 - Distribution of campaign literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distribution of campaign literature. 452.67 Section 452.67... AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Campaign Safeguards § 452.67 Distribution of campaign literature. The Act... distribute his campaign literature to the membership at his expense. When the organization or its officers...

  2. What makes or breaks a health fundraising campaign on twitter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prasetyo, N.D.; Hauff, C.; Nguyen, D.; Broek, T.A. van den; Hiemstra, D.

    2015-01-01

    Health campaigns that aim to raise awareness and subsequently raise funds for research and treatment are commonplace. While many local campaigns exist, very few attract the attention of a global audience. One of those global campaigns is Movember, an annual campaign during the month of November,

  3. The construction of the Øresund link between Denmark and Sweden: the effect of a multi-faceted safety campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kines, Peter; Spangenberg, S.; Mikkelsen, K.L.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a safety campaign implemented midway during the construction of the railway and road link across the Sound, Oresund, between Denmark and Sweden. The safety campaign was multi-faceted and aimed both at promoting positive attitudes...... of type of work before and after the campaign was taken into account. The modest effect of the safety campaign might be explained by the fact that the site, like any construction site, was a temporary workplace, where several contractors' had short-term project assignments. Apparently, the contractors...... working routines were not sufficiently affected by the safety campaign. Other factors, that might affect a safety campaign at a construction site, are discussed. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. A multi-media strategy for a breastfeeding campaign in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, S

    1981-03-01

    The breast feeding campaign in Colombia is particularly aimed at pregnant and feeding mothers in both urban and rural areas. The objectives are to: 1) encourage breast feeding; 2) lengthen the period of breast feeding; 3) delay the introduction of other foods, and 4) discourage the use of bottle feeding. The pregnant and feeding mothers were reached through doctors, nurses, nutritionists and educational agents. Seminars were organized to train health sector personnel. Curricula of university courses were revised. Printed materials such as handbooks, flipcharts and promotional posters were used. Games such as "Breastfeeding Ladder" were played in health centers. The use of mass media (radio, television, and films) was found to be the most effective method. Promotional advertising was aired on TV and radio. Films were used in 2 ways: short 10-minute films were produced and slide projection was introduced preceding the main feature film. The slide shows informed the mothers of the advantages of breast feeding. Some legal reforms were also made as part of the campaign: the Ministry of Health passed a resolution encouraging breast feeding in all its medical centers; the use of milk substitutes was prohibited; and promotion and packaging of milk substitutes were regulated by a decree. The success of this campaign can be measured by the increase in requests for advice on breast feeding in medical centers; the organizing in hospitals of specific programs for the promotion of breast feeding, and the move by advertising agencies to start promoting simultaneously their products and maternal milk.

  5. Next doubling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J D

    1998-01-01

    In 1971, Bangladesh and Pakistan each had a population of about 66 million and a 3% annual growth rate. Bangladesh embarked on a family planning (FP) program, and its current population is about 120 million versus 140 million in Pakistan. While all of the expected worldwide population increase (from 5.9 to 9.4 billion by 2050) will occur in developing countries, the effect will be felt worldwide. Already, 100 countries rely on grain imports, 1.3 billion people survive on US$1/day or less, and water demands are exacerbating international tensions. Creating appropriate population policies requires understanding that population growth is caused by 1) unmet need for FP, 2) a desire for large families, and 3) population momentum. While the percentage of couples using FP has increased dramatically, the absolute number of women not using FP has increased because of obstacles in accessibility. Accessibility can be improved by taking services to isolated women, reducing prices, and conducting research to increase contraceptive options. Small family norms can be encouraged by reducing child mortality, improving the economic status of women, and improving education. To control population momentum, it will be vital to delay births by postponing marriage age and promoting use of temporary contraceptives. Population spending by developing countries is on track with agreements made at the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, but developed countries are failing to meet their commitments. Resources must be committed to stave off the socioeconomic and ecological problems of overpopulation.

  6. Cultivating Campaign Managers: A Discussion Regarding the Creation and Implementation of a Campaign Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Amber R.

    2018-01-01

    When approached about working with colleagues to develop a new course revolving around the inner-workings of a political campaign, one thing was obvious to me: We had to give the course the unique element of making it as closely mimic real-world campaign activities as possible. If we were going to attempt to actually prepare students for work on a…

  7. Amateur astronomers in support of observing campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P.

    2014-07-01

    The Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy (PACA) project evolved from the observational campaign of C/2012 S1 or C/ISON. The success of the paradigm shift in scientific research is now implemented in other comet observing campaigns. While PACA identifies a consistent collaborative approach to pro-am collaborations, given the volume of data generated for each campaign, new ways of rapid data analysis, mining access, and storage are needed. Several interesting results emerged from the synergistic inclusion of both social media and amateur astronomers: - the establishment of a network of astronomers and related professionals that can be galvanized into action on short notice to support observing campaigns; - assist in various science investigations pertinent to the campaign; - provide an alert-sounding mechanism should the need arise; - immediate outreach and dissemination of results via our media/blogger members; - provide a forum for discussions between the imagers and modelers to help strategize the observing campaign for maximum benefit. In 2014, two new comet observing campaigns involving pro-am collaborations have been identified: (1) C/2013 A1 (C/Siding Spring) and (2) 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG). The evolving need for individual customized observing campaigns has been incorporated into the evolution of PACA (Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy) portal that currently is focused on comets: from supporting observing campaigns for current comets, legacy data, historical comets; interconnected with social media and a set of shareable documents addressing observational strategies; consistent standards for data; data access, use, and storage, to align with the needs of professional observers. The integration of science, observations by professional and amateur astronomers, and various social media provides a dynamic and evolving collaborative partnership between professional and amateur astronomers. The recent observation of comet 67P, at a magnitude of 21.2, from Siding

  8. Double hard scattering without double counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Gaunt, Jonathan R. [VU Univ. Amsterdam (Netherlands). NIKHEF Theory Group; Schoenwald, Kay [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Double parton scattering in proton-proton collisions includes kinematic regions in which two partons inside a proton originate from the perturbative splitting of a single parton. This leads to a double counting problem between single and double hard scattering. We present a solution to this problem, which allows for the definition of double parton distributions as operator matrix elements in a proton, and which can be used at higher orders in perturbation theory. We show how the evaluation of double hard scattering in this framework can provide a rough estimate for the size of the higher-order contributions to single hard scattering that are affected by double counting. In a numeric study, we identify situations in which these higher-order contributions must be explicitly calculated and included if one wants to attain an accuracy at which double hard scattering becomes relevant, and other situations where such contributions may be neglected.

  9. Double hard scattering without double counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diehl, Markus; Gaunt, Jonathan R.

    2017-02-01

    Double parton scattering in proton-proton collisions includes kinematic regions in which two partons inside a proton originate from the perturbative splitting of a single parton. This leads to a double counting problem between single and double hard scattering. We present a solution to this problem, which allows for the definition of double parton distributions as operator matrix elements in a proton, and which can be used at higher orders in perturbation theory. We show how the evaluation of double hard scattering in this framework can provide a rough estimate for the size of the higher-order contributions to single hard scattering that are affected by double counting. In a numeric study, we identify situations in which these higher-order contributions must be explicitly calculated and included if one wants to attain an accuracy at which double hard scattering becomes relevant, and other situations where such contributions may be neglected.

  10. Remembering the 100,000 lives campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Earlier this week the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI emailed its weekly bulletin celebrating that it has been ten years since the end of the 100,000 Lives Campaign (Appendix 1. This was the campaign, according to the bulletin, that put IHI on the map. The Campaign started at the IHI National Forum in December 2004, when IHI's president, Don Berwick, announced that IHI would work together with nearly three-quarters of the US hospitals to reduce needless deaths by 100,000 over 18 months. A phrase borrowed from political campaigns became IHI's cri de coeur: “Some is not a number. Soon is not a time.” The Campaign relied on six key interventions: Rapid Response Teams; Improved Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction; Medication Reconciliation; Preventing Central Line Infections; Preventing Surgical Site Infections; Preventing Ventilator-Associated Pnemonia [sic]. According to the bulletin, the Campaign’s impact rippled across the organization and the world. IHI listed some ...

  11. Governmentality in health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling; Land, Birgit; Pedersen, Kirsten Bransholm

    Objectives: Issues of governance in health promotion during the last 3-4 decades has increasingly been seen as characterized by health interventions and campaigns aimed at influencing the citizens to exhibit a certain desired behavior, that is an orientation towards generating self...... is not sufficient to ensure healthy behaviour. Such measures are used in the public as well as the private sector. In this paper we will give a number of examples of this development and a preliminary analysis of the social framework for its emergence. Methods: The paper will present a theoretical discussion...... was conducted as a case oriented search in relevant media and available documents illustrating the tendency towards using coercive measures to promote healthy behaviour. This was followed up through semi-structured interviews with actors from public authorities, organizations and companies with experience...

  12. VERB - a social marketing campaign to increase physical activity among youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Faye; Huhman, Marian; Heitzler, Carrie; Asbury, Lori; Bretthauer-Mueller, Rosemary; McCarthy, Susan; Londe, Paula

    2004-07-01

    The VERB campaign is a multiethnic media campaign with a goal to increase and maintain physical activity among tweens, or children aged nine to 13 years. Parents, especially mothers aged 29 to 46, and other sources of influence on tweens (e.g., teachers, youth program leaders) are the secondary audiences of the VERB initiative. VERB applies sophisticated commercial marketing techniques to address the public health problem of sedentary lifestyles of American children, using the social marketing principles of product, price, place, and promotion. In this paper, we describe how these four principles were applied to formulate the strategies and tactics of the VERB campaign, and we provide examples of the multimedia materials (e.g., posters, print advertising, television, radio spots) that were created.

  13. 'Heat Market Campaign' of the German coal mining industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dach, G.

    1983-12-22

    The ''Heat Market Campaign'', presented in June '83 by experts of all fields of coal mining, investigates the possibilities of coal sales promotion. The article reviews the main data of the heat market and discusses the ''Heat Market Campaign'' under the aspects of coal policy and energy policy. The campaign was started with the objectives of energy supply assurance in the Federal Republic of Germany, energy cost reduction on the consumer side, and stabilisation and development of coal markets not affected by the steel crisis. Sales goald on the household, trade and industrial sector are quantified, and obstacles preventing further expansion of the heat market are discussed. Apart from the mining industry's marketing concept for the heat market, there is also the possibility of receiving financial aid by the Federal government.

  14. Lessons for public health campaigns from analysing commercial food marketing success factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; JA Perez-Cueto, Federico; Niedzwiedzka, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background: Commercial food marketing has considerably shaped consumer food choice behaviour. Meanwhile, public health campaigns for healthier eating have had limited impact to date. Social marketing suggests that successful commercial food marketing campaigns can provide useful lessons for public...... sector activities. The aim of the present study was to empirically identify food marketing success factors that, using the social marketing approach, could help improve public health campaigns to promote healthy eating. Methods: In this case-study analysis, 27 recent and successful commercial food...... in the communication related to the food. Visual as well as written material was gathered, complemented by semi-structured interviews with 12 food market trend experts and 19 representatives of food companies and advertising agencies. Success factors were identified by a group of experts who reached consensus through...

  15. Immunization campaigns and political agendas: retrospective from Ecuador and El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloyd, Stephen; Suarez Torres, Jose; Mercer, Mary Anne

    2003-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s international donors have promoted vertical, campaign-based strategies to help improve immunization coverage in poor countries. National immunization days (NIDs) are currently in vogue and are prominent in the worldwide polio eradication efforts. In spite of their widespread use, campaigns that include NIDs have not been well evaluated for their effects on coverage, reduction in vaccine-preventable diseases, or effects on the health system. An assessment of the results of two such campaigns implemented in Ecuador and El Salvador shows limited impact on short-term coverage and questionable effects on long-term coverage and disease incidence. Although NIDs may have substantial short-term political benefits, the vertical approach can undermine provision of routine services by ministries of health and may be counterproductive in the long-term.

  16. Exploring Affordances of Facebook as a Social Media Platform in Political Campaigning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Dyrby, Signe

    2013-01-01

    In recent years we have witnessed political parties adopting social media as part of their election campaign strategy to encourage citizen participation and involvement. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what Facebook as a social media platform is perceived to afford political parties...... in their campaign strategy and how these intentions are reflected in the actual actions during the campaign. Based on a case study of political parties’ use of Facebook in the Danish general election in 2011, our findings reveal that the medium is perceived to afford: 1) facilitation of direct communication...... to promote political interests and enable dialogue, 2) projection of an image of authenticity through informal media and 3) creating interaction and involvement through dynamic relationships with supporters. A closer look at the parties’ actual use of Facebook shows that the majority of the intended...

  17. Participatory and social media to engage youth: from the Obama campaign to public health practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jordi; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Springgate, Benjamin F

    2011-01-01

    Barack Obama's successful campaign for the presidency has been widely attributed to the use of social networking sites, mobile devices, and interactive websites to engage previously hard-to-reach populations in political activity. Campaign communication strategies may be applicable for youth health promotion efforts, particularly for the highly stigmatized issue of mental health. In this article, we examine elements of the 2008 Obama presidential campaign's use of social media technologies and content designed to foster effective political participation among youth. We outline how the same social media technologies may be applied to public health efforts focused on reaching and providing services to the 20% of young people who have a diagnosable mental disorder. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the application of these media to date, and raise questions about the future use of these media for engaging hard-to-reach populations in addressing stigmatized public health issues.

  18. Qualitative evaluation of the Saleema campaign to eliminate female genital mutilation and cutting in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrea C; Douglas Evans, W; Barrett, Nicole; Badri, Howida; Abdalla, Tamador; Donahue, Cody

    2018-02-17

    Female genital mutilation and cutting (FGM/C, herein FGM) is a widespread and harmful practice. The Government developed a national campaign in Sudan, called Saleema, to change social norms discouraging FGM. Saleema translates to being "whole", healthy in body and mind, unharmed, intact, pristine, and untouched, in a God-given condition. An interim evaluation was conducted using focus groups among Sudanese adults. The primary aim was to explore perceptions of the Saleema poster exemplars and to assess if the desired themes were being communicated. Secondary aims were to understand more about participants' information sources, values, and suggestions for the campaign broadly. The Saleema campaign evaluation included four focus groups from each of the 18 states in Sudan (72 total). Participants were presented with three poster stimuli from the Saleema campaign and asked about the content and their reactions. Themes were coded inductively by concepts that arose through content in the transcripts. Codes were also reviewed in conjunction with themes from the broader Saleema evaluation framework. Participants reported the most common source of information or admiration was from local leaders who are responsive to a community, media-based outlets, and discussions among community members. Participants held high value for education, community solidarity, and/or religious devotion. Participants had positive opinions of Saleema and responded positively to the branding elements in the posters and the campaign as a whole. The most common suggestion was continued awareness. Advocacy, training, and posters were suggested to highlight the harms of FGM through leaders or in community settings. Individuals suggested that these activities target older women and individuals in rural villages. There was also a burgeoning theme of targeting youth for support of the campaign. The results of this focus group analysis demonstrate support for future Saleema campaign efforts promoting

  19. RESULTS of the "ELIMINATING NOISE" campaign

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    From 4 to 6 August, CERN’s nurses conducted a screening campaign entitled "Eliminating noise". This campaign was especially aimed at young people exposed to noise during their leisure hours (playing in a band, listening to MP3 players, attending concerts, etc.). In all, 166 people attended the Infirmary, where they were able to receive personalised advice, documentation and, above all, a hearing test (audiogram). While the high attendance of people in the younger age category (18-30) was a success, their audiogram data were a cause for concern, with 24.5% showing abnormal results, hearing deficiencies which, we should remind you, are irreversible. It should be noted that such conditions are almost exclusively caused by noise exposure in a non-professional environment (leisure activities, music, etc.). This latest campaign confirms the harmful effects of noise on people’s hearing due to the absence or insufficiency of protective equipment during music-related activities; this further unde...

  20. RESULTS of the "ELIMINATING NOISE" campaign

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    From 4 to 6 August, CERN’s nurses conducted a screening campaign entitled "Eliminating noise". This campaign was especially aimed at young people exposed to noise during their leisure hours (playing in a band, listening to MP3 players, attending concerts, etc.). In all, 166 people attended the infirmary, where they were able to receive personalised advice, documentation and, above all, a hearing test (audiogram). While the high attendance of people in the younger age category (18-30) was a success, their audiogram data were a cause for concern, with 24.5% showing abnormal results, hearing deficiencies which, we should remind you, are irreversible. It should be noted that such conditions are almost exclusively caused by noise exposure in a non-professional environment (leisure activities, music, etc.). This latest campaign confirms the harmful effects of noise on people’s hearing due to the absence or insufficiency of protective equipment during music-related activities; this further unde...

  1. Road safety campaign is a great success

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Rolf Heuer, the next Director-General of CERN, and Sigurd Lettow, the Director of Finance and Human Resources (photo below), completed all the tests of the CERN road safety campaign under the supervision of TCS instructors. The road safety campaign, which took place in the Main Building during the week of 10 November, attracted large numbers of participants. More than 300 CERN personnel and users took part in, and in some cases were literally bowled over by, the activities set up by instructors from the TCS (Touring Club Suisse). The campaign’s aim was to raise driver awareness of several aspects of road safety, including speed, use of mobile phones at the wheel, pedestrian priority, unlawful parking and driving with a valid licence. The campaign was an unqualified success! Even CERN’s directors joined in, testing their own reactions as drivers on the various pieces of apparatus in place.

  2. The American Medicine Chest Challenge: Evaluation of a Drug Take-Back and Disposal Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovitzky, Itzhak

    2016-07-01

    Prescription drug take-back programs provide a safe and convenient way to dispose of expired, unwanted, or unused medications that people store in homes, thus limiting the potential misuse of prescription drugs. This study evaluated public response to a social marketing campaign promoting a community-based drug take-back program, the American Medicine Chest Challenge. A telephone survey was conducted with a representative sample of adults in New Jersey (N = 906) 2 weeks following the conclusion of the statewide collection day event in November 2010. The survey assessed public exposure to the campaign and the extent to which it is associated with public perceptions and behaviors the campaign was designed to influence. The campaign, which relied heavily on community channels for the dissemination of messages, was able to reach directly more than 60% of its target audience. When potential confounders were controlled for, campaign exposure was a strong predictor of a respondent having one or more conversations with others about medicine disposal (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4, 95% CI [1.5, 3.6]); actually disposing of expired, unwanted, or unused medicine in a collection site (OR = 2.14, 95% CI [1.15, 3.9]); and talking to kids about the dangers of prescription drug abuse (OR = 1.65, 95% CI [1.1, 2.45])-all of which were exclusively promoted through the campaign. This case illustrates the potential efficacy of community-based prevention marketing efforts to stimulate community discourse regarding the dangers of prescription drug misuse and to decrease the availability of expired, unwanted, or unused medicine in the community.

  3. Development and evaluation of a youth mental health community awareness campaign – The Compass Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Meredith G

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early detection and treatment of mental disorders in adolescents and young adults can lead to better health outcomes. Mental health literacy is a key to early recognition and help seeking. Whilst a number of population health initiatives have attempted to improve mental health literacy, none to date have specifically targeted young people nor have they applied the rigorous standards of population health models now accepted as best practice in other health areas. This paper describes the outcomes from the application of a health promotion model to the development, implementation and evaluation of a community awareness campaign designed to improve mental health literacy and early help seeking amongst young people. Method The Compass Strategy was implemented in the western metropolitan Melbourne and Barwon regions of Victoria, Australia. The Precede-Proceed Model guided the population assessment, campaign strategy development and evaluation. The campaign included the use of multimedia, a website, and an information telephone service. Multiple levels of evaluation were conducted. This included a cross-sectional telephone survey of mental health literacy undertaken before and after 14 months of the campaign using a quasi-experimental design. Randomly selected independent samples of 600 young people aged 12–25 years from the experimental region and another 600 from a comparison region were interviewed at each time point. A series of binary logistic regression analyses were used to measure the association between a range of campaign outcome variables and the predictor variables of region and time. Results The program was judged to have an impact on the following variables, as indicated by significant region-by-time interaction effects (p Conclusion We believe this is the first study to apply the rigorous standards of a health promotion model including the use of a control region to a mental health population intervention. The

  4. Reverse engineering a 'responsible drinking' campaign to assess strategic intent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Simone; Biagioni, Nicole; Daube, Mike; Stafford, Julia; Jones, Sandra C; Chikritzhs, Tanya

    2016-06-01

    The alcohol industry produces 'responsible drinking' advertising campaigns. There is concern that these may promote drinking while persuading governments and the general public that the industry is acting responsibly. This paper examined young people's thoughts and feelings in response to one of these campaigns in Australia. A qualitative analysis of introspection data provided by young drinkers after exposure to a responsible drinking advertisement produced by DrinkWise called 'How to Drink Properly'. Perth, Western Australia. Forty-eight 18-21-year-old drinkers. The qualitative data were imported into NVivo10 and coded according to the various stages of advertising effects frameworks. A thematic analysis approach was used to identify patterns in the data relating to (i) perceptions of the source and purpose of the advertisement and (ii) any resulting attitudinal or behavioural outcomes. Despite the sample comprising mainly high-risk drinkers, participants were generally unable to relate to the heavy drinkers depicted in the DrinkWise advertisement. This disassociation resulted in a perceived lack of need to modify their own drinking behaviours. Instead, the study participants found the advertisement to be entertaining and supportive of existing social norms relating to heavy drinking among members of this age group. The 'How to Drink Properly' advertisement by Drinkwise in Australia may reinforce existing drinking attitudes and behaviours among young drinkers. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Scottish Nuclear's advertising campaign: 'The on-going task'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, R R [Scottish Nuclear (United Kingdom)

    1993-07-01

    During the past year the Scottish Nuclear had been working to win increased public acceptance of nuclear power in Scotland. Since then it has stepped up the PR campaign activities - and has had a very successful year. But much has still to be done. The programme 'Come and See' which was introduced in the Spring of 1991. was developed and extended introducing a Talks Service and a mobile exhibition as two new features. At the same time the Torness Power Station Visitors' Centre was opened. In 1992 a visitor's centre was opened at Hunterston Power Station. By the end of November 1992, there was almost 28,000 visitors - an increase of 48% compared to the previous year. An extensive 1.9 million pound television and newspaper advertising campaign was also mounted during the summer months. So it has been a particularly busy year and more than modestly successful. Another arm of Come and See is 'Talkabout' - the Talks Service. In 1992 members of staff gave 187 talks all over Scotland - to over 5,000 people. In the Spring of 1992 a Mobile Exhibition was also introduced. It tours the whole of Scotland. In all there have been 62 venues, a large variety of events. Over 30,000 people have visited the exhibition since March. To enhance all these Programmes a variety of literature, videos, promotional items, and static exhibition material are prepared. These have all been developed since 1990 and are kept updated on an on-going basis.

  6. Scottish Nuclear's advertising campaign: 'The on-going task'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    During the past year the Scottish Nuclear had been working to win increased public acceptance of nuclear power in Scotland. Since then it has stepped up the PR campaign activities - and has had a very successful year. But much has still to be done. The programme 'Come and See' which was introduced in the Spring of 1991. was developed and extended introducing a Talks Service and a mobile exhibition as two new features. At the same time the Torness Power Station Visitors' Centre was opened. In 1992 a visitor's centre was opened at Hunterston Power Station. By the end of November 1992, there was almost 28,000 visitors - an increase of 48% compared to the previous year. An extensive 1.9 million pound television and newspaper advertising campaign was also mounted during the summer months. So it has been a particularly busy year and more than modestly successful. Another arm of Come and See is 'Talkabout' - the Talks Service. In 1992 members of staff gave 187 talks all over Scotland - to over 5,000 people. In the Spring of 1992 a Mobile Exhibition was also introduced. It tours the whole of Scotland. In all there have been 62 venues, a large variety of events. Over 30,000 people have visited the exhibition since March. To enhance all these Programmes a variety of literature, videos, promotional items, and static exhibition material are prepared. These have all been developed since 1990 and are kept updated on an on-going basis

  7. The (n,γ campaigns at EXILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolie J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the PF1B cold neutron beam line at the Institut Laue Langevin, the EXILL array consisting of EXOGAM, GASP and ILL-Clover detectors was used to perform (n,γ measurements at very high coincidence rates. About ten different reactions were measured in autumn 2012 using a highly collimated cold neutron beam. In spring 2013, the EXOGAM array was combined with 16 LaBr3(Ce scintillators in the EXILL&FATIMA campaign for the measurement of lifetimes using the generalised centroid difference method. We report on the properties of the set-ups and present first results from both campaigns.

  8. Impact of a direct-to-consumer information campaign on prescription patterns for overactive bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Tomio, Jun; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2018-05-03

    Direct-to-consumer information (DTCI) campaign is a new medium to inform and empower patients in their decision-making without directly promoting specific drugs. However, little is known about the impact of DTCI campaigns, expanding rapidly in developed countries, on changes in prescription patterns. We sought to determine whether a DTCI campaign on overactive bladder increases the prescription rate for overactive bladder treatment drugs. We performed a 3-year retrospective cohort study of 1332 participants who were diagnosed overactive bladder but not prescribed treatment drugs prior to the examined DTCI campaign (exposure), using the health insurance claims dataset of the Japan Medical Data Center (November 19, 2010 to November 18, 2013). The DTCI campaign for overactive bladder included television, Internet, and print advertising (November 19, 2011 to December 22, 2011). We divided the study period into Pre-Campaign Year (2010-2011), Year 1 (2011-2012), and Year 2 (2012-2013). Each year began on November 19 and included Period 1 (weeks 1-5) through Period 10 (weeks 46-50). The main outcome was first-time prescription of the treatment drug for each patient, measured by 5-week periods. Using Period 10 in the Pre-Campaign Year as the referent period, we applied the Cox proportional hazard model for each period. Additionally, we performed the interrupted time series analysis (ITSA) for the first-time prescription rate per 5-week period. Following the DTCI campaign, patients were about seven times more likely to receive a first prescription of a treatment drug during Period 4 in Year 1 (hazard ratio 7.09; 95% CI, 2.11-23.8; p-valueimpact on the level of prescription rate (one-time increase in the regression-intercept) that increased by 1128.1 [per standardized 100,000 persons] (p < .05) during Period 4 in Year 1. The examined DTCI campaign appeared to increase the prescription rate among patients with overactive bladder for 15 weeks with a 15-week delay. Clinical

  9. Project LEAN--lessons learned from a national social marketing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, S E

    1993-01-01

    The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation initiated a social marketing campaign in 1987 to reduce the nation's risk for heart disease and some cancers. Consensus on recommendations for dietary change have stimulated the development of a variety of social marketing campaigns to promote behavior change. Project LEAN (Low-Fat Eating for America Now) is a national campaign whose goal is to reduce dietary fat consumption to 30 percent of total calories through public service advertising, publicity, and point-of-purchase programs in restaurants, supermarkets, and school and worksite cafeterias. The public service advertising reached 50 percent of the television viewing audience and the print publicity, more than 35 million readers. The toll-free hotline received more than 300,000 calls. Thirty-four organizations joined the foundation in partnership and raised $350,000 for collaborative activities. Thirteen States implemented local campaigns. Lessons have been learned about the use of the media, market segmentation, effective spokespersons, and successful partnerships. These lessons will be valuable to others planning social marketing campaigns on nutrition and other preventive behaviors.

  10. Turning negative into positive: public health mass media campaigns and negative advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonio, D E; Malone, R E

    2009-06-01

    Literature suggests that 'negative advertising' is an effective way to encourage behavioral changes, but it has enjoyed limited use in public health media campaigns. However, as public health increasingly focuses on non-communicable disease prevention, negative advertising could be more widely applied. This analysis considers an illustrative case from tobacco control. Relying on internal tobacco industry documents, surveys and experimental data and drawing from political advocacy literature, we describe tobacco industry and public health research on the American Legacy Foundation's "truth" campaign, an example of effective negative advertising in the service of public health. The tobacco industry determined that the most effective advertisements run by Legacy's "truth" campaign were negative advertisements. Although the tobacco industry's own research suggested that these negative ads identified and effectively reframed the cigarette as a harmful consumer product rather than focusing solely on tobacco companies, Philip Morris accused Legacy of 'vilifying' it. Public health researchers have demonstrated the effectiveness of the "truth" campaign in reducing smoking initiation. Research on political advocacy demonstrating the value of negative advertising has rarely been used in the development of public health media campaigns, but negative advertising can effectively communicate certain public health messages and serve to counter corporate disease promotion.

  11. Athletes as PR Spokespeople: the NFL’s “A Crucial Catch” PR Campaign Explored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chyna Teresa Trible

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of the present study were presented at the 2015 International Conference on Communication and Management and examined the National Football League’s (NFL “A Crucial Catch” breast cancer awareness campaign in the United States. Variables included identification with NFL athletes, exposure to the campaign, NFL fanship, and intention to schedule a breast cancer screening (the action promoted by NFL athletes in this PR campaign. Social media outlets and an e-mail listserv of the School of Communication at Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York, USA were employed to solicit participants (n=119 in a survey. A questionnaire composed of items modified from Brown and Bocarnea’s (2007a Celebrity-Persona Parasocial Identification Scale to investigate identification with NFL athletes was used. Statistically significant relationships were found between identification with NFL athletes and exposure, identification with NFL athletes and intention to schedule a breast cancer screening, and identification with NFL athletes and NFL fanship. NFL fanship was also significantly related to exposure to the campaign. Implications for future studies analyzing PR campaigns produced by the NFL and FIFA are suggested.

  12. Marketing HIV prevention for heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women: the Hombres Sanos campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Cerdeño, Araceli; Martínez-Donate, Ana P; Zellner, Jennifer A; Sañudo, Fernando; Carrillo, Héctor; Engelberg, Moshe; Sipan, Carol; Hovell, Melbourne

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development process of Hombres Sanos, a social marketing campaign to promote HIV testing and condom use for heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women. The steps included qualitative formative research and a social marketing analytic framework to understand our target audience better, identify incentives and barriers to risk reduction, guide product development, define an optimal promotional campaign, and inform the selection of campaign platforms. A better grasp of the authors' target beneficiaries' needs and values led to an innovative dual strategy for audience segmentation and targeting. The campaign had consumer-centered, culturally sensitive, and theory-driven communication materials. The authors found communication materials and events to be appealing and effective. The campaign was well received among the wider community, and evaluation showed promising results among Latino men in general and among heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women in particular. The authors provide a step-by-step overview of the project's formative research, including research methods and findings, and how these were translated into a social marketing campaign. In addition, the authors discuss the challenges encountered in this process and the potential of social marketing to reduce HIV risk among Latinos.

  13. A 10-year retrospective of research in health mass media campaigns: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M

    2006-01-01

    Mass media campaigns have long been a tool for promoting public health. How effective are such campaigns in changing health-related attitudes and behaviors, however, and how has the literature in this area progressed over the past decade? The purpose of the current article is threefold. First, I discuss the importance of health mass media campaigns and raise the question of whether they are capable of effectively impacting public health. Second, I review the literature and discuss what we have learned about the effectiveness of campaigns over the past 10 years. Finally, I conclude with a discussion of possible avenues for the health campaign literature over the next 10 years. The overriding conclusion is the following: The literature is beginning to amass evidence that targeted, well-executed health mass media campaigns can have small-to-moderate effects not only on health knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes, but on behaviors as well, which can translate into major public health impact given the wide reach of mass media. Such impact can only be achieved, however, if principles of effective campaign design are carefully followed.

  14. The Dynamic Definition of the Advertising Campaign Budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrianyn Serhii O.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed at exploring means for optimizing the budgeting of advertising activity, the optimal distribution of the advertising budget among several products, advertised by a company, and several advertising channels used during the distribution of an advertisement. The current status of the optimizationized budgeting models in the world and in Ukraine was analyzed. The topicality of scientific developments in this direction has been substantiated. The model is based on the non-linear logistics function of the response value of sales for the costs of placement of an advertising message, including market saturation effects and the accumulation of promotional effect. A complex advertising budgeting model has been proposed, which includes the dynamic definition of a budget constraint based on the expected sales return from a byed advertising campaign whose budget is being optimized. The proposed model allows to schedule advertising activities in conditions of uncertainty and rapid change of environment.

  15. Possibilities of personalized advertising campaigns application on social networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasković Jelena V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of new technologies and the emergence of sites and applications that are primarily intended for fun, considerably changed the way of communication among people. Social networks can be stated as a preferred product of modern society that have become an essential form of communication especially among young people, but also in older generations. The most popular social network in our country is Facebook which has over 3.5 million users. This kind of popularity led this social network into a position to become a place where many companies want to promote their products and services. Facebook has a mechanism that allows page administrators to easily target a group of potential consumers and to present them a desired message. This paper will analyze the advertising possibility through social networks. Also, the example of the campaign implementation for the Facebook page that is primarily engaged in the sale will be shown.

  16. Compliance of disease awareness campaigns in printed Dutch media with national and international regulatory guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo Alves, Teresa; Martins de Freitas, Auramarina F; van Eijk, Martine E C; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2014-01-01

    The European legislation prohibits prescription-only medicines' advertising but allows pharmaceutical companies to provide information to the public on health and diseases, provided there is no direct or indirect reference to a pharmaceutical product. Various forms of promotion have become increasingly common in Europe including "disease-oriented" campaigns. To explore examples of disease awareness campaigns by pharmaceutical companies in the Netherlands, by assessing their compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) Ethical Criteria for medicinal drug promotion and the Dutch guidelines for provision of information by pharmaceutical companies. Materials referring to health/disease and treatments published in the most widely circulated newspapers and magazines were collected from March to May 2012. An evaluation tool was developed based on relevant underlying principles from the WHO ethical criteria and Dutch self-regulation guidelines. Collected disease awareness advertisements were used to pilot the evaluation tool and to explore the consistency of information provided with the WHO and Dutch criteria. Eighty materials met our inclusion criteria; 71 were published in newspapers and 9 in magazines. The large majority were news items but 21 were disease awareness advertisements, of which 5 were duplicates. Fifteen out of the 16 disease awareness campaigns were non-compliant with current guidelines mainly due to lack of balance (n = 12), absence of listed author and/or sponsor (n = 8), use of misleading or incomplete information (n = 5) and use of promotional information (n = 5). None mentioned a pharmaceutical product directly. Disease Awareness Campaigns are present in Dutch printed media. Although no brand names were mentioned, the lack of compliance of disease awareness campaigns with the current regulations is alarming. There were information deficiencies and evidence of information bias. A key concern is that the context in which the information is

  17. Compliance of disease awareness campaigns in printed Dutch media with national and international regulatory guidelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Leonardo Alves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The European legislation prohibits prescription-only medicines' advertising but allows pharmaceutical companies to provide information to the public on health and diseases, provided there is no direct or indirect reference to a pharmaceutical product. Various forms of promotion have become increasingly common in Europe including "disease-oriented" campaigns. OBJECTIVES: To explore examples of disease awareness campaigns by pharmaceutical companies in the Netherlands, by assessing their compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO Ethical Criteria for medicinal drug promotion and the Dutch guidelines for provision of information by pharmaceutical companies. METHODS: Materials referring to health/disease and treatments published in the most widely circulated newspapers and magazines were collected from March to May 2012. An evaluation tool was developed based on relevant underlying principles from the WHO ethical criteria and Dutch self-regulation guidelines. Collected disease awareness advertisements were used to pilot the evaluation tool and to explore the consistency of information provided with the WHO and Dutch criteria. FINDINGS: Eighty materials met our inclusion criteria; 71 were published in newspapers and 9 in magazines. The large majority were news items but 21 were disease awareness advertisements, of which 5 were duplicates. Fifteen out of the 16 disease awareness campaigns were non-compliant with current guidelines mainly due to lack of balance (n = 12, absence of listed author and/or sponsor (n = 8, use of misleading or incomplete information (n = 5 and use of promotional information (n = 5. None mentioned a pharmaceutical product directly. CONCLUSION: Disease Awareness Campaigns are present in Dutch printed media. Although no brand names were mentioned, the lack of compliance of disease awareness campaigns with the current regulations is alarming. There were information deficiencies and evidence of information

  18. Image Gently(SM): a national education and communication campaign in radiology using the science of social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goske, Marilyn J; Applegate, Kimberly E; Boylan, Jennifer; Butler, Priscilla F; Callahan, Michael J; Coley, Brian D; Farley, Shawn; Frush, Donald P; Hernanz-Schulman, Marta; Jaramillo, Diego; Johnson, Neil D; Kaste, Sue C; Morrison, Gregory; Strauss, Keith J

    2008-12-01

    Communication campaigns are an accepted method for altering societal attitudes, increasing knowledge, and achieving social and behavioral change particularly within public health and the social sciences. The Image Gently(SM) campaign is a national education and awareness campaign in radiology designed to promote the need for and opportunities to decrease radiation to children when CT scans are indicated. In this article, the relatively new science of social marketing is reviewed and the theoretical basis for an effective communication campaign in radiology is discussed. Communication strategies are considered and the type of outcomes that should be measured are reviewed. This methodology has demonstrated that simple, straightforward safety messages on radiation protection targeted to medical professionals throughout the radiology community, utilizing multiple media, can affect awareness potentially leading to change in practice.

  19. Development of the place-based Adelante social marketing campaign for prevention of substance use, sexual risk and violence among Latino immigrant youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E L; Evans, W D; Barrett, N D; Cleary, S D; Edberg, M C; Alvayero, R D; Kierstead, E C; Beltran, A

    2018-04-01

    Immigrant Latino youth represent a high-risk subgroup that should be targeted with health promotion efforts. However, there are considerable barriers to engagement in health-related programming. Little is known about the engagement possibilities of social marketing campaigns and digital strategies for traditionally 'hard-to-reach' immigrants, underscoring the importance of testing these techniques with immigrant Latino adolescents. We developed and piloted a place-based social marketing campaign in coordination with the branded, Positive Youth Development-based (PYD) Adelante intervention targeting risk factors for co-occurring youth substance abuse, sexual risk and violence. Building on prior research, we conducted a four-phase formative research process, and planned the Adelante social marketing campaign based on findings from one group interview and ongoing consultation with Adelante staff (n=8) and four focus groups with youth (n=35). Participants identified four overarching campaign themes, and suggested portrayal of resilient, proud youth who achieved goals despite adversity. Youth guided selection of campaign features and engagement strategies, including message/visual content, stylistic elements, and a mixed language approach. We developed a 12-month campaign to be delivered via print ads, multi-platform social media promotion, contests, youth-generated videos, blog posts, and text messaging. We describe the process and outcome of campaign development and make recommendations for future campaigns.

  20. Transmutation Fuels Campaign FY-09 Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lori Braase

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year 2009 (FY-08) accomplishments for the Transmutation Fuels Campaign (TFC). The emphasis is on the accomplishments and relevance of the work. Detailed description of the methods used to achieve the highlighted results and the associated support tasks are not included in this report.

  1. Persistence of Change: Fume Hood Campaign Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Elah; Robinson, Jennifer; Wakefield, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability initiatives typically operate for a limited time period, but it is often unclear whether they have lasting effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine a laboratory fume hood campaign, in order to identify factors that might contribute or detract from long-term change persistence. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  2. Campaign best practice in intravenous therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Wayne; Murphy, Jayne; Shakespeare, David; Kelly, Chris; Fox, Louise; Kelly, Matthew

    Intravenous therapy is an integral part of nursing care but is associated with a high risk of infection. This article outlines a campaign that aimed to increase awareness of best practice for IV therapy and reduce the risks of healthcare-associated IV infections in hospital and community settings.

  3. The Political Scientist as Local Campaign Consultant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crew, Robert E., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    During my 45 years as an academic, I have followed the admonition sometimes attributed to the legendary Jedi warrior Obi-Wan Kenobe that political scientists should "use [their] power for good and not for evil." In this spirit, I have devoted substantial portions of my career to public service by providing strategic advice and campaign management…

  4. Advocacy of Trafficking Campaigns: A Controversy Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Echezarreta, Vanesa; Alvarado, María-Cruz; Gómez-Lorenzini, Paulina

    2018-01-01

    The construction, visualization and stabilization of public problems require the mobilization of civil society groups concerned about these issues to actively engage in the demand for actions and policies. This paper explores the institutional campaigns against human trafficking and sexual exploitation in Spain between 2008 and 2017 and their role…

  5. News and campaign dynamics in EU 27

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vreese, C.; Schuck, A.; Maier, M.; Stengel, K.; Haubold, V.; Süß, K.; Tenscher, J.

    2009-01-01

    The presentation provides an introduction to the media content analysis of the European election campaign conducted in the 27 EU member states in the 3 weeks leading up to the June 2009 elections. The analysis is an integral part of the PIREDEU project (www.piredeu.eu): Providing an Infrastructure

  6. Gender identity and breast cancer campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Puntoni (Stefano); S.T.L.R. Sweldens (Steven); N.T. Tavassoli (Nader)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractConcerning itself with understanding how marketing methods and tools can be of benefit to healthcare professionals, health marketing is an area of research that has grown substantially in recent years. Of much interest to the sector is whether awareness campaigns are effective in

  7. Teen PACK: Population Awareness Campaign Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This packet of instructional materials is designed to teach teenagers about the effects of overpopulation on the world and on the individual. Information is presented in three related booklets. The first of the three parts of the "Teen Population Awareness Campaign Kit," illustrates overpopulation through profiles of teens living in…

  8. Campaign Assessment in Counterinsurgency: Reinventing the Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-22

    Pamphlet 525-5-500: Commander’s Appreciation and Campaign Design (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 2008), 18. 18 Robert Axelrod and Michael D...distrust within the Johnson 60 Axelrod and Cohen, Harnessing Complexity: Organizational...Metrics in COIN: Effects Based Analysis.” Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin (April-June 2010). Axelrod , Robert and Michael D. Cohen

  9. The World Campaign for the Biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Charles R.

    1984-01-01

    Lists and discusses goals of The World Campaign for the Biosphere and strategies designed to achieve these goals. Also lists eight suggestions for science teachers to help incorporate the goals into school curricula and programs. These include organizing assemblies which present information about environmental problems and presenting environmental…

  10. Analyzing the Communication Dynamics of Political Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Sally

    2007-01-01

    It is widely agreed that college students do not fully participate in the political process. The most commonly cited reasons are apathy, indifference, and ignorance. This article presents an activity that aims to help students learn about communication dynamics in the context of political campaigns and develop an appreciation and confidence about…

  11. Educative campaign about information on irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna C, P.C.

    1991-07-01

    The irradiation of foods is accepted by international agencies (FAO, OMS) like a healthy and effective technology at the moment the irradiated foods are marketed easily in many countries, however in other countries exist several factors that affect the practical application of this process. In this work is planned about an educational campaign about the irradiation process directed to the consumers. (Author)

  12. The Promotion of Drug Abuse- PO*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-02

    Mar 2, 1974 ... experience in modern marketing techniques could develop a promotional campaign to increase drug abuse. ... Drug abuse-identity ... conforms to the same social, intellectual and cultural ... The brand names should also be chosen carefu11y. ... In this market the mass media offer the greatest coverage.

  13. Social Media Campaign Effects: Moderating Role of Social Capital in an Anti-Smoking Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkoong, Kang; Nah, Seungahn; Van Stee, Stephanie K; Record, Rachael A

    2018-03-01

    This study examined the effects of an anti-smoking campaign that employs a crowdsourcing method with a social networking service. Drawing upon social capital scholarship and the expression effect research paradigm in eHealth systems, the study also investigated the roles of social trust and community life satisfaction in the social media campaign that has a specific geographical boundary. To that end, we conducted an experiment using a two-group pretest-posttest design. We randomly assigned 201 participants to two conditions: "campaign message reception only" as a control group and "message reception and expression" as a treatment group in which participants fully engaged in the campaign process by sharing their own campaign ideas with other participants. Findings revealed that social trust and community life satisfaction interacted with the treatment condition to positively affect persuasive intentions, but in distinct ways. Social trust moderated the effect of the message reception and interaction condition on participants' willingness to encourage community members to stop smoking. In contrast, community life satisfaction moderated the effect of the treatment condition on encouraging others to comply with the community's anti-smoking policy. These results provide theoretical and practical implications related to the roles of social capital in geographically defined social media campaigns.

  14. International double taxation

    OpenAIRE

    Körbl, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    1 Summary This thesis deals with the issue of international double taxation of income and capital and methods for its solution. International double taxation is an issue which states began to deal with in the late 19th century. This interest intensified after the First World War when also the League of Nations (predecessor of the United Nations) began to deal with international double taxation. Most attention the phenomenon of double taxation of income and capital with an international elemen...

  15. The social image of drinking - mass media campaigns may inadvertently increase binge drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Friederike; Kohlmann, Karoline; Monter, Anne; Ameis, Nina

    2017-10-01

    Mass media campaigns that promote responsible drinking are rarely tested for their usefulness in reducing heavy alcohol consumption. Existing campaigns that appeal to responsible drinking while simultaneously displaying young people in social drinking situations may even have paradoxical effects. To examine such possible effects, we drew on a real-world media campaign, which we systematically modified on the basis of recent prototype research. We pilot tested questionnaires (using n = 41 participants), developed two different sets of posters in the style of an existing campaign (n = 39) and investigated their effectiveness (n = 102). In the main study, young men were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: sociable or unsociable binge drinker prototype condition or a control group. Outcome variables were intention, behavioural willingness, attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, prototype evaluation and prototype similarity with respect to binge drinking. Binge drinking as a habit was included to control for the fact that habitual drinking in social situations is hard to overcome and poses a particular challenge to interventions. The manipulation check showed that the experimental variation (sociable vs. unsociable drinker prototype condition) was successful. Results of the main study showed that the sociable drinker prototype condition resulted in a higher willingness and - for those with less of a habit - a higher intention to binge drink the next weekend. The unsociable drinker prototype condition had no effects. The results imply that the social components of mass media campaigns might inadvertently exacerbate binge drinking in young men. We therefore advocate against campaigns including aspects of alcohol consumption that might be positively associated with drinker prototype perception. Finally, we provide suggestions for future research.

  16. Choosing Wisely Canada Students and Trainees Advocating for Resource Stewardship (STARS) campaign: a descriptive evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Franco; Cheung, Daphne; Han, Angela; Born, Karen B; Alexander, Lisa; Levinson, Wendy; Wong, Brian M

    2017-12-19

    Resource stewardship is being increasingly recognized as an essential competency for physicians, but medical schools are just beginning to integrate this into education. We describe the evaluation of Choosing Wisely Canada's Students and Trainees Advocating for Resource Stewardship (STARS) campaign, a student-led campaign to advance resource stewardship education in medical schools across Canada. We evaluated the campaign 6 months after its launch, in November 2015. STARS students were administered a telephone survey eliciting a description of the initiatives that they had implemented or planned to implement at their schools to promote resource stewardship, and exploring their perceptions of facilitators of and barriers to successful implementation of their initiatives. We used a mixed-methods approach to analyze and summarize the data. Twenty-seven (82%) of the 33 eligible students representing all 17 medical schools responded. In 14 schools (82%), students led various local activities (e.g., interest groups, campaign weeks) to raise awareness about resource stewardship among medical students and faculty. Students contributed to curriculum change (both planned and implemented) at 10 schools (59%). Thematic analysis revealed key program characteristics that facilitated success (e.g., pan-Canadian student network, local faculty champion) as well as barriers to implementing change (e.g., complex processes to change curriculum, hierarchical nature of medical school). This student-led campaign, with support from local faculty and Choosing Wisely Canada staff, led to awareness-building activities and early curricula change at medical schools across Canada. Future plans will build on the initial momentum created by the STARS campaign to sustain and spread local initiatives. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  17. Campaigning for Children's Oral Health: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Arguably, the ultimate application of evidenced-based communications is translating the research recommendations into a full-fledged media campaign. This article explains the development and implementation of Watch Your Mouth, a campaign based on FrameWorks Institute's research on children's oral health. To date, this innovative campaign has been…

  18. 5 CFR 950.103 - Establishing a local campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishing a local campaign. 950.103... PRIVATE VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS General Provisions § 950.103 Establishing a local campaign. (a) The Director establishes and maintains the official list of local campaigns and the geographical area each...

  19. Negative campaigning in Western Europe: Similar or different?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how political parties in parliamentary election campaigns in Western Europe make use of negative campaigning and examines whether their behaviour differs from that of candidates competing in US presidential election campaigns. Furthermore, it theorises how the differences and

  20. Marketing Social Service Programs Using Political Campaign Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Discusses how human services agencies can use strategies and information technologies similar to those used in political campaigns to identify needs and attitudes for social services campaigns. Marketing for social services programs is described, and the use of computers for a political campaign and for a teenage pregnancy program is compared.…

  1. 5 CFR 734.411 - Participation in political campaigning; prohibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... under this subpart may not: (a) Take an active part in managing the political campaign of a candidate for partisan political office or a candidate for political party office; (b) Campaign for partisan... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation in political campaigning...

  2. 5 CFR 734.205 - Participation in political campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Participation in political campaigns. 734... in political campaigns. Subject to the prohibitions in § 734.306, an employee may: (a) Display... candidate or a candidate for political party office in a political advertisement, broadcast, campaign...

  3. Monitoring speed before and during a speed publicity campaign.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schagen, I.N.L.G. van Commandeur, J.J.F. Goldenbeld, C. & Stipdonk, H.

    2016-01-01

    Driving speeds were monitored during a period of 16 weeks encompassing different stages of an anti-speeding campaign in the Netherlands. This campaign targeted speed limit violations in built-up areas. The observation periods differed in terms of intensity and media used for the campaign. Small

  4. 29 CFR 452.69 - Expenses of campaign literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Expenses of campaign literature. 452.69 Section 452.69... AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Campaign Safeguards § 452.69 Expenses of campaign literature. Each... is no requirement that the union distribute the literature of the candidate free of charge. In the...

  5. Adapting a 1% or less milk campaign for a Hispanic/Latino population: the Adelante Con Leche Semi-descremada 1% experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Arnell J; Mistry, Ritesh; McCarthy, William J; Yancey, Antronette K

    2008-01-01

    Describe and evaluate a media campaign to encourage 1% or nonfat milk consumption. Uncontrolled pre/post test. One largely rural (Santa Paula) and one urban (East Los Angeles) California community. Community residents and milk vendors in primarily low-income Latino/Hispanic communities. The "1% or Less" milk campaign, which promotes substitution of 2% fat or whole milk with 1% or less fat milk was adapted and implemented. Comparison of post-campaign milk sales with pre-campaign sales. Chi-square tests of independence used to compare precampaign and postcampaign sales. There were decreases in the proportion of whole milk sold and increases in the proportion of reduced-fat, low-fat, and nonfat milk sold in the weeks following each campaign (Santa Paula: p = .0165; East Los Angeles: p Latino/Hispanic communities is not evident.

  6. Fresh Air and Good Food: Children and the Anti-Tuberculosis Campaign in the Netherlands c.1900-1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Nelleke

    2010-01-01

    As elsewhere in the Western world, between 1900 and 1940 the anti-tuberculosis campaign in the Netherlands produced a wide range of initiatives to promote child health. In each of these the social and the medical were linked, as the hygienic "mood" was encouraged by a child-saving ethos that focused upon the poor. In this article the…

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Removal Campaign Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.

    2000-01-01

    The overall operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project will include fuel removal, sludge removal, debris removal, and deactivation transition activities. Figure 1-1 provides an overview of the current baseline operating schedule for project sub-systems, indicating that a majority of fuel removal activities are performed over an approximately three-and-one-half year time period. The purpose of this document is to describe the strategy for operating the fuel removal process systems. The campaign plan scope includes: (1) identifying a fuel selection sequence during fuel removal activities, (2) identifying MCOs that are subjected to extra testing (process validation) and monitoring, and (3) discussion of initial MCO loading and monitoring in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The campaign plan is intended to integrate fuel selection requirements for handling special groups of fuel within the basin (e.g., single pass reactor fuel), process validation activities identified for process systems, and monitoring activities during storage

  8. Fear and Leadership in Union Organizing Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Murphy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article adopts a mobilization framework to examine the crucial actions of workplace activists in overcoming fear of employer reprisal during union organizing campaigns in hostile environments. The article explores fear as part of the organizing process in two ways; first, we examine how fear can act as a stimulus for workplace activists to take action in an attempt to overcome the source of that fear. Second, we examine fear as an inhibiting factor in organizing, whereby the presence of fear hinders individuals from taking action. Using qualitative data from interviews conducted with workplace activists across a variety of campaigns in Ireland, this article examines the process through which workplace activists conquer their own sense of fear and undertake the task of mobilizing colleagues toward collective action in pursuit of union representation amid fear of employer reprisal.

  9. Planning for Action: Campaign Concepts and Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    painting that gets the creative juices flowing. Campaign planning is an art, but some of the science of tactics, techniques, and practices (TTP) can help...Designation of the reserve, including its location and composition .  Reconnaissance and security operations.  Essential stability tasks...measurable, collectable, and relevant to a specific time. Examples of indicators include bushels of apples sold in a specific market in the past

  10. Ignition tuning for the National Ignition Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Landen O.; Edwards J.; Haan S.W.; Lindl J.D.; Boehly T.R.; Bradley D.K.; Callahan D.A.; Celliers P.M.; Dewald E.L.; Dixit S.; Doeppner T.; Eggert J.; Farley D.; Frenje J.A.; Glenn S.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion [1] tuning campaigns [2] is to maximize the probability of ignition by experimentally correcting for likely residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics [3] used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models, and by checking for and resolving unexpected shot-to-shot variability in performance [4]. This has been started successfully using a variety of surrogate capsules that set key laser, hohlraum and caps...

  11. Campaign to kick polio out of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letore, D

    1998-12-01

    This article discusses the goal of eradicating poliomyelitis (polio) in Africa by the year 2000. Polio is a crippling disease that paralyzes hundreds of thousands of children yearly. Polio was endemic in Africa during the 1970s. Today, polio is confined to sub-Saharan Africa and, specifically, to the Congo, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Somalia, and the Sudan. Considerable progress is evident. Full eradication is necessary because of the ease with which the virus is transmitted. The World Health Organization (WHO) set the goal of eradication by the year 2000 at a 1988 assembly meeting. The Plan of Action for a Global Polio Eradication Initiative was approved in 1989. The WHO Regional Committee for Africa adopted the resolution and urged again in 1995 for vigorous implementation. The Organization of African Unity endorsed the initiative in 1996. South African President Mandela led a region-wide mobilization campaign to increase public awareness of the initiative. Since 1997, leading players from the African Football Confederation have participated in awareness campaigns by spreading the message through a variety of channels. The initiative includes routine immunization complemented by the National Immunization Days (NIDs), training at the local level, surveillance, and door-to-door campaigns. The initiative must assure functioning systems of cold storage of vaccines and must continue to educate communities about the importance of routine immunization. There must be a strong laboratory network for isolating the 3 types of the virus. NIDs will be scheduled for 1999 in countries with civil conflict. The polio model is useful for other disease eradication campaigns.

  12. Functional Effectiveness of Threat Appeals in Exercise Promotion Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brengman, Malaika; Wauters, Birgit; Macharis, Cathy; Mairesse, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    As more than 70% of individuals in Western societies can be categorized as sedentary and inactivity has been recognized to lead to a series of serious physical and psychological disorders, the importance of physical activity promotion is ever more emphasized. Many social marketing campaigns use threat (or fear) appeals to promote healthy…

  13. Campaigns and counter campaigns: reactions on Twitter to e-cigarette education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allem, Jon-Patrick; Escobedo, Patricia; Chu, Kar-Hai; Soto, Daniel W; Cruz, Tess Boley; Unger, Jennifer B

    2017-03-01

    Social media present opportunities for public health departments to galvanise interest in health issues. A challenge is creating content that will resonate with target audiences, and determining reactions to educational material. Twitter can be used as a real-time surveillance system to capture individuals' immediate reactions to education campaigns and such information could lead to better campaigns in the future. A case study testing Twitter's potential presented itself when the California Department of Public Health launched its 'Still Blowing Smoke' media campaign about the potential harmful effects of e-cigarettes. Pro-e-cigarette advocacy groups, in response, launched a counter campaign titled 'Not Blowing Smoke'. This study tracked the popularity of the two campaigns on Twitter, analysed the content of the messages and determined who was involved in these discussions. The study period was from 22 March 2015 to 27 June 2015. A stratified sampling procedure supplied 2192 tweets for analysis. Content analysis identified pro, anti and neutral e-cigarette tweets, and five additional themes: Marketing Elements, Money, Regulation/propaganda, Health, and Other. Metadata were analysed to obtain additional information about Twitter accounts. 'Not Blowing Smoke' was referenced more frequently than 'Still Blowing Smoke' on Twitter. Messages commonly objected to government regulation of e-cigarettes, refuted claims that e-cigarette manufactures were aligned with big tobacco, and touted the health benefits of e-cigarette use. E-cigarette companies and vape shops used campaign slogans to communicate with customers on Twitter. Findings showed the time dynamics of Twitter and the possibility for real-time monitoring of education campaigns. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Feasibility study of the AOSTA experimental campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carta M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of the nuclear waste is one of the most important nuclear issues. The high radiotoxicity of the spent fuel is due to plutonium and some minor actinides (MAs such as neptunium, americium and curium, above all. One way to reduce their hazard is to destroy by fission MAs in appropriate nuclear reactors. To allow the MAs destruction an important effort have been done on the nuclear data due to the poor knowledge in this field. In the framework of one of the NEA Expert Group on Integral Experiments for Minor Actinide Management an analysis of the feasibility of MAs irradiation campaign in the TAPIRO fast research reactor is carried out. This paper provides preliminary results obtained by calculations modelling the irradiation, in different TAPIRO irradiation channels, of some CEA samples coming from the French experimental campaign OSMOSE, loaded with different contents of MAs, in order to access, through particular peak spectrometry, to their capture cross section. On the basis of neutron transport calculation results, obtained by both deterministic and Monte Carlo methods, an estimate of the irradiated samples counting levels from the AOSTA (Activation of OSMOSE Samples in TAPIRO experimental campaign is provided.

  15. Advertising Efficiency in Road Safety Prevention Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Catalina Serrano Cordero

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the importance of the results evaluation processes in the education and road safety campaigns, although they have achieved remarkable progress in praxis, evidenced a lack of information as to the relevance and suitability of the tools of communication in prevention. The objective was to validate an education and road safety campaign implemented by the Municipal Transit and Transport Company of the city of Cuenca (Ecuador in 2014, for which qualitative and quantitative techniques were used, choosing a stratified probabilistic sample of 304 university students, (age: 15-39. The data collection instruments were: focus group, questionnaire and statistical records, interpreted through content analysis and descriptive statistics. The findings indicate that the most frequent perception about the causes of accidents is: alcohol consumption, speeding, cell phone use. Likewise, the campaign "Best to Prevent" obtained a level of generalized recognition, but it was the younger ones who received more influence of their content of communication. Results that corroborate that the methods of motivation and persuasion do affect the attitude changes, which influences the transformation towards a culture of road prevention.

  16. Intercomparison campaign of Contracted Partner Institutes 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinen, H.A.J.M.; Tijsmans, M.H.; Van Tuinen, S.T.; Overwater, R.M.W.; Aldenkamp, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Dutch National Plan for Nuclear Emergency Planning and Response (EPR) is trained frequently. Intercomparison campaigns and exercises are part of this training for the Contracted Partner Institutes (CPI). The results of an intercomparison campaign in 1997 for the CPI are reported. Two carbon cartridges, one contaminated homogeneously and one inhomogeneously with 131 I, and a water sample contaminated with 134 Cs and 137 Cs were analysed by means of gamma spectroscopy. The results had to be faxed to RIVM within the time limits prescribed in the emergency protocols for CPI, i.e. 2 hours for the cartridges and 24 hours for the water sample. Most CPI reported in time. The results for the inhomogeneously contaminated cartridge are within 25% from the accepted reference value (ARV). For the homogeneously contaminated cartridge the results are within 40% from the ARV. In reality, the contamination of the cartridge will have an exponential profile, with most of the activity in the first few millimeters. In this situation results can be expected to be within 20% from the true value. The results for the water sample are within 5% from the ARV. Although most CPI have applied corrections for coincidence summing for 134 Cs there is still a systematic error of 4% for this nuclide. In regard of the requirements for measurements during emergency situations, the results of this intercomparison campaign are satisfactory

  17. Q-Thruster Breadboard Campaign Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Dr. Harold "Sonny" White has developed the physics theory basis for utilizing the quantum vacuum to produce thrust. The engineering implementation of the theory is known as Q-thrusters. During FY13, three test campaigns were conducted that conclusively demonstrated tangible evidence of Q-thruster physics with measurable thrust bringing the TRL up from TRL 2 to early TRL 3. This project will continue with the development of the technology to a breadboard level by leveraging the most recent NASA/industry test hardware. This project will replace the manual tuning process used in the 2013 test campaign with an automated Radio Frequency (RF) Phase Lock Loop system (precursor to flight-like implementation), and will redesign the signal ports to minimize RF leakage (improves efficiency). This project will build on the 2013 test campaign using the above improvements on the test implementation to get ready for subsequent Independent Verification and Validation testing at Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in FY 2015. Q-thruster technology has a much higher thrust to power than current forms of electric propulsion (7x Hall thrusters), and can significantly reduce the total power required for either Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) or Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP). Also, due to the high thrust and high specific impulse, Q-thruster technology will greatly relax the specific mass requirements for in-space nuclear reactor systems. Q-thrusters can reduce transit times for a power-constrained architecture.

  18. A national campaign to finance supported employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Michael F; Drake, Robert E; Goldman, Howard H

    2014-06-01

    Medicaid is now the main payment source and financing mechanism for services for adults with serious mental illness. Services formerly paid with state mental health funds have been converted to Medicaid, lightening the burden on state budgets affected by recession and other factors. The change has allowed states to maintain community care and inpatient services (in general hospitals). Medicaid service benefits include clinic and inpatient care, case management, and some rehabilitation services. But using Medicaid to finance some high-priority services such as supported employment has proven difficult. Now critical changes in Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act allow states to amend their Medicaid State Plans to provide more flexible services to people with serious mental illness. Advocacy and support may be needed to encourage this step. A national campaign to finance supported employment would join various stakeholders in the field, including professional organizations, family and service user groups, and organizations representing service providers. The authors of this editorial pledge their energies to support this campaign. They present suggestions for a campaign, including building a coalition, goals and targets, and online resources.

  19. Influencing the Conversation About Masculinity and Suicide: Evaluation of the Man Up Multimedia Campaign Using Twitter Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthorst, Marisa; King, Kylie; Turnure, Jackie; Sukunesan, Suku; Phelps, Andrea; Pirkis, Jane

    2018-02-15

    content related to help-seeking, masculinity, and expressing emotions. A number of followers tweeted personal stories that revealed overwhelmingly positive perceptions of the content of the documentary and strongly endorsed its messages. The Man Up Twitter campaign triggered conversations about masculinity and suicide that otherwise may not have happened. For some, this may have been game-changing in terms of shifting attitudes toward expressing emotions and reaching out to others for help. The campaign was particularly effective in disseminating information and promoting conversations in real time, an advantage that it had over more traditional health promotion campaigns. This sort of approach could well be adapted to other areas of mental (and physical) health promotion campaigns to increase their reach and effectiveness. ©Marisa Schlichthorst, Kylie King, Jackie Turnure, Suku Sukunesan, Andrea Phelps, Jane Pirkis. Originally published in JMIR Mental Health (http://mental.jmir.org), 15.02.2018.

  20. 11 CFR 9004.4 - Use of payments; examples of qualified campaign expenses and non-qualified campaign expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of payments; examples of qualified campaign expenses and non-qualified campaign expenses. 9004.4 Section 9004.4 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION CAMPAIGN FUND: GENERAL ELECTION FINANCING ENTITLEMENT OF ELIGIBLE CANDIDATES...

  1. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-07-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. We briefly discuss the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Author)

  2. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. The author briefly discusses the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Auth.)

  3. Double-double effect and coordination number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mioduski, T.

    1992-01-01

    The original method of interpretation together with its theoretical foundations is developed, making it possible to use location and direction of the double-double (tetrad) effect within the Ln and An series to determine the coordination number (CN) complexes of the f-block elements. The method is applied for potentiometric and radiometric equilibrium studies. It has been pointed and that the decisive factor for the direction of the double-double effect in the case of the Gibbs energy variations is a difference in the CN of the f-element ion between the reaction product complex and that for the reaction substrate the ''regular'' effect for a given tetrad is accompanied by decrease in the CN while the ''reverse'' effect by increase in the CN. (author). 122 refs, 5 tabs, 8 figs

  4. McLetchie on mass campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, C J

    1982-01-01

    Dr. J.L. McLetchie was asked in 1963 to express his thoughts on the many aspects of mass campaigns for the historical record fro future field workers. The significance of his thoughts at that time lies in the soundness of the principles outlined, based upon field responsibility. It was from such principles that the modern strategy of community health in dveloping countries arose, which was adopted and put into practice by the World Health Organization and was presented at the Alma Ata Conference on Primary Health Care in 1978. The text is reproduced here. There should be no need to argue the need for mass campaigns under conditions as they exist at present in Africa as well as other tropical areas. Several conditions cannot be dealt with in other way, e.g., tuberculosis, malnutrition, onchocerciasis, yaws, sleeping sickness. The most essential needs are the recognition, at the highest political and administrative level, that a country's services must be balanced, with well-developed preventive, laboratory, and curative sections. To obtain and retain this balance requires strong and continous administrative action to counteract the overwhelming attraction of the curative services to young African doctors and to expatriates on short-term contracts. The preventive services divide naturally into those dealing with urban problems having a large content of environmental hygiene and those dealing with rural problems in which curative medicine plays a mojor part, i.e., mass treatment. In rural health work, the "amateur" -- the young medical officer assigned to rural duties for a period of 1-2 years -- may play a valuable part but cannot do so unless the service is well organized and has a core of "professionals," senior medical staff with considerable experience with rural problems and how to tackle them. Rural health specialists have to work closely in cooperation with other sections of the medical department, with other departments, and with local government authorities

  5. Increasing tobacco quitline calls from pregnant african american women: the "one tiny reason to quit" social marketing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, May G; Genderson, Maureen Wilson; Sepulveda, Allison L; Garland, Sheryl L; Wilson, Diane Baer; Stith-Singleton, Rose; Dubuque, Susan

    2013-05-01

    Pregnant African American women are at disproportionately high risk of premature birth and infant mortality, outcomes associated with cigarette smoking. Telephone-based, individual smoking cessation counseling has been shown to result in successful quit attempts in the general population and among pregnant women, but "quitlines" are underutilized. A social marketing campaign called One Tiny Reason to Quit (OTRTQ) promoted calling a quitline (1-800-QUIT-NOW) to pregnant, African American women in Richmond, Virginia, in 2009 and was replicated there 2 years later. The campaign disseminated messages via radio, interior bus ads, posters, newspaper ads, and billboards. Trained volunteers also delivered messages face-to-face and distributed branded give-away reminder items. The number of calls made from pregnant women in the Richmond area during summer 2009 was contrasted with (a) the number of calls during the seasons immediately before and after the campaign, and (b) the number of calls the previous summer. The replication used the same evaluation design. There were statistically significant spikes in calls from pregnant women during both campaign waves for both types of contrasts. A higher proportion of the calls from pregnant women were from African Americans during the campaign. A multimodal quitline promotion like OTRTQ should be considered for geographic areas with sizable African American populations and high rates of infant mortality.

  6. Increasing Tobacco Quitline Calls from Pregnant African American Women: The “One Tiny Reason to Quit” Social Marketing Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genderson, Maureen Wilson; Sepulveda, Allison L.; Garland, Sheryl L.; Wilson, Diane Baer; Stith-Singleton, Rose; Dubuque, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Pregnant African American women are at disproportionately high risk of premature birth and infant mortality, outcomes associated with cigarette smoking. Telephone-based, individual smoking cessation counseling has been shown to result in successful quit attempts in the general population and among pregnant women, but “quitlines” are underutilized. A social marketing campaign called One Tiny Reason to Quit (OTRTQ) promoted calling a quitline (1-800-QUIT-NOW) to pregnant, African American women in Richmond, Virginia, in 2009 and was replicated there 2 years later. Methods The campaign disseminated messages via radio, interior bus ads, posters, newspaper ads, and billboards. Trained volunteers also delivered messages face-to-face and distributed branded give-away reminder items. The number of calls made from pregnant women in the Richmond area during summer 2009 was contrasted with (a) the number of calls during the seasons immediately before and after the campaign, and (b) the number of calls the previous summer. The replication used the same evaluation design. Results There were statistically significant spikes in calls from pregnant women during both campaign waves for both types of contrasts. A higher proportion of the calls from pregnant women were from African Americans during the campaign. Conclusion A multimodal quitline promotion like OTRTQ should be considered for geographic areas with sizable African American populations and high rates of infant mortality. PMID:23621745

  7. Public reaction to Victoria's "2 Fruit 'n' 5 Veg Every Day" campaign and reported consumption of fruit and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, H; Borland, R; Segan, C; Stafford, H; Sindall, C

    1998-01-01

    The Victorian "2 Fruit 'n' 5 Veg Every Day" campaign was aimed at increasing awareness of the need to eat more fruit and vegetables and encouraging increased consumption of these foods in the Australian state of Victoria. The demand-side component of the campaign, which had television advertising as a centerpiece, ran from 1992 to 1995. Annual postcampaign telephone surveys of approximately 500 Victorians ages 20 and over were conducted with the aim of examining public awareness of the campaign, beliefs about desirable eating habits for fruit and vegetables, and reported consumption of these foods. Over the years, patterns in the level of public awareness, reported consumption, and beliefs about appropriate levels of consumption have tended to parallel changes in the level of mass media investment. During the campaign's most intense period of promotional activity, significant increases in all of these variables occurred. The results suggest that significant achievements can be made with relatively small-budget mass media promotion of dietary recommendations, especially when part of a more comprehensive program. However, campaigns may need to be adequately resourced for several years if sustained change is to be achieved.

  8. Campaign for A-rated circulator pumps - a proven strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueders, Christian; Wilke, Goeran (The Danish Electricity Saving Trust (Denmark)); Dam Wied, Martin (Wormslev - NRGi Raadgivning A/S (Denmark))

    2009-07-01

    1.2 million households in Denmark have a central heating circulator pump. An estimated 800,000 pumps installed are old and inefficient. Potential savings per year of 400 GWh and 200,000 tons of CO{sub 2} can be achieved by replacing these obsolete pumps. However, many consumers and installers have neither an opinion about, nor play an active role in choosing a circulator pump. This paper documents how it is possible to promote the wider use of A-rated circulator pumps via an offensive campaign strategy to get both consumers and installers to participate actively in the choice of pump, thereby increasing the market share of A-rated pumps sold. The campaign is based on a broadly-based push-pull strategy which aims to influence both consumers and suppliers simultaneously. The strategy consists of the following elements: Involvement of the supply side via voluntary agreements with producers, wholesalers, installers, and their trade organisations; Partnerships with installers in order to secure fixed price installations for A-rated pumps; Influencing consumers through magazine advertisements and TV commercials. The market share for A-rated circulator pumps in Denmark grew from 15-60% in the period January 2006 to the end of October 2008. In a new phase, the strategy is switching the focus to OEM and boiler producers, and producers of heat exchangers for district and underfloor heating systems. The aim of the current phase was for A pumps to have accounted for 60% of the Danish market by the end of 2008

  9. Development and evaluation of a youth mental health community awareness campaign – The Compass Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Annemarie; McGorry, Patrick D; Harris, Meredith G; Jorm, Anthony F; Pennell, Kerryn

    2006-01-01

    Background Early detection and treatment of mental disorders in adolescents and young adults can lead to better health outcomes. Mental health literacy is a key to early recognition and help seeking. Whilst a number of population health initiatives have attempted to improve mental health literacy, none to date have specifically targeted young people nor have they applied the rigorous standards of population health models now accepted as best practice in other health areas. This paper describes the outcomes from the application of a health promotion model to the development, implementation and evaluation of a community awareness campaign designed to improve mental health literacy and early help seeking amongst young people. Method The Compass Strategy was implemented in the western metropolitan Melbourne and Barwon regions of Victoria, Australia. The Precede-Proceed Model guided the population assessment, campaign strategy development and evaluation. The campaign included the use of multimedia, a website, and an information telephone service. Multiple levels of evaluation were conducted. This included a cross-sectional telephone survey of mental health literacy undertaken before and after 14 months of the campaign using a quasi-experimental design. Randomly selected independent samples of 600 young people aged 12–25 years from the experimental region and another 600 from a comparison region were interviewed at each time point. A series of binary logistic regression analyses were used to measure the association between a range of campaign outcome variables and the predictor variables of region and time. Results The program was judged to have an impact on the following variables, as indicated by significant region-by-time interaction effects (p awareness of mental health campaigns, self-identified depression, help for depression sought in the previous year, correct estimate of prevalence of mental health problems, increased awareness of suicide risk, and a reduction

  10. Qualitative Analysis of Infant Safe Sleep Public Campaign Messaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Nadine R; Altfeld, Susan; Rosenthal, Allison L; Garland, Caitlin E; Massino, Jill M; Smith, Sherri L; Rowe, Hillary L; Wagener, Sarah E

    2018-03-01

    The 1994 Back to Sleep public education campaign resulted in dramatic reductions in sleep-related infant deaths, but comparable progress in recent years has been elusive. We conducted qualitative analyses of recent safe sleep campaigns from 13 U.S. cities. Goals were to (a) determine whether the campaigns reflect the full range of American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2011 safe sleep recommendations, (b) describe tone and framing of the messages (e.g., use of fear appeals), (c) describe targeting/tailoring of messages to priority populations, and (d) ascertain whether the campaigns have been evaluated for reach and/or effectiveness. Methods included computer-assisted analyses of campaign materials and key informant interviews. All campaigns included "ABC" (Alone, Back, Crib) messaging; many ignored other AAP recommendations such as breastfeeding, room-sharing, immunizations, and avoiding smoke exposure. Campaigns frequently targeted priority populations such as African Americans. Fear appeals were used in three quarters of the campaigns, and 60% of the fear-based campaigns used guilt/blame messaging. We did not find published evaluation data for any of the campaigns. More attention is needed in public education campaigns to the full range of AAP recommendations, and evaluations are needed to determine the impact of these interventions on knowledge, behavior, and health outcomes.

  11. Distance Diffusion of Home Bias for Crowdfunding Campaigns between Categories: Insights from Data Analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihuan Guo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available As the information communication and investment of crowdfunding campaigns are usually accomplished online, online crowdfunding theoretically breaks the limitation of space. However, investors’ behaviors still show significant home bias; furthermore, from a dynamic view, the changes in home bias during the funding duration reflect the investment preference. This paper studies the dynamics of home bias in crowdfunding investment as well as the distance diffusion of home bias in the crowdfunding market through data mining and econometric models. The distance between investors and founders gradually increases from 3605 km to 4229 km as the funding progresses, and home bias shows different diffusion patterns between categories. For most of the campaigns, the distance between backers and founders of the successful campaigns is always greater than that of the failed ones; thus, the distance diffusion impacts the pledge results. However, the study also finds that for some categories, home bias does not play a positive role in investment or that it even shows negative impacts, among which food and technology are two extreme categories. The study provides a theoretical basis from the perspective of user behavior to analyze online investment and to improve the promotion of crowdfunding campaigns.

  12. Brazil launches anti-AIDS campaign for Indians. Education and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-09

    Anthropologists are educating Indian tribes regarding methods of preventing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), particularly acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), in a new Brazilian campaign. Estimates of the number of Indians who are infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vary because records do not categorize by race. While the National Indian Foundation (Funai) believes 20 of 320,000 Indians are infected, the Catholic Church's Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI) states that 11 Indians have died of AIDS since 1989, and that another 4 are HIV-positive. According to Pedro Chequer, campaign coordinator, the Indian population is at low risk, but highly vulnerable to the spread of HIV infection; each tribe has different sexual mores, which must be respected, and its own language, which requires educational materials in that language. Based on recent studies, 10-15% of Brazilian Indians are infected with some form of STD. Indians at high risk, those living near urban areas or having regular contact with mining and forestry workers, particularly the wildcat golddiggers known as "garimpeiros," are being targeted. The use of army personnel, who are often the only non-indigenous people in isolated areas of the Amazon, in the campaign is being considered. The Ministry of Heath is also promoting studies of Indian culture and an education campaign in 1310 schools, reaching 62,000 indigenous students and 2504 teachers.

  13. FY 2000 report on the basic survey to promote Joint Implementation, etc. Energy conservation by modernization of a cement plant (Double Horse Cement Co.) in China; 2000 nendo kyodo jisshi nado suishin kiso chosa hokokusho. Chugoku cement kojo (Double Horse Cement) kindaika ni yoru sho energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    An investigational study was conducted of possibilities of energy conservation and greenhouse effect gas emission reduction in the cement production process of Double Horse Cement Co., Mianyang City, Sichuan Province, China. Double Horse Cement adopts the wet type long kiln production system and has a production ability of approximately 1.5 million t/y. In the project, as to three production lines out of the six production lines, improvement was planned to be made of the technologies on the following: mixing of raw materials, grinding of raw materials, NSP, clinker cooler, clinker pre-grinder, high-efficiency separator, waste heat use power generation, etc. As a result of the study, it was found that the energy conservation amount obtained was 54,646 toe/y. And, the amount of greenhouse effect gas reduction was 169,086 t-CO2/y. The total fund required for this project was approximately 5.553 billion yen and the internal earning rate was 7.36% after tax. When the project is carried out, expenses vs. effects are 9.8 toe/million yen in energy conservation amount and 30.4 t-CO2/million yen in greenhouse effect gas reduction. (NEDO)

  14. The role and utilisation of public health evaluations in Europe: a case study of national hand hygiene campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Evaluations are essential to judge the success of public health programmes. In Europe, the proportion of public health programmes that undergo evaluation remains unclear. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control sought to determine the frequency of evaluations amongst European national public health programmes by using national hand hygiene campaigns as an example of intervention. Methods A cohort of all national hand hygiene campaigns initiated between 2000 and 2012 was utilised for the analysis. The aim was to collect information about evaluations of hand hygiene campaigns and their frequency. The survey was sent to nominated contact points for healthcare-associated infection surveillance in European Union and European Economic Area Member States. Results Thirty-six hand hygiene campaigns in 20 countries were performed between 2000 and 2012. Of these, 50% had undergone an evaluation and 55% of those utilised the WHO hand hygiene intervention self-assessment tool. Evaluations utilised a variety of methodologies and indicators in assessing changes in hand hygiene behaviours pre and post intervention. Of the 50% of campaigns that were not evaluated, two thirds reported that both human and financial resource constraints posed significant barriers for the evaluation. Conclusion The study identified an upward trend in the number of hand hygiene campaigns implemented in Europe. It is likely that the availability of the internationally-accepted evaluation methodology developed by the WHO contributed to the evaluation of more hand hygiene campaigns in Europe. Despite this rise, hand hygiene campaigns appear to be under-evaluated. The development of simple, programme-specific, standardised guidelines, evaluation indicators and other evidence-based public health materials could help promote evaluations across all areas of public health. PMID:24507086

  15. Effects of information, education, and communication campaign on a community-based health insurance scheme in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofie, Patience; De Allegri, Manuela; Kouyaté, Bocar; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2013-12-06

    The study analysed the effect of Information, Education, and Communication (IEC) campaign activities on the adoption of a community-based health insurance (CHI) scheme in Nouna, Burkina Faso. It also identified the factors that enhanced or limited the campaign's effectiveness. Complementary data collection approaches were used. A survey was conducted with 250 randomly selected household heads, followed by in-depth interviews with 22 purposively selected community leaders, group discussions with the project management team, and field observations. Bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the association between household exposure to campaign and acquisition of knowledge as well as household exposure to campaign and enrolment. The IEC campaign had a positive effect on households' knowledge about the CHI and to a lesser extent on household enrolment in the scheme. The effectiveness of the IEC strategy was mainly influenced by: (1) frequent and consistent IEC messages from multiple media channels (mass and interpersonal channels), including the radio, a mobile information van, and CHI team, and (2) community heads' participation in the CHI scheme promotion. Education was the only significantly influential socio-demographic determinant of knowledge and enrolment among household heads. The relatively low effects of the IEC campaign on CHI enrolment are indicative of other important IEC mediating factors, which should be taken into account in future CHI campaign evaluation. The study concludes that an IEC campaign is crucial to improving the understanding of the CHI scheme concept, which is an enabler to enrolment, and should be integrated into scheme designs and evaluations.

  16. Effects of information, education, and communication campaign on a community-based health insurance scheme in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Cofie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The study analysed the effect of Information, Education, and Communication (IEC campaign activities on the adoption of a community-based health insurance (CHI scheme in Nouna, Burkina Faso. It also identified the factors that enhanced or limited the campaign's effectiveness. Design : Complementary data collection approaches were used. A survey was conducted with 250 randomly selected household heads, followed by in-depth interviews with 22 purposively selected community leaders, group discussions with the project management team, and field observations. Bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the association between household exposure to campaign and acquisition of knowledge as well as household exposure to campaign and enrolment. Results : The IEC campaign had a positive effect on households’ knowledge about the CHI and to a lesser extent on household enrolment in the scheme. The effectiveness of the IEC strategy was mainly influenced by: 1 frequent and consistent IEC messages from multiple media channels (mass and interpersonal channels, including the radio, a mobile information van, and CHI team, and 2 community heads’ participation in the CHI scheme promotion. Education was the only significantly influential socio-demographic determinant of knowledge and enrolment among household heads. The relatively low effects of the IEC campaign on CHI enrolment are indicative of other important IEC mediating factors, which should be taken into account in future CHI campaign evaluation. Conclusion : The study concludes that an IEC campaign is crucial to improving the understanding of the CHI scheme concept, which is an enabler to enrolment, and should be integrated into scheme designs and evaluations.

  17. A systematic review: effectiveness of mass media campaigns for reducing alcohol-impaired driving and alcohol-related crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajendra-Prasad; Kobayashi, Miwako

    2015-09-04

    Mass media campaigns have long been used as a tool for promoting public health. In the past decade, the growth of social media has allowed more diverse options for mass media campaigns. This systematic review was conducted to assess newer evidence from quantitative studies on the effectiveness of mass media campaigns for reducing alcohol-impaired driving (AID) and alcohol-related crashes, particularly after the paper that Elder et al. published in 2004. This review focused on English language studies that evaluated the effect of mass media campaigns for reducing AID and alcohol-related crashes, with or without enforcement efforts. A systematic search was conducted for studies published between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2013. Studies from the review by Elder et al. were added as well. A total of 19 studies met the inclusion criteria for the systematic review, including three studies from the review by Elder et al. Nine of them had concomitant enforcement measures and did not evaluate the impact of media campaigns independently. Studies that evaluated the impact of mass media independently showed reduction more consistently (median -15.1%, range -28.8 to 0%), whereas results of studies that had concomitant enforcement activities were more variable (median -8.6%, range -36.4 to +14.6%). Summary effects calculated from seven studies showed no evidence of media campaigns reducing the risk of alcohol-related injuries or fatalities (RR 1.00, 95% CI = 0.94 to 1.06). Despite additional decade of evidence, reviewed studies were heterogeneous in their approaches; therefore, we could not conclude that media campaigns reduced the risk of alcohol-related injuries or crashes. More studies are needed, including studies evaluating newly emerging media and cost-effectiveness of media campaigns.

  18. Evaluation of a multifaceted social marketing campaign to increase awareness of and screening for oral cancer in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedele, J M; Ismail, A I

    2010-08-01

    A 2-year social marketing media campaign and community education activities were organized to promote screening for oral cancer in a high-risk population in Detroit/Wayne County, Michigan. Long-term goals of the campaign were to reduce the oral cancer death rate, increase the proportion of oral cancers detected at an early stage, and increase the proportion of adults who report having been screened. The intermediate goals of the campaign were to increase awareness of oral cancer and of oral cancer screening. This article presents outcomes related to the intermediate goals of the campaign. The intermediate goals of the campaign were assessed by the number of calls to a toll-free hotline, which media venues led to calls, number of screenings conducted by the free screening clinic, number of precancers and cancers detected, and the number of sessions conducted, organizations involved, and persons participating in the community education program. The costs per screened case and cancers detected were also evaluated. The media campaign promoted screening using billboards, radio and newspaper ads, and a toll-free hotline. Culturally relevant messages were developed collaboratively with focus groups representing the target audience. Billboards were placed in highly visible locations around Detroit, Michigan. Sixty-second messages on the impact of oral cancer and that screening is 'painless and free' were aired on radio stations popular with the target audience. Ads displaying the hotline were placed in two local newspapers. Callers to the hotline were scheduled for a free screening with a clinic operated by the project. Referral to an oral surgeon was scheduled if a suspicious lesion was found. Free education sessions were also conducted with community-based organizations. Costs associated with the campaign and hotline were totaled, and the cost per screening and cancer detected were calculated. During the campaign, 1327 radio spots aired; 42 billboards were displayed; two

  19. Promoting Practices: How Activists Employ Online Tactics to Promote Energy Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, Maarten; van den Broek, Tijs Adriaan

    2014-01-01

    This research combines institutional and social movement theory to explore and describe how social movement organizations use online tactics to promote new institutional norms. The research setting for the current research is the Dutch environmental movement. The process of an online campaign of the

  20. The Effect of Campaign-Generated Interpersonal Communication on Campaign-Targeted Health Outcomes: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Michelle; Bae, Rosie Eungyuhl

    2017-06-16

    This study examined the effect of mass media campaign-generated conversations on campaign-targeted health outcomes, via a systematic meta-analysis of 28 studies (including 124 sub-studies and a total of 138,898 participants). The study also conducted a series of moderation analyses to examine the conditions under which interpersonal communication has larger effects on bringing about the desired outcomes. The findings of this meta-analysis indicate that campaign-generated conversations have a positive effect on inducing campaign-targeted outcomes (OR = 1.28) and show that this effect is moderated by health topic addressed by the campaign, the type of outcome being targeted by the campaign, and with whom people converse, along with several other campaign-relevant and study-relevant variables. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  1. Marketing campaigns and politics – british experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halida Sarajlić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available By gaining political power, individuals and political par¬ties at the same time gain the power to shape not only political but also public life. An accelerated growth of mass media communication has led to the development of various means and techniques of political marketing. This in turn requires certain adjustments to political campaigns and programs, out of which only those adapted to the new communication environment may succeed. Marketing in terms of politics and especially negative comparative advertising, which is becoming increasingly more present and intense in political campaigning, opens a series of ethical questions. Among others, these include whether such advertising in politics is effective, to what extent and what its consequences are. The goal of this paper is to present the main characteristics of political marketing, the effectiveness of the methods and techniques used in the course of elect¬ion campaigning, their consequences and basic differences between political marketing and products and services marketing. A special emphasis will be placed on the presentation of political marketing of Great Britain, which has a long tradition in utilizing marketing methods and techniques in the political arena. Moreover, political moves made by politicians and political parties in Great Britain certainly make a good starting point for shaping an optimal political strategy in other countries, while at the same time taking into account the particulars of a specific political and social environment. Content analysis methodology was used in the preparation of this paper and all the data were gathered from secondary sources.

  2. Periodontal health: CPITN as a promotional strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxson, L J; Purdell-Lewis, D

    1994-10-01

    Community and individual involvement are essential needs in preventive programmes for periodontal health. Campaigns should be directed towards a better individual understanding of the importance of healthy gum tissues if a functional healthy dentition is to be retained over a lifetime. Effective awareness campaigns require not only participation and education of the general public, but also all levels of health care professionals. Awareness programmes need to be carefully planned and their messages clear, non-conflicting and regularly reinforced. The complete programme should be based on, and include, specific aims, goals, strategies, monitoring and evaluation. Oral health and hygiene promotion campaigns need careful coordination between the relevant agencies or institutions involved in their implementation, such as government agencies, professional associations, industry, aid groups and education organisations.

  3. Ignition tuning for the National Ignition Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landen O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The overall goal of the indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion [1] tuning campaigns [2] is to maximize the probability of ignition by experimentally correcting for likely residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics [3] used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models, and by checking for and resolving unexpected shot-to-shot variability in performance [4]. This has been started successfully using a variety of surrogate capsules that set key laser, hohlraum and capsule parameters to maximize ignition capsule implosion velocity, while minimizing fuel adiabat, core shape asymmetry and ablator-fuel mix.

  4. Kimon's military campaign in Caria and Lycia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranov D.A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available the article analyzes the reasons, course and results of the military campaign of the Athenian military commander Kimon in the southwest of Asia Minor. The author provides a brief comparative-historical and textual analysis of written sources and archaeological materials testifying the military-political activity of Athens in Caria and Lycia. An attempt is made to analyze the evolution of views on the problem within the framework of classical and modern historiography. Based on the involvement of a wide range of data, an attempt is made to analyze the evolution of the political influence of Athens in southwestern Anatolia.

  5. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2015 Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braase, Lori Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-29

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors; enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel; effectively utilize nuclear energy resources; and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This report is a compilation of technical accomplishment summaries for FY-15. Emphasis is on advanced accident-tolerant LWR fuel systems, advanced transmutation fuels technologies, and capability development.

  6. Preliminary survey on the information campaign on nuclear energy of the Austrian Government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, H.

    1977-01-01

    To provide adequate, unbiased information to the public as well as basic material for future decisions concerning nuclear energy to parliament, the Austrian Government began the Information Campaign on Nuclear Energy in October 1976 and it will continue to June 1977. In the first phase of this campaign, teams of experts consisting of promoters and critics of nuclear energy discussed the various aspects of this topic in public as well as in internal debates, finally producing exhaustive reports. In the second phase, scheduled to take place in May and June 1977, these reports will be discussed in a series of symposia by representatives of the different viewpoints of the Austrian public on nuclear energy. They will then be submitted to parliament together with a summary provided by the Government. The motivation of the campaign, the preparation and execution of the first phase, as well as the first steps in the preparation of the second pahse, are described. Preliminary analyses concern: a) the interaction between the authorities, the experts and the public; b) the interaction among the experts; c) the character of the protest movement and its activities and the public activities of the promoters of nuclear energy; d) the role of the mass media and the information flow in society; and, very cursorily; e) the international echo. Preliminary conclusions are drawn on the organisation of the process of optimal transfer of information to the public, consensus-finding in society and decision-making; a comparison with experiences in other countries is attempted

  7. Results of a workplace health campaign: what can be achieved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyk, Dieter; Rohde, Ulrich; Hartmann, Nadine D; Preuß, Philipp A; Sievert, Alexander; Witzki, Alexander

    2014-05-02

    Effective health promotion in the workplace is now essential because of the rising health-related costs for businesses, the increasing pressure arising from international competition, prolonged working lives, and the aging of the work force. The basic problem of prevention campaigns is that the target groups are too rarely reached and sustainable benefits too rarely achieved. In 2011, we carried out a broad-based health and fitness campaign to assess how many personnel could be motivated to participate in a model study under nearly ideal conditions. 1010 personnel were given the opportunity to participate in various kinds of sports, undergo sports-medicine examinations, attend monthly expert lectures, and benefit from nutritional offerings and Intranet information during work hours. Pseudonymized questionnaires were used to classify the participants according to their exercise behavior as non-active, not very active, and very active. The participants' subjective responses (regarding, e.g., health, exercise, nutrition, and the factors that motivated them to participate in sports or discouraged them from doing so) were recorded, as were their objective data (measures of body size and strength). The duration of the study was one year. 490 of the 1010 personnel (48.5%, among whom 27.2% were nonactive, 44.1% not very active, and 28.7% very active) participated in the initial questionnaire and testing. By the end of the study, this figure had dropped to 17.8%; diminished participation affected all three groups to a comparable extent. A comparison of dropouts and non-dropouts revealed that older age was a stable predictor for drop-out (bivariate odds ratio [OR] 1.028, p = 0.006; multivariate OR 1.049, p = 0.009). The study participants reported beneficial effects on their health and health awareness, performance ability, psychological balance, stress perception, exercise and dietary behavior. Even under optimal conditions and with high use of staff resources, this model

  8. Qualitative developmental research among low income African American adults to inform a social marketing campaign for walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study describes the development of a social marketing campaign for increasing walking in a low income, high crime community as part of the Positive Action for Today’s Health (PATH) trial. Methods Focus groups were conducted with 52 African American adults (ages 18 to 65 yrs), from two underserved communities to develop themes for a social marketing campaign to promote walking. Participants responded to questions concerning social marketing principles related to product, price, place, promotion, and positioning for increasing neighbourhood walking. Results Focus group data informed the development of the campaign objectives that were derived from the “5 Ps” to promote physical and mental health, social connectedness, safety, and confidence in walking regularly. Focus group themes indicated that physical and mental health benefits of walking were important motivators. Walking for social reasons was also important for overcoming barriers to walking. Police support from trusted officers while walking was also essential to promoting safety for walking. Print materials were developed by the steering committee, with a 12-month calendar and door hangers delivered to residents’ homes to invite them to walk. Pride Stride walks empowered community walkers to serve as peer leaders for special walking events to engage new walkers. Conclusions Essential elements for developing culturally tailored social marketing interventions for promoting walking in underserved communities are outlined for future researchers. PMID:23497164

  9. Qualitative developmental research among low income African American adults to inform a social marketing campaign for walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dawn K; St George, Sara M; Trumpeter, Nevelyn N; Coulon, Sandra M; Griffin, Sarah F; Wandersman, Abe; Forthofer, Melinda; Gadson, Barney; Brown, Porschia V

    2013-03-05

    This study describes the development of a social marketing campaign for increasing walking in a low income, high crime community as part of the Positive Action for Today's Health (PATH) trial. Focus groups were conducted with 52 African American adults (ages 18 to 65 yrs), from two underserved communities to develop themes for a social marketing campaign to promote walking. Participants responded to questions concerning social marketing principles related to product, price, place, promotion, and positioning for increasing neighbourhood walking. Focus group data informed the development of the campaign objectives that were derived from the "5 Ps" to promote physical and mental health, social connectedness, safety, and confidence in walking regularly. Focus group themes indicated that physical and mental health benefits of walking were important motivators. Walking for social reasons was also important for overcoming barriers to walking. Police support from trusted officers while walking was also essential to promoting safety for walking. Print materials were developed by the steering committee, with a 12-month calendar and door hangers delivered to residents' homes to invite them to walk. Pride Stride walks empowered community walkers to serve as peer leaders for special walking events to engage new walkers. Essential elements for developing culturally tailored social marketing interventions for promoting walking in underserved communities are outlined for future researchers.

  10. Observing Double Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  11. Formation of double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.; Wong, A.Y.; Quon, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on both stationary and propagating double layers and a related analytical model are described. Stationary double layers were produced in a multiple plasma device, in which an electron drift current was present. An investigation of the plasma parameters for the stable double layer condition is described. The particle distribution in the stable double layer establishes a potential profile, which creates electron and ion beams that excite plasma instabilities. The measured characteristics of the instabilities are consistent with the existence of the double layer. Propagating double layers are formed when the initial electron drift current is large. Ths slopes of the transition region increase as they propagate. A physical model for the formation of a double layer in the experimental device is described. This model explains the formation of the low potential region on the basis of the space charge. This space charge is created by the electron drift current. The model also accounts for the role of ions in double layer formation and explains the formation of moving double layers. (Auth.)

  12. Comparing online and telephone survey results in the context of a skin cancer prevention campaign evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollier, L P; Pettigrew, S; Slevin, T; Strickland, M; Minto, C

    2017-03-01

    A large proportion of health promotion campaign evaluation research has historically been conducted via telephone surveys. However, there are concerns about the continued viability of this form of surveying in providing relevant and representative data. Online surveys are an increasingly popular alternative, and as such there is a need to assess the comparability between data collected using the two different methods to determine the implications for longitudinal comparisons. The present study compared these survey modes in the context of health promotion evaluation research. Data were collected via computer-assisted telephone interviewing and an online panel. In total, 688 and 606 respondents aged between 14 and 45 years completed the online and telephone surveys, respectively. Online respondents demonstrated higher awareness of the advertisement, rated the advertisement as more personally relevant and had better behavioural outcomes compared with the telephone respondents. The results indicate significant differences between the telephone and online surveys on most measures used to assess the effectiveness of a health promotion advertising campaign. Health promotion practitioners could consider the combination of both methods to overcome the deterioration in telephone survey response rates and the likely differences in respondent outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Improving Sales Promotion of a Beverage Company in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulrauf, Abdullahi

    2012-01-01

    Promotion campaign is probably the most important aspect of the four marketing-mix elements—Price, Place, Product and Promotion— that are used to solve companies’ problems and gain competitive advantage if well implemented. This important element of marketing-mix involves personal selling, advertisement, sales promotion and public relations. Meanwhile, the ultimate objectives of promotion are to create awareness, provide information about goods and services, and differentiate a product fro...

  14. Click to "like" organ donation: the use of online media to promote organ donor registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanone, Michael; Anker, Ashley E; Evans, Melanie; Feeley, Thomas Hugh

    2012-06-01

    Efforts to promote organ donation have traditionally relied on mass-mediated or interpersonal communication to promote donor registration. Despite its popularity, the use of online media has yet to be carefully evaluated as a platform to promote organ donation. To describe results of an intervention to promote donor registration that relies solely on online media to communicate to target audiences. For 3 years, 6 campaigns were implemented in 3 different online media formats. Online media formats included (1) traditional online advertising, (2) student seeders' social networking sites campaigns, and (3) challenge campaigns. Online media campaigns primarily targeted college-aged individuals.Intervention-Each campaign directed individuals to the dedicated project website, where they could access educational material about donation and request a donor registration card. Unique website visitors, webpages viewed per site visit, time spent on site, and organ donor cards requested/received were tracked in relation to each online media format. Traditional online advertising offered greater message exposure but failed to result in a higher proportion of website visitors who registered their donation intentions. Use of student seeders (ie, motivated students who promote donation by using social networking sites) and challenge campaigns resulted in greater attention to the project website, donor card requests, and subsequent returns. Additional research is recommended to reveal the effect of combining 2 or more varying online media formats within a single campaign.

  15. In Search of the Campaign Fan: Media Use and Caucus Participation in the 1980 Primary Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droge, David; Davis, Kristine

    High turnout for the 1980 Iowa caucuses and conflicting explanations for that high turnout formed the background for an investigation of the relationship between media uses and gratifications, involvement in the local community, and caucus participation. Campaign fan gratifications--either excitement seeking or communicative utility--were…

  16. Fear appeals and confronting information campaigns. [Previously: Fear-based information campaigns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2007-01-01

    Fear appeals or confronting information campaigns confront people in an often hard and sometimes even shocking way with the consequences of risky behaviour. This can have a positive impact on the attitudes and behavioural intentions of the target group, but only if key conditions are met. Those

  17. Second-rate election campaigning? An analysis of campaign styles in European parliamentary elections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vreese, C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The literature on professionalization of political campaigns is strongly biased toward first-order (national) elections and the U.S. and U.K. contexts. This study expands that scope. Based on a survey of candidates for the 2004 European elections in eight European Union countries, we tested whether

  18. Talking About Antismoking Campaigns: What Do Smokers Talk About, and How Does Talk Influence Campaign Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Emily; Durkin, Sarah J; Wakefield, Melanie A; Kashima, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Campaign-stimulated conversations have been shown to increase the effectiveness of antismoking campaigns. In order to explore why such effects occur, in the current study we coded the content of naturally occurring conversations. We also examined whether the short-term effects of talking, and of different types of talk, on quitting intentions were mediated through intrapersonal message responses. Using the Natural Exposure(SM) methodology, we exposed 411 smokers to 1 of 6 antismoking advertisements while they were watching television at home. Responses to the advertisement-conversation participation and content, emotional responses, personalized perceived effectiveness, and changes in intentions to quit-were measured within 3 days of exposure. Conversations were coded for appraisal of the advertisement (favorable, neutral, or unfavorable) and the presence of quitting talk and emotion talk. Mediation analyses indicated that the positive effects of talking on intention change were mediated through personalized perceived effectiveness and that the positive effects were driven by conversations that contained a favorable appraisal and/or quitting talk. Conversely, conversations that contained an unfavorable appraisal of the advertisement were negatively associated with campaign effectiveness. These findings highlight the importance of measuring interpersonal communication when evaluating campaigns and the need for further research to identify the message characteristics that predict when smokers talk and when they talk only in desirable ways.

  19. Mobilizing social media users to become advertisers: Corporate hashtag campaigns as a public health concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laestadius, Linnea I; Wahl, Megan M

    2017-01-01

    With the growing popularity of social media, corporate marketers are increasingly launching hashtag campaigns to encourage consumers to create branded user-generated content on their behalves. If successful, these campaigns may expand the reach of harmful marketing messages and capitalize on peer-effects among adolescents. To shed light on these novel corporate campaigns, we performed a case study of the user-generated Instagram content created in response to a hashtag campaign promoting the quick-service restaurant Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC). We performed a content analysis of one week's worth of user-generated Instagram posts created with the hashtag #HowDoYouKFC between 24 April 2015-1 May 2015. Posts were coded to discern: (a) relevance to KFC as a brand and/or food; (b) themes in the post, (c) the content of images/videos, and (d) overall sentiment toward KFC. Posts that were deleted or made private during the study period were removed. Descriptive statistics were calculated to discern trends in post content. Instagram users created 196 posts with #HowDoYouKFC during the study period. After removing irrelevant and deleted/private posts, analysis of the 128 remaining user-generated posts revealed that 45% of posts were explicitly positive toward KFC and 39% lacked a specific stance or emotion related to KFC. Of the posts, 55% depicted KFC chicken and 65% included depictions of the brand hashtag on food packaging. Findings indicate that corporations are successfully converting individual social media users into positive advertisers for harmful products. Novel efforts are needed to counter corporate user-generated content campaigns.

  20. Experience of a national campaign for hand trauma prevention in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellemere, P; Guimberteau, J C

    2013-12-01

    In France, hand injuries are the number one cause of all accidents referred to our hospital casualty departments. Their human and economic consequences are very serious. Two thirds of these accidents arise during everyday living activities and a third of them happen at work. The specific prevention of hand injuries in each of these domains has not been sufficiently developed. The authors present the national prevention campaign recently set up by the FESUM. The campaign took place in the form of events held in different towns in France. Each event, lasting from a minimum of 2 days to 10 days maximum, included press conferences, prevention workshops specific to hand injuries, theatrical animation for youngsters, conferences for the general public, meetings in industrial or training college environments, photography and video exhibitions, and the publication of pamphlets and posters. These manifestations were carried out in partnership with the association APAVC and the voluntary involvement of surgeons from the FESUM hand centres in each town visited. Over a period of 2 years, 22 large or medium-sized towns were able to hold these campaign events. By this means, thousands of people - adults, schoolchildren or young, professional apprentices - were made aware of hand injuries and how to prevent them. We were able to reinforce the broadcasting of simple prevention messages launched by the campaign, particularly with regard to wearing gloves for all manual activities, with the help of heavy local, regional and national media coverage. This campaign was the first widespread action of its kind, aimed specifically at the prevention of hand injuries. Furthermore, it was a way of strengthening the credibility of the FESUM hand emergency centres with the health authorities and to promote the services available to patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. The Impact of Public Health Awareness Campaigns on the Awareness and Quality of Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Jane

    2018-01-01

    The right to health includes a right of access to good quality palliative care, but inequalities persist. Raising awareness is a key plank of the public health approach to palliative care, but involves consideration of subjects most of us prefer not to address. This review addresses the question: "do public health awareness campaigns effectively improve the awareness and quality of palliative care"? The evidence shows that public awareness campaigns can improve awareness of palliative care and probably improve quality of care, but there is a lack of evidence about the latter. Rapid review and synthesis. A comprehensive public awareness campaign about palliative care (including advance care planning and end-of-life decision making) should be based on clear and shared terminology, use well piloted materials, and the full range of mass media to suit different ages, cultures, and religious/spiritual perspectives. Arts and humanities have a role to play in allowing individuals and communities to express experiences of illness, death, and grief and encourage conversation and thoughtful reflection. There is evidence about key factors for success: targeting, networking, and use of specific, measurable, achievable, realistic time-bound objectives; continuous evaluation; and complementarity to national and international policy. Campaigns should be located within the framework of public health promotion and the synergy between short national mass media campaigns and longer term local community action initiatives carefully considered. National and local projects to raise awareness should identify and address any barriers at the level of individuals, communities, and systems of care, for example, literacy skills and unequal access to resources.

  2. Public health campaigns and obesity - a critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proietto Joseph

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Controlling obesity has become one of the highest priorities for public health practitioners in developed countries. In the absence of safe, effective and widely accessible high-risk approaches (e.g. drugs and surgery attention has focussed on community-based approaches and social marketing campaigns as the most appropriate form of intervention. However there is limited evidence in support of substantial effectiveness of such interventions. Discussion To date there is little evidence that community-based interventions and social marketing campaigns specifically targeting obesity provide substantial or lasting benefit. Concerns have been raised about potential negative effects created by a focus of these interventions on body shape and size, and of the associated media targeting of obesity. Summary A more appropriate strategy would be to enact high-level policy and legislative changes to alter the obesogenic environments in which we live by providing incentives for healthy eating and increased levels of physical activity. Research is also needed to improve treatments available for individuals already obese.

  3. Post-campaign information from the Infirmary

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Service’s “TAKE YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE TO HEART” campaign, which ran from 24 to 27 March 2015 (see here), was a resounding success.   In total, 274 people visited the nurses at their pop-up clinics (in Building 40, Restaurants 2 and 3 and the Main Building) or at the Infirmary (Building 57). Each of them had their blood pressure measured and received information and advice about high blood pressure, its contributory factors and ways to control it. They were also offered various leaflets about this public health issue. We would like to draw attention to the fact that 21% of the participants were found to have abnormally high blood-pressure and, crucially, 72% of these had been unaware of the problem. Another point to note is that a significant proportion (16%) of the younger people tested (aged 18 to 30) had abnormal results. The results of this campaign demonstrate the importance of early screening, but also the high level of interest among the pers...

  4. Transmutation Fuel Campaign Description and Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jon Carmack; Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu

    2008-01-01

    This report contains a technical summary package in response to a Level 2 milestone in the transmutation fuel campaign (TFC) management work-package calling for input to the Secretarial decision. At present, the form of the Secretarial decision package is not fully defined, and it is not clear exactly what will be required from the TFC as a final input. However, it is anticipated that a series of technical and programmatic documents will need to be provided in support of a wider encompassing document on GNEP technology development activities. The TFC technical leadership team provides this report as initial input to the secretarial decision package which is being developed by the Technical Integration Office (TIO) in support of Secretarial decision. This report contains a summary of the TFC execution plan with a work breakdown structure, high level schedule, major milestones, and summary description of critical activities in support of campaign objectives. Supporting documents referenced in this report but provided under separate cover include: (1) An updated review of the state-of-the art for transmutation fuel development activities considering national as well as international fuel research and development testing activities. (2) A definition of the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) used to systematically define and execute the transmutation fuel development activities

  5. La retirada de una campaña publicitaria para promoción de la vacuna tetravalente del virus del papiloma humano en España Withdrawal of an advertising campaign to promote the quadrivalent human papilloma virus vaccine in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Martín-Llaguno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La inclusión de la vacuna tetravalente del virus del papiloma humano (VPH en el Sistema Nacional de Salud aviva el debate sobre Gardasil®, presentada ante la opinión pública como «la vacuna contra el cáncer de cérvix». En este contexto, Sanofi Pasteur MSD es demandada por publicidad engañosa por la campaña cuentaselo.org. Pese a que la querella no se admite a trámite, la acción desencadena cinco cambios en la titularidad del dominio de la web que, avalada por sociedades científicas, queda sin razón legal. Por vulnerar la Ley de la Sociedad de Servicios de la Información, y ante la sospecha de que detrás está la farmacéutica (que no puede hacer publicidad de su producto, la plataforma para la moratoria de la vacuna del virus del papiloma humano reclama a la Sociedad Española de Ginecología y Obstetricia (presente en la web ante Autocontrol. Sanofi Pasteur MSD, anunciante no mencionado, «acepta la reclamación y da de baja la web», corroborando así su implicación.The inclusion of the quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV vaccine in the schedule of the Spanish National Health System sparked the debate over Gardasil®, which was presented to the public as a "vaccine against cervical cancer". In this context, Sanofi Pasteur MSD was sued for misleading advertising in the campaign "cuentaselo.org". Although the complaint was not admitted, the lawsuit triggered five changes in the ownership of the web domain which, although backed by scientific societies, was not supported by law. Because of the violation of the Law of the Society of Information Services, and prompted by the suspicion that the pharmaceutical company was behind these changes (as it could not advertise the product, the platform for the moratorium on the HPV vaccine filed a complaint against the Spanish Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (whose logo appeared on the webpage for breaching the code of advertising self-regulation. Sanofi Pasteur MSD, the advertiser

  6. Does culture matter?: a cross-national investigation of women's responses to cancer prevention campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyoo-Hoon; Jo, Samsup

    2012-01-01

    We examined how culture influences the persuasive effects of health campaigns that promote early screening for cancers that occur in women. Two message dimensions were included: individualistic vs. collectivistic appeal and gain vs. loss frame. A total of 955 females from three countries-the United States, South Korea, and Japan-participated in the experiment. From the results, we found that message framing alone did not significantly influence the effectiveness of public campaigns for women's cancer prevention; and this tendency was similar across the three countries. Gain-framed messages are likely to be more persuasive when combined with a collectivistic appeal, however, whereas loss-framed messages tend to be more effective when combined with an individualistic appeal in both the United States and South Korea; but this result was not the case for Japan. Based on the findings, we suggested theoretical and managerial implications as well as several directions for future research.

  7. Reflections on a Multi-stakeholder National Campaign in India around Comet ISON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Prajval

    2015-08-01

    Astronomy has been repeatedly demonstrated to be an effective vehicle to promote learning science by doing and to propagate a scientific temper among the public. In this spirit, the efforts undertaken in India during the international Year of Astronomy enabled the building of collaborations between professional astrophysicists, amateur astronomers, science teachers, science activists, theatre artistes and artist-designers. In the six years since, these networks have managed to not only sustain, but expand in reach, and have built focused attention of school-going children around astronomical events. The activities that were part of the build-up to both the Transit of Venus (2012) and the arrival of Comet ISON (2013) will be described. A somewhat informal consortium led the campaign around the comet. The campaigners were enabled by open-source digitally based resource material available in both English and regional languages. The lessons learnt will be discussed.

  8. Promoting Healthy Work for Employees with Chronic Illness : Analysis of Models of Good Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristin ten Have; Anja Dijkman; Dr. Rob Gründemann; Cees Wevers

    2012-01-01

    The ENWHP project and campaign Promoting Healthy Work for Employees with Chronic Illness (PH Work) should contribute towards the implementation of effective workplace health practices within corporate policies of enterprises in Europe. More specific the project should stimulate activities and

  9. York research doubles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadomski, C.

    1991-01-01

    This article addresses the performance of independent energy company stocks for the first quarter of 1991. Some factors discussed include the successful campaign in the Persian Gulf region, anticipation of contracts for rebuilding of Kuwait, successful bidding by companies for future work and product sales, and analysts recommendation of companies as good investments

  10. Towards Sustainability in Viral Marketing with User Engaging Supporting Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Jankowski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available While viral marketing has captured substantial academic and professional interest, the processes that underpin successful viral marketing campaigns remain poorly understood. High competition and pressure for successful campaigns lead to strategies based on persuasion, unsolicited messages, and other techniques that negatively affect brand perception. The need for more sustainable strategies with a limited negative impact on web users is observed. Therefore, the current study examines the effectiveness of viral marketing and a supporting campaign, where the main goal was to increase user engagement and overall campaign performance. Supporting campaigns were evaluated, to determine whether they enhanced viral activity, but without the need for high persuasion or intrusive techniques. Results showed that supporting actions could be integrated with lower performing campaigns to increase their effectiveness. Apart from the main scientific goal that is presented, the study demonstrates how virtual worlds can provide a laboratory-like environment for identifying the processes that underpin viral marketing.

  11. Mourning the Commons: Circulating Affect in Crowdfunded Funeral Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Kneese

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the role of circulated affect in crowdfunded funeral campaigns, which have attracted little scholarly attention so far. This study is based on content analysis of online campaigns ( N  = 50 and qualitative interviews ( N  = 10 with campaign supporters and initiators. Its aim is to connect crowdfunded funeral campaigns to the larger digital-sharing economy. The findings of the study suggest that in order to gather sufficient funds to cover funeral costs, individuals share emotionally evocative narratives and images with their social networks and an imagined Internet audience with the expectation of attracting compassion. The study shows that political movements, media coverage, and sharing on social media platforms are integral to the success of campaigns for socially marginal individuals. The article contributes to the growing study of crowdwork and finds persistent structural inequalities in crowdfunding campaigns, thereby contesting the ethos of the digital commons.

  12. Double-negative feedback loop between long non-coding RNA TUG1 and miR-145 promotes epithelial to mesenchymal transition and radioresistance in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiemei; Qiu, Kaifeng; Li, Mingyi; Liang, Ying

    2015-10-07

    LncRNAs have a critical role in the regulation of cellular processes such as cancer progression and metastasis. In the present study, we confirmed that TUG1 was overexpressed in bladder cancer tissues and established cell lines. Knockdown of TUG1 inhibited bladder cancer cell metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we found that TUG1 promoted cancer cell invasion and radioresistance through inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Interestingly, TUG1 decreased the expression of miR-145 and there was a reciprocal repression between TUG1 and miR-145 in an Argonaute2-dependent manner. ZEB2 was identified as a down-stream target of miR-145 and TUG1 exerted its function through the miR-145/ZEB2 axis. In summary, our data indicated that blocking TUG1 function may be an effective anti-cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Lessons learned from evaluating Maryland's anti-drunk driving campaign: assessing the evidence for cognitive, behavioral, and public health impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H

    2009-07-01

    The evidence concerning Maryland's anti-drunk driving program, Checkpoint Strikeforce, is reviewed. To date, there is no evidence to indicate that this campaign, which involves a number of sobriety checkpoints and media activities to promote these efforts, has had any impact on public perceptions, driver behaviors, or alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes and injuries. This conclusion is drawn after examining statistics for alcohol-related crashes, police citations for impaired driving, and public perceptions of alcohol-impaired driving risk. Comparisons are also made with other states in the mid-Atlantic region, where similar campaign activities have occurred. Reasons for this failure in Maryland include insufficient levels of enforcement (e.g., too few sobriety checkpoints and vehicle contacts occurred to raise public perceptions of risk pertaining to impaired driving) and inadequate publicity surrounding this campaign. Suggestions for overcoming these problems are offered.

  14. Health Promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Lene; Borup, I.

    2015-01-01

    and Adolescent Health Promotion', Salutogenesis - from theory to practice' and Health, Stress and Coping'. More than half of all doctoral theses undertaken at NHV during these years had health promotion as their theme. As a derivative, the Nordic Health Promotion Research Network (NHPRN) was established in 2007......In 1953 when the Nordic School of Public Health was founded, the aim of public health programmes was disease prevention more than health promotion. This was not unusual, since at this time health usually was seen as the opposite of disease and illness. However, with the Ottawa Charter of 1986......, the World Health Organization made a crucial change to view health not as a goal in itself but as the means to a full life. In this way, health promotion became a first priority and fundamental action for the modern society. This insight eventually reached NHV and in 2002 - 50 years after the foundation...

  15. The Effectiveness of Campaign Messages on Turnout and Vote Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Friedel, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    In this dissertation, I study campaign effects on turnout and vote choice. I analyze different campaign messages and the way they affect voters across various situations. First, through an online survey experiment, I study the impact of campaign messages and ideological cues on voters as they make inferences on candidates. Next, through a field experiment, I test whether microtargeted messages or general messages on the economy have any effect on turnout. Lastly, using online survey data, I e...

  16. Cancer foundation campaign for the 2017 World No Tobacco Day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gomes

    2018-03-01

    The tobacco control campaign of 2017 was well received and had a similar scope when compared to other Foundation campaigns. The comments were satisfactory and the content elaborated could be used for other occasions during the year. However, boosting the posts would give a much greater scope to action and this will be reevaluated next year. By the way, this campaign is also timeless and can be used on other dates related to tobacco control.

  17. Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment (ShUREX): overview of the campaign with some preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantha, Lakshmi; Lawrence, Dale; Luce, Hubert; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Wilson, Richard; Mixa, Tyler; Yabuki, Masanori

    2017-12-01

    The Shigaraki unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-Radar Experiment (ShUREX) is an international (USA-Japan-France) observational campaign, whose overarching goal is to demonstrate the utility of small, lightweight, inexpensive, autonomous UAVs in probing and monitoring the lower troposphere and to promote synergistic use of UAVs and very high frequency (VHF) radars. The 2-week campaign lasting from June 1 to June 14, 2015, was carried out at the Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU) Observatory in Shigaraki, Japan. During the campaign, the DataHawk UAV, developed at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and equipped with high-frequency response cold wire and pitot tube sensors (as well as an iMET radiosonde), was flown near and over the VHF-band MU radar. Measurements in the atmospheric column in the immediate vicinity of the radar were obtained. Simultaneous and continuous operation of the radar in range imaging mode enabled fine-scale structures in the atmosphere to be visualized by the radar. It also permitted the UAV to be commanded to sample interesting structures, guided in near real time by the radar images. This overview provides a description of the ShUREX campaign and some interesting but preliminary results of the very first simultaneous and intensive probing of turbulent structures by UAVs and the MU radar. The campaign demonstrated the validity and utility of the radar range imaging technique in obtaining very high vertical resolution ( 20 m) images of echo power in the atmospheric column, which display evolving fine-scale atmospheric structures in unprecedented detail. The campaign also permitted for the very first time the evaluation of the consistency of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates in turbulent structures inferred from the spectral broadening of the backscattered radar signal and direct, in situ measurements by the high-frequency response velocity sensor on the UAV. The data also enabled other turbulence parameters such as the temperature

  18. Double deflation and aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Erik; Hoen, A.R.

    Published input-output tables in constant prices are relatively scarce. Therefore, input-output tables often have to be deflated by the practitioners themselves. The method of double deflation is used predominantly for this purpose. The present paper shows that the double-deflation method is subject

  19. Campaign effects and self-analysis Internet tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brange, Birgitte [Danish Electricity Saving Trust (Denmark); Fjordbak Larsen, Troels [IT Energy ApS (Denmark); Wilke, Goeran [Danish Electricity Saving Trust (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    In October 2006, the Danish Electricity Saving Trust launched a large TV campaign targeting domestic electricity consumption. The campaign was based on the central message '1000 kWh/year per person is enough'. The campaign was accompanied by a new internet portal with updated information about numerous household appliances, and by analysis tools for bringing down electricity consumption to 1000 kWh/year per person. The effects of the campaign are monitored through repeated surveys and analysed in relation to usage of internet tools.

  20. Use of Deixis in Donald Trump?s Campaign Speech

    OpenAIRE

    Hanim, Saidatul

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study are (1) to find out the types of deixis in Donald Trump?s campaign speech, (2) to find out the reasons for the use of dominant type of deixis in Donald Trump?s campaign speech and (3) to find out whether or not the deixis is used appropriately in Donald Trump?s campaign speech. This research is conducted by using qualitative content analysis. The data of the study are the utterances from the script Donald Trump?s campaign speech. The data are analyzed by using Levinson ...

  1. Advertising eugenics: Charles M. Goethe's campaign to improve the race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenl, William; Peck, Danielle

    2010-06-01

    Over the last several decades historians have shown that the eugenics movement appealed to an extraordinarily wide constituency. Far from being the brainchild of the members of any one particular political ideology, eugenics made sense to a diverse range of Americans and was promoted by professionals ranging from geneticists and physicians to politicians and economists.(1) Seduced by promises of permanent fixes to national problems, and attracted to the idea of a scientifically legitimate form of social activism, eugenics quickly grew in popularity during the first decades of the twentieth century. Charles M. Goethe, the land developer, entrepreneur, conservationist and skilled advertiser who founded the Eugenics Society of Northern California, exemplifies the broad appeal of the eugenics movement. Goethe played an active role within the American eugenics movement at its peak in the 1920s. The last president of the Eugenics Research Association,(2) he also campaigned hard against Mexican immigration to the US and he continued open support for the Nazi regime's eugenic practices into the later 1930s.(3) This article examines Goethe's eugenic vision and, drawing on his correspondence with the leading geneticist Charles Davenport, explores the relationship between academic and non-academic advocates of eugenics in America. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Effects of a behavior change campaign on household drinking water disinfection in the Lake Chad basin using the RANAS approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilje, Jonathan; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2018-04-01

    Worldwide, an estimated 700 million people rely on unimproved drinking water sources; even more consume water that is not safe to drink. Inadequate drinking water quality constitutes a major risk factor for cholera and other diarrheal diseases around the globe, especially for young children in developing countries. Household water treatment and safe storage systems represent an intermediate solution for settings that lack infrastructure supplying safe drinking water. However, the correct and consistent usage of such treatment technologies rely almost exclusively on the consumer's behavior. This study targeted at evaluating effects of a behavior change campaign promoting the uptake of household drinking water chlorination in communities along the Chari and Logone rivers in Chad. The campaign was based on formative research using health psychological theory and targeted several behavioral factors identified as relevant. A total of 220 primary caregivers were interviewed concerning their household water treatment practices and mindset related to water treatment six months after the campaign. The Risks, Attitudes, Norms, Abilities, and Self-regulation (RANAS) model was used to structure the interviews as the RANAS approach had been used for designing the campaign. Results show significantly higher self-reported drinking water chlorination among participants of the intervention. Significant differences from a control group were identified regarding several behavioral factors. Mediation analysis revealed that the intervention positively affected participants' individual risk estimation for diarrheal disease, health knowledge, perceived efforts and benefits of water treatment, social support strategies, knowledge of how to perform chlorination, and perceived ability to do so. The campaign's effect on water treatment was mainly mediated through differences in health knowledge, changes in norms, and self-efficacy convictions. The findings imply that water treatment behavior

  3. A formative evaluation of social media campaign to reduce adolescent dating violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Danielle N; Bishop, Lauren E; Guetig, Stephanie; Frew, Paula M

    2014-11-12

    The Emory Jane Fonda Center implemented the Start Strong Atlanta social marketing campaign, "Keep It Strong ATL", in 2007 to promote the development of healthy adolescent relationships and to foster the prevention of adolescent dating abuse among 11-14 year olds. A formative evaluation was conducted to understand whether messages directed at the target audience were relevant to the program's relationship promotion and violence prevention goals, and whether the "Web 2.0" social media channels of communication (Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, Tumblr, and Pinterest) were reaching the intended audience. Mixed methodologies included qualitative interviews and a key informant focus group, a cross-sectional survey, and web analytics. Qualitative data were analyzed using constant comparative methodology informed by grounded theory. Descriptive statistics were generated from survey data, and web analytics provided user information and traffic patterns. Results indicated that the Keep It Strong ATL social marketing campaign was a valuable community resource that had potential for broader scope and greater reach. The evaluation team learned the importance of reaching adolescents through Web 2.0 platforms, and the need for message dissemination via peers. Survey results indicated that Facebook (ranked 6.5 out of 8) was the highest rated social media outlet overall, and exhibited greatest appeal and most frequent visits, yet analytics revealed that only 3.5% of "likes" were from the target audience. These results indicate that the social media campaign is reaching predominantly women (76.5% of viewership) who are outside of the target age range of 11-14 years. While the social media campaign was successfully launched, the findings indicate the need for a more focused selection of communication channels, timing of media updates to maximize visibility, balancing message tone and delivery, and incorporating differentiated messaging for the target audiences. Collaboration with

  4. Evidence, ethics, and values: a framework for health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stacy M; Rychetnik, Lucie; Lloyd, Beverley; Kerridge, Ian H; Baur, Louise; Bauman, Adrian; Hooker, Claire; Zask, Avigdor

    2011-03-01

    We propose a new approach to guide health promotion practice. Health promotion should draw on 2 related systems of reasoning: an evidential system and an ethical system. Further, there are concepts, values, and procedures inherent in both health promotion evidence and ethics, and these should be made explicit. We illustrate our approach with the exemplar of intervention in weight, and use a specific mass-media campaign to show the real-world dangers of intervening with insufficient attention to ethics and evidence. Both researchers and health promotion practitioners should work to build the capacities required for evidential and ethical deliberation in the health promotion profession.

  5. In "Step" with HIV Vaccines? A Content Analysis of Local Recruitment Campaigns for an International HIV Vaccine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Paula M; Macias, Wendy; Chan, Kayshin; Harding, Ashley C

    2009-01-01

    During the past two decades of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, several recruitment campaigns were designed to generate community involvement in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials. These efforts utilized a blend of advertising and marketing strategies mixed with public relations and community education approaches to attract potential study participants to clinical trials (integrated marketing communications). Although more than 30,000 persons worldwide have participated in preventive HIV vaccine studies, no systematic analysis of recruitment campaigns exists. This content analysis study was conducted to examine several United States and Canadian recruitment campaigns for one of the largest-scale HIV vaccine trials to date (the "Step Study"). This study examined persuasive features consistent with the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) including message content, personal relevance of HIV/AIDS and vaccine research, intended audiences, information sources, and other contextual features. The results indicated variation in messages and communication approaches with gay men more exclusively targeted in these regions. Racial/ethnic representations also differed by campaign. Most of the materials promote affective evaluation of the information through heuristic cueing. Implications for subsequent campaigns and research directions are discussed.

  6. In “Step” with HIV Vaccines? A Content Analysis of Local Recruitment Campaigns for an International HIV Vaccine Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, Paula M.; Macias, Wendy; Chan, Kayshin; Harding, Ashley C.

    2009-01-01

    During the past two decades of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, several recruitment campaigns were designed to generate community involvement in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials. These efforts utilized a blend of advertising and marketing strategies mixed with public relations and community education approaches to attract potential study participants to clinical trials (integrated marketing communications). Although more than 30,000 persons worldwide have participated in preventive HIV vaccine studies, no systematic analysis of recruitment campaigns exists. This content analysis study was conducted to examine several United States and Canadian recruitment campaigns for one of the largest-scale HIV vaccine trials to date (the “Step Study”). This study examined persuasive features consistent with the Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) including message content, personal relevance of HIV/AIDS and vaccine research, intended audiences, information sources, and other contextual features. The results indicated variation in messages and communication approaches with gay men more exclusively targeted in these regions. Racial/ethnic representations also differed by campaign. Most of the materials promote affective evaluation of the information through heuristic cueing. Implications for subsequent campaigns and research directions are discussed. PMID:19609373

  7. Social media campaigns that make a difference: what can public health learn from the corporate sector and other social change marketers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Becky; Potente, Sofia; Rock, Vanessa; McIver, Jacqueline

    2015-03-30

    A great deal of enthusiasm and interest exists in using social media for public health communications, but few research studies have examined its success in promoting and adopting protective health behaviours. To begin to understand how best to develop effective online social marketing campaigns, this paper provides a summary of success factors and key lessons learnt from selected social media campaign case studies. Case study review Methods: A selection of case studies was reviewed for lessons in campaign development, delivery and evaluation from both the corporate and public health sectors. Information about the objective of the campaign, the tactics used and the lessons learnt was extracted from each case study. Lessons learnt from across the case studies were then sorted according to themes. Lessons from the nine case studies selected were categorised into eight themes: planning, use of social media tools, community, content, personal benefits, promotion, costs and challenges. Outcome evaluation data were lacking in the case studies. Overall, the nine case studies show that social media hold promise in changing user behaviours and that social media are highly effective in recruiting participants and motivating them to take small, concrete actions. The case studies also demonstrate that there is room in social media for targeted, inexpensive, small-scale projects, as well as large, well-funded, mass-reach marketing blitzes. Social media campaign process and impact evaluation measures are readily available. Outcome evaluation models and measures are needed to better assess the effectiveness of social media campaigns in changing health behaviours.

  8. Stereo Matching Based On Election Campaign Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Qing Hua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereo matching is one of the significant problems in the study of the computer vision. By getting the distance information through pixels, it is possible to reproduce a three-dimensional stereo. In this paper, the edges are the primitives for matching, the grey values of the edges and the magnitude and direction of the edge gradient were figured out as the properties of the edge feature points, according to the constraints for stereo matching, the energy function was built for finding the route minimizing by election campaign optimization algorithm during the process of stereo matching was applied to this problem the energy function. Experiment results show that this algorithm is more stable and it can get the matching result with better accuracy.

  9. Advanced Fuels Campaign FY 2011 Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01

    One of the major research and development (R&D) areas under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is advanced fuels development. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) has the responsibility to develop advanced fuel technologies for the Department of Energy (DOE) using a science-based approach focusing on developing a microstructural understanding of nuclear fuels and materials. Accomplishments made during fiscal year (FY 20) 2011 are highlighted in this report, which focuses on completed work and results. The process details leading up to the results are not included; however, the technical contact is provided for each section. The order of the accomplishments in this report is consistent with the AFC work breakdown structure (WBS).

  10. Manufactured Doubt: The Campaign Against Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, N. L.

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear electricity is a CO2 free technology with a proven track record of large scale commercial deployment. For example, France generates 78% of its electrical power with nuclear plants. France has the lowest pre-tax cost of electricity in Europe at 4.75 eurocents per KWH and France is the world's largest exporter of electricity. There are large world reserves of uranium sufficient for hundreds of years, even without breeder technology. Additionally, thorium, another radioactive mineral is in even more plentiful supply. Although present-day nuclear technology has proven to be safe and reliable, waiting in the wings is new generation technology that promises great improvements in both safety and cost. Yet, there has been a calculated and sophisticated campaign in the later part of the 20th century to create doubt and fear concerning nuclear power. In the United States this campaign has essentially destroyed the nuclear industry. No new plants have been commissioned for decades. Leadership in the nuclear power field has been ceded to other countries. The great paradox is that the very organizations that express great alarm concerning CO2 emissions are the same organizations that led the campaign against nuclear power decades ago. Representatives of these organizations will say privately that they are taking a new look at nuclear power, but no major organization has reversed course and become a supporter of nuclear power. To do so would involve a loss of face and create doubts concerning the credibility of the organization. As recently as 2001 environmentalist lobbyists made great efforts to ensure that no credit could be given for nuclear power under the Kyoto accords and the associated clean development mechanism. They succeeded and nuclear power receives unfavorable treatment under the Kyoto accords even though it is a proven solution for reducing CO2 emissions. The technique used to destroy nuclear energy as a viable alternative in the United States had two

  11. A report from YMC Sumatra field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, K.; Yokoi, S.; Mori, S.; Nasuno, T.; Yamanaka, M. D.; Yasunaga, K.; Haryoko, U.; Nurhayati, N.; Syamsudin, F.

    2017-12-01

    Years of the Maritime Continent (YMC) is a two-year international field campaign from July 2017 through the early 2020. It aims at enhancing our knowledge of weather-climate systems over the Maritime Continent and its relation to higher latitudes through observations and numerical modeling. YMC field observations consist of several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) and routine basis long-term observations done by local agencies. One of IOPs is a joint effort done by Japanese and Indonesian research groups and we call it YMC-Sumatra, which studies precipitation mechanism along the west coast of Sumatra Island (Bengkulu city) especially focusing on a relationship between diurnal cycle convection and large-scale disturbances such as the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Observations will be carried out from November 16, 2017 through January 15, 2018. Since it is known that diurnally developed convection over the coast propagates offshore in the night time, we will deploy a ship off the coast in addition to the land-based site in Bengkulu meteorological station. From both sides, we conduct scanning weather radars, 3-hourly radiosonde soundings, and continuous surface meteorological measurements. Ocean surface is also intensively measured by 3-hourly CTD, ADCP, turbulent sensor, and so on from the ship. In addition, two types of forecast run (global 7-/14-km mesh for 14-/30-day forecast) using NICAM will be performed. Since this campaign in Sumatra is being done during the AGU meeting, a preliminary live report will be provided, so that scientific results as well as logistics information can be used for further IOPs.

  12. Find Cancer Early: Evaluation of a Community Education Campaign to Increase Awareness of Cancer Signs and Symptoms in People in Regional Western Australians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Jane Croager

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionCancer outcomes for people living in rural and remote areas are worse than for those living in urban areas. Although access to and quality of cancer treatment are important determinants of outcomes, delayed presentation has been observed in rural patients.MethodsFormative research with people from rural Western Australia (WA led to the Find Cancer Early campaign. Find Cancer Early was delivered in three regions of WA, with two other regions acting as controls. Staff delivered the campaign using a community engagement approach, including promotion in local media. Television communications were not used to minimize contamination in the control regions. The campaign evaluation was undertaken at 20 months via a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI survey comparing campaign and control regions. The primary outcome variable was knowledge of cancer signs and symptoms.ResultsRecognition and recall of Find Cancer Early and symptom knowledge were higher in the campaign regions. More than a quarter of those who were aware of the campaign reported seeing the GP as a result of their exposure.ConclusionDespite limited use of mass media, Find Cancer Early successfully improved knowledge of cancer symptoms and possibly led to changes in behavior. Social marketing campaigns using community development can raise awareness and knowledge of a health issue in the absence of television advertising.

  13. Find Cancer Early: Evaluation of a Community Education Campaign to Increase Awareness of Cancer Signs and Symptoms in People in Regional Western Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croager, Emma Jane; Gray, Victoria; Pratt, Iain Stephen; Slevin, Terry; Pettigrew, Simone; Holman, C D'arcy; Bulsara, Max; Emery, Jon

    2018-01-01

    Cancer outcomes for people living in rural and remote areas are worse than for those living in urban areas. Although access to and quality of cancer treatment are important determinants of outcomes, delayed presentation has been observed in rural patients. Formative research with people from rural Western Australia (WA) led to the Find Cancer Early campaign. Find Cancer Early was delivered in three regions of WA, with two other regions acting as controls. Staff delivered the campaign using a community engagement approach, including promotion in local media. Television communications were not used to minimize contamination in the control regions. The campaign evaluation was undertaken at 20 months via a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI) survey comparing campaign and control regions. The primary outcome variable was knowledge of cancer signs and symptoms. Recognition and recall of Find Cancer Early and symptom knowledge were higher in the campaign regions. More than a quarter of those who were aware of the campaign reported seeing the GP as a result of their exposure. Despite limited use of mass media, Find Cancer Early successfully improved knowledge of cancer symptoms and possibly led to changes in behavior. Social marketing campaigns using community development can raise awareness and knowledge of a health issue in the absence of television advertising.

  14. The Antibiotic Guardian campaign: a qualitative evaluation of an online pledge-based system focused on making better use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesten, Joanna May; Bhattacharya, Alex; Ashiru-Oredope, Diane; Gobin, Maya; Audrey, Suzanne

    2017-07-11

    The Antibiotic Guardian Campaign was developed to increase commitment to reducing Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR), change behaviour and increase knowledge through an online pledge system for healthcare professionals and members of the public to become Antibiotic Guardians (AG). This qualitative evaluation aimed to understand AG experiences of the campaign and perceived impact on behaviour. Ninety-four AGs (48 via a survey and 46 who had agreed to future contact) were invited to participate in a telephone semi-structured interview. The sample was based on self-identification as a healthcare professional or a member of the public, pledge group (e.g. adults, primary care prescribers etc.), pledge and gender. Interviews explored how participants became aware of the campaign, reasons for joining, pledge choices, responses to joining and views about the campaign's implementation. Interviews were analysed using the Framework Method. Twenty-two AGs (10 healthcare professionals and 12 members of the public) were interviewed. AGs became aware of the campaign through professional networks and social media, and were motivated to join by personal and professional concern for AMR. Choice of pledge group and pledge were attributed to relevance and potential impact on AMR and the behaviour of others through pledge enactment and promotion of the campaign. Most AGs could not recall their pledge unprompted. Most felt they fulfilled their pledge, although this reflected either behaviour change or the pledge reinforcing pre-existing behaviour. The campaign triggered AGs to reflect on AMR related behaviour and reinforced pre-existing beliefs. Several AGs promoted the campaign to others. Responding collectively as part of the campaign was thought to have a greater impact than individual action. However, limited campaign visibility was observed and the campaign was perceived to have restricted ability to reach those unaware of AMR. AGs were motivated to reduce AMR and most felt they

  15. Social Marketing as a Framework for Youth Physical Activity Initiatives: a 10-Year Retrospective on the Legacy of CDC's VERB Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhman, Marian; Kelly, Ryan P; Edgar, Timothy

    2017-06-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the VERB. It's what you do! campaign to increase physical activity among tweens and concomitantly respond to the rise in childhood obesity. This retrospective study summarizes the history of the VERB campaign's social marketing approach and its effectiveness in promoting behavior change in the targeted population. The legacy of VERB, which ended in 2006, is discussed, with an emphasis on examining initiatives over the last decade and the degree to which they followed (or did not follow) the structural and thematic lead of the campaign. The article ends with suggestions for how VERB still has the potential to inform other social marketing campaigns going forward.

  16. Congenital maxillary double lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Double lip, also referred to as "macrocheilia," is a rare anomaly which affects the upper lip more commonly than the lower lip. It consists of a fold of excess or redundant hypertrophic tissue on the mucosal side of the lip. The congenital double lip is believed to be present at birth and becomes more prominent after eruption of teeth. It affects esthetics and also interferes with speech and mastication. Simple surgical excision produces good functional and cosmetic results. We report a case of a non-syndromic congenital maxillary double lip in a 21-year-old male patient.

  17. Fear appeals and confronting information campaigns. [Previously: Fear-based information campaigns.

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Fear appeals or confronting information campaigns confront people in an often hard and sometimes even shocking way with the consequences of risky behaviour. This can have a positive impact on the attitudes and behavioural intentions of the target group, but only if key conditions are met. Those conditions are that the information does not only evoke fear, but also informs the target group individuals of their personal risk and provides them with feasible and effective behavioural alternatives...

  18. Mediacampaign: A Multimodal Semantic Analysis System for Advertisement Campaign Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rehatschek, Herwig; Sorschag, Robert; Rettenbacher, Bernhard; Zeiner, Herwig; Nioche, Julien; de Jong, Franciska M.G.; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; van Leeuwen, David A.

    MediaCampaign's scope is on discovering and inter-relating advertisements and campaigns, i.e. to relate advertisements semantically belonging together, across different countries and different media. The project’s main goal is to automate to a large degree the detection and tracking of advertisement

  19. Mediacampaign - A multimodal semantic analysis system for advertisement campaign detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rehatschek, H.; Sorschag, R.; Rettenbacher, B.; Zeiner, H.; Nioche, J.; Jong, F. de; Ordelmann, R.; Leeuwen, D. van

    2008-01-01

    MediaCampaign's scope is on discovering and inter-relating advertisements and campaigns, i.e. to relate advertisements semantically belonging together, across different countries and different media. The project's main goal is to automate to a large degree the detection and tracking of advertisement

  20. Associative issue ownership as a determinant of voters’ campaign attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefevere, J.; Tresch, A.; Walgrave, S.

    2015-01-01

    Campaigns raise public interest in politics and allow parties to convey their messages to voters. However, voters’ exposure and attention during campaigns are biased towards parties and candidates they like. This hinders parties’ ability to reach new voters. This paper theorises and empirically