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Sample records for camp signal transduction

  1. Uniform cAMP stimulation of Dictyostelium cells induces localized patches of signal transduction and pseudopodia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, M.; Roelofs, J.; Goedhart, J.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Haastert, van P.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The chemoattractant cAMP induces the translocation of cytosolic PHCrac-GFP to the plasma membrane. PHCrac-GFP is a green fluorescent protein fused to a PH domain that presumably binds to phosphatydylinositol polyphosphates in the membrane. We determined the relative concentration of PHCrac-GFP in

  2. cAMP and EPAC are key players in the regulation of the signal transduction pathway involved in the α-hemolysin autophagic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Mestre

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla is the S. aureus-secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus-containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell.

  3. cAMP and EPAC Are Key Players in the Regulation of the Signal Transduction Pathway Involved in the α-Hemolysin Autophagic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, María Belén; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla) is the S. aureus–secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus–containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell. PMID:22654658

  4. Cellular semiotics and signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Semiosis, the processes of production, communication and interpretation of signs - coding and de-coding - takes place within and between organisms. The term "endosemiosis" refers to the processes of interpretation and sign transmission inside an organism (as opposed to "exosemiosis", which refers...... to the processes of sign interpretation and transmission between organisms of the same or different species). In Biosemiotics it is customary to recognise the cell as the most elementary integration unit for semiosis. Therefore intra and intercellular communication constitute the departure point for the study...... considering semiotic logic in order to construct our understanding of living phenomena. Given the central integrating role of signal transduction in physiological and ecological studies, this chapter outlines its semiotic implications. The multi-modality and modularity of signal molecules and relative...

  5. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2013-09-03

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  6. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Helen R; Gehring, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively.

  7. cAMP signaling in subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2014-09-01

    In the complex microcosm of a cell, information security and its faithful transmission are critical for maintaining internal stability. To achieve a coordinated response of all its parts to any stimulus the cell must protect the information received from potentially confounding signals. Physical segregation of the information transmission chain ensures that only the entities able to perform the encoded task have access to the relevant information. The cAMP intracellular signaling pathway is an important system for signal transmission responsible for the ancestral 'flight or fight' response and involved in the control of critical functions including frequency and strength of heart contraction, energy metabolism and gene transcription. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the cAMP signaling pathway uses compartmentalization as a strategy for coordinating the large number of key cellular functions under its control. Spatial confinement allows the formation of cAMP signaling "hot spots" at discrete subcellular domains in response to specific stimuli, bringing the information in proximity to the relevant effectors and their recipients, thus achieving specificity of action. In this report we discuss how the different constituents of the cAMP pathway are targeted and participate in the formation of cAMP compartmentalized signaling events. We illustrate a few examples of localized cAMP signaling, with a particular focus on the nucleus, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of interventions designed to perturb specific cAMP cascades locally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Simulated evolution of signal transduction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mobashir

    Full Text Available Signal transduction is the process of routing information inside cells when receiving stimuli from their environment that modulate the behavior and function. In such biological processes, the receptors, after receiving the corresponding signals, activate a number of biomolecules which eventually transduce the signal to the nucleus. The main objective of our work is to develop a theoretical approach which will help to better understand the behavior of signal transduction networks due to changes in kinetic parameters and network topology. By using an evolutionary algorithm, we designed a mathematical model which performs basic signaling tasks similar to the signaling process of living cells. We use a simple dynamical model of signaling networks of interacting proteins and their complexes. We study the evolution of signaling networks described by mass-action kinetics. The fitness of the networks is determined by the number of signals detected out of a series of signals with varying strength. The mutations include changes in the reaction rate and network topology. We found that stronger interactions and addition of new nodes lead to improved evolved responses. The strength of the signal does not play any role in determining the response type. This model will help to understand the dynamic behavior of the proteins involved in signaling pathways. It will also help to understand the robustness of the kinetics of the output response upon changes in the rate of reactions and the topology of the network.

  9. Cancer, signal transduction and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Poulomi; Basu, Sudipta; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying different cellular signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer are leading to the identification of novel drug targets as well as novel drug candidates. Multiple targeted therapeutics that modulate aberrant molecular pathways have already reached the clinic. However, targeted therapeutics can exert mechanism-driven side effects as a result of the implication of the molecular target in normal physiological functions besides tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that targeted therapeutics can be optimized by merging them with nanotechnology, which offers the potential for preferential targeting to the tumor, resulting in increased intratumoral concentrations of the active agent with reduced distribution to other parts of the body. This review will address some of the emerging concepts that integrate these two disciplines to engineer novel nanovectors that target different signaling pathways.

  10. Signal transduction immunohistochemistry - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander E. Kalyuzhny statement that immunohistochemical detection of labile, low abundance and short-lived signal transduction molecules appears to be a very challenging task actually captures the same reader’s feeling. Each of us daily using immunohistochemical protocols to reveal targets either useful for research or diagnostic aims will surely wonder by which tricky techniques it is possible to overcome the preservation and unmasking of those labile antigens involved in signal transduction. Well, by seventheen chapters grouped in five parts Prof. Alexander E. Kalyuzhny is presenting an invaluable technical and methodological source of hints to satisfy our needs: to overcome troubleshottings if we are already in the field or to orientate those entering the field....

  11. Signal transduction during cold stress in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Solanke, Amolkumar U.; Sharma, Arun K.

    2008-01-01

    Cold stress signal transduction is a complex process. Many physiological changes like tissue break down and senescence occur due to cold stress. Low temperature is initially perceived by plasma membrane either due to change in membrane fluidity or with the help of sensors like Ca2+ permeable channels, histidine kinases, receptor kinases and phospholipases. Subsequently, cytoskeleton reorganization and cytosolic Ca2+ influx takes place. Increase in cytosolic Ca2+ is sensed by CDPKs, phosphatas...

  12. PDE4-Mediated cAMP Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracy A. Fertig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available cAMP is the archetypal and ubiquitous second messenger utilised for the fine control of many cardiovascular cell signalling systems. The ability of cAMP to elicit cell surface receptor-specific responses relies on its compartmentalisation by cAMP hydrolysing enzymes known as phosphodiesterases. One family of these enzymes, PDE4, is particularly important in the cardiovascular system, where it has been extensively studied and shown to orchestrate complex, localised signalling that underpins many crucial functions of the heart. In the cardiac myocyte, cAMP activates PKA, which phosphorylates a small subset of mostly sarcoplasmic substrate proteins that drive β-adrenergic enhancement of cardiac function. The phosphorylation of these substrates, many of which are involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, has been shown to be tightly regulated by highly localised pools of individual PDE4 isoforms. The spatial and temporal regulation of cardiac signalling is made possible by the formation of macromolecular “signalosomes”, which often include a cAMP effector, such as PKA, its substrate, PDE4 and an anchoring protein such as an AKAP. Studies described in the present review highlight the importance of this relationship for individual cardiac PKA substrates and we provide an overview of how this signalling paradigm is coordinated to promote efficient adrenergic enhancement of cardiac function. The role of PDE4 also extends to the vascular endothelium, where it regulates vascular permeability and barrier function. In this distinct location, PDE4 interacts with adherens junctions to regulate their stability. These highly specific, non-redundant roles for PDE4 isoforms have far reaching therapeutic potential. PDE inhibitors in the clinic have been plagued with problems due to the active site-directed nature of the compounds which concomitantly attenuate PDE activity in all highly localised “signalosomes”.

  13. Signal transduction during cold stress in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanke, Amolkumar U; Sharma, Arun K

    2008-04-01

    Cold stress signal transduction is a complex process. Many physiological changes like tissue break down and senescence occur due to cold stress. Low temperature is initially perceived by plasma membrane either due to change in membrane fluidity or with the help of sensors like Ca(2+) permeable channels, histidine kinases, receptor kinases and phospholipases. Subsequently, cytoskeleton reorganization and cytosolic Ca(2+) influx takes place. Increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) is sensed by CDPKs, phosphatase and MAPKs, which transduce the signals to switch on transcriptional cascades. Photosynthetic apparatus have also been thought to be responsible for low temperature perception and signal transduction. Many cold induced pathways are activated to protect plants from deleterious effects of cold stress, but till date, most studied pathway is ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway. However, the importance of CBF independent pathways in cold acclimation is supported by few Arabidopsis mutants' studies. Cold stress signaling has certain pathways common with other abiotic and biotic stress signaling which suggest cross-talks among these. Most of the economically important crops are sensitive to low temperature, but very few studies are available on cold susceptible crop plants. Therefore, it is necessary to understand signal transducing components from model plants and utilize that knowledge to improve survival of cold sensitive crop plants at low temperature.

  14. Signal transduction by growth factor receptors: signaling in an instant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2007-01-01

    -out by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has allowed exciting views on the very early events in signal transduction. Activation profiles of regulated phosphorylation sites on epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream signal transducers showed different kinetics within the first ten seconds...

  15. Controlling Signal Transduction with Synthetic Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, David M.; Wandless, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Crabtree, Gerald R.

    1993-11-01

    Dimerization and oligomerization are general biological control mechanisms contributing to the activation of cell membrane receptors, transcription factors, vesicle fusion proteins, and other classes of intra- and extracellular proteins. Cell permeable, synthetic ligands were devised that can be used to control the intracellular oligomerization of specific proteins. To demonstrate their utility, these ligands were used to reduce intracellular oligomerization of cell surface receptors that lacked their transmembrane and extracellular regions but contained intracellular signaling domains. Addition of these ligands to cells in culture resulted in signal transmission and specific target gene activation. Monomeric forms of the ligands blocked the pathway. This method of ligandregulated activation and termination of signaling pathways has the potential to be applied wherever precise control of a signal transduction pathway is desired.

  16. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  17. Endothelial cell oxidative stress and signal transduction

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    ROCIO FONCEA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction (ED is an early event in atherosclerotic disease, preceding clinical manifestations and complications. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated as important mechanisms that contribute to ED, and ROS’s may function as intracellular messengers that modulate signaling pathways. Several intracellular signal events stimulated by ROS have been defined, including the identification of two members of the mitogen activated protein kinase family (ERK1/2 and big MAP kinase, BMK1, tyrosine kinases (Src and Syk and different isoenzymes of PKC as redox-sensitive kinases. ROS regulation of signal transduction components include the modification in the activity of transcriptional factors such as NFkB and others that result in changes in gene expression and modifications in cellular responses. In order to understand the intracellular mechanisms induced by ROS in endothelial cells (EC, we are studying the response of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells to increased ROS generation by different pro-atherogenic stimuli. Our results show that Homocysteine (Hcy and oxidized LDL (oxLDL enhance the activity and expression of oxidative stress markers, such as NFkB and heme oxygenase 1. These results suggest that these pro-atherogenic stimuli increase oxidative stress in EC, and thus explain the loss of endothelial function associated with the atherogenic process

  18. Critical Signal Transduction Pathways in CLL

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    Ghosh, Asish K.; Kay, Neil E.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are cell-surface transmembrane receptors that contain regulated kinase activity within their cytoplasmic domain and play a critical role in signal transduction in both normal and malignant cells. Besides B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in CLL, multiple RTKs have been reported to be constitutively active in CLL B-cells resulting in enhanced survival and resistance to apoptosis of the leukemic cells induced by chemotherapeutic agents. In addition to increased plasma levels of various types of cytokines/growth factors in CLL, we and others have detected that CLL B-cells spontaneously produce multiple cytokines in vitro which may constitute an autocrine loop of RTK activation on the leukemic B-cells. Moreover, aberrant expression and activation of non-RTKs, for example Src/Syk kinases, induce resistance of the leukemic B-cells to therapy. Based on current available knowledge, we detailed the impact of aberrant activities of various RTKs/non-RTKs on CLL B-cell survival and the potential of using these signaling components as future therapeutic targets in CLL therapy. PMID:24014299

  19. Osmoreception: perspectives on signal transduction and environmental modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, A P; Watanabe, S; Grau, E G

    2012-05-01

    Osmoregulation is essential to life in vertebrates and osmoreception is a fundamental element in osmoregulation. Progress in characterizing the mechanisms that mediate osmoreception has been made possible by using a uniquely accessible cell model, the prolactin (PRL) cell of the euryhaline tilapia, Oreochromis mossambicus. In addition to a brief historical overview, we offer a summary of our recent progress on signal transduction and osmosensitivity in the tilapia PRL cell model. Prolactin is a central regulator of hydromineral balance in teleosts in freshwater (FW). Consistent with its essential role in FW osmoregulation, PRL release in tilapia is inversely related to extracellular osmolality, both in vivo and in vitro. Osmotically-driven changes in PRL cell volume control PRL release. A decrease in extracellular osmolality increases cell volume, leading to a rapid influx of Ca(2+) through stretch-activated channels followed by a sharp rise in PRL release. Our recent studies also suggest that cAMP is involved in the osmotic signal transduction, and that acclimation salinity can modulate PRL cell osmosensitivity. Prolactin cells from FW tilapia show a larger rise in PRL release after a reduction in medium osmolality than those from SW fish. Paradoxically, hyposmotically-induced increase in PRL mRNA was observed only in cells from SW fish. Our studies have revealed differences in the abundance of the water channel, aquaporin 3 (AQP3), and the stretch activated Ca(2+) channel, transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in PRL cells of FW and SW fish that may explain their differing osmosensitivity and osmoreceptive output in differing acclimation salinities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. EDITORIAL: Special section on signal transduction Special section on signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    This special section of Physical Biology focuses on multiple aspects of signal transduction, broadly defined as the study of the mechanisms by which cells communicate with their environment. Mechanisms of cell communication involve detection of incoming signals, which can be chemical, mechanical or electromagnetic, relaying these signals to intracellular processes, such as cytoskeletal networks or gene expression systems, and, ultimately, converting these signals to responses such as cell differentiation or death. Given the multiscale nature of signal transduction systems, they must be studied at multiple levels, from the identities and structures of molecules comprising signal detection and interpretation networks, to the systems-level properties of these networks. The 11 papers in this special section illustrate some of the most exciting aspects of signal transduction research. The first two papers, by Marie-Anne Félix [1] and by Efrat Oron and Natalia Ivanova [2], focus on cell-cell interactions in developing tissues, using vulval patterning in worm and cell fate specification in mammalian embryos as prime examples of emergent cell behaviors. Next come two papers from the groups of Julio Saez-Rodriguez [3] and Kevin Janes [4]. These papers discuss how the causal relationships between multiple components of signaling systems can be inferred using multivariable statistical analysis of empirical data. An authoritative review by Zarnitsyna and Zhu [5] presents a detailed discussion of the sequence of signaling events involved in T-cell triggering. Once the structure and components of the signaling systems are determined, they can be modeled using approaches that have been successful in other physical sciences. As two examples of such approaches, reviews by Rubinstein [6] and Kholodenko [7], present reaction-diffusion models of cell polarization and thermodynamics-based models of gene regulation. An important class of models takes the form of enzymatic networks

  1. Signal transduction in the footsteps of goethe and schiller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Karlheinz; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Entschladen, Frank; Serfling, Edgar; Thiel, Gerald; Kieser, Arnd; Giehl, Klaudia; Ehrhardt, Christina; Feller, Stephan M; Ullrich, Oliver; Schaper, Fred; Janssen, Ottmar; Hass, Ralf

    2009-02-04

    The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS) has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction - Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field.The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction.

  2. Invited Review: Mechanochemical signal transduction in the fetal lung

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mingyao Liu; Martin Post

    2000-01-01

    .... These effects are mediated through special signal transduction pathways in fetal lung cells. Various in vivo and in vitro model systems have been developed to investigate the mechanotransduction process...

  3. Signal Transduction of Immunoglobulin E Receptor Crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Timothy Aidan

    In the work presented in this thesis we explore several important aspects of the mechanisms involved in the signal transduction of the crosslinking of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-receptor complexes on the surface of rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells. In order to understand what interactions may be important in determining the lateral diffusibility of this cell surface protein, quantitative fluorescence measurements were made of the distribution of fluorescence labelled IgE as well as a variety of other membrane proteins under externally applied electrical potential gradients. These measurements reveal that strong steric interactions are manifest at the typical protein concentrations on cell surfaces, and that these interactions are well accounted for in these experiments by an excluded volume model which can be expressed as a Fermi distribution. The relationship between the lateral diffusion coefficient determined from fluorescence photobleaching recovery (FPR) experiments and those determined by analyzing the relaxation of the concentration gradients induced by externally applied electrical gradients are discussed. The cell surface interactions associated with IgE-receptor crosslinking are known to lead to dramatic changes in free ionized Ca^{2+} activity (Ca^{2+}] _{i} within the cells. Methods were developed which allowed us to study the spatio-temporal dynamics of (Ca^{2+}] _{i} during the crosslinking events using quantitative low light level imaging of the fluorescent Ca^{2+} indicator fura -2 loaded into RBL cells. These studies indicate that the cell surface crosslinking events lead to large complex oscillations of (Ca^{2+}] _{i} within the cell, which appear to be controlled by some as yet unidentified messenger molecule. Comparisons of the kinetics of the changes in (Ca^{2+}]_{i } induced within the cells with that of the crosslinking induced by a simple bivalent antigen suggest that the relevant stimulus needed to generate a (Ca ^{2+}]_{i} response is not

  4. The ever unfolding story of cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: vive la difference!

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    Daniel Nii Aryee Tagoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids are unicellular, eukaryotic, flagellated protozoans containing the eponymous kinetoplast. Within this order, the family of trypanosomatids are responsible for some of the most serious human diseases, including Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, sleeping sickness (T. brucei spp. and leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp. Although cAMP is produced during the life cycle stages of these parasites, its signalling pathways are very different from those of mammals. The absence of G-protein-coupled recep¬tors, the presence of structurally different adenylyl cyclases, the paucity of known cAMP effector proteins and the stringent need for regulation of cAMP in the small kinetoplastid cells all suggest a significantly different biochemical pathway and likely cell biology. However, each of the main kinetoplastid parasites express four class 1-type cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEA-D, which have highly similar catalytic domains to that of human PDEs. To date, only TbrPDEB, expressed as two slightly different isoforms TbrPDEB1 and B2, has been found to be essential when ablated. Although the genomes contain reasonably well con¬served genes for catalytic and regulatory domains of pro¬tein kinase A, these have been shown to have varied structural and functional roles in the different species. Recent discovery of a role of cAMP/AMP metabolism in a quorum-sensing signalling pathway in T. brucei, and the identification of downstream cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs whose expression levels correlate with sensitivity to PDE inhibitors, suggests a complex signalling cascade. The interplay between the roles of these novel CARPs and the quorum-sensing signalling pathway on cell division and differentiation makes for intriguing cell biology and a new paradigm in cAMP signal transduction, as well as potential targets for trypanosomatid-specific cAMP pathway-based therapeutics.

  5. Quantifying efficient information transduction of biochemical signaling cascades

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Cells can be considered as systems that utilize changes in thermodynamic entropy as information. Therefore, they serve as useful models for investigating the relationships between entropy production and information transmission, i.e., signal transduction. Based on the hypothesis that cells apply a chemical reaction cascade for the most efficient transduction of information, we adopted a coding design that minimizes the number of bits per concentration of molecules that are employed for inform...

  6. Cell biology symposium: Membrane trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, membrane trafficking is a broad group of processes where proteins and other large molecules are distributed throughout the cell as well as adjacent extracellular spaces. Whereas signal transduction is a process where signals are transmitted through a series of chemical or molecular event...

  7. Expression of SMAD signal transduction molecules in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Michael; Hougaard, D.; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2001-01-01

    Members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and in regulation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells. Different TGF-beta members signal through phosphorylation of different signal transduction proteins, which eve...

  8. Developing a synthetic signal transduction system in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, Kevin J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Albrecht, Kirk D; Bowen, Tessa A; Troupe, Jared F; Havens, Keira L; Medford, June I

    2011-01-01

    One area of focus in the emerging field of plant synthetic biology is the manipulation of systems involved in sensing and response to environmental signals. Sensing and responding to signals, including ligands, typically involves biological signal transduction. Plants use a wide variety of signaling systems to sense and respond to their environment. One of these systems, a histidine kinase (HK) based signaling system, lends itself to manipulation using the tools of synthetic biology. Both plants and bacteria use HKs to relay signals, which in bacteria can involve as few as two proteins (two-component systems or TCS). HK proteins are evolutionarily conserved between plants and bacteria and plant HK components have been shown to be functional in bacteria. We found that this conservation also applies to bacterial HK components which can function in plants. This conservation of function led us to hypothesize that synthetic HK signaling components can be designed and rapidly tested in bacteria. These novel HK signaling components form the foundation for a synthetic signaling system in plants, but typically require modifications such as codon optimization and proper targeting to allow optimal function. We describe the process and methodology of producing a synthetic signal transduction system in plants. We discovered that the bacterial response regulator (RR) PhoB shows HK-dependent nuclear translocation in planta. Using this discovery, we engineered a partial synthetic pathway in which a synthetic promoter (PlantPho) is activated using a plant-adapted PhoB (PhoB-VP64) and the endogenous HK-based cytokinin signaling pathway. Building on this work, we adapted an input or sensing system based on bacterial chemotactic binding proteins and HKs, resulting in a complete eukaryotic signal transduction system. Input to our eukaryotic signal transduction system is provided by a periplasmic binding protein (PBP), ribose-binding protein (RBP). RBP interacts with the membrane

  9. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  10. The sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue: prospecting signal transduction in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Mendes Souza

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available EST sequencing has enabled the discovery of many new genes in a vast array of organisms, and the utility of this approach to the scientific community is greatly increased by the establishment of fully annotated databases. The present study aimed to identify sugarcane ESTs sequenced in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br that corresponded to signal transduction components. We also produced a sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br/private/mining-reports/QG/QG-mining.htm that covered the main categories and pathways. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs encoding enzymes for hormone (gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathways were found and tissue specificity was inferred from their relative frequency of occurrence in the different libraries. Whenever possible, transducers of hormones and plant peptide signaling were catalogued to the respective pathway. Over 100 receptors were found in sugarcane, which contains a large family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors and also photoreceptors, histidine kinase receptors and their response regulators. G-protein and small GTPases were analyzed and compared to known members of these families found in mammalian and plant systems. Major kinase and phosphatase pathways were mapped, with special attention being given to the MAP kinase and the inositol pathway, both of which are well known in plants.O sequenciamento de ESTs (etiquetas de sequencias transcritas tem possibilitado a descoberta de muitos novos genes em uma ampla variedade de organismos. Um aumento do aproveitamento desta informação pela comunidade científica tem sido possível graças ao desenvolvimento de base de dados contendo seqüências completamente anotadas. O trabalho aqui relatado teve como objetivo a identificação de ESTs de cana de açúcar seqüenciadas através do projeto SUCEST (http://sucest.lad.ic. unicamp.br que

  11. Signal transduction during cold, salt, and drought stresses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guo-Tao; Ma, Shi-Liang; Bai, Li-Ping; Zhang, Li; Ma, Hui; Jia, Ping; Liu, Jun; Zhong, Ming; Guo, Zhi-Fu

    2012-02-01

    Abiotic stresses, especially cold, salinity and drought, are the primary causes of crop loss worldwide. Plant adaptation to environmental stresses is dependent upon the activation of cascades of molecular networks involved in stress perception, signal transduction, and the expression of specific stress-related genes and metabolites. Plants have stress-specific adaptive responses as well as responses which protect the plants from more than one environmental stress. There are multiple stress perception and signaling pathways, some of which are specific, but others may cross-talk at various steps. In this review article, we first expound the general stress signal transduction pathways, and then highlight various aspects of biotic stresses signal transduction networks. On the genetic analysis, many cold induced pathways are activated to protect plants from deleterious effects of cold stress, but till date, most studied pathway is ICE-CBF-COR signaling pathway. The Salt-Overly-Sensitive (SOS) pathway, identified through isolation and study of the sos1, sos2, and sos3 mutants, is essential for maintaining favorable ion ratios in the cytoplasm and for tolerance of salt stress. Both ABA-dependent and -independent signaling pathways appear to be involved in osmotic stress tolerance. ROS play a dual role in the response of plants to abiotic stresses functioning as toxic by-products of stress metabolism, as well as important signal transduction molecules and the ROS signaling networks can control growth, development, and stress response. Finally, we talk about the common regulatory system and cross-talk among biotic stresses, with particular emphasis on the MAPK cascades and the cross-talk between ABA signaling and biotic signaling.

  12. MAPK cascades in guard cell signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuree eLee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions.

  13. Olfactory G proteins: simple and complex signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, F A; Chess, A

    1998-06-04

    In both vertebrates and invertebrates, olfactory perception is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors. Recent work, in both mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans, sheds light on the role of specific G proteins in olfactory signal transduction, neuronal morphology and axon guidance.

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Testerink, C.; Wang, M.

    1998-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C),

  15. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. © FEMS 2016.

  16. Signal amplification and transduction in phytochrome photosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takala, Heikki; Björling, Alexander; Berntsson, Oskar; Lehtivuori, Heli; Niebling, Stephan; Hoernke, Maria; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert; Menzel, Andreas; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Sensory proteins must relay structural signals from the sensory site over large distances to regulatory output domains. Phytochromes are a major family of red-light-sensing kinases that control diverse cellular functions in plants, bacteria and fungi(1-9). Bacterial phytochromes consist of a

  17. NF1 Signal Transduction and Vascular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    the effects of losing a second allele of NF1 in the vascular endothelium of the adult mouse. This will be the first model of NF1 loss in the... adult endothelium and can serve as a model system for investigation of both cardiovascular effects and the tumor microenvironment. Body: Aim 1...would be to try and determine if there were defects in TGF-b signaling (Smad activation/EndMT) prior to doing a wholesale catalog of all the

  18. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  19. Mechanisms of hypoxic signal transduction regulated by reactive nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbayev, V V; Yasinska, I M

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports devoted to the field of oxygen sensing outline that signalling molecules such as nitric oxide/nitric oxide derived species as well as cytokines and other inflammatory mediators participate in hypoxic signal transduction. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) derived from it in hypoxic signal transduction and particularly in accumulation/de-accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein, which is critical not only for cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability but also for generation of inflammatory and innate immune responses. After brief description of nitric oxide and other RNS as multifunctional messengers we analyse and discuss the RNS-dependent accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein under normoxia followed by discussion of the mechanisms of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent enzyme-regulated degradation of HIF-1alpha protein under low oxygen availability.

  20. Effects of microgravity environment on intracellular signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De CHANG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity environment is a stress and extracellular signal that affects cellular morphology and function through signal transduction system, thus leading to certain biological effect. At present, many signaling pathways have been reported to be involved in the regulation of cell function under microgravity environment, such as NF-κB signaling pathway, Notch signaling pathway, MAPK signaling pathway, HSP signaling pathway and so on, and these reports have laid a foundation for the molecular studies of cytolergy under outer space environment. The recent progress in the researches on intracellular signaling pathways affected by microgravity is herewith reviewed in present paper in the hope of providing references for understanding the cell activity in space environment, and to find the ways to alleviate the harmful effects caused by the microgravity environment.

  1. Rules for modeling signal-transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavacek, William S; Faeder, James R; Blinov, Michael L; Posner, Richard G; Hucka, Michael; Fontana, Walter

    2006-07-18

    Formalized rules for protein-protein interactions have recently been introduced to represent the binding and enzymatic activities of proteins in cellular signaling. Rules encode an understanding of how a system works in terms of the biomolecules in the system and their possible states and interactions. A set of rules can be as easy to read as a diagrammatic interaction map, but unlike most such maps, rules have precise interpretations. Rules can be processed to automatically generate a mathematical or computational model for a system, which enables explanatory and predictive insights into the system's behavior. Rules are independent units of a model specification that facilitate model revision. Instead of changing a large number of equations or lines of code, as may be required in the case of a conventional mathematical model, a protein interaction can be introduced or modified simply by adding or changing a single rule that represents the interaction of interest. Rules can be defined and visualized by using graphs, so no specialized training in mathematics or computer science is necessary to create models or to take advantage of the representational precision of rules. Rules can be encoded in a machine-readable format to enable electronic storage and exchange of models, as well as basic knowledge about protein-protein interactions. Here, we review the motivation for rule-based modeling; applications of the approach; and issues that arise in model specification, simulation, and testing. We also discuss rule visualization and exchange and the software available for rule-based modeling.

  2. Postreceptor signal transduction mechanisms involved in octreotide-induced inhibition of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, P C; Barrie, R; Hill, N; Landeck, S; Kurozawa, D; Woltering, E A

    1994-12-01

    Somatostatin analogues inhibit peptide release and cell growth through multiple postreceptor signal transduction mechanisms (PRSTM), including G proteins (GP), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), calcium, protein kinase C (PKC), and tyrosine phosphatase (TP). Octreotide acetate (OA), a somatostatin analogue, has been shown to inhibit angiogenesis; however, the PRSTM involved are unknown. Fertilized chicken eggs were obtained and incubated. On day 3, embryos were removed and placed in plastic wrap hammocks. On day 7, disks containing OA, test substances that interfere with PRSTM, or combinations of OA plus a test substance were placed on the developing chorioallantoic membrane. Blood vessel growth under each disk was assessed at 24 hours. Data were evaluated by chi-squared analysis. OA's ability to inhibit angiogenesis is significantly diminished when combined with calcium, bradykinin (increases calcium), pertussis toxin (inhibits GP), or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (increases cAMP). In contrast, no significant decrease is noted in OA's ability to inhibit angiogenesis when combined with phorbol ester (activates PKC) or vanadate (inhibits TP). OA-induced inhibition of angiogenesis is GP, calcium, and cAMP dependent and is PKC and TP independent. Better understanding of the PRSTM involved with OA-induced inhibition of angiogenesis may lead to enhancement of OA's effect on angiogenesis.

  3. Identification of photoperception and light signal transduction pathways in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies employing model species have elucidated several aspects of photoperception and light signal transduction that control plant development. However, the information available for economically important crops is scarce. Citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST were investigated in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins responsible for light-regulated developmental control in model plants. Approximately 176,200 EST sequences from 53 libraries were queried and all bona fide and putative photoreceptor gene families were found in citrus species. We have identified 53 orthologs for several families of transcriptional regulators and cytoplasmic proteins mediating photoreceptor-induced responses although some important Arabidopsis phytochrome- and cryptochrome-signaling components are absent from citrus sequence databases. The main gene families responsible for phototropin-mediated signal transduction were present in citrus transcriptome, including general regulatory factors (14-3-3 proteins, scaffolding elements and auxin-responsive transcription factors and transporters. A working model of light perception, signal transduction and response-eliciting in citrus is proposed based on the identified key components. These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and economically important crop species to elucidate several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  4. DMPD: Toll-like receptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17934330 Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Krishnan J, Selvarajoo K, Tsuchiya... M, Lee G, Choi S. Exp Mol Med. 2007 Aug 31;39(4):421-38. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor sig...nal transduction. PubmedID 17934330 Title Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Authors Krishnan J,

  5. State-time spectrum of signal transduction logic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNamara, Aidan; Terfve, Camille; Henriques, David; Bernabé, Beatriz Peñalver; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2012-08-01

    Despite the current wealth of high-throughput data, our understanding of signal transduction is still incomplete. Mathematical modeling can be a tool to gain an insight into such processes. Detailed biochemical modeling provides deep understanding, but does not scale well above relatively a few proteins. In contrast, logic modeling can be used where the biochemical knowledge of the system is sparse and, because it is parameter free (or, at most, uses relatively a few parameters), it scales well to large networks that can be derived by manual curation or retrieved from public databases. Here, we present an overview of logic modeling formalisms in the context of training logic models to data, and specifically the different approaches to modeling qualitative to quantitative data (state) and dynamics (time) of signal transduction. We use a toy model of signal transduction to illustrate how different logic formalisms (Boolean, fuzzy logic and differential equations) treat state and time. Different formalisms allow for different features of the data to be captured, at the cost of extra requirements in terms of computational power and data quality and quantity. Through this demonstration, the assumptions behind each formalism are discussed, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and possible future developments.

  6. Signal transduction and information processing in mammalian taste buds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The molecular machinery for chemosensory transduction in taste buds has received considerable attention within the last decade. Consequently, we now know a great deal about sweet, bitter, and umami taste mechanisms and are gaining ground rapidly on salty and sour transduction. Sweet, bitter, and umami tastes are transduced by G-protein-coupled receptors. Salty taste may be transduced by epithelial Na channels similar to those found in renal tissues. Sour transduction appears to be initiated by intracellular acidification acting on acid-sensitive membrane proteins. Once a taste signal is generated in a taste cell, the subsequent steps involve secretion of neurotransmitters, including ATP and serotonin. It is now recognized that the cells responding to sweet, bitter, and umami taste stimuli do not possess synapses and instead secrete the neurotransmitter ATP via a novel mechanism not involving conventional vesicular exocytosis. ATP is believed to excite primary sensory afferent fibers that convey gustatory signals to the brain. In contrast, taste cells that do have synapses release serotonin in response to gustatory stimulation. The postsynaptic targets of serotonin have not yet been identified. Finally, ATP secreted from receptor cells also acts on neighboring taste cells to stimulate their release of serotonin. This suggests that there is important information processing and signal coding taking place in the mammalian taste bud after gustatory stimulation. PMID:17468883

  7. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarunendu Mapder

    Full Text Available To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  8. Modeling evolution of crosstalk in noisy signal transduction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareen, Ammar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2018-02-01

    Signal transduction networks can form highly interconnected systems within cells due to crosstalk between constituent pathways. To better understand the evolutionary design principles underlying such networks, we study the evolution of crosstalk for two parallel signaling pathways that arise via gene duplication. We use a sequence-based evolutionary algorithm and evolve the network based on two physically motivated fitness functions related to information transmission. We find that one fitness function leads to a high degree of crosstalk while the other leads to pathway specificity. Our results offer insights on the relationship between network architecture and information transmission for noisy biomolecular networks.

  9. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles ...... of beta1 and beta2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR)....

  10. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  11. Signal Transduction and Intracellular Trafficking by the Interleukin 36 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Siddhartha S; Singh, Divyendu; Raymond, Ernest L; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Caviness, Gary; Grimaldi, Christine; Woska, Joseph R; Mennerich, Detlev; Brown, Su-Ellen; Mbow, M Lamine; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-09-25

    Improper signaling of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R), a member of the IL-1 receptor family, has been associated with various inflammation-associated diseases. However, the requirements for IL-36R signal transduction remain poorly characterized. This work seeks to define the requirements for IL-36R signaling and intracellular trafficking. In the absence of cognate agonists, IL-36R was endocytosed and recycled to the plasma membrane. In the presence of IL-36, IL-36R increased accumulation in LAMP1+ lysosomes. Endocytosis predominantly used a clathrin-mediated pathway, and the accumulation of the IL-36R in lysosomes did not result in increased receptor turnover. The ubiquitin-binding Tollip protein contributed to IL-36R signaling and increased the accumulation of both subunits of the IL-36R. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  13. Abscisic acid perception and signaling transduction in strawberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunli; Jia, Haifeng; Chai, Yemao; Shen, Yuanyue

    2011-01-01

    On basis of fruit differential respiration and ethylene effects, climacteric and non-climacteric fruits have been classically defined. Over the past decades, the molecular mechanisms of climacteric fruit ripening were abundantly described and found to focus on ethylene perception and signaling transduction. In contrast, until our most recent breakthroughs, much progress has been made toward understanding the signaling perception and transduction mechanisms for abscisic acid (ABA) in strawberry, a model for non-climacteric fruit ripening. Our reports not only have provided several lines of strong evidences for ABA-regulated ripening of strawberry fruit, but also have demonstrated that homology proteins of Arabidopsis ABA receptors, including PYR/PYL/RCAR and ABAR/CHLH, act as positive regulators of ripening in response to ABA. These receptors also trigger a set of ABA downstream signaling components, and determine significant changes in the expression levels of both sugar and pigment metabolism-related genes that are closely associated with ripening. Soluble sugars, especially sucrose, may act as a signal molecular to trigger ABA accumulation through an enzymatic action of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (FaNCED1). This mini-review offers an overview of these processes and also outlines the possible, molecular mechanisms for ABA in the regulation of strawberry fruit ripening through the ABA receptors. PMID:22095148

  14. Extracellular cAMP activates molecular signalling pathways associated with sperm capacitation in bovines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Carlos Agustín I; Osycka-Salut, Claudia E; Castellano, Luciana; Cesari, Andreína; Di Siervi, Nicolás; Mutto, Adrián; Johannisson, Anders; Morrell, Jane M; Davio, Carlos; Perez-Martinez, Silvina

    2017-08-01

    Is extracellular cAMP involved in the regulation of signalling pathways in bovine sperm capacitation? Extracellular cAMP induces sperm capacitation through the activation of different signalling pathways that involve phospholipase C (PLC), PKC/ERK1-2 signalling and an increase in sperm Ca2+ levels, as well as soluble AC and cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signalling. In order to fertilize the oocyte, ejaculated spermatozoa must undergo a series of changes in the female reproductive tract, known as capacitation. This correlates with a number of membrane and metabolic modifications that include an increased influx of bicarbonate and Ca2+, activation of a soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) to produce cAMP, PKA activation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and the development of hyperactivated motility. We previously reported that cAMP efflux by Multidrug Resistance Protein 4 (MRP4) occurs during sperm capacitation and the pharmacological blockade of this inhibits the process. Moreover, the supplementation of incubation media with cAMP abolishes the inhibition and leads to sperm capacitation, suggesting that extracellular cAMP regulates crucial signalling cascades involved in this process. Bovine sperm were selected by the wool glass column method, and washed by centrifugation in BSA-Free Tyrode's Albumin Lactate Pyruvate (sp-TALP). Pellets were resuspended then diluted for each treatment. For in vitro capacitation, 10 to 15 × 106 SPZ/ml were incubated in 0.3% BSA sp-TALP at 38.5°C for 45 min under different experimental conditions. To evaluate the role of extracellular cAMP on different events associated with sperm capacitation, 10 nM cAMP was added to the incubation medium as well as different inhibitors of enzymes associated with signalling transduction pathways: U73122 (PLC inhibitor, 10 μM), Gö6983 (PKC inhibitor, 10 μM), PD98059 (ERK-1/2 inhibitor, 30 μM), H89 and KT (PKA inhibitors, 50 μM and 100 nM, respectively), KH7 (sAC inhibitor, 10 μM), BAPTA

  15. Towards blueprints for network architecture, biophysical dynamics and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, Stephen; Doiron, Brent; Josić, Kresimir; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2006-12-15

    We review mathematical aspects of biophysical dynamics, signal transduction and network architecture that have been used to uncover functionally significant relations between the dynamics of single neurons and the networks they compose. We focus on examples that combine insights from these three areas to expand our understanding of systems neuroscience. These range from single neuron coding to models of decision making and electrosensory discrimination by networks and populations and also coincidence detection in pairs of dendrites and dynamics of large networks of excitable dendritic spines. We conclude by describing some of the challenges that lie ahead as the applied mathematics community seeks to provide the tools which will ultimately underpin systems neuroscience.

  16. Signal transduction by a nondissociable heterotrimeric yeast G protein

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Shoshana; Reuveni, Hadas; Levitzki, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    Many signal transduction pathways involve heterotrimeric G proteins. The accepted model for activation of heterotrimeric G proteins states that the protein dissociates to the free Gα (GTP)-bound subunit and free Gβγ dimer. On GTP hydrolysis, Gα (GDP) then reassociates with Gβγ [Gilman, A. G. (1987) Annu. Rev. Biochem. 56, 615–649]. We reexamined this hypothesis, by using the mating G protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoded by the genes GPA1, STE4, and STE18. In the absence of ma...

  17. Signal transduction and activation of the NADPH oxidase in eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Lindsay

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the eosinophil NADPH oxidase and the subsequent release of toxic oxygen radicals has been implicated in the mechanism of parasite killing and inflammation. At present, little is known of the signal transduction pathway that govern agonist-induced activation of the respiratory burst and is the subject of this review. In particular, we focus on the ability of leukotrine B4 to activate the NADPH oxidase in guinea-pig peritoneal eosinophils which can be obtained in sufficient number and purity for detailed biochemical experiments to be performed.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  19. Influence of Unweighting on Insulin Signal Transduction in Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    2002-01-01

    Unweighting of the juvenile soleus muscle is characterized by an increased binding capacity for insulin relative to muscle mass due to sparing of the receptors during atrophy. Although carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation in the unweighted muscle develop increased sensitivity to insulin in vivo, protein synthesis in vivo and system A amino acid transport in vitro do not appear to develop such an enhanced response. The long-term goal is to identify the precise nature of this apparent resistance in the insulin signal transduction pathway and to consider how reduced weight-bearing may elicit this effect, by evaluating specific components of the insulin signalling pathway. Because the insulin-signalling pathway has components in common with the signal transduction pathway for insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and potentially other growth factors, the study could have important implications in the role of weight-bearing function on muscle growth and development. Since the insulin signalling pathway diverges following activation of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, the immediate specific aims will be to study the receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) and those branches, which lead to phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and of Shc protein. To achieve these broader objectives, we will test in situ, by intramuscular injection, the responses of glucose transport, system A amino acid transport and protein synthesis to insulin analogues for which the receptor has either a weaker or much stronger binding affinity compared to insulin. Studies will include: (1) estimation of the ED(sub 50) for each analogue for these three processes; (2) the effect of duration (one to four days) of unweighting on the response of each process to all analogues tested; (3) the effect of unweighting and the analogues on IRTK activity; and (4) the comparative effects of unweighting and analogue binding on the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRTK, IRS-1, and Shc protein.

  20. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1 shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2 shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  1. Chemotactic antagonists of cAMP inhibit Dictyostelium phospholipase C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bominaar, Anthony A.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    In Dictyostelium discoideum extracellular cAMP induces chemotaxis via a transmembrane signal transduction cascade consisting of surface cAMP receptors, G-proteins and effector enzymes including adenylyl cyclase, guanylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. Previously it was demonstrated that some cAMP

  2. Interplay Between Sugar and Hormone Signalling Pathways Modulate Floral Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianis G. Matsoukas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions are major determinants of plant reproductive success and adaptation to the local environment. Understanding the intricate molecular genetic and physiological machinery by which environment regulates juvenility and floral signal transduction has significant scientific and economic implications. Sugars are recognized as important regulatory molecules that regulate cellular activity at multiple levels, from transcription and translation to protein stability and activity. Molecular genetic and physiological approaches have demonstrated different aspects of carbohydrate involvement and its interactions with other signal transduction pathways in regulation of the juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions. Sugars regulate juvenility and floral signal transduction through their function as energy sources, osmotic regulators and signalling molecules. Interestingly, sugar signalling has been shown to involve extensive connections with phytohormone signalling. This includes interactions with phytohormones that are also important for the orchestration of developmental phase transitions, including gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene and brassinosteroids. This article highlights the potential roles of sugar-hormone interactions in regulation of floral signal transduction, with particular emphasis on Arabidopsis thaliana mutant phenotypes, and suggests possible directions for future research.

  3. Interplay between sugar and hormone signaling pathways modulate floral signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsoukas, Ianis G

    2014-01-01

    NOMENCLATURE The following nomenclature will be used in this article: Names of genes are written in italicized upper-case letters, e.g., ABI4.Names of proteins are written in non-italicized upper-case letters, e.g., ABI4.Names of mutants are written in italicized lower-case letters, e.g., abi4. The juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions are major determinants of plant reproductive success and adaptation to the local environment. Understanding the intricate molecular genetic and physiological machinery by which environment regulates juvenility and floral signal transduction has significant scientific and economic implications. Sugars are recognized as important regulatory molecules that regulate cellular activity at multiple levels, from transcription and translation to protein stability and activity. Molecular genetic and physiological approaches have demonstrated different aspects of carbohydrate involvement and its interactions with other signal transduction pathways in regulation of the juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions. Sugars regulate juvenility and floral signal transduction through their function as energy sources, osmotic regulators and signaling molecules. Interestingly, sugar signaling has been shown to involve extensive connections with phytohormone signaling. This includes interactions with phytohormones that are also important for the orchestration of developmental phase transitions, including gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, and brassinosteroids. This article highlights the potential roles of sugar-hormone interactions in regulation of floral signal transduction, with particular emphasis on Arabidopsis thaliana mutant phenotypes, and suggests possible directions for future research.

  4. Analysis of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Adeel

    Abstract Euglena gracilis is a photosynthetic, eukaryotic flagellate. It can adapt autotrophic and heterotrophic mode of growth and respond to different stimuli, this makes it an organism of choice for different research disciplines. It swims to reach a suitable niche by employing different stimuli such as oxygen, light, gravity and different chemicals. Among these stimuli light and gravity are the most important. Phototaxis (locomotion under light stimulus) and gravitaxis (locomotion under gravity stimulus) synergistically help cells to attain an optimal niche in the environment. However, in the complete absence of light or under scarcity of detectable light, cells can totally depend on gravity to find its swimming path. Therefore gravity has certain advantages over other stimuli.Unlike phototatic signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis no clear primary gravity receptor has been identified in Euglena cells so far. However, there are some convincing evidence that TRP like channels act as a primary gravity receptor in Euglena gracilis.Use of different inhibitors gave rise to the involvement of protein kinase and calmodulin proteins in signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis. Recently, specific calmodulin (Calmodulin 2) and protein kinase (PKA) have been identified as potential candidates of gravitactic signal transduction chain. Further characterization and investigation of these candidates was required. Therefore a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques was employed to localize proteins in cells and also to find interacting partners. For localization studies, specific antibodies were raised and characterized. Specificity of antibodies was validated by knockdown mutants, Invitro-translated proteins and heterologously expressed proteins. Cell fractionation studies, involving separation of the cell body and flagella for western blot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence studies were performed for subcellular localization. In order to find

  5. cAMP signalling in the normal and tumorigenic pituitary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, R; Vassallo, J

    2014-07-05

    cAMP signalling plays a key role in the normal physiology of the pituitary gland, regulating cellular growth and proliferation, hormone production and release. Deregulation of the cAMP signalling pathway has been reported to be a common occurrence in pituitary tumorigenesis. Several mechanisms have been implicated including somatic mutations, gene-gene interactions and gene-environmental interactions. Somatic mutations in G-proteins and protein kinases directly alter cAMP signalling, while malfunctioning of other signalling pathways such as the Raf/MAPK/ERK, PI3K/Akt/mTOR and Wnt pathways which normally interact with the cAMP pathway may mediate indirect effects on cAMP and varying downstream effectors. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor signalling pathway has been implicated in pituitary tumorigenesis and we review its role in general and specifically in relation to cAMP de-regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emergent decision-making in biological signal transduction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helikar, Tomáš; Konvalina, John; Heidel, Jack; Rogers, Jim A.

    2008-01-01

    The complexity of biochemical intracellular signal transduction networks has led to speculation that the high degree of interconnectivity that exists in these networks transforms them into an information processing network. To test this hypothesis directly, a large scale model was created with the logical mechanism of each node described completely to allow simulation and dynamical analysis. Exposing the network to tens of thousands of random combinations of inputs and analyzing the combined dynamics of multiple outputs revealed a robust system capable of clustering widely varying input combinations into equivalence classes of biologically relevant cellular responses. This capability was nontrivial in that the network performed sharp, nonfuzzy classifications even in the face of added noise, a hallmark of real-world decision-making. PMID:18250321

  7. Synthetic modular systems--reverse engineering of signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawson, Tony; Linding, Rune

    2005-01-01

    During the last decades, biology has decomposed cellular systems into genetic, functional and molecular networks. It has become evident that these networks consist of components with specific functions (e.g., proteins and genes). This has generated a considerable amount of knowledge and hypotheses...... concerning cellular organization. The idea discussed here is to test the extent of this knowledge by reconstructing, or reverse engineering, new synthetic biological systems from known components. We will discuss how integration of computational methods with proteomics and engineering concepts might lead us...... to a deeper and more abstract understanding of signal transduction systems. Designing and successfully introducing synthetic proteins into cellular pathways would provide us with a powerful research tool with many applications, such as development of biosensors, protein drugs and rewiring of biological...

  8. Computational modeling of signal transduction networks: a pedagogical exposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    We give a pedagogical introduction to computational modeling of signal transduction networks, starting from explaining the representations of chemical reactions by differential equations via the law of mass action. We discuss elementary biochemical reactions such as Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetics and cooperative binding, and show how these allow the representation of large networks as systems of differential equations. We discuss the importance of looking for simpler or reduced models, such as network motifs or dynamical motifs within the larger network, and describe methods to obtain qualitative behavior by bifurcation analysis, using freely available continuation software. We then discuss stochastic kinetics and show how to implement easy-to-use methods of rule-based modeling for stochastic simulations. We finally suggest some methods for comprehensive parameter sensitivity analysis, and discuss the insights that it could yield. Examples, including code to try out, are provided based on a paper that modeled Ras kinetics in thymocytes.

  9. The information highways of a biotechnological workhorse – signal transduction in Hypocrea jecorina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmoll Monika

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei is one of the most prolific producers of biomass-degrading enzymes and frequently termed an industrial workhorse. To compete for nutrients in its habitat despite its shortcoming in certain degradative enzymes, efficient perception and interpretation of environmental signals is indispensable. A better understanding of these signals as well as their transmission machinery can provide sources for improvement of biotechnological processes. Results The genome of H. jecorina was analysed for the presence and composition of common signal transduction pathways including heterotrimeric G-protein cascades, cAMP signaling, mitogen activated protein kinases, two component phosphorelay systems, proteins involved in circadian rhythmicity and light response, calcium signaling and the superfamily of Ras small GTPases. The results of this survey are discussed in the context of current knowledge in order to assess putative functions as well as potential impact of alterations of the respective pathways. Conclusion Important findings include an additional, bacterial type phospholipase C protein and an additional 6-4 photolyase. Moreover the presence of 4 RGS-(Regulator of G-protein Signaling proteins and 3 GprK-type G-protein coupled receptors comprising an RGS-domain suggest a more complex posttranslational regulation of G-protein signaling than in other ascomycetes. Also the finding, that H. jecorina, unlike yeast possesses class I phosducins which are involved in phototransduction in mammals warrants further investigation. An alteration in the regulation of circadian rhythmicity may be deduced from the extension of both the class I and II of casein kinases, homologues of which are implicated in phosphorylation of FRQ in Neurospora crassa. On the other hand, a shortage in the number of the pathogenicity related PTH11-type G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs as well as a lack of

  10. DMPD: LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2008 May;42(2):145-51. Epub 2008 Mar 4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS/TLR4 signal transduction path...way. PubmedID 18304834 Title LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Authors Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Publica

  11. Glycation & the RAGE axis: targeting signal transduction through DIAPH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhtman, Alexander; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2017-02-01

    The consequences of chronic disease are vast and unremitting; hence, understanding the pathogenic mechanisms mediating such disorders holds promise to identify therapeutics and diminish the consequences. The ligands of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) accumulate in chronic diseases, particularly those characterized by inflammation and metabolic dysfunction. Although first discovered and reported as a receptor for advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the expansion of the repertoire of RAGE ligands implicates the receptor in diverse milieus, such as autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, obesity, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Areas covered: This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the ligand families of RAGE and data from human subjects and animal models on the role of the RAGE axis in chronic diseases. The recent discovery that the cytoplasmic domain of RAGE binds to the formin homology 1 (FH1) domain, DIAPH1, and that this interaction is essential for RAGE ligand-stimulated signal transduction, is discussed. Finally, we review therapeutic opportunities targeting the RAGE axis as a means to mitigate chronic diseases. Expert commentary: With the aging of the population and the epidemic of cardiometabolic disease, therapeutic strategies to target molecular pathways that contribute to the sequelae of these chronic diseases are urgently needed. In this review, we propose that the ligand/RAGE axis and its signaling nexus is a key factor in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and that therapeutic interruption of this pathway may improve quality and duration of life.

  12. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsirichai, K.; Harrison, B.; Stanga, J.; Young, L.-S.; Neal, C.; Sabat, G.; Murthy, N.; Harms, A.; Sedbrook, J.; Masson, P.

    The primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings respond to gravity stimulation by developing a tip curvature that results from differential cellular elongation on opposite flanks of the elongation zone. This curvature appears modulated by a lateral gradient of auxin that originates in the gravity-perceiving cells (statocytes) of the root cap through an apparent lateral repositioning of a component the auxin efflux carrier complex within these cells (Friml et al, 2002, Nature 415: 806-809). Unfortunately, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern early phases of gravity perception and signal transduction within the root-cap statocytes. We have used a molecular genetic approach to uncover some of these mechanisms. Mutations in the Arabidopsis ARG1 and ARL2 genes, which encode J-domain proteins, resulted in specific alterations in root and hypocotyl gravitropism, without pleiotropic phenotypes. Interestingly, ARG1 and ARL2 appear to function in the same genetic pathway. A combination of molecular genetic, biochemical and cell-biological approaches were used to demonstrate that ARG1 functions in early phases of gravity signal transduction within the root and hypocotyl statocytes, and is needed for efficient lateral auxin transport within the cap. The ARG1 protein is associated with components of the secretory and/or endosomal pathways, suggesting its role in the recycling of components of the auxin efflux carrier complex between plasma membrane and endosome (Boonsirichai et al, 2003, Plant Cell 15:2612-2625). Genetic modifiers of arg1-2 were isolated and shown to enhance the gravitropic defect of arg1-2, while resulting in little or no gravitropic defects in a wild type ARG1 background. A slight tendency for arg1-2;mar1-1 and arg1-2;mar2-1 double-mutant organs to display an opposite gravitropic response compared to wild type suggests that all three genes contribute to the interpretation of the gravity-vector information by seedling organs. The

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis to dissect differences in signal transduction in activating TSH receptor mutations in the thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Kerstin; Boisnard, Alexandra; Ihling, Christian; Ludgate, Marian; Eszlinger, Markus; Krohn, Knut; Sinz, Andrea; Fuhrer, Dagmar

    2012-02-01

    In the thyroid, cAMP controls both thyroid growth and function. Gain-of-function mutations in the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) lead to constitutive cAMP formation and are a major cause of autonomous thyroid adenomas. The impact of activating TSHR mutations on the signal transduction network of the thyrocyte is not fully understood. To gain more insights into constitutive TSHR signaling, rat thyrocytes (FRTL-5 cells) with stable expression of three activating TSHR mutants (mutTSHR: A623I, L629F and Del613-621), which differ in their functional characteristics in vitro, were analyzed by a quantitative proteomic approach and compared to the wild-type TSHR (WT-TSHR). This study revealed (1) differences in the expression of Rab proteins suggesting an increased TSHR internalization in mutTSHR but not in the WT-TSHR; (2) differential stimulation of PI3K/Akt signaling in mutTSHR vs. WT-TSHR cells, (3) activation of Epac, impairing short-time Akt phosphorylation in both, mutTSHR and WT-TSHR cells. Based on the analysis of global changes in protein expression patterns, our findings underline the complexity of gain-of-function TSHR signaling in thyrocytes, which extends beyond pure cAMP and/or IP formation. Moreover, evidence for augmented endocytosis in the mutTSHR, adds to a new concept of TSHR signaling in thyroid autonomy. Further studies are required to clarify whether the observed differences in Rab, PI3K and Epac signaling may contribute to differences in the phenotypic presentation, i.e. stimulation of function and growth of thyroid autonomy in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  15. Oxygen sensing and signal transduction in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Natascha; Strielkov, Ievgen; Pak, Oleg; Weissmann, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), also known as the von Euler-Liljestrand mechanism, is an essential response of the pulmonary vasculature to acute and sustained alveolar hypoxia. During local alveolar hypoxia, HPV matches perfusion to ventilation to maintain optimal arterial oxygenation. In contrast, during global alveolar hypoxia, HPV leads to pulmonary hypertension. The oxygen sensing and signal transduction machinery is located in the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) of the pre-capillary vessels, albeit the physiological response may be modulated in vivo by the endothelium. While factors such as nitric oxide modulate HPV, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been suggested to act as essential mediators in HPV. ROS may originate from mitochondria and/or NADPH oxidases but the exact oxygen sensing mechanisms, as well as the question of whether increased or decreased ROS cause HPV, are under debate. ROS may induce intracellular calcium increase and subsequent contraction of PASMCs via direct or indirect interactions with protein kinases, phospholipases, sarcoplasmic calcium channels, transient receptor potential channels, voltage-dependent potassium channels and L-type calcium channels, whose relevance may vary under different experimental conditions. Successful identification of factors regulating HPV may allow development of novel therapeutic approaches for conditions of disturbed HPV. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  16. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  17. Modulation of signal transduction by tea catechins and related phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Masahito [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States); Weinstein, I. Bernard [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States)]. E-mail: ibw1@columbia.edu

    2005-12-11

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations and experimental studies in rodents provide evidence that green tea and its constituents can inhibit both the development and growth of tumors at a variety of tissue sites. In addition, EGCG, a major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence that these effects are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of the activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream pathways of signal transduction. We also review evidence indicating that the antitumor effects of the related polyphenolic phytochemicals resveratrol, genistein, curcumin, and capsaicin are exerted via similar mechanisms. Some of these agents (EGCG, genistein, and curcumin) appear to directly target specific RTKs, and all of these compounds cause inhibition of the activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Critical areas of future investigation include: (1) identification of the direct molecular target(s) of EGCG and related polyphenolic compounds in cells; (2) the in vivo metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds; (3) the ancillary effects of these compounds on tumor-stromal interactions; (4) the development of synergistic combinations with other antitumor agents to enhance efficacy in cancer prevention and therapy, and also minimize potential toxicities.

  18. Interplay Between Sugar and Hormone Signalling Pathways Modulate Floral Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Ianis G. Matsoukas; Ianis G. Matsoukas

    2014-01-01

    The juvenile-to-adult and vegetative-to-reproductive phase transitions are major determinants of plant reproductive success and adaptation to the local environment. Understanding the intricate molecular genetic and physiological machinery by which environment regulates juvenility and floral signal transduction has significant scientific and economic implications. Sugars are recognized as important regulatory molecules that regulate cellular activity at multiple levels, from transcription and ...

  19. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

  20. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor... Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signa...l transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. Authors

  1. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  2. Nitric oxide. A novel signal transduction mechanism for transcellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignarro, L J

    1990-11-01

    Nitric oxide first captured the interest of biologists when this inorganic molecule was found to activate cytosolic guanylate cyclase and stimulate cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP) formation in mammalian cells. Further studies led to the finding that nitric oxide causes vascular smooth muscle relaxation and inhibition of platelet aggregation by mechanisms involving cyclic GMP and that several clinically used nitrovasodilators owe their biological actions to nitric oxide. Nitric oxide possesses physicochemical and pharmacological properties that make it an ideal candidate for a short-term regulator or modulator of vascular smooth muscle tone and platelet function. Nitric oxide is synthesized by various mammalian tissues including vascular endothelium, macrophages, neutrophils, hepatic Kupffer cells, adrenal tissue, cerebellum, and other tissues. Nitric oxide is synthesized from endogenous L-arginine by a nitric oxide synthase system that possesses different cofactor requirements in different cell types. The nitric oxide formed diffuses out of its cells of origin and into nearby target cells, where it binds to the heme group of cytosolic guanylate cyclase and thereby causes enzyme activation. This interaction represents a novel and widespread signal transduction mechanism that links extracellular stimuli to the biosynthesis of cyclic GMP in nearby target cells. The small molecular size and lipophilic nature of nitric oxide enable communication with nearby cells containing cytosolic guanylate cyclase. The extent of transcellular communication is limited by the short half-life of nitric oxide, thereby ensuring a localized response. Labile nitric oxide-generating molecules such as S-nitrosothiols may be involved as precursors or effectors. Further research will provide a deeper understanding of the biology of nitric oxide and the nature of associated pathophysiological states.

  3. Global and local missions of cAMP signaling in neural plasticity, learning, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daewoo

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been a popular model to study cAMP signaling and resultant behaviors due to its powerful genetic approaches. All molecular components (AC, PDE, PKA, CREB, etc) essential for cAMP signaling have been identified in the fly. Among them, adenylyl cyclase (AC) gene rutabaga and phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene dunce have been intensively studied to understand the role of cAMP signaling. Interestingly, these two mutant genes were originally identified on the basis of associative learning deficits. This commentary summarizes findings on the role of cAMP in Drosophila neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and memory. It mainly focuses on two distinct mechanisms (global versus local) regulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic plasticity related to cAMP homeostasis. This dual regulatory role of cAMP is to increase the strength of excitatory neural circuits on one hand, but to act locally on postsynaptic GABA receptors to decrease inhibitory synaptic plasticity on the other. Thus the action of cAMP could result in a global increase in the neural circuit excitability and memory. Implications of this cAMP signaling related to drug discovery for neural diseases are also described.

  4. FASEB summer research conference on signal transduction in plants. Final report, June 16, 1996--June 21, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, T.L.; Quatrano, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This is the program from the second FASEB conference on Signal Transduction in Plants. Topic areas included the following: environmental signaling; perception and transduction of light signals; signaling in plant microbe interactions; signaling in plant pathogen interactions; cell, cell communication; cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and cellwall continuum; signaling molecules in plant growth and development I and II. A list of participants is included.

  5. The gravity persistent signal (gps) Mutants of Arabidopsis: Insights into Gravitropic Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, S.

    The gravitropic response of Arabidopsis stems is rapid with a visible within 30 min and vertical reorientation within 2 h. However, horizontal gravistimulation for 3 h at 4°C does not cause curvature. When the stems are subsequently placed in the vertical position at RT, they bend in response to the previous, horizontal gravistimulation. These results indicate that the gravity perception step can occur at 4°C, but that part of the response is sensitive to cold. At 4°C, starch-containing amyloplasts in the endodermis of the inflorescence stems sedimented normally but auxin transport was abolished indicating that the cold treatment affected early events of the signal transduction pathway that occur after amyloplast sedimentation but prior to auxin transport. The gps mutants of Arabidopsis are a unique group of mutants that respond abnormally after gravistimulation at 4°C. gps1 shows no response to the cold gravistimulation, gps2 bends the wrong way as compared to wild type and gps3 over responds, bending past the anticipated curvature. The mutants were selected from a T-DNA tagged population. Cloning strategies based on the tag have been employed to identify the genes disrupted. GPS1 was cloned using TAIL PCR and is At3g20130, a cytochrome P450, CYP705A22, of unknown function. GPS1p::GFP fusions are being used to determine temporal and spatial expression of GPS1. The mutation in gps3 appears to disrupt a non-coding region downstream of At1g43950 No function has yet been determined for this region, but it appears that the mutation disrupts transcription of a transcription factor homologous to the DNA binding domain of an auxin response factor (ARF) 9-like protein. The identity of GPS2 is as yet unknown. The gps mutants represent potentially three independent aspects of signal transduction in the gravitropic response: perception or retention of the gravity signal (gps1), determination of the polarity of the response (gps2), and the tissue specificity of the

  6. DMPD: When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18631453 When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-...l) Show When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transd...uction. PubmedID 18631453 Title When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative

  7. Physician Education: The Erythropoietin Receptor and Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura; Arai

    1996-01-01

    differentiation such as the induction of globin synthesis [3, 4]. The remaining half is not required for this signaling, and, conversely, it acts to dampen the signals. It is known that a tyrosine kinase called JAK2 associates with the region near the plasma membrane, undergoes autophosphorylation, and phosphorylates the EPO receptor, and a transcription factor called a STAT [5]. It is thought that JAK2 plays an important role in promoting cellular proliferation. The STAT is activated by the phosphorylation, and it then translocates to the nucleus, recognizes a specific base sequence in the promoter region of its target gene, and initiates transcription. At present, we know that the STAT whose activation is mediated by the EPO receptor is STAT5, and the target genes are CIS [6], which has an SH2 domain (a molecular structure that recognizes a phosphorylated tyrosine) and OSM [7], which is a pleiotropic cytokine. However, activation of STAT5 and activation of the target genes are not unique to the EPO receptor, and they also occur with the IL-2 and IL-3 receptors. Moreover, the JAK2 substrate that is directly linked to cellular proliferation is still unknown. At present, studies are under way to determine the transcription factors specific to EPO and their target genes, as well as the substrates of JAK2. RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION AND CESSATION OF THE SIGNAL: On the other hand, tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor is necessary at the cytoplasmic tail region far from the plasma membrane, and the signal transduction pathway that originates with this phosphorylated tyrosine and is mediated by proteins with SH2 domains becomes activated. First, a GTP/GDP exchange factor called SOS, which is mediated by Shc and Grb2, migrates to the plasma membrane and converts a ras protein to its GTP form. The activated ras protein then activates the Raf-MAP kinase kinase-MAP kinase cascade, and ultimately initiates the transcription of oncogenes such as c-fos and c-jun. An enzyme called PI3 kinase

  8. A phosphoproteomics approach to elucidate neuropeptide signal transduction controlling insect metamorphosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim F; Larsen, Martin R; Lobner-Olesen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    , proteins not previously linked to PTTH and ecdysone biosynthesis were identified as targets of PTTH signaling. These include proteins involved in signal transduction, endosomal trafficking, constituents of the cytoskeleton and regulators of transcription and translation. Our screen shows that PTTH likely...... quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate signal transduction events initiated by PTTH. We identified Spook (CYP307A1), a suspected rate-limiting enzyme for E biosynthesis, and components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, as major phosphorylation targets of PTTH signaling. Further...

  9. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  10. Abscisic acid signaling: thermal stability shift assays as tool to analyze hormone perception and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Fen-Fen; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that plays important roles in growth and development. ABA is also the central regulator to protect plants against abiotic stresses, such as drought, high salinity, and adverse temperatures, and ABA signaling is therefore a promising biotechnological target for the generation of crops with increased stress resistance. Recently, a core signal transduction pathway has been established, in which ABA receptors, type 2C protein phosphatases, and AMPK-related protein kinases control the regulation of transcription factors, ion channels, and enzymes. Here we use a simple protein thermal stability shift assay to independently validate key aspects of this pathway and to demonstrate the usefulness of this technique to detect and characterize very weak (Kd ≥ 50 µM) interactions between receptors and physiological and synthetic agonists, to determine and analyze protein-protein interactions, and to screen small molecule inhibitors.

  11. Abscisic acid signaling: thermal stability shift assays as tool to analyze hormone perception and signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen-Fen Soon

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA is a plant hormone that plays important roles in growth and development. ABA is also the central regulator to protect plants against abiotic stresses, such as drought, high salinity, and adverse temperatures, and ABA signaling is therefore a promising biotechnological target for the generation of crops with increased stress resistance. Recently, a core signal transduction pathway has been established, in which ABA receptors, type 2C protein phosphatases, and AMPK-related protein kinases control the regulation of transcription factors, ion channels, and enzymes. Here we use a simple protein thermal stability shift assay to independently validate key aspects of this pathway and to demonstrate the usefulness of this technique to detect and characterize very weak (Kd ≥ 50 µM interactions between receptors and physiological and synthetic agonists, to determine and analyze protein-protein interactions, and to screen small molecule inhibitors.

  12. [Transforming growth factor beta1/Smad3 signal transduction pathway and post-traumatic scar formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Rong; Cen, Ying

    2012-03-01

    To summarize the recent progress in related research on transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1)/Smad3 signal transduction pathway and post-traumatic scar formation. Recent related literature at home and abroad on TGF-beta1/Smad3 signal transduction pathway and post-traumatic scar formation was reviewed and summarized. TGF-beta1 is an important influence factor of fibrotic diseases, and it plays biological effects by TGF-beta1/ Smad3 signal transduction pathway. The pathway is regulated by many factors and has crosstalk with other signal pathways at cellular and molecular levels. The pathway is involved in the early post-traumatic inflammatory response, wound healing, and late pathological scar formation. Intervening the transduction pathway at the molecular level can influence the process of fibrosis and extracellular matrix deposition. TGF-beta1/Smad3 signal transduction pathway is an important way to affect post-traumatic scar formation and extracellular matrix deposition. The further study on the pathway will provide a theoretical basis for promotion of wound healing, as well as prevention and treatment of pathological scar formation.

  13. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  14. Altering the threshold of an excitable signal transduction network changes cell migratory modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yuchuan; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Edwards, Marc; Cai, Huaqing; Inoue, Takanari; Iglesias, Pablo A; Devreotes, Peter N

    2017-04-01

    The diverse migratory modes displayed by different cell types are generally believed to be idiosyncratic. Here we show that the migratory behaviour of Dictyostelium was switched from amoeboid to keratocyte-like and oscillatory modes by synthetically decreasing phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate levels or increasing Ras/Rap-related activities. The perturbations at these key nodes of an excitable signal transduction network initiated a causal chain of events: the threshold for network activation was lowered, the speed and range of propagating waves of signal transduction activity increased, actin-driven cellular protrusions expanded and, consequently, the cell migratory mode transitions ensued. Conversely, innately keratocyte-like and oscillatory cells were promptly converted to amoeboid by inhibition of Ras effectors with restoration of directed migration. We use computational analysis to explain how thresholds control cell migration and discuss the architecture of the signal transduction network that gives rise to excitability.

  15. Analysis of a signal transduction pathway involved in leaf epidermis differentiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip W. Becraft

    2005-05-23

    The major objective of this study was to identify and analyze signal transduction factors that function with the CR4 receptor kinase. We pursued this analysis in Arabidopsis. Analysis of other members of the ACR4 related receptor (CRR) family produced biochemical evidence consistent with some of them functioning in ACR4 signal transduction. Yeast 2-hybrid identified six proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of ACR4, representing putative downstream signal transduction components. The interactions for all 6 proteins were verified by in vitro pull down assays. Five of the interacting proteins were phosphorylated by ACR4. We also identified candidate interactors with the extracellular TNFR domain. We hypothesize this may be the ligand binding domain for ACR4. In one approach, yeast 2-hybrid was again used and five candidate proteins identified. Nine additional candidates were identified in a genome wide scan of Arabidopsis amino acid sequences that threaded onto the TNF structure.

  16. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  17. Gene expression, signal transduction pathways and functional networks associated with growth of sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, Hjalte C.R.; Borup, Rehannah; Alanin, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine global gene expression in relation to Vestibular schwannomas (VS) growth rate and to identify signal transduction pathways and functional molecular networks associated with growth. Repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to surgery determined...... and analyzed by dChip software. Differential gene expression was defined as a 1.5-fold difference between fast and slow growing tumors (>... of signal transduction pathways and functional molecular networks associated with tumor growth. In total 109 genes were deregulated in relation to tumor growth rate. Genes associated with apoptosis, growth and cell proliferation were deregulated. Gene ontology included regulation of the cell cycle, cell...

  18. Aberrant transmembrane signal transduction in Dictyostelium cells expressing a mutated ras gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Kesbeke, Fanja; Reymond, Christophe D.; Firtel, Richard A.; Luderus, Eva; Driel, Roel van

    1987-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum cells contain a single ras gene (Dd-ras) that is highly homologous to mammalian ras genes. Cell transformation with a vector carrying a ras gene with a (glycine → threonine) missense mutation at position 12 causes an altered morphogenesis. Extracellular cAMP signals regulate

  19. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  20. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  1. Signal Transduction: Turning a Switch into a Rheostat

    OpenAIRE

    Bardwell, Lee

    2008-01-01

    MAP kinase cascades are inherently switch-like, but, during yeast mating, MAPK signaling is graded. A new study suggests that the Ste5 scaffold protein is responsible for making this switch less switch-like.

  2. Integration of Computational Techniques for the Modelling of Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Pedro Pablo Gonzalez; Garcia, Maura Cardenas; Gershenson, Carlos; Lagunez-Otero, Jaime

    2002-01-01

    A cell can be seen as an adaptive autonomous agent or as a society of adaptive autonomous agents, where each can exhibit a particular behaviour depending on its cognitive capabilities. We present an intracellular signalling model obtained by integrating several computational techniques into an agent-based paradigm. Cellulat, the model, takes into account two essential aspects of the intracellular signalling networks: cognitive capacities and a spatial organization. Exemplifying the functional...

  3. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianfei; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process. PMID:26393507

  4. Signal transduction during mating and meiosis in S. pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Nielsen, Olaf

    1993-01-01

    When starved, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe responds by producing mating factors or pheromones that signal to cells of the opposite sex to initiate mating. Like its distant relative Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells of the two mating types of S. pombe each produce a distinct pheromone...... that binds to receptors on the opposite cell type to induce the morphological changes required for mating. While the pathways are basically very similar in the two yeasts, pheromone signalling in S. pombe differs in several important ways from that of the more familiar budding yeast. In this article, Olaf...... Nielsen describes the pheromones and their effects in S. pombe, and compares the signalling pathways of the two yeasts....

  5. Role of signal transduction and actin in G1 phase progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opstal, Angélique; Bijvelt, Jose J M; Margadant, Coert; Boonstra, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    Progression through the cell cycle of mammalian cells is dependent upon external factors such as growth- and ECM factors. These factors exert their effect predominantly during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells are cultured in suspension or when growth factors are withdrawn from the medium, cells will stop cell cycle progression and enter a quiescent state. Cells will remain in this quiescent state until extracellular conditions change and cells are stimulated to re-enter the cell cycle. This stimulation is mediated by various signal transduction cascades such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) pathway. In Chinese hamster ovary cells at least two serum-dependent points exist during G1 phase that lead to diffent cellular responses. The first point is located immediately after mitosis and is suggested to link with apoptosis. The second point is located in late G1 phase and probably corresponds with cellular differentiation. Signal transduction is mutually related to the cytoskeleton, especially the actin microfilament system. The actin microfilament system influences signal transduction and several signal transduction pathways influence the actin structure. Here we describe the role of the MAPK and PI3-kinase activities and of actin microfilaments in progression through the cell cycle and their role in the two G1 checkpoints.

  6. The role of Ryk and Ror receptor tyrosine kinases in Wnt signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, J.; Nusse, R.; van Amerongen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases of the Ryk and Ror families were initially classified as orphan receptors because their ligands were unknown. They are now known to contain functional extracellular Wnt-binding domains and are implicated in Wnt-signal transduction in multiple species. Although their

  7. Genomic Analysis of Two-Component Signal Transduction Proteins in Basidiomycetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Lavín, JL; Binnewies, Tim Terence

    2010-01-01

    Two-component system (TCS) proteins are components of complex signal transduction pathways in fungi, and play essential roles in the regulation of several cellular functions and responses. Species of basidiomycetes have a marked variation in their specific physiological traits, morphological...

  8. Effects of matrine on JAK-STAT signaling transduction pathways in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study aims to investigate the effects of matrine on the JAK-STAT signaling transduction pathways in bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and to explore its action mechanism. A total of 72 male C57BL/6 mice were randomized into the control, model, and treatment groups. PF models were ...

  9. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F.; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins

  10. DMPD: Endotoxin signal transduction in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iol. 1996 Jul;60(1):8-26. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Endotoxin signal transduction in macrophages. P... Leukoc Biol. 1996 Jul;60(1):8-26. Pathway - PNG File (.png) SVG File (.svg) HTML File (.html

  11. Cholesterol-dependent separation of the beta2-adrenergic receptor from its partners determines signaling efficacy: insight into nanoscale organization of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Stéphanie M; Percherancier, Yann; Galandrin, Ségolène; Breit, Andreas; Galés, Céline; Bouvier, Michel

    2008-09-05

    Determining the role of lipid raft nanodomains in G protein-coupled receptor signaling remains fraught by the lack of assays directly monitoring rafts in native membranes. We thus combined extensive biochemical and pharmacological approaches to a nanoscale strategy based on bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) to assess the spatial and functional influence of cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered lipid nanodomains on beta2 adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) signaling. The data revealed that whereas beta2AR did not partition within liquid-ordered lipid phase, a pool of G protein and adenylyl cyclase (AC) were sequestered in these domains. Destabilization of the liquid-ordered phase by cholesterol depletion led to a lateral redistribution of Galphas and AC that favored interactions between the receptor and its signaling partners as assessed by BRET. This resulted in an increased basal and agonist-promoted beta2AR-stimulated cAMP production that was partially dampened as a result of constitutive protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation and desensitization of the receptor. This restraining influence of nanodomains on beta2AR signaling was further substantiated by showing that liquid-ordered lipid phase stabilization using caveolin overexpression or increasing membrane cholesterol amount led to an inhibition of beta2AR-associated signaling. Given the emerging concept that clustering of receptors and effectors into signaling platforms contributes to the efficacy and selectivity of signal transduction, our results support a model whereby cholesterol-promoted liquid-ordered lipid phase-embedding Gs and AC allows their lateral separation from the receptor, thus restraining the basal activity and controlling responsiveness of beta2AR signaling machinery within larger signaling platforms.

  12. The role of ras proteins in insulin signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maassen, J.A.; Burgering, B.M.T.; Medema, R.H.; Osterop, A.P.R.M.; Zon, G.C.M. van der; Möller, W.; Bos, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Ras-proteins are guanine nucleotide binding proteins, which, in the GTP bound state emit a strong mitogenic signal. In the GDP bound state, the protein appears inactive. We have found that stimulation by insulin of cells expressing elevated levels of insulin receptors results in a rapid conversion

  13. Modelling and simulation of signal transductions in an apoptosis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    analysis technique, and presented the biological meaning of the analysis results. Nevertheless, it is still expected to find a general methodology to model and analyse common signalling pathways by using Petri nets. The current standard approach to represent biochemical reactions as a system is to use a series of ordinary ...

  14. Signal-transduction networks and the regulation of muscle protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Jacobson, Lewis A

    2005-10-01

    Protein degradation in muscle functions in maintaining normal physiological homeostasis and adapting to new homeostatic states, and is required for muscle wasting or atrophy in various pathological states. The interplay between protein synthesis and degradation to maintain homeostasis is complex and responds to a variety of autocrine and intercellular signals from neuronal inputs, hormones, cytokines, growth factors and other regulatory molecules. The intracellular events that connect extracellular signals to the molecular control of protein degradation are incompletely understood, but likely involve interacting signal-transduction networks rather than isolated pathways. We review some examples of signal-transduction systems that regulate protein degradation, including effectors of proteolysis inducing factor (PIF), insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and their receptors, and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and its receptors.

  15. EXERCISE-INDUCED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND GENE REGULATION IN SKELETAL MUSCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Wackerhage

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle adapts to various forms of exercise depending on the force, speed and duration characteristics of the contraction pattern. The stresses and signals associated with each contraction pattern are likely to specifically activate a network of signal transduction pathways that integrate this information. These pathways include the calcineurin, Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, protein kinase C (PKC, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-B, AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK, insulin signalling and developmental pathways. Activated signal transduction pathways activate or increase the expression of transcription factors via various mechanisms. Skeletal muscle genes are usually regulated by combinatorial control exerted by several transcription factors and possibly other mechanisms. In addition, adaptations such as an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis or the activation of satellite cell proliferation involve distinct regulatory mechanisms

  16. Dynamic Testing of Signal Transduction Deregulation During Breast Cancer Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    pollution, such as chlorine, sulfur and ozone . When these substances react with the silver layer, it becomes tarnished so that the required optical...Evaluation of the effectiveness of anticancer drugs such as the onset of apoptosis in living cells is an important process in drug development and therapy ...quantitatively monitoring the changes in fluorescence signals, caspase-9 activity within a single living MCF- 7 cell was detected. Photodynamic therapy (PDT

  17. Signal transduction regulating meristem development in Arabidopsis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cark, Steven E.

    2003-09-10

    Research support by DE-FG02-96ER20227 focused on the CLV loci and their regulation of organ formation at the Arabidopsis shoot meristem. Shoot meristem function is central to plant development as all of the above-ground organs and tissues of the plant are derived post-embryonically from the shoot meristem. At the shoot meristem, stem cells are maintained, and progeny cells undergo a switch toward differentiation and organ formation. The CLV loci, represented by three genes CLV1, CLV2 and CLV3 are key regulators of meristem development. Each of the CLV loci encode a putative receptor-mediated signaling component. When this work began, virtually nothing was known about receptor-mediated signaling in plants. Thus, our goal was to both characterize these genes and the proteins they encode as regulators of meristem development, and to investigate how receptor-mediated signaling might function in plants. Our work lead to several major publications that were significant contributions to understanding this system.

  18. EXERCISE-INDUCED SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND GENE REGULATION IN SKELETAL MUSCLE

    OpenAIRE

    Henning Wackerhage; Niall M. Woods

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal muscle adapts to various forms of exercise depending on the force, speed and duration characteristics of the contraction pattern. The stresses and signals associated with each contraction pattern are likely to specifically activate a network of signal transduction pathways that integrate this information. These pathways include the calcineurin, Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein kinase C (PKC), nuclear factor kappa B (...

  19. Increased entropy of signal transduction in the cancer metastasis phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The statistical study of biological networks has led to important novel biological insights, such as the presence of hubs and hierarchical modularity. There is also a growing interest in studying the statistical properties of networks in the context of cancer genomics. However, relatively little is known as to what network features differ between the cancer and normal cell physiologies, or between different cancer cell phenotypes. Results Based on the observation that frequent genomic alterations underlie a more aggressive cancer phenotype, we asked if such an effect could be detectable as an increase in the randomness of local gene expression patterns. Using a breast cancer gene expression data set and a model network of protein interactions we derive constrained weighted networks defined by a stochastic information flux matrix reflecting expression correlations between interacting proteins. Based on this stochastic matrix we propose and compute an entropy measure that quantifies the degree of randomness in the local pattern of information flux around single genes. By comparing the local entropies in the non-metastatic versus metastatic breast cancer networks, we here show that breast cancers that metastasize are characterised by a small yet significant increase in the degree of randomness of local expression patterns. We validate this result in three additional breast cancer expression data sets and demonstrate that local entropy better characterises the metastatic phenotype than other non-entropy based measures. We show that increases in entropy can be used to identify genes and signalling pathways implicated in breast cancer metastasis and provide examples of de-novo discoveries of gene modules with known roles in apoptosis, immune-mediated tumour suppression, cell-cycle and tumour invasion. Importantly, we also identify a novel gene module within the insulin growth factor signalling pathway, alteration of which may predispose the tumour to

  20. Increased entropy of signal transduction in the cancer metastasis phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teschendorff Andrew E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The statistical study of biological networks has led to important novel biological insights, such as the presence of hubs and hierarchical modularity. There is also a growing interest in studying the statistical properties of networks in the context of cancer genomics. However, relatively little is known as to what network features differ between the cancer and normal cell physiologies, or between different cancer cell phenotypes. Results Based on the observation that frequent genomic alterations underlie a more aggressive cancer phenotype, we asked if such an effect could be detectable as an increase in the randomness of local gene expression patterns. Using a breast cancer gene expression data set and a model network of protein interactions we derive constrained weighted networks defined by a stochastic information flux matrix reflecting expression correlations between interacting proteins. Based on this stochastic matrix we propose and compute an entropy measure that quantifies the degree of randomness in the local pattern of information flux around single genes. By comparing the local entropies in the non-metastatic versus metastatic breast cancer networks, we here show that breast cancers that metastasize are characterised by a small yet significant increase in the degree of randomness of local expression patterns. We validate this result in three additional breast cancer expression data sets and demonstrate that local entropy better characterises the metastatic phenotype than other non-entropy based measures. We show that increases in entropy can be used to identify genes and signalling pathways implicated in breast cancer metastasis and provide examples of de-novo discoveries of gene modules with known roles in apoptosis, immune-mediated tumour suppression, cell-cycle and tumour invasion. Importantly, we also identify a novel gene module within the insulin growth factor signalling pathway, alteration of which may

  1. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koul Sweaty

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy.

  2. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure-selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity.

  3. Discovery of GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Simone; Tafi, Andrea; Désaubry, Laurent; Nebigil, Canan G.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking) are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as three-dimensional quantitative structure–selectivity relationships, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCR ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators, and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity. PMID:25506327

  4. Signal transduction in a covalent post-assembly modification cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Ben S.; Roberts, Derrick A.; Lohr, Thorsten G.; Ronson, Tanya K.; Nitschke, Jonathan R.

    2017-12-01

    Natural reaction cascades control the movement of biomolecules between cellular compartments. Inspired by these systems, we report a synthetic reaction cascade employing post-assembly modification reactions to direct the partitioning of supramolecular complexes between phases. The system is composed of a self-assembled tetrazine-edged FeII8L12 cube and a maleimide-functionalized FeII4L6 tetrahedron. Norbornadiene (NBD) functions as the stimulus that triggers the cascade, beginning with the inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder reaction of NBD with the tetrazine moieties of the cube. This reaction generates cyclopentadiene as a transient by-product, acting as a relay signal that subsequently undergoes a Diels-Alder reaction with the maleimide-functionalized tetrahedron. Cyclooctyne can selectively inhibit the cascade by outcompeting NBD as the initial trigger. Initiating the cascade with 2-octadecyl NBD leads to selective alkylation of the tetrahedron upon cascade completion. The increased lipophilicity of the C18-tagged tetrahedron drives this complex into a non-polar phase, allowing its isolation from the initially inseparable mixture of complexes.

  5. Modulation of signal transduction pathways by natural compounds in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Alok; Fofaria, Neel M; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is generally regarded as the result of abnormal growth of cells. According to World Health Organization, cancer is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Mother nature provides a large source of bioactive compounds with excellent therapeutic efficacy. Numerous phytochemicals from nature have been investigated for anticancer properties. In this review article, we discuss several natural compounds, which have shown anti-cancer activity. Natural compounds induce cell cycle arrest, activate intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways, generate Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), and down-regulate activated signaling pathways, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation, progression and metastasis of cancer. Several preclinical studies have suggested that natural compounds can also increase the sensitivity of resistant cancers to available chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, combining FDA approved anti-cancer drugs with natural compounds results in improved efficacy. On the basis of these exciting outcomes of natural compounds against several cancer types, several agents have already advanced to clinical trials. In conclusion, preclinical results and clinical outcomes against cancer suggest promising anticancer efficacy of agents from natural sources. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Signal Transduction and Molecular Targets of Selected Flavonoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Diet exerts a major influence on the risk for developing cancer and heart disease. Food factors such as flavonoids are alleged to protect cells from premature aging and disease by shielding DNA, proteins, and lipids from oxidative damage. Recent Advances: Our work has focused on clarifying the effects of dietary components on cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth, discovering mechanisms to explain the effects, and identifying the specific molecular targets of these compounds. Our strategy for identifying specific molecular targets of phytochemicals involves the use of supercomputer technology combined with protein crystallography, molecular biology, and experimental laboratory verification. Critical Issues: One of the greatest challenges for scientists is to reduce the accumulation of distortion and half truths reported in the popular media regarding the health benefits of certain foods or food supplements. The use of these is not new, but interest has increased dramatically because of perceived health benefits that are presumably acquired without unpleasant side effects. Flavonoids are touted to exert many beneficial effects in vitro. However, whether they can produce these effects in vivo is disputed. Future Directions: The World Health Organization indicates that one third of all cancer deaths are preventable and that diet is closely linked to prevention. Based on this idea and epidemiological findings, attention has centered on dietary phytochemicals as an effective intervention in cancer development. However, an unequivocal link between diet and cancer has not been established. Thus, identifying cancer preventive dietary agents with specific molecular targets is essential to move forward toward successful cancer prevention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 163–180. PMID:23458437

  7. Image informatics for studying signal transduction in cells interacting with 3D matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; Guo, Jin; Chen, Chengpin; Yannas, Ioannis V.; Wei, Xunbin; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Cells sense and respond to chemical stimuli on their environment via signal transduction pathways, complex networks of proteins whose interactions transmit chemical information. This work describes an implementation of image informatics, imaging-based methodologies for studying signal transduction networks. The methodology developed focuses on studying signal transduction networks in cells that interact with 3D matrices. It utilizes shRNA-based knock down of network components, 3D high-content imaging of cells inside the matrix by spectral multi-photon microscopy, and single-cell quantification using features that describe both cell morphology and cell-matrix adhesion pattern. The methodology is applied in a pilot study of TGFβ signaling via the SMAD pathway in fibroblasts cultured inside porous collagen-GAG scaffolds, biomaterials similar to the ones used clinically to induce skin regeneration. Preliminary results suggest that knocking down all rSMAD components affects fibroblast response to TGFβ1 and TGFβ3 isoforms in different ways, and suggest a potential role for SMAD1 and SMAD5 in regulating TGFβ isoform response. These preliminary results need to be verified with proteomic results that can provide solid evidence about the particular role of individual components of the SMAD pathway.

  8. [Screening for cellular signal transduction pathway involved in C-reactive protein induced endothelial cell inflammation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xu-dong; Chen, Ai-hua; Zhou, Li-yao; Xiao, Hua; Fu, Qiang; Li, Zhi-liang

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the cellular signal transduction pathway involved in participation of C-reactive protein (CRP) in inflammation process in endothelial cell. Human umbilical vascular endothelial cells were cultured and characterized by anti-Factor VIII-related antigen. The cells were divided into CRP group and control group, and they were respectively treated with CRP (20 mg/L) or serum-free medium for 24 hours. RNAs of two groups were extracted and analyzed by human signal transduction pathway gene array. Expressions of 13 genes were increased, whereas expressions of 25 genes were decreased in CRP group compared with control group. Especially, WNT1 inducible signaling pathway protein 2 (WISP2) was increased by 37.63 folds, which was believed to involve in inflammation process as a growth factor, p53 was increased by 30.50 folds, which was a key factor to modulate apoptosis, whereas, Bcl-x and Bcl-2 were decreased by 9.61% and 49.95% which were characterized as an important factor to prevent apoptosis. Vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was increased by 2.75 folds after treated with CRP, while intercellular adhesion molecular (ICAM) between two groups didn't show statistically significant difference. CRP may be involved in inflammatory process of endothelial cell, and the mechanism may be to induce apoptosis and activate cellular signal transduction pathway of cell adhesion proteins.

  9. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  10. Endosomal generation of cAMP in GPCR signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic G.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the production of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic AMP, which is mediated by cell surface G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its termination take place exclusively at the plasma membrane. Recent studies reveal that diverse GPCRs do not always follow this conventional paradigm. In the new model, GPCRs mediate G-protein signaling not only from the plasma membrane but also from endosomal membranes. This model proposes that following ligand binding and activation, cell surface GPCRs internalize and redistribute into early endosomes, where trimeric G protein signaling can be maintained for an extended period of time. This Perspective discusses the molecular and cellular mechanistic subtleties as well as the physiological consequences of this unexpected process, which is considerably changing how we think about GPCR signaling and regulation and how we study drugs that target this receptor family. PMID:25271346

  11. Sensory cilia and integration of signal transduction in human health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Lotte B; Schneider, Linda

    2007-01-01

    the extracellular environment in order to control basic cellular processes during embryonic and postnatal development, as well as in tissue homeostasis in adulthood. Consequently, defects in building of the cilium or in transport or function of ciliary signal proteins are associated with a series of pathologies......, including developmental disorders and cancer. In this review, we highlight recent examples of the mechanisms by which signal components are selectively targeted and transported to the ciliary membrane and we present an overview of the signal transduction pathways associated with primary and motile cilia...

  12. MDA5 and LGP2: accomplices and antagonists of antiviral signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Kenny R; Bruns, Annie M; Horvath, Curt M

    2014-08-01

    Mammalian cells have the ability to recognize virus infection and mount a powerful antiviral transcriptional response that provides an initial barrier to replication and impacts both innate and adaptive immune responses. Retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptor (RLR) proteins mediate intracellular virus recognition and are activated by viral RNA ligands to induce antiviral signal transduction. While the mechanisms of RIG-I regulation are already well understood, less is known about the more enigmatic melanoma differentiation-associated 5 (MDA5) and laboratory of genetics and physiology 2 (LGP2). Emerging evidence suggests that these two RLRs are intimately associated as both accomplices and antagonists of antiviral signal transduction. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Role of Glycolytic Intermediates in Global Regulation and Signal Transduction. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.C.

    2000-05-08

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of glycolytic intermediates in regulation of cell physiology. It is known that many glycolytic intermediates are involved in regulation of enzyme activities at the kinetic level. However, little is known regarding the role of these metabolites in global regulation and signal transduction. This project aims to investigate the role of glycolytic intermediates in the regulation of gene expression.

  14. Cleavage/Repair and Signal Transduction Pathways in Irradiated Breast Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    influence of p53 function on Radiation Research, 135, 75-80. radiosensitivity of human glioblastoma cells . Cancer SuMŽ•,txRAN,• V. N., EALOVEGA, N’I. WV...after drug exposure while Leung et ted mitotic arrest and giant cell formation in irradiated al. [75] reported that continuous exposure for 24 h to MCF-7...Signal Transduction Pathways in Irradiated Breast Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David A. Gewirtz, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Virginia

  15. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated......) for metabolic effects, a domain located in or near the proline-rich region is of importance; and (iii) for internalization, phenylalanine 346 is necessary....

  16. Arabidopsis signal transduction mutant defective in chemically and biologically induced disease resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Delaney, T P; Friedrich, L.; Ryals, J A

    1995-01-01

    Plants possess multiple resistance mechanisms that guard against pathogen attack. Among these are inducible systems such as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). SAR is activated by pathogen exposure and leads to an increase in salicylic acid (SA), high-level expression of SAR-related genes, and resistance to a spectrum of pathogens. To identify components of the signal transduction pathways regulating SAR, a mutant screen was developed that uses 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid as an activator of...

  17. Ischemic preconditioning modulates mitochondrial respiration, irrespective of the employed signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, David A; Manintveld, Olivier C; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; McFalls, Edward O; Heinen, Andre; Verdouw, Pieter D; Sluiter, Wim; Duncker, Dirk J

    2008-01-01

    We tested in the in vivo rat heart the hypothesis that although ischemic preconditioning can employ different signal transduction pathways, these pathways converge ultimately at the level of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Infarct size produced by a 60-min coronary artery occlusion (69%+/-2% of the area at risk) was limited by a preceding 15-min coronary occlusion (48%+/-4%). Cardioprotection by this stimulus was triggered by adenosine receptor stimulation, which was followed by protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase activation and then mitochondrial K(+)(ATP)-channel opening. In contrast, cardioprotection by 3 cycles of 3-min coronary occlusions (infarct size 27%+/-5% of the area at risk) involved the release of reactive oxygen species, which was followed by protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase activation, but was independent of adenosine receptor stimulation and K(+)(ATP)-channel activation. However, both pathways decreased respiratory control index (RCI; state-3/state-2, using succinate as complex-II substrate) from 3.1+/-0.2 in mitochondria from sham-treated hearts to 2.4+/-0.2 and 2.5+/-0.1 in hearts subjected to a single 15-min and triple 3-min coronary occlusions, respectively (both P<0.05). The decreases in RCI were due to an increase in state-2 respiration, whereas state-3 respiration was unchanged. Abolition of cardioprotection by blockade of either signal transduction pathway was paralleled by a concomitant abolition of mitochondrial uncoupling. These observations are consistent with the concept that mild mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to infarct size limitation by various ischemic preconditioning stimuli, despite using different signal transduction pathways. In conclusion, in the in vivo rat heart, different ischemic preconditioning (IPC) stimuli can activate highly different signal transduction pathways, which seem to converge at the level of the mitochondria where they increase state-2 respiration.

  18. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pathways media

  19. Identification of pathway deregulation--gene expression based analysis of consistent signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Mieczkowski

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways belong to a complex system of communication that governs cellular processes. They represent signal transduction from an extracellular stimulus via a receptor to intracellular mediators, as well as intracellular interactions. Perturbations in signaling cascade often lead to detrimental changes in cell function and cause many diseases, including cancer. Identification of deregulated pathways may advance the understanding of complex diseases and lead to improvement of therapeutic strategies. We propose Analysis of Consistent Signal Transduction (ACST, a novel method for analysis of signaling pathways. Our method incorporates information regarding pathway topology, as well as data on the position of every gene in each pathway. To preserve gene-gene interactions we use a subject-sampling permutation model to assess the significance of pathway perturbations. We applied our approach to nine independent datasets of global gene expression profiling. The results of ACST, as well as three other methods used to analyze signaling pathways, are presented in the context of biological significance and repeatability among similar, yet independent, datasets. We demonstrate the usefulness of using information of pathway structure as well as genes' functions in the analysis of signaling pathways. We also show that ACST leads to biologically meaningful results and high repeatability.

  20. Influence of arsenate and arsenite on signal transduction pathways: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Vaillancourt, Richard R. [The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Arsenic has been a recognized contaminant and toxicant, as well as a medicinal compound throughout human history. Populations throughout the world are exposed to arsenic and these exposures have been associated with a number of human cancers. Not much is known about the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen and more recently its role in non-cancerous diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus have been uncovered. The health effects associated with arsenic are numerous and the association between arsenic exposure and human disease has intensified the search for molecular mechanisms that describe the biological activity of arsenic in humans and leads to the aforementioned disease states. Arsenic poses a human health risk due in part to the regulation of cellular signal transduction pathways and over the last few decades, some cellular mechanisms that account for arsenic toxicity, as well as, signal transduction pathways have been discovered. However, given the ubiquitous nature of arsenic in the environment, making sense of all the data remains a challenge. This review will focus on our knowledge of signal transduction pathways that are regulated by arsenic. (orig.)

  1. Protein phosphorylation and signal transduction modulation: chemistry perspectives for small-molecule drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, T K; Shakespeare, W C; Wang, Y; Sundaramoorthi, R; Huang, W-S; Metcalf, C A; Thomas, M; Lawrence, B M; Rozamus, L; Noehre, J; Zhu, X; Narula, S; Bohacek, R S; Weigele, M; Dalgarno, D C

    2005-05-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been exploited by Nature in profound ways to control various aspects of cell proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, survival, motility and gene transcription. Cellular signal transduction pathways involve protein kinases, protein phosphatases, and phosphoprotein-interacting domain (e.g., SH2, PTB, WW, FHA, 14-3-3) containing cellular proteins to provide multidimensional, dynamic and reversible regulation of many biological activities. Knowledge of cellular signal transduction pathways has led to the identification of promising therapeutic targets amongst these superfamilies of enzymes and adapter proteins which have been linked to various cancers as well as inflammatory, immune, metabolic and bone diseases. This review focuses on protein kinase, protein phosphatase and phosphoprotein-interacting cellular protein therapeutic targets with an emphasis on small-molecule drug discovery from a chemistry perspective. Noteworthy studies related to molecular genetics, signal transduction pathways, structural biology, and drug design for several of these therapeutic targets are highlighted. Some exemplary proof-of-concept lead compounds, clinical candidates and/or breakthrough medicines are further detailed to illustrate achievements as well as challenges in the generation, optimization and development of small-molecule inhibitors of protein kinases, protein phosphatases or phosphoprotein-interacting domain containing cellular proteins.

  2. Peach (Prunus persica) extract inhibits angiotensin II-induced signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Ryohei; Okuno, Yoshiharu; Nakamura, Misa; Inada, Ken-ichi; Tokuda, Akihiko; Yamashita, Miki; Hidaka, Ryu; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi

    2013-08-15

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a vasoactive hormone that has been implicated in cardiovascular diseases. Here, the effect of peach, Prunus persica L. Batsch, pulp extract on Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and signal transduction events in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was investigated. Pretreatment of peach ethyl acetate extract inhibited Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in VSMCs. Furthermore, Ang II-induced ROS generation, essential for signal transduction events, was diminished by the peach ethyl acetate extract. The peach ethyl acetate extract also attenuated the Ang II-induced phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor and myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, both of which are associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension. These results suggest that peach ethyl acetate extract may have clinical potential for preventing cardiovascular diseases by interfering with Ang II-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation, the generation of ROS, and then blocking signal transduction events. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Controlled membrane translocation provides a mechanism for signal transduction and amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J.; Keymeulen, Flore; Ciaccia, Maria; Williams, Nicholas H.; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2017-05-01

    Transmission and amplification of chemical signals across lipid bilayer membranes is of profound significance in many biological processes, from the development of multicellular organisms to information processing in the nervous system. In biology, membrane-spanning proteins are responsible for the transmission of chemical signals across membranes, and signal transduction is often associated with an amplified signalling cascade. The ability to reproduce such processes in artificial systems has potential applications in sensing, controlled drug delivery and communication between compartments in tissue-like constructs of synthetic vesicles. Here we describe a mechanism for transmitting a chemical signal across a membrane based on the controlled translocation of a synthetic molecular transducer from one side of a lipid bilayer membrane to the other. The controlled molecular motion has been coupled to the activation of a catalyst on the inside of a vesicle, which leads to a signal-amplification process analogous to the biological counterpart.

  4. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    Full Text Available We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of

  5. Gravity persistent signal 1 reveals a novel cytochrome P450 involved in gravitropic signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    is involved in gravitropic signal transduction. (Partially support by NSF: 0618506 to SEW)

  6. Divergent cAMP signaling differentially regulates serotonin-induced spinal motor plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, D P; Mitchell, G S

    2017-02-01

    Spinal metabotropic serotonin receptors encode transient experiences into long-lasting changes in motor behavior (i.e. motor plasticity). While interactions between serotonin receptor subtypes are known to regulate plasticity, the significance of molecular divergence in downstream G protein coupled receptor signaling is not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that distinct cAMP dependent signaling pathways differentially regulate serotonin-induced phrenic motor facilitation (pMF); a well-studied model of spinal motor plasticity. Specifically, we studied the capacity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) to regulate 5-HT2A receptor-induced pMF within adult male rats. Although spinal PKA, EPAC and 5-HT2A each elicit pMF when activated alone, concurrent PKA and 5-HT2A activation interact via mutual inhibition thereby blocking pMF expression. Conversely, concurrent EPAC and 5-HT2A activation enhance pMF expression reflecting additive contributions from both mechanisms. Thus, we demonstrate that distinct downstream cAMP signaling pathways enable differential regulation of 5-HT2A-induced pMF. Conditional activation of independent signaling mechanisms may explain experience amendable changes in plasticity expression (i.e. metaplasticity), an emerging concept thought to enable flexible motor control within the adult central nervous system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Trichoderma Biocontrol: Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Host Sensing and Mycoparasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Zeilinger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi of the genus Trichoderma are used as biocontrol agents against several plant pathogenic fungi like Rhizoctonia spp., Pythium spp., Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium spp. which cause both soil-borne and leaf- or flower-borne diseases of agricultural plants. Plant disease control by Trichoderma is based on complex interactions between Trichoderma, the plant pathogen and the plant. Until now, two main components of biocontrol have been identified: direct activity of Trichoderma against the plant pathogen by mycoparasitism and induced systemic resistance in plants. As the mycoparasitic interaction is host-specific and not merely a contact response, it is likely that signals from the host fungus are recognised by Trichoderma and provoke transcription of mycoparasitism-related genes.In the last few years examination of signalling pathways underlying Trichoderma biocontrol started and it was shown that heterotrimeric G-proteins and mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases affected biocontrol-relevant processes such as the production of hydrolytic enzymes and antifungal metabolites and the formation of infection structures. MAPK signalling was also found to be involved in induction of plant systemic resistance in Trichoderma virens and in the hyperosmotic stress response in Trichoderma harzianum. Analyses of the function of components of the cAMP pathway during Trichoderma biocontrol revealed that mycoparasitism-associated coiling and chitinase production as well as secondary metabolism are affected by the internal cAMP level; in addition, a cross talk between regulation of light responses and the cAMP signalling pathway was found in Trichoderma atroviride.

  8. Excitation and Adaptation in Bacteria–a Model Signal Transduction System that Controls Taxis and Spatial Pattern Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xue

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The machinery for transduction of chemotactic stimuli in the bacterium E. coli is one of the most completely characterized signal transduction systems, and because of its relative simplicity, quantitative analysis of this system is possible. Here we discuss models which reproduce many of the important behaviors of the system. The important characteristics of the signal transduction system are excitation and adaptation, and the latter implies that the transduction system can function as a “derivative sensor” with respect to the ligand concentration in that the DC component of a signal is ultimately ignored if it is not too large. This temporal sensing mechanism provides the bacterium with a memory of its passage through spatially- or temporally-varying signal fields, and adaptation is essential for successful chemotaxis. We also discuss some of the spatial patterns observed in populations and indicate how cell-level behavior can be embedded in population-level descriptions.

  9. Signal transduction meets vesicle traffic: the software and hardware of GLUT4 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klip, Amira; Sun, Yi; Chiu, Tim Ting; Foley, Kevin P

    2014-05-15

    Skeletal muscle is the major tissue disposing of dietary glucose, a function regulated by insulin-elicited signals that impart mobilization of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane. This phenomenon, also central to adipocyte biology, has been the subject of intense and productive research for decades. We focus on muscle cell studies scrutinizing insulin signals and vesicle traffic in a spatiotemporal manner. Using the analogy of an integrated circuit to approach the intersection between signal transduction and vesicle mobilization, we identify signaling relays ("software") that engage structural/mechanical elements ("hardware") to enact the rapid mobilization and incorporation of GLUT4 into the cell surface. We emphasize how insulin signal transduction switches from tyrosine through lipid and serine phosphorylation down to activation of small G proteins of the Rab and Rho families, describe key negative regulation step of Rab GTPases through the GTPase-activating protein activity of the Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160), and focus on the mechanical effectors engaged by Rabs 8A and 10 (the molecular motor myosin Va), and the Rho GTPase Rac1 (actin filament branching and severing through Arp2/3 and cofilin). Finally, we illustrate how actin filaments interact with myosin 1c and α-Actinin4 to promote vesicle tethering as preamble to fusion with the membrane. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Oxidative stress in fungi: its function in signal transduction, interaction with plant hosts, and lignocellulose degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenbach, Michael; Weber, Manuela; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Karl, Thomas; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore

    2015-04-03

    In this review article, we want to present an overview of oxidative stress in fungal cells in relation to signal transduction, interaction of fungi with plant hosts, and lignocellulose degradation. We will discuss external oxidative stress which may occur through the interaction with other microorganisms or plant hosts as well as internally generated oxidative stress, which can for instance originate from NADPH oxidases or "leaky" mitochondria and may be modulated by the peroxiredoxin system or by protein disulfide isomerases thus contributing to redox signaling. Analyzing redox signaling in fungi with the tools of molecular genetics is presently only in its beginning. However, it is already clear that redox signaling in fungal cells often is linked to cell differentiation (like the formation of perithecia), virulence (in plant pathogens), hyphal growth and the successful passage through the stationary phase.

  11. Oxidative Stress in Fungi: Its Function in Signal Transduction, Interaction with Plant Hosts, and Lignocellulose Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Breitenbach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, we want to present an overview of oxidative stress in fungal cells in relation to signal transduction, interaction of fungi with plant hosts, and lignocellulose degradation. We will discuss external oxidative stress which may occur through the interaction with other microorganisms or plant hosts as well as internally generated oxidative stress, which can for instance originate from NADPH oxidases or “leaky” mitochondria and may be modulated by the peroxiredoxin system or by protein disulfide isomerases thus contributing to redox signaling. Analyzing redox signaling in fungi with the tools of molecular genetics is presently only in its beginning. However, it is already clear that redox signaling in fungal cells often is linked to cell differentiation (like the formation of perithecia, virulence (in plant pathogens, hyphal growth and the successful passage through the stationary phase.

  12. Different roles of GNAS and cAMP signaling during early and late stages of osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S; Kaplan, F S; Shore, E M

    2012-09-01

    Progressive osseous heteroplasia (POH) and fibrous dysplasia (FD) are genetic diseases of bone formation at opposite ends of the osteogenic spectrum: imperfect osteogenesis of the skeleton occurs in FD, while heterotopic ossification in skin, subcutaneous fat, and skeletal muscle forms in POH. POH is caused by heterozygous inactivating germline mutations in GNAS, which encodes G-protein subunits regulating the cAMP pathway, while FD is caused by GNAS somatic activating mutations. We used pluripotent mouse ES cells to examine the effects of Gnas dysregulation on osteoblast differentiation. At the earliest stages of osteogenesis, Gnas transcripts Gsα, XLαs and 1A are expressed at low levels and cAMP levels are also low. Inhibition of cAMP signaling (as in POH) by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine enhanced osteoblast differentiation while conversely, increased cAMP signaling (as in FD), induced by forskolin, inhibited osteoblast differentiation. Notably, increased cAMP was inhibitory for osteogenesis only at early stages after osteogenic induction. Expression of osteogenic and adipogenic markers showed that increased cAMP enhanced adipogenesis and impaired osteoblast differentiation even in the presence of osteogenic factors, supporting cAMP as a critical regulator of osteoblast and adipocyte lineage commitment. Furthermore, increased cAMP signaling decreased BMP pathway signaling, indicating that G protein-cAMP pathway activation (as in FD) inhibits osteoblast differentiation, at least in part by blocking the BMP-Smad pathway, and suggesting that GNAS inactivation as occurs in POH enhances osteoblast differentiation, at least in part by stimulating BMP signaling. These data support that differences in cAMP levels during early stages of cell differentiation regulate cell fate decisions. Supporting information available online at http:/www.thieme-connect.de/ejournals/toc/hmr. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culhane, Kelly J; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  14. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  15. Ubiquitination of basal VEGFR2 regulates signal transduction and endothelial function

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    Gina A. Smith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors can undergo recycling or proteolysis but the cellular decision-making events that sort between these pathways remain poorly defined. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 regulate signal transduction and angiogenesis, but how signaling and proteolysis is regulated is not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a pathway requiring the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 controls basal VEGFR2 levels, hence metering plasma membrane receptor availability for the VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell response. VEGFR2 undergoes VEGF-A-independent constitutive degradation via a UBA1-dependent ubiquitin-linked pathway. Depletion of UBA1 increased VEGFR2 recycling from endosome-to-plasma membrane and decreased proteolysis. Increased membrane receptor availability after UBA1 depletion elevated VEGF-A-stimulated activation of key signaling enzymes such as PLCγ1 and ERK1/2. Although UBA1 depletion caused an overall decrease in endothelial cell proliferation, surviving cells showed greater VEGF-A-stimulated responses such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. Our study now suggests that a ubiquitin-linked pathway regulates the balance between receptor recycling and degradation which in turn impacts on the intensity and duration of VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction and the endothelial response.

  16. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Barrett-Wilt, Greg A; Masson, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant's perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in TOC132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  17. Abscisic acid perception and signaling transduction in strawberry: a model for non-climacteric fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunli; Jia, Haifeng; Chai, Yemao; Shen, Yuanyue

    2011-12-01

    On basis of fruit differential respiration and ethylene effects, climacteric and non-climacteric fruits have been classically defined. Over the past decades, the molecular mechanisms of climacteric fruit ripening were abundantly described and found to focus on ethylene perception and signaling transduction. In contrast, until our most recent breakthroughs, much progress has been made toward understanding the signaling perception and transduction mechanisms for abscisic acid (ABA) in strawberry, a model for non-climacteric fruit ripening. Our reports not only have provided several lines of strong evidences for ABA-regulated ripening of strawberry fruit, but also have demonstrated that homology proteins of Arabidopsis ABA receptors, including PYR/PYL/RCAR and ABAR/CHLH, act as positive regulators of ripening in response to ABA. These receptors also trigger a set of ABA downstream signaling components, and determine significant changes in the expression levels of both sugar and pigment metabolism-related genes that are closely associated with ripening. Soluble sugars, especially sucrose, may act as a signal molecular to trigger ABA accumulation through an enzymatic action of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (FaNCED1). This mini-review offers an overview of these processes and also outlines the possible, molecular mechanisms for ABA in the regulation of strawberry fruit ripening through the ABA receptors. © 2011 Landes Bioscience

  18. Creating a bio-hybrid signal transduction pathway: opening a new channel of communication between cells and machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarkoni, Orr; Donlon, Lynn; Frankel, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Manipulation of signal transduction pathways presents a viable mechanism to interface cells with electronics. In this work, we present a two-step signal transduction pathway involving cellular and electronic transduction elements. In order to circumvent many of the conventional difficulties encountered when harnessing chemical signalling for the purpose of electronics communication, gaseous nitric oxide (NO) was selected as the signalling molecule. By genetic engineering of the nitric oxide synthase protein eNOS and insertion of light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) domains, we have created a photoactive version of the protein. The novel chimeric eNOS was found to be capable of producing NO in response to excitation by visible light. By coupling these mutant cells to a surface modified platinum electrode, it was possible to convert an optical signal into a chemical one, followed by subsequent conversion of the chemical signal into an electrical output.

  19. Elevated cAMP improves signal-to-noise ratio in amphibian rod photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, Luba A; Nikolaeva, Darya A; Fedotkina, Tamara V; Govardovskii, Victor I; Firsov, Michael L

    2017-07-03

    The absolute sensitivity of vertebrate retinas is set by a background noise, called dark noise, which originates from several different cell types and is generated by different molecular mechanisms. The major share of dark noise is produced by photoreceptors and consists of two components, discrete and continuous. Discrete noise is generated by spontaneous thermal activations of visual pigment. These events are undistinguishable from real single-photon responses (SPRs) and might be considered an equivalent of the signal. Continuous noise is produced by spontaneous fluctuations of the catalytic activity of the cGMP phosphodiesterase. This masks both SPR and spontaneous SPR-like responses. Circadian rhythms affect photoreceptors, among other systems by periodically increasing intracellular cAMP levels ([cAMP]in), which increases the size and changes the shape of SPRs. Here, we show that forskolin, a tool that increases [cAMP]in, affects the magnitude and frequency spectrum of the continuous and discrete components of dark noise in photoreceptors. By changing both components of rod signaling, the signal and the noise, cAMP is able to increase the photoreceptor signal-to-noise ratio by twofold. We propose that this results in a substantial improvement of signal detection, without compromising noise rejection, at the rod bipolar cell synapse. © 2017 Astakhova et al.

  20. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  1. Smartphone Operated Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) Amplifier for Nanopore Sensors: Design and Analytical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Kahnemouyi, Sina; Fan, Hsinwen; Mak, Wai Han; Lohith, Akshar; Seger, Adam; Teodorescu, Mircea; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-03-25

    In this report, we demonstrated a handheld wireless voltage-clamp amplifier for current measurement of nanopore sensors. This amplifier interfaces a sensing probe and connects wirelessly with a computer or smartphone for the required stimulus input, data processing and storage. To test the proposed Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) wireless amplifier, in the current study the system was tested with a nano-pH sensor to measure pH of standard buffer solutions and the performance was compared against the commercial voltage-clamp amplifier. To our best knowledge, STING amplifier is the first miniaturized wireless voltage-clamp platform operated with a customized smart-phone application (app).

  2. Hijacking PrPC-dependent signal transduction: when prions impair Αβ clearance

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    Julia eHernandez-Rapp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein PrPC is the normal counterpart of the scrapie prion protein PrPSc, the main component of the infectious agent of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. The recent discovery that PrPC can serve as a receptor for the amyloid Αβ peptide and relay its neurotoxicity is sparking renewed interest on this protein and its involvement in signal transduction processes. Disease-associated PrPSc shares with Αβ the ability to hijack PrPC-dependent signalling cascades, and thereby instigate pathogenic events. Among these is an impairment of Αβ clearance, uncovered in prion-infected neuronal cells. These findings add another facet to the intricate interplay between PrPC and Αβ. Here, we summarize the connection between PrP-mediated signalling and Αβ clearance and discuss its pathological implications.

  3. Role and regulation of 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1999-01-01

    Extracellular signals activate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades to execute complex cellular programs, like proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. In mammalian cells, three MAPK families have been characterized: extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is activated...... by growth factors, peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, and Jun kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK, which are activated by cellular stress stimulus as well as growth factors. This review describes the family of 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinases (RSK; also known as p90rsk or MAPK-activated protein kinase-1, MAPKAP-K1......), which were among the first substrates of ERK to be discovered and which has proven to be a ubiquitous and versatile mediator of ERK signal transduction. RSK is composed of two functional kinase domains that are activated in a sequential manner by a series of phosphorylations. Recently, a family of RSK...

  4. The role of Ryk and Ror receptor tyrosine kinases in Wnt signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer; Nusse, Roel; van Amerongen, Renée

    2014-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases of the Ryk and Ror families were initially classified as orphan receptors because their ligands were unknown. They are now known to contain functional extracellular Wnt-binding domains and are implicated in Wnt-signal transduction in multiple species. Although their signaling mechanisms still remain to be resolved in detail, both Ryk and Ror control important developmental processes in different tissues. However, whereas many other Wnt-signaling responses affect cell proliferation and differentiation, Ryk and Ror are mostly associated with controlling processes that rely on the polarized migration of cells. Here we discuss what is currently known about the involvement of this exciting class of receptors in development and disease.

  5. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Alfred J; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins and of the elimination of damaged or functionally redundant organelles. Proper functioning of this process is essential for cell survival. Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in the etiology of several pathologies. The history of the studies on the interrelationship between amino acids, MTOR signaling and autophagy is the subject of this review. The mechanisms responsible for the stimulation of MTOR-mediated signaling, and the inhibition of autophagy, by amino acids have been studied intensively in the past but are still not completely clarified. Recent developments in this field are discussed.

  6. Umami taste transduction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnamon, Sue C

    2009-09-01

    l-Glutamate elicits the umami taste sensation, now recognized as a fifth distinct taste quality. A characteristic feature of umami taste is its potentiation by 5'-ribonucleotides such as guanosine-5'-monophosphate and inosine 5'-monophosphate, which also elicit the umami taste on their own. Recent data suggest that multiple G protein-coupled receptors contribute to umami taste. This review will focus on events downstream of the umami taste receptors. Ligand binding leads to Gbetagamma activation of phospholipase C beta2, which produces the second messengers inositol trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. Inositol trisphosphate binds to the type III inositol trisphosphate receptor, which causes the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores and Ca(2+)-dependent activation of a monovalent-selective cation channel, TRPM5. TRPM5 is believed to depolarize taste cells, which leads to the release of ATP, which activates ionotropic purinergic receptors on gustatory afferent nerve fibers. This model is supported by knockout of the relevant signaling effectors as well as physiologic studies of isolated taste cells. Concomitant with the molecular studies, physiologic studies show that l-glutamate elicits increases in intracellular Ca(2+) in isolated taste cells and that the source of the Ca(2+) is release from intracellular stores. Both Galpha gustducin and Galpha transducin are involved in umami signaling, because the knockout of either subunit compromises responses to umami stimuli. Both alpha-gustducin and alpha-transducin activate phosphodiesterases to decrease intracellular cAMP. The target of cAMP in umami transduction is not known, but membrane-permeant analogs of cAMP antagonize electrophysiologic responses to umami stimuli in isolated taste cells, which suggests that cAMP may have a modulatory role in umami signaling.

  7. Signal Transduction Mechanisms of Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Emerging Role of Lipin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Min; Jogasuria, Alvin; Lee, Kwangwon; Wu, Jiashin; Zhang, Yanqiao; Lee, Yoon Kwang; Sadana, Prabodh

    2016-01-01

    Lipin-1, a mammalian phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP), is a bi-functional molecule involved in various signaling pathways via its function as a PAP enzyme in the triglyceride synthesis pathway and in the nucleus as a transcriptional co-regulator. In the liver, lipin-1 is known to play a vital role in controlling the lipid metabolism and inflammation process at multiple regulatory levels. Alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD) is one of the earliest forms of liver injury and approximately 8–20% of patients with simple steatosis can develop into more severe forms of liver injury, including steatohepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The signal transduction mechanisms for alcohol-induced detrimental effects in liver involves alteration of complex and multiple signaling pathways largely governed by a central and upstream signaling system, namely, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-AMP activated kinase (AMPK) axis. Emerging evidence suggests a pivotal role of lipin-1 as a crucial downstream regulator of SIRT1-AMPK signaling system that is likely to be ultimately responsible for development and progression of AFLD. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that ethanol exposure significantly induces lipin-1 gene and protein expression levels in cultured hepatocytes and in the livers of rodents, induces lipin-1-PAP activity, impairs the functional activity of nuclear lipin-1, disrupts lipin-1 mRNA alternative splicing and induces lipin-1 nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Such impairment in response to ethanol leads to derangement of hepatic lipid metabolism, and excessive production of inflammatory cytokines in the livers of the rodents and human alcoholics. This review summarizes current knowledge about the role of lipin-1 in the pathogenesis of AFLD and its potential signal transduction mechanisms. PMID:26278388

  8. The application of multiple biophysical cues to engineer functional neocartilage for treatment of osteoarthritis. Part II: signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mariea A; Waldman, Stephen D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-02-01

    The unique mechanoelectrochemical environment of cartilage has motivated researchers to investigate the effect of multiple biophysical cues, including mechanical, magnetic, and electrical stimulation, on chondrocyte biology. It is well established that biophysical stimuli promote chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and maturation within "biological windows" of defined dose parameters, including mode, frequency, magnitude, and duration of stimuli (see companion review Part I: Cellular Response). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways activated in response to multiple biophysical stimuli remain to be elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms of biophysical signal transduction will deepen knowledge of tissue organogenesis, remodeling, and regeneration and aiding in the treatment of pathologies such as osteoarthritis. Further, this knowledge will provide the tissue engineer with a potent toolset to manipulate and control cell fate and subsequently develop functional replacement cartilage. The aim of this article is to review chondrocyte signal transduction pathways in response to mechanical, magnetic, and electrical cues. Signal transduction does not occur along a single pathway; rather a number of parallel pathways appear to be activated, with calcium signaling apparently common to all three types of stimuli, though there are different modes of activation. Current tissue engineering strategies, such as the development of "smart" functionalized biomaterials that enable the delivery of growth factors or integration of conjugated nanoparticles, may further benefit from targeting known signal transduction pathways in combination with external biophysical cues.

  9. Three-state kinetic mechanism for scaffold-mediated signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locasale, Jason W.

    2008-11-01

    Signaling events in eukaryotic cells are often guided by a scaffolding protein. Scaffold proteins assemble multiple proteins into a spatially localized signaling complex and exert numerous physical effects on signaling pathways. To study these effects, we consider a minimal, three-state kinetic model of scaffold-mediated kinase activation. We first introduce and apply a path summation technique to obtain approximate solutions to a single molecule master equation that governs protein kinase activation. We then consider exact numerical solutions. We comment on when this approximation is appropriate and then use this analysis to illustrate the competition of processes occurring at many time scales that are involved in signal transduction in the presence of a scaffold protein. We find that our minimal model captures how scaffold concentration can influence the times over which signaling is distributed in kinase cascades. For a range of scaffold concentrations, scaffolds allow for signaling to be distributed over multiple decades. The findings are consistent with recent experiments and simulation data. These results provide a framework and offer a mechanism for understanding how scaffold proteins can influence the shape of the waiting time distribution of kinase activation and effectively broaden the times over which protein kinases are activated in the course of cell signaling.

  10. Lipoic acid attenuates inflammation via cAMP and protein kinase A signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonemany Salinthone

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal regulation of the inflammatory response is an important component of diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS. Lipoic acid (LA has been shown to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and is being pursued as a therapy for these diseases. We first reported that LA stimulates cAMP production via activation of G-protein coupled receptors and adenylyl cyclases. LA also suppressed NK cell activation and cytotoxicity. In this study we present evidence supporting the hypothesis that the anti-inflammatory properties of LA are mediated by the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade. Additionally, we show that LA oral administration elevates cAMP levels in MS subjects.We determined the effects of LA on IL-6, IL-17 and IL-10 secretion using ELISAs. Treatment with 50 µg/ml and 100 µg/ml LA significantly reduced IL-6 levels by 19 and 34%, respectively, in T cell enriched PBMCs. IL-17 levels were also reduced by 35 and 50%, respectively. Though not significant, LA appeared to have a biphasic effect on IL-10 production. Thymidine incorporation studies showed LA inhibited T cell proliferation by 90%. T-cell activation was reduced by 50% as measured by IL-2 secretion. Western blot analysis showed that LA treatment increased phosphorylation of Lck, a downstream effector of protein kinase A. Pretreatment with a peptide inhibitor of PKA, PKI, blocked LA inhibition of IL-2 and IFN gamma production, indicating that PKA mediates these responses. Oral administration of 1200 mg LA to MS subjects resulted in increased cAMP levels in PBMCs four hours after ingestion. Average cAMP levels in 20 subjects were 43% higher than baseline.Oral administration of LA in vivo resulted in significant increases in cAMP concentration. The anti-inflammatory effects of LA are mediated in part by the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade. These novel findings enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of action of LA.

  11. Creating and analyzing pathway and protein interaction compendia for modelling signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirouac Daniel C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the information-processing capabilities of signal transduction networks, how those networks are disrupted in disease, and rationally designing therapies to manipulate diseased states require systematic and accurate reconstruction of network topology. Data on networks central to human physiology, such as the inflammatory signalling networks analyzed here, are found in a multiplicity of on-line resources of pathway and interactome databases (Cancer CellMap, GeneGo, KEGG, NCI-Pathway Interactome Database (NCI-PID, PANTHER, Reactome, I2D, and STRING. We sought to determine whether these databases contain overlapping information and whether they can be used to construct high reliability prior knowledge networks for subsequent modeling of experimental data. Results We have assembled an ensemble network from multiple on-line sources representing a significant portion of all machine-readable and reconcilable human knowledge on proteins and protein interactions involved in inflammation. This ensemble network has many features expected of complex signalling networks assembled from high-throughput data: a power law distribution of both node degree and edge annotations, and topological features of a “bow tie” architecture in which diverse pathways converge on a highly conserved set of enzymatic cascades focused around PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, JAK/STAT, NFκB, and apoptotic signaling. Individual pathways exhibit “fuzzy” modularity that is statistically significant but still involving a majority of “cross-talk” interactions. However, we find that the most widely used pathway databases are highly inconsistent with respect to the actual constituents and interactions in this network. Using a set of growth factor signalling networks as examples (epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor, and wingless, we find a multiplicity of network topologies in which receptors couple to downstream

  12. P2CS: a two-component system resource for prokaryotic signal transduction research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méjean Vincent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the escalation of high throughput prokaryotic genome sequencing, there is an ever-increasing need for databases that characterise, catalogue and present data relating to particular gene sets and genomes/metagenomes. Two-component system (TCS signal transduction pathways are the dominant mechanisms by which micro-organisms sense and respond to external as well as internal environmental changes. These systems respond to a wide range of stimuli by triggering diverse physiological adjustments, including alterations in gene expression, enzymatic reactions, or protein-protein interactions. Description We present P2CS (Prokaryotic 2-Component Systems, an integrated and comprehensive database of TCS signal transduction proteins, which contains a compilation of the TCS genes within 755 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and 39 metagenomes. P2CS provides detailed annotation of each TCS gene including family classification, sequence features, functional domains, as well as genomic context visualization. To bypass the generic problem of gene underestimation during genome annotation, we also constituted and searched an ORFeome, which improves the recovery of TCS proteins compared to searches on the equivalent proteomes. Conclusion P2CS has been developed for computational analysis of the modular TCSs of prokaryotic genomes and metagenomes. It provides a complete overview of information on TCSs, including predicted candidate proteins and probable proteins, which need further curation/validation. The database can be browsed and queried with a user-friendly web interface at http://www.p2cs.org/.

  13. Effect of saw palmetto extract on PI3K cell signaling transduction in human glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Hui, Lv; Yuqin, Che; Jie, Li; Shuai, Hou; Tiezhu, Zhou; Wei, Wang

    2014-08-01

    Saw palmetto extract can induce the apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of saw palmetto extract on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling transduction pathway in human glioma U87 and U251 cell lines. Suspensions of U87 and U251 cells in a logarithmic growth phase were seeded into six-well plates at a density of 104 cells/well. In the experimental group, 1 μl/ml saw palmetto extract was added, while the control group was cultured without a drug for 24 h. The expression levels of PI3K, B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) and p53 were evaluated through western blot analysis. In the experimental group, the U87 and U251 cells exhibited a lower expression level of PI3K protein as compared with the control group (t=6.849; Psaw palmetto extract induces glioma cell growth arrest and apoptosis via decreasing PI3K/Akt signal transduction.

  14. Gibberellin biosynthesis and signal transduction is essential for internode elongation in deepwater rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayano, Madoka; Kani, Takahiro; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kitaoka, Takuya; Kuroha, Takeshi; Angeles-Shim, Rosalyn B; Kitano, Hidemi; Nagai, Keisuke; Ashikari, Motoyuki

    2014-10-01

    Under flooded conditions, the leaves and internodes of deepwater rice can elongate above the water surface to capture oxygen and prevent drowning. Our previous studies showed that three major quantitative trait loci (QTL) regulate deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. In this study, we investigated the age-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. We also investigated the relationship between deepwater-dependent internode elongation and the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) by physiological and genetic approach using a QTL pyramiding line (NIL-1 + 3 + 12). Deepwater rice did not show internode elongation before the sixth leaf stage under deepwater condition. Additionally, deepwater-dependent internode elongation occurred on the sixth and seventh internodes during the sixth leaf stage. These results indicate that deepwater rice could not start internode elongation until the sixth leaf stage. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the phytohormone contents showed a deepwater-dependent GA1 and GA4 accumulation in deepwater rice. Additionally, a GA inhibitor abolished deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. On the contrary, GA feeding mimicked internode elongation under ordinary growth conditions. However, mutations in GA biosynthesis and signal transduction genes blocked deepwater-dependent internode elongation. These data suggested that GA biosynthesis and signal transduction are essential for deepwater-dependent internode elongation in deepwater rice. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Two-Component Signal Transduction System SaeRS Positively Regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  16. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE - and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slowik Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1 and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2 and RAGE in amyloid-β 1–42 (Aβ1-42-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. Results We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections.

  17. Kinase activity profiling reveals active signal transduction pathways in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia : A new approach for target discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sligte, Naomi E.; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny G. J.; Lourens, Harm Jan; ter Elst, Arja; Diks, Sander H.; Guryev, Victor; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van Leeuwen, Frank N.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    Still about 20% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) struggle with relapse, despite intensive chemotherapy. We and others have shown that kinase activity profiling is able to give more insights in active signal transduction pathways and point out interesting signaling hubs as well as

  18. Kinase activity profiling reveals active signal transduction pathways in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A new approach for target discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sligte, N.E. van der; Scherpen, F.J.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, T.G.; Lourens, H.J.; Elst, A. Ter; Diks, S.H.; Guryev, V.; Peppelenbosch, M.P.; Leeuwen, F.N. van; Bont, E.S. de

    2015-01-01

    Still about 20% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) struggle with relapse, despite intensive chemotherapy. We and others have shown that kinase activity profiling is able to give more insights in active signal transduction pathways and point out interesting signaling hubs as well as

  19. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPNP-A) has been assigned a role in abiotic and biotic stress responses, and the recombinant protein has been demonstrated to elicit cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent stomatal guard cell opening, regulate ion movements, and induce osmoticum-dependent water uptake. Although the importance of the hormone in maintaining ion and fluid homeostasis has been established, key components of the AtPNP-A-dependent signal transduction pathway remain unknown. Since identification of the binding partners of AtPNP-A, including its receptor(s), is fundamental to understanding the mode of its action at the molecular level, comprehensive protein-protein interaction studies, involving yeast two-hybrid screening, affinity-based assays, protein cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric (MS) analyses have been performed. Several candidate binding partners of AtPNP-A identified with at least two independent methods were subsequently expressed as recombinant proteins, purified, and the specificity of their interactions with the recombinant AtPNP-A was verified using surface plasmon resonance. Several specific binary interactants of AtPNP-A were subjected to functional assays aimed at unraveling the consequences of the interactions in planta. These experiments have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are novel secondary messengers involved in the transduction of AtPNP-A signal in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana (Col-0). Further insight into the AtPNP-A dependent signalling events occurring in suspension-cultured cells in ROS-dependent or ROS-independent manner have been obtained from the large-scale proteomics study employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labelling followed by MS analysis to

  20. Molecular Insights into Toluene Sensing in the TodS/TodT Signal Transduction System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Serry; Hwang, Jungwon; Guchhait, Koushik; Lee, Eun-Gyeong; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Sujin; Lee, Sangmin; Chung, Jeong Min; Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Sang Jun; Ryu, Choong-Min; Lee, Seung-Goo; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kwon, Ohsuk; Kim, Myung Hee

    2016-01-01

    TodS is a sensor kinase that responds to various monoaromatic compounds, which either cause an agonistic or antagonistic effect on phosphorylation of its cognate response regulator TodT, and controls tod operon expression in Pseudomonas putida strains. We describe a molecular sensing mechanism of TodS that is activated in response to toluene. The crystal structures of the TodS Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) 1 sensor domain (residues 43–164) and its complex with toluene (agonist) or 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (antagonist) show a typical β2α3β3 PAS fold structure (residues 45–149), forming a hydrophobic ligand-binding site. A signal transfer region (residues 150–163) located immediately after the canonical PAS fold may be intrinsically flexible and disordered in both apo-PAS1 and antagonist-bound forms and dramatically adapt an α-helix upon toluene binding. This structural change in the signal transfer region is proposed to result in signal transmission to activate the TodS/TodT two-component signal transduction system. Site-directed mutagenesis and β-galactosidase assays using a P. putida reporter strain system verified the essential residues involved in ligand sensing and signal transfer and suggest that the Phe46 residue acts as a ligand-specific switch. PMID:26903514

  1. Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation for quantitative modeling of protein signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Morris, Melody K; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i) excessive CPU time requirements and ii) loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms.

  2. Non Linear Programming (NLP formulation for quantitative modeling of protein signal transduction pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mitsos

    Full Text Available Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i excessive CPU time requirements and ii loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms.

  3. Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Auburn

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other important components of the Gs pathway. Using meta-analysis across case-control and family trio (affected child and parental controls studies of severe malaria from The Gambia and Malawi, we sought evidence of association in six Gs pathway candidate genes: adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A and 2B (ADORA2B, beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1, adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9, G protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3, and regulator of G protein signalling 2 (RGS2. Our study amassed a total of 2278 cases and 2364 controls. Allele-based models of association were investigated in all genes, and genotype and haplotype-based models were investigated where significant allelic associations were identified. Although no significant associations were observed in the other genes, several were identified in ADORA2A. The most significant association was observed at the rs9624472 locus, where the G allele (approximately 20% frequency appeared to confer enhanced risk to severe malaria [OR = 1.22 (1.09-1.37; P = 0.001]. Further investigation of the ADORA2A gene region is required to validate the associations identified here, and to identify and functionally characterize the responsible causal variant(s. Our results provide further evidence supporting a role of the Gs signal transduction pathway in the regulation of severe malaria, and request further exploration of this pathway in future studies.

  4. Molecular Analysis of the Graviperception Signal Transduction in the Flagellate Euglena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, Donat; Daiker, Viktor; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis perceives and reacts to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that the orientation can be explained by passive orientation only to a small extend while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. Our current working hypothesis is based on the fact that the cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently exerts pressure onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. We recently succeeded in identifying these channels as gene products of the TRP family. RNAi of the corresponding gene abolished graviperception. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. The inwardly gated calcium binds to a specific calmodulin which is likewise an intrinsic element of the signal transduction chain. RNAi of the related mRNA also stopped graviperception. This calmodulin is thought to activate an adenylyl cyclase which generates cyclic AMP which in turn modulates the beating pattern of the flagellum.

  5. A novel computer simulation method for simulating the multiscale transduction dynamics of signal proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Emanuel; Dick, Bernhard; Baeurle, Stephan A.

    2012-03-01

    Signal proteins are able to adapt their response to a change in the environment, governing in this way a broad variety of important cellular processes in living systems. While conventional molecular-dynamics (MD) techniques can be used to explore the early signaling pathway of these protein systems at atomistic resolution, the high computational costs limit their usefulness for the elucidation of the multiscale transduction dynamics of most signaling processes, occurring on experimental timescales. To cope with the problem, we present in this paper a novel multiscale-modeling method, based on a combination of the kinetic Monte-Carlo- and MD-technique, and demonstrate its suitability for investigating the signaling behavior of the photoswitch light-oxygen-voltage-2-Jα domain from Avena Sativa (AsLOV2-Jα) and an AsLOV2-Jα-regulated photoactivable Rac1-GTPase (PA-Rac1), recently employed to control the motility of cancer cells through light stimulus. More specifically, we show that their signaling pathways begin with a residual re-arrangement and subsequent H-bond formation of amino acids near to the flavin-mononucleotide chromophore, causing a coupling between β-strands and subsequent detachment of a peripheral α-helix from the AsLOV2-domain. In the case of the PA-Rac1 system we find that this latter process induces the release of the AsLOV2-inhibitor from the switchII-activation site of the GTPase, enabling signal activation through effector-protein binding. These applications demonstrate that our approach reliably reproduces the signaling pathways of complex signal proteins, ranging from nanoseconds up to seconds at affordable computational costs.

  6. Phyletic distribution and lineage-specific domain architectures of archaeal two-component signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y; Makarova, Kira S; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-12-20

    The two-component signal transduction (TCS) machinery is a key mechanism of sensing environmental changes in the prokaryotic world. The TCS systems have been thoroughly characterized in bacteria but to a much lesser extent, in archaea. Here, we provide an updated census of more than 2,000 histidine kinases and response regulators encoded in 218 complete archaeal genomes as well as unfinished genomes available from metagenomic data. We describe the domain architectures of the archaeal TCS components, including several novel output domains, and discuss the evolution of the archaeal TCS machinery. The distribution of TCS systems in archaea is strongly biased, with a high abundance in haloarchaea and thaumarchaea but none detected in the sequenced genomes from the phyla Crenarchaeota, Nanoarchaeota or Korarchaeota. The archaeal sensor histidine kinases are generally similar to their well-studied bacterial counterparts but often located in the cytoplasm and carry multiple PAS and/or GAF domains. In contrast, archaeal response regulators dramatically differ from the bacterial ones. Most archaeal genomes do not encode any of the major classes of bacterial response regulators, such as the DNA-binding transcriptional regulators of the OmpR/PhoB, NarL/FixJ, NtrC, AgrA/LytR, and ActR/PrrA families and the response regulators with GGDEF and/or EAL output domains. Instead, archaea encode multiple copies of response regulators containing either the stand-alone receiver (REC) domain or combinations of REC with PAS and/or GAF domains. Therefore, the prevailing mechanism of archaeal TCS signaling appears to be via a variety of protein-protein interactions, rather than direct transcriptional regulation.IMPORTANCE Although archaea represent a separate domain of life, their signaling systems have been assumed to be closely similar to the bacterial ones. A study of the domain architectures of the archaeal two-component signal transduction (TCS) machinery revealed an overall similarity

  7. Cadmium Induces Apoptosis in Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense through Activating Calcium Signal Transduction Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxiang Wang

    Full Text Available Calcium ion (Ca2+ is one of the key intracellular signals, which is implicated in the regulation of cell functions such as impregnation, cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Cadmium (Cd is a toxic environmental pollutant that can disturb cell functions and even lead to cell death. Recently, we have found that Cd induced apoptosis in gill cells of the freshwater crab Sinopotamon henanense via caspase activation. In the present study, we further investigated the role of calcium signaling in the Cd-induced apoptosis in the animals. Our data showed that Cd triggered gill cell apoptosis which is evidenced by apoptotic DNA fragmentation, activations of caspases-3, -8 and -9 and the presence of apoptotic morphological features. Moreover, Cd elevated the intracellular concentration of Ca2+, the protein concentration of calmodulin (CaM and the activity of Ca2+-ATPase in the gill cells of the crabs. Pretreatment of the animals with ethylene glycol-bis-(b-aminoethyl ether-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA, Ca2+ chelator, inhibited Cd-induced activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 as well as blocked the Cd-triggered apoptotic DNA fragmentation. The apoptotic morphological features were no longer observed in gill cells pretreated with the Ca2+ signaling inhibitors before Cd treatment. Our results indicate that Cd evokes gill cell apoptosis through activating Ca2+-CaM signaling transduction pathway.

  8. A framework for mapping, visualisation and automatic model creation of signal-transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Krause, Falko; Cedersund, Gunnar; Palmér, Robert; Klipp, Edda; Hohmann, Stefan; Kitano, Hiroaki; Krantz, Marcus

    2012-04-24

    Intracellular signalling systems are highly complex. This complexity makes handling, analysis and visualisation of available knowledge a major challenge in current signalling research. Here, we present a novel framework for mapping signal-transduction networks that avoids the combinatorial explosion by breaking down the network in reaction and contingency information. It provides two new visualisation methods and automatic export to mathematical models. We use this framework to compile the presently most comprehensive map of the yeast MAP kinase network. Our method improves previous strategies by combining (I) more concise mapping adapted to empirical data, (II) individual referencing for each piece of information, (III) visualisation without simplifications or added uncertainty, (IV) automatic visualisation in multiple formats, (V) automatic export to mathematical models and (VI) compatibility with established formats. The framework is supported by an open source software tool that facilitates integration of the three levels of network analysis: definition, visualisation and mathematical modelling. The framework is species independent and we expect that it will have wider impact in signalling research on any system.

  9. Signal Sensing and Transduction by Histidine Kinases as Unveiled through Studies on a Temperature Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A; Albanesi, Daniela; Dal Peraro, Matteo; de Mendoza, Diego

    2017-06-20

    Histidine kinases (HK) are the sensory proteins of two-component systems, responsible for a large fraction of bacterial responses to stimuli and environmental changes. Prototypical HKs are membrane-bound proteins that phosphorylate cognate response regulator proteins in the cytoplasm upon signal detection in the membrane or periplasm. HKs stand as potential drug targets but also constitute fascinating systems for studying proteins at work, specifically regarding the chemistry and mechanics of signal detection, transduction through the membrane, and regulation of catalytic outputs. In this Account, we focus on Bacillus subtilis DesK, a membrane-bound HK part of a two-component system that maintains appropriate membrane fluidity at low growth temperatures. Unlike most HKs, DesK has no extracytoplasmic signal-sensing domains; instead, sensing is carried out by 10 transmembrane helices (coming from two protomers) arranged in an unknown structure. The fifth transmembrane helix from each protomer connects, without any of the intermediate domains found in other HKs, into the dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domain located in the cytoplasm, which is followed by the ATP-binding domains (ABD). Throughout the years, genetic, biochemical, structural, and computational studies on wild-type, mutant, and truncated versions of DesK allowed us to dissect several aspects of DesK's functioning, pushing forward a more general understanding of its own structure/function relationships as well as those of other HKs. We have shown that the sensing mechanism is rooted in temperature-dependent membrane properties, most likely a combination of thickness, fluidity, and water permeability, and we have proposed possible mechanisms by which DesK senses these properties and transduces the signals. X-ray structures and computational models have revealed structural features of TM and cytoplasmic regions in DesK's kinase- and phosphatase-competent states. Biochemical and genetic

  10. cAMP-Induced Desensitization of Surface cAMP Receptors in Dictyostelium : Different Second Messengers Mediate Receptor Phosphorylation, Loss of Ligand Binding, Degradation of Receptor, and Reduction of Receptor mRNA Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wang, Mei; Bominaar, Anthony A.; Devreotes, Peter N.; Schaap, Pauline

    Surface cAMP receptors on Dictyostelium cells are linked to several second messenger systems and mediate multiple physiological responses, including chemotaxis and differentiation. Activation of the receptor also triggers events which desensitize signal transduction. These events include the

  11. Guard Cell Signal Transduction Network: Advances in Understanding Abscisic Acid, CO2, and Ca2+ Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Tae-Houn

    2010-05-04

    Stomatal pores are formed by pairs of specialized epidermal guard cells and serve as major gateways for both CO2 influx into plants from the atmosphere and transpirational water loss of plants. Because they regulate stomatal pore apertures via integration of both endogenous hormonal stimuli and environmental signals, guard cells have been highly developed as a model system to dissect the dynamics and mechanisms of plant-cell signaling. The stress hormone ABA and elevated levels of CO2 activate complex signaling pathways in guard cells that are mediated by kinases/phosphatases, secondary messengers, and ion channel regulation. Recent research in guard cells has led to a new hypothesis for how plants achieve specificity in intracellular calcium signaling: CO2 and ABA enhance (prime) the calcium sensitivity of downstream calcium-signaling mechanisms. Recent progress in identification of early stomatal signaling components are reviewed here, including ABA receptors and CO2-binding response proteins, as well as systems approaches that advance our understanding of guard cell-signaling mechanisms.

  12. MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis and its prognostic impact in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-hua Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1/protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1 signal transduction axis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. To explore the expression and prognostic value of MMP-1 and PAR-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC, we evaluated the expression of two proteins in resected specimens from 85 patients with ESCC by immunohistochemistry. Sixty-two (72.9% and 58 (68.2% tumors were MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive, respectively, while no significant staining was observed in normal esophageal squamous epithelium. MMP-1 and PAR-1 overexpression was significantly associated with tumor node metastasis (TNM stage and regional lymph node involvement. Patients with MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive tumors, respectively, had poorer disease-free survival (DFS than those with negative ESCC (P = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between TNM stage [hazard ratio (HR = 2.836, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.866-4.308], regional lymph node involvement (HR = 2.955, 95%CI = 1.713-5.068, MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.669, 95%CI = 1.229-6.127, and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.762, 95%CI = 1.156-2.883 and DFS. Multivariate analysis including the above four parameters identified TNM stage (HR = 2.035, 95%CI = 1.167-3.681, MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.109, 95%CI = 1.293-3.279, and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.967, 95%CI = 1.256-2.881 as independent and significant prognostic factors for DFS. Our data suggest for the first time that MMP-1 and PAR-1 were both overexpressed in ESCC and are novel predictors of poor patient prognosis after curative resection. The MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis might be a new therapeutic target for future therapies tailored against ESCC.

  13. Chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism as adaptive strategies during citrus canker induction by Xanthomonas citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Leandro Marcio; Facincani, Agda Paula; Ferreira, Cristiano Barbalho; Ferreira, Rafael Marine; Ferro, Maria Inês Tiraboshi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Ferro, Jesus Aparecido; Soares, Márcia Regina

    2015-03-01

    The genome of Xanthomonas citri subsp. Citri strain 306 pathotype A (Xac) was completely sequenced more than 10 years; to date, few studies involving functional genomics Xac and its host compatible have been developed, specially related to adaptive events that allow the survival of Xac within the plant. Proteomic analysis of Xac showed that the processes of chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism are key adaptive strategies during the interaction of a pathogenic bacterium with its plant host. The results also indicate the importance of a group of proteins that may not be directly related to the classical virulence factors, but that are likely fundamental to the success of the initial stages of the infection, such as methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (Mcp) and phosphate specific transport (Pst). Furthermore, the analysis of the mutant of the gene pstB which codifies to an ABC phosphate transporter subunit revealed a complete absence of citrus canker symptoms when inoculated in compatible hosts. We also conducted an in silico analysis which established the possible network of genes regulated by two-component systems PhoPQ and PhoBR (related to phosphate metabolism), and possible transcriptional factor binding site (TFBS) motifs of regulatory proteins PhoB and PhoP, detaching high degree of conservation of PhoB TFBS in 84 genes of Xac genome. This is the first time that chemotaxis signal transduction and phosphate metabolism were therefore indicated to be fundamental to the process of colonization of plant tissue during the induction of disease associated with Xanthomonas genus bacteria.

  14. Phospholipase Cγ1 is required for pre-TCR signal transduction and pre-T cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guoping; Yu, Mei; Chen, Yuhong; Zheng, Yongwei; Zhu, Wen; Newman, Debra K; Wang, Demin; Wen, Renren

    2017-01-01

    Pre-T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is required for pre-T cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation from the CD4 and CD8 double negative (DN) to the double positive (DP) stage. However, the pre-TCR signal transduction pathway is not fully understood and the signaling molecules involved have not been completely identified. Phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) 1 is an important signaling molecule that generates two second messengers, diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, that are important to mediate PKC activation and intracellular Ca(2+) flux in many signaling pathways. Previously, we have shown that PLCγ1 is important for TCR-mediated signaling, development and T-cell activation, but the role of PLCγ1 in pre-TCR signal transduction and pre-T cell development is not known. In this study, we demonstrated that PLCγ1 expression level in pre-T cells was comparable to that in mature T cells. Deletion of PLCγ1 prior to the pre-TCR signaling stage partially blocked the DN3 to DN4 transition and reduced thymic cellularity. We also demonstrated that deletion of PLCγ1 impaired pre-T cell proliferation without affecting cell survival. Further study showed that deficiency of PLCγ1 impaired pre-TCR mediated Ca(2+) flux and Erk activation. Thus our studies demonstrate that PLCγ1 is important for pre-TCR mediated signal transduction and pre-T cell development. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Temporal profile of gene transcription noise modulated by cross-talking signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiwen; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2012-02-01

    Gene transcription is a central cellular process and is stochastic in nature. The stochasticity has been studied in real cells and in theory, but often for the transcription activated by a single signaling pathway at steady-state. As transcription of many genes is involved with multiple pathways, we investigate how the transcription efficiency and noise is modulated by cross-talking pathways. We model gene transcription as a renewal process for which the gene can be turned on by different pathways. We determine the transcription efficiency by solving a system of differential equations, and obtain the mathematical formula of the noise strength by the Laplace transform and standard techniques in renewal theory. Our numerical examples demonstrate that cross-talking pathways are capable of inducing more cells to transcribe than the steady-state level after a short time period of signal transduction, and creating exceedingly high stationary transcription noise strength. In contrast, it is shown that one signaling pathway alone is unable to do so. Very strikingly, it is observed that the noise strength varies gradually over most values of the system parameters, but changes abruptly over a narrow range in the neighborhoods of some critical parameter values.

  16. Signal transduction of PACAP and GLP-1 in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, C A; Holz, G G; Habener, J F

    1996-12-26

    PACAP and GLP-1 depolarize pancreatic beta cells and stimulate insulin secretion in the presence of glucose. Depolarization occurs through at least two distinct mechanisms: (1) closure of ATP-sensitive K+ channels, and (2) activation of nonselective cation channels (NSCCs). Under physiological conditions the NSCCs carry a predominantly Na(+)-dependent current. The current may also have a Ca2+ component, but this remains to be determined. Acting together, these two signaling systems reinforce each other and serve to promote membrane depolarization, a rise of [Ca2+]i, and exocytosis of insulin-containing secretory granules. The NSCCs in beta cells are dually regulated by intracellular cAMP and [Ca2+]i. In view of this dual regulation, it appears likely that NSCC channel activation results from signaling events occurring not only at the plasma membrane (gating of channels by cAMP; protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of channels) but also at intracellular sites (mobilization of calcium stores by an as yet to be determined process). It is noteworthy that activation of NSCCs has also been reported following stimulation of beta-cells with maitotoxin, or after depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. Therefore, the possibility arises that PACAP, GLP-1, and maitotoxin all act on the same types of ion channels in these cells, and that these channels are sensitive to alterations in the content of intracellular calcium. FIGURE 6 summarizes our current knowledge concerning the properties of the PACAP and GLP-1 signaling systems as they pertain to the regulation of NSCCs and intracellular calcium homeostasis in the beta cell. Given that PACAP and GLP-1 are proven to be exceptionally potent insulin secretagogues, it is of considerable interest to determine their usefulness as blood glucose-lowering agents. Initial evaluations of the therapeutic effectiveness of GLP-1 indicate a role for this peptide in the treatment of NIDDM, and also possibly insulin-dependent diabetes

  17. CASCADE_SCAN: mining signal transduction network from high-throughput data based on steepest descent method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Hu, Fuyan; Xu, Kejia; Cheng, Hua; Jiang, Meng; Feng, Ruili; Li, Jing; Wen, Tieqiao

    2011-05-17

    Signal transduction is an essential biological process involved in cell response to environment changes, by which extracellular signaling initiates intracellular signaling. Many computational methods have been generated in mining signal transduction networks with the increasing of high-throughput genomic and proteomic data. However, more effective means are still needed to understand the complex mechanisms of signaling pathways. We propose a new approach, namely CASCADE_SCAN, for mining signal transduction networks from high-throughput data based on the steepest descent method using indirect protein-protein interactions (PPIs). This method is useful for actual biological application since the given proteins utilized are no longer confined to membrane receptors or transcription factors as in existing methods. The precision and recall values of CASCADE_SCAN are comparable with those of other existing methods. Moreover, functional enrichment analysis of the network components supported the reliability of the results. CASCADE_SCAN is a more suitable method than existing methods for detecting underlying signaling pathways where the membrane receptors or transcription factors are unknown, providing significant insight into the mechanism of cellular signaling in growth, development and cancer. A new tool based on this method is freely available at http://www.genomescience.com.cn/CASCADE_SCAN/.

  18. Transduction motif analysis of gastric cancer based on a human signaling network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.; Li, D.Z.; Jiang, C.S.; Wang, W. [Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou, China, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-04-04

    To investigate signal regulation models of gastric cancer, databases and literature were used to construct the signaling network in humans. Topological characteristics of the network were analyzed by CytoScape. After marking gastric cancer-related genes extracted from the CancerResource, GeneRIF, and COSMIC databases, the FANMOD software was used for the mining of gastric cancer-related motifs in a network with three vertices. The significant motif difference method was adopted to identify significantly different motifs in the normal and cancer states. Finally, we conducted a series of analyses of the significantly different motifs, including gene ontology, function annotation of genes, and model classification. A human signaling network was constructed, with 1643 nodes and 5089 regulating interactions. The network was configured to have the characteristics of other biological networks. There were 57,942 motifs marked with gastric cancer-related genes out of a total of 69,492 motifs, and 264 motifs were selected as significantly different motifs by calculating the significant motif difference (SMD) scores. Genes in significantly different motifs were mainly enriched in functions associated with cancer genesis, such as regulation of cell death, amino acid phosphorylation of proteins, and intracellular signaling cascades. The top five significantly different motifs were mainly cascade and positive feedback types. Almost all genes in the five motifs were cancer related, including EPOR, MAPK14, BCL2L1, KRT18, PTPN6, CASP3, TGFBR2, AR, and CASP7. The development of cancer might be curbed by inhibiting signal transductions upstream and downstream of the selected motifs.

  19. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  20. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling : how complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodkin, Alexey N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Plant, Nick; Mone, Martijn J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Campbell, Moray J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Carlberg, Carsten; Snoep, Jacky L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2010-01-01

    The topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of 'design' aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic models of

  1. Comparative analysis of two-component signal transduction systems of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, de M.W.H.J.; Francke, C.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group are ubiquitously present in the environment and can adapt to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. In bacteria, these adaptive responses are generally mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), which consist of a histidine kinase (HK) and

  2. DMPD: Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1916089 Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneuk...ep;5(12):2652-60. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effect...tive endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. Authors Raetz

  3. Restoration of autophagy alleviates hepatic ER stress and impaired insulin signalling transduction in high fructose-fed male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Ruo-Qiong; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Zhou, Xiu; Li, Songpei; Jo, Eunjung; Molero, Juan C; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2015-01-01

    High-carbohydrate (mainly fructose) consumption is a major dietary factor for hepatic insulin resistance, involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid accumulation. Because autophagy has been implicated in ER stress, the present study investigated the role of autophagy in high-fructose (HFru) diet-induced hepatic ER stress and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice. The results show that chronic HFru feeding induced glucose intolerance and impaired insulin signaling transduction in the liver, associated with ER stress and the accumulation of lipids. Intriguingly, hepatic autophagy was suppressed as a result of activation of mammalian target of rapamycin. The suppressed autophagy was detected within 6 hours after HFru feeding along with activation of both inositol-requiring enzyme 1 and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase pathways. These events occurred prior to lipid accumulation or lipogenesis and were sufficient to blunt insulin signaling transduction with activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/inhibitory-κB kinase and serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1. The stimulation of autophagy attenuated ER stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase/inhibitory-κB kinase-associated impairment in insulin signaling transduction in a mammalian target of rapamycin -independent manner. Taken together, our data suggest that restoration of autophagy functions disrupted by fructose is able to alleviate ER stress and improve insulin signaling transduction.

  4. Inquiry into Chemotherapy-Induced P53 Activation in Cancer Cells as a Model for Teaching Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srougi, Melissa C.; Carson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular communication is conducted through an intricate and interwoven network of signal transduction pathways. The mechanisms for how cells speak with one another are of significant biological importance to both basic and industrial scientists from a number of different disciplines. We have therefore developed and…

  5. Cloning of a two-component signal transduction system of Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans strain BXPF65

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, JWYF; Maynard, Scott; Goodwin, PH

    1998-01-01

    A putative two-component signal transduction system was amplified and cloned from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans isolate BXPF65. The 620 bp amplified fragment was sequenced and analyzed with the BLAST Enhanced Alignment Utility (BEAUTY). BEAUTY ana...

  6. Alterations in phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) signaling: an endophenotype of lithium-responsive bipolar disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alda, Martin; Shao, Li; Wang, Jun-Feng; Lopez de Lara, Catalina; Jaitovich-Groisman, Iris; Lebel, Veronique; Sun, Xiujun; Duffy, Anne; Grof, Paul; Rouleau, Guy A; Turecki, Gustavo; Young, L Trevor

    2013-12-01

    Abnormalities of signal transduction are considered among the susceptibility factors for bipolar disorder (BD). These include changes in G-protein-mediated signaling and subsequent modification of gene expression via transcription factors such as cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). We investigated levels of CREB in lymphoblasts from patients with BD, all responders to lithium prophylaxis (n = 13), and healthy control subjects (n = 15). Phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) was measured by immunoblotting in subjects with BD (n = 15) as well as in their affected (n = 17) and unaffected (n = 18) relatives, and healthy controls (n = 16). Basal CREB levels were comparable in patients and control subjects and were not changed by lithium treatment. pCREB levels were increased in both patients and their relatives compared to controls (p = 0.003). Forskolin stimulation led to a 24% increase in pCREB levels in cells from healthy subjects (p = 0.002) but not in the other three groups. When using basal and stimulated pCREB levels as a biochemical phenotype in a preliminary linkage study, we found the strongest support for linkage in regions largely overlapping with those showing linkage with the clinical phenotype (3p, 6p, 16p, 17q, 19q, and 21q). Abnormal pCREB signaling could be considered a biochemical phenotype for lithium-responsive BD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nitric oxide agents impair insulin-mediated signal transduction in rat skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragoobirsingh Dalip

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence demonstrates that exogenously administered nitric oxide (NO can induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. We have investigated the modulatory effects of two NO donors, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO on the early events in insulin signaling in rat skeletal myocytes. Results Skeletal muscle cells from 6–8 week old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with SNAP or GSNO (25 ng/ml in the presence or absence of glucose (25 mM and insulin (100 nM. Cellular insulin receptor-β levels and tyrosine phosphorylation in IRS-1 were significantly reduced, while serine phosphorylation in IRS-1 was significantly increased in these cells, when compared to the insulin-stimulated control. Reversal to near normal levels was achieved using the NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO. Conclusion These data suggest that NO is a potent modulator of insulin-mediated signal transduction and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Information theory and signal transduction systems: from molecular information processing to network inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Mahon, Siobhan S; Sim, Aaron; Filippi, Sarah; Johnson, Robert; Liepe, Juliane; Smith, Dominic; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2014-11-01

    Sensing and responding to the environment are two essential functions that all biological organisms need to master for survival and successful reproduction. Developmental processes are marshalled by a diverse set of signalling and control systems, ranging from systems with simple chemical inputs and outputs to complex molecular and cellular networks with non-linear dynamics. Information theory provides a powerful and convenient framework in which such systems can be studied; but it also provides the means to reconstruct the structure and dynamics of molecular interaction networks underlying physiological and developmental processes. Here we supply a brief description of its basic concepts and introduce some useful tools for systems and developmental biologists. Along with a brief but thorough theoretical primer, we demonstrate the wide applicability and biological application-specific nuances by way of different illustrative vignettes. In particular, we focus on the characterisation of biological information processing efficiency, examining cell-fate decision making processes, gene regulatory network reconstruction, and efficient signal transduction experimental design. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Methodologies for the modeling and simulation of biochemical networks, illustrated for signal transduction pathways: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElKalaawy, Nesma; Wassal, Amr

    2015-03-01

    Biochemical networks depict the chemical interactions that take place among elements of living cells. They aim to elucidate how cellular behavior and functional properties of the cell emerge from the relationships between its components, i.e. molecules. Biochemical networks are largely characterized by dynamic behavior, and exhibit high degrees of complexity. Hence, the interest in such networks is growing and they have been the target of several recent modeling efforts. Signal transduction pathways (STPs) constitute a class of biochemical networks that receive, process, and respond to stimuli from the environment, as well as stimuli that are internal to the organism. An STP consists of a chain of intracellular signaling processes that ultimately result in generating different cellular responses. This primer presents the methodologies used for the modeling and simulation of biochemical networks, illustrated for STPs. These methodologies range from qualitative to quantitative, and include structural as well as dynamic analysis techniques. We describe the different methodologies, outline their underlying assumptions, and provide an assessment of their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, publicly and/or commercially available implementations of these methodologies are listed as appropriate. In particular, this primer aims to provide a clear introduction and comprehensive coverage of biochemical modeling and simulation methodologies for the non-expert, with specific focus on relevant literature of STPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sustained nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound reverses dysregulated NO signal transduction in priapism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoda, Gwen; Sezen, Sena F.; Hurt, K. Joseph; Cabrini, Marcelo R.; Mohanty, Dillip K.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic potential of a sustained nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound to correct the molecular hallmarks and pathophysiology of priapism, an important but poorly characterized erectile disorder. 1,5-Bis-(dihexyl-N-nitrosoamino)-2,4-dinitrobenzene (C6′) and an inactive form of the compound [1,5-bis-(dihexylamino)-2,4-dinitrobenzene (C6)] were tested in neuronal cell cultures and penile lysates for NO release (Griess assay) and biological activity (cGMP production). The effect of local depot C6′ or C6 was evaluated in mice with a priapic phenotype due to double neuronal and endothelial NO synthase deletion (dNOS−/−) or human sickle hemoglobin transgenic expression (Sickle). Changes in NO signaling molecules and reactive oxygen species (ROS) surrogates were assessed by Western blot. The physiological response after C6′ treatment was assessed using an established model of electrically stimulated penile erection. C6′ generated NO, increased cGMP, and dose dependently increased NO metabolites. C6′ treatment reversed abnormalities in key penile erection signaling molecules, including phosphodiesterase type 5, phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein. In Sickle mice, C6′ also attenuated the increased ROS markers gp91phox, 4-hydroxynonenal, and 3-nitrotyrosine. Finally, C6′ corrected the excessive priapic erection response of dNOS−/− mice. Exogenous sustained NO release from C6′ corrects pathological erectile signaling in mouse models of priapism and suggests novel approaches to human therapy.—Lagoda, G., Sezen, S. F., Hurt, K. J., Cabrini, M. R., Mohanty, D. K., Burnett, A. L. Sustained nitric oxide (NO)-releasing compound reverses dysregulated NO signal transduction in priapism. PMID:24076963

  11. Signal transduction mechanisms and nitric oxide in hypoxic and ischemic human cardiac ventricular cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbucci, G C; Ricchi, A; Lettieri, B; Mastronardi, P

    2001-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a well-known role in regulating endocellular adaptive changes to acute hypoxia and ischemia. The reversible inhibition of complex IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain fulfils a cytoprotective function, whereas the progressive inhibition of complex I and II reveals the onset of irreversible oxidative damage due to persistent NO production in response to prolonged hypoxia and/or ischemia. In hypoxic or ischemic human myocardial cells, death may be caused by apoptosis or necrosis following the activation of the biomolecular signal transduction mechanisms. The activation of MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) followed by ERK (extracellular regulated kinase) and p21waf is necessary in this respect. The myocardial cell is well known for its postmitotic nature and through their activation these kinases aim to repair DNA damaged by oxidative stress in order to guarantee the survival of the cell itself. A direct correlation has been found between the activation of these kinases and NO production. It was decided to carry out this study in hypoxic and ischemic human heart ventricular tissue in order to confirm this connection. In 10 patients undergoing cardiac valvular replacement, ventricular samples were collected before aortic clamping, after 15 min of ischemia and after 60 minutes during which the patients received doses of hematic cardioplegic solution at regular intervals. The results show a rapid increase in NO production in response to ischemia followed by a tendency for levels of this element to fall. MAPK, ERK and p21waf activation was parallel to No production, irrespective of the repeated administration of hematic cardioplegic solution. The heart tissue examined 60 minutes after aortic clamping came from a ventricular area subject to preconditioning mechanisms. In view of this, the data obtained must be seen in terms of the close correlation between the mitochondrial action played by NO and the contemporary and consequent

  12. The allosteric behavior of Fur mediates oxidative stress signal transduction in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePelliciari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is exposed to oxidative stress originating from the aerobic environment, the oxidative burst of phagocytes and the formation of reactive oxygen species, catalyzed by iron excess. Accordingly, the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress defense have been repeatedly linked to the ferric uptake regulator Fur. Moreover, mutations in the Fur protein affect the resistance to metronidazole, likely due to loss-of-function in the regulation of genes involved in redox control. Although many advances in the molecular understanding of HpFur function were made, little is known about the mechanisms that enable Fur to mediate the responses to oxidative stress.Here we show that iron-inducible, apo-Fur repressed genes, such as pfr and hydA, are induced shortly after oxidative stress, while their oxidative induction is lost in a fur knockout strain. On the contrary, holo-Fur repressed genes, such as frpB1 and fecA1, vary modestly in response to oxidative stress. This indicates that the oxidative stress signal specifically targets apo-Fur repressed genes, rather than impairing indiscriminately the regulatory function of Fur. Footprinting analyses showed that the oxidative signal strongly impairs the binding affinity of Fur towards apo-operators, while the binding towards holo-operators is less affected. Further evidence is presented that a reduced state of Fur is needed to maintain apo-repression, while oxidative conditions shift the preferred binding architecture of Fur towards the holo-operator binding conformation, even in the absence of iron. Together the results demonstrate that the allosteric regulation of Fur enables transduction of oxidative stress signals in H. pylori, supporting the concept that apo-Fur repressed genes can be considered oxidation inducible Fur regulatory targets. These findings may have important implications in the study of H. pylori treatment and resistance to

  13. Estrogen Stimulates Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells through Different Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Okada

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study indicated that both 17β-estradiol (E2, known to be an endogenous estrogen, and bisphenol A (BPA, known to be a xenoestrogen, could positively influence the proliferation or differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs. The aim of the present study was to identify the signal transduction pathways for estrogenic activities promoting proliferation and differentiation of NS/PCs via well known nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs or putative membrane-associated ERs. NS/PCs were cultured from the telencephalon of 15-day-old rat embryos. In order to confirm the involvement of nuclear ERs for estrogenic activities, their specific antagonist, ICI-182,780, was used. The presence of putative membrane-associated ER was functionally examined as to whether E2 can activate rapid intracellular signaling mechanism. In order to confirm the involvement of membrane-associated ERs for estrogenic activities, a cell-impermeable E2, bovine serum albumin-conjugated E2 (E2-BSA was used. We showed that E2 could rapidly activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK 1/2, which was not inhibited by ICI-182,780. ICI-182,780 abrogated the stimulatory effect of these estrogens (E2 and BPA on the proliferation of NS/PCs, but not their effect on the differentiation of the NS/PCs into oligodendroglia. Furthermore, E2-BSA mimicked the activity of differentiation from NS/PCs into oligodendroglia, but not the activity of proliferation. Our study suggests that (1 the estrogen induced proliferation of NS/PCs is mediated via nuclear ERs; (2 the oligodendroglial generation from NS/PCs is likely to be stimulated via putative membrane‑associated ERs.

  14. Protein cysteine S-guanylation and electrophilic signal transduction by endogenous nitro-nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khandaker Ahtesham; Sawa, Tomohiro; Akaike, Takaaki

    2011-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous free radical that is synthesized in organisms by nitric oxide synthases, participates in a critical fashion in the regulation of diverse physiological functions such as vascular and neuronal signal transduction, host defense, and cell death regulation. Two major pathways of NO signaling involve production of the second messenger guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and posttranslational modification (PTM) of redox-sensitive cysteine thiols of proteins. We recently clarified the physiological formation of 8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) as the first demonstration, since the discovery of cGMP more than 40 years ago, of a new second messenger derived from cGMP in mammals. 8-Nitro-cGMP is electrophilic and reacts efficiently with sulfhydryls of proteins to produce a novel PTM via cGMP adduction, a process that we named protein S-guanylation. 8-Nitro-cGMP may regulate electrophilic signaling on the basis of its electrophilicity through induction of S-guanylation of redox sensor proteins. Examples include S-guanylation of the redox sensor protein Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), which leads to activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent expression of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes. This S-guanylation-mediated activation of an antioxidant adaptive response may play an important role in cytoprotection during bacterial infections and oxidative stress. Identification of new redox-sensitive proteins as targets for S-guanylation may help development of novel therapeutics for oxidative stress- and inflammation-related disorders and vascular diseases as well as understanding of cellular protection against oxidative stress.

  15. Microscopic insight into thermodynamics of conformational changes of SAP-SLAM complex in signal transduction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2017-04-01

    The signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, associate with SLAM-associated protein (SAP)-related molecules, composed of single SH2 domain architecture. SAP activates Src-family kinase Fyn after SLAM ligation, resulting in a SLAM-SAP-Fyn complex, where, SAP binds the Fyn SH3 domain that does not involve canonical SH3 or SH2 interactions. This demands insight into this SAP mediated signalling cascade. Thermodynamics of the conformational changes are extracted from the histograms of dihedral angles obtained from the all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of this structurally well characterized SAP-SLAM complex. The results incorporate the binding induced thermodynamic changes of individual amino acid as well as the secondary structural elements of the protein and the solvent. Stabilization of the peptide partially comes through a strong hydrogen bonding network with the protein, while hydrophobic interactions also play a significant role where the peptide inserts itself into a hydrophobic cavity of the protein. SLAM binding widens SAP's second binding site for Fyn, which is the next step in the signal transduction cascade. The higher stabilization and less fluctuation of specific residues of SAP in the Fyn binding site, induced by SAP-SLAM complexation, emerge as the key structural elements to trigger the recognition of SAP by the SH3 domain of Fyn. The thermodynamic quantification of the protein due to complexation not only throws deeper understanding in the established mode of SAP-SLAM interaction but also assists in the recognition of the relevant residues of the protein responsible for alterations in its activity.

  16. A cytosolic juxtamembrane interface modulates plexin A3 oligomerization and signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Barton

    Full Text Available Plexins (plxns are transmembrane (TM receptors involved in the guidance of vascular, lymphatic vessel, and neuron growth as well as cancer metastasis. Plxn signaling results in cytosolic GTPase-activating protein activity, and previous research implicates dimerization as important for activation of plxn signaling. Purified, soluble plxn extracellular and cytosolic domains exhibit only weak homomeric interactions, suggesting a role for the plxn TM and juxtamembrane regions in homooligomerization. In this study, we consider a heptad repeat in the Danio rerio PlxnA3 cytosolic juxtamembrane domain (JM for its ability to influence PlxnA3 homooligomerization in TM-domain containing constructs. Site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with the AraTM assay and bioluminescent energy transfer (BRET² suggest an interface involving a JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, regulates PlxnA3 homomeric interactions when examined in constructs containing an ectodomain, TM and JM domain. In the presence of a neuropilin-2a co-receptor and semaphorin 3F ligand, disruption to PlxnA3 homodimerization caused by an M1281F mutation is eliminated, suggesting destabilization of the PlxnA3 homodimer in the JM is not sufficient to disrupt co-receptor complex formation. In contrast, enhanced homodimerization of PlxnA3 caused by mutation M1281L remains even in the presence of ligand semaphorin 3F and co-receptor neuropilin-2a. Consistent with this pattern of PlxnA3 dimerization in the presence of ligand and co-receptor, destabilizing mutations to PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281F are able to rescue motor patterning defects in sidetracked zebrafish embryos, whereas mutations that enhance PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281L are not. Collectively, our results indicate the JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, forms a switchable interface that modulates both PlxnA3 homomeric interactions and signal transduction.

  17. Regulation of Early Steps of GPVI Signal Transduction by Phosphatases: A Systems Biology Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L Dunster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a data-driven mathematical model of a key initiating step in platelet activation, a central process in the prevention of bleeding following Injury. In vascular disease, this process is activated inappropriately and causes thrombosis, heart attacks and stroke. The collagen receptor GPVI is the primary trigger for platelet activation at sites of injury. Understanding the complex molecular mechanisms initiated by this receptor is important for development of more effective antithrombotic medicines. In this work we developed a series of nonlinear ordinary differential equation models that are direct representations of biological hypotheses surrounding the initial steps in GPVI-stimulated signal transduction. At each stage model simulations were compared to our own quantitative, high-temporal experimental data that guides further experimental design, data collection and model refinement. Much is known about the linear forward reactions within platelet signalling pathways but knowledge of the roles of putative reverse reactions are poorly understood. An initial model, that includes a simple constitutively active phosphatase, was unable to explain experimental data. Model revisions, incorporating a complex pathway of interactions (and specifically the phosphatase TULA-2, provided a good description of the experimental data both based on observations of phosphorylation in samples from one donor and in those of a wider population. Our model was used to investigate the levels of proteins involved in regulating the pathway and the effect of low GPVI levels that have been associated with disease. Results indicate a clear separation in healthy and GPVI deficient states in respect of the signalling cascade dynamics associated with Syk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Our approach reveals the central importance of this negative feedback pathway that results in the temporal regulation of a specific class of protein tyrosine phosphatases in

  18. Regulation of Early Steps of GPVI Signal Transduction by Phosphatases: A Systems Biology Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunster, Joanne L; Mazet, Francoise; Fry, Michael J; Gibbins, Jonathan M; Tindall, Marcus J

    2015-11-01

    We present a data-driven mathematical model of a key initiating step in platelet activation, a central process in the prevention of bleeding following Injury. In vascular disease, this process is activated inappropriately and causes thrombosis, heart attacks and stroke. The collagen receptor GPVI is the primary trigger for platelet activation at sites of injury. Understanding the complex molecular mechanisms initiated by this receptor is important for development of more effective antithrombotic medicines. In this work we developed a series of nonlinear ordinary differential equation models that are direct representations of biological hypotheses surrounding the initial steps in GPVI-stimulated signal transduction. At each stage model simulations were compared to our own quantitative, high-temporal experimental data that guides further experimental design, data collection and model refinement. Much is known about the linear forward reactions within platelet signalling pathways but knowledge of the roles of putative reverse reactions are poorly understood. An initial model, that includes a simple constitutively active phosphatase, was unable to explain experimental data. Model revisions, incorporating a complex pathway of interactions (and specifically the phosphatase TULA-2), provided a good description of the experimental data both based on observations of phosphorylation in samples from one donor and in those of a wider population. Our model was used to investigate the levels of proteins involved in regulating the pathway and the effect of low GPVI levels that have been associated with disease. Results indicate a clear separation in healthy and GPVI deficient states in respect of the signalling cascade dynamics associated with Syk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Our approach reveals the central importance of this negative feedback pathway that results in the temporal regulation of a specific class of protein tyrosine phosphatases in controlling the rate

  19. cAMP signalling regulates synchronised growth of symbiotic Epichloë fungi with the host grass Lolium perenne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rosalie Voisey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The seed-transmitted fungal symbiont, Epichloë festucae, colonizes grasses by infecting host tissues as they form on the shoot apical meristem (SAM of the seedling. How this fungus accommodates the complexities of plant development to successfully colonize the leaves and inflorescences is unclear. Since adenosine 3′, 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP-dependent signaling is often essential for host colonization by fungal pathogens, we disrupted the cAMP cascade by insertional mutagenesis of the E. festucae adenylate cyclase gene (acyA. Consistent with deletions of this gene in other fungi, acyA mutants had a slow radial growth rate in culture, and hyphae were convoluted and hyper-branched suggesting that fungal apical dominance had been disrupted. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT staining of hyphae showed that cAMP disruption mutants were impaired in their ability to synthesize superoxide, indicating that cAMP signaling regulates accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Despite significant defects in hyphal growth and ROS production, E. festucae ΔacyA mutants were infectious and capable of forming symbiotic associations with grasses. Plants infected with E. festucae ΔacyA were marginally less robust than the wild-type (WT, however hyphae were hyper-branched, and leaf tissues heavily colonized, indicating that the tight regulation of hyphal growth normally observed in maturing leaves requires functional cAMP signaling.

  20. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  1. Adaptation to Environmental Stimuli within the Host: Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretl, Daniel J.; Demetriadou, Chrystalla; Zahrt, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pathogenic microorganisms encounter a variety of environmental stresses following infection of their respective hosts. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiological agent of tuberculosis, is an unusual bacterial pathogen in that it is able to establish lifelong infections in individuals within granulomatous lesions that are formed following a productive immune response. Adaptation to this highly dynamic environment is thought to be mediated primarily through transcriptional reprogramming initiated in response to recognition of stimuli, including low-oxygen tension, nutrient depletion, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, altered pH, toxic lipid moieties, cell wall/cell membrane-perturbing agents, and other environmental cues. To survive continued exposure to these potentially adverse factors, M. tuberculosis encodes a variety of regulatory factors, including 11 complete two-component signal transduction systems (TCSSs) and several orphaned response regulators (RRs) and sensor kinases (SKs). This report reviews our current knowledge of the TCSSs present in M. tuberculosis. In particular, we discuss the biochemical and functional characteristics of individual RRs and SKs, the environmental stimuli regulating their activation, the regulons controlled by the various TCSSs, and the known or postulated role(s) of individual TCSSs in the context of M. tuberculosis physiology and/or pathogenesis. PMID:22126994

  2. Oscillation and noise determine signal transduction in shark multimodal sensory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, H A; Wissing, H; Schäfer, K; Hirsch, M C

    1994-01-20

    Oscillating membrane potentials that generate rhythmic impulse patterns are considered to be of particular significance for neuronal information processing. In contrast, noise is usually seen as a disturbance which limits the accuracy of information transfer. We show here, however, that noise in combination with intrinsic oscillations can provide neurons with particular encoding properties, a discovery we made when recording from single electro-sensory afferents of a fish. The temporal sequence of the impulse trains indicates oscillations that operate near the spike-triggering threshold. The oscillation frequency determines the basic rhythm of impulse generation, but whether or not an impulse is actually triggered essentially depends on superimposed noise. The probability of impulse generation can be altered considerably by minor modifications of oscillation baseline and amplitude, which may underlie the exquisite sensitivity of these receptors to thermal and electrical stimuli. Additionally, thermal, but not electrical, stimuli alter the oscillation frequency, allowing dual sensory messages to be conveyed in a single spike train. These findings demonstrate novel properties of sensory transduction which may be relevant for neuronal signalling in general.

  3. Rho/Rock signal transduction pathway is required for MSC tenogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharam, Edward; Yaport, Miguel; Villanueva, Nathaniel L; Akinyibi, Takintope; Laudier, Damien; He, Zhiyong; Leong, Daniel J; Sun, Hui B

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based treatments have shown promise for improving tendon healing and repair. MSCs have the potential to differentiate into multiple lineages in response to select chemical and physical stimuli, including into tenocytes. Cell elongation and cytoskeletal tension have been shown to be instrumental to the process of MSC differentiation. Previous studies have shown that inhibition of stress fiber formation leads MSCs to default toward an adipogenic lineage, which suggests that stress fibers are required for MSCs to sense the environmental factors that can induce differentiation into tenocytes. As the Rho/ROCK signal transduction pathway plays a critical role in both stress fiber formation and in cell sensation, we examined whether the activation of this pathway was required when inducing MSC tendon differentiation using rope-like silk scaffolds. To accomplish this, we employed a loss-of-function approach by knocking out ROCK, actin and myosin (two other components of the pathway) using the specific inhibitors Y-27632, Latrunculin A and blebbistatin, respectively. We demonstrated that independently disrupting the cytoskeleton and the Rho/ROCK pathway abolished the expression of tendon differentiation markers and led to a loss of spindle morphology. Together, these studies suggest that the tension that is generated by MSC elongation is essential for MSC teno-differentiation and that the Rho/ROCK pathway is a critical mediator of tendon differentiation on rope-like silk scaffolds.

  4. Functional characterization of WalRK: A two-component signal transduction system from Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisha Dhiman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS, consisting of a sensor histidine protein kinase and its cognate response regulator, are an important mode of environmental sensing in bacteria. Additionally, they have been found to regulate virulence determinants in several pathogens. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a bioterrorism agent, harbours 41 pairs of TCS. However, their role in its pathogenicity has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show that WalRK of B. anthracis forms a functional TCS which exhibits some species-specific functions. Biochemical studies showed that domain variants of WalK, the histidine kinase, exhibit classical properties of autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer to its cognate response regulator WalR. Interestingly, these domain variants also show phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated WalR, thereby making WalK a bifunctional histidine kinase/phosphatase. An in silico regulon determination approach, using a consensus binding sequence from Bacillus subtilis, provided a list of 30 genes that could form a putative WalR regulon in B. anthracis. Further, electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to show direct binding of purified WalR to the upstream regions of three putative regulon candidates, an S-layer protein EA1, a cell division ABC transporter FtsE and a sporulation histidine kinase KinB3. Our work lends insight into the species-specific functions and mode of action of B. anthracis WalRK.

  5. Short- and long-term memory: differential involvement of neurotransmitter systems and signal transduction cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÔNICA R.M. VIANNA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Since William James (1890 first distinguished primary from secondary memory, equivalent to short- and long-term memory, respectively, it has been assumed that short-term memory processes are in charge of cognition while long-term memory is being consolidated. From those days a major question has been whether short-term memory is merely a initial phase of long-term memory, or a separate phenomena. Recent experiments have shown that many treatments with specific molecular actions given into the hippocampus and related brain areas after one-trial avoidance learning can effectively cancel short-term memory without affecting long-term memory formation. This shows that short-term memory and long-term memory involve separate mechanisms and are independently processed. Other treatments, however, influence both memory types similarly, suggesting links between both at the receptor and at the post-receptor level, which should not be surprising as they both deal with nearly the same sensorimotor representations. This review examines recent advances in short- and long-term memory mechanisms based on the effect of intra-hippocampal infusion of drugs acting upon neurotransmitter and signal transduction systems on both memory types.

  6. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean–Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity.

  7. Signal transduction pathways mediating parathyroid hormone regulation of osteoblastic gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, N. C.; Bloch, S. R.; Pearman, A. T.

    1994-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) plays a central role in regulation of calcium metabolism. For example, excessive or inappropriate production of PTH or the related hormone, parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), accounts for the majority of the causes of hypercalcemia. Both hormones act through the same receptor on the osteoblast to elicit enhanced bone resorption by the osteoclast. Thus, the osteoblast mediates the effect of PTH in the resorption process. In this process, PTH causes a change in the function and phenotype of the osteoblast from a cell involved in bone formation to one directing the process of bone resorption. In response to PTH, the osteoblast decreases collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin expression and increases production of osteocalcin, cytokines, and neutral proteases. Many of these changes have been shown to be due to effects on mRNA abundance through either transcriptional or post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, the signal transduction pathway for the hormone to cause these changes is not completely elucidated in any case. Binding of PTH and PTHrP to their common receptor has been shown to result in activation of protein kinases A and C and increases in intracellular calcium. The latter has not been implicated in any changes in mRNA of osteoblastic genes. On the other hand activation of PKA can mimic all the effects of PTH; protein kinase C may be involved in some responses. We will discuss possible mechanisms linking PKA and PKC activation to changes in gene expression, particularly at the nuclear level.

  8. Negative control in two-component signal transduction by transmitter phosphatase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Stewart, Valley

    2011-01-01

    Bifunctional sensor transmitter modules of two-component systems exert both positive and negative control on the receiver domain of the cognate response regulator. In negative control, the transmitter module accelerates the rate of phospho-receiver dephosphorylation. This transmitter phosphatase reaction serves the important physiological functions of resetting response regulator phosphorylation level and suppressing cross talk. Although the biochemical reactions underlying positive control are reasonably well-understood, the mechanism for transmitter phosphatase activity has been unknown. A recent hypothesis is that the transmitter phosphatase reaction is catalyzed by a conserved Gln, Asn or Thr residue, via a hydrogen bond between the amide or hydroxyl group and the nucleophilic water molecule in acyl-phosphate hydrolysis. This hypothetical mechanism closely resembles the established mechanisms of auxiliary phosphatases such as CheZ and CheX, and may be widely conserved in two-component signal transduction. In addition to the proposed catalytic residues, transmitter phosphatase activity also requires the correct transmitter conformation and appropriate interactions with the receiver. Evidence suggests that the phosphatase-competent and autokinase-competent states are mutually exclusive, and the corresponding negative and positive activities are likely to be reciprocally regulated through dynamic control of transmitter conformations. PMID:21895797

  9. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  10. Gravitactic signal transduction elements in astasia longa investigated during parabolic flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Lebert, Michael; Häder, Donat-P.

    2003-12-01

    Euglena gracilis and its close relative Astasia longa show a pronounced negative gravitactic behavior. Many experiments revealed that gravitaxis is most likely mediated by an active physiological mechanism. The goal of the present study was to examine elements in the sensory transduction by means of inhibitors of gravitaxis and the intracellular calcium concentration during short microgravity periods. During the course of six parabolic flights (ESA 31 th parabolic flight campaign and DLR 6 th parabolic flight campaign) the effects of trifluoperazine (calmodulin inhibitor), caffeine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) and gadolinium (blocks mechano-sensitive ion channels) was investigated. Due to the extreme parabolic flight maneuvers of the aircraft alternating phases of 1.8×gn (about 20 s) and microgravity (about 22 s) were achieved (gn: acceleration of Earth's gravity field). The duration of the microgravity periods was sufficient to detect a loss of cell orientation in the samples. In the presence of gadolinium impaired gravitaxis was found during acceleration, while caffeine-treated cells showed, compared to the controls, a very precise gravitaxis and faster reorientation in the 1.8×gn period following microgravity. A transient increase of the intracellular calcium upon increased acceleration was detected also in inhibitor-treated samples. Additionally, it was found that the cells showed a higher calcium signal when they deviated from the vertical swimming direction. In the presence of trifluoperazine a slightly higher general calcium signal was detected compared to untreated controls, while gadolinium was found to decrease the intracellular calcium concentration. In the presence of caffeine no clear changes of intracellular calcium were detected compared to the control.

  11. Postsynaptic Signal Transduction Models for Long-Term Potentiation and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Tiina; Hituri, Katri; Kotaleski, Jeanette Hellgren; Blackwell, Kim T.; Linne, Marja-Leena

    2010-01-01

    More than a hundred biochemical species, activated by neurotransmitters binding to transmembrane receptors, are important in long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). To investigate which species and interactions are critical for synaptic plasticity, many computational postsynaptic signal transduction models have been developed. The models range from simple models with a single reversible reaction to detailed models with several hundred kinetic reactions. In this study, more than a hundred models are reviewed, and their features are compared and contrasted so that similarities and differences are more readily apparent. The models are classified according to the type of synaptic plasticity that is modeled (LTP or LTD) and whether they include diffusion or electrophysiological phenomena. Other characteristics that discriminate the models include the phase of synaptic plasticity modeled (induction, expression, or maintenance) and the simulation method used (deterministic or stochastic). We find that models are becoming increasingly sophisticated, by including stochastic properties, integrating with electrophysiological properties of entire neurons, or incorporating diffusion of signaling molecules. Simpler models continue to be developed because they are computationally efficient and allow theoretical analysis. The more complex models permit investigation of mechanisms underlying specific properties and experimental verification of model predictions. Nonetheless, it is difficult to fully comprehend the evolution of these models because (1) several models are not described in detail in the publications, (2) only a few models are provided in existing model databases, and (3) comparison to previous models is lacking. We conclude that the value of these models for understanding molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity is increasing and will be enhanced further with more complete descriptions and sharing of the published models. PMID:21188161

  12. Postsynaptic signal transduction models for long-term potentiation and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiina Manninen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available More than a hundred biochemical species, activated by neurotransmitters binding to transmembrane receptors, are important in long-term potentiation and depression. To investigate which species and interactions are critical for synaptic plasticity, many computational postsynaptic signal transduction models have been developed. The models range from simple models with a single reversible reaction to detailed models with several hundred kinetic reactions. In this study, more than a hundred models are reviewed, and their features are compared and contrasted so that similarities and differences are more readily apparent. The models are classified according to the type of synaptic plasticity that is modeled (long-term potentiation or long-term depression and whether they include diffusion or electrophysiological phenomena. Other characteristics that discriminate the models include the phase of synaptic plasticity modeled (induction, expression, or maintenance and the simulation method used (deterministic or stochastic method. We find that models are becoming increasingly sophisticated, by including stochastic properties, integrating with electrophysiological properties of entire neurons, or incorporating diffusion of signaling molecules. Simpler models continue to be developed because they are computationally efficient and allow theoretical analysis. The more complex models permit investigation of mechanisms underlying specific properties and experimental verification of model predictions. Nonetheless, it is difficult to fully comprehend the evolution of these models because (1 several models are not described in detail in the publications, (2 only a few models are provided in existing model databases, and (3 comparison to previous models is lacking. We conclude that the value of these models for understanding molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity is increasing and will be enhanced further with more complete descriptions and sharing of the

  13. The Raf Kinase Inhibitor Sorafenib Inhibits JAK-STAT Signal Transduction in Human Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin del Campo, Sara E; Levine, Kala M; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Grignol, Valerie P; Fairchild, Ene T; Campbell, Amanda R; Trikha, Prashant; Mace, Thomas A; Paul, Bonnie K; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena Cristina; Markowitz, Joseph; Kondadasula, Sri Vidya; Guenterberg, Kristan D; McClory, Susan; Karpa, Volodymyr I; Pan, Xueliang; Olencki, Thomas E; Monk, J Paul; Mortazavi, Amir; Tridandapani, Susheela; Lesinski, Gregory B; Byrd, John C; Caligiuri, Michael A; Shah, Manisha H; Carson, William E

    2015-09-01

    Sorafenib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that was originally developed as a Raf kinase inhibitor. We hypothesized that sorafenib would also have inhibitory effects on cytokine signaling pathways in immune cells. PBMCs from normal donors were treated with varying concentrations of sorafenib and stimulated with IFN-α or IL-2. Phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT5 was measured by flow cytometry and confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Changes in IFN-α- and IL-2-stimulated gene expression were measured by quantitative PCR, and changes in cytokine production were evaluated by ELISA. Cryopreserved PBMCs were obtained from cancer patients before and after receiving 400 mg sorafenib twice daily. Patient PBMCs were thawed, stimulated with IL-2 or IFN-α, and evaluated for phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT5. Pretreatment of PBMCs with 10 μM sorafenib decreased STAT1 and STAT5 phosphorylation after treatment with IFN-α or IL-2. This inhibitory effect was observed in PBMCs from healthy donors over a range of concentrations of sorafenib (5-20 μM), IL-2 (2-24 nM), and IFN-α (10(1)-10(6) U/ml). This effect was observed in immune cell subsets, including T cells, B cells, NK cells, regulatory T cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Pretreatment with sorafenib also inhibited PBMC expression of IFN-α- and IL-2-regulated genes and inhibited NK cell production of IFN-γ, RANTES, MIP1-α, and MIG in response to IFN-α stimulation. PBMCs from patients receiving sorafenib therapy showed decreased responsiveness to IL-2 and IFN-α treatment. Sorafenib is a Raf kinase inhibitor that could have off-target effects on cytokine-induced signal transduction in immune effector cells. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Membrane actions of progestins at dopamine type 1-like and GABAA receptors involve downstream signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Cheryl A; Walf, Alicia A

    2008-10-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), progestins facilitate lordosis via rapid actions at membrane dopamine Type 1-like (D(1)) and/or GABA(A) receptors (GBRs), rather than via cognate, intracellular progestin receptors (PRs). Downstream signal transduction pathways involved in these effects were investigated using lordosis as a bioassay. If progestins' actions at D(1) and/or GBRs in the VTA require activation of G-proteins, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), phospholipase C (PLC), and/or PKC, then pharmacologically blocking these pathways would be expected to attenuate progestin-facilitated lordosis and its enhancement by D(1) and GBR activity. Ovariectomized, estradiol-primed rats were infused first with vehicle or signal transduction inhibitor, and second with vehicle, a D(1) or GBR agonist, and then with vehicle or progestins to the VTA. Rats were tested for lordosis following infusions. Results indicated that initiation of G-proteins, adenylyl cyclase, PKA, PLC, or PKC in the VTA is required for rapid effects of progestins through D(1) and/or GBRs to facilitate lordosis. As well, progestins' actions at n-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) may modulate activity at D(1) and/or GBRs and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) may be a common signaling pathway. Findings from a microarray study demonstrated that there was upregulation of genes associated with steroid metabolism, GBRs, D(1), NMDARs and signal transduction factors in the midbrain VTA of naturally receptive mated compared to non-mated rats. Thus, in the VTA, progestins have rapid membrane-mediated actions via D(1), GBRs, NMDARs and their downstream signal transduction pathways.

  15. TRP2: A candidate transduction channel for mammalian pheromone sensory signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Liman, Emily R.; Corey, David P.; Dulac, Catherine

    1999-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) of terrestrial vertebrates plays a key role in the detection of pheromones, chemicals released by animals that elicit stereotyped sexual and aggressive behaviors among conspecifics. Sensory transduction in the VNO appears unrelated to that in the vertebrate olfactory and visual systems: the putative pheromone receptors of the VNO are evolutionarily independent from the odorant receptors and, in contrast to vertebrate visual and olfactory transduction, vomeronasal t...

  16. Immunocytochemical evidence for co-expression of Type III IP3 receptor with signaling components of bitter taste transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnamon Sue C

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli into electrical signals that lead to the sense of taste. An important second messenger in taste transduction is IP3, which is involved in both bitter and sweet transduction pathways. Several components of the bitter transduction pathway have been identified, including the T2R/TRB taste receptors, phospholipase C β2, and the G protein subunits α-gustducin, β3, and γ13. However, the identity of the IP3 receptor subtype in this pathway is not known. In the present study we used immunocytochemistry on rodent taste tissue to identify the IP3 receptors expressed in taste cells and to examine taste bud expression patterns for IP3R3. Results Antibodies against Type I, II, and III IP3 receptors were tested on sections of rat and mouse circumvallate papillae. Robust cytoplasmic labeling for the Type III IP3 receptor (IP3R3 was found in a large subset of taste cells in both species. In contrast, little or no immunoreactivity was seen with antibodies against the Type I or Type II IP3 receptors. To investigate the potential role of IP3R3 in bitter taste transduction, we used double-label immunocytochemistry to determine whether IP3R3 is expressed in the same subset of cells expressing other bitter signaling components. IP3R3 immunoreactive taste cells were also immunoreactive for PLCβ2 and γ13. Alpha-gustducin immunoreactivity was present in a subset of IP3R3, PLCβ2, and γ13 positive cells. Conclusions IP3R3 is the dominant form of the IP3 receptor expressed in taste cells and our data suggest it plays an important role in bitter taste transduction.

  17. Umami taste transduction mechanisms1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    l-Glutamate elicits the umami taste sensation, now recognized as a fifth distinct taste quality. A characteristic feature of umami taste is its potentiation by 5′-ribonucleotides such as guanosine-5'-monophosphate and inosine 5′-monophosphate, which also elicit the umami taste on their own. Recent data suggest that multiple G protein–coupled receptors contribute to umami taste. This review will focus on events downstream of the umami taste receptors. Ligand binding leads to Gβγ activation of phospholipase C β2, which produces the second messengers inositol trisphosphate and diacylglycerol. Inositol trisphosphate binds to the type III inositol trisphosphate receptor, which causes the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and Ca2+-dependent activation of a monovalent-selective cation channel, TRPM5. TRPM5 is believed to depolarize taste cells, which leads to the release of ATP, which activates ionotropic purinergic receptors on gustatory afferent nerve fibers. This model is supported by knockout of the relevant signaling effectors as well as physiologic studies of isolated taste cells. Concomitant with the molecular studies, physiologic studies show that l-glutamate elicits increases in intracellular Ca2+ in isolated taste cells and that the source of the Ca2+ is release from intracellular stores. Both Gα gustducin and Gα transducin are involved in umami signaling, because the knockout of either subunit compromises responses to umami stimuli. Both α-gustducin and α-transducin activate phosphodiesterases to decrease intracellular cAMP. The target of cAMP in umami transduction is not known, but membrane-permeant analogs of cAMP antagonize electrophysiologic responses to umami stimuli in isolated taste cells, which suggests that cAMP may have a modulatory role in umami signaling. PMID:19571214

  18. Jellyfish vision starts with cAMP signaling mediated by opsin-G(s) cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Takano, Kosuke; Tsukamoto, Hisao; Ohtsu, Kohzoh; Tokunaga, Fumio; Terakita, Akihisa

    2008-10-07

    Light sensing starts with phototransduction in photoreceptor cells. The phototransduction cascade has diverged in different species, such as those mediated by transducin in vertebrate rods and cones, by G(q)-type G protein in insect and molluscan rhabdomeric-type visual cells and vertebrate photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, and by G(o)-type G protein in scallop ciliary-type visual cells. Here, we investigated the phototransduction cascade of a prebilaterian box jellyfish, the most basal animal having eyes containing lens and ciliary-type visual cells similar to vertebrate eyes, to examine the similarity at the molecular level and to obtain an implication of the origin of the vertebrate phototransduction cascade. We showed that the opsin-based pigment functions as a green-sensitive visual pigment and triggers the G(s)-type G protein-mediated phototransduction cascade in the ciliary-type visual cells of the box jellyfish lens eyes. We also demonstrated the light-dependent cAMP increase in the jellyfish visual cells and HEK293S cells expressing the jellyfish opsin. The first identified prebilaterian cascade was distinct from known phototransduction cascades but exhibited significant partial similarity with those in vertebrate and molluscan ciliary-type visual cells, because all involved cyclic nucleotide signaling. These similarities imply a monophyletic origin of ciliary phototransduction cascades distributed from prebilaterian to vertebrate.

  19. Cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase-mediated signal transduction and interleukin 2 (IL-2) expression in the murine T-cell line, EL4.IL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, R; Herring, A; Koh, W S; Lee, M; Kaminski, N E

    1996-05-31

    Cannabinoid receptors negatively regulate adenylate cyclase through a pertussis toxin-sensitive GTP-binding protein. In the present studies, signaling via the adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway was investigated in the murine thymoma-derived T-cell line, EL4.IL-2. Northern analysis of EL4.IL-2 cells identified the presence of 4-kilobase CB2 but not CB1 receptor-subtype mRNA transcripts. Southern analysis of genomic DNA digests for the CB2 receptor demonstrated identical banding patterns for EL4.IL-2 cells and mouse-derived DNA, both of which were dissimilar to DNA isolated from rat. Treatment of EL4.IL-2 cells with either cannabinol or Delta9-THC disrupted the adenylate cyclase signaling cascade by inhibiting forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation which consequently led to a decrease in protein kinase A activity and the binding of transcription factors to a CRE consensus sequence. Likewise, an inhibition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) protein secretion, which correlated to decreased IL-2 gene transcription, was induced by both cannabinol and Delta9-THC. Further, cannabinoid treatment also decreased PMA/ionomycin-induced nuclear factor binding to the AP-1 proximal site of the IL-2 promoter. Conversely, forskolin enhanced PMA/ionomycin-induced AP-1 binding. These findings suggest that inhibition of signal transduction via the adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway induces T-cell dysfunction which leads to a diminution in IL-2 gene transcription.

  20. A novel signal transduction pathway that modulates rhl quorum sensing and bacterial virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Cao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The rhl quorum-sensing (QS system plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. However, the regulatory effects that occur directly upstream of the rhl QS system are poorly understood. Here, we show that deletion of gene encoding for the two-component sensor BfmS leads to the activation of its cognate response regulator BfmR, which in turn directly binds to the promoter and decreases the expression of the rhlR gene that encodes the QS regulator RhlR, causing the inhibition of the rhl QS system. In the absence of bfmS, the Acka-Pta pathway can modulate the regulatory activity of BfmR. In addition, BfmS tunes the expression of 202 genes that comprise 3.6% of the P. aeruginosa genome. We further demonstrate that deletion of bfmS causes substantially reduced virulence in lettuce leaf, reduced cytotoxicity, enhanced invasion, and reduced bacterial survival during acute mouse lung infection. Intriguingly, specific missense mutations, which occur naturally in the bfmS gene in P. aeruginosa cystic fibrosis (CF isolates such as DK2 strains and RP73 strain, can produce BfmS variants (BfmSL181P, BfmSL181P/E376Q, and BfmSR393H that no longer repress, but instead activate BfmR. As a result, BfmS variants, but not the wild-type BfmS, inhibit the rhl QS system. This study thus uncovers a previously unexplored signal transduction pathway, BfmS/BfmR/RhlR, for the regulation of rhl QS in P. aeruginosa. We propose that BfmRS TCS may have an important role in the regulation and evolution of P. aeruginosa virulence during chronic infection in CF lungs.

  1. From Stress to Inflammation and Major Depressive Disorder: A Social Signal Transduction Theory of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Major life stressors, especially those involving interpersonal stress and social rejection, are among the strongest proximal risk factors for depression. In this review, we propose a biologically plausible, multilevel theory that describes neural, physiologic, molecular, and genomic mechanisms that link experiences of social-environmental stress with internal biological processes that drive depression pathogenesis. Central to this social signal transduction theory of depression is the hypothesis that experiences of social threat and adversity up-regulate components of the immune system involved in inflammation. The key mediators of this response, called proinflammatory cytokines, can in turn elicit profound changes in behavior, which include the initiation of depressive symptoms such as sad mood, anhedonia, fatigue, psychomotor retardation, and social-behavioral withdrawal. This highly conserved biological response to adversity is critical for survival during times of actual physical threat or injury. However, this response can also be activated by modern-day social, symbolic, or imagined threats, leading to an increasingly proinflammatory phenotype that may be a key phenomenon driving depression pathogenesis and recurrence, as well as the overlap of depression with several somatic conditions including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pain, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and neurodegeneration. Insights from this theory may thus shed light on several important questions including how depression develops, why it frequently recurs, why it is strongly predicted by early life stress, and why it often co-occurs with symptoms of anxiety and with certain physical disease conditions. This work may also suggest new opportunities for preventing and treating depression by targeting inflammation. PMID:24417575

  2. Universality and diversity in the signal transduction pathway that regulates seasonal reproduction in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke eNakane

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most vertebrates living outside the tropical zone show robust physiological responses in response to seasonal changes in photoperiod, such as seasonal reproduction, molt, and migration. The highly sophisticated photoperiodic mechanism in Japanese quail has been used to uncover the mechanism of seasonal reproduction. Molecular analysis of quail mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH revealed that local thyroid hormone activation within the MBH plays a critical role in the photoperiodic response of gonads. This activation is accomplished by two gene switches: thyroid hormone-activating (DIO2 and thyroid hormone-inactivating enzymes (DIO3. Functional genomics studies have shown that long-day induced thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in the pars tuberalis (PT of the pituitary gland regulates DIO2/3 switching. In birds, light information received directly by deep brain photoreceptors regulates PT TSH. Recent studies demonstrated that Opsin 5-positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF-contacting neurons are deep brain photoreceptors that regulate avian seasonal reproduction. Although the involvement of TSH and DIO2/3 in seasonal reproduction has been confirmed in various mammals, the light input pathway that regulates PT TSH in mammals differs from that of birds. In mammals, the eye is the only photoreceptor organ and light information received by the eye is transmitted to the pineal gland through the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Nocturnal melatonin secretion from the pineal gland indicates the length of night and regulates the PT TSH. In fish, the regulatory machinery for seasonal reproduction, from light input to neuroendocrine output, has been recently demonstrated in the coronet cells of the saccus vasculosus (SV. The SV is unique to fish and coronet cells are CSF-contacting neurons. Here, we discuss the universality and diversity of signal transduction pathways that regulate vertebrate seasonal reproduction.

  3. From stress to inflammation and major depressive disorder: a social signal transduction theory of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M; Irwin, Michael R

    2014-05-01

    Major life stressors, especially those involving interpersonal stress and social rejection, are among the strongest proximal risk factors for depression. In this review, we propose a biologically plausible, multilevel theory that describes neural, physiologic, molecular, and genomic mechanisms that link experiences of social-environmental stress with internal biological processes that drive depression pathogenesis. Central to this social signal transduction theory of depression is the hypothesis that experiences of social threat and adversity up-regulate components of the immune system involved in inflammation. The key mediators of this response, called proinflammatory cytokines, can in turn elicit profound changes in behavior, which include the initiation of depressive symptoms such as sad mood, anhedonia, fatigue, psychomotor retardation, and social-behavioral withdrawal. This highly conserved biological response to adversity is critical for survival during times of actual physical threat or injury. However, this response can also be activated by modern-day social, symbolic, or imagined threats, leading to an increasingly proinflammatory phenotype that may be a key phenomenon driving depression pathogenesis and recurrence, as well as the overlap of depression with several somatic conditions including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pain, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and neurodegeneration. Insights from this theory may thus shed light on several important questions including how depression develops, why it frequently recurs, why it is strongly predicted by early life stress, and why it often co-occurs with symptoms of anxiety and with certain physical disease conditions. This work may also suggest new opportunities for preventing and treating depression by targeting inflammation.

  4. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo Cho Yoon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC, has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca2+ and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca2+ and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca2+ and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  5. The Two-Component Signal Transduction System VxrAB Positively Regulates Vibrio cholerae Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschler, Jennifer K; Cheng, Andrew T; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2017-09-15

    Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), typically composed of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), are the primary mechanism by which pathogenic bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. The pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae is no exception and harbors 52 RR genes. Using in-frame deletion mutants of each RR gene, we performed a systematic analysis of their role in V. cholerae biofilm formation. We determined that 7 RRs impacted the expression of an essential biofilm gene and found that the recently characterized RR, VxrB, regulates the expression of key structural and regulatory biofilm genes in V. choleraevxrB is part of a 5-gene operon, which contains the cognate HK vxrA and three genes of unknown function. Strains carrying ΔvxrA and ΔvxrB mutations are deficient in biofilm formation, while the ΔvxrC mutation enhances biofilm formation. The overexpression of VxrB led to a decrease in motility. We also observed a small but reproducible effect of the absence of VxrB on the levels of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). Our work reveals a new function for the Vxr TCS as a regulator of biofilm formation and suggests that this regulation may act through key biofilm regulators and the modulation of cellular c-di-GMP levels.IMPORTANCE Biofilms play an important role in the Vibrio cholerae life cycle, providing protection from environmental stresses and contributing to the transmission of V. cholerae to the human host. V. cholerae can utilize two-component systems (TCS), composed of a histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR), to regulate biofilm formation in response to external cues. We performed a systematic analysis of V. cholerae RRs and identified a new regulator of biofilm formation, VxrB. We demonstrated that the VxrAB TCS is essential for robust biofilm formation and that this system may regulate biofilm formation via its regulation of key biofilm regulators and cyclic di-GMP levels. This research furthers our

  6. Losartan reduces insulin resistance by inhibiting oxidative stress and enhancing insulin signaling transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y; Qiao, Q Y; Pan, L H; Zhou, D C; Hu, C; Gu, H F; Fu, S K; Liu, X L; Jin, H M

    2015-03-01

    Inhibition of the rennin-angiotensin system (RAS) could reduce insulin resistance in patients with hypertension and diabetic kidney disease (DKD), but whether the effect of losartan on insulin resistance is associated with reduction of oxidative stress and enhancement of insulin signaling transduction has not been fully elucidated. 130 patients with type 2 DKD were randomly assigned into 2 groups, the losartan group (n=65, 100 mg orally daily for 12 months) and the amlodipine group (n=65, 10 mg orally daily for 12 months). Oxidative stress markers in plasma, urine concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and nitrotyrosine (NT) as well as SOD activity were measured by ELISA. After in vitro treatment with different doses of losartan (10, 100 μmol/L) or amlodipine for 48 h, the size of H2O2-induced adipocytes and glucose consumption were measured. Western blot was performed to investigate IRS-1 serine phosphorylation level as well as the protein expressions of phosphorylated insulin receptor (pIR), phosphatidylinositol 3- kinase (PI3K) and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. After 12-month treatment, there were no significant differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreases, plasma fasting blood glucose and HbA1c between the 2 groups. Compared with amlodipine group, fasting blood insulin levels and insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) were significantly decreased in losartan group, and in addition, the circulating levels of 8-OHdG and NT were significantly decreased in losartan group, while the serum SOD activity was enhanced. There were significant positively correlations of HOMA-IR with inflammatory oxidative stress markers. In vitro study showed that losartan could increase glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes (Padipocyte size (Preduction of oxidative stress and inflammation in patients with type 2 DKD as well as the activation of insulin signal pathway in insulin-resistance 3T3-L1 adipocytes through

  7. The mammalian Cos2 homolog Kif7 plays an essential role in modulating Hh signal transduction during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoh-Yamagami, Setsu; Evangelista, Marie; Wilson, Deanna; Wen, Xiaohui; Theunissen, Jan-Willem; Phamluong, Khanhky; Davis, Matti; Scales, Suzie J; Solloway, Mark J; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Peterson, Andrew S

    2009-08-11

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway regulates development in animals ranging from flies to humans. Although its framework is conserved, differences in pathway components have been reported. A kinesin-like protein, Costal2 (Cos2), plays a central role in the Hh pathway in flies. Knockdown of a zebrafish homolog of Cos2, Kif7, results in ectopic Hh signaling, suggesting that Kif7 acts primarily as a negative regulator of Hh signal transduction. However, in vitro analysis of the function of mammalian Kif7 and the closely related Kif27 has led to the conclusion that neither protein has a role in Hh signaling. Using Kif7 knockout mice, we demonstrate that mouse Kif7, like its zebrafish and Drosophila homologs, plays a role in transducing the Hh signal. We show that Kif7 accumulates at the distal tip of the primary cilia in a Hh-dependent manner. We also demonstrate a requirement for Kif7 in the efficient localization of Gli3 to cilia in response to Hh and for the processing of Gli3 to its repressor form. These results suggest a role for Kif7 in coordinating Hh signal transduction at the tip of cilia and preventing Gli3 cleavage into a repressor form in the presence of Hh.

  8. Discovering Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeted to Ligand-Stimulated RAGE-DIAPH1 Signaling Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jinhong

    The receptor of advanced glycation end product (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules, which plays an important role in immune responses. Full-length RAGE includes three extracellular immunoglobulin domains, a transmembrane domain and an intracellular domain. It is a pattern recognition receptor that can bind diverse ligands. NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallization studies of the extracellular domains of RAGE indicate that RAGE ligands bind by distinct charge- and hydrophobicity-dependent mechanisms. It is found that calgranulin binding to the C1C2 domain or AGEs binding to the V domain activates extracellular signaling, which triggers interactions of the RAGE cytoplasmic tail (ctRAGE) with intracellular effector, such as diaphanous 1 (DIAPH1), to initiate signal transduction cascades. ctRAGE is essential for RAGE-ligand-mediated signal transduction and consequent modulation of gene expression and cellular properties. RAGE is over-expressed in diseased tissues of most RAGE-associated pathogenic conditions, such as complications of Alzheimer's diseases, diabetes, vascular diseases, inflammation, cancers and neurodegeneration. They are the major diseases affecting a large population worldwide. RAGE can function as a biomarker or drug target for these diseases. The cytoplasmic tail of RAGE can be used as a drug target to inhibit RAGE-induced intracellular signaling by small molecule inhibitors to treat RAGE-associated diseases. We developed a high throughput screening assay with which we probed a small molecule library of 58,000 compounds to find that 777 small molecules displayed 50% inhibition and 97 compounds demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of the binding of ctRAGE-DIAPH1. Eventually, there were 13 compounds which displayed dose-dependent inhibition of ctRAGE binding to DIAPH1 and direct binding to ctRAGE analyzed by 15N HSQC-NMR and native tryptophan fluorescence titration experiments; thus, they were

  9. Functional conservation between Schizosaccharomyces pombe ste8 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE11 protein kinases in yeast signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrkársdóttir, U; Egel, R; Nielsen, O

    1992-01-01

    In fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), the mat1-Pm gene, which is required for entry into meiosis, is expressed in response to a pheromone signal. Cells carrying a mutation in the ste8 gene are unable to induce transcription of mat1-Pm in response to pheromone, suggesting that the ste8 gene...... in signal transduction in budding yeast. Expression of the S. cerevisiae STE11 gene in S. pombe ste8 mutants restores the ability to transcribe mat1-Pm in response to pheromone. Also, such cells become capable of conjugation and sporulation. When mat1-Pm is artifically expressed from a heterologous promoter...

  10. (Pro)renin Receptor–Mediated Signal Transduction and Tissue Renin-Angiotensin System Contribute to Diabetes-Induced Retinal Inflammation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shingo Satofuka; Atsuhiro Ichihara; Norihiro Nagai; Kousuke Noda; Yoko Ozawa; Akiyoshi Fukamizu; Kazuo Tsubota; Hiroshi Itoh; Yuichi Oike; Susumu Ishida

    2009-01-01

    (Pro)renin Receptor–Mediated Signal Transduction and Tissue Renin-Angiotensin System Contribute to Diabetes-Induced Retinal Inflammation Shingo Satofuka 1 , 2 , Atsuhiro Ichihara 3 , Norihiro Nagai 1 , 2 , Kousuke Noda 1...

  11. Heavy metal accumulation and signal transduction in herbaceous and woody plants: Paving the way for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Bin; He, Jiali; Polle, Andrea; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metal (HM)-accumulating herbaceous and woody plants are employed for phytoremediation. To develop improved strategies for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency, knowledge of the microstructural, physiological and molecular responses underlying HM-accumulation is required. Here we review the progress in understanding the structural, physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying HM uptake, transport, sequestration and detoxification, as well as the regulation of these processes by signal transduction in response to HM exposure. The significance of genetic engineering for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency is also discussed. In herbaceous plants, HMs are taken up by roots and transported into the root cells via transmembrane carriers for nutritional ions. The HMs absorbed by root cells can be further translocated to the xylem vessels and unloaded into the xylem sap, thereby reaching the aerial parts of plants. HMs can be sequestered in the cell walls, vacuoles and the Golgi apparatuses. Plant roots initially perceive HM stress and trigger the signal transduction, thereby mediating changes at the molecular, physiological, and microstructural level. Signaling molecules such as phytohormones, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), modulate plant responses to HMs via differentially expressed genes, activation of the antioxidative system and coordinated cross talk among different signaling molecules. A number of genes participated in HM uptake, transport, sequestration and detoxification have been functionally characterized and transformed to target plants for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency. Fast growing woody plants hold an advantage over herbaceous plants for phytoremediation in terms of accumulation of high HM-amounts in their large biomass. Presumably, woody plants accumulate HMs using similar mechanisms as herbaceous counterparts, but the processes of HM accumulation and signal transduction can be more complex in woody plants

  12. The role of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) in signal transduction of the metabolic neuropeptide Mem-CC in the cetoniid beetle, Pachnoda sinuata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerswald, Lutz; Gäde, Gerd

    2002-12-01

    We have investigated the role of inositol triphosphate, Ins(1,4,5)P(3), in the transduction of the hypertrehalosaemic and hyperprolinaemic signal of the endogenous neuropeptide Mem-CC in the cetoniid beetle Pachnoda sinuata. Flight and injection of Mem-CC into the haemocoel of the beetle induce an increase of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels in the fat body of the beetle. When Mem-CC is co-injected with U 73122, which is an inhibitor of phospholipase C, this effect is abolished. Mem-CC also elevates Ins(1,4,5)P(3) concentration in fat body pieces in vitro. The increase in Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels is tissue-specific and does not occur in brain and flight muscles. Elevation of the Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels upon injection of Mem-CC is time- and dose-dependent: the maximum response is reached after 3 min and a dose of 10 pmol is needed. Compounds that mimic the action of cAMP (cpt-cAMP, forskolin) do not influence the concentration of Ins(1,4,5)P(3), while those that stimulate G-proteins (aluminium fluoride and cholera toxin) cause an increase of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels. The application (in vivo and in vitro) of F-Ins(1,4,5)P(3), an Ins(1,4,5)P(3) analogue that penetrates the cell membrane, causes a mobilisation of carbohydrate reserves via the activation of glycogen phosphorylase but does not stimulate proline synthesis. In addition, U 73122 abolishes the hypertrehalosaemic but not the hyperprolinaemic effect of Mem-CC. The results suggest that the hypertrehalosaemic signal of Mem-CC is mediated via an increase of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) levels in the fat body of P. sinuata.

  13. Towards understanding the nitrogen signal transduction for nif gene expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöer, Jens; Thummer, Robert; Ullrich, Heike; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2008-12-01

    In the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae, the nitrogen sensory protein GlnK mediates the cellular nitrogen status towards the NifL/NifA system that regulates transcription of the nitrogen fixation genes in response to ammonium and molecular oxygen. To identify amino acids of GlnK essential for this signal transduction by protein-protein interaction, we performed random point mutagenesis by PCR amplification under conditions of reduced Taq polymerase fidelity. Three thousand two hundred mutated glnK genes were screened to identify those that would no longer complement a K. pneumoniaeDeltaglnK strain for growth under nitrogen fixing conditions. Twenty-four candidates resulting in a Nif(-) phenotype were identified, carrying 1-11 amino acid changes in GlnK. Based on these findings, as well as structural data, several single mutations were introduced into glnK by site-directed mutagenesis, and the Nif phenotype and the respective effects on NifA-mediated nif gene induction was monitored in K. pneumoniae using a chromosomal nifK'-'lacZ fusion. Single amino acid changes resulting in significant nif gene inhibition under nitrogen limiting conditions were located within the highly conserved T-loop (A43G, A49T and N54D), the body of the protein (G87V and K79E) and in the C-terminal region (I100M, R103S, E106Q and D108G). Complex formation analyses between GlnK (wild-type or derivatives) and NifL or NifA in response to 2-oxoglutarate indicated that: (a) besides the T-loop, the C-terminal region of GlnK is essential for the interaction with NifL and NifA and (b) GlnK binds both proteins in the absence of 2-oxoglutarate, whereas, in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate, NifA is released but NifL remains bound to GlnK.

  14. Effects of obesity and exercise on testicular leptin signal transduction and testosterone biosynthesis in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xuejie; Gao, Haining; Chen, Dequan; Tang, Donghui; Huang, Wanting; Li, Tao; Ma, Tie; Chang, Bo

    2017-04-01

    To explore the role of the testicular leptin and JAK-STAT[leptin (LEP)-JAK-STAT] pathway in testosterone biosynthesis during juvenile stages and exercise for weight loss, male C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into normal-diet and high-fat diet groups. After 10 wk, mice in the high-fat diet-fed group were further divided randomly into obese control, obese moderate-volume exercise, and obese high-volume exercise groups. Mice in the obese moderate-volume exercise group were provided with 2 h/day, 6 days/wk swimming exercise for 8 wk, and mice in the obese high-volume exercise group underwent twice the amount of daily exercise intervention as the obese moderate-volume exercise group. The results showed that a high-fat diet causes obesity, leptin resistance, inhibition of the testicular LEP-JAK-STAT pathway, decreased mRNA and protein expression of steroidogenic factor-1, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and the P-450 side-chain cleavage enzyme, a decrease in the serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio, and declines in sperm quality parameters. Both moderate and high-volume exercise were able to reduce body fat and increase the mRNA and protein expression of LEP-JAK-STAT, but only moderate exercise significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of steroidogenic factor-1, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, and P-450 side-chain cleavage enzyme and significantly reversed the serum testosterone-to-estradiol ratio and sperm quality parameters. These findings suggest that by impairing the testicular LEP-JAK-STAT pathway, early-stage obesity inhibits the biosynthesis of testosterone and sexual development and reduces male reproductive potential. Long-term moderate and high-volume exercise can effectively reduce body fat and improve obesity-induced abnormalities in testicular leptin signal transduction, whereas only moderate-volume exercise can reverse the negative impacts of obesity on male reproductive function. Copyright © 2017 the American

  15. Genomic Targets and Features of BarA-UvrY (-SirA Signal Transduction Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfalem R Zere

    Full Text Available The two-component signal transduction system BarA-UvrY of Escherichia coli and its orthologs globally regulate metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, virulence of pathogens and quorum sensing by activating the transcription of genes for regulatory sRNAs, e.g. CsrB and CsrC in E. coli. These sRNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA away from lower affinity mRNA targets. In this study, we used ChIP-exo to identify, at single nucleotide resolution, genomic sites for UvrY (SirA binding in E. coli and Salmonella enterica. The csrB and csrC genes were the strongest targets of crosslinking, which required UvrY phosphorylation by the BarA sensor kinase. Crosslinking occurred at two sites, an inverted repeat sequence far upstream of the promoter and a site near the -35 sequence. DNAse I footprinting revealed specific binding of UvrY in vitro only to the upstream site, indicative of additional binding requirements and/or indirect binding to the downstream site. Additional genes, including cspA, encoding the cold-shock RNA-binding protein CspA, showed weaker crosslinking and modest or negligible regulation by UvrY. We conclude that the global effects of UvrY/SirA on gene expression are primarily mediated by activating csrB and csrC transcription. We also used in vivo crosslinking and other experimental approaches to reveal new features of csrB/csrC regulation by the DeaD and SrmB RNA helicases, IHF, ppGpp and DksA. Finally, the phylogenetic distribution of BarA-UvrY was analyzed and found to be uniquely characteristic of γ-Proteobacteria and strongly anti-correlated with fliW, which encodes a protein that binds to CsrA and antagonizes its activity in Bacillus subtilis. We propose that BarA-UvrY and orthologous TCS transcribe sRNA antagonists of CsrA throughout the γ-Proteobacteria, but rarely or never perform this function in other species.

  16. [Nobel prize in physiology of medicine for year 2000 for research of signal transduction in the nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gispen, W H

    2000-11-11

    The three Nobel laureates Arvid Carlsson, Paul Greengard and Eric Kandel have made pioneering discoveries concerning slow synaptic transmission between neurons. As common theme, for which the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2000 is given, the Nobel Assembly chose 'signal transduction in the nervous system'. The work of Carlsson led to the discovery of dopamine as transmitter in the brain and opened the way for the development of the levodopa therapy of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. His later work concentrated on the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia and the rationale for the mechanism of action of antipsychotics. Greengard pioneered the field of receptor-mediated phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of brain proteins. He was the first to describe the cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase in the brain and the activation of this kinase following dopamine receptor activation. A substrate enriched in cells that bear dopamine receptors is 'dopamine- and cyclic-AMP-regulated phosphoprotein' (DARPP-32). Phosphorylation by the cyclic-AMP-dependent kinase influences its protein phosphatase inhibiting capacity and, as such, DARPP-32 is an important 'feed-forward activator' in the dopamine signal transduction cascade. Kandel received the prize for his contributions to our understanding of the neural substrate of learning and memory. Most of his work was carried out in the sea slug Aplysia in which he was able to relate three psychologically defined forms of learning--habituation, sensitisation, and classical conditioning--to subcellular processes and intercellular signalling. Kandel is known all over the world for his eminent textbook Principles of Neural Science which inspired generations of young neuroscientists. It seems that it is not so much the signal transduction that joins these laureates but their outstanding conceptual approach to, in fact, three different themes of the neurosciences during the second part of the last century.

  17. MC1R and cAMP signaling inhibit cdc25B activity and delay cell cycle progression in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Jesse; Bastian, Boris C; McCormick, Frank

    2013-08-20

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) mediates the tanning response through induction of cAMP and downstream pigmentary enzymes. Diminished function alleles of MC1R are associated with decreased tanning and increased melanoma risk, which has been attributed to increased rates of mutation. We have found that MC1R or cAMP signaling also directly decreases proliferation in melanoma cell lines. MC1R overexpression, treatment with the MC1R ligand, or treatment with small-molecule activators of cAMP signaling causes delayed progression from G2 into mitosis. This delay is caused by phosphorylation and inhibition of cdc25B, a cyclin dependent kinase 1-activating phosphatase, and is rescued by expression of a cdc25B mutant that cannot be phosphorylated at the serine 323 residue. These results show that MC1R and cAMP signaling can directly inhibit melanoma growth through regulation of the G2/M checkpoint.

  18. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the

  19. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galperin, Michael Y

    2005-06-14

    Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins--histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases--encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set) can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the highest IQ, including the current leader Wolinella succinogenes

  20. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Coordinated Regulation of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis through Signal Transduction and Sugar Metabolism in Black Rice Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linghua Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Black rice (Oryza sativa L. is considered to be a healthy food due to its high content of anthocyanins in the pericarp. The synthetic pathway of anthocyanins in black rice grains has been identified, however, the proteomic profile of leaves during grain development is still unclear. Here, isobaric Tags Relative and Absolute Quantification (iTRAQ MS/MS was carried out to identify statistically significant changes of leaf proteome in the black rice during grain development. Throughout three sequential developmental stages, a total of 3562 proteins were detected and 24 functional proteins were differentially expressed 3–10 days after flowering (DAF. The detected proteins are known to be involved in various biological processes and most of these proteins were related to gene expression regulatory (33.3%, signal transduction (16.7% and developmental regulation and hormone-like proteins (12.5%. The coordinated changes were consistent with changes in regulatory proteins playing a leading role in leaves during black rice grain development. This indicated that signal transduction between leaves and grains may have an important role in anthocyanin biosynthesis and accumulation during grain development of black rice. In addition, four identified up-regulated proteins associated with starch metabolism suggested that the remobilization of nutrients for starch synthesis plays a potential role in anthocyanin biosynthesis of grain. The mRNA transcription for eight selected proteins was validated with quantitative real-time PCR. Our results explored the proteomics of the coordination between leaf and grain in anthocyanins biosynthesis of grain, which might be regulated by signal transduction and sugar metabolism in black rice leaf.

  1. Multiple Drug Treatments That Increase cAMP Signaling Restore Long-Term Memory and Aberrant Signaling in Fragile X Syndrome Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Bell, Aaron J.; Hinchey, Joseph; Rosenfelt, Cory; Gertner, Michael J.; Campbell, Sean R.; Emerson, Danielle; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Ferrick, Neal J.; Chambers, Daniel B.; Langer, Steven; Sust, Steven; Malik, Aatika; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Liebelt, David A.; Ferreiro, David; Sharma, Ali; Koenigsberg, Eric; Choi, Richard J.; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E.; Featherstone, Robert E.; Siegel, Steven J.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; McDonald, Thomas V.; Bolduc, Francois V.; Jongens, Thomas A.; McBride, Sean M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X is the most common monogenic disorder associated with intellectual disability (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Additionally, many patients are afflicted with executive dysfunction, ADHD, seizure disorder and sleep disturbances. Fragile X is caused by loss of FMRP expression, which is encoded by the FMR1 gene. Both the fly and mouse models of fragile X are also based on having no functional protein expression of their respective FMR1 homologs. The fly model displays well defined cognitive impairments and structural brain defects and the mouse model, although having subtle behavioral defects, has robust electrophysiological phenotypes and provides a tool to do extensive biochemical analysis of select brain regions. Decreased cAMP signaling has been observed in samples from the fly and mouse models of fragile X as well as in samples derived from human patients. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that strategies that increase cAMP signaling can rescue short term memory in the fly model and restore DHPG induced mGluR mediated long term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus to proper levels in the mouse model (McBride et al., 2005; Choi et al., 2011, 2015). Here, we demonstrate that the same three strategies used previously with the potential to be used clinically, lithium treatment, PDE-4 inhibitor treatment or mGluR antagonist treatment can rescue long term memory in the fly model and alter the cAMP signaling pathway in the hippocampus of the mouse model. PMID:27445731

  2. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B

    2001-01-01

    3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity (phosphotyrosine and IRS-1 associated) in control subjects (P ... in signal transduction noted for IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase may be attributed to elevated basal phosphorylation/activity of these parameters, because absolute phosphorylation/activity under insulin-stimulated conditions was similar between IGT relatives and control subjects. Insulin increased Akt serine...... phosphorylation in control subjects and IGT relatives, with a tendency for reduced phosphorylation in IGT relatives (P = 0.12). In conclusion, aberrant phosphorylation/activity of IRS-1, PI 3-kinase, and Akt is observed in skeletal muscle from relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes with IGT. However...

  3. Identification of proteins likely to be involved in morphogenesis, cell division, and signal transduction in Planctomycetes by comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogler, Christian; Waldmann, Jost; Huang, Xiaoluo; Jogler, Mareike; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Mascher, Thorsten; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Members of the Planctomycetes clade share many unusual features for bacteria. Their cytoplasm contains membrane-bound compartments, they lack peptidoglycan and FtsZ, they divide by polar budding, and they are capable of endocytosis. Planctomycete genomes have remained enigmatic, generally being quite large (up to 9 Mb), and on average, 55% of their predicted proteins are of unknown function. Importantly, proteins related to the unusual traits of Planctomycetes remain largely unknown. Thus, we embarked on bioinformatic analyses of these genomes in an effort to predict proteins that are likely to be involved in compartmentalization, cell division, and signal transduction. We used three complementary strategies. First, we defined the Planctomycetes core genome and subtracted genes of well-studied model organisms. Second, we analyzed the gene content and synteny of morphogenesis and cell division genes and combined both methods using a "guilt-by-association" approach. Third, we identified signal transduction systems as well as sigma factors. These analyses provide a manageable list of candidate genes for future genetic studies and provide evidence for complex signaling in the Planctomycetes akin to that observed for bacteria with complex life-styles, such as Myxococcus xanthus.

  4. Group VII Ethylene Response Factors Coordinate Oxygen and Nitric Oxide Signal Transduction and Stress Responses in Plants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel J.; Conde, Jorge Vicente; Berckhan, Sophie; Prasad, Geeta; Mendiondo, Guillermina M.; Holdsworth, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The group VII ethylene response factors (ERFVIIs) are plant-specific transcription factors that have emerged as important regulators of abiotic and biotic stress responses, in particular, low-oxygen stress. A defining feature of ERFVIIs is their conserved N-terminal domain, which renders them oxygen- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent substrates of the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis. In the presence of these gases, ERFVIIs are destabilized, whereas an absence of either permits their accumulation; ERFVIIs therefore coordinate plant homeostatic responses to oxygen availability and control a wide range of NO-mediated processes. ERFVIIs have a variety of context-specific protein and gene interaction partners, and also modulate gibberellin and abscisic acid signaling to regulate diverse developmental processes and stress responses. This update discusses recent advances in our understanding of ERFVII regulation and function, highlighting their role as central regulators of gaseous signal transduction at the interface of ethylene, oxygen, and NO signaling. PMID:25944828

  5. Self-organization of signal transduction [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/zg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model of parameter learning for signal transduction, where the objective function is defined by signal transmission efficiency. We apply this to learn kinetic rates as a form of evolutionary learning, and look for parameters which satisfy the objective. This is a novel approach compared to the usual technique of adjusting parameters only on the basis of experimental data. The resulting model is self-organizing, i.e. perturbations in protein concentrations or changes in extracellular signaling will automatically lead to adaptation. We systematically perturb protein concentrations and observe the response of the system. We find compensatory or co-regulation of protein expression levels. In a novel experiment, we alter the distribution of extracellular signaling, and observe adaptation based on optimizing signal transmission. We also discuss the relationship between signaling with and without transients. Signaling by transients may involve maximization of signal transmission efficiency for the peak response, but a minimization in steady-state responses. With an appropriate objective function, this can also be achieved by concentration adjustment. Self-organizing systems may be predictive of unwanted drug interference effects, since they aim to mimic complex cellular adaptation in a unified way.

  6. Reciprocal bystander effect between α-irradiated macrophage and hepatocyte is mediated by cAMP through a membrane signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Li, Jitao; Yuan, Dexiao; Bai, Yang; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated cells can induce biological effects on vicinal non-irradiated bystander cells, meanwhile the bystander cells may rescue the irradiated cells through a feedback signal stress. To elucidate the nature of this reciprocal effect, we examined the interaction between α-irradiated human macrophage cells U937 and its bystander HL-7702 hepatocyte cells using a cell co-culture system. Results showed that after 6h of cell co-culture, mitochondria depolarization corresponding to apoptosis was significantly induced in the HL-7702 cells, but the formation of micronuclei in the irradiated U937 cells was markedly decreased compared to that without cell co-culture treatment. This reciprocal effect was not observed when the cell membrane signaling pathway was blocked by filipin that inhibited cAMP transmission from bystander cells to irradiated cells. After treatment of cells with exogenous cAMP, forskolin (an activator of cAMP) or KH-7 (an inhibitor of cAMP), respectively, it was confirmed that cAMP communication from bystander cells to targeted cells could mitigate radiation damage in U739 cells, and this cAMP insufficiency in the bystander cells contributed to the enhancement of bystander apoptosis. Moreover, the bystander apoptosis in HL-7702 cells was aggravated by cAMP inhibition but it could not be evoked when p53 of HL-7702 cells was knocked down no matter of forskolin and KH-7 treatment. In conclusion, this study disclosed that cAMP could be released from bystander HL-7702 cells and compensated to α-irradiated U937 cells through a membrane signaling pathway and this cAMP communication played a profound role in regulating the reciprocal bystander effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Azelastine hydrochloride (Azeptin) inhibits peplomycin (PLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis by contradicting the up-regulation of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, K; Yamamoto, T; Ueta, E; Osaki, T

    1997-10-01

    Inhibition of peplomycin (PLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis by azelastine hydrochloride (Azeptin) was examined using ICR mice, and the effects of both drugs on signal transduction were investigated. Microscopically, Azeptin (a total of 56 mg/kg for 28 days) suppressed pulmonary fibrosis in mice which received an i.p. injection of a total of 60 or 75 mg/kg PLM. In parallel with the microscopic findings, smaller amounts of collagen were synthesized in the lungs of Azeptin-injected mice. PLM enhanced the expression of interleukin-1 beta- and transforming growth factor-beta-mRNA in lungs. In contrast, Azeptin suppressed the expression. Compatible with these in vivo results, Azeptin and PLM contradictively regulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation and c-myc mRNA expression in human gingival and mouse pulmonary fibroblasts. In addition, NF-kappa B was activated by fibroblast treatment with 5 micrograms/ml PLM for 1 h, but intranuclear NF-kappa B was decreased by cell treatment with 10(-5) M Azeptin. From these results, it is concluded that Azeptin inhibits PLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis by antagonizing the up-regulation of signal transduction.

  8. An Overview of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems Implicated in Extra-Intestinal PathogenicE. coliInfections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Erin J; Eberly, Allison R; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) infections are common in mammals and birds. The predominant ExPEC types are avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), neonatal meningitis causing E. coli /meningitis associated E. coli (NMEC/MAEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). Many reviews have described current knowledge on ExPEC infection strategies and virulence factors, especially for UPEC. However, surprisingly little has been reported on the regulatory modules that have been identified as critical in ExPEC pathogenesis. Two-component systems (TCSs) comprise the predominant method by which bacteria respond to changing environments and play significant roles in modulating bacterial fitness in diverse niches. Recent studies have highlighted the potential of manipulating signal transduction systems as a means to chemically re-wire bacterial pathogens, thereby reducing selective pressure and avoiding the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review begins by providing a brief introduction to characterized infection strategies and common virulence factors among APEC, NMEC, and UPEC and continues with a comprehensive overview of two-component signal transduction networks that have been shown to influence ExPEC pathogenesis.

  9. An Overview of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems Implicated in Extra-Intestinal Pathogenic E. coli Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J. Breland

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC infections are common in mammals and birds. The predominant ExPEC types are avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, neonatal meningitis causing E. coli/meningitis associated E. coli (NMEC/MAEC, and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. Many reviews have described current knowledge on ExPEC infection strategies and virulence factors, especially for UPEC. However, surprisingly little has been reported on the regulatory modules that have been identified as critical in ExPEC pathogenesis. Two-component systems (TCSs comprise the predominant method by which bacteria respond to changing environments and play significant roles in modulating bacterial fitness in diverse niches. Recent studies have highlighted the potential of manipulating signal transduction systems as a means to chemically re-wire bacterial pathogens, thereby reducing selective pressure and avoiding the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review begins by providing a brief introduction to characterized infection strategies and common virulence factors among APEC, NMEC, and UPEC and continues with a comprehensive overview of two-component signal transduction networks that have been shown to influence ExPEC pathogenesis.

  10. An Overview of Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems Implicated in Extra-Intestinal Pathogenic E. coli Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breland, Erin J.; Eberly, Allison R.; Hadjifrangiskou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) infections are common in mammals and birds. The predominant ExPEC types are avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC), neonatal meningitis causing E. coli/meningitis associated E. coli (NMEC/MAEC), and uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). Many reviews have described current knowledge on ExPEC infection strategies and virulence factors, especially for UPEC. However, surprisingly little has been reported on the regulatory modules that have been identified as critical in ExPEC pathogenesis. Two-component systems (TCSs) comprise the predominant method by which bacteria respond to changing environments and play significant roles in modulating bacterial fitness in diverse niches. Recent studies have highlighted the potential of manipulating signal transduction systems as a means to chemically re-wire bacterial pathogens, thereby reducing selective pressure and avoiding the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review begins by providing a brief introduction to characterized infection strategies and common virulence factors among APEC, NMEC, and UPEC and continues with a comprehensive overview of two-component signal transduction networks that have been shown to influence ExPEC pathogenesis. PMID:28536675

  11. Transforming growth factor beta signal transduction: a potential target for maintenance/restoration of transparency of the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Shizuya; Yamanaka, Osamu; Sumioka, Takayoshi; Okada, Yuka; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Shirai, Kumi; Kitano, Ai; Tanaka, Sai-ichi

    2010-09-01

    Maintenance of the transparency and regular shape of the cornea are essential to the normal vision, whereas opacification of the tissue impairs vision. Fibrogenic reaction leading to scarring in an injured cornea is characterized by appearance of myofibroblasts, the key player of the fibrogenic reaction, and excess accumulation of fibrous extracellular matrix. Inflammatory/fibrogenic growth factors/cytokines produced by inflammatory cells play a pivotal role in fibrogenic response. Signaling systems involved in myofibroblast formation and fibrogenesis are activated by various growth factors, i.e., transforming growth factor beta or others. Modulation of transforming growth factor beta signal transduction molecules, e.g., Smad and mitogen-activated protein kinases, by gene transfer and other technology provides a new concept of prevention/treatment of unfavorable fibrogenesis in the cornea.

  12. Transcriptome Analysis Provides a Preliminary Regulation Route of the Ethylene Signal Transduction Component, SlEIN2, during Tomato Ripening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Heng Wang

    Full Text Available Ethylene is crucial in climacteric fruit ripening. The ethylene signal pathway regulates several physiological alterations such as softening, carotenoid accumulation and sugar level reduction, and production of volatile compounds. All these physiological processes are controlled by numerous genes and their expression simultaneously changes at the onset of ripening. Ethylene insensitive 2 (EIN2 is a key component for ethylene signal transduction, and its mutation causes ethylene insensitivity. In tomato, silencing SlEIN2 resulted in a non-ripening phenotype and low ethylene production. RNA sequencing of SlEIN2-silenced and wild type tomato, and differential gene expression analyses, indicated that silencing SlEIN2 caused changes in more than 4,000 genes, including those related to photosynthesis, defense, and secondary metabolism. The relative expression level of 28 genes covering ripening-associated transcription factors, ethylene biosynthesis, ethylene signal pathway, chlorophyll binding proteins, lycopene and aroma biosynthesis, and defense pathway, showed that SlEIN2 influences ripening inhibitor (RIN in a feedback loop, thus controlling the expression of several other genes. SlEIN2 regulates many aspects of fruit ripening, and is a key factor in the ethylene signal transduction pathway. Silencing SlEIN2 ultimately results in lycopene biosynthesis inhibition, which is the reason why tomato does not turn red, and this gene also affects the expression of several defense-associated genes. Although SlEIN2-silenced and green wild type fruits are similar in appearance, their metabolism is significantly different at the molecular level.

  13. Reciprocal bystander effect between α-irradiated macrophage and hepatocyte is mediated by cAMP through a membrane signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mingyuan [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130033 (China); Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Li, Jitao; Yuan, Dexiao; Bai, Yang [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • α-Irradiation induced reciprocal effects between macrophage and hepatocyte cells. • cAMP played a protective role in regulating the reverse bystander effect. • cAMP communication contributed to the reciprocal effects via membrane signaling. • p53 was required for cAMP-regulated bystander effect in the recipient cells. - Abstract: Irradiated cells can induce biological effects on vicinal non-irradiated bystander cells, meanwhile the bystander cells may rescue the irradiated cells through a feedback signal stress. To elucidate the nature of this reciprocal effect, we examined the interaction between α-irradiated human macrophage cells U937 and its bystander HL-7702 hepatocyte cells using a cell co-culture system. Results showed that after 6 h of cell co-culture, mitochondria depolarization corresponding to apoptosis was significantly induced in the HL-7702 cells, but the formation of micronuclei in the irradiated U937 cells was markedly decreased compared to that without cell co-culture treatment. This reciprocal effect was not observed when the cell membrane signaling pathway was blocked by filipin that inhibited cAMP transmission from bystander cells to irradiated cells. After treatment of cells with exogenous cAMP, forskolin (an activator of cAMP) or KH-7 (an inhibitor of cAMP), respectively, it was confirmed that cAMP communication from bystander cells to targeted cells could mitigate radiation damage in U739 cells, and this cAMP insufficiency in the bystander cells contributed to the enhancement of bystander apoptosis. Moreover, the bystander apoptosis in HL-7702 cells was aggravated by cAMP inhibition but it could not be evoked when p53 of HL-7702 cells was knocked down no matter of forskolin and KH-7 treatment. In conclusion, this study disclosed that cAMP could be released from bystander HL-7702 cells and compensated to α-irradiated U937 cells through a membrane signaling pathway and this cAMP communication played a profound role in

  14. Streptococcus pyogenes CAMP factor promotes bacterial adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial cells without serum via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Mie; Oda, Masataka; Domon, Hisanori; Isono, Toshihito; Nakamura, Yuki; Saitoh, Issei; Hayasaki, Haruaki; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada; Terao, Yutaka

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a bacterium that causes systemic diseases, such as pharyngitis and toxic shock syndrome, via oral- or nasal-cavity infection. S. pyogenes produces various molecules known to function with serum components that lead to bacterial adhesion and invasion in human tissues. In this study, we identified a novel S. pyogenes adhesin/invasin. Our results revealed that CAMP factor promoted streptococcal adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial Detroit562 cells without serum. Recombinant CAMP factor initially localized on the membranes of cells and then became internalized in the cytosol following S. pyogenes infection. Additionally, CAMP factor phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase and serine-threonine kinase in the cells. ELISA results demonstrate that CAMP factor affected the amount of phosphorylated phosphoinositide 3-kinase and serine-threonine kinase in Detroit562 cells. Furthermore, CAMP factor did not reverse the effect of phosphoinositide 3-kinase knockdown by small interfering RNA in reducing the level of adhesion and invasion of S. pyogenes isogenic cfa-deficient mutant. These results suggested that S. pyogenes CAMP factor activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/serine-threonine kinase signaling pathway, promoting S. pyogenes invasion of Detroit562 cells without serum. Our findings suggested that CAMP factor played an important role on adhesion and invasion in pharyngeal epithelial cells. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Three-dimensional culture and cAMP signaling promote the maturation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shinichiro; Surapisitchat, James; Virtanen, Carl; Ogawa, Mina; Niapour, Maryam; Sugamori, Kim S.; Wang, Shuang; Tamblyn, Laura; Guillemette, Chantal; Hoffmann, Ewa; Zhao, Bin; Strom, Stephen; Laposa, Rebecca R.; Tyndale, Rachel F.; Grant, Denis M.; Keller, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent a novel source of hepatocytes for drug metabolism studies and cell-based therapy for the treatment of liver diseases. These applications are, however, dependent on the ability to generate mature metabolically functional cells from the hPSCs. Reproducible and efficient generation of such cells has been challenging to date, owing to the fact that the regulatory pathways that control hepatocyte maturation are poorly understood. Here, we show that the combination of three-dimensional cell aggregation and cAMP signaling enhance the maturation of hPSC-derived hepatoblasts to a hepatocyte-like population that displays expression profiles and metabolic enzyme levels comparable to those of primary human hepatocytes. Importantly, we also demonstrate that generation of the hepatoblast population capable of responding to cAMP is dependent on appropriate activin/nodal signaling in the definitive endoderm at early stages of differentiation. Together, these findings provide new insights into the pathways that regulate maturation of hPSC-derived hepatocytes and in doing so provide a simple and reproducible approach for generating metabolically functional cell populations. PMID:23861064

  16. Signal transduction by HLA class II antigens expressed on activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L

    1991-01-01

    Human T cells express HLA class II antigens upon activation. Although activated, class II+ T cells can present alloantigens under certain circumstances, the functional role of class II antigens on activated T cells remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cross-linking of HLA-DR molecules...... after cross-linking CD4. Ligation of CD4 and class II molecules generated a synergistic effect of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration response that required an interaction between the molecules on the cell surface. Since class II is the natural ligand for CD4, the present data suggest that class...... expressed on allospecific, CD4+ T clones and cell lines can function as transduction elements that trigger rapid cellular responses including tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins and mobilization of Ca2+ from internal stores. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine were distinct from those observed...

  17. Insulin-like growth factor-I receptor signal transduction and the Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himpe, Eddy; Kooijman, Ron

    2009-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor IGF-I is an important fetal and postnatal growth factor, which is also involved in tissue homeostasis via regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and cell survival. To understand the role of IGF-I in the pathophysiology of a variety of disorders, including growth disorders, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, a detailed knowledge of IGF-I signal transduction is required. This knowledge may also contribute to the development of new therapies directed at the IGF-I receptor or other signaling molecules. In this review, we will address IGF-I receptor signaling through the JAK/STAT pathway in IGF-I signaling and the role of cytokine-induced inhibitors of signaling (CIS) and suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS). It appears that, in addition to the canonical IGF-I signaling pathways through extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)-Akt, IGF-I also signals through the JAK/STAT pathway. Activation of this pathway may lead to induction of SOCS molecules, well-known feedback inhibitors of the JAK/STAT pathway, which also suppress of IGF-I-induced JAK/STAT signaling. Furthermore, other IGF-I-induced signaling pathways may also be modulated by SOCS. It is conceivable that the effect of these classical inhibitors of cytokine signaling directly affect IGF-I receptor signaling, because they are able to associate to the intracellular part of the IGF-I receptor. These observations indicate that CIS and SOCS molecules are key to cross-talk between IGF-I receptor signaling and signaling through receptors belonging to the hematopoietic/cytokine receptor superfamily. Theoretically, dysregulation of CIS or SOCS may affect IGF-I-mediated effects on body growth, cell differentiation, proliferation, and cell survival. (c) 2009 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells from osteoporotic patients feature impaired signal transduction but sustained osteoinduction in response to BMP-2 stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prall, Wolf Christian; Haasters, Florian; Heggebö, Jostein; Polzer, Hans; Schwarz, Christina; Gassner, Christoph; Grote, Stefan; Anz, David; Jäger, Marcus; Mutschler, Wolf; Schieker, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    Osteoporotic fractures show reduced callus formation and delayed bone healing. Cellular sources of fracture healing are mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that differentiate into osteoblasts by stimulation with osteoinductive cytokines, such as BMP-2. We hypothesized that impaired signal transduction and reduced osteogenic differentiation capacity in response to BMP-2 may underlie the delayed fracture healing. Therefore, MSC were isolated from femoral heads of healthy and osteoporotic patients. Grouping was carried out by bone mineral densitometry in an age-matched manner. MSC were stimulated with BMP-2. Signal transduction was assessed by western blotting of pSMAD1/5/8 and pERK1/2 as well as by quantitative RT-PCR of Runx-2, Dlx5, and Osteocalcin. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by quantifying Alizarin Red staining. Osteoporotic MSC featured an accurate phosphorylation pattern of SMAD1/5/8 but a significantly reduced activation of ERK1/2 by BMP-2 stimulation. Furthermore, osteoporotic MSC showed significantly reduced basal expression levels of Runx-2 and Dlx5. However, Runx-2, Dlx5, and Osteocalcin expression showed adequate up-regulation due to BMP-2 stimulation. The global osteogenic differentiation in standard osteogenic differentiation media was reduced in osteoporotic MSC. Nevertheless, osteoporotic MSC were shown to feature an adequate induction of osteogenic differentiation due to BMP-2 stimulation. Taken together, we here demonstrate osteoporosis associated alterations in BMP-2 signaling but sustained specific osteogenic differentiation capacity in response to BMP-2. Therefore, BMP-2 may represent a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of fractures in osteoporotic patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlation of body mass index with Th1/Th2 balance, adhesion molecules and insulin signal transduction in infertile patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Juan Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of body mass index with Th1/Th2 balance, adhesion molecules and insulin signal transduction in infertile patients. Methods: A total of 132 patients who received diagnostic curettage due to infertility in Tangshan Maternal and Child Health Hospital between June 2015 and March 2016 were selected as the research subjects and divided into the normal group with BMI 30 kg/m 2 according to BMI, and the levels of Th1/ Th2 cytokines in serum as well as the expression of Th1/Th2 transcription factors, adhesion molecules and insulin signal pathway molecules in endometrial tissue were detected. Results: IFN-γ and TNF-α levels in serum of obesity group and overweight group were significantly higher than those of control group while IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels in serum as well as CD44V6, N-cadherin, FAK, ICAM-1, GLUT-4, IRS-1, PI3K and AKT mRNA expression in endometrial tissue were significantly lower than those of control group; IFN-γ and TNF-α levels in serum of obesity group were significantly higher than those of overweight group while IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 levels in serum as well as CD44V6, N-cadherin, FAK, ICAM-1, GLUT-4, IRS-1, PI3K and AKT mRNA expression in endometrial tissue were significantly lower than those of overweight group. Conclusion: Weight gain can aggravate the Th1/Th2 disorder, reduce the adhesion molecule expression and hinder the insulin signal transduction in infertile patients.

  20. Host-pathogen systems biology: logical modelling of hepatocyte growth factor and Helicobacter pylori induced c-Met signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kähne Thilo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF stimulates mitogenesis, motogenesis, and morphogenesis in a wide range of tissues, including epithelial cells, on binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met. Abnormal c-Met signalling contributes to tumour genesis, in particular to the development of invasive and metastatic phenotypes. The human microbial pathogen Helicobacter pylori can induce chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration and more rarely, gastric adenocarcinoma. The H. pylori effector protein cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA, which is translocated via a type IV secretion system (T4SS into epithelial cells, intracellularly modulates the c-Met receptor and promotes cellular processes leading to cell scattering, which could contribute to the invasiveness of tumour cells. Using a logical modelling framework, the presented work aims at analysing the c-Met signal transduction network and how it is interfered by H. pylori infection, which might be of importance for tumour development. Results A logical model of HGF and H. pylori induced c-Met signal transduction is presented in this work. The formalism of logical interaction hypergraphs (LIH was used to construct the network model. The molecular interactions included in the model were all assembled manually based on a careful meta-analysis of published experimental results. Our model reveals the differences and commonalities of the response of the network upon HGF and H. pylori induced c-Met signalling. As another important result, using the formalism of minimal intervention sets, phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1 was identified as knockout target for repressing the activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, a signalling molecule directly linked to cell scattering in H. pylori infected cells. The model predicted only an effect on ERK1/2 for the H. pylori stimulus, but not for HGF treatment. This result could be confirmed experimentally in MDCK cells using a specific

  1. The NO/cGMP pathway inhibits transient cAMP signals through the activation of PDE2 in striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina ePolito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The NO-cGMP signaling plays an important role in the regulation of striatal function although the mechanisms of action of cGMP specifically in medium spiny neurons (MSNs remain unclear. Using genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, including a novel Epac-based sensor (EPAC-SH150 with increased sensitivity for cAMP, we analyze the cGMP response to NO and whether it affected cAMP/PKA signaling in MSNs. The Cygnet2 sensor for cGMP reported large responses to NO donors in both striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, and this cGMP signal was controlled partially by PDE2. At the level of cAMP brief forskolin stimulations produced transient cAMP signals which differed between D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons. NO inhibited these cAMP transients through cGMP-dependent PDE2 activation, an effect that was translated and magnified downstream of cAMP, at the level of PKA. PDE2 thus appears as a critical effector of NO which modulates the post-synaptic response of MSNs to dopaminergic transmission.

  2. [Effect of JNK signal transduction pathway in intense noise-induced apoptosis of vestibular hair cells in guinea pigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ming; Wang, Wei-tao; Zhang, Tao; Tu, Ling; Liang, Ying-hong; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Jun-hua; Gong, Yan-jie

    2012-10-01

    To investigate the mechanism of intense noise-induced apoptosis of vestibular hair cells in guinea pigs and the effect of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway in intense noise-induced apoptosis of vestibular hair cells. Thirty-two guinea pigs were randomly and equally divided into 1, 5, and 15 d experimental groups and control group. The guinea pigs in the experimental groups were exposed to 4 kHz narrow-band noise at 120 dB SPL for 4 h and then subjected to measurement of auditory brainstem response at 1, 5, or 15 d after noise exposure. In each group, four guinea pigs were used to prepare paraffin sections of vestibular hair cells, and the rest for extraction of total protein from vestibular hair cells. The apoptosis of vestibular hair cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated d-UTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). The expression levels of p-JNK and pc-Jun were measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. TUNEL-positive cells were found in the vestibular hair cells in the experimental groups, most in the 1 d experimental group and least in the 15 d experimental group, but no positive cells were found in the control group. The immunohistochemical results showed that p-JNK and pc-Jun were detected in the cell nuclei in the experimental groups, but no p-JNK- and pc-Jun-positive cells were found in the control group. The Western blot showed that p-JNK and pc-Jun were increased and activated quickly at 1d after noise exposure, reached the peak levels at 5 d after noise exposure, and were then decreased gradually, but they were still at relatively high levels at 15 d after noise exposure. Intense noise can cause injury to vestibular hair cells by inducing cell apoptosis, and p-JNK marks the activation of JNK signal transduction pathway, suggesting that JNK signal transduction pathway plays an important role in intense noise-induced apoptosis of vestibular hair cells in guinea pigs.

  3. The Effect of Minimally Invasive Hematoma Aspiration on the JNK Signal Transduction Pathway after Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Pei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of minimally invasive hematoma aspiration (MIHA on the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK signal transduction pathway after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Methods: In this experiment, 300 adult male Wistar rats were randomly and averagely divided into sham-operated group, ICH group and MIHA group. In each group, 60 rats were used in the detection of indexes in this experiment, while the other 40 rats were used to replace rats which reached the exclusion criteria (accidental death or operation failure. In ICH group and MIHA group, ICH was induced by injection of 70 µL of autologous arterial blood into rat brain, while only the rats in MIHA group were treated by MIHA 6 h after ICH. Rats in sham-operated group were injected nothing into brains, and they were not treated either, like rats in ICH group. In each group, six rats were randomly selected to observe their Bederson’s scales persistently (6, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 h after ICH. According to the time they were sacrificed, the remaining rats in each group were divided into 3 subgroups (24, 72, 120 h. The change of brain water content (BWC was measured by the wet weight to dry weight ratio method. The morphology of neurons in cortex was observed by the hematoxylin–eosin (HE staining. The expressions of phospho-c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (pJNK and JNK in peri-hematomal brain tissue were determined by the immunohistochemistry (IHC and Western blotting (WB. Results: At all time points, compared with the ICH groups, the expression of pJNK decreased obviously in MIHA groups (p < 0.05, while their Bederson’s scales and BWC declined, and neuron injury in the cortex was relieved. The expression level of JNK was not altered at different groups. The data obtained by IHC and WB indicated a high-level of consistency, which provided a certain dependability of the test results. Conclusion: The JNK signal transduction pathway could be activated after intracerebral hemorrhage

  4. A novel "four-component" two-component signal transduction mechanism regulates developmental progression in Myxococcus xanthus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Sakthimala; Mann, Petra; Schink, Christian W; Higgs, Penelope I

    2009-08-07

    Histidine-aspartate phosphorelays are employed by two-component signal transduction family proteins to mediate responses to specific signals or stimuli in microorganisms and plants. The RedCDEF proteins constitute a novel signaling system in which four two-component proteins comprising a histidine kinase, a histidine-kinase like protein, and two response regulators function together to regulate progression through the elaborate developmental program of Myxococcus xanthus. A combination of in vivo phenotypic analyses of in-frame deletions and non-functional point mutations in each gene as well as in vitro autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer analyses of recombinant proteins indicate that the RedC histidine kinase protein autophosphorylates and donates a phosphoryl group to the single domain response regulator, RedF, to repress progression through the developmental program. To relieve this developmental repression, RedC instead phosphorylates RedD, a dual receiver response regulator protein. Surprisingly, RedD transfers the phosphoryl group to the histidine kinase-like protein RedE, which itself appears to be incapable of autophosphorylation. Phosphorylation of RedE may render RedE accessible to RedF, where it removes the phosphoryl group from RedF-P, which is otherwise an unusually stable phosphoprotein. These analyses reveal a novel "four-component" signaling mechanism that has probably arisen to temporally coordinate signals controlling the developmental program in M. xanthus. The RedCDEF signaling system provides an important example of how the inherent plasticity and modularity of the basic two-component signaling domains comprise a highly adaptable framework well suited to expansion into complex signaling mechanisms.

  5. A Novel “Four-component” Two-component Signal Transduction Mechanism Regulates Developmental Progression in Myxococcus xanthus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Sakthimala; Mann, Petra; Schink, Christian W.; Higgs, Penelope I.

    2009-01-01

    Histidine-aspartate phosphorelays are employed by two-component signal transduction family proteins to mediate responses to specific signals or stimuli in microorganisms and plants. The RedCDEF proteins constitute a novel signaling system in which four two-component proteins comprising a histidine kinase, a histidine-kinase like protein, and two response regulators function together to regulate progression through the elaborate developmental program of Myxococcus xanthus. A combination of in vivo phenotypic analyses of in-frame deletions and non-functional point mutations in each gene as well as in vitro autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer analyses of recombinant proteins indicate that the RedC histidine kinase protein autophosphorylates and donates a phosphoryl group to the single domain response regulator, RedF, to repress progression through the developmental program. To relieve this developmental repression, RedC instead phosphorylates RedD, a dual receiver response regulator protein. Surprisingly, RedD transfers the phosphoryl group to the histidine kinase-like protein RedE, which itself appears to be incapable of autophosphorylation. Phosphorylation of RedE may render RedE accessible to RedF, where it removes the phosphoryl group from RedF-P, which is otherwise an unusually stable phosphoprotein. These analyses reveal a novel “four-component” signaling mechanism that has probably arisen to temporally coordinate signals controlling the developmental program in M. xanthus. The RedCDEF signaling system provides an important example of how the inherent plasticity and modularity of the basic two-component signaling domains comprise a highly adaptable framework well suited to expansion into complex signaling mechanisms. PMID:19535336

  6. DDB2 modulates TGF-β signal transduction in human ovarian cancer cells by downregulating NEDD4L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Cui, Tiantian; Han, Chunhua; Zhang, Xiaoli; He, Jinshan; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Yu, Jianhua; Wani, Altaf A.; Wang, Qi-En

    2015-01-01

    The expression of DNA damage-binding protein 2 (DDB2) has been linked to the prognosis of ovarian cancer and its underlying transcription regulatory function was proposed to contribute to the favorable treatment outcome. By applying gene microarray analysis, we discovered neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 4-Like (NEDD4L) as a previously unidentified downstream gene regulated by DDB2. Mechanistic investigation demonstrated that DDB2 can bind to the promoter region of NEDD4L and recruit enhancer of zeste homolog 2 histone methyltransferase to repress NEDD4L transcription by enhancing histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) at the NEDD4L promoter. Given that NEDD4L plays an important role in constraining transforming growth factor β signaling by targeting activated Smad2/Smad3 for degradation, we investigated the role of DDB2 in the regulation of TGF-β signaling in ovarian cancer cells. Our data indicate that DDB2 enhances TGF-β signal transduction and increases the responsiveness of ovarian cancer cells to TGF-β-induced growth inhibition. The study has uncovered an unappreciated regulatory mode that hinges on the interaction between DDB2 and NEDD4L in human ovarian cancer cells. The novel mechanism proposes the DDB2-mediated fine-tuning of TGF-β signaling and its downstream effects that impinge upon tumor growth in ovarian cancers. PMID:26130719

  7. Peroxisomes in human health and disease: metabolic pathways, metabolite transport, interplay with other organelles and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, Ronald J A

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes play a key role in human physiology as exemplified by the devastating consequences of a defect in peroxisome biogenesis as observed in patients affected by Zellweger syndrome. The main metabolic functions of peroxisomes in humans include: (1) fatty acid beta-oxidation; (2) etherphospholipid synthesis; (3) bile acid synthesis; (4) fatty acid alpha-oxidation, and (5) glyoxylate detoxification. Since peroxisomes lack a citric acid cycle and respiratory chain like mitochondria do, metabolism in peroxisomes requires continued cross-talk with other organelles, notably mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum in order to allow continued metabolism of the products generated by peroxisomes. Many of the metabolites which require peroxisomes for homeostasis, are involved in signal transduction pathways. These include the primary bile acids; platelet activating factor; plasmalogens, N-acylglycines and N-acyltaurines; docosahexaenoic acid as well as multiple prostanoids. The current state of knowledge in this area will be discussed in this review.

  8. Differences in two-component signal transduction proteins among the genus Brucella: implications for host preference and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binnewies, Tim Terence; Ussery, David; Lavín, JL

    2010-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. Species of the genus Brucella are genetically highly related and differ mainly in mammalian host adaptation and pathogenesis. In this study, TCS proteins encoded in the available genome sequences of Brucella...... species have been identified using bioinformatic methods. All the Brucella species share an identical set of TCS proteins, and the number of TCS proteins in the closely related opportunistic human pathogen Ochrobactrum anthropi was higher than in Brucella species as expected from its lifestyle. O....... anthropi lacks orthologs of the Brucella TCSs NodVW, TceSR and TcfSR, suggesting that these TCS proteins could be necessary for the adaptation of Brucella as an intracellular pathogen. This genomic analysis revealed the presence of a differential distribution of TCS pseudogenes among Brucella species...

  9. Geometric analysis of Arabidopsis root apex reveals a new aspect of the ethylene signal transduction pathway in development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Emilio; Tocino, Angel

    2005-01-01

    Structurally, ethylene is the simplest phytohormone and regulates multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Its effects are mediated by a signal transduction cascade involving receptors, MAP kinases and transcription factors. Many morphological effects of ethylene in plant development, including root size, have been previously described. In this article a combined geometric and algebraic approach has been used to analyse the shape and the curvature in the root apex of Arabidopsis seedlings. The process requires the fitting of Bezier curves that reproduce the root apex shape, and the calculation of the corresponding curvatures. The application of the method has allowed us to identify significant differences in the root curvatures of ethylene insensitive mutants (ein2-1 and etr1-1) with respect to the wild-type Columbia.

  10. RIP4 is a target of multiple signal transduction pathways in keratinocytes: Implications for epidermal differentiation and cutaneous wound repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Stephanie [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Institute of Physiology, Arnimallee 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Munz, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.munz@charite.de [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Institute of Physiology, Arnimallee 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    Receptor interacting protein 4 (RIP4) is an important regulator of epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic development. We could previously show that expression of the rip4 gene is strongly downregulated in cutaneous wound repair, which might be initiated by a broad variety of growth factors and cytokines. Here, we demonstrate that in keratinocytes, rip4 expression is controlled by a multitude of different signal transduction pathways, such as the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) cascade, in a unique and specific manner. Furthermore, we show that the steroid dexamethasone abolishes the physiological rip4 downregulation after injury and might thus contribute to the phenotype of reduced and delayed wound reepithelialization seen in glucocorticoid-treated patients. As a whole, our data indicate that rip4 expression is regulated in a complex manner, which might have therapeutic implications.

  11. Two-component signal transduction system SaeRS is involved in competence and penicillin susceptibility in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qiang; Ma, Yuanfang; Qu, Di

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, the S. epidermidis SaeRS was identified to negatively regulate the expression of genes involved in competence (comF, murF), cytolysis (lrgA), and autolysis (lytS) by DNA microarray or real-time RT-PCR analysis. In addition, saeRS mutant showed increased competence and higher susceptibility to antibiotics such as penicillin and oxacillin than the wild-type strain. The study will be helpful for understanding the characterization of the SaeRS in S. epidermidis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. [Study of the effect of JNK signal transduction pathway in intense noise-induced apoptosis in cochlea of guinea pig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiuhong; Chen, Jia; Gong, Shusheng; Xie, Jing; He, Jian; Chen, Xiaolin

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the mechanism of intense noise-induced cochlea cells death in guinea pig, and the effect of JNK signal transduction pathway in the procedure of cochlea cells apoptosis by intense noise-induced. Thirty-two guinea pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups. The guinea pigs in the experiment groups were exposed to 4 kHz narrow band noise at 120 dB SPL for 4 h. After the noise expose for 1, 4, 14 days of the experiment guinea pigs, ABR of the guinea pigs on experiment and control groups were tested before put them to death. Four guinea pig's cochleas of every group were taken to paraffin section, and the rest was extracted the total cochlear's protein. Apoptosis was tested by terminal deoxynucleotidyl Transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (d-UTP) nick and labeling method (TUNEL). The phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun were tested by immunohistochemistry and western blot methods. Tunel-Positive cells in the Corti's, SGC and SV of experiment groups, and there have significant differences compared with the control group (Pnoise exposed, but no positive cells were found in the control. Protein levels of P-JNK and P-c-Jun were risen up and activated quickly after noise exposed, and achieved peak in 1 d, 4 d and then fallen-offs, but still maintained higher levels within 14 d. Intense noise causes cochlea cell lesion by inducing apoptosis to result in and JNK signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the procedure of apoptosis.

  13. A novel signal transduction protein: Combination of solute binding and tandem PAS-like sensor domains in one polypeptide chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R; Wilton, R; Cuff, M E; Endres, M; Babnigg, G; Edirisinghe, J N; Henry, C S; Joachimiak, A; Schiffer, M; Pokkuluri, P R

    2017-04-01

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of a novel periplasmic ligand-binding protein, Dret_0059, from Desulfohalobium retbaense DSM 5692, an organism isolated from Lake Retba, in Senegal. The structure of the protein consists of a unique combination of a periplasmic solute binding protein (SBP) domain at the N-terminal and a tandem PAS-like sensor domain at the C-terminal region. SBP domains are found ubiquitously, and their best known function is in solute transport across membranes. PAS-like sensor domains are commonly found in signal transduction proteins. These domains are widely observed as parts of many protein architectures and complexes but have not been observed previously within the same polypeptide chain. In the structure of Dret_0059, a ketoleucine moiety is bound to the SBP, whereas a cytosine molecule is bound in the distal PAS-like domain of the tandem PAS-like domain. Differential scanning flourimetry support the binding of ligands observed in the crystal structure. There is significant interaction between the SBP and tandem PAS-like domains, and it is possible that the binding of one ligand could have an effect on the binding of the other. We uncovered three other proteins with this structural architecture in the non-redundant sequence data base, and predict that they too bind the same substrates. The genomic context of this protein did not offer any clues for its function. We did not find any biological process in which the two observed ligands are coupled. The protein Dret_0059 could be involved in either signal transduction or solute transport. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. HRGRN: A Graph Search-Empowered Integrative Database of Arabidopsis Signaling Transduction, Metabolism and Gene Regulation Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinbin; Li, Jun; Liu, Tingsong; Zhao, Patrick Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The biological networks controlling plant signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulation are composed of not only tens of thousands of genes, compounds, proteins and RNAs but also the complicated interactions and co-ordination among them. These networks play critical roles in many fundamental mechanisms, such as plant growth, development and environmental response. Although much is known about these complex interactions, the knowledge and data are currently scattered throughout the published literature, publicly available high-throughput data sets and third-party databases. Many 'unknown' yet important interactions among genes need to be mined and established through extensive computational analysis. However, exploring these complex biological interactions at the network level from existing heterogeneous resources remains challenging and time-consuming for biologists. Here, we introduce HRGRN, a graph search-empowered integrative database of Arabidopsis signal transduction, metabolism and gene regulatory networks. HRGRN utilizes Neo4j, which is a highly scalable graph database management system, to host large-scale biological interactions among genes, proteins, compounds and small RNAs that were either validated experimentally or predicted computationally. The associated biological pathway information was also specially marked for the interactions that are involved in the pathway to facilitate the investigation of cross-talk between pathways. Furthermore, HRGRN integrates a series of graph path search algorithms to discover novel relationships among genes, compounds, RNAs and even pathways from heterogeneous biological interaction data that could be missed by traditional SQL database search methods. Users can also build subnetworks based on known interactions. The outcomes are visualized with rich text, figures and interactive network graphs on web pages. The HRGRN database is freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/hrgrn/. © The Author 2015. Published

  15. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  16. Dissecting blue light signal transduction pathway in leaf epidermis using a pharmacological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivanovic, Branka D.; Shabala, Lana I.; Elzenga, Theo J. M.; Shabala, Sergey N.

    2015-01-01

    Blue light signalling pathway in broad bean leaf epidermal cells includes key membrane transporters: plasma- and endomembrane channels and pumps of H (+) , Ca (2+) and K (+) ions, and plasma membrane redox system. Blue light signalling pathway in epidermal tissue isolated from the abaxial side of

  17. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David I; Griendling, Kathy K

    2015-01-30

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by ROS are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here, we review the current literature on ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by hRheb(S16H transduction of dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Hoon Jeong

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is one of representative neurotrophic factors for the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Its effects are primarily mediated via CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα. It is still unclear whether the levels of CNTFRα change in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD patients, but CNTF expression shows the remarkable decrease in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc, suggesting that the support of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway may be a useful neuroprotective strategy for the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection in the adult brain. Here, we report that transduction of rat SNpc dopaminergic neurons by adeno-associated virus with a gene encoding human ras homolog enriched in brain (hRheb, with an S16H mutation [hRheb(S16H], significantly upregulated the levels of both CNTF and CNTFRα in dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, the hRheb(S16H-activated CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway was protective against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neurotoxicity in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projections. These results suggest that activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by specific gene delivery such as hRheb(S16H may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of PD.

  19. Activation of CNTF/CNTFRα Signaling Pathway by hRheb(S16H) Transduction of Dopaminergic Neurons In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Nam, Jin Han; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of representative neurotrophic factors for the survival of dopaminergic neurons. Its effects are primarily mediated via CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα). It is still unclear whether the levels of CNTFRα change in the substantia nigra of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients, but CNTF expression shows the remarkable decrease in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), suggesting that the support of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway may be a useful neuroprotective strategy for the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projection in the adult brain. Here, we report that transduction of rat SNpc dopaminergic neurons by adeno-associated virus with a gene encoding human ras homolog enriched in brain (hRheb), with an S16H mutation [hRheb(S16H)], significantly upregulated the levels of both CNTF and CNTFRα in dopaminergic neurons. Moreover, the hRheb(S16H)-activated CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway was protective against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neurotoxicity in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic projections. These results suggest that activation of CNTF/CNTFRα signaling pathway by specific gene delivery such as hRheb(S16H) may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of PD. PMID:25799580

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-03

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS.

  1. Esterase D enhances type I interferon signal transduction to suppress foot-and-mouth disease virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Zixiang; Cao, Weijun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Xiangle; Li, Dan; Zhang, Keshan; Li, Pengfei; Mao, Ruoqing; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2016-07-01

    The enzymatic activities of esterase D (ESD) are involved in many human diseases. However, no antiviral property of ESD has been described to date. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the etiological agent of foot-and-mouth disease. In this study, we showed that FMDV infection triggered ESD expression. Overexpression of ESD significantly suppressed FMDV replication and knockdown of ESD expression enhanced virus replication, showing an essential antiviral role of ESD. Furthermore, we found that Sendai-virus-induced interferon (IFN) signaling was enhanced by upregulation of ESD, and ESD promoted activation of the IFN-β promoter simulated by IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 or its upstream molecules (retinoic acid-inducible gene-I, melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5, virus-induced signaling adaptor and TANK binding kinase 1). Detailed analysis revealed that ESD protein enhanced IRF3 phosphorylation during FMDV infection. Overexpression of ESD also promoted the expression of various antiviral interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and knockdown of ESD impaired the expression of these antiviral genes during FMDV infection. Our findings demonstrate a new mechanism evolved by ESD to enhance type I IFN signal transduction and suppress viral replication during FMDV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Group VII Ethylene Response Factors Coordinate Oxygen and Nitric Oxide Signal Transduction and Stress Responses in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Daniel J; Conde, Jorge Vicente; Berckhan, Sophie; Prasad, Geeta; Mendiondo, Guillermina M; Holdsworth, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    The group VII ethylene response factors (ERFVIIs) are plant-specific transcription factors that have emerged as important regulators of abiotic and biotic stress responses, in particular, low-oxygen stress. A defining feature of ERFVIIs is their conserved N-terminal domain, which renders them oxygen- and nitric oxide (NO)-dependent substrates of the N-end rule pathway of targeted proteolysis. In the presence of these gases, ERFVIIs are destabilized, whereas an absence of either permits their accumulation; ERFVIIs therefore coordinate plant homeostatic responses to oxygen availability and control a wide range of NO-mediated processes. ERFVIIs have a variety of context-specific protein and gene interaction partners, and also modulate gibberellin and abscisic acid signaling to regulate diverse developmental processes and stress responses. This update discusses recent advances in our understanding of ERFVII regulation and function, highlighting their role as central regulators of gaseous signal transduction at the interface of ethylene, oxygen, and NO signaling. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Cadmium Induces Apoptosis in Freshwater Crab Sinopotamon henanense through Activating Calcium Signal Transduction Pathway: e0144392

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jinxiang Wang; Pingping Zhang; Na Liu; Qian Wang; Jixian Luo; Lan Wang

    2015-01-01

      Calcium ion (Ca2+) is one of the key intracellular signals, which is implicated in the regulation of cell functions such as impregnation, cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Cadmium (Cd...

  4. Signal transduction pathway(s) in guard cells after prolonged exposure to low vapour pressure deficit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Niaei Fard, S.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: Abscisic acid, Arabidopsis thaliana, calcium, CYP707As, desiccation, environmental factors, guard cells’ signalling pathway, hydrogen peroxide, natural variation, nitric oxide, photosystem II efficiency, RD29A, relative water content, secondary messengers, stomata, vapour pressure

  5. Noninvasive imaging of receptor function: signal transduction pathways and physiological readouts

    OpenAIRE

    Rudin, M

    2008-01-01

    Intracellular signaling describes the process of information propagation from the cell surface to the location within the cell where a biological response is executed. Signaling pathways involve a complex network of interacting molecular species. It is obvious that information on the activation of individual pathways is highly relevant in biomedical research, both from a diagnostic point of view and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. Modern molecular imaging approaches are capable of p...

  6. Local inhibition and long-range enhancement of Dpp signal transduction by Sog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashe, H L; Levine, M

    1999-04-01

    Extracellular gradients of signalling molecules can specify different thresholds of gene activity in development. A gradient of Decapentaplegic (Dpp) activity subdivides the dorsal ectoderm of the Drosophila embryo into amnioserosa and dorsal epidermis. The proteins Short gastrulation (Sog) and Tolloid (Tld) are required to shape this gradient. Sog has been proposed to form an inhibitory complex with either Dpp or the related ligand Screw, and is subsequently processed by the protease Tld. Paradoxically, Sog appears to be required for amnioserosa formation, which is specified by peak Dpp signalling activity. Here we show that the misexpression of sog using the even-skipped stripe-2 enhancer redistributes Dpp signalling in a mutant background in which dpp is expressed throughout the embryo. Dpp activity is diminished near the Sog stripe and peak Dpp signalling is detected far from this stripe. However, a tethered form of Sog suppresses local Dpp activity without augmenting Dpp activity at a distance, indicating that diffusion of Sog may be required for enhanced Dpp activity and consequent amnioserosa formation. The long-distance stimulation of Dpp activity by Sog requires Tld, whereas Sog-mediated inhibition of Dpp does not. The heterologous Dpp inhibitor Noggin inhibits Dpp signalling but fails to augment Dpp activity. These results suggest an unusual strategy for generating a gradient threshold of growth-factor activity, whereby Sog and its protease specify peak Dpp signalling far from a localized source of Sog.

  7. Chloroplast His-to-Asp signal transduction: a potential mechanism for plastid gene regulation in Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Michael A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance of homeostasis requires that an organism perceive selected physical and chemical signals within an informationally dense environment. Functionally, an organism uses a variety of signal transduction arrays to amplify and convert these perceived signals into appropriate gene transcriptional responses. These changes in gene expression serve to modify selective metabolic processes and thus optimize reproductive success. Here we analyze a chloroplast-encoded His-to-Asp signal transduction circuit in the stramenopile Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada Hada ex Y. Hara et Chihara [syn. H. carterae (Hulburt F.J.R. Taylor]. The presence, structure and putative function of this protein pair are discussed in the context of their evolutionary homologues. Results Bioinformatic analysis of the Heterosigma akashiwo chloroplast genome sequence revealed the presence of a single two-component His-to-Asp (designated Tsg1/Trg1 pair in this stramenopile (golden-brown alga. These data represent the first documentation of a His-to-Asp array in stramenopiles and counter previous reports suggesting that such regulatory proteins are lacking in this taxonomic cluster. Comparison of the 43 kDa H. akashiwo Tsg1 with bacterial sensor kinases showed that the algal protein exhibits a moderately maintained PAS motif in the sensor kinase domain as well as highly conserved H, N, G1 and F motifs within the histidine kinase ATP binding site. Molecular modelling of the 27 kDa H. akashiwo Trg1 regulator protein was consistent with a winged helix-turn-helix identity – a class of proteins that is known to impact gene expression at the level of transcription. The occurrence of Trg1 protein in actively growing H. akashiwo cells was verified by Western analysis. The presence of a PhoB-like RNA polymerase loop in Trg1 and its homologues in the red-algal lineage support the hypothesis that Trg1 and its homologues interact with a sigma 70 (σ70 subunit (encoded by

  8. Prostaglandin E2 Inhibits Histamine-Evoked Ca2+ Release in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells through Hyperactive cAMP Signaling Junctions and Protein Kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Emily J A; Pantazaka, Evangelia; Shelley, Kathryn L; Taylor, Colin W

    2017-11-01

    In human aortic smooth muscle cells, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulates adenylyl cyclase (AC) and attenuates the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration evoked by activation of histamine H1 receptors. The mechanisms are not resolved. We show that cAMP mediates inhibition of histamine-evoked Ca2+ signals by PGE2 Exchange proteins activated by cAMP were not required, but the effects were attenuated by inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). PGE2 had no effect on the Ca2+ signals evoked by protease-activated receptors, heterologously expressed muscarinic M3 receptors, or by direct activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors by photolysis of caged IP3 The rate of Ca2+ removal from the cytosol was unaffected by PGE2, but PGE2 attenuated histamine-evoked IP3 accumulation. Substantial inhibition of AC had no effect on the concentration-dependent inhibition of Ca2+ signals by PGE2 or butaprost (to activate EP2 receptors selectively), but it modestly attenuated responses to EP4 receptors, activation of which generated less cAMP than EP2 receptors. We conclude that inhibition of histamine-evoked Ca2+ signals by PGE2 occurs through "hyperactive signaling junctions," wherein cAMP is locally delivered to PKA at supersaturating concentrations to cause uncoupling of H1 receptors from phospholipase C. This sequence allows digital signaling from PGE2 receptors, through cAMP and PKA, to histamine-evoked Ca2+ signals. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  9. Comprehensive logic based analyses of Toll-like receptor 4 signal transduction pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kumar Padwal

    Full Text Available Among the 13 TLRs in the vertebrate systems, only TLR4 utilizes both Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR-domain-containing adapter interferon-β-inducing Factor (TRIF adaptors to transduce signals triggering host-protective immune responses. Earlier studies on the pathway combined various experimental data in the form of one comprehensive map of TLR signaling. But in the absence of adequate kinetic parameters quantitative mathematical models that reveal emerging systems level properties and dynamic inter-regulation among the kinases/phosphatases of the TLR4 network are not yet available. So, here we used reaction stoichiometry-based and parameter independent logical modeling formalism to build the TLR4 signaling network model that captured the feedback regulations, interdependencies between signaling kinases and phosphatases and the outcome of simulated infections. The analyses of the TLR4 signaling network revealed 360 feedback loops, 157 negative and 203 positive; of which, 334 loops had the phosphatase PP1 as an essential component. The network elements' interdependency (positive or negative dependencies in perturbation conditions such as the phosphatase knockout conditions revealed interdependencies between the dual-specific phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 and the kinases in MAPK modules and the role of PP2A in the auto-regulation of Calmodulin kinase-II. Our simulations under the specific kinase or phosphatase gene-deficiency or inhibition conditions corroborated with several previously reported experimental data. The simulations to mimic Yersinia pestis and E. coli infections identified the key perturbation in the network and potential drug targets. Thus, our analyses of TLR4 signaling highlights the role of phosphatases as key regulatory factors in determining the global interdependencies among the network elements; uncovers novel signaling connections; identifies potential drug targets for

  10. Oxidative post-translational modifications of cysteine residues in plant signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszczak, Cezary; Akter, Salma; Jacques, Silke; Huang, Jingjing; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2015-05-01

    In plants, fluctuation of the redox balance by altered levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect many aspects of cellular physiology. ROS homeostasis is governed by a diversified set of antioxidant systems. Perturbation of this homeostasis leads to transient or permanent changes in the redox status and is exploited by plants in different stress signalling mechanisms. Understanding how plants sense ROS and transduce these stimuli into downstream biological responses is still a major challenge. ROS can provoke reversible and irreversible modifications to proteins that act in diverse signalling pathways. These oxidative post-translational modifications (Ox-PTMs) lead to oxidative damage and/or trigger structural alterations in these target proteins. Characterization of the effect of individual Ox-PTMs on individual proteins is the key to a better understanding of how cells interpret the oxidative signals that arise from developmental cues and stress conditions. This review focuses on ROS-mediated Ox-PTMs on cysteine (Cys) residues. The Cys side chain, with its high nucleophilic capacity, appears to be the principle target of ROS. Ox-PTMs on Cys residues participate in various signalling cascades initiated by plant stress hormones. We review the mechanistic aspects and functional consequences of Cys Ox-PTMs on specific target proteins in view of stress signalling events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in the anterior pituitary gland in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-08-16

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was the first among the so-called "second messengers" to be described. It is conserved in most organisms and functions as a signal transducer by mediating the intracellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters. In this review, we first delineate how different members of the cAMP pathway ensure its correct compartmentalization and activity, mediate the terminal intracellular effects, and allow the crosstalk with other signaling pathways. We then focus on the pituitary gland, where cAMP exerts a crucial function by controlling the responsiveness of the cells to hypothalamic hormones, neurotransmitters and peripheral factors. We discuss the most relevant physiological functions mediated by cAMP in the different pituitary cell types, and summarize the defects affecting this pathway that have been reported in the literature. We finally discuss how a deregulated cAMP pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders and how it affects the response to therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Novel mechanisms and signaling pathways of esophageal ulcer healing: the role of prostaglandin EP2 receptors, cAMP, and pCREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Baatar, Dolgor; Jones, Michael K; Tarnawski, Andrzej S

    2014-09-15

    Clinical studies indicate that prostaglandins of E class (PGEs) may promote healing of tissue injury e.g., gastroduodenal and dermal ulcers. However, the precise roles of PGEs, their E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, signaling pathways including cAMP and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and their relation to VEGF and angiogenesis in the tissue injury healing process remain unknown, forming the rationale for this study. Using an esophageal ulcer model in rats, we demonstrated that esophageal mucosa expresses predominantly EP2 receptors and that esophageal ulceration triggers an increase in expression of the EP2 receptor, activation of CREB (the downstream target of the cAMP signaling), and enhanced VEGF gene expression. Treatment of rats with misoprostol, a PGE1 analog capable of activating EP receptors, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB, stimulated VEGF expression and angiogenesis, and accelerated esophageal ulcer healing. In cultured human esophageal epithelial (HET-1A) cells, misoprostol increased intracellular cAMP levels (by 163-fold), induced phosphorylation of CREB, and stimulated VEGF expression. A cAMP analog (Sp-cAMP) mimicked, whereas an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (Rp-cAMP) blocked, these effects of misoprostol. These results indicate that the EP2/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway mediates the stimulatory effect of PGEs on angiogenesis essential for tissue injury healing via the induction of CREB activity and VEGF expression.

  13. Signal Transduction of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate G Protein—Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Young

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive lipid capable of eliciting dramatic effects in a variety of cell types. Signaling by this molecule is by a family of five G protein—coupled receptors named S1P1–5 that signal through a variety of pathways to regulate cell proliferation, migration, cytoskeletal organization, and differentiation. These receptors are expressed in a wide variety of tissues and cell types, and their cellular effects contribute to important biological and pathological functions of S1P in many processes, including angiogenesis, vascular development, lymphocyte trafficking, and cancer. This review will focus on the current progress in the field of S1P receptor signaling and biology.

  14. Signal transduction downstream of salicylic and jasmonic acid in herbivory-induced parasitoid attraction by Arabidopsis is independent of JAR1 and NPR1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poecke, van R.M.P.; Dicke, M.

    2003-01-01

    Plants can defend themselves indirectly against herbivores by emitting a volatile blend upon herbivory that attracts the natural enemies of these herbivores, either predators or parasitoids. Although signal transduction in plants from herbivory to induced volatile production depends on jasmonic acid

  15. Expansion of Signal Transduction Pathways in Fungi by Extensive Genome Duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corrochano, Luis M; Kuo, Alan; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Polaino, Silvia; Salamov, Asaf; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M; Grimwood, Jane; Álvarez, M Isabel; Avalos, Javier; Bauer, Diane; Benito, Ernesto P; Benoit, Isabelle|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314410023; Burger, Gertraud; Camino, Lola P; Cánovas, David; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Domínguez, Angel; Eliáš, Marek; Eslava, Arturo P; Glaser, Fabian; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Heitman, Joseph; Henrissat, Bernard; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Lang, B Franz; Lavín, José L; Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Wenjun; Lindquist, Erika; López-García, Sergio; Luque, Eva M; Marcos, Ana T; Martin, Joel; McCluskey, Kevin; Medina, Humberto R; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Muñoz-Torres, Elisa; Oguiza, José A; Ohm, Robin A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837628; Olmedo, María; Orejas, Margarita; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa; Sanz, Catalina; Schackwitz, Wendy; Shahriari, Mahdi; Shelest, Ekaterina; Silva-Franco, Fátima; Soanes, Darren; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tagua, Víctor G; Talbot, Nicholas J; Thon, Michael R; Tice, Hope; de Vries, Ronald P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186324960; Wiebenga, Ad|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314110763; Yadav, Jagjit S; Braun, Edward L; Baker, Scott E; Garre, Victoriano; Schmutz, Jeremy; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Idnurm, Alexander; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Gabaldón, Toni; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2016-01-01

    Plants and fungi use light and other signals to regulate development, growth, and metabolism. The fruiting bodies of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus are single cells that react to environmental cues, including light, but the mechanisms are largely unknown [1]. The related fungus Mucor

  16. Jasmonates: signal transduction components and their roles in environmental stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Jonas; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Schweizer, Fabian; Goossens, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Jasmonates, oxylipin-type plant hormones, are implicated in diverse aspects of plant growth development and interaction with the environment. Following diverse developmental and environmental cues, jasmonate is produced, conjugated to the amino acid isoleucine and perceived by a co-receptor complex composed of the Jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) repressor proteins and an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex containing the F-box CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1). This event triggers the degradation of the JAZ proteins and the release of numerous transcription factors, including MYC2 and its homologues, which are otherwise bound and inhibited by the JAZ repressors. Here, we will review the role of the COI1, JAZ and MYC2 proteins in the interaction of the plant with its environment, illustrating the significance of jasmonate signalling, and of the proteins involved, for responses to both biotic stresses caused by insects and numerous microbial pathogens and abiotic stresses caused by adverse climatic conditions. It has also become evident that crosstalk with other hormone signals, as well as light and clock signals, plays an important role in the control and fine-tuning of these stress responses. Finally, we will discuss how several pathogens exploit the jasmonate perception and early signalling machinery to decoy the plants defence systems.

  17. Signal transduction pathways in the pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mowrey

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of allosteric action within pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs remain to be determined. Using crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, and two-electrode voltage clamp measurements, we identified two functionally relevant sites in the extracellular (EC domain of the bacterial pLGIC from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC. One site is at the C-loop region, where the NQN mutation (D91N, E177Q, and D178N eliminated inter-subunit salt bridges in the open-channel GLIC structure and thereby shifted the channel activation to a higher agonist concentration. The other site is below the C-loop, where binding of the anesthetic ketamine inhibited GLIC currents in a concentration dependent manner. To understand how a perturbation signal in the EC domain, either resulting from the NQN mutation or ketamine binding, is transduced to the channel gate, we have used the Perturbation-based Markovian Transmission (PMT model to determine dynamic responses of the GLIC channel and signaling pathways upon initial perturbations in the EC domain of GLIC. Despite the existence of many possible routes for the initial perturbation signal to reach the channel gate, the PMT model in combination with Yen's algorithm revealed that perturbation signals with the highest probability flow travel either via the β1-β2 loop or through pre-TM1. The β1-β2 loop occurs in either intra- or inter-subunit pathways, while pre-TM1 occurs exclusively in inter-subunit pathways. Residues involved in both types of pathways are well supported by previous experimental data on nAChR. The direct coupling between pre-TM1 and TM2 of the adjacent subunit adds new insight into the allosteric signaling mechanism in pLGICs.

  18. Immune signal transduction in leishmaniasis from natural to artificial systems: role of feedback loop insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Milsee; Patole, Milind S; Singh, Shailza

    2014-01-01

    Modulated immune signal (CD14-TLR and TNF) in leishmaniasis can be linked to EGFR pathway involved in wound healing, through crosstalk points. This signaling network can be further linked to a synthetic gene circuit acting as a positive feedback loop to elicit a synchronized intercellular communication among the immune cells which may contribute to a better understanding of signaling dynamics in leishmaniasis. Network reconstruction with positive feedback loop, simulation (ODE 15s solver) and sensitivity analysis of CD14-TLR, TNF and EGFR was done in SimBiology (MATLAB 7.11.1). Cytoscape and adjacency matrix were used to calculate network topology. PCA was extracted by using sensitivity coefficient in MATLAB. Model reduction was done using time, flux and sensitivity score. Network has five crosstalk points: NIK, IκB-NFκB and MKK (4/7, 3/6, 1/2) which show high flux and sensitivity. PI3K in EGFR pathway shows high flux and sensitivity. PCA score was high for cytoplasmic ERK1/2, PI3K, Atk, STAT1/3 and nuclear JNK. Of the 125 parameters, 20% are crucial as deduced by model reduction. EGFR can be linked to CD14-TLR and TNF through the MAPK crosstalk points. These pathways may be controlled through Ras and Raf that lie upstream of signaling components ERK ½ (c) and JNK (n) that have a high PCA score via a synthetic gene circuit for activating cell-cell communication to elicit an inflammatory response. Also a disease resolving effect may be achieved through PI3K in the EGFR pathway. The reconstructed signaling network can be linked to a gene circuit with a positive feedback loop, for cell-cell communication resulting in synchronized response in the immune cell population, for disease resolving effect in leishmaniasis. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Paula; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity towards H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underline the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  20. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits extracellular IFN-α-mediated signal transduction by downregulation of type I IFN receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Il-Rae; Oh, Myungju; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Jhun, Byung Hak; Pellegrini, Sandra; Fuchs, Serge Y; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-04-01

    We have previously shown that hepatitis B virus (HBV) protein X (HBX), a regulatory protein of HBV, activates Stat1, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. Type I IFN secreted from HBX-expressing hepatic cells enforces antiviral signals through its binding to the cognate type I IFN receptor. We therefore investigated how cells handle this detrimental situation. Interestingly, compared to Chang cells stably expressing an empty vector (Chang-Vec), Chang cells stably expressing HBX (Chang-HBX) showed lower levels of IFN-α receptor 1 (IFNAR1) protein, a subunit of type I IFN receptor. The levels of IFNAR1 transcripts detected in Chang-HBX cells were lower than the levels in Chang-Vec cells, indicating that HBX regulates IFNAR1 at the transcriptional level. Moreover, we observed that HBX induced the translocation of IFNAR1 to the cytoplasm. Consistent with these observations, HBX also downregulated Tyk2, which is required for the stable expression of IFNAR1 on the cell surface. Eventually, Chang-HBX cells consistently maintained a lower level of IFNAR1 expression and displayed no proper response to IFN-α, while Chang-Vec cells exhibited a proper response to IFN-α treatment. Taken together, we propose that HBX downregulates IFNAR1, leading to the avoidance of extracellular IFN-α signal transduction.

  1. A Comprehensive, Multi-Scale Dynamical Model of ErbB Receptor Signal Transduction in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helikar, Tomáš; Kochi, Naomi; Kowal, Bryan; Dimri, Manjari; Naramura, Mayumi; Raja, Srikumar M.; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid; Rogers, Jim A.

    2013-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src and receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB1) have been established as collaborators in cellular signaling and their combined dysregulation plays key roles in human cancers, including breast cancer. In part due to the complexity of the biochemical network associated with the regulation of these proteins as well as their cellular functions, the role of Src in EGFR regulation remains unclear. Herein we present a new comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells. This model, constructed manually from published biochemical literature, consists of 245 nodes representing proteins and their post-translational modifications sites, and over 1,000 biochemical interactions. Using computer simulations of the model, we find it is able to reproduce a number of cellular phenomena. Furthermore, the model predicts that overexpression of Src results in increased endocytosis of EGFR in the absence/low amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF). Our subsequent laboratory experiments also suggest increased internalization of EGFR upon Src overexpression under EGF-deprived conditions, further supporting this model-generated hypothesis. PMID:23637902

  2. A comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Helikar

    Full Text Available The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src and receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB1 have been established as collaborators in cellular signaling and their combined dysregulation plays key roles in human cancers, including breast cancer. In part due to the complexity of the biochemical network associated with the regulation of these proteins as well as their cellular functions, the role of Src in EGFR regulation remains unclear. Herein we present a new comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells. This model, constructed manually from published biochemical literature, consists of 245 nodes representing proteins and their post-translational modifications sites, and over 1,000 biochemical interactions. Using computer simulations of the model, we find it is able to reproduce a number of cellular phenomena. Furthermore, the model predicts that overexpression of Src results in increased endocytosis of EGFR in the absence/low amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF. Our subsequent laboratory experiments also suggest increased internalization of EGFR upon Src overexpression under EGF-deprived conditions, further supporting this model-generated hypothesis.

  3. HLA-DR molecules enhance signal transduction through the CD3/Ti complex in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L

    1991-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in activated human T cells. Here we have studied the effect of DR on CD3-induced signal transduction...... in allospecific T-cell clones and T-leukemia (HUT78) cells. Co-crosslinking of DR with CD3 produced an enhanced [Ca2+]i response compared to that seen with CD3 alone. In contrast, CD2 responses were not enhanced by co-crosslinking with DR. Co-crosslinking CD45 in a tri-molecular complex of CD45, CD3, and DR...... completely abrogated the enhancing effects of DR on CD3-induced [Ca2+]i responses. In contrast, the enhancing effect of co-crosslinking CD4 on CD3 responses was not inhibited by co-crosslinking CD45. Thus, the DR-mediated accessory signals appear to be regulated differently from those provided by CD4...

  4. [Effect of allicin on myocardial fibrosis after myocardial infarction in rats and its relationship with TGFβ/Smads signal transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-Chun; Ma, Li-Na; Chen, Jian; Li, Yi-Kui

    2016-07-01

    Allicin is the internationally accepted active substance of garlic, and has cardiovascular protective effect. This research was designed to investigate the effect of allicin on myocardial fibrosis after myocardial infarction and explore the relationship between the effect and TGFβ1/Smads signaling pathway. The rat myocardial infarction model were made by ligating the left anterior desending coronary artery. The drugs were administered intraperitoneally 24 h after the operation. After 21 days, the rats were sacrificed and myocardial collagen fibres were observed by Masson staining. The protein expression of Ⅰ, Ⅲ collagen and TGFβ1, Smad3, Smad7 in the myocardium was measured by the immunohistochemistry. The results showed that myocardial fibrosis was serious and the expression of Ⅰ, Ⅲ collagen was increased in model group. After treatment with allicin, the myocardial fibrosis could be relieved markedly, and the expression of collagen was down-regulated. Meanwhile, TGFβ1 and Smad3 in heart tissue could be down-regulated and Smad7 could be up-regulated in allicin groups. So allicin may exhibit anti-myocardial fibrosis effect on rats, and the mechanism of this is related to TGFβ/Smads signal transduction. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Measurement of intracellular Ca2+mobilization to study GPCR signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokan, Anisha; Aradhyam, Gopala K

    2017-01-01

    Understanding G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) structure-function relationship and its activation mechanism has been broadly explored using mutational strategy due to problems in GPCR crystallization. Probing into GPCR: effector (G protein/β-arrestin) interactions and downstream signaling are important aspects of GPCR research. Among the G proteins, though there are some approaches to investigate G q -mediated signaling, they involve the use of radioactivity and are qualitative in nature. Our method described here makes use of the cell permeable nature of fluorescent Ca 2+ indicator dye, fura2AM, that binds with the Ca 2+ released in response to GPCR: G q interaction on ligand treatment. Using this spectrophotometric method, EC 50 values of the GPCR: ligand binding can be calculated and the binding affinity can be analyzed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterisation of viral proteins that inhibit Toll-like receptor signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Julianne; Bowie, Andrew G

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling involves five TIR adapter proteins, which couple to downstream protein kinases that ultimately lead to the activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family. TLRs play a crucial role in host defence against invading microorganisms, and highlighting their importance in the immune system is the fact that TLRs are targeted by viral immune evasion strategies. Identifying the target host proteins of such viral inhibitors is very important because valuable insights into how host cells respond to infection may be obtained. Also, viral proteins may have potential as therapeutic agents. Luciferase reporter gene assays are a very useful tool for the analysis of TLR signalling pathways, as the effect of a putative viral inhibitor on a large amount of signals can be examined in one experiment. A basic reporter gene assay involves the transfection of cells with a luciferase reporter gene, along with an activating expression plasmid, with or without a plasmid expressing a viral inhibitor. Induction of a signalling pathway leads to luciferase protein expression, which is measured using a luminometer. Results from these assays can be informative for deciding which host proteins to test for interactions with a viral inhibitor. Successful assays for measuring protein-protein interactions include co-immunoprecipitations (Co-IPs) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-pulldowns. Co-IP experiments involve precipitating a protein out of a cell lysate using a specific antibody bound to Protein A/G sepharose. Additional molecules complexed to that protein are captured as well and can be detected by Western blot analysis. GST-pulldown experiments are similar in principle to Co-IPs, but a bait GST-fusion protein complexed to glutathione-sepharose (GSH) beads is used to pull down interaction partners instead of an antibody. Again, complexes recovered from the beads are

  7. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revati eWani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of reactive oxygen species (ROS has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g. cancer. New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically-distinct alterations to the protein (e.g. sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides. These post-translational modifications (PTM are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology.

  8. Reconstruction of cellular signal transduction networks using perturbation assays and linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Bettina; Kaderali, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Perturbation experiments for example using RNA interference (RNAi) offer an attractive way to elucidate gene function in a high throughput fashion. The placement of hit genes in their functional context and the inference of underlying networks from such data, however, are challenging tasks. One of the problems in network inference is the exponential number of possible network topologies for a given number of genes. Here, we introduce a novel mathematical approach to address this question. We formulate network inference as a linear optimization problem, which can be solved efficiently even for large-scale systems. We use simulated data to evaluate our approach, and show improved performance in particular on larger networks over state-of-the art methods. We achieve increased sensitivity and specificity, as well as a significant reduction in computing time. Furthermore, we show superior performance on noisy data. We then apply our approach to study the intracellular signaling of human primary nave CD4(+) T-cells, as well as ErbB signaling in trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cells. In both cases, our approach recovers known interactions and points to additional relevant processes. In ErbB signaling, our results predict an important role of negative and positive feedback in controlling the cell cycle progression.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinase 14 modulates signal transduction and angiogenesis in the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jin-Hong; Huang, Yu-Hui; Cunningham, Christy M; Han, Kyu-Yeon; Chang, Michael; Seiki, Motoharu; Zhou, Zhongjun; Azar, Dimitri T

    2016-01-01

    The cornea is transparent and avascular, and retention of these characteristics is critical to maintaining vision clarity. Under normal conditions, wound healing in response to corneal injury occurs without the formation of new blood vessels; however, neovascularization may be induced during corneal wound healing when the balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic mediators is disrupted to favor angiogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are key factors in extracellular matrix remodeling and angiogenesis, contribute to the maintenance of this balance, and in pathologic instances, can contribute to its disruption. Here, we elaborate on the facilitative role of MMPs, specifically MMP-14, in corneal neovascularization. MMP-14 is a transmembrane MMP that is critically involved in extracellular matrix proteolysis, exosome transport, and cellular migration and invasion, processes that are critical for angiogenesis. To aid in developing efficacious therapies that promote healing without neovascularization, it is important to understand and further investigate the complex pathways related to MMP-14 signaling, which can also involve vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, Wnt/β-catenin, transforming growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor or chemokines, epidermal growth factor, prostaglandin E2, thrombin, integrins, Notch, Toll-like receptors, PI3k/Akt, Src, RhoA/RhoA kinase, and extracellular signal-related kinase. The involvement and potential contribution of these signaling molecules or proteins in neovascularization are the focus of the present review. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Reconstruction of cellular signal transduction networks using perturbation assays and linear programming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Knapp

    Full Text Available Perturbation experiments for example using RNA interference (RNAi offer an attractive way to elucidate gene function in a high throughput fashion. The placement of hit genes in their functional context and the inference of underlying networks from such data, however, are challenging tasks. One of the problems in network inference is the exponential number of possible network topologies for a given number of genes. Here, we introduce a novel mathematical approach to address this question. We formulate network inference as a linear optimization problem, which can be solved efficiently even for large-scale systems. We use simulated data to evaluate our approach, and show improved performance in particular on larger networks over state-of-the art methods. We achieve increased sensitivity and specificity, as well as a significant reduction in computing time. Furthermore, we show superior performance on noisy data. We then apply our approach to study the intracellular signaling of human primary nave CD4(+ T-cells, as well as ErbB signaling in trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cells. In both cases, our approach recovers known interactions and points to additional relevant processes. In ErbB signaling, our results predict an important role of negative and positive feedback in controlling the cell cycle progression.

  11. Characterization and expression of genes involved in the ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction during ripening of mulberry fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changying Liu

    Full Text Available Although ethylene is well known as an essential regulator of fruit development, little work has examined the role ethylene plays in the development and maturation of mulberry (Morus L. fruit. To study the mechanism of ethylene action during fruit development in this species, we measured the ethylene production, fruit firmness, and soluble solids content (SSC during fruit development and harvest. By comparing the results with those from other climacteric fruit, we concluded that Morus fruit are probably climacteric. Genes associated with the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Morus were characterized from M. notabilis Genome Database, including four ethylene receptor genes, a EIN2-like gene, a CTR1-like gene, four EIN3-like genes, and a RTE1-like gene. The expression patterns of these genes were analyzed in the fruit of M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. During fruit development, transcript levels of MaETR2, MaERS, MaEIN4, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were lower at the early stages and higher after 26 days after full bloom (DAF, while MaETR1, MaEIL1, MaEIL2, and MaEIL3 remained constant. In ripening fruit, the transcripts of MaACO1 and MaACS3 increased, while MaACS1 and MaACO2 decreased after harvest. The transcripts of MaACO1, MaACO2, and MaACS3 were inhibited by ethylene, and 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene upregulated MaACS3. The transcripts of the MaETR-like genes, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were inhibited by ethylene and 1-MCP, suggesting that ethylene may accelerate the decline of MaETRs transcripts. No significant changes in the expression of MaEIN2, MaEIL1, and MaEIL3 were observed during ripening or in response to ethylene, while the expressions of MaEIL2 and MaEIL4 increased rapidly after 24 h after harvest (HAH and were upregulated by ethylene. The present study provides insights into ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction in Morus plants and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms underlying Morus fruit development and

  12. Characterization and expression of genes involved in the ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction during ripening of mulberry fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changying; Zhao, Aichun; Zhu, Panpan; Li, Jun; Han, Leng; Wang, Xiling; Fan, Wei; Lü, Ruihua; Wang, Chuanhong; Li, Zhengang; Lu, Cheng; Yu, Maode

    2015-01-01

    Although ethylene is well known as an essential regulator of fruit development, little work has examined the role ethylene plays in the development and maturation of mulberry (Morus L.) fruit. To study the mechanism of ethylene action during fruit development in this species, we measured the ethylene production, fruit firmness, and soluble solids content (SSC) during fruit development and harvest. By comparing the results with those from other climacteric fruit, we concluded that Morus fruit are probably climacteric. Genes associated with the ethylene signal transduction pathway of Morus were characterized from M. notabilis Genome Database, including four ethylene receptor genes, a EIN2-like gene, a CTR1-like gene, four EIN3-like genes, and a RTE1-like gene. The expression patterns of these genes were analyzed in the fruit of M. atropurpurea cv. Jialing No.40. During fruit development, transcript levels of MaETR2, MaERS, MaEIN4, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were lower at the early stages and higher after 26 days after full bloom (DAF), while MaETR1, MaEIL1, MaEIL2, and MaEIL3 remained constant. In ripening fruit, the transcripts of MaACO1 and MaACS3 increased, while MaACS1 and MaACO2 decreased after harvest. The transcripts of MaACO1, MaACO2, and MaACS3 were inhibited by ethylene, and 1-MCP (1-methylcyclopropene) upregulated MaACS3. The transcripts of the MaETR-like genes, MaRTE, and MaCTR1 were inhibited by ethylene and 1-MCP, suggesting that ethylene may accelerate the decline of MaETRs transcripts. No significant changes in the expression of MaEIN2, MaEIL1, and MaEIL3 were observed during ripening or in response to ethylene, while the expressions of MaEIL2 and MaEIL4 increased rapidly after 24 h after harvest (HAH) and were upregulated by ethylene. The present study provides insights into ethylene biosynthesis and signal transduction in Morus plants and lays a foundation for the further understanding of the mechanisms underlying Morus fruit development and ripening.

  13. The Role of Peroxiredoxins in the Transduction of H2O2 Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Sue Goo; Woo, Hyun Ae; Kang, Dongmin

    2017-07-10

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced on stimulation of many cell surface receptors and serves as an intracellular messenger in the regulation of diverse physiological events, mostly by oxidizing cysteine residues of effector proteins. Mammalian cells express multiple H2O2-eliminating enzymes, including catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and peroxiredoxin (Prx). A conserved cysteine in Prx family members is the site of oxidation by H2O2. Peroxiredoxins possess a high-affinity binding site for H2O2 that is lacking in catalase and GPx and which renders the catalytic cysteine highly susceptible to oxidation, with a rate constant several orders of magnitude greater than that for oxidation of cysteine in most H2O2 effector proteins. Moreover, Prxs are abundant and present in all subcellular compartments. The cysteines of most H2O2 effectors are therefore at a competitive disadvantage for reaction with H2O2. Recent Advances: Here we review intracellular sources of H2O2 as well as H2O2 target proteins classified according to biochemical and cellular function. We then highlight two strategies implemented by cells to overcome the kinetic disadvantage of most target proteins with regard to H2O2-mediated oxidation: transient inactivation of local Prx molecules via phosphorylation, and indirect oxidation of target cysteines via oxidized Prx. Critical Issues and Future Directions: Recent studies suggest that only a small fraction of the total pools of Prxs and H2O2 effector proteins localized in specific subcellular compartments participates in H2O2 signaling. Development of sensitive tools to selectively detect phosphorylated Prxs and oxidized effector proteins is needed to provide further insight into H2O2 signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  14. Targeting of the Hedgehog signal transduction pathway suppresses survival of malignant pleural mesothelioma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Min; Varona-Santos, Javier; Singh, Samer; Robbins, David J; Savaraj, Niramol; Nguyen, Dao M

    2014-01-01

    The present study sought to determine whether the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is active and regulates the cell growth of cultured malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells and to evaluate the efficacy of pathway blockade using smoothened (SMO) antagonists (SMO inhibitor GDC-0449 or the antifungal drug itraconazole [ITRA]) or Gli inhibitors (GANT61 or the antileukemia drug arsenic trioxide [ATO]) in suppressing MPM viability. Selective knockdown of SMO to inhibit Hh signaling was achieved by small interfering RNA in 3 representative MPM cells. The growth inhibitory effect of GDC-0449, ITRA, GANT61, and ATO was evaluated in 8 MPM lines, with cell viability quantified using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell death was determined by annexinV/propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. SMO small interfering RNA mediated a two- to more than fivefold reduction of SMO and Gli1 gene expression as determined by real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, indicating significant Hh pathway blockade. This was associated with significantly reduced cell viability (34% ± 7% to 61% ± 14% of nontarget small interfering RNA controls; P = .0024 to P = .043). Treating MPM cells with Hh inhibitors resulted in a 1.5- to 4-fold reduction of Gli1 expression. These 4 Hh antagonists strongly suppressed MPM cell viability. More importantly, ITRA, ATO, GANT61 induced significant apoptosis in the representative MPM cells. Hh signaling is active in MPM and regulates cell viability. ATO and ITRA were as effective as the prototypic SMO inhibitor GDC-0449 and the Gli inhibitor GANT61 in suppressing Hh signaling in MPM cells. Pharmaceutical agents Food and Drug Administration-approved for other indications but recently found to have anti-Hh activity, such as ATO or ITRA, could be repurposed to treat MPM. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. A search for protein biomarkers links olfactory signal transduction to social immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarna, Maria Marta; Melathopoulos, Andony P; Huxter, Elizabeth; Iovinella, Immacolata; Parker, Robert; Stoynov, Nikolay; Tam, Amy; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Chan, Queenie W T; Pelosi, Paolo; White, Rick; Pernal, Stephen F; Foster, Leonard J

    2015-02-08

    The Western honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is a critical component of human agriculture through its pollination activities. For years, beekeepers have controlled deadly pathogens such as Paenibacillus larvae, Nosema spp. and Varroa destructor with antibiotics and pesticides but widespread chemical resistance is appearing and most beekeepers would prefer to eliminate or reduce the use of in-hive chemicals. While such treatments are likely to still be needed, an alternate management strategy is to identify and select bees with heritable traits that allow them to resist mites and diseases. Breeding such bees is difficult as the tests involved to identify disease-resistance are complicated, time-consuming, expensive and can misidentify desirable genotypes. Additionally, we do not yet fully understand the mechanisms behind social immunity. Here we have set out to discover the molecular mechanism behind hygienic behavior (HB), a trait known to confer disease resistance in bees. After confirming that HB could be selectively bred for, we correlated measurements of this behavior with protein expression over a period of three years, at two geographically distinct sites, using several hundred bee colonies. By correlating the expression patterns of individual proteins with HB scores, we identified seven putative biomarkers of HB that survived stringent control for multiple hypothesis testing. Intriguingly, these proteins were all involved in semiochemical sensing (odorant binding proteins), nerve signal transmission or signal decay, indicative of the series of events required to respond to an olfactory signal from dead or diseased larvae. We then used recombinant versions of two odorant-binding proteins to identify the classes of ligands that these proteins might be helping bees detect. Our data suggest that neurosensory detection of odors emitted by dead or diseased larvae is the likely mechanism behind a complex and important social immunity behavior that allows bees to co

  16. Role of the HAMP domain region of sensory rhodopsin transducers in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchin, Ivan Yu; Gordeliy, Valentin I; Grudinin, Sergei

    2011-02-01

    Archaea are able to sense light via the complexes of sensory rhodopsins I and II and their corresponding chemoreceptor-like transducers HtrI and HtrII. Though generation of the signal has been studied in detail, the mechanism of its propagation to the cytoplasm remains obscured. The cytoplasmic part of the transducer consists of adaptation and kinase activity modulating regions, connected to transmembrane helices via two HAMP (histidine kinases, adenylyl cyclases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, phosphatases) domains. The inter-HAMP region of Natronomonas pharaonis HtrII (NpHtrII) was found to be α-helical [Hayashi, K., et al. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 14380-14390]. We studied the inter-HAMP regions of NpHtrII and other phototactic signal transducers by means of molecular dynamics. Their structure is found to be a bistable asymmetric coiled coil, in which the protomers are longitudinally shifted by ~1.3 Å. The free energy penalty for the symmetric structure is estimated to be 1.2-1.5 kcal/mol depending on the molarity of the solvent. Both flanking HAMP domains are mechanistically coupled to the inter-HAMP region and are asymmetric. The longitudinal shift in the inter-HAMP region is coupled with the in-plane displacement of the cytoplasmic part by 8.6 Å relative to the transmembrane part. The established properties suggest that (1) the signal may be transduced through the inter-HAMP domain switching and (2) the inter-HAMP region may allow cytoplasmic parts of the transducers to come sufficiently close to each other to form oligomers.

  17. Calcium and cAMP signaling induced by gamma-hydroxybutyrate receptor(s) stimulation in NCB-20 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coune, P; Taleb, O; Mensah-Nyagan, A G; Maitre, M; Kemmel, V

    2010-04-28

    The NCB-20 neurohybridoma cells differentiated with dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP represent an interesting model to study several components of the gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) system in brain. In particular, an active Na(+)-dependent uptake and a depolarization-evoked release of GHB is expressed by these cells, together with high affinity specific binding sites for this substance. However, only little is known about cellular mechanisms following GHB receptor(s) stimulation in these neurons. Electrophysiological data indicate that GHB can differently affect Ca(2+) currents. L-type calcium channels were typically inhibited by GHB when NCB-20 cells were depolarized. In contrast, when NCB-20 cells were at resting potential, GHB induced a specific Ca(2+) entry through T-type calcium channels. In this study, we investigated the effect induced on cytosolic free Ca(2+) level and cAMP production by GHB receptor(s) stimulated with micromolar concentrations of GHB or structural analogues of GHB. Ca(2+) movements studied by cellular imaging were dose-dependently increased but disappeared for GHB concentrations >25 microM. In addition, nanomolar doses of GHB inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. This effect was also rapidly desensitized at higher GHB concentrations. Acting as an antagonist, NCS-382 decreased GHB receptor(s) mediated cAMP and calcium signals. The agonist NCS-356 mimicked GHB effects which were not affected by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-55-845. Our results reveal the occurrence of Ca(2+)-dependent adenylate cyclase inhibition in NCB-20 neurons after GHB receptor(s) stimulation by GHB concentrations NCB-20 neurons of GHB receptors belonging to GPCR family that may recruit various G protein subtypes. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oryza sativa COI Homologues Restore Jasmonate Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis coi1-1 Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Han Yong Lee; Ju-Seok Seo; Jang Hee Cho; Harin Jung; Ju-Kon Kim; Jong Seob Lee; Sangkee Rhee; Yang Do Choi

    2013-01-01

    CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1) encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex component that interacts with JAZ proteins and targets them for degradation in response to JA signaling. The Arabidopsis genome has a single copy of COI1, but the Oryza sativa genome has three closely related COI homologs. To examine the functions of the three OsCOIs, we used yeast two-hybrid assays to examine their interactions with JAZ proteins and found that OsCOIs interacted with OsJAZs and with JAZs, in a coronatine d...

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Bcl10-Mediated NF-kB Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-08

    cDNA (complementary DNA): DNA synthesized from an RNA template CH12 B cell: a B cell line with an H-2k MHC haplotype that is derived from a murine...of antigen receptor-induced activation of NF-kappaB and neural tube closure. Cell 104:33-42. 61. Ruland, J., G. S. Duncan, A. Wakeham, and T. W. Mak...Perez, D. Pe’er, D. A. Lauffenburger, and G. P. Nolan. 2005. Causal protein-signaling networks derived from multiparameter single-cell data. Science

  20. Time-resolved in silico modeling of fine-tuned cAMP signaling in platelets: feedback loops, titrated phosphorylations and pharmacological modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemostasis is a critical and active function of the blood mediated by platelets. Therefore, the prevention of pathological platelet aggregation is of great importance as well as of pharmaceutical and medical interest. Endogenous platelet inhibition is predominantly based on cyclic nucleotides (cAMP, cGMP elevation and subsequent cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase (PKA, PKG activation. In turn, platelet phosphodiesterases (PDEs and protein phosphatases counterbalance their activity. This main inhibitory pathway in human platelets is crucial for countervailing unwanted platelet activation. Consequently, the regulators of cyclic nucleotide signaling are of particular interest to pharmacology and therapeutics of atherothrombosis. Modeling of pharmacodynamics allows understanding this intricate signaling and supports the precise description of these pivotal targets for pharmacological modulation. Results We modeled dynamically concentration-dependent responses of pathway effectors (inhibitors, activators, drug combinations to cyclic nucleotide signaling as well as to downstream signaling events and verified resulting model predictions by experimental data. Experiments with various cAMP affecting compounds including anti-platelet drugs and their combinations revealed a high fidelity, fine-tuned cAMP signaling in platelets without cross-talk to the cGMP pathway. The model and the data provide evidence for two independent feedback loops: PKA, which is activated by elevated cAMP levels in the platelet, subsequently inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC but as well activates PDE3. By multi-experiment fitting, we established a comprehensive dynamic model with one predictive, optimized and validated set of parameters. Different pharmacological conditions (inhibition, activation, drug combinations, permanent and transient perturbations are successfully tested and simulated, including statistical validation and sensitivity analysis

  1. Information processing in network architecture of genome controlled signal transduction circuit. A proposed theoretical explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Sarkar, Bimal Kumar; Patel, Pratiksha; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, Shannon information theory has been applied to elaborate cell signaling. It is proposed that in the cellular network architecture, four components viz. source (DNA), transmitter (mRNA), receiver (protein) and destination (another protein) are involved. The message transmits from source (DNA) to transmitter (mRNA) and then passes through a noisy channel reaching finally the receiver (protein). The protein synthesis process is here considered as the noisy channel. Ultimately, signal is transmitted from receiver to destination (another protein). The genome network architecture elements were compared with genetic alphabet L = {A, C, G, T} with a biophysical model based on the popular Shannon information theory. This study found the channel capacity as maximum for zero error (sigma = 0) and at this condition, transition matrix becomes a unit matrix with rank 4. The transition matrix will be erroneous and finally at sigma = 1 channel capacity will be localized maxima with a value of 0.415 due to the increased value at sigma. On the other hand, minima exists at sigma = 0.75, where all transition probabilities become 0.25 and uncertainty will be maximum resulting in channel capacity with the minima value of zero.

  2. Novel effects of Helicobacter pylori CagA on key genes of gastric cancer signal transduction: a comparative transfection study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Farzam; Peerayeh, Shahin N; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Maghsoudi, Nader; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Siadat, Seyed D; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is now recognized as a worldwide problem. Helicobacter pylori CagA is the first bacterial oncoprotein to be identified in relation to human cancer. Helicobacter pylori CagA is noted for structural diversity in its C-terminal region (contains EPIYA motifs), with which CagA interacts with numerous host cell proteins. Deregulation of host signaling by translocated bacterial proteins provides a new aspect of microbial-host cell interaction. The aim of this study is to compare the cellular effects of two different CagA EPIYA motifs on identified signaling pathways involve in gastric carcinogenesis. To investigate the effects of CagA protein carboxyl region variations on the transcription of genes involved in gastric epithelial carcinogenesis pathways, the eukaryotic vector carrying the cagA gene (ABC and ABCCC types) was transfected into gastric cancer cell line. The 42 identified key genes of signal transduction involved in gastric cancer were analyzed at the transcription level by real-time PCR. The results of real-time PCR provide us important clue that the ABCCC oncoprotein variant can change the fate of the cell completely different from ABC type. In fact, these result proposed that the ABCCC type can induce the intestinal metaplasia, IL-8, perturbation of Crk adaptor proteins, anti-apoptotic effect and carcinogenic effect more significantly than ABC type. These data support our hypothesis of a complex interaction of host cell and these two different H. pylori effector variants that determines host cellular fate. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Intersection of interferon and hypoxia signal transduction pathways in nitric oxide-induced tumor apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, D S; Bao, C; Wang, T; Huang, E L; Ratovitski, E A; Pardoll, D A; Lowenstein, C J

    2001-05-01

    Activated macrophages play a central role in antitumor immunity. However, the stimuli that activate macrophages to kill tumor cells are not completely understood. Because the center of solid tumors can be hypoxic, we hypothesized that hypoxia may be an important signal in activating macrophages to kill tumor cells. Hypoxia stimulates IFN-primed macrophages to express the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and to synthesize nitric oxide (NO). We show that this synergy between IFN and hypoxia is mediated by the direct interaction of the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and IFN regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1), which are both required for the hypoxic transcription of NOS2. This interaction between HIF-1 and IRF-1 may explain the mechanism by which macrophages infiltrating into tumors are activated to express NOS2 and to produce NO, a mediator of tumor apoptosis.

  4. Gamma-secretase activity of presenilin 1 regulates acetylcholine muscarinic receptor-mediated signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Bogdan O; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2004-01-01

    causing an exon 9 deletion in PS1 results in enhanced basal phospholipase C (PLC) activity (Cedazo-Minguez, A., Popescu, B. O., Ankarcrona, M., Nishimura, T., and Cowburn, R. F. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 36646-36655). To further elucidate the mechanisms by which PS1 interferes with PLC-calcium signaling...... by the PLC inhibitor neomycin, the ryanodine receptor antagonist dantrolene, the general aspartyl protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and the specific gamma-secretase inhibitor N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester. The cells expressing either PS1 D257A or PS1 D385N had attenuated...... or PS1 D385N dominant negative cells. Our findings suggest that PS1 can regulate PLC activity and that this function is gamma-secretase activity-dependent....

  5. cADP-ribose/ryanodine channel/Ca2+-release signal transduction pathway in mesangial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufi, A N; Cheng, J; Thompson, M A; Dousa, T P; Warner, G M; Walker, H J; Grande, J P

    2001-07-01

    Signaling via release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores is mediated by several systems, including the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and cADP-ribose (cADPR) pathway. We recently discovered a high capacity for cADPR synthesis in rat glomeruli and cultured mesangial cells (MC). We sought to determine whether 1) cADPR synthesis in MC is regulated by cytokines and hormones, 2) ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are expressed in MC, and 3) Ca2+ is released through RyRs in response to cADPR. We found that ADP-ribosyl cyclase, a CD38-like enzyme that catalyzes cADPR synthesis, is upregulated in MC by tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and all-trans retinoic acid (atRA). [3H]ryanodine binds to microsomal fractions from MC with high affinity in a Ca2+-dependent manner; binding is enhanced by specific RyR agonists and blocked by ruthenium red and cADPR. Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of RyR in MC. Release of 45Ca2+ from MC microsomes was stimulated by cADPR; release was blocked by ruthenium red and 8-bromo-cADPR. ADPR (non-cyclic) was without effect. In MC, TNF-alpha and atRA amplified the increment of cytoplasmic Ca2+ elicited by vasopressin. We conclude that MC possess elements of a novel ADP-ribosyl cyclase-->cADPR-->RyR-->Ca2+-release signaling pathway subject to regulation by proinflammatory cytokines and steroid superfamily hormones.

  6. Landscape mapping of functional proteins in insulin signal transduction and insulin resistance: a network-based protein-protein interaction analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjib Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The type 2 diabetes has increased rapidly in recent years throughout the world. The insulin signal transduction mechanism gets disrupted sometimes and it's known as insulin-resistance. It is one of the primary causes associated with type-2 diabetes. The signaling mechanisms involved several proteins that include 7 major functional proteins such as INS, INSR, IRS1, IRS2, PIK3CA, Akt2, and GLUT4. Using these 7 principal proteins, multiple sequences alignment has been created. The scores between sequences also have been developed. We have constructed a phylogenetic tree and modified it with node and distance. Besides, we have generated sequence logos and ultimately developed the protein-protein interaction network. The small insulin signal transduction protein arrangement shows complex network between the functional proteins.

  7. The NFP locus of Medicago truncatula controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction upstream of a rapid calcium flux and root hair deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Besma Ben; Shaw, Sidney L; Oldroyd, Giles E D; Maillet, Fabienne; Penmetsa, R Varma; Cook, Douglas; Long, Sharon R; Dénarié, Jean; Gough, Clare

    2003-05-01

    Establishment of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis depends on a molecular dialogue, in which rhizobial nodulation (Nod) factors act as symbiotic signals, playing a key role in the control of specificity of infection and nodule formation. Using nodulation-defective (Nod-) mutants of Medicago truncatula to study the mechanisms controlling Nod factor perception and signalling, we have previously identified five genes that control components of a Nod factor-activated signal transduction pathway. Characterisation of a new M. truncatula Nod- mutant led to the identification of the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) locus. The nfp mutant has a novel phenotype among Nod- mutants of M. truncatula, as it does not respond to Nod factors by any of the responses tested. The nfp mutant thus shows no rapid calcium flux, the earliest detectable Nod factor response of wild-type plants, and no root hair deformation. The nfp mutant is also deficient in Nod factor-induced calcium spiking and early nodulin gene expression. While certain genes controlling Nod factor signal transduction also control the establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, the nfp mutant shows a wild-type mycorrhizal phenotype. These data indicate that the NFP locus controls an early step of Nod factor signal transduction, upstream of previously identified genes and specific to nodulation.

  8. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy M Paramonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming - all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells, underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: 1 genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; 2 inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control – something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  9. Signal transduction controls heterogeneous NF-κB dynamics and target gene expression through cytokine-specific refractory states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Antony; Boddington, Christopher; Downton, Polly; Rowe, William; Bagnall, James; Lam, Connie; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Schmidt, Lorraine; Harper, Claire V.; Spiller, David G.; Rand, David A.; Jackson, Dean A.; White, Michael R. H.; Paszek, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cells respond dynamically to pulsatile cytokine stimulation. Here we report that single, or well-spaced pulses of TNFα (>100 min apart) give a high probability of NF-κB activation. However, fewer cells respond to shorter pulse intervals (refractory state. This refractory state is established in the signal transduction network downstream of TNFR and upstream of IKK, and depends on the level of the NF-κB system negative feedback protein A20. If a second pulse within the refractory phase is IL-1β instead of TNFα, all of the cells respond. This suggests a mechanism by which two cytokines can synergistically activate an inflammatory response. Gene expression analyses show strong correlation between the cellular dynamic response and NF-κB-dependent target gene activation. These data suggest that refractory states in the NF-κB system constitute an inherent design motif of the inflammatory response and we suggest that this may avoid harmful homogenous cellular activation. PMID:27381163

  10. Multifaceted effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neurons: impact on neuronal firing rate, signal transduction and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Kuo, Wen Ping; Frühbeis, Carsten; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Zehendner, Christoph M; Luhmann, Heiko J; Pinto, Sheena; Toedling, Joern; Trotter, Jacqueline; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-09-26

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by almost every cell type. They exert versatile functions in intercellular communication important for many physiological and pathological processes. Recently, exosomes attracted interest with regard to their role in cell-cell communication in the nervous system. We have shown that exosomes released from oligodendrocytes upon stimulation with the neurotransmitter glutamate are internalized by neurons and enhance the neuronal stress tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that oligodendroglial exosomes also promote neuronal survival during oxygen-glucose deprivation, a model of cerebral ischaemia. We show the transfer from oligodendrocytes to neurons of superoxide dismutase and catalase, enzymes which are known to help cells to resist oxidative stress. Additionally, we identify various effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neuronal physiology. Electrophysiological analysis using in vitro multi-electrode arrays revealed an increased firing rate of neurons exposed to oligodendroglial exosomes. Moreover, gene expression analysis and phosphorylation arrays uncovered differentially expressed genes and altered signal transduction pathways in neurons after exosome treatment. Our study thus provides new insight into the broad spectrum of action of oligodendroglial exosomes and their effects on neuronal physiology. The exchange of extracellular vesicles between neural cells may exhibit remarkable potential to impact brain performance. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Signal transduction of Helicobacter pylori during interaction with host cell protein receptors of epithelial and immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachathundikandi, Suneesh Kumar; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections can induce pathologies ranging from chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration to gastric cancer. Bacterial isolates harbor numerous well-known adhesins, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, protease HtrA, urease, peptidoglycan, and type IV secretion systems (T4SS). It appears that H. pylori targets more than 40 known host protein receptors on epithelial or immune cells. A series of T4SS components such as CagL, CagI, CagY, and CagA can bind to the integrin α5β1 receptor. Other targeted membrane-based receptors include the integrins αvβ3, αvβ5, and β2 (CD18), RPTP-α/β, GP130, E-cadherin, fibronectin, laminin, CD46, CD74, ICAM1/LFA1, T-cell receptor, Toll-like receptors, and receptor tyrosine kinases EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and c-Met. In addition, H. pylori is able to activate the intracellular receptors NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3 with important roles in innate immunity. Here we review the interplay of various bacterial factors with host protein receptors. The contribution of these interactions to signal transduction and pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:24280762

  12. Signal transduction of Helicobacter pylori during interaction with host cell protein receptors of epithelial and immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachathundikandi, Suneesh Kumar; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Backert, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections can induce pathologies ranging from chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration to gastric cancer. Bacterial isolates harbor numerous well-known adhesins, vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, protease HtrA, urease, peptidoglycan, and type IV secretion systems (T4SS). It appears that H. pylori targets more than 40 known host protein receptors on epithelial or immune cells. A series of T4SS components such as CagL, CagI, CagY, and CagA can bind to the integrin α 5β 1 receptor. Other targeted membrane-based receptors include the integrins αvβ 3, αvβ 5, and β 2 (CD18), RPTP-α/β, GP130, E-cadherin, fibronectin, laminin, CD46, CD74, ICAM1/LFA1, T-cell receptor, Toll-like receptors, and receptor tyrosine kinases EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and c-Met. In addition, H. pylori is able to activate the intracellular receptors NOD1, NOD2, and NLRP3 with important roles in innate immunity. Here we review the interplay of various bacterial factors with host protein receptors. The contribution of these interactions to signal transduction and pathogenesis is discussed.

  13. MAPK Signal Transduction Pathway Regulation: A Novel Mechanism of Rat HSC-T6 Cell Apoptosis Induced by FUZHENGHUAYU Tablet

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    Qi Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available FUZHENGHUAYU Tablets have been widely used in the treatment of liver fibrosis in China. Here, we investigate the apoptotic effect of FUZHENGHUAYU Tablet in rat liver stellate cell line HSC-T6. HSC-T6 cells were incubated with control serum or drug serum from rats fed with 0.9% NaCl or FUZHENGHUAYU Tablet, respectively. Cells exposed to drug serum showed higher proportions of early and late apoptotic cells than controls. The mRNA levels of collagens I and III, TGF-β1 and α-SMA were reduced by drug serum compared to control serum. Differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs were analyzed by microarray and sequencing, respectively. We identified 334 differentially expressed mRNAs and also 60 GOs and two pathways related to the mRNAs. Seventy-five differentially expressed miRNAs were down-regulated by drug serum and 1963 target genes were predicted. 134 GOs up-regulated in drug serum group were linked to miRNA targets, and drug serum also regulated 43 miRNA signal transduction pathways. Protein levels were evaluated by Western blot. Drug serum down-regulated (phospho-SAPK/JNK/(SAPK/JNK and up-regulated phospho-p38/p38 ratios. The study showed that FUZHENGHUAYU Tablet induced apoptosis in rat HSC-T6 cells possibly in part by activating p38 and inhibiting SAPK/JNK.

  14. IMAGING BRAIN SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AND METABOLISM VIA ARACHIDONIC AND DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2012-01-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), important second messengers in brain, are released from membrane phospholipid following receptor-mediated activation of specific phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes. We developed an in vivo method in rodents using quantitative autoradiography to image PUFA incorporation into brain from plasma, and showed that their incorporation rates equal their rates of metabolic consumption by brain. Thus, quantitative imaging of unesterified plasma AA or DHA incorporation into brain can be used as a biomarker of brain PUFA metabolism and neurotransmission. We have employed our method to image and quantify effects of mood stabilizers on brain AA/DHA incorporation during neurotransmission by muscarinic M1,3,5, serotonergic 5-HT2A/2C, dopaminergic D2-like (D2, D3, D4) or glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors, and effects of inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, of selective serotonin and dopamine reuptake transporter inhibitors, of neuroinflammation (HIV-1 and lipopolysaccharide) and excitotoxicity, and in genetically modified rodents. The method has been extended for the use with positron emission tomography (PET), and can be employed to determine how human brain AA/DHA signaling and consumption are influenced by diet, aging, disease and genetics. PMID:22178644

  15. lpNet: a linear programming approach to reconstruct signal transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Marta R A; Knapp, Bettina; Kaderali, Lars

    2015-10-01

    With the widespread availability of high-throughput experimental technologies it has become possible to study hundreds to thousands of cellular factors simultaneously, such as coding- or non-coding mRNA or protein concentrations. Still, extracting information about the underlying regulatory or signaling interactions from these data remains a difficult challenge. We present a flexible approach towards network inference based on linear programming. Our method reconstructs the interactions of factors from a combination of perturbation/non-perturbation and steady-state/time-series data. We show both on simulated and real data that our methods are able to reconstruct the underlying networks fast and efficiently, thus shedding new light on biological processes and, in particular, into disease's mechanisms of action. We have implemented the approach as an R package available through bioconductor. This R package is freely available under the Gnu Public License (GPL-3) from bioconductor.org (http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/lpNet.html) and is compatible with most operating systems (Windows, Linux, Mac OS) and hardware architectures. bettina.knapp@helmholtz-muenchen.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Multisite interaction with Sufu regulates Ci/Gli activity through distinct mechanisms in Hh signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuhong; Shi, Qing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-05-19

    The tumor suppressor protein Suppressor of fused (Sufu) plays a conserved role in the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway by inhibiting Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) transcription factors, but the molecular mechanism by which Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity remains poorly understood. Here we show that Sufu can bind Ci/Gli through a C-terminal Sufu-interacting site (SIC) in addition to a previously identified N-terminal site (SIN), and that both SIC and SIN are required for optimal inhibition of Ci/Gli by Sufu. We show that Sufu can sequester Ci/Gli in the cytoplasm through binding to SIN while inhibiting Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus depending on SIC. We also find that binding of Sufu to SIC and the middle region of Ci can impede recruitment of the transcriptional coactivator CBP by masking its binding site in the C-terminal region of Ci. Indeed, moving the CBP-binding site to an "exposed" location can render Ci resistant to Sufu-mediated inhibition in the nucleus. Hence, our study identifies a previously unidentified and conserved Sufu-binding motif in the C-terminal region of Ci/Gli and provides mechanistic insight into how Sufu inhibits Ci/Gli activity in the nucleus.

  17. DC-ATLAS: a systems biology resource to dissect receptor specific signal transduction in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalieri, Duccio; Rivero, Damariz; Beltrame, Luca; Buschow, Sonja I; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Gessani, Sandra; Gauzzi, Maria C; Reith, Walter; Baur, Andreas; Bonaiuti, Roberto; Brandizi, Marco; De Filippo, Carlotta; D'Oro, Ugo; Draghici, Sorin; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Gatti, Evelina; Granucci, Francesca; Gündel, Michaela; Kramer, Matthijs; Kuka, Mirela; Lanyi, Arpad; Melief, Cornelis Jm; van Montfoort, Nadine; Ostuni, Renato; Pierre, Philippe; Popovici, Razvan; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Schierer, Stephan; Schuler, Gerold; Soumelis, Vassili; Splendiani, Andrea; Stefanini, Irene; Torcia, Maria G; Zanoni, Ivan; Zollinger, Raphael; Figdor, Carl G; Austyn, Jonathan M

    2010-11-19

    The advent of Systems Biology has been accompanied by the blooming of pathway databases. Currently pathways are defined generically with respect to the organ or cell type where a reaction takes place. The cell type specificity of the reactions is the foundation of immunological research, and capturing this specificity is of paramount importance when using pathway-based analyses to decipher complex immunological datasets. Here, we present DC-ATLAS, a novel and versatile resource for the interpretation of high-throughput data generated perturbing the signaling network of dendritic cells (DCs). Pathways are annotated using a novel data model, the Biological Connection Markup Language (BCML), a SBGN-compliant data format developed to store the large amount of information collected. The application of DC-ATLAS to pathway-based analysis of the transcriptional program of DCs stimulated with agonists of the toll-like receptor family allows an integrated description of the flow of information from the cellular sensors to the functional outcome, capturing the temporal series of activation events by grouping sets of reactions that occur at different time points in well-defined functional modules. The initiative significantly improves our understanding of DC biology and regulatory networks. Developing a systems biology approach for immune system holds the promise of translating knowledge on the immune system into more successful immunotherapy strategies.

  18. The hexokinase 2-dependent glucose signal transduction pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Fernando; Herrero, Pilar

    2002-03-01

    Sugars, predominantly glucose, evoke a variety of responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These responses are elicited through a complex network of regulatory mechanisms that transduce the signal of presence of external glucose to their final intracellular targets. The HXK2 gene, encoding hexokinase 2 (Hxk2), the enzyme that initiates glucose metabolism, is highly expressed during growth in glucose and plays a pivotal role in the control of the expression of numerous genes, including itself. The mechanism of this autocontrol of expression is not completely understood. Hxk2 is found both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of S. cerevisiae; the nuclear localization is dependent on the presence of a stretch of amino acids located from lysine-6 to methionine-15. Although serine-14, within this stretch, can be phosphorylated in the absence of glucose, it is still unsettled whether this phosphorylation plays a role in the cellular localization of Hxk2. The elucidation of the mechanism of transport of Hxk2 to and from the nucleus, the influence of the oligomeric state of the protein on the nuclear transport and the fine mechanism of regulation of transcription of HXK2 are among the important unanswered questions in relation with the regulatory role of Hxk2.

  19. Discovery of A class GPCR ligands for probing signal transduction pathways

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    Simone eBrogi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven integral transmembrane proteins that are the primary targets of almost 30% of approved drugs and continue to represent a major focus of pharmaceutical research. All of GPCR targeted medicines were discovered by classical medicinal chemistry approaches. After the first GPCR crystal structures were determined, the docking screens using these structures lead to discovery of more novel and potent ligands. There are over 360 pharmaceutically relevant GPCRs in the human genome and to date about only 30 of structures have been determined. For these reasons, computational techniques such as homology modeling and molecular dynamics (MD simulations have proven their usefulness to explore the structure and function of GPCRs. Furthermore, structure-based drug design (SBDD and in silico screening (High Throughput Docking are still the most common computational procedures in GPCRs drug discovery. Moreover, ligand-based methods such as 3D-QSAR, are the ideal molecular modeling approaches to rationalize the activity of tested GPCR ligands and identify novel GPCRs ligands. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances for the computational approaches to effectively guide selectivity and affinity of ligands. We also describe novel approaches in medicinal chemistry, such as the development of biased agonists, allosteric modulators and bivalent ligands for class A GPCRs. Furthermore, we highlight some knockout mice models in discovering biased signaling selectivity.

  20. Signal transduction leading to low-temperature tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Marc R

    2002-07-29

    Calcium is used by most cells to convert external signals into biochemical events within the cytosol. To detect the effects of cold stress, a gene encoding apoaequorin has been introduced into various cell types that, in the presence of coelenterazine, allows calcium levels to be monitored by the emission of blue light. All cell types respond to the cold by elevating calcium. This event is rapid after cold stress but then shows a slower kinetic response. The magnitude is dependent on both the rate and the final temperature to which cooling occurs. It would appear that calcium is transferred both from outside the cell and from the vacuole into the cytosol. The more rapid phase involves the former and the slower phase the latter. By studying mutant plants, it has been identified that an increase in intracellular calcium can activate the expression of transcription factors that control the subsequent transcription of a whole battery of genes which must be switched on to provide cold tolerance in the plant.

  1. Ethylene signal transduction elements involved in chilling injury in non-climacteric loquat fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Zhang, Bo; Li, Xian; Xu, Changjie; Yin, Xueren; Shan, Lanlan; Ferguson, Ian; Chen, Kunsong

    2010-01-01

    Loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) is a subtropical fruit, with some cultivars such as 'Luoyangqing' (LYQ) susceptible to chilling injury (CI), while others such as 'Baisha' (BS) are resistant. Although loquats are non-climacteric, modulation of ethylene has an effect on ripening-related post-harvest CI. Therefore the role of ethylene signalling in the development of CI was investigated in fruit of both the LYQ and BS cultivars. Three ethylene receptor genes, one CTR1-like gene, and one EIN3-like gene were isolated and characterized in ripening fruit. All of these genes were expressed differentially within and between fruit of the two cultivars. Transcripts either declined over fruit development (EjERS1a in both cultivars and EjEIL1 in LYQ) or showed an increase in the middle stages of fruit development before declining (EjETR1, EjERS1b, and EjCTR1 in both cultivars and EjEIL1 in BS). The main cultivar differences were in levels rather than in patterns of expression during post-harvest storage. EjETR1, EjCTR1, and EjEIL1 genes showed increased expression in response to low temperature and this was particularly notable for EjETR1, and EjEIL1 during CI development in LYQ fruit. The genes were also differentially responsive to ethylene treatment, 1-methycyclopropene (1-MCP) and low temperature conditioning, confirming a role for ethylene in regulation of CI in loquat fruit.

  2. Epigenetic and Posttranslational Modifications in Light Signal Transduction and the Circadian Clock in Neurospora crassa

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    Marco Proietto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Blue light, a key abiotic signal, regulates a wide variety of physiological processes in many organisms. One of these phenomena is the circadian rhythm presents in organisms sensitive to the phase-setting effects of blue light and under control of the daily alternation of light and dark. Circadian clocks consist of autoregulatory alternating negative and positive feedback loops intimately connected with the cellular metabolism and biochemical processes. Neurospora crassa provides an excellent model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in these phenomena. The White Collar Complex (WCC, a blue-light receptor and transcription factor of the circadian oscillator, and Frequency (FRQ, the circadian clock pacemaker, are at the core of the Neurospora circadian system. The eukaryotic circadian clock relies on transcriptional/translational feedback loops: some proteins rhythmically repress their own synthesis by inhibiting the activity of their transcriptional factors, generating self-sustained oscillations over a period of about 24 h. One of the basic mechanisms that perpetuate self-sustained oscillations is post translation modification (PTM. The acronym PTM generically indicates the addition of acetyl, methyl, sumoyl, or phosphoric groups to various types of proteins. The protein can be regulatory or enzymatic or a component of the chromatin. PTMs influence protein stability, interaction, localization, activity, and chromatin packaging. Chromatin modification and PTMs have been implicated in regulating circadian clock function in Neurospora. Research into the epigenetic control of transcription factors such as WCC has yielded new insights into the temporal modulation of light-dependent gene transcription. Here we report on epigenetic and protein PTMs in the regulation of the Neurospora crassa circadian clock. We also present a model that illustrates the molecular mechanisms at the basis of the blue light control of the circadian clock.

  3. Role of Structural Dynamics at the Receptor G Protein Interface for Signal Transduction.

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    Alexander S Rose

    Full Text Available GPCRs catalyze GDP/GTP exchange in the α-subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαßγ through displacement of the Gα C-terminal α5 helix, which directly connects the interface of the active receptor (R* to the nucleotide binding pocket of G. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry and kinetic analysis of R* catalysed G protein activation have suggested that displacement of α5 starts from an intermediate GDP bound complex (R*•GGDP. To elucidate the structural basis of receptor-catalysed displacement of α5, we modelled the structure of R*•GGDP. A flexible docking protocol yielded an intermediate R*•GGDP complex, with a similar overall arrangement as in the X-ray structure of the nucleotide free complex (R*•Gempty, however with the α5 C-terminus (GαCT forming different polar contacts with R*. Starting molecular dynamics simulations of GαCT bound to R* in the intermediate position, we observe a screw-like motion, which restores the specific interactions of α5 with R* in R*•Gempty. The observed rotation of α5 by 60° is in line with experimental data. Reformation of hydrogen bonds, water expulsion and formation of hydrophobic interactions are driving forces of the α5 displacement. We conclude that the identified interactions between R* and G protein define a structural framework in which the α5 displacement promotes direct transmission of the signal from R* to the GDP binding pocket.

  4. Rimexolone inhibits proliferation, cytokine expression and signal transduction of human CD4+ T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Cornelia M; Gaber, Timo; Hahne, Martin; Naumann, Lydia; Tripmacher, Robert; Schellmann, Saskia; Stahn, Cindy; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Radbruch, Andreas; Buttgereit, Frank

    2010-06-15

    Rimexolone is a lipophilic glucocorticoid drug used for local application. Only few data are available describing its effects on immune cell functions. In this study we investigated the effects of rimexolone on the proliferation of human CD4+ T-cells using dexamethasone as standard reference. Isolated CD4+ T-cells were pre-incubated with rimexolone or dexamethasone at different concentrations for 10 min (10(-11)/10(-8)/10(-5)M) and stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 for 96 h. Proliferation was determined by flow cytometry. The percentage of dividing cells was significantly reduced by 10(-5)M rimexolone and dexamethasone; however, the average number of cell divisions was unchanged. In addition, production of IL-2 and other cytokines was reduced by both glucocorticoids at 10(-5)M. Interestingly, we observed a rimexolone-induced down-regulation of CD4 expression in unstimulated and non-dividing cells. The inhibitory effects on proliferation and CD4 expression could be blocked by the glucocorticoid-antagonist RU486 and were not due to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. Rimexolone and dexamethasone showed a similar potential to induce IkappaBalpha gene expression. We demonstrate rimexolone and dexamethasone to impair T-cell signalling pathways by rapid non-genomic suppression of the phosphorylation of Akt, p38 and ERK. We conclude that rimexolone and dexamethasone inhibit T-cell proliferation as well as cytokine production of activated CD4+ T-cells in a similar manner. As these inhibitory effects predominantly occur at high concentrations, a relatively high occupation-rate of cytosolic glucocorticoid receptors is needed, but receptor-mediated non-genomic effects may also be involved. It is implied that these effects contribute to the well-known beneficial anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of glucocorticoid therapy. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Involvement of nitric oxide and auxin in signal transduction of copper-induced morphological responses in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pető, Andrea; Lehotai, Nóra; Lozano-Juste, Jorge; León, José; Tari, Irma; Erdei, László; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants are able to adapt to the environment dynamically through regulation of their growth and development. Excess copper (Cu2+), a toxic heavy metal, induces morphological alterations in plant organs; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. With this in mind, the multiple signalling functions of nitric oxide (NO) in plant cells and its possible regulatory role and relationship with auxin were examined during Cu2+-induced morphological responses. Methods Endogenous auxin distribution was determined by microscopic observation of X-Gluc-stained DR5::GUS arabidopsis, and the levels of NO, superoxide and peroxynitrite were detected by fluorescence microscopy. As well as wild-type, NO-overproducer (nox1) and -deficient (nia1nia2 and nia1nia2noa1-2) arabidopsis plants were used. Key Results Cu2+ at a concentration of 50 µm resulted in a large reduction in cotyledon area and hypocotyl and primary root lengths, accompanied by an increase in auxin levels. In cotyledons, a low Cu2+ concentration promoted NO accumulation, which was arrested by nitric oxide synthase or nitrate reductase inhibitors. The 5-μm Cu2+-induced NO synthesis was not detectable in nia1nia2 or nia1nia2noa1-2 plants. In roots, Cu2+ caused a decrease of the NO level which was not associated with superoxide and peroxynitrite formation. Inhibition of auxin transport resulted in an increase in NO levels, while exogenous application of an NO donor reduced DR5::GUS expression. The elongation processes of nox1 were not sensitive to Cu2+, but NO-deficient plants showed diverse growth responses. Conclusions In plant organs, Cu2+ excess results in severe morphological responses during which the endogenous hormonal balance and signal transduction are affected. Auxin and NO negatively regulate each other's level and NO intensifies the metal-induced cotyledon expansion, but mitigates elongation processes under Cu2+ exposure. PMID:21856638

  6. A pulsing electric field (PEF) increases human chondrocyte proliferation through a transduction pathway involving nitric oxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Robert J; Gordon, Stephen L; Kronberg, James; Ganey, Timothy; Pilla, Arthur A

    2008-06-01

    A potential treatment modality for joint pain due to cartilage degradation is electromagnetic fields (EMF) that can be delivered, noninvasively, to chondrocytes buried within cartilage. A pulsed EMF in clinical use for recalcitrant bone fracture healing has been modified to be delivered as a pulsed electric field (PEF) through capacitive coupling. It was the objective of this study to determine whether the PEF signal could have a direct effect on chondrocytes in vitro. This study shows that a 30-min PEF treatment can increase DNA content of chondrocyte monolayer by approximately 150% at 72 h poststimulus. Studies intended to explore the biological mechanism showed this PEF signal increased nitric oxide measured in culture medium and cGMP measured in cell extract within the 30-min exposure period. Increasing calcium in the culture media or adding the calcium ionophore A23187, without PEF treatment, also significantly increased short-term nitric oxide production. The inhibitor W7, which blocks calcium/calmodulin, prevented the PEF-stimulated increase in both nitric oxide and cGMP. The inhibitor L-NAME, which blocks nitric oxide synthase, prevented the PEF-stimulated increase in nitric oxide, cGMP, and DNA content. An inhibitor of guanylate cyclase (LY83583) blocked the PEF-stimulated increase in cGMP and DNA content. A nitric oxide donor, when present for only 30 min, increased DNA content 72 h later. Taken together, these results suggest the transduction pathway for PEF-stimulated chondrocyte proliferation involves nitric oxide and the production of nitric oxide may be the result of a cascade that involves calcium, calmodulin, and cGMP production. (c) 2008 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  7. Crosstalk between mTORC1 and cAMP Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    unknown mode of action. In addition to growth factors, additional stimuli such as inflammation, Wnt signaling , hypoxia , low energy status, and DNA...REDD1 (d) Hypoxia LKB1 (e) Low energy IKKβ(b) Inflamma!on GSKβ(c) Wnt signaling p53 Nf1 Plasma membrane (f) DNA damage IRS PI3K PTEN...Arginine‑induced stimulation of protein synthesis and survival in IPEC‑J2 cells is mediated by mTOR but not nitric oxide . Am. J. Physiol

  8. Is autoinducer-2 a universal signal for interspecies communication: a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis of the synthesis and signal transduction pathways

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    Wagner-Döbler Irene

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a process of bacterial cell-to-cell communication involving the production and detection of extracellular signaling molecules called autoinducers. Recently, it has been proposed that autoinducer-2 (AI-2, a furanosyl borate diester derived from the recycling of S-adenosyl-homocysteine (SAH to homocysteine, serves as a universal signal for interspecies communication. Results In this study, 138 completed genomes were examined for the genes involved in the synthesis and detection of AI-2. Except for some symbionts and parasites, all organisms have a pathway to recycle SAH, either using a two-step enzymatic conversion by the Pfs and LuxS enzymes or a one-step conversion using SAH-hydrolase (SahH. 51 organisms including most Gamma-, Beta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria, and Firmicutes possess the Pfs-LuxS pathway, while Archaea, Eukarya, Alphaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria prefer the SahH pathway. In all 138 organisms, only the three Vibrio strains had strong, bidirectional matches to the periplasmic AI-2 binding protein LuxP and the central signal relay protein LuxU. The initial two-component sensor kinase protein LuxQ, and the terminal response regulator luxO are found in most Proteobacteria, as well as in some Firmicutes, often in several copies. Conclusions The genomic analysis indicates that the LuxS enzyme required for AI-2 synthesis is widespread in bacteria, while the periplasmic binding protein LuxP is only present in Vibrio strains. Thus, other organisms may either use components different from the AI-2 signal transduction system of Vibrio strains to sense the signal of AI-2, or they do not have such a quorum sensing system at all.

  9. Major and minor group rhinoviruses elicit differential signaling and cytokine responses as a function of receptor-mediated signal transduction.

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    Bryce A Schuler

    Full Text Available Major- and minor-group human rhinoviruses (HRV enter their host by binding to the cell surface molecules ICAM-1 and LDL-R, respectively, which are present on both macrophages and epithelial cells. Although epithelial cells are the primary site of productive HRV infection, previous studies have implicated macrophages in establishing the cytokine dysregulation that occurs during rhinovirus-induced asthma exacerbations. Analysis of the transcriptome of primary human macrophages exposed to major- and minor-group HRV demonstrated differential gene expression. Alterations in gene expression were traced to differential mitochondrial activity and signaling pathway activation between two rhinovirus serotypes, HRV16 (major-group and HRV1A (minor-group, upon initial HRV binding. Variances in phosphorylation of kinases (p38, JNK, ERK5 and transcription factors (ATF-2, CREB, CEBP-alpha were observed between the major- and minor-group HRV treatments. Differential activation of signaling pathways led to changes in the production of the asthma-relevant cytokines CCL20, CCL2, and IL-10. This is the first report of genetically similar viruses eliciting dissimilar cytokine release, transcription factor phosphorylation, and MAPK activation from macrophages, suggesting that receptor use is a mechanism for establishing the inflammatory microenvironment in the human airway upon exposure to rhinovirus.

  10. Exposure to a specific time-varying electromagnetic field inhibits cell proliferation via cAMP and ERK signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Carly A; Buckner, Alison L; Koren, Stan A; Persinger, Michael A; Lafrenie, Robert M

    2017-11-10

    Exposure to specific electromagnetic field (EMF) patterns can affect a variety of biological systems. We have shown that exposure to Thomas-EMF, a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern, inhibited growth and altered cell signaling in malignant cells. Exposure to Thomas-EMF for 1 h/day inhibited the growth of malignant cells including B16-BL6 mouse melanoma cells, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, BT-20, and MCF-7 human breast cancer and HeLa cervical cancer cells but did not affect non-malignant cells. The Thomas-EMF-dependent changes in cell proliferation were mediated by adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF transiently changed the level of cellular cAMP and promoted ERK phosphorylation. Pharmacologic inhibitors (SQ22536) and activators (forskolin) of cAMP production both blocked the ability of Thomas-EMF to inhibit cell proliferation, and an inhibitor of the MAP kinase pathway (PD98059) was able to partially block Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Genetic modulation of protein kinase A (PKA) in B16-BL6 cells also altered the effect of Thomas-EMF on cell proliferation. Cells transfected with the constitutively active form of PKA (PKA-CA), which interfered with ERK phosphorylation, also interfered with the Thomas-EMF effect on cell proliferation. The non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in cAMP levels, ERK phosphorylation, or cell growth. These data indicate that exposure to the specific Thomas-EMF pattern can inhibit the growth of malignant cells in a manner dependent on contributions from the cAMP and MAP kinase pathways. Bioelectromagnetics. 2017;9999:XX-XX. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Release of GTP Exchange Factor Mediated Down-Regulation of Abscisic Acid Signal Transduction through ABA-Induced Rapid Degradation of RopGEFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waadt, Rainer; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical to plant development and stress responses. Abiotic stress triggers an ABA signal transduction cascade, which is comprised of the core components PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, PP2C-type protein phosphatases, and protein kinases. Small GTPases of the ROP/RAC family act as negative regulators of ABA signal transduction. However, the mechanisms by which ABA controls the behavior of ROP/RACs have remained unclear. Here, we show that an Arabidopsis guanine nucleotide exchange factor protein RopGEF1 is rapidly sequestered to intracellular particles in response to ABA. GFP-RopGEF1 is sequestered via the endosome-prevacuolar compartment pathway and is degraded. RopGEF1 directly interacts with several clade A PP2C protein phosphatases, including ABI1. Interestingly, RopGEF1 undergoes constitutive degradation in pp2c quadruple abi1/abi2/hab1/pp2ca mutant plants, revealing that active PP2C protein phosphatases protect and stabilize RopGEF1 from ABA-mediated degradation. Interestingly, ABA-mediated degradation of RopGEF1 also plays an important role in ABA-mediated inhibition of lateral root growth. The presented findings point to a PP2C-RopGEF-ROP/RAC control loop model that is proposed to aid in shutting off ABA signal transduction, to counteract leaky ABA signal transduction caused by “monomeric” PYL/RCAR ABA receptors in the absence of stress, and facilitate signaling in response to ABA. PMID:27192441

  12. Effects of osmotic stress on the activity of MAPKs and PDGFR-beta-mediated signal transduction in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M-B; Christensen, Søren Tvorup; Hoffmann, E K

    2008-01-01

    in a serum- and nutrient-free inorganic medium (300 mosM) to analyze the effects of osmotic stress on MAPK activity and PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-beta-mediated signal transduction. We found that hypoosmolarity (cell swelling at 211 mosM) induced the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of ERK1/2, most......Signaling in cell proliferation, cell migration, and apoptosis is highly affected by osmotic stress and changes in cell volume, although the mechanisms underlying the significance of cell volume as a signal in cell growth and death are poorly understood. In this study, we used NIH-3T3 fibroblasts...

  13. Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0051 TITLE: Activation of mTor Signaling by Gene Transduction to Induce Axon Regeneration in the Central Nervous System ...Central Nervous System Following Neural Injury 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0051 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert...mature mammalian central nervous system (CNS), unlike the peripheral nervous system (PNS), is incapable of axon regeneration. There are currently two

  14. Crosstalk between mTORC1 and cAMP Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (25). We identified the Arf1 GTPase to be involved in a signaling pathway that connects Gln to mTORC1 activation at the lysosome in...Empty vector,NLKwild type, orNLK-KNwas transfected togetherwith S6K into HEK293 cells. Cells were starved with amino acid-free medium for 1 h and...normal culture or starved with amino acid-free medium for 1 h. The activity of mTORC1was examined by S6K phosphorylation. (F ) NLK induces Raptor

  15. Identification of DNA binding motifs of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP/PhoR two-component signal transduction system.

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    Mena Cimino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Mycobacterium tuberculosis PhoP/PhoR two-component signal transduction system controls the expression of about 2% of the genome and plays a major role in pathogenicity. However, its regulon has not been well characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The binding site of PhoP transcription regulator was identified in the upstream regions of msl3, pks2, lipF and fadD21 genes, by using gene fusions, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting experiments. A consensus sequence for PhoP binding was deduced. It consists of two direct repeats, DR1/DR2, associated with a third repeat, DR3, important in some cases for PhoP binding to DR1/DR2 but located at a variable distance from these direct repeats. DR1/DR2 and DR3 consensus sequences were used to screen the whole-genome sequence for other putative binding sites potentially corresponding to genes directly regulated by PhoP. The identified 87 genes, encoding transcription regulators, and proteins involved in secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and catabolism are proposed to belong to the PhoP regulon. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A consensus sequence derived from the analysis of PhoP binding to four gene promoter regions is proposed. We show for the first time the involvement of a third direct repeat motif in this binding reaction. The consensus sequence was instrumented to study the global regulation mediated by PhoP in M. tuberculosis. This analysis leads to the identification of several genes that are potentially regulated by this key player.

  16. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    sigma Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned mu opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding, by sigma(1) receptors. sigma Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither sigma agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Yet sigma receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC(50) of opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. sigma(1) Receptors physically associate with mu opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, sigma receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of sigma(1) in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated mu opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to mu and delta opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, sigma(1)-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, suggesting a broader role for sigma receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling.

  17. A cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication is involved in signal transduction in antigen-specific T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, R L; Clark, R B; Gutowski, J K; Katz, M E; Fresa, K L; Cohen, S

    1990-05-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from T cell lines undergoing antigen-specific, interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent proliferation were tested for their ability to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. A tetanus toxoid (TET)-specific T cell line, established from peripheral blood of a normal human volunteer, was stimulated in the presence of relevant antigen and 1 unit/ml IL-2. Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells were capable of inducing DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts to induce DNA synthesis in isolated nuclei correlated positively with the degree of proliferation induced in these cells. In contrast, incubation of this T cell line in the absence of antigen failed to induce proliferation and cytoplasmic extracts prepared from these cells induced little to no DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei. The factor present in the cytoplasm of T cells stimulated with relevant antigen in the presence of IL-2 is similar, if not identical, to a factor which we have previously demonstrated in cytoplasmic extracts prepared from transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines and from mitogenically stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This factor, which we have called activator of DNA replication (ADR) is a heat-labile protein, and is inactivated by treatment with protease inhibitors, including aprotinin. The ability of cytoplasmic extracts from T cells undergoing antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent proliferation to induce DNA synthesis in isolated, quiescent nuclei was markedly inhibited in the presence of aprotinin, providing strong evidence that a cytoplasmic activator of DNA replication, ADR, is involved in the signal transduction process for antigen-specific, IL-2-dependent T cell proliferation. ADR may represent a common intracellular mediator of DNA synthesis in activated and transformed lymphocytes.

  18. Alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotection and visual signal transduction in the retina of Parkinsonian, MPTP-treated monkeys.

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    Laura Campello

    Full Text Available Parkinson disease is mainly characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system, including the retina. Different interrelated molecular mechanisms underlying Parkinson disease-associated neuronal death have been put forward in the brain, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Systemic injection of the proneurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP to monkeys elicits the appearance of a parkinsonian syndrome, including morphological and functional impairments in the retina. However, the intracellular events leading to derangement of dopaminergic and other retinal neurons in MPTP-treated animal models have not been so far investigated. Here we have used a comparative proteomics approach to identify proteins differentially expressed in the retina of MPTP-treated monkeys. Proteins were solubilized from the neural retinas of control and MPTP-treated animals, labelled separately with two different cyanine fluorophores and run pairwise on 2D DIGE gels. Out of >700 protein spots resolved and quantified, 36 were found to exhibit statistically significant differences in their expression levels, of at least ± 1.4-fold, in the parkinsonian monkey retina compared with controls. Most of these spots were excised from preparative 2D gels, trypsinized and subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and LC-MS/MS analyses. Data obtained were used for protein sequence database interrogation, and 15 different proteins were successfully identified, of which 13 were underexpressed and 2 overexpressed. These proteins were involved in key cellular functional pathways such as glycolysis and mitochondrial electron transport, neuronal protection against stress and survival, and phototransduction processes. These functional categories underscore that alterations in energy metabolism, neuroprotective mechanisms and signal transduction are involved in MPTP-induced neuronal degeneration in the retina, in similarity to

  19. Evolutionary history of the OmpR/IIIA family of signal transduction two component systems in Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae

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    González-Candelas Fernando

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two component systems (TCS are signal transduction pathways which typically consist of a sensor histidine kinase (HK and a response regulator (RR. In this study, we have analyzed the evolution of TCS of the OmpR/IIIA family in Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae, two families belonging to the group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. LAB colonize nutrient-rich environments such as foodstuffs, plant materials and the gastrointestinal tract of animals thus driving the study of this group of both basic and applied interest. Results The genomes of 19 strains belonging to 16 different species have been analyzed. The number of TCS encoded by the strains considered in this study varied between 4 in Lactobacillus helveticus and 17 in Lactobacillus casei. The OmpR/IIIA family was the most prevalent in Lactobacillaceae accounting for 71% of the TCS present in this group. The phylogenetic analysis shows that no new TCS of this family has recently evolved in these Lactobacillaceae by either lineage-specific gene expansion or domain shuffling. Furthermore, no clear evidence of non-orthologous replacements of either RR or HK partners has been obtained, thus indicating that coevolution of cognate RR and HKs has been prevalent in Lactobacillaceae. Conclusions The results obtained suggest that vertical inheritance of TCS present in the last common ancestor and lineage-specific gene losses appear as the main evolutionary forces involved in their evolution in Lactobacillaceae, although some HGT events cannot be ruled out. This would agree with the genomic analyses of Lactobacillales which show that gene losses have been a major trend in the evolution of this group.

  20. Signal transduction of the melatonin receptor MT1 is disrupted in breast cancer cells by electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgert, Rainer; Hanf, Volker; Emons, Günter; Gründker, Carsten

    2010-04-01

    The growth of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer cells is inhibited by the pineal gland hormone, melatonin. Concern has been raised that power-line frequency and microwave electromagnetic fields (EMFs) could reduce the efficiency of melatonin on breast cancer cells. In this study we investigated the impact of EMFs on the signal transduction of the high-affinity receptor MT1 in parental MCF-7 cells and MCF-7 cells transfected with the MT1 gene. The binding of the cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein to a promoter sequence of BRCA-1 after stimulation with melatonin was analyzed by a gel-shift assay and the expression of four estrogen-responsive genes was measured in sham-exposed breast cancer cells and cells exposed to a sinusoidal 50 Hz EMF of 1.2 microT for 48 h. In sham-exposed cells, binding of CREB to the promoter of BRCA-1 was increased by estradiol and subsequently diminished by treatment with melatonin. In cells exposed to 1.2 microT, 50 Hz EMF, binding of CREB was almost completely omitted. Expression of BRCA-1, p53, p21(WAF), and c-myc was increased by estradiol stimulation and subsequently decreased by melatonin treatment in both cell lines, except for p53 expression in the transfected cell line, thereby proving the antiestrogenic effect of melatonin at molecular level. In contrast, in breast cancer cells transfected with MT1 exposed to 1.2 microT of the 50 Hz EMF, the expression of p53 and c-myc increased significantly after melatonin treatment but for p21(WAF) the increase was not significant. These results convincingly prove the negative effect of EMF on the antiestrogenic effect of melatonin in breast cancer cells. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Anti-proliferative, apoptotic and signal transduction effects of hesperidin in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birsu Cincin, Zeynep; Unlu, Miray; Kiran, Bayram; Sinem Bireller, Elif; Baran, Yusuf; Cakmakoglu, Bedia

    2015-06-01

    Hesperidin, a glycoside flavonoid, is thought to act as an anti-cancer agent, since it has been found to exhibit both pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in several cancer cell types. The mechanisms underlying hesperidin-induced growth arrest and apoptosis are, however, not well understood. Here, we aimed to investigate the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of hesperidin on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and to investigate the mechanisms involved. The anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of hesperidin on two NSCLC-derived cell lines, A549 and NCI-H358, were determined using a WST-1 colorimetric assay, a LDH cytotoxicity assay, a Cell Death Detection assay, an AnnexinV-FITC assay, a caspase-3 assay and a JC-1 assay, respectively, all in a time- and dose-dependent manner. As a control, non-cancerous MRC-5 lung fibroblasts were included. Changes in whole genome gene expression profiles were assessed using an Illumina Human HT-12v4 beadchip microarray platform, and subsequent data analyses were performed using an Illumina Genome Studio and Ingenuity Pathway Analyser (IPA). We found that after hesperidin treatment, A549 and NCI-H358 cells exhibited decreasing cell proliferation and increasing caspase-3 and other apoptosis-related activities, in conjunction with decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential activities, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Through a GO analysis, by which changes in gene expression profiles were compared, we found that the FGF and NF-κB signal transduction pathways were most significantly affected in the hesperidin treated NCI-H358 and A549 NSCLC cells. Our results indicate that hesperidin elicits an in vitro growth inhibitory effect on NSCLC cells by modulating immune response-related pathways that affect apoptosis. When confirmed in vivo, hesperidin may serve as a novel anti-proliferative agent for non-small cell lung cancer.

  2. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebiyi, Adebowale, E-mail: aadebiyi@uthsc.edu; Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  3. Carbohydrate Stress Affecting Fruitlet Abscission and Expression of Genes Related to Auxin Signal Transduction Pathway in Litchi

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    Wang-Jin Lu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Auxin, a vital plant hormone, regulates a variety of physiological and developmental processes. It is involved in fruit abscission through transcriptional regulation of many auxin-related genes, including early auxin responsive genes (i.e., auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA, Gretchen Hagen3 (GH3 and small auxin upregulated (SAUR and auxin response factors (ARF, which have been well characterized in many plants. In this study, totally five auxin-related genes, including one AUX/IAA (LcAUX/IAA1, one GH3 (LcGH3.1, one SAUR (LcSAUR1 and two ARFs (LcARF1 and LcARF2, were isolated and characterized from litchi fruit. LcAUX/IAA1, LcGH3.1, LcSAUR1, LcARF1 and LcARF2 contain open reading frames (ORFs encoding polypeptides of 203, 613, 142, 792 and 832 amino acids, respectively, with their corresponding molecular weights of 22.67, 69.20, 11.40, 88.20 and 93.16 kDa. Expression of these genes was investigated under the treatment of girdling plus defoliation which aggravated litchi fruitlet abscission due to the blockage of carbohydrates transport and the reduction of endogenous IAA content. Results showed that transcript levels of LcAUX/IAA1, LcGH3.1 and LcSAUR1 mRNAs were increased after the treatment in abscission zone (AZ and other tissues, in contrast to the decreasing accumulation of LcARF1 mRNA, suggesting that LcAUX/IAA1, LcSAUR1 and LcARF1 may play more important roles in abscission. Our results provide new insight into the process of fruitlet abscission induced by carbohydrate stress and broaden our understanding of the auxin signal transduction pathway in this process at the molecular level.

  4. Expression of signal transduction system encoding genes of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis IP32953 at 28°C and 3°C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveliina Palonen

    Full Text Available Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a significant psychrotrophic food pathogen whose cold tolerance mechanisms are poorly understood. Signal transduction systems serve to monitor the environment, but no systematic investigation of their role at cold temperatures in Y. pseudotuberculosis has yet been undertaken. The relative expression levels of 54 genes predicted to encode proteins belonging to signal transduction systems in Y. pseudotuberculosis IP32953 were determined at 28°C and 3°C by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. The relative expression levels of 44 genes were significantly (p<0.05 higher at 3°C than at 28°C. Genes encoding the two-component system CheA/CheY had the highest relative expression levels at 3°C. Mutational analysis revealed that cheA is important for growth and motility at 3°C. The relative expression level of one gene, rssB, encoding an RpoS regulator, was significantly (p<0.05 lower at 3°C than at 28°C. The results suggest that several signal transduction systems might be used during growth at low temperature, and at least, CheA/CheY two-component system is important for low-temperature growth.

  5. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lei [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physiology, Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin 300071 (China); Carr, Aprell L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Ping; Lee, Jessica; McGregor, Mary [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Lei, E-mail: Li.78@nd.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Stil is a human oncogene that is conserved in vertebrate species. • Stil functions in the Shh pathway in mammalian cells. • The expression of Stil is required for mammalian dopaminergic cell proliferation. - Abstract: The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  6. Subretinal Fluid Levels of Signal-Transduction Proteins and Apoptosis Molecules in Macula-Off Retinal Detachment Undergoing Scleral Buckle Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpineto, Paolo; Aharrh-Gnama, Agbeanda; Ciciarelli, Vincenzo; Borrelli, Enrico; Petti, Francesco; Aloia, Raffaella; Lamolinara, Alessia; Di Nicola, Marta; Mastropasqua, Leonardo

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate signal transduction and early apoptosis protein levels in subretinal fluid collected during scleral buckling surgery for macula-off rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD). Our aim was to assess both their relation with RRD features and their influence on the posttreatment outcome. Thirty-three eyes of 33 RRD patients scheduled for scleral buckle surgery were enrolled in the study. Undiluted subretinal fluid samples were collected during surgery and analyzed via magnetic bead-based immunoassay. All patients underwent a complete ophthalmologic evaluation at baseline and at each follow-up visit (months 1, 3, and 6). Moreover, both at baseline and at the postsurgery month 6 visit, the patients were tested by means of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) in order to evaluate the average ganglion cell-inner plexiform complex thickness, as well as the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction status. Patients' clinical features (retinal detachment size, detachment duration, and occurrence of proliferative vitreoretinopathy) were associated with several early apoptotic factors (caspase-8, caspase-9, and B-cell lymphoma 2 [Bcl-2]-associated death promoter [BAD]). Furthermore, both early apoptosis factors (caspase-8, Bcl-2, and p53) and signal-transduction proteins (ERK 1/2) were found to influence the postsurgery month 3 OCT characteristics. Signal-transduction proteins and early apoptosis proteins are associated with different clinical features and postsurgery outcomes.

  7. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Maite Rocío, E-mail: arana@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás, E-mail: gtocchetti@live.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Domizi, Pablo, E-mail: domizi@ibr-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Arias, Agostina, E-mail: agoarias@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo, E-mail: jprigalli@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Ruiz, María Laura, E-mail: ruiz@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  8. CNP-pGC-cGMP-PDE3-cAMP Signal Pathway Upregulated in Gastric Smooth Muscle of Diabetic Rats

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    Ying-Lan Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP is upregulated in the diabetic rats. The present study was designed to determine whether the upregulation of CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP signal pathway affects cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway in diabetic gastric smooth muscle. The gastric smooth muscle motility was observed by using isometric measurement. PDEs expressions in diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue were observed by using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and RT-PCR methods. The results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of CNP on the spontaneous contraction of gastric antral circular smooth muscle was potentiated in STZ-induced diabetic rat. CNP-induced increase of cGMP and cAMP was much higher in diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue than in controls. The expression of PDE3 is downregulated while the levels of gene expression of PDE1, PDE2, PDE4, and PDE5 were not altered in the diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue. The results suggest that the sensitivity of gastric smooth muscle to CNP is potentiated via activation of CNP-pGC-cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway in STZ-induced diabetic rats, which may be associated with diabetes-induced gastric motility disorder.

  9. Protein expression, biochemical pharmacology of signal transduction, and relation to intraocular pressure modulation by bradykinin B₂ receptors in ciliary muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Najam A; Xu, Shouxi; Li, Linya; Katoli, Parvaneh; Kelly, Curtis R; Wang, Yu; Cao, Shutong; Patil, Rajkumar; Husain, Shahid; Klekar, Laura; Scott, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    To examine the bradykinin (BK) B₂-receptor system in human and monkey ciliary muscle (CM) using immunohistochemical techniques, and to pharmacologically characterize the associated biochemical signal transduction systems in human CM (h-CM) cells. BK-induced modulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) in pigmented Dutch-Belt rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys was also studied. Previously published procedures were used throughout these studies. The human and monkey ciliary bodies expressed high levels of B₂-receptor protein immunoreactivity. Various kinins differentially stimulated [Ca²⁺](i) mobilization in primary h-CM cells (BK EC₅₀=2.4±0.2 nM > Hyp³,β-(2-thienyl)-Ala⁵,Tyr(Me)⁸-(®)-Arg⁹-BK (RMP-7) > Des-Arg⁹-BK EC₅₀=4.2 µM [n=3-6]), and this was blocked by B₂-selective antagonists, HOE-140 (IC₅₀=1.4±0.1 nM) and WIN-63448 (IC₅₀=174 nM). A phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122; 10-30 µM) and ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (1-2 mM) abolished the BK-induced [Ca²⁺](i) mobilization. Total prostaglandin (primarily PGE₂) secretion stimulated by BK and other kinins in h-CM cells was attenuated by the cyclooxygenase inhibitors bromfenac and flurbiprofen, and by the B₂-antagonists. BK and RMP-7 (100 nM) induced a twofold increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 phosphorylation, and BK (0.1-1 µM; at 24 h) caused a 1.4-3.1-fold increase in promatrix metalloproteinases-1-3 release. Topical ocular BK (100 µg) failed to alter IOP in cynomolgus monkeys. However, intravitreal injection of 50 µg of BK, but not Des-Arg⁹-BK, lowered IOP in rabbit eyes (22.9±7.3% and 37.0±5.6% at 5 h and 8 h post-injection; n=7-10). These studies have provided evidence of a functional endogenously expressed B₂-receptor system in the CM that appears to be involved in modulating IOP.

  10. Multiple effects of differentiation-inducing factor on prespore differentiation and cyclic-AMP signal transduction in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Mei; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Schaap, Pauline

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the differentiation inducing factor (DIF) on several cAMP-induced responses in Dictyostelium were investigated. It was found that DIF reduces the apparent affinity of cell-surface cAMP receptors. DIF does not affect the cAMP-induced cGMP response, but it is a potent inhibitor of the

  11. beta3-Adrenergic-dependent and -independent mechanisms participate in cold-induced modulation of insulin signal transduction in brown adipose tissue of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparetti, Alessandra L; Alvarez-Rojas, Fernanda; de Araujo, Eliana P; Hirata, Aparecida E; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2005-03-01

    During cold exposure, homeothermic animals mobilize glucose with higher efficiency than at thermoneutrality. An interaction between the insulin signal transduction machinery and high sympathetic tonus is thought to play an important role in this phenomenon. In the present study, rats were exposed to cold during 8 days and treated, or not, with a beta3-adrenergic agonist, BRL37344 sodium 4-2-2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl amino propyl phenoxy-acetic acid sodium (BRL37344), or antagonist, SR59230A 3-(2-ethylphenoxy)-[(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphth-1-ylamino]-(2S)-2-propanol oxalate (SR59230A), to evaluate the cross-talk between insulin and beta3-adrenergic intracellular signaling in brown adipose tissue. The drugs did not modify food ingestion, body temperature, and body weight in control and cold-exposed rats. Treatment of control rats with BRL37344 led to higher insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptors, insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 and ERK, higher insulin-induced IRS-1/PI3-kinase association, and higher [Ser(473)] phosphorylation of Akt. Cold exposure alone promoted higher insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptors, IRS-1, IRS-2, and ERK, and higher insulin-induced IRS-1 and IRS-2/PI3-kinase association. Except for the regulation of ERK, SR59230A abolished all the cold-induced effects upon the insulin signal transduction pathway. However, this antagonist only partially inhibited the cold-induced increase of glucose uptake. Thus, the sympathetic tonus generated during cold-exposure acts, in brown adipose tissue, through the beta3-adrenergic receptor and modulates insulin signal transduction, with the exception of ERK. However, insulin-independent mechanisms other than beta3-adrenergic activation participate in cold-induced glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue of rats.

  12. The tomato kinome and the tomato kinase library ORFeome: novel resources for the study of kinases and signal transduction in tomato and solanaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharmendra K; Calviño, Mauricio; Brauer, Elizabeth K; Fernandez-Pozo, Noe; Strickler, Susan; Yalamanchili, Roopa; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Aoki, Koh; Shibata, Daisuke; Stratmann, Johannes W; Popescu, George V; Mueller, Lukas A; Popescu, Sorina C

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase-driven phosphorylation constitutes the core of cellular signaling. Kinase components of signal transduction pathways are often targeted for inactivation by pathogens. The study of kinases and immune signal transduction in the model crop tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) would benefit from the availability of community-wide resources for large scale and systems-level experimentation. Here, we defined the tomato kinome and performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of the tomato kinome and 15 other plant species. We constructed a tomato kinase library (TOKN 1.0) of over 300 full-length open reading frames (ORF) cloned into a recombination-based vector. We developed a high-throughput pipeline to isolate and transform tomato protoplasts. A subset of the TOKN 1.0 library kinases were expressed in planta, were purified, and were used to generate a functional tomato protein microarray. All resources created were utilized to test known and novel associations between tomato kinases and Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 effectors in a large-scale format. Bsk7 was identified as a component of the plant immune response and a candidate effector target. These resources will enable comprehensive investigations of signaling pathways and host-pathogen interactions in tomato and other Solanaceae spp.

  13. Traffic signal summer camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    The Department of Transportation's new Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) program mandates that computing, communications, electronics, and other advanced technologies be applied to improving the capacity and safety of the nation's transportatio...

  14. Similar activation of signal transduction pathways by the herpesvirus-encoded chemokine receptors US28 and ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLean, Katherine A; Holst, Peter J; Martini, Lene

    2004-01-01

    The virally encoded chemokine receptors US28 from human cytomegalovirus and ORF74 from human herpesvirus 8 are both constitutively active. We show that both receptors constitutively activate the transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and cAMP response element binding...... viral gene expression similarly. As ORF74 is a known inducer of neoplasia, these findings may have important implications for cytomegalovirus-associated pathogenicity....

  15. Leptin interferes with 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP signaling to inhibit steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HoYuen Basil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of female infertility. Leptin, an adipocytokine which is elevated during obesity, may influence gonadal function through modulating steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. Methods The effect of leptin on progesterone production in simian virus 40 immortalized granulosa (SVOG cells was examined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The effect of leptin on the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, P450scc, 3betaHSD in SVOG cells was examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mRNA expression of leptin receptor isoforms in SVOG cells were examined by using PCR. SVOG cells were co-treated with leptin and specific pharmacological inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in leptin-reduced progesterone production. Silencing RNA against leptin receptor was used to determine that the inhibition of leptin on cAMP-induced steroidogenesis acts in a leptin receptor-dependent manner. Results and Conclusion In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying leptin-regulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. We show that leptin inhibits 8-bromo cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that leptin inhibits expression of the cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, the rate limiting de novo protein in progesterone synthesis. Leptin induces the activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK but only the ERK1/2 (PD98059 and p38 (SB203580 inhibitors attenuate the leptin-induced inhibition of cAMP-stimulated StAR protein expression and progesterone production. These data suggest that the leptin-induced MAPK signal transduction pathway interferes with cAMP/PKA-stimulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. Moreover, siRNA mediated knock-down of the endogenous leptin receptor attenuates the effect of leptin on cAMP-induced StAR protein expression and progesterone

  16. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling of ROS scavenging and signal transduction pathways in rice (Oryza sativa L.) in response to different types of ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Song, Mira; Lee, Kyung Jun; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Jang, Cheol Sung; Kim, Jin-Baek; Kim, Sang Hoon; Ha, Bo-Keun; Kang, Si-Yong; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-12-01

    Ionizing radiation directly and indirectly affects gene expression within the plant genome. To access the antioxidant response of rice to different types of ionizing radiation, rice seeds were exposed to gamma-ray, cosmic-ray and ion beam radiation. Exposure to ionizing radiation dramatically decreased the shoot length in all plants but not the root length compared with a non-irradiated plant. Electron spin resonance, confirmed that the number of free radicals in cell was greatly increased by different types of ionizing radiation. The measurement of the MDA, chlorophyll, carotenoids contents and activity of antioxidant enzymes revealed that gamma-ray and cosmic-ray, but not ion beam, ionization deceased chlorophyll and carotenoids contents, while all three ionization treatments increased the activities of peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase compared with the non-irradiated plants. Microarray analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip was used to establish the gene transcript profiles of rice genes regarding ROS scavenging and signal transduction pathways after ionization treatment. Many of the rice genes involved in ROS scavenging and signal transduction pathways showed induction or repression that had increased more than twofold after ionization treatment. In particular, genes associated with electron transport, such as NADPH oxidase-like and alternative oxidase, were often down-regulated by more than twofold in response to the ionization treatments. In our transcriptomic profile analysis, we confirmed that the expression of rice genes associated with ROS scavenging and signal transduction pathways was induced or repressed to different degrees by the different types of ionizing radiations, as in other environmental stresses.

  17. Systems level analysis of two-component signal transduction systems in Erwinia amylovora: Role in virulence, regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis and swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundin George W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTs, consisting of a histidine kinase (HK and a response regulator (RR, represent a major paradigm for signal transduction in prokaryotes. TCSTs play critical roles in sensing and responding to environmental conditions, and in bacterial pathogenesis. Most TCSTs in Erwinia amylovora have either not been identified or have not yet been studied. Results We used a systems approach to identify TCST and related signal transduction genes in the genome of E. amylovora. Comparative genomic analysis of TCSTs indicated that E. amylovora TCSTs were closely related to those of Erwinia tasmaniensis, a saprophytic enterobacterium isolated from apple flowers, and to other enterobacteria. Forty-six TCST genes in E. amylovora including 17 sensor kinases, three hybrid kinases, 20 DNA- or ligand-binding RRs, four RRs with enzymatic output domain (EAL-GGDEF proteins, and two kinases were characterized in this study. A systematic TCST gene-knockout experiment was conducted, generating a total of 59 single-, double-, and triple-mutants. Virulence assays revealed that five of these mutants were non-pathogenic on immature pear fruits. Results from phenotypic characterization and gene expression experiments indicated that several groups of TCST systems in E. amylovora control amylovoran biosynthesis, one of two major virulence factors in E. amylovora. Both negative and positive regulators of amylovoran biosynthesis were identified, indicating a complex network may control this important feature of pathogenesis. Positive (non-motile, EnvZ/OmpR, negative (hypermotile, GrrS/GrrA, and intermediate regulators for swarming motility in E. amylovora were also identified. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that TCSTs in E. amylovora played major roles in virulence on immature pear fruit and in regulating amylovoran biosynthesis and swarming motility. This suggested presence of regulatory networks governing

  18. A VicRK Signal Transduction System in Streptococcus mutans Affects gtfBCD, gbpB, and ftf Expression, Biofilm Formation, and Genetic Competence Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadheera, M. Dilani; Guggenheim, Bernard; Spatafora, Grace A.; Huang, Yi-Chen Cathy; Choi, Jison; Hung, David C. I.; Treglown, Jennifer S.; Goodman, Steven D.; Ellen, Richard P.; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G.

    2005-01-01

    Bacteria exposed to transient host environments can elicit adaptive responses by triggering the differential expression of genes via two-component signal transduction systems. This study describes the vicRK signal transduction system in Streptococcus mutans. A vicK (putative histidine kinase) deletion mutant (SmuvicK) was isolated. However, a vicR (putative response regulator) null mutation was apparently lethal, since the only transformants isolated after attempted mutagenesis overexpressed all three genes in the vicRKX operon (Smuvic+). Compared with the wild-type UA159 strain, both mutants formed aberrant biofilms. Moreover, the vicK mutant biofilm formed in sucrose-supplemented medium was easily detachable relative to that of the parent. The rate of total dextran formation by this mutant was remarkably reduced compared to the wild type, whereas it was increased in Smuvic+. Based on real-time PCR, Smuvic+ showed increased gtfBCD, gbpB, and ftf expression, while a recombinant VicR fusion protein was shown to bind the promoter regions of the gtfB, gtfC, and ftf genes. Also, transformation efficiency in the presence or absence of the S. mutans competence-stimulating peptide was altered for the vic mutants. In vivo studies conducted using SmuvicK in a specific-pathogen-free rat model resulted in significantly increased smooth-surface dental plaque (Pearson-Filon statistic [PF], <0.001). While the absence of vicK did not alter the incidence of caries, a significant reduction in SmuvicK CFU counts was observed in plaque samples relative to that of the parent (PF, <0.001). Taken together, these findings support involvement of the vicRK signal transduction system in regulating several important physiological processes in S. mutans. PMID:15937169

  19. PrPc capping in T cells promotes its association with the lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and reggie-2 and leads to signal transduction : [Langfassung

    OpenAIRE

    Stürmer, Claudia; Langhorst, Matthias F.; Wiechers, Marianne F.; Legler, Daniel F.; Hannbeck von Hanwehr, Sylvia; Guse, Andreas H.; Plattner, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPc) resides in lipid rafts, yet the type of raft and the physiological function of PrPc are unclear. We show here that cross-linking of PrPc with specific antibodies leads to 1) PrPc capping in Jurkat and human peripheral blood T cells; 2) to cocapping with the intracellular lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and reggie-2; 3) to signal transduction as seen by MAP kinase phosphorylation and an elevation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration; 4) to the recruitment of T...

  20. Biochemical Characterization of RssA-RssB, a Two-Component Signal Transduction System Regulating Swarming Behavior in Serratia marcescens

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Jun-Rong; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Soo, Po-Chi; Horng, Yu-Tze; Hsieh, Shang-Chen; Ho, Shen-Wu; Lai, Hsin-Chih

    2005-01-01

    Our previous study had identified a pair of potential two-component signal transduction proteins, RssA-RssB, involved in the regulation of Serratia marcescens swarming. When mutated, both rssA and rssB mutants showed precocious swarming phenotypes on LB swarming agar, whereby swarming not only occurred at 37°C but also initiated on a surface of higher agar concentration and more rapidly than did the parent strain at 30°C. In this study, we further show that the predicted sensor kinase RssA an...

  1. Structures of the first representatives of Pfam family PF06938 (DUF1285) reveal a new fold with repeated structural motifs and possible involvement in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gye Won; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Miller, Mitchell D; Kumar, Abhinav; Carlton, Dennis; Najmanovich, Rafael J; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Ernst, Dustin; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Johnson, Hope A; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S Sri; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc André; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A

    2010-10-01

    The crystal structures of SPO0140 and Sbal_2486 were determined using the semiautomated high-throughput pipeline of the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) as part of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). The structures revealed a conserved core with domain duplication and a superficial similarity of the C-terminal domain to pleckstrin homology-like folds. The conservation of the domain interface indicates a potential binding site that is likely to involve a nucleotide-based ligand, with genome-context and gene-fusion analyses additionally supporting a role for this family in signal transduction, possibly during oxidative stress.

  2. Expression of early nodulin genes in alfalfa mycorrhizae indicates that signal transduction pathways used in forming arbuscular mycorrhizae and Rhizobium-induced nodules may be conserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, P.; Fang, Y.; Galili, S.; Shaul, O.; Atzmon, N.; Wininger, S.; Eshed, Y.; Lum, M.; Li, Y.; To, V.; Fujishige, N.; Kapulnik, Y.; Hirsch, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    Transcripts for two genes expressed early in alfalfa nodule development (MsENOD40 and MsENOD2) are found in mycorrhizal roots, but not in noncolonized roots or in roots infected with the fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani. These same two early nodulin genes are expressed in uninoculated roots upon application of the cytokinin 6-benzylaminopurine. Correlated with the expression of the two early nodulin genes, we found that mycorrhizal roots contain higher levels of trans-zeatin riboside than nonmycorrhizal roots. These data suggest that there may be conservation of signal transduction pathways between the two symbioses—nitrogen-fixing nodules and phosphate-acquiring mycorrhizae. PMID:11038545

  3. Pseudohyphal growth is induced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a combination of stress and cAMP signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, O; Gancedo, J M

    2000-08-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae pseudohyphae formation may be triggered by nitrogen deprivation and is stimulated by cAMP. It was observed that even in a medium with an adequate nitrogen supply, cAMP can induce pseudohyphal growth when S. cerevisiae uses ethanol as carbon source. This led us to investigate the effects of the carbon source and of a variety of stresses on yeast morphology. Pseudohyphae formation and invasive growth were observed in a rich medium (YP) with poor carbon sources such as lactate or ethanol. External cAMP was required for the morphogenetic transition in one genetic background, but was dispensable in strain sigma 1278b which has been shown to have an overactive Ras2/cAMP pathway. Pseudohyphal growth and invasiveness also took place in YPD plates when the yeast was subjected to different stresses: a mild heat-stress (37 degrees C), an osmotic stress (1 m NACl), or addition of compounds which affect the lipid bilayer organization of the cell membrane (aliphatic alcohols at 2%) or alter the glucan structure of the cell wall (Congo red). We conclude that pseudohyphal growth is a physiological response not only to starvation but also to a stressful environment; it appears to require the coordinate action of a MAP kinase cascade and a cAMP-dependent pathway.

  4. Cellular Prion Protein and Caveolin-1 Interaction in a Neuronal Cell Line Precedes Fyn/Erk 1/2 Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Toni

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that cellular prion protein (PrPc is enriched in caveolae or caveolae-like domains with caveolin-1 (Cav-1 participating to signal transduction events by Fyn kinase recruitment. By using the Glutathione-S-transferase (GST-fusion proteins assay, we observed that PrPc strongly interacts in vitro with Cav-1. Thus, we ascertained the PrPc caveolar localization in a hypothalamic neuronal cell line (GN11, by confocal microscopy analysis, flotation on density gradient, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Following the anti-PrPc antibody-mediated stimulation of live GN11 cells, we observed that PrPc clustered on plasma membrane domains rich in Cav-1 in which Fyn kinase converged to be activated. After these events, a signaling cascade through p42/44 MAP kinase (Erk 1/2 was triggered, suggesting that following translocations from rafts to caveolae or caveolae-like domains PrPc could interact with Cav-1 and induce signal transduction events.

  5. PrPc capping in T cells promotes its association with the lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and reggie-2 and leads to signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuermer, Claudia A O; Langhorst, Matthias F; Wiechers, Marianne F; Legler, Daniel F; Von Hanwehr, Sylvia Hannbeck; Guse, Andreas H; Plattner, Helmut

    2004-11-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrPc) resides in lipid rafts, yet the type of raft and the physiological function of PrPc are unclear. We show here that cross-linking of PrPc with specific antibodies leads to 1) PrPc capping in Jurkat and human peripheral blood T cells; 2) to cocapping with the intracellular lipid raft proteins reggie-1 and reggie-2; 3) to signal transduction as seen by MAP kinase phosphorylation and an elevation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration; 4) to the recruitment of Thy-1, TCR/CD3, fyn, lck and LAT into the cap along with local tyrosine phosphorylation and F-actin polymerization, and later, internalization of PrPc together with the reggies into limp-2 positive lysosomes. Thus, PrPc association with reggie rafts triggers distinct transmembrane signal transduction events in T cells that promote the focal concentration of PrPc itself by guiding activated PrPc into preformed reggie caps and then to the recruitment of important interacting signaling molecules.

  6. Signal transduction by HLA-DR is mediated by tyrosine kinase(s) and regulated by CD45 in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L

    1991-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that HLA class II molecules on B cells and activated human T cells can transmit signals involving tyrosine phosphorylation of specific proteins, activation of the inositol phospholipid pathway, and release of cytosolic free Ca2+(Ca2+)i. The regulation of class II induced...... signals is poorly understood, however, and it remained unknown whether these pathways were coupled or activated independently. Here we show that a specific inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK), herbimycin, abrogated DR-induced elevation of (Ca2+)i in activated human T cells. Genistein, belonging......, but the inhibitory effect of CD45 dominated over the enhancing effect of CD4. These data indicate that PTK activation is obligatory for DR-induced (Ca2+)i responses, suggesting a linkage between these pathways in class II signal transduction. This conclusion is consistent with our observation that in activated human...

  7. Human conjunctival epithelial cell responses to platelet-activating factor (PAF): signal transduction and release of proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Najam A; Xu, Shouxi; Hellberg, Peggy E; Pang, Iok-Hou; Gamache, Daniel A; Yanni, John M

    2009-06-06

    The aims of the study were to characterize the signal transduction responses to platelet-activating factor (PAF) and to monitor the downstream effects of PAF on the production of proinflammatory cytokines in human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCECs). The generation of inositol phosphates ([(3)H]IPs) from [(3)H]phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the mobilization of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) were evaluated using ion exchange chromatography and Fura-2 fluorescence techniques, respectively. The production of the cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], interleukin-8 [IL-8], and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) from PAF-stimulated HCECs was quantified using specific ELISA assays. Specific PAF antagonists were used to study the pharmacological aspects of PAF actions in HCECs. PAF (100 nM) maximally stimulated PI turnover in HCECs by 2.3+/-0.02 fold (n=21) above basal levels and with a potency (EC(50)) of 5.9+/-1.7 nM (n=4). PAF or its stabilized analog, methyl carbamyl (mc)PAF (EC(50)=0.8 nM), rapidly mobilized [Ca(2+)](i), which peaked within 30-60 s and remained elevated for 3 min. PAF (10 nM-1 microM) stimulated the release of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF, 1.4-3.5 fold above basal levels. The effects of PAF (100 nM) on PI turnover and [Ca(2+)](i) were potently antagonized by the PAF antagonists, 1-o-hexadecyl-2-o-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho (N,N,N-trimethyl) hexanolamine (IC(50)=0.69 microM; K(i)=38 nM), methyl 2-(phenylthio)ethyl-1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethyl-pyridine-3,5-dicsrboxylate (PCA-42481; IC(50)=0.89 microM; K(i)=50 nM), rac-3-(N-octadecylcarbomoyl)-2-methoxy) propyl-(2-thiazolioethyl) phosphate (CV-3988; IC(50)=13 microM; K(i)=771 nM), and (+/-)-cis-3,5-dimethyl-2-(3-pyridyl)thiazolidin-4-one HCl (SM-10661; IC(50)=14 microM; K(i)=789 nM [n=3 for each antagonist]). PAF-induced production of IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF from HCECs was also blocked by these PAF antagonists (IC(50)=4.6- 8.6 microM). HCECs respond

  8. Chondrocyte migration affects tissue-engineered cartilage integration by activating the signal transduction pathways involving Src, PLCγ1, and ERK1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yiming; Xu, Yang; Yin, Zhaowei; Yang, Xiaofei; Jiang, Yiqiu; Gui, Jianchao

    2013-11-01

    To determine the signal transduction pathways involved in chondrocyte migration and their effects on cartilage integration in autologous chondrocyte implantation. Articular chondrocytes were divided into three inhibitor groups pretreated with different inhibitors to Src, phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 signaling pathways and one control group pretreated with vehicle. The effect of these pathways on chondrocyte migration was first explored by Boyden chamber assay, and then by an in vitro cell/ring integration model. Chondrocyte migration was visualized and quantified by cell tracking, and the activity of Src, PLCγ1, and ERK1/2 was determined by Western blotting. The effect of these pathways on cartilage integration was evaluated histologically, biochemically, and biomechanically. Boyden chamber assay revealed that the number of migrated cells was significantly increased in the control group without inhibitors. In an in vitro integration model, the implanted chondrocytes were observed to migrate through the interface and infiltrate into the native cartilage. Additionally, chondrocyte migration could be improved in the absence of inhibitors After 4 weeks of culture, the control group demonstrated a significantly higher cellularity, larger amount of chemical content deposition, stronger extracellular matrix staining in the integration zone, and higher integrative strength as compared to the inhibitor groups. Western blotting demonstrated that the Src-PLCγ1-ERK1/2 signaling pathway was promoted in the integration process. This study is the first to show that the Src-PLCγ1-ERK1/2 signaling transduction pathway is involved in cartilage tissue integration by affecting chondrocyte migration. Our results raise the importance of the chondrocyte migration enhancement therapy or the development of new agents specifically targeting the pathways to ensure long-term functionality of the restored joint surface.

  9. Proanthocyanidins from Grape Seeds Modulate the NF-κB Signal Transduction Pathways in Rats with TNBS-Induced Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Wu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effects of proanthocyanidins from grape seeds (GSPE, we explore whether GSPE regulates the inflammatory response of TNBS-induced colitis in rats at the levels of NF-κB signal transduction pathway. Rats were intragastrically administered of different doses of GSPE (100, 200 and 400 mg·kg−1 per day for seven days after ulcerative colitis (UC was induced by intracolonic injection of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS dissolved in 50% ethanol. Sulfasalazine (SASP at 400 mg/kg was used as a positive control drug. The expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, phospho-I kappaB-alpha (pIκBα, inhibitor kappa B kinase (IκK in the colon tissues were all measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA methods. Treatment with GSPE reduced the expression of NF-κB, pIκBα and IκK in the colon. The results of this study show that GSPE exerts beneficial effects in inflammatory bowel disease by inhibition of NF-κB signal transduction pathways.

  10. Effects of antenatal application of ambroxol and glucocorticoid on lung morphometry and signal transduction of bone morphogenetic protein in the fetal rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Guo, Xi-Rong; Zhou, Xiao-Yu

    2012-07-01

    Antenatal ambroxol, dexamethasone (Dex) and betamethasone (Beta) are used to prevent neonate respiratory distress syndrome. The present study aimed to investigate the role of ambroxol, Dex and Beta administered antenatally on lung morphogenesis and signal transduction of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in rat embryo. Fetal lungs treated with ambroxol, 1-day Beta, 3-day Dex and 3-day Beta were more mature compared to the controls as determined by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Expression of BMP4 and bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR‑II) mRNA was upregulated in the 1-day-Beta-, 3-day-Dex- and 3-day-Beta-treated animals. BMP4 and BMPR-II protein were significantly increased in the 1-day-Beta-, 3-day-Dex- and 3-day-Beta-treated animals. Ambroxol, Dex and Beta promoted the morphological development of rat fetal lung; Beta was more effective than Dex. A multi-dose of glucocorticoids exhited a more beneficial effect than a single dose. The effects of Beta and Dex may be mediated by regulation of BMP signal transduction in rat fetal lung.

  11. Expression Patterns of OsPIL11, a Phytochrome-Interacting Factor in Rice, and Preliminary Analysis of Its Roles in Light Signal Transduction

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    Li LI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The expression patterns of OsPIL11, one of six putative phytochrome-interacting factors, were analyzed in different organs of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum. The expression of OsPIL11 was organ-specific and was regulated by leaf development, abscisic acid (ABA, jasmonic acid (JA and salicylic acid (SA. To further explore the role of OsPIL11 in plant light signal transduction, a plant expression vector of OsPIL11 was constructed and introduced into tobacco. When grown under continuous red light, OsPIL11-overexpressed transgenic tobacco exhibited shorter hypocotyls and larger cotyledons and leaves compared to wild-type seedlings. When grown under continuous far-red light, however, transgenic and wild-type seedlings showed similar phenotypes. These results indicate that OsPIL11 is involved in red light induced de-etiolation, but not in far-red light induced de-etiolation in transgenic tobacco, which lays the foundation for dissecting the function of OsPIL11 in phytochrome-mediated light signal transduction in rice.

  12. Carbon monoxide blocks lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression by interfering with proximal TLR4 to NF-kappaB signal transduction in human monocytes.

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    Maneesha Chhikara

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is an endogenous messenger that suppresses inflammation, modulates apoptosis and promotes vascular remodeling. Here, microarrays were employed to globally characterize the CO (250 ppm suppression of early (1 h LPS-induced inflammation in human monocytic THP-1 cells. CO suppressed 79 of 101 immediate-early genes induced by LPS; 19% (15/79 were transcription factors and most others were cytokines, chemokines and immune response genes. The prototypic effects of CO on transcription and protein production occurred early but decreased rapidly. CO activated p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and Akt and caused an early and transitory delay in LPS-induced JNK activation. However, selective inhibitors of these kinases failed to block CO suppression of LPS-induced IL-1beta, an inflammation marker. Of CO-suppressed genes, 81% (64/79 were found to have promoters with putative NF-kappaB binding sites. CO was subsequently shown to block LPS-induced phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaBalpha in human monocytes, thereby inhibiting NF-kappaB signal transduction. CO broadly suppresses the initial inflammatory response of human monocytes to LPS by reshaping proximal events in TLR4 signal transduction such as stress kinase responses and early NF-kappaB activation. These rapid, but transient effects of CO may have therapeutic applications in acute pulmonary and vascular injury.

  13. Spatial Turing-type Pattern Formation in a Model of Signal Transduction Involving Membrane-based Receptors Coupled by G Proteins

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    Wannapong Triampo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a model of signaling pathways involving G proteins is investigated. The model incorporates reaction-diffusion mechanisms in which various reactants participate inside and on the extra-cellular surface membrane. The messenger molecules may diffuse over the surface of the cell membrane and signal transduction across the cell membrane is mediated by membrane receptor bound proteins which connect the genetically controlled biochemical intra-cellular reactions to the production of the second messenger, leading to desired functional responses. Dynamic and steady-state properties of the model are then investigated through weakly nonlinear stability analysis. Turing-type patterns are shown to form robustly under different delineating conditions on the system parameters. The theoretical predictions are then discussed in the context of some recently reported experimental evidence.

  14. Receptors and transduction of umami taste stimuli.

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    Kinnamon, Sue C; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie

    2009-07-01

    L-glutamate and 5'-ribonucleotides, such as GMP and IMP, elicit the "umami" taste, also known as the fifth taste. This review will highlight recent advancements in our understanding of umami taste receptors and their downstream signaling effectors in taste receptor cells. Several G protein-coupled receptors that bind umami stimuli have been identified in taste buds, including the heterodimer T1R1/T1R3, truncated and brain forms of mGluR4 and mGluR1, brain mGluR2, and brain mGluR3. Further, ionotropic glutamate receptors are expressed in taste cells and may play a role in glutamate transduction or signaling between taste cells and/or nerve fibers. Knockout of T1R1 or T1R3 reduces, but does not eliminate, responses to umami stimuli, suggesting that multiple receptors contribute to umami taste. The signaling effectors downstream of umami G protein-coupled receptors involve Gbetagamma activation of PLCbeta2 to elicit Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores and activation of a cation channel, TRPM5. In fungiform and palatal taste buds, T1R1/T1R3 is co-expressed with Galpha gustducin and transducin, but the Galpha proteins involved in circumvallate taste buds have not been identified. In most taste fields, however, cAMP antagonizes responses to umami stimuli, suggesting that the Galpha subunit serves to modulate umami taste sensitivity.

  15. New kids on the block: The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) protein family acting as a novel class of cAMP effector proteins in striated muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Thomas; Schindler, Roland

    2017-12-01

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling pathway constitutes an ancient signal transduction pathway present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Previously, it was thought that in eukaryotes three effector proteins mediate cAMP signalling, namely protein kinase A (PKA), exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) and the cyclic-nucleotide gated channels. However, recently a novel family of cAMP effector proteins emerged and was termed the Popeye domain containing (POPDC) family, which consists of three members POPDC1, POPDC2 and POPDC3. POPDC proteins are transmembrane proteins, which are abundantly present in striated and smooth muscle cells. POPDC proteins bind cAMP with high affinity comparable to PKA. Presently, their biochemical activity is poorly understood. However, mutational analysis in animal models as well as the disease phenotype observed in patients carrying missense mutations suggests that POPDC proteins are acting by modulating membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. In this review, we will describe the current knowledge about this gene family and also outline the apparent gaps in our understanding of their role in cAMP signalling and beyond. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Interrogating the Spatiotemporal Landscape of Neuromodulatory GPCR Signaling by Real-Time Imaging of cAMP in Intact Neurons and Circuits

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    Brian S. Muntean

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of neuronal circuits is key to information processing in the brain. The majority of neuromodulators exert their effects by activating G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that control the production of second messengers directly impacting cellular physiology. How numerous GPCRs integrate neuromodulatory inputs while accommodating diversity of incoming signals is poorly understood. In this study, we develop an in vivo tool and analytical suite for analyzing GPCR responses by monitoring the dynamics of a key second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP, with excellent quantitative and spatiotemporal resolution in various neurons. Using this imaging approach in combination with CRISPR/Cas9 editing and optogenetics, we interrogate neuromodulatory mechanisms of defined populations of neurons in an intact mesolimbic reward circuit and describe how individual inputs generate discrete second-messenger signatures in a cell- and receptor-specific fashion. This offers a resource for studying native neuronal GPCR signaling in real time.

  17. Adenylyl cyclase alpha and cAMP signaling mediate Plasmodium sporozoite apical regulated exocytosis and hepatocyte infection.

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    Takeshi Ono

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria starts with the infection of the liver of the host by Plasmodium sporozoites, the parasite form transmitted by infected mosquitoes. Sporozoites migrate through several hepatocytes by breaching their plasma membranes before finally infecting one with the formation of an internalization vacuole. Migration through host cells induces apical regulated exocytosis in sporozoites. Here we show that apical regulated exocytosis is induced by increases in cAMP in sporozoites of rodent (P. yoelii and P. berghei and human (P. falciparum Plasmodium species. We have generated P. berghei parasites deficient in adenylyl cyclase alpha (ACalpha, a gene containing regions with high homology to adenylyl cyclases. PbACalpha-deficient sporozoites do not exocytose in response to migration through host cells and present more than 50% impaired hepatocyte infectivity in vivo. These effects are specific to ACalpha, as re-introduction of ACalpha in deficient parasites resulted in complete recovery of exocytosis and infection. Our findings indicate that ACalpha and increases in cAMP levels are required for sporozoite apical regulated exocytosis, which is involved in sporozoite infection of hepatocytes.

  18. Synergism between cAMP and PPARγ Signalling in the Initiation of UCP1 Gene Expression in HIB1B Brown Adipocytes

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    H. Y. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the brown adipocyte-specific gene, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1, is increased by both PPARγ stimulation and cAMP activation through their ability to stimulate the expression of the PPAR coactivator PGC1α. In HIB1B brown preadipocytes, combination of the PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone, and the cAMP stimulator forskolin synergistically increased UCP1 mRNA expression, but PGC1α expression was only increased additively by the two drugs. The PPARγ antagonist, GW9662, and the PKA inhibitor, H89, both inhibited UCP1 expression stimulated by rosiglitazone and forskolin but PGC1α expression was not altered to the same extent. Reporter studies demonstrated that combined rosiglitazone and forskolin synergistically activated transcription from a full length 3.1 kbp UCP1 luciferase promoter construct, but the response was only additive and much reduced when a minimal 260 bp proximal UCP1 promoter was examined. Rosiglitazone and forskolin in combination were able to synergistically stimulate promoters comprising of tandem repeats of either PPREs or CREs. We conclude that rosiglitazone and forskolin act together to synergistically activate the UCP1 promoter directly rather than by increasing PGC1α expression and by a mechanism involving cross-talk between the signalling systems regulating the CRE and PPRE on the promoters.

  19. Single-Molecule Narrow-Field Microscopy of Protein-DNA Binding Dynamics in Glucose Signal Transduction of Live Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J M; Leake, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule narrow-field microscopy is a versatile tool to investigate a diverse range of protein dynamics in live cells and has been extensively used in bacteria. Here, we describe how these methods can be extended to larger eukaryotic, yeast cells, which contain subcellular compartments. We describe how to obtain single-molecule microscopy data but also how to analyze these data to track and obtain the stoichiometry of molecular complexes diffusing in the cell. We chose glucose mediated signal transduction of live yeast cells as the system to demonstrate these single-molecule techniques as transcriptional regulation is fundamentally a single-molecule problem-a single repressor protein binding a single binding site in the genome can dramatically alter behavior at the whole cell and population level.

  20. Integration of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle with cAMP signaling and Sfl2 pathways in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Zhang, Yulong; Fan, Shuru; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Guan, Guobo; Huang, Guanghua

    2017-01-01

    Morphological transitions and metabolic regulation are critical for the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to adapt to the changing host environment. In this study, we generated a library of central metabolic pathway mutants in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and investigated the functional consequences of these gene deletions on C. albicans biology. Inactivation of the TCA cycle impairs the ability of C. albicans to utilize non-fermentable carbon sources and dramatically attenuates cell growth rates under several culture conditions. By integrating the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway and the heat shock factor-type transcription regulator Sfl2, we found that the TCA cycle plays fundamental roles in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development. The TCA cycle and cAMP signaling pathways coordinately regulate hyphal growth through the molecular linkers ATP and CO2. Inactivation of the TCA cycle leads to lowered intracellular ATP and cAMP levels and thus affects the activation of the Ras1-regulated cAMP signaling pathway. In turn, the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway controls the TCA cycle through both Efg1- and Sfl2-mediated transcriptional regulation in response to elevated CO2 levels. The protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit Tpk1, but not Tpk2, may play a major role in this regulation. Sfl2 specifically binds to several TCA cycle and hypha-associated genes under high CO2 conditions. Global transcriptional profiling experiments indicate that Sfl2 is indeed required for the gene expression changes occurring in response to these elevated CO2 levels. Our study reveals the regulatory role of the TCA cycle in CO2 sensing and hyphal development and establishes a novel link between the TCA cycle and Ras1-cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:28787458

  1. Integration of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle with cAMP signaling and Sfl2 pathways in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Zhang, Yulong; Fan, Shuru; Nobile, Clarissa J; Guan, Guobo; Huang, Guanghua

    2017-08-01

    Morphological transitions and metabolic regulation are critical for the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to adapt to the changing host environment. In this study, we generated a library of central metabolic pathway mutants in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and investigated the functional consequences of these gene deletions on C. albicans biology. Inactivation of the TCA cycle impairs the ability of C. albicans to utilize non-fermentable carbon sources and dramatically attenuates cell growth rates under several culture conditions. By integrating the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway and the heat shock factor-type transcription regulator Sfl2, we found that the TCA cycle plays fundamental roles in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development. The TCA cycle and cAMP signaling pathways coordinately regulate hyphal growth through the molecular linkers ATP and CO2. Inactivation of the TCA cycle leads to lowered intracellular ATP and cAMP levels and thus affects the activation of the Ras1-regulated cAMP signaling pathway. In turn, the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway controls the TCA cycle through both Efg1- and Sfl2-mediated transcriptional regulation in response to elevated CO2 levels. The protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit Tpk1, but not Tpk2, may play a major role in this regulation. Sfl2 specifically binds to several TCA cycle and hypha-associated genes under high CO2 conditions. Global transcriptional profiling experiments indicate that Sfl2 is indeed required for the gene expression changes occurring in response to these elevated CO2 levels. Our study reveals the regulatory role of the TCA cycle in CO2 sensing and hyphal development and establishes a novel link between the TCA cycle and Ras1-cAMP signaling pathways.

  2. Integration of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle with cAMP signaling and Sfl2 pathways in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphological transitions and metabolic regulation are critical for the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to adapt to the changing host environment. In this study, we generated a library of central metabolic pathway mutants in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and investigated the functional consequences of these gene deletions on C. albicans biology. Inactivation of the TCA cycle impairs the ability of C. albicans to utilize non-fermentable carbon sources and dramatically attenuates cell growth rates under several culture conditions. By integrating the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway and the heat shock factor-type transcription regulator Sfl2, we found that the TCA cycle plays fundamental roles in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development. The TCA cycle and cAMP signaling pathways coordinately regulate hyphal growth through the molecular linkers ATP and CO2. Inactivation of the TCA cycle leads to lowered intracellular ATP and cAMP levels and thus affects the activation of the Ras1-regulated cAMP signaling pathway. In turn, the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway controls the TCA cycle through both Efg1- and Sfl2-mediated transcriptional regulation in response to elevated CO2 levels. The protein kinase A (PKA catalytic subunit Tpk1, but not Tpk2, may play a major role in this regulation. Sfl2 specifically binds to several TCA cycle and hypha-associated genes under high CO2 conditions. Global transcriptional profiling experiments indicate that Sfl2 is indeed required for the gene expression changes occurring in response to these elevated CO2 levels. Our study reveals the regulatory role of the TCA cycle in CO2 sensing and hyphal development and establishes a novel link between the TCA cycle and Ras1-cAMP signaling pathways.

  3. Effect of Lipoglycans from Mycobacterium Chelonae on the expression of inflammatory factors IL-8 and IL-6 in human corneal epithelial cells and its possible signal transduction pathway

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    Chun-Zhou Tang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the influence of Lipoglycans from Mycobacterium Chelonae(Cheon the expression of IL-6 and IL-8 in human corneal epithelia cells and its possible signal transduction pathway.METHODS: Lipoglycans was extracted by the Triton X-114 phase partitioning. Lipoglycans from Che were purified, by successive detergent and phenol extractions. Lipoglycans were separated by gel filtration on a Sephacryl 200 column and Sephacryl 100 column in series, followed by extensive dialisis. Purified Lipoglycans(50μg/mLwere added into culture medium to stimulate primary human corneal epithelial(HCEcells. Cells and supernatant were collected at 0, 6, 12, 24h after the stimulation. The IL-6 and IL-8 expression at mRNA level was assayed by using real time RT-PCR and the secreted IL-6 and IL-8 in the supernatants was measured by ELISA. Immunochemistry was used to detect the expression and location of NF-κB in HCE cells.RESULTS: After the treatment of Lipoglycans, the expression of IL-8 and IL-6 at mRNA level obviouly increased within 12h, and reached peak level at 6h(IL-8 was 36.8 times that of the blank control, and IL-6 was 32.7 times. Compared with the blank control group, the expression of IL-8 at protein level in the supernatant increased 2.8 folds at 6h(P>0.05, 13.4 folds at 12h(PPPPPCONCLUSION: Lipoglycans from Che can induce HCE cells to produce inflammatory factors(IL-6 and IL-8, and its signal transduction pathway probably is mediated by NF-κB.

  4. Molecular analysis of the graviperception signal transduction in the flagellate Euglena gracilis: Involvement of a transient receptor potential-like channel and a calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, Donat-Peter; Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Euglena gracilis, a unicellular, photosynthetic flagellate is a model system for environmentally controlled behavior responses. The organism shows pronounced negative gravitaxis. This movement is based on physiological mechanisms, which in the past had been only indirectly assessed. It was shown that mechano-sensitive calcium channels are involved in the gravitaxis response. Recent studies have demonstrated that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family function as mechano-sensitive channels in several different cell types. We have sequenced part of a TRP gene in Euglena and applied RNA interference (RNAi) to confirm that these channels are involved in graviperception. It was found that RNAi against the putative TRP channel abolished gravitaxis. The genes of three calmodulins were sequences in Euglena, one of which was previously known in its protein structure (cal 1). The other two were unknown (cal 2 and cal 3). Cal 2 has been analyzed in detail. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of cal 1 and cal 2 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to see whether this blockage impairs gravitaxis. RNAi of cal 1 leads to a long-term loss of free swimming in the cells (while euglenoid movement persists). It induced pronounced cell form aberrations and the division of cells was hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Thus cal 1 does not seem to be involved in gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of cal 2 has no pronounced influence on motility and cell form but leads to a complete loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days showing that this calmodulin is an element in the signal transduction chain. The data are discussed in the context of the current model of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis.

  5. Vinculin, VASP, and profilin are coordinately regulated during actin remodeling in epithelial cells, which requires de novo protein synthesis and protein kinase signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Margaret P

    2004-08-01

    Transformation progression of epithelial cells involves alterations in their morphology, polarity, and adhesive characteristics, all of which are associated with the loss and/or reorganization of actin structures. To identify the underlying mechanism of formation of the adhesion-dependent, circumferential actin network, the expression and localization of the actin binding and regulating proteins (ABPs), vinculin, VASP, and profilin were evaluated. Experimental depolarization of epithelial cells results in the loss of normal F-actin structures and the transient upregulation of vinculin, VASP, and profilin. This response is due to the loss of cell-cell, and not cell-substrate interactions, since cells that no longer express focal adhesions or stress fibers are still sensitive to changes in adhesion and manifest this in the altered profile of expression of these ABPs. Transient upregulation is dependent upon de novo protein synthesis, and protein kinase-, but not phosphatase-sensitive signal transduction pathway(s). Inhibition of the synthesis of these proteins is accompanied by dephosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 protein, but does not involve inhibition of the PI3-kinase-Akt-mTOR pathway. Constitutive expression of VASP results in altered cell morphology and adhesion and F-actin and vinculin structures. V12rac1 expressing epithelial cells are constitutively nonadhesive, malignantly transformed, and constitutively express high levels of these ABPs, with altered subcellular localizations. Transformation suppression is accompanied by the restoration of normal levels of the three ABPs, actin structures, adhesion, and epithelial morphology. Thus, vinculin, VASP, and profilin are coordinately regulated by signal transduction pathways that effect a translational response. Additionally, their expression profile maybe indicative of the adhesion and transformation status of epithelial cells. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. A novel signal transduction protein: Combination of solute binding and tandem PAS-like sensor domains in one polypeptide chain: Periplasmic Ligand Binding Protein Dret_0059

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    Wu, R. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Wilton, R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Cuff, M. E. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Endres, M. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Babnigg, G. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Edirisinghe, J. N. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Henry, C. S. [Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Joachimiak, A. [Midwest Center for Structural Genomics, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Structural Biology Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago Illinois 60637; Schiffer, M. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Pokkuluri, P. R. [Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439

    2017-03-06

    We report the structural and biochemical characterization of a novel periplasmic ligand-binding protein, Dret_0059, from Desulfohalobium retbaense DSM 5692, an organism isolated from the Salt Lake Retba in Senegal. The structure of the protein consists of a unique combination of a periplasmic solute binding protein (SBP) domain at the N-terminal and a tandem PAS-like sensor domain at the C-terminal region. SBP domains are found ubiquitously and their best known function is in solute transport across membranes. PAS-like sensor domains are commonly found in signal transduction proteins. These domains are widely observed as parts of many protein architectures and complexes but have not been observed previously within the same polypeptide chain. In the structure of Dret_0059, a ketoleucine moiety is bound to the SBP, whereas a cytosine molecule is bound in the distal PAS-like domain of the tandem PAS-like domain. Differential scanning flourimetry support the binding of ligands observed in the crystal structure. There is significant interaction between the SBP and tandem PAS-like domains, and it is possible that the binding of one ligand could have an effect on the binding of the other. We uncovered three other proteins with this structural architecture in the non-redundant sequence data base, and predict that they too bind the same substrates. The genomic context of this protein did not offer any clues for its function. We did not find any biological process in which the two observed ligands are coupled. The protein Dret_0059 could be involved in either signal transduction or solute transport.

  7. Signal transduction of aortic and carotid sinus baroreceptors is not modified by central command during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Kanji; Ishii, Kei; Kadowaki, Akito; Ishida, Tomoko; Idesako, Mitsuhiro; Liang, Nan

    2014-05-15

    Our laboratory has suggested that central command provides selective inhibition of the cardiomotor component of aortic baroreflex at the start of exercise, preserving carotid sinus baroreflex. It is postulated that central command may modify the signal transduction of aortic baroreceptors, so as to decrease aortic baroreceptor input to the cardiovascular centers, and, thereby, can cause the selective inhibition of aortic baroreflex. To test the hypothesis, we directly analyzed the responses in multifiber aortic nerve activity (AoNA) and carotid sinus nerve activity (CsNA) during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate, paralyzed cats. The increases of 62-104% in mean AoNA and CsNA were found during spontaneous motor activity, in proportion to a rise of 35 ± 3 mmHg (means ± SE) in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), and had an attenuating tendency by restraining heart rate (HR) at the lower intrinsic frequency of 154 ± 6 beats/min. Brief occlusion of the abdominal aorta was conducted before and during spontaneous motor activity to produce a mechanically evoked increase in MAP and, thereby, to examine the stimulus-response relationship of arterial baroreceptors. Although the sensitivity of the MAP-HR baroreflex curve was markedly blunted during spontaneous motor activity, the stimulus-response relationships of AoNA and CsNA were not influenced by spontaneous motor activity, irrespective of the absence or presence of the HR restraint. Thus, it is concluded that aortic and carotid sinus baroreceptors can code beat-by-beat blood pressure during spontaneous motor activity in decerebrate cats and that central command is unlikely to modulate the signal transduction of arterial baroreceptors. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Odontoblasts as sensory receptors: transient receptor potential channels, pannexin-1, and ionotropic ATP receptors mediate intercellular odontoblast-neuron signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibukawa, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Masaki; Kimura, Maki; Sobhan, Ubaidus; Shimada, Miyuki; Nishiyama, Akihiro; Kawaguchi, Aya; Soya, Manabu; Kuroda, Hidetaka; Katakura, Akira; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Tazaki, Masakazu

    2015-04-01

    Various stimuli induce pain when applied to the surface of exposed dentin. However, the mechanisms underlying dentinal pain remain unclear. We investigated intercellular signal transduction between odontoblasts and trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons following direct mechanical stimulation of odontoblasts. Mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts increased the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) by activating the mechanosensitive-transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, and TRPA1, but not TRPM8 channels. In cocultures of odontoblasts and TG neurons, increases in [Ca(2+)]i were observed not only in mechanically stimulated odontoblasts, but also in neighboring odontoblasts and TG neurons. These increases in [Ca(2+)]i were abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) and in the presence of mechanosensitive TRP channel antagonists. A pannexin-1 (ATP-permeable channel) inhibitor and ATP-degrading enzyme abolished the increases in [Ca(2+)]i in neighboring odontoblasts and TG neurons, but not in the stimulated odontoblasts. G-protein-coupled P2Y nucleotide receptor antagonists also inhibited the increases in [Ca(2+)]i. An ionotropic ATP (P2X3) receptor antagonist inhibited the increase in [Ca(2+)]i in neighboring TG neurons, but not in stimulated or neighboring odontoblasts. During mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts, a connexin-43 blocker did not have any effects on the [Ca(2+)]i responses observed in any of the cells. These results indicate that ATP, released from mechanically stimulated odontoblasts via pannexin-1 in response to TRP channel activation, transmits a signal to P2X3 receptors on TG neurons. We suggest that odontoblasts are sensory receptor cells and that ATP released from odontoblasts functions as a neurotransmitter in the sensory transduction sequence for dentinal pain.

  9. Portulaca oleracea extract can inhibit nodule formation of colon cancer stem cells by regulating gene expression of the Notch signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Heiying; Chen, Li; Wang, Shuiming; Chao, Deng

    2017-07-01

    To investigate whether Portulaca oleracea extract affects tumor formation in colon cancer stem cells and its chemotherapy sensitivity. In addition, to analyze associated genetic changes within the Notch signal transduction pathway. Serum-free cultures of colon cancer cells (HT-29) and HT-29 cancer stem cells were treated with the chemotherapeutic drug 5-fluorouracil to assess sensitivity. Injections of the stem cells were also given to BALB/c mice to confirm tumor growth and note its characteristics. In addition, the effect of different concentrations of P. oleracea extract was tested on the growth of HT-29 colon cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells, as determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide method. The effects of P. oleracea extract on the expression of β-catenin, Notch1, and Notch2 in the HT-29 cells were studied using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The tumor volume of the HT29 cells was two times larger than that of HT29 cancer stem cells. Treatment with P. oleracea extract inhibited the proliferation of both HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells at doses from 0.07 to 2.25 µg/mL. Apoptosis of HT-29 cancer cells and HT-29 cancer stem cells was assessed by flow cytometry; it was enhanced by the addition of P. oleracea extract. Finally, treatment with P. oleracea extract significantly downregulated the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes in both cell types. The results of this study show that P. oleracea extract inhibits the growth of colon cancer stem cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, it inhibits the expression of the Notch1 and β-catenin genes. Taken together, this suggests that it may elicit its effects through regulatory and target genes that mediate the Notch signal transduction pathway.

  10. Camera-based ratiometric fluorescence transduction of nucleic acid hybridization with reagentless signal amplification on a paper-based platform using immobilized quantum dots as donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2014-10-21

    Paper-based diagnostic assays are gaining increasing popularity for their potential application in resource-limited settings and for point-of-care screening. Achievement of high sensitivity with precision and accuracy can be challenging when using paper substrates. Herein, we implement the red-green-blue color palette of a digital camera for quantitative ratiometric transduction of nucleic acid hybridization on a paper-based platform using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). A nonenzymatic and reagentless means of signal enhancement for QD-FRET assays on paper substrates is based on the use of dry paper substrates for data acquisition. This approach offered at least a 10-fold higher assay sensitivity and at least a 10-fold lower limit of detection (LOD) as compared to hydrated paper substrates. The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to assemble a transduction interface that consisted of immobilized QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) served as donors with Cy3 as an acceptor. A hybridization event that brought the Cy3 acceptor dye in close proximity to the surface of immobilized gQDs was responsible for a FRET-sensitized emission from the acceptor dye, which served as an analytical signal. A hand-held UV lamp was used as an excitation source and ratiometric analysis using an iPad camera was possible by a relative intensity analysis of the red (Cy3 photoluminescence (PL)) and green (gQD PL) color channels of the digital camera. For digital imaging using an iPad camera, the LOD of the assay in a sandwich format was 450 fmol with a dynamic range spanning 2 orders of magnitude, while an epifluorescence microscope detection platform offered a LOD of 30 fmol and a dynamic range spanning 3 orders of magnitude. The selectivity of the hybridization assay was demonstrated by detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism at a contrast ratio of 60:1. This work provides an

  11. Photoreception and signal transduction in corals: proteomic and behavioral evidence for cytoplasmic calcium as a mediator of light responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, J Daniel; Brady, Aisling K; Spaho, Skender A; Vize, Peter D

    2012-12-01

    Little is known about how corals sense and respond to light. In this report the proteome of coral is explored using 2D protein electrophoresis in two species, Montastraea cavernosa and Acropora millepora. Multiple protein species have major shifts in abundance in both species when sampled in daylight compared to corals sampled late in the night. These changes were observed both in larvae lacking zooxanthellae and in adult tissue containing zooxanthellae, including both Pacific and Caribbean corals. When larvae kept in the dark were treated with either thapsigargin or ionomycin, compounds that raise the level of cytoplasmic calcium, the night pattern of proteins shifted to the day pattern. This implies that photoreceptors responding to light elevate calcium levels and that calcium acts as the second messenger relaying light responses in corals. Corals spawn at night, and spawning can be delayed by exposure to light or pushed forward by early artificial sunsets. In a series of behavioral experiments, treatment of corals with ionomycin or thapsigargin was found to delay broadcast spawning in M. franksi, demonstrating that pharmacologically altering cytoplasmic calcium levels generates the same response as light exposure. Together these results show that the photo-responsive cells of corals detect and respond to light by altering cytoplasmic calcium levels, similarly to the transduction pathways in complex invertebrate eyes. The primacy of cytoplasmic calcium levels in light responsivity has broad implications for coral reproduction, including predicting how different species spawn at different times after sunset and how reproductive isolation is achieved during coral speciation.

  12. Breaking the relay in deregulated cellular signal transduction as a rationale for chemoprevention with anti-inflammatory phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon [National Research Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Shinlim-dong, Kwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2005-12-11

    Center to the cancer biology is disrupted intracellular signaling network, which transmits improper signals resulting in abnormal cellular functioning. Therefore, modulation of inappropriate cell signaling cascades might be a rational approach in achieving chemoprevention. Inflammation has long been suspected to contribute to carcinogenesis. A new horizon in chemoprevention research is the recent discovery of molecular links between inflammation and cancer. Components of the cell signaling network, especially those converge on redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-{kappa}B involved in mediating inflammatory response, have been implicated in carcinogenesis. Intracellular signaling through another redox-sensitive transcription factor AP-1 and that transmitted via a more recently identified oncoprotein {beta}-catenin are also considered to be crucial for inflammation-associated cancer. Epidemiological and experimental studies have revealed that a wide variety of phytochemicals present in our daily diet are potential chemopreventive agents that can alter or correct undesired cellular functions caused by abnormal pro-inflammatory signal transmission. Modulation of cellular signaling involved in chronic inflammatory response by anti-inflammatory phytochemicals may comprise a rational and pragmatic strategy in molecular target-based chemoprevention.

  13. Phospholipases and the network of auxin signal transduction with ABP1 and TIR1 as two receptors: a comprehensive and provocative model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther F. E. Scherer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D (PLD, secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 and patatin-related phospholipase A (pPLA are important elements in auxin signal transduction. PLDζ2 has a function in auxin transport. PLD's potential link to upstream receptors ABP1 or TIR1, and to cytosolic calcium as an activator of PLDζ2, is outlined. A link from PLDζ2 to activation of PINOID, a kinase activating PIN proteins, is suggested. The activation mechanism of sPLA2, also involved in auxin transport-related functions, is unknown. New experiments show that not only ABP1 but also pPLA isoforms are tied to rapid activation of early auxin-induced genes, the functional domain of the other auxin receptor TIR1. Post-translational activation mechanisms for pPLAs are suggested to be tied to ABP1. We propose pPLAs and PLDζ2 are mediators in auxin signaling. The downstream targets of regulation by ABP1 as the receptor we propose to be primarily PIN proteins. This coordinates gene expression regulation by TIR1 in the nucleus. A clear separation of cytosolic mechanisms of auxin signalling is suggested with ABP1 as receptor, and phospholipases A and D and PIN proteins as downstream targets on the on hand, and TIR1 and regulation of early auxin-induced genes on the other. At the same time, this separation is coordinated by auxin transport creating the auxin concentration in the nucleus suitable for gene regulation.

  14. Lubiprostone activates Cl- secretion via cAMP signaling and increases membrane CFTR in the human colon carcinoma cell line, T84.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Mei; Venkatasubramanian, Jayashree; Boonkaewwan, Chaiwat; Ganesan, Nivetha; Syed, Asma; Benya, Richard V; Rao, Mrinalini C

    2011-02-01

    Lubiprostone, used clinically (b.i.d.) to treat constipation, has been reported to increase transepithelial Cl(-) transport in T84 cells by activating ClC-2 channels. To identify the underlying signaling pathway, we explored the effects of short-term and overnight lubiprostone treatment on second messenger signaling and Cl(-) transport. Cl(-) transport was assessed either as I(sc) across T84 monolayers grown on Transwells and mounted in Ussing chambers or by the iodide efflux assay. [cAMP](i) was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and [Ca(2+)](i) by Fluo-3 fluorescence. Quantitation of apical cell surface CFTR protein levels was assessed by Western blotting and biotinylation with the EZ-Link Sulfo-NHS-LC-LC-Biotin. ClC-2 mRNA level was studied by RT-PCR. Lubiprostone and the cAMP stimulator, forskolin, caused comparable and maximal increases of I(sc) in T84 cells. The I(sc) effects of lubiprostone and forskolin were each suppressed if the tissue had previously been treated with the other agent. These responses were unaltered even if the monolayers were treated with lubiprostone overnight. Lubiprostone-induced increases in iodide efflux were ~80% of those obtained with forskolin. Lubiprostone increased [cAMP](i). H89, bumetanide, or CFTR(inh)-172 greatly attenuated lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) secretion, whereas the ClC-2 inhibitor CdCl(2) did not. Compared to controls, FSK-treatment increased membrane-associated CFTR by 1.9 fold, and lubiprostone caused a 2.6-fold increase in apical membrane CFTR as seen by immunoblotting following cell surface biotinylation. Lubiprostone activates Cl(-) secretion in T84 cells via cAMP, protein kinase A, and by increasing apical membrane CFTR protein.

  15. Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer: Potential Role of Androgen and ErbB Receptor Signal Transduction Crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Salama El Sheikh

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In prostate cancer (PC, increasing evidence suggests that androgen receptor (AR signalling is functional under conditions of maximal androgen blockade. PC cells survive and proliferate in the altered hormonal environment possibly by interactions between growth factor-activated pathways and AR signalling. The present review article summarizes the current evidence of this crosstalk and focuses on the interactions among the ErbB receptor network, its downstream pathways, the AR. The potential role of this crosstalk in the development of androgen independence and in relation to antiandrogen therapy is discussed. Such interactions provide insight into possible complementary or additional strategies in the management of PC.

  16. Signal Transduction Mechanisms Underlying Group I mGluR-mediated Increase in Frequency and Amplitude of Spontaneous EPSCs in the Spinal Trigeminal Subnucleus Oralis of the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Dong-Kuk

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and 5 pre- and/or postsynaptically regulate synaptic transmission at glutamatergic synapses. By recording spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs in the spinal trigeminal subnucleus oralis (Vo, we here investigated the regulation of glutamatergic transmission through the activation of group I mGluRs. Bath-applied DHPG (10 μM/5 min, activating the group I mGluRs, increased sEPSCs both in frequency and amplitude; particularly, the increased amplitude was long-lasting. The DHPG-induced increases of sEPSC frequency and amplitude were not NMDA receptor-dependent. The DHPG-induced increase in the frequency of sEPSCs, the presynaptic effect being further confirmed by the DHPG effect on paired-pulse ratio of trigeminal tract-evoked EPSCs, an index of presynaptic modulation, was significantly but partially reduced by blockades of voltage-dependent sodium channel, mGluR1 or mGluR5. Interestingly, PKC inhibition markedly enhanced the DHPG-induced increase of sEPSC frequency, which was mainly accomplished through mGluR1, indicating an inhibitory role of PKC. In contrast, the DHPG-induced increase of sEPSC amplitude was not affected by mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists although the long-lasting property of the increase was disappeared; however, the increase was completely inhibited by blocking both mGluR1 and mGluR5. Further study of signal transduction mechanisms revealed that PLC and CaMKII mediated the increases of sEPSC in both frequency and amplitude by DHPG, while IP3 receptor, NO and ERK only that of amplitude during DHPG application. Altogether, these results indicate that the activation of group I mGluRs and their signal transduction pathways differentially regulate glutamate release and synaptic responses in Vo, thereby contributing to the processing of somatosensory signals from orofacial region.

  17. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding "...

  18. Signal transduction in primary human T lymphocytes in altered gravity - results of the MASER-12 suborbital space flight mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Svantje; Hauschild, Swantje; Crescio, Claudia; Secchi, Christian; Paulsen, Katrin; Pantaleo, Antonella; Saba, Angela; Buttron, Isabell; Thiel, Cora Sandra; Cogoli, Augusto; Pippia, Proto; Ullrich, Oliver

    2013-05-07

    We investigated the influence of altered gravity on key proteins of T cell activation during the MASER-12 ballistic suborbital rocket mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Swedish Space Cooperation (SSC) at ESRANGE Space Center (Kiruna, Sweden). We quantified components of the T cell receptor, the membrane proximal signaling, MAPK-signaling, IL-2R, histone modifications and the cytoskeleton in non-activated and in ConA/CD28-activated primary human T lymphocytes. The hypergravity phase during the launch resulted in a downregulation of the IL-2 and CD3 receptor and reduction of tyrosine phosphorylation, p44/42-MAPK phosphorylation and histone H3 acetylation, whereas LAT phosphorylation was increased. Compared to the baseline situation at the point of entry into the microgravity phase, CD3 and IL-2 receptor expression at the surface of non-activated T cells were reduced after 6 min microgravity. Importantly, p44/42-MAPK-phosphorylation was also reduced after 6 min microgravity compared to the 1g ground controls, but also in direct comparison between the in-flight μg and the 1g group. In activated T cells, the reduced CD3 and IL-2 receptor expression at the baseline situation recovered significantly during in-flight 1g conditions, but not during microgravity conditions. Beta-tubulin increased significantly after onset of microgravity until the end of the microgravity phase, but not in the in-flight 1g condition. This study suggests that key proteins of T cell signal modules are not severely disturbed in microgravity. Instead, it can be supposed that the strong T cell inhibiting signal occurs downstream from membrane proximal signaling, such as at the transcriptional level as described recently. However, the MASER-12 experiment could identify signal molecules, which are sensitive to altered gravity, and indicates that gravity is obviously not only a requirement for transcriptional processes as described before, but also for specific phosphorylation

  19. Signal transductions induced by bone morphogenetic protein-2 and transforming growth factor-beta in normal human osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Fang; Cheng, Su-Li

    2002-05-03

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) activates Ras/MAPK signaling in many cell types. Because TGF-beta and BMP-2 exert similar effects, we examined if this signaling is stimulated by both factors and analyzed the relationship between this signaling and the Smads in osteoblasts. BMP-2 and TGF-beta stimulated Ras, MAPK, and AP-1 activities. The DNA binding activities of c-Fos, FosB/Delta FosB, Fra-1, Fra-2, and JunB were up-regulated whereas JunD activity was decreased. c-Fos, FosB/Delta FosB, and JunB were associated with Smad4. The stimulation of AP-1 by BMP-2 and TGF-beta was dependent on Smad signaling, and anti-Smad4 antibody interfered with AP-1 activity. Thus, BMP-2 and TGF-beta activate both Ras/MAPK/AP-1 and Smad signaling in osteoblasts with Smads modulating AP-1 activity. To determine the roles of MAPK in BMP-2 and TGF-beta function, we analyzed the effect of ERK and p38 inhibitors on the regulation of bone matrix protein expression and JunB and JunD levels by these two factors. ERK and p38 mediated TGF-beta suppression of osteocalcin and JunD as well as stimulation of JunB. p38 was essential in BMP-2 up-regulation of type I collagen, fibronectin, osteopontin, osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase activity whereas ERK mediated BMP-2 stimulation of fibronectin and osteopontin. Thus, ERK and p38 differentially mediate TGF-beta and BMP-2 function in osteoblasts.

  20. Piperine blocks interleukin-2-driven cell cycle progression in CTLL-2 T lymphocytes by inhibiting multiple signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, Carolyn D; Greenshields, Anna L; Liwski, Robert S; Hoskin, David W

    2015-04-02

    Piperine, a pungent alkaloid found in the fruits of black pepper plants, has diverse physiological effects, including the ability to inhibit immune cell-mediated inflammation. Since the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) is essential for the clonal expansion and differentiation of T lymphocytes, we investigated the effect of piperine on IL-2 signaling in IL-2-dependent mouse CTLL-2 T lymphocytes. Tritiated-thymidine incorporation assays and flow cytometric analysis of Oregon Green 488-stained cells showed that piperine inhibited IL-2-driven T lymphocyte proliferation; however, piperine did not cause T lymphocytes to die or decrease their expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor, as determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that piperine blocked the IL-2-induced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 and STAT5 without affecting the upstream phosphorylation of Janus kinase (JAK) 1 and JAK3. In addition, piperine inhibited the IL-2-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt, which are signaling molecules that regulate cell cycle progression. Piperine also suppressed the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 1, Cdk4, Cdk6, cyclin B, cyclin D2, and Cdc25c protein phosphatase by IL-2-stimulated T lymphocytes, indicating G0/G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrest. Piperine-mediated inhibition of IL-2 signaling and cell cycle progression in CTLL-2 T lymphocytes suggests that piperine should be further investigated in animal models as a possible natural source treatment for T lymphocyte-mediated transplant rejection and autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [6]-Gingerol Prevents Disassembly of Cell Junctions and Activities of MMPs in Invasive Human Pancreas Cancer Cells through ERK/NF-κB/Snail Signal Transduction Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Ok Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effects of [6]-gingerol, a ginger phytochemical, on tight junction (TJ molecules, we investigated TJ tightening and signal transduction pathways in human pancreatic duct cell-derived cancer cell line PANC-1. The following methods were utilized: MTT assay to determine cytotoxicity; zymography to examine matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activities; transepithelial electrical resistance (TER and paracellular flux for TJ measurement; RT-PCR and immunoblotting for proteins related to TJ and invasion; and EMSA for NF-κB activity in PANC-1 cells. Results revealed that TER significantly increased and claudin 4 and MMP-9 decreased compared to those of the control. TJ protein levels, including zonula occludens (ZO- 1, occludin, and E-cadherin, increased in [6]-gingerol-treated cells, which correlated with a decrease in paracellular flux and MMP activity. Furthermore, NF-κB/Snail nuclear translocation was suppressed via downregulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway in response to [6]-gingerol treatment. Moreover, treatment with U0126, an ERK inhibitor, completely blocked NF-κB activity. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that [6]-gingerol regulates TJ-related proteins and suppresses invasion and metastasis through NF-κB/Snail inhibition via inhibition of the ERK pathway. Therefore, [6]-gingerol may suppress the invasive activity of PANC-1 cells.

  2. Identification of the amino acids essential for LytSR-mediated signal transduction in Staphylococcus aureus and their roles in biofilm-specific gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, McKenzie K; Bose, Jeffrey L; Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K; Moormeier, Derek E; Endres, Jennifer L; Sadykov, Marat R; Biswas, Indranil; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that expression of the Staphylococcus aureus lrgAB operon is specifically localized within tower structures during biofilm development. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying this spatial control of lrgAB expression, we carried out a detailed analysis of the LytSR two-component system. Specifically, a conserved aspartic acid (Asp53) of the LytR response regulator was shown to be the target of phosphorylation, which resulted in enhanced binding to the lrgAB promoter and activation of transcription. In addition, we identified His390 of the LytS histidine kinase as the site of autophosphorylation and Asn394 as a critical amino acid involved in phosphatase activity. Interestingly, LytS-independent activation of LytR was observed during planktonic growth, with acetyl phosphate acting as a phosphodonor to LytR. In contrast, mutations disrupting the function of LytS prevented tower-specific lrgAB expression, providing insight into the physiologic environment within these structures. In addition, overactivation of LytR led to increased lrgAB promoter activity during planktonic and biofilm growth and a change in biofilm morphology. Overall, the results of this study are the first to define the LytSR signal transduction pathway, as well as determine the metabolic context within biofilm tower structures that triggers these signaling events. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Tamarind Seed Xyloglucans Promote Proliferation and Migration of Human Skin Cells through Internalization via Stimulation of Proproliferative Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Nie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Xyloglucans (XGs of Tamarindus indica L. Fabaceae are used as drug vehicles or as ingredients of cosmetics. Two xyloglucans were extracted from T. indica seed with cold water (TSw and copper complex precipitation (TSc. Both were analyzed in regard to composition and influence on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, migration, MAPK phosphorylation, and gene expression of human skin keratinocytes (NHEK and HaCaT and fibroblasts (NHDF in vitro. TSw and TSc differed in molecular weight, rhamnose content, and ratios of xylose, arabinose, galactose, and glucose. Both XGs improved keratinocytes and fibroblast proliferation, promoted the cell cycle, and stimulated migration and intracellular enzyme activity of NHDF after endosomal uptake. Only TSw significantly enhanced HaCaT migration and extracellular enzyme activity of NHDF and HaCaT. TSw and TSc predominantly enhanced the phosphorylation of molecules that referred to Erk signaling in NHEK. In NHDF parts of the integrin signaling and SAPK/JNK pathway were affected. Independent of cell type TSw marginally regulated the expression of genes, which referred to membrane proteins, cytoskeleton, cytokine signaling, and ECM as well as to processes of metabolism and transcription. Results show that T. indica xyloglucans promote skin regeneration by a direct influence on cell proliferation and migration.

  4. Protease activation and the signal transduction pathway regulating motility in sperm from the water strider Aquarius remigis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Thaler, Catherine D; Haimo, Leah T; Cardullo, Richard A

    2012-04-01

    Many motile processes are regulated such that movement occurs only upon activation of a signaling cascade. Sperm from a variety of species are initially quiescent and must be activated prior to beating. The signaling events leading to the activation and regulation of sperm motility are not well characterized. Mature seminal vesicle sperm from the water strider Aquarius remigis are immotile in vitro, but vigorous motility is activated by trypsin. Trypsin-activated motility was blocked by pretreatment of the sperm with BAPTA-AM to chelate intracellular Ca(2+) and was partially rescued by subsequent addition of A23187 and Ca(2+). Thapsigargin stimulated motility in the absence of trypsin, suggesting that intracellular Ca(2+) stores are available. In addition, motility could be fully activated by the phosphatase inhibitor calyculin A, suggesting that the immotile state is maintained by an endogenous phosphatase and that kinase activity is required for motility. The MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 significantly reduced trypsin activated motility, and MPM-2, an antibody which recognizes proline-directed phosphorylation by kinases such as MAPK, recognized components of the water strider sperm flagellum. Antibodies specific for the mouse protease activated receptor PAR2 recognized an antigen on the sperm flagellum. These results suggest that trypsin stimulates a Ca(2+) and MAPK mediated signaling pathway and potentially implicate a PAR2-like protein in regulating motility. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mechanism of bacterial signal transduction revealed by molecular dynamics of Tsr dimers and trimers of dimers in lipid vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Hall

    Full Text Available Bacterial chemoreceptors provide an important model for understanding signalling processes. In the serine receptor Tsr from E. coli, a binding event in the periplasmic domain of the receptor dimer causes a shift in a single transmembrane helix of roughly 0.15 nm towards the cytoplasm. This small change is propagated through the ≈ 22 nm length of the receptor, causing downstream inhibition of the kinase CheA. This requires interactions within a trimer of receptor dimers. Additionally, the signal is amplified across a 53,000 nm(2 array of chemoreceptor proteins, including ≈ 5,200 receptor trimers-of-dimers, at the cell pole. Despite a wealth of experimental data on the system, including high resolution structures of individual domains and extensive mutagenesis data, it remains uncertain how information is communicated across the receptor from the binding event to the downstream effectors. We present a molecular model of the entire Tsr dimer, and examine its behaviour using coarse-grained molecular dynamics and elastic network modelling. We observe a large bending in dimer models between the linker domain HAMP and coiled-coil domains, which is supported by experimental data. Models of the trimer of dimers, built from the dimer models, are more constrained and likely represent the signalling state. Simulations of the models in a 70 nm diameter vesicle with a biologically realistic lipid mixture reveal specific lipid interactions and oligomerisation of the trimer of dimers. The results indicate a mechanism whereby small motions of a single helix can be amplified through HAMP domain packing, to initiate large changes in the whole receptor structure.

  6. A novel role for ecdysone in Drosophila conditioned behavior: linking GPCR-mediated non-canonical steroid action to cAMP signaling in the adult brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ishimoto

    Full Text Available The biological actions of steroid hormones are mediated primarily by their cognate nuclear receptors, which serve as steroid-dependent transcription factors. However, steroids can also execute their functions by modulating intracellular signaling cascades rapidly and independently of transcriptional regulation. Despite the potential significance of such "non-genomic" steroid actions, their biological roles and the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood, particularly with regard to their effects on behavioral regulation. The major steroid hormone in the fruit fly Drosophila is 20-hydroxy-ecdysone (20E, which plays a variety of pivotal roles during development via the nuclear ecdysone receptors. Here we report that DopEcR, a G-protein coupled receptor for ecdysteroids, is involved in activity- and experience-dependent plasticity of the adult central nervous system. Remarkably, a courtship memory defect in rutabaga (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-responsive adenylate cyclase mutants was rescued by DopEcR overexpression or acute 20E feeding, whereas a memory defect in dunce (cAMP-specific phosphodiestrase mutants was counteracted when a loss-of-function DopEcR mutation was introduced. A memory defect caused by suppressing dopamine synthesis was also restored through enhanced DopEcR-mediated ecdysone signaling, and rescue and phenocopy experiments revealed that the mushroom body (MB--a brain region central to learning and memory in Drosophila--is critical for the DopEcR-dependent processing of courtship memory. Consistent with this finding, acute 20E feeding induced a rapid, DopEcR-dependent increase in cAMP levels in the MB. Our multidisciplinary approach demonstrates that DopEcR mediates the non-canonical actions of 20E and rapidly modulates adult conditioned behavior through cAMP signaling, which is universally important for neural plasticity. This study provides novel insights into non-genomic actions of steroids, and opens a new avenue for

  7. Enzyme localization, crowding, and buffers collectively modulate diffusion-influenced signal transduction: Insights from continuum diffusion modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J. A.

    2015-09-01

    Biochemical reaction networks consisting of coupled enzymes connect substrate signaling events with biological function. Substrates involved in these reactions can be strongly influenced by diffusion "barriers" arising from impenetrable cellular structures and macromolecules, as well as interactions with biomolecules, especially within crowded environments. For diffusion-influenced reactions, the spatial organization of diffusion barriers arising from intracellular structures, non-specific crowders, and specific-binders (buffers) strongly controls the temporal and spatial reaction kinetics. In this study, we use two prototypical biochemical reactions, a Goodwin oscillator, and a reaction with a periodic source/sink term to examine how a diffusion barrier that partitions substrates controls reaction behavior. Namely, we examine how conditions representative of a densely packed cytosol, including reduced accessible volume fraction, non-specific interactions, and buffers, impede diffusion over nanometer length-scales. We find that diffusion barriers can modulate the frequencies and amplitudes of coupled diffusion-influenced reaction networks, as well as give rise to "compartments" of decoupled reactant populations. These effects appear to be intensified in the presence of buffers localized to the diffusion barrier. These findings have strong implications for the role of the cellular environment in tuning the dynamics of signaling pathways.

  8. Regulation of ERK-mediated signal transduction by p38 MAP kinase in human monocytic THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Satoshi; Watabe, Masahiko; Nishimura, Satoshi; Kurosawa, Masahiro; Izuno, Makoto; Yoshida, Takemi

    2003-05-01

    SB 203580 has been widely used to specifically shut down the p38 MAP kinase-dependent pathway, although it is capable of inducing c-Raf kinase activity in cells. The present study demonstrates that SB 203580 activates members of the ERK cascade, c-Raf, MEK, and ERK, in human monocytic THP-1 cells. The activation of these kinases was sustained for at least 24 h after SB 203580 treatment and was also observed in U937 cells, suggesting that c-Raf efficiently transduces the signal even in the presence of the inhibitor in these cells. However, the expression of ERK cascade-dependent genes, such as c-fos and IL-1beta, was extremely limited. Analysis of the cellular distribution of ERK in SB 203580-treated cells indicated that nuclear translocation of phosphorylated ERK was impaired. Also, nuclear translocation of ERK induced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was inhibited by SB 239063, which does not associate with c-Raf and is highly selective for p38 MAP kinase. In addition, the forced expression of the dominant negative mutant of p38 MAP kinase suppressed serum responsive element-dependent transactivation induced by TPA. These results suggest that the steady-state level of p38 MAP kinase activity modulates ERK signaling.

  9. In TCR-stimulated T-cells, N-ras regulates specific genes and signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Stephen J; Zavadil, Jiri; Pellicer, Angel

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently shown that N-ras plays a preferential role in immune cell development and function; specifically: N-ras, but not H-ras or K-ras, could be activated at and signal from the Golgi membrane of immune cells following a low level T-cell receptor stimulus. The goal of our studies was to test the hypothesis that N-ras and H-ras played distinct roles in immune cells at the level of the transcriptome. First, we showed via mRNA expression profiling that there were over four hundred genes that were uniquely differentially regulated either by N-ras or H-ras, which provided strong evidence in favor of the hypothesis that N-ras and H-ras have distinct functions in immune cells. We next characterized the genes that were differentially regulated by N-ras in T cells following a low-level T-cell receptor stimulus. Of the large pool of candidate genes that were differentially regulated by N-ras downstream of TCR ligation, four genes were verified in qRT-PCR-based validation experiments (Dntt, Slc9a6, Chst1, and Lars2). Finally, although there was little overlap between individual genes that were regulated by N-ras in unstimulated thymocytes and stimulated CD4(+) T-cells, there was a nearly complete correspondence between the signaling pathways that were regulated by N-ras in these two immune cell types.

  10. Deciphering complex dynamics of water counteraction around secondary structural elements of allosteric protein complex: Case study of SAP-SLAM system in signal transduction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2018-01-01

    The first hydration shell of a protein exhibits heterogeneous behavior owing to several attributes, majorly local polarity and structural flexibility as revealed by solvation dynamics of secondary structural elements. We attempt to recognize the change in complex water counteraction generated due to substantial alteration in flexibility during protein complex formation. The investigation is carried out with the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, and interacting with SLAM-associated protein (SAP), composed of one SH2 domain. All atom molecular dynamics simulations are employed to the aqueous solutions of free SAP and SLAM-peptide bound SAP. We observed that water dynamics around different secondary structural elements became highly affected as well as nicely correlated with the SLAM-peptide induced change in structural rigidity obtained by thermodynamic quantification. A few instances of contradictory dynamic features of water to the change in structural flexibility are explained by means of occluded polar residues by the peptide. For βD, EFloop, and BGloop, both structural flexibility and solvent accessibility of the residues confirm the obvious contribution. Most importantly, we have quantified enhanced restriction in water dynamics around the second Fyn-binding site of the SAP due to SAP-SLAM complexation, even prior to the presence of Fyn. This observation leads to a novel argument that SLAM induced more restricted water molecules could offer more water entropic contribution during the subsequent Fyn binding and provide enhanced stability to the SAP-Fyn complex in the signaling cascade. Finally, SLAM induced water counteraction around the second binding site of the SAP sheds light on the allosteric property of the SAP, which becomes an integral part of the underlying signal transduction mechanism.

  11. Activation of salicylic acid metabolism and signal transduction can enhance resistance to Fusarium wilt in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Cavendish).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Jia, Caihong; Li, Jingyang; Huang, Suzhen; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubens (Foc) is the most serious disease that attacks banana plants. Salicylic acid (SA) can play a key role in plant-microbe interactions. Our study is the first to examine the role of SA in conferring resistance to Foc TR4 in banana (Musa acuminata L. AAA group, cv. Cavendish), which is the greatest commercial importance cultivar in Musa. We used quantitative real-time reverse polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to analyze the expression profiles of 45 genes related to SA biosynthesis and downstream signaling pathways in a susceptible banana cultivar (cv. Cavendish) and a resistant banana cultivar (cv. Nongke No. 1) inoculated with Foc TR4. The expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and downstream signaling pathways was suppressed in a susceptible cultivar and activated in a resistant cultivar. The SA levels in each treatment arm were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. SA levels were decreased in the susceptible cultivar and increased in the resistant cultivar. Finally, we examined the contribution of exogenous SA to Foc TR4 resistance in susceptible banana plants. The expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and signal transduction pathways as well as SA levels were significantly increased. The results suggest that one reason for banana susceptibility to Foc TR4 is that expression of genes involved in SA biosynthesis and SA levels are suppressed and that the induced resistance observed in banana against Foc TR4 might be a case of salicylic acid-dependent systemic acquired resistance.

  12. The regulatory role of the NO/cGMP signal transduction cascade during larval attachment and metamorphosis of the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Y.

    2012-08-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is among the most dominant fouling species on intertidal rocky shores in tropical and subtropical areas and is thus a target organism in antifouling research. After being released from adults, the swimming nauplius undertakes six molting cycles and then transforms into a cyprid. Using paired antennules, a competent cyprid actively explores and selects a suitable substratum for attachment and metamorphosis (collectively known as settlement). This selection process involves the reception of exogenous signals and subsequent endogenous signal transduction. To investigate the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) during larval settlement of B. amphitrite, we examined the effects of an NO donor and an NO scavenger, two nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors and a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor on settling cyprids. We found that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) inhibited larval settlement in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, both the NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO and the NOS inhibitors aminoguanidine hemisulfate (AGH) and S-methylisothiourea sulfate (SMIS) significantly accelerated larval settlement. Suppression of the downstream guanylyl cyclase (GC) activity using a GC-selective inhibitor ODQ could also significantly accelerate larval settlement. Interestingly, the settlement inhibition effects of SNP could be attenuated by ODQ at all concentrations tested. In the developmental expression profiling of NOS and sGC, the lowest expression of both genes was detected in the cyprid stage, a crucial stage for the larval decision to attach and metamorphose. In summary, we concluded that NO regulates larval settlement via mediating downstream cGMP signaling.

  13. Piperine, a component of black pepper, decreases eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in non-chemosensory 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Cho; Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Park, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of an ethanol extract of black pepper and its constituent, piperine, on odorant-induced signal transduction in non-chemosensory cells. An ethanol extract of black pepper decreased eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells with no toxicity. Phosphorylation of CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) was down-regulated by the black pepper extract. The concentration (133.8 mg/g) and retention time (5.5 min) of piperine in the ethanol extract were quantified using UPLC-MS/MS. Pretreatment with piperine decreased eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in 3T3-L1 cells. Piperine also decreased the phosphorylation of CREB, which is up-regulated by eugenol. These results suggest that piperine inhibits the eugenol-induced signal transduction pathway through modulation of cAMP and calcium levels and phosphorylation of CREB in non-chemosensory cells.

  14. In vivo imaging of signal transduction cascades with probes based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2009-12-01

    Genetically encoded FRET probes enable us to visualize a variety of signaling events such as protein phosphorylation and G-protein activation in living cells. This unit focuses on FRET probes wherein both the donor and acceptor are fluorescence proteins and incorporated into a single molecule, i.e., a unimolecular probe. Advantages of these probes lie in their easy loading into cells, simple acquisition of FRET images, and clear evaluation of data. We have developed FRET probes for Ras-superfamily GTPases, designated Ras and interacting protein chimeric unit (Raichu) probes. We hereby describe strategies to develop Raichu-type FRET probes, procedures for their characterization, and acquisition and processing of images. Although improvements upon FRET probes are still based on trial-and-error, we provide practical tips for their optimization and briefly discuss the theory and applications of unimolecular FRET probes.

  15. The Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 in stress-induced signal transduction: implications for cell proliferation and cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine Falsig

    2006-01-01

    has expanded from one of a household protein involved in ion homeostasis to that of a multifaceted regulator and/or modulator of a wide variety of cell functions. NHE1 plays pivotal roles in response to a number of important physiological stress conditions which, in addition to cell shrinkage...... and acidification, include hypoxia and mechanical stimuli, such as cell stretch. It has recently become apparent that NHE1-mediated modulation of, e.g., cell migration, morphology, proliferation, and death results not only from NHE1-mediated changes in pHi, cell volume, and/or [Na+]i, but also from direct protein-protein...... interactions with, e.g., ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins and regulation of cellular signaling events, including the activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt/protein kinase B (PKB). The aim of this review is to present and discuss new findings implicating NHE1 activation as a central...

  16. Signal transduction and downregulation of C-MET in HGF stimulated low and highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husmann, Knut, E-mail: khusmann@research.balgrist.ch [Laboratory for Orthopedic Research, Department of Orthopedics, Balgrist University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Ducommun, Pascal [Laboratory for Orthopedic Research, Department of Orthopedics, Balgrist University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Division of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, Department of Surgery, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Sabile, Adam A.; Pedersen, Else-Marie; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno [Laboratory for Orthopedic Research, Department of Orthopedics, Balgrist University Hospital, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-04

    The poor outcome of osteosarcoma (OS), particularly in patients with metastatic disease and a five-year survival rate of only 20%, asks for more effective therapeutic strategies targeting malignancy-promoting mechanisms. Dysregulation of C-MET, its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the fusion oncogene product TPR-MET, first identified in human MNNG-HOS OS cells, have been described as cancer-causing factors in human cancers. Here, the expression of these molecules at the mRNA and the protein level and of HGF-stimulated signaling and downregulation of C-MET was compared in the parental low metastatic HOS and MG63 cell lines and the respective highly metastatic MNNG-HOS and 143B and the MG63-M6 and MG63-M8 sublines. Interestingly, expression of TPR-MET was only observed in MNNG-HOS cells. HGF stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 in all cell lines investigated, but phospho-Stat3 remained at basal levels. Downregulation of HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation was much faster in the HGF expressing MG63-M8 cells than in HOS cells. Degradation of HGF-activated C-MET occurred predominantly through the proteasomal and to a lesser extent the lysosomal pathway in the cell lines investigated. Thus, HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 signaling as well as proteasomal degradation of HGF activated C-MET are potential therapeutic targets in OS. - Highlights: • Expression of TPR-MET was only observed in MNNG-HOS cells. • HGF stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 but not of Stat3 in osteosarcoma cell lines. • Degradation of HGF-activated C-MET occurred predominantly through the proteasomal pathway.

  17. A novel link between the proteasome pathway and the signal transduction pathway of the Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Richard H

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intracellular signaling events of the Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs involve the R-Smad family members Smad1, Smad5, Smad8 and the Co-Smad, Smad4. Smads are currently considered to be DNA-binding transcriptional modulators and shown to recruit the master transcriptional co-activator CBP/p300 for transcriptional activation. SNIP1 is a recently discovered novel repressor of CBP/p300. Currently, the detailed molecular mechanisms that allow R-Smads and Co-Smad to co-operatively modulate transcription events are not fully understood. Results Here we report a novel physical and functional link between Smad1 and the 26S proteasome that contributes to Smad1- and Smad4-mediated transcriptional regulation. Smad1 forms a complex with a proteasome β subunit HsN3 and the ornithine decarboxylase antizyme (Az. The interaction is enhanced upon BMP type I receptor activation and occur prior to the incorporation of HsN3 into the mature 20S proteasome. Furthermore, BMPs trigger the translocation of Smad1, HsN3 and Az into the nucleus, where the novel CBP/p300 repressor protein SNIP1 is further recruited to Smad1/HsN3/Az complex and degraded in a Smad1-, Smad4- and Az-dependent fashion. The degradation of the CBP/p300 repressor SNIP1 is likely an essential step for Smad1-, Smad4-mediated transcriptional activation, since increased SNIP1 expression inhibits BMP-induced gene responses. Conclusions Our studies thus add two additional important functional partners of Smad1 into the signaling web of BMPs and also suggest a novel mechanism for Smad1 and Smad4 to co-modulate transcription via regulating proteasomal degradation of CBP/p300 repressor SNIP1.

  18. Increased expression of IRE1α and stress-related signal transduction proteins in ischemia-reperfusion injured retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuyo Hata

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Natsuyo Hata1, Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Akiko Yokoyama1,3, Yoshinori Mitamura1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chuo-ku, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, Japan; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Inoue Memorial Hospital, Chuo-ku, Chiba, JapanAbstract: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the expression of ER stress-related factors IRE1α, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1, SAPK/ERK kinase 1 (SEK1 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK is associated with the damaged retinal neurons induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury. After 60 minutes of ischemia, the rat retinas were reperfused, and retinas were isolated and fixed after 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 hours, and 2, 5, and 9 days of reperfusion. Cryosections were immunostained with Fluoro-Jade B, a degenerating neuron marker to label degenerating neurons. Semi-quantitative analysis of the expression of IRE1α, ASK1, SEK1, and JNK were performed in both control and ischemic retinas. In ischemic retinas, the intensities of IRE1α immunoreactivity in the ganglion cell layer (GCL were significantly higher than in the control retinas. In ischemic retinas, the numbers of SEK1-, ASK1-, and JNK-positive cells were significantly increased in the GCL compared to those in the control retinas. In addition, the cells that were positive for SEK1-, ASK1-, and JNK were also positive for Fluoro-Jade B-positive cells. These results indicate that the increased expression of ER stress-related factors was, in part, associated with the retinal neuronal abnormalities after ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat retinas.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum, IRE1α, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, SAPK/ERK kinase 1, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, Fluoro-Jade B, ischemia-reperfusion injury

  19. NADPH oxidase 1 supports proliferation of colon cancer cells by modulating reactive oxygen species-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Agnes; Markel, Susan; Gaur, Shikha; Liu, Han; Lu, Jiamo; Jiang, Guojian; Wu, Xiwei; Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Melillo, Giovanni; Meitzler, Jennifer L; Haines, Diana C; Butcher, Donna; Roy, Krishnendu; Doroshow, James H

    2017-05-12

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in cell signaling and proliferation. NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), a membrane-bound flavin dehydrogenase that generates O2̇̄, is highly expressed in colon cancer. To investigate the role that NOX1 plays in colon cancer growth, we used shRNA to decrease NOX1 expression stably in HT-29 human colon cancer cells. The 80-90% decrease in NOX1 expression achieved by RNAi produced a significant decline in ROS production and a G1/S block that translated into a 2-3-fold increase in tumor cell doubling time without increased apoptosis. The block at the G1/S checkpoint was associated with a significant decrease in cyclin D1 expression and profound inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Decreased steady-state MAPK phosphorylation occurred concomitant with a significant increase in protein phosphatase activity for two colon cancer cell lines in which NOX1 expression was knocked down by RNAi. Diminished NOX1 expression also contributed to decreased growth, blood vessel density, and VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression in HT-29 xenografts initiated from NOX1 knockdown cells. Microarray analysis, supplemented by real-time PCR and Western blotting, revealed that the expression of critical regulators of cell proliferation and angiogenesis, including c-MYC, c-MYB, and VEGF, were down-regulated in association with a decline in hypoxic HIF-1α protein expression downstream of silenced NOX1 in both colon cancer cell lines and xenografts. These studies suggest a role for NOX1 in maintaining the proliferative phenotype of some colon cancers and the potential of NOX1 as a therapeutic target in this disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Characterization of Cell Surface and EPS Remodeling of Azospirillum brasilense Chemotaxis-like 1 Signal Transduction Pathway mutants by Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billings, Amanda N [ORNL; Siuti, Piro [ORNL; Bible, Amber [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Alexandre, Gladys [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    To compete in complex microbial communities, bacteria must quickly sense environmental changes and adjust cellular functions for optimal growth. Chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways are implicated in the modulation of multiple cellular responses, including motility, EPS production, and cell-to-cell interactions. Recently, the Che1 chemotaxis-like pathway from Azospirillum brasilense was shown to modulate flocculation. In A. brasilense, cell surface properties, including EPS production, are thought to play a direct role in promoting flocculation. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have detected distinct changes in the surface morphology of flocculating A. brasilense Che1 mutant strains that are absent in the wild type strain. Whereas the wild type strain produces a smooth mucosal extracellular matrix, the flocculating Che1 mutant strains produce distinctive extracellular fibril structures. Further analyses using flocculation inhibition and lectin-binding assays suggest that the composition of EPS components in the extracellular matrix differs between the cheA1 and cheY1 mutants, despite an apparent similarity in the macroscopic floc structures. Collectively, these data indicate that mutations in the Che1 pathway that result in increased flocculation are correlated with distinctive changes in the extracellular matrix structure produced by the mutants, including likely changes in the EPS structure and/or composition.

  1. Effects of Zhichan powder on signal transduction and apoptosis-associated gene expression in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajun; Ma, Jinshu; Qiu, Yafei; Yi, Shihong; Liu, Yongmao; Zhou, Qingwei; Zhang, Pengguo; Wan, Quan; Kuang, Ye

    2012-09-25

    Previous studies have shown that Zhichan powder elevated immunity and suppressed oxidation in mice. Rat models of Parkinson's disease were induced by stereotaxically injecting 6-hydroxydopamine into the substantia nigra. The rat models were intragastrically treated with Zhichan powder, which is composed of milkvetch root, ginseng, bunge swallowwort root, himalayan teasel root, Magnolia officinalis, Ligustrum lucidum Ait. and szechwan lovage rhizome. Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR results demonstrated that mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas, caspase-8, cytochrome C, Bax, caspase-3, and p53 significantly increased, but Bcl-2 expression significantly decreased in the substantia nigra of rats with Parkinson's disease. Following Zhichan powder administration, mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, Fas, caspase-8, cytochrome C, Bax, caspase-3, and p53 diminished, but Bcl-2 expression increased in the rat substantia nigra. These results indicate that Zhichan powder regulates signal transduction protein expression, inhibits apoptosis, and exerts therapeutic effects on Parkinson's disease.

  2. Effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on signal transduction pathway-related protein expression in liver and cerebrum of rhesus monkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Mari; Akema, Satoshi; Tsuzuki, Masami; Kubota, Shunichiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Korenaga, Tatsumi; Fukusato, Toshio [Teikyo Univ. of School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Asaoka, Kazuo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Murata, Nobuo [Teikyo Univ. of School of Medicine, Kawasaki (Japan); Nomizu, Motoyoshi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Arima, Akihiro [Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories, Ltd., Kagoshima (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is known to produce a wide range of toxic and biochemical effects in experimental animals, including immunological dysfunctions, chloracne, tetragenecity and carcinogenesis. Recently, the potential impact of dioxins on neurological disorders with particular focus on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are concerned. Although a lot of information is available from studies in rodents, not much is known of the low dose effects of TCDD in non-human primates. In higher animals, dioxins are metabolized slowly, as evidenced by the estimated TCDD half-life of 5.8 to 14.1 years. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the long-term effects of TCDD on human health. Considering the pronounced species differences observed in some studies of TCDD, the studies using primates are needed for assessment of TCDD exposure on human health. We have been studying the metabolism and the effects of single administration of TCDD on pregnant monkey (F0) and F1 rhesus monkey. The focus of the present study is to study the effects of TCDD on signal transduction pathway-related protein levels in various organs, especially in liver and brain of F0 monkeys.

  3. Yeast Ca(2+)-signal transduction inhibitors isolated from Dominican amber prevent the degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells through the inhibition of Ca(2+)-influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomomi; Kobayashi, Miki; Okawa, Yusuke; Inui, Tomoki; Yoshida, Jun; Higashio, Hironori; Shinden, Hisao; Uesugi, Shota; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Ken-Ichi

    2016-09-01

    A new norlabdane compound, named kujigamberol has previously been isolated from Kuji amber (but not from Baltic amber) by activity guided fractionation. However, there has been no study of biological compounds in Dominican amber. Biological activities were examined using the hypersensitive mutant yeast (zds1Δ erg3Δ pdr1Δ pdr3Δ) with respect to Ca(2+)-signal transduction, enzymes and rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. The structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral analysis including high resolution (HR)-EI-MS, 1D NMR and 2D NMR. Three diterpenoid compounds, 5(10)-halimen-15-oic acid (1), 3-cleroden-15-oic acid (2) and 8-labden-15-oic acid (3), which are different from the bioactive compounds in Kuji and Baltic ambers, were isolated from Dominican amber. They inhibited both calcineurin (CN) (IC50=40.0, 21.2 and 34.2μM) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) (IC50=48.9, 43.8 and 41.1μM) which are involved in the growth restored activity against the mutant yeast. The most abundant compound 2 showed inhibitory activity against both degranulation and Ca(2+)-influx in RBL-2H3 cells. The compounds having the growth res