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Sample records for camp signal transduction

  1. Cultured lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects have altered cAMP signal transduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, L E; Diamond, I; Gordon, A.

    1988-01-01

    Previous work has shown that freshly isolated lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects show significantly reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels. This decrease could be due to ethanol-induced cellular adaptation or to a genetic difference in the regulation of cAMP signal transduction. Therefore, we cultured human lymphocytes in defined medium without ethanol for 7-8 days and then examined differences in receptor-dependent cAMP accumulation between lymphocytes from alcoholic an...

  2. Signal Transduction in Dictyostelium fgd A Mutants with a Defective Interaction between Surface cAMP Receptors and a GTP-binding Regulatory Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1988-01-01

    Transmembrane signal transduction was investigated in four Dictyostelium discoideum mutants that belong to the fgd A complementation group. The results show the following. (a) Cell surface cAMP receptors are present in fgd A mutants, but cAMP does not induce any of the intracellular responses, inclu

  3. Signal transduction in Dictyostelium fgd A mutants with a defective interaction between surface cAMP receptors and a GTP-binding regulatory protein [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1988 Dec;107(6 Pt 1):following 2463

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Transmembrane signal transduction was investigated in four Dictyostelium discoideum mutants that belong to the fgd A complementation group. The results show the following. (a) Cell surface cAMP receptors are present in fgd A mutants, but cAMP does not induce any of the intracellular responses, including the activation of adenylate or guanylate cyclase and chemotaxis. (b) cAMP induces down- regulation and the covalent modification (presumably phosphorylation) of the cAMP receptor. (c) The inhi...

  4. Quantitation of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, S; Brand, M D

    2000-12-01

    Conventional qualitative approaches to signal transduction provide powerful ways to explore the architecture and function of signaling pathways. However, at the level of the complete system, they do not fully depict the interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways and fail to give a manageable overview of the complexity that is often a feature of cellular signal transduction. Here, we introduce a quantitative experimental approach to signal transduction that helps to overcome these difficulties. We present a quantitative analysis of signal transduction during early mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes, with steady-state respiration rate as a convenient marker of metabolic stimulation. First, by inhibiting various key signaling pathways, we measure their relative importance in regulating respiration. About 80% of the input signal is conveyed via identifiable routes: 50% through pathways sensitive to inhibitors of protein kinase C and MAP kinase and 30% through pathways sensitive to an inhibitor of calcineurin. Second, we quantify how each of these pathways differentially stimulates functional units of reactions that produce and consume a key intermediate in respiration: the mitochondrial membrane potential. Both the PKC and calcineurin routes stimulate consumption more strongly than production, whereas the unidentified signaling routes stimulate production more than consumption, leading to no change in membrane potential despite increased respiration rate. The approach allows a quantitative description of the relative importance of signal transduction pathways and the routes by which they activate a specific cellular process. It should be widely applicable.

  5. Integrins mediating bone signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Chuanglong; WANG Yuanliang; YANG Lihua; ZHANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesions play critical roles in diverse cell functions. Integrins offers a platform on which mechanical stimuli, cytoskeletal organization, biochemical signals can concentrate. Mechanical stimuli transmitted by integrins influence the cytoskeleton, in turn, the cytoskeleton influences cell adhesion via integrins, then cell adhesion results in a series of signal transduction cascades. In skeleton, integrins also have a key role for bone resoption by osteoclasts and reformation by osteoblasts. In present review, the proteins involved in integrin signal transduction and integrin signal transduction pathways were discussed, mainly on the basic mechanisms of integrin signaling and the roles of integrins in bone signal transduction, which may give insight into new therapeutic agents to all kinds of skeletal diseases and new strategies for bone tissue engineering.

  6. Reliable Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Roy

    Stochasticity inherent to biochemical reactions (intrinsic noise) and variability in cellular states (extrinsic noise) degrade information transmitted through signaling networks. We analyzed the ability of temporal signal modulation - that is dynamics - to reduce noise-induced information loss. In the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), calcium (Ca(2 +)) , and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF- κB) pathways, response dynamics resulted in significantly greater information transmission capacities compared to nondynamic responses. Theoretical analysis demonstrated that signaling dynamics has a key role in overcoming extrinsic noise. Experimental measurements of information transmission in the ERK network under varying signal-to-noise levels confirmed our predictions and showed that signaling dynamics mitigate, and can potentially eliminate, extrinsic noise-induced information loss. By curbing the information-degrading effects of cell-to-cell variability, dynamic responses substantially increase the accuracy of biochemical signaling networks.

  7. Gibberellin Signal Transduction in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Min Fan; Xiaoyan Feng; Yu Wang; Xing Wang Deng

    2007-01-01

    In the past decade, significant knowledge has accumulated regarding gibberellin (GA) signal transduction in rice as a result of studies using multiple approaches, particularly molecular genetics. The present review highlights the recent developments in the identification of GA signaling pathway components, the discovery of GA-induced destruction of GA signaling represser (DELLA protein), and the possible mechanism underlying the regulation of GA-responsive gene expression in rice.

  8. Meeting Report: Teaching Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, IJsbrand; Thomas, Geraint

    2006-01-01

    In July, 2005, the European Institute of Chemistry and Biology at the campus of the University of Bordeaux, France, hosted a focused week of seminars, workshops, and discussions around the theme of "teaching signal transduction." The purpose of the summer school was to offer both junior and senior university instructors a chance to reflect on the…

  9. cAMP and EPAC are key players in the regulation of the signal transduction pathway involved in the α-hemolysin autophagic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Mestre

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla is the S. aureus-secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus-containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell.

  10. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2013-09-03

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  11. Sentra, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltsev, N.; Marland, E.; Yu, G. X.; Bhatnagar, S.; Lusk, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2002-01-01

    Sentra (http://www-wit.mcs.anl.gov/sentra) is a database of signal transduction proteins with the emphasis on microbial signal transduction. The database was updated to include classes of signal transduction systems modulated by either phosphorylation or methylation reactions such as PAS proteins and serine/threonine kinases, as well as the classical two-component histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Currently, Sentra contains signal transduction proteins from 43 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes as well as sequences from SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL. Signal transduction proteins are annotated with information describing conserved domains, paralogous and orthologous sequences, and conserved chromosomal gene clusters. The newly developed user interface supports flexible search capabilities and extensive visualization of the data.

  12. SENTRA, a database of signal transduction proteins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, M.; Romine, M. F.; Maltsev, N.; Mathematics and Computer Science; PNNL

    2000-01-01

    SENTRA, available via URL http://wit.mcs.anl.gov/WIT2/Sentra/, is a database of proteins associated with microbial signal transduction. The database currently includes the classical two-component signal transduction pathway proteins and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, but will be expanded to also include other classes of signal transduction systems that are modulated by phosphorylation or methylation reactions. Although the majority of database entries are from prokaryotic systems, eukaroytic proteins with bacterial-like signal transduction domains are also included. Currently SENTRA contains signal transduction proteins in 34 complete and almost completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, as well as sequences from 243 organisms available in public databases (SWISS-PROT and EMBL). The analysis was carried out within the framework of the WIT2 system, which is designed and implemented to support genetic sequence analysis and comparative analysis of sequenced genomes.

  13. Bioinformatics analyses for signal transduction networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Research in signaling networks contributes to a deeper understanding of organism living activities. With the development of experimental methods in the signal transduction field, more and more mechanisms of signaling pathways have been discovered. This paper introduces such popular bioin-formatics analysis methods for signaling networks as the common mechanism of signaling pathways and database resource on the Internet, summerizes the methods of analyzing the structural properties of networks, including structural Motif finding and automated pathways generation, and discusses the modeling and simulation of signaling networks in detail, as well as the research situation and tendency in this area. Now the investigation of signal transduction is developing from small-scale experiments to large-scale network analysis, and dynamic simulation of networks is closer to the real system. With the investigation going deeper than ever, the bioinformatics analysis of signal transduction would have immense space for development and application.

  14. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  15. Brassinosteroid signal transduction: An emerging picture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiaomei; MA Ligeng

    2003-01-01

    Steroid hormones play essential roles in animal growth and development. Steroid signaling in animal system is focused on the direct gene regulation response mediated by its nuclear receptors. Recently, steroid hormones are also found in plants. Identification of BRI1 - a critical component of the plasma-membrane steroid receptor complex, and the related signal transduction pathway mediated by the membrane receptor have revealed an elementary picture of BR signaling from the cell surface perception to the activation of BR-responsive nuclear genes.

  16. Signal transduction immunohistochemistry - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alexander E. Kalyuzhny statement that immunohistochemical detection of labile, low abundance and short-lived signal transduction molecules appears to be a very challenging task actually captures the same reader’s feeling. Each of us daily using immunohistochemical protocols to reveal targets either useful for research or diagnostic aims will surely wonder by which tricky techniques it is possible to overcome the preservation and unmasking of those labile antigens involved in signal transduction. Well, by seventheen chapters grouped in five parts Prof. Alexander E. Kalyuzhny is presenting an invaluable technical and methodological source of hints to satisfy our needs: to overcome troubleshottings if we are already in the field or to orientate those entering the field....

  17. Signal transduction by growth factor receptors: signaling in an instant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Blagoev, Blagoy;

    2007-01-01

    -out by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has allowed exciting views on the very early events in signal transduction. Activation profiles of regulated phosphorylation sites on epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream signal transducers showed different kinetics within the first ten seconds...

  18. Automated modelling of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aach John

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular signal transduction is achieved by networks of proteins and small molecules that transmit information from the cell surface to the nucleus, where they ultimately effect transcriptional changes. Understanding the mechanisms cells use to accomplish this important process requires a detailed molecular description of the networks involved. Results We have developed a computational approach for generating static models of signal transduction networks which utilizes protein-interaction maps generated from large-scale two-hybrid screens and expression profiles from DNA microarrays. Networks are determined entirely by integrating protein-protein interaction data with microarray expression data, without prior knowledge of any pathway intermediates. In effect, this is equivalent to extracting subnetworks of the protein interaction dataset whose members have the most correlated expression profiles. Conclusion We show that our technique accurately reconstructs MAP Kinase signaling networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This approach should enhance our ability to model signaling networks and to discover new components of known networks. More generally, it provides a method for synthesizing molecular data, either individual transcript abundance measurements or pairwise protein interactions, into higher level structures, such as pathways and networks.

  19. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp) in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, M.A.; B. Evans-Bain; Santi, S. L.; Dickerson, I M

    2001-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as...

  20. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Russo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids (GSLs are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development.

  1. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Domenico; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; D’Angelo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development. PMID:27754465

  2. Mechanisms of UV-induced signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulms, D.; Schwarz, T. [Univ. Muenster, Muenster (Germany). Ludwing Boltzmann Inst. for Cell Biology and Immunobiology of the Skin

    2002-04-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UV) causes a variety of biological effects that can be either beneficial or harmful for human health. To exert these effects on a cellular basis, UV uses a variety of signaling pathways. DNA is the major chromophore for UVB. Thus, nuclear DNA damage has been detected to be a major mediator of numerous UVB effects, and experimental reduction of DNA damage is associated with a loss of these effects. On the other hand, UV has been found to utilize molecular components within the cytoplasm or at the cell membrane for signaling. UV can directly activate cell surface receptors, kinases, and transcription factors. The nuclear and extranuclear signaling pathways are generated independently and have been recently recognized to be not mutually exclusive but to contribute to various UV effects in an independent and additive way. Further knowledge of how these signaling pathways relate to each other will certainly increase our understanding of how UV acts as a pathogen. The following review will briefly discuss current aspects of the mechanisms involved in UV-induced signal transduction. (author)

  3. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Kevin J Morey; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A.; Smith, J. Jeff; Webb, Colleen T.; Hellinga, Homme W.; Medford, June I.

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparent...

  4. Nonequilibrium phase transitions in biomolecular signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric; Krishnamurthy, Supriya; Fontana, Walter; Krakauer, David

    2011-11-01

    We study a mechanism for reliable switching in biomolecular signal-transduction cascades. Steady bistable states are created by system-size cooperative effects in populations of proteins, in spite of the fact that the phosphorylation-state transitions of any molecule, by means of which the switch is implemented, are highly stochastic. The emergence of switching is a nonequilibrium phase transition in an energetically driven, dissipative system described by a master equation. We use operator and functional integral methods from reaction-diffusion theory to solve for the phase structure, noise spectrum, and escape trajectories and first-passage times of a class of minimal models of switches, showing how all critical properties for switch behavior can be computed within a unified framework.

  5. Signal transduction of erythrocytes after specific binding of ecdysterone and cholesterol immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykhaylyk, O.M. E-mail: helek@iptelecom.net.ua; Kotzuruba, A.V.; Buchanevich, O.M.; Korduban, A.M.; Meged, E.F.; Gulaya, N.M

    2001-07-01

    Concurrent binding of cholesterol and ecdysterone immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite to intact rat erythrocytes was investigated. Several binding components on erythrocyte plasma membrane with different affinities were revealed in the range of 10{sup -15}-10{sup -8} M. The specific binding modulates signal transduction through adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase systems as manifested by the decrease in cAMP and increase in cGMP second messenger production.

  6. Signal transduction by erythrocytes on specific binding of doxorubicin immobilized on nanodispersed magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykhaylyk, Olga [Institute Applied Problems Physics and Biophysics, NAS, Sluzhbova 3, UA-03142 Kyiv (Ukraine)]. E-mail: Olga.Mykhaylyk@gmx.net; Kotzuruba, Anatoliy [Institute of Biochemistry, NAS, Leontovicha 9, UA-01030 Kyiv (Ukraine); Dudchenko, Nataliya [Institute Applied Problems Physics and Biophysics, NAS, Sluzhbova 3, UA-03142 Kyiv (Ukraine); Toerok, Gyula [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)

    2005-05-15

    Two specific binding sites for doxorubicin were revealed at the plasma membrane of human erythrocytes on investigation of the binding of doxorubicin magnetic nanoconjugates. Free and conjugated doxorubicins modulated signal transduction in erythrocytes in a similar way. Both up-regulated nitric oxide and cyclic GMP (cGMP) and down-regulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and stabilize the membranes of damaged erythrocytes.

  7. The Membrane and Lipids as Integral Participants in Signal Transduction: Lipid Signal Transduction for the Non-Lipid Biochemist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyster, Kathleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Reviews of signal transduction have often focused on the cascades of protein kinases and protein phosphatases and their cytoplasmic substrates that become activated in response to extracellular signals. Lipids, lipid kinases, and lipid phosphatases have not received the same amount of attention as proteins in studies of signal transduction.…

  8. Quantifying efficient information transduction of biochemical signaling cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2016-01-01

    Cells can be considered as systems that utilize changes in thermodynamic entropy as information. Therefore, they serve as useful models for investigating the relationships between entropy production and information transmission, i.e., signal transduction. Based on the hypothesis that cells apply a chemical reaction cascade for the most efficient transduction of information, we adopted a coding design that minimizes the number of bits per concentration of molecules that are employed for information transduction. As a result, the average rate of entropy production is uniform across all cycles in a cascade reaction. Thus, the entropy production rate can be a valuable measure for the quantification of intracellular signal transduction.

  9. EDITORIAL: Special section on signal transduction Special section on signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsman, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    This special section of Physical Biology focuses on multiple aspects of signal transduction, broadly defined as the study of the mechanisms by which cells communicate with their environment. Mechanisms of cell communication involve detection of incoming signals, which can be chemical, mechanical or electromagnetic, relaying these signals to intracellular processes, such as cytoskeletal networks or gene expression systems, and, ultimately, converting these signals to responses such as cell differentiation or death. Given the multiscale nature of signal transduction systems, they must be studied at multiple levels, from the identities and structures of molecules comprising signal detection and interpretation networks, to the systems-level properties of these networks. The 11 papers in this special section illustrate some of the most exciting aspects of signal transduction research. The first two papers, by Marie-Anne Félix [1] and by Efrat Oron and Natalia Ivanova [2], focus on cell-cell interactions in developing tissues, using vulval patterning in worm and cell fate specification in mammalian embryos as prime examples of emergent cell behaviors. Next come two papers from the groups of Julio Saez-Rodriguez [3] and Kevin Janes [4]. These papers discuss how the causal relationships between multiple components of signaling systems can be inferred using multivariable statistical analysis of empirical data. An authoritative review by Zarnitsyna and Zhu [5] presents a detailed discussion of the sequence of signaling events involved in T-cell triggering. Once the structure and components of the signaling systems are determined, they can be modeled using approaches that have been successful in other physical sciences. As two examples of such approaches, reviews by Rubinstein [6] and Kholodenko [7], present reaction-diffusion models of cell polarization and thermodynamics-based models of gene regulation. An important class of models takes the form of enzymatic networks

  10. Signal transduction molecule patterns indicating potential glioblastoma therapy approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruceru ML

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Linda Cruceru,1 Ana-Maria Enciu,1,2,7 Adrian Claudiu Popa,1,3 Radu Albulescu,2,4,7 Monica Neagu,2,7 Cristiana Pistol Tanase,2,7 Stefan N Constantinescu5–7 1Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Bucharest, Romania; 2Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, Romania; 3Army Centre for Medical Research, Bucharest, Romania; 4National Institute for Chemical Pharmaceutical R&D, Bucharest, Romania; 5de Duve Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium; 6Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Brussels, Belgium; 7Operational Sectorial Programme for Competitive Economic Growth Canbioprot at Victor Babes National Institute of Pathology, Bucharest, Romania Purpose: The expression of an array of signaling molecules, along with the assessment of real-time cell proliferation, has been performed in U87 glioma cell line and in patients’ glioblastoma established cell cultures in order to provide a better understanding of cellular and molecular events involved in glioblastoma pathogenesis. Experimental therapy was performed using a phosphatydylinositol-3´-kinase (PI3K inhibitor. Patients and methods: xMAP technology was employed to assess expression levels of several signal transduction molecules and real-time xCELLigence platform for cell behavior. Results: PI3K inhibition induced the most significant effects on global signaling pathways in patient-derived cell cultures, especially on members of the mitogen-activated protein-kinase family, P70S6 serine-threonine kinase, and cAMP response element-binding protein expression and further prevented tumor cell proliferation. Conclusion: The PI3K pathway might be a prime target for glioblastoma treatment. Keywords: personalized medicine, PI3K inhibitor, targeted therapy, xCELLigence, xMAP analysis

  11. Engineering key components in a synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Mauricio S; Morey, Kevin J; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Bowen, Tessa A; Smith, J Jeff; Webb, Colleen T; Hellinga, Homme W; Medford, June I

    2009-01-01

    Signal transduction underlies how living organisms detect and respond to stimuli. A goal of synthetic biology is to rewire natural signal transduction systems. Bacteria, yeast, and plants sense environmental aspects through conserved histidine kinase (HK) signal transduction systems. HK protein components are typically comprised of multiple, relatively modular, and conserved domains. Phosphate transfer between these components may exhibit considerable cross talk between the otherwise apparently linear pathways, thereby establishing networks that integrate multiple signals. We show that sequence conservation and cross talk can extend across kingdoms and can be exploited to produce a synthetic plant signal transduction system. In response to HK cross talk, heterologously expressed bacterial response regulators, PhoB and OmpR, translocate to the nucleus on HK activation. Using this discovery, combined with modification of PhoB (PhoB-VP64), we produced a key component of a eukaryotic synthetic signal transduction pathway. In response to exogenous cytokinin, PhoB-VP64 translocates to the nucleus, binds a synthetic PlantPho promoter, and activates gene expression. These results show that conserved-signaling components can be used across kingdoms and adapted to produce synthetic eukaryotic signal transduction pathways.

  12. Modeling Signal Transduction and Lipid Rafts in Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2011-03-01

    Experimental evidence increasingly suggests that lipid rafts are nanometer sized cholesterol dependent dynamic assemblies enriched in sphingolipids and associated proteins. Lipid rafts are dynamic structures that break-up and reform on a relatively short time-scale, and are believed to facilitate the interactions of raft-associated proteins. The role of these rafts in signaling has been controversial, partly due to controversies regarding the existence and nature of the rafts themselves. Experimental evidence has indicated that in several cell types, especially T cells, rafts do influence signal transduction and T cell activation. Given the emerging consensus on the biophysical character of lipid rafts, the question can be asked as to what roles they possibly play in signal transduction. Here we carry out simulations of minimal models of the signal transduction network that regulates Src-family kinase dynamics in T cells and other cell types. By separately treating raft-based biochemical interactions, we find that rafts can indeed putatively play an important role in signal transduction, and in particular may affect the sensitivity of signal transduction. This illuminates possible functional consequences of membrane heterogeneities on signal transduction and points towards mechanisms for spatial control of signaling by cells.

  13. Signal transduction in the footsteps of goethe and schiller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Karlheinz; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Entschladen, Frank; Serfling, Edgar; Thiel, Gerald; Kieser, Arnd; Giehl, Klaudia; Ehrhardt, Christina; Feller, Stephan M; Ullrich, Oliver; Schaper, Fred; Janssen, Ottmar; Hass, Ralf

    2009-02-04

    The historical town of Weimar in Thuringia, the "green heart of Germany" was the sphere of Goethe and Schiller, the two most famous representatives of German literature's classic era. Not yet entirely as influential as those two cultural icons, the Signal Transduction Society (STS) has nevertheless in the last decade established within the walls of Weimar an annual interdisciplinary Meeting on "Signal Transduction - Receptors, Mediators and Genes", which is well recognized as a most attractive opportunity to exchange results and ideas in the field.The 12th STS Meeting was held from October 28 to 31 and provided a state-of-the-art overview of various areas of signal transduction research in which progress is fast and discussion lively. This report is intended to share with the readers of CCS some highlights of the Meeting Workshops devoted to specific aspects of signal transduction.

  14. Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0820 TITLE: Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two...Report 3. DATES COVERED 15 September 2011-14 September 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Serotonin Signal Transduction in Two Groups of Autistic Patients...the arena of serotonin sensitivity, from those cells obtained from autistic subjects with normal serum serotonin . This was not the case, as the

  15. Gene Expression Pattern of Signal Transduction in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Huiyu; JIE Shenghua; GUO Tiannan; HUANG Shi'ang

    2006-01-01

    To explore the transcriptional gene expression profiles of signaling pathway in Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), a series of cDNA microarray chips were tested. The results showed that differentially expressed genes related to singal transduction in CML were screened out and the genes involved in Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K), Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and other signaling pathway genes simultaneously. The results also showed that most of these genes were up-expression genes , which suggested that signal transduction be overactivated in CML. Further analysis of these differentially expressed signal transduction genes will be helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of CML and find new targets of treatment.

  16. Effects of Low Dose Radiation on Signal Transduction of Neurons in Mouse Hypothalamus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Effects of low dose radiation on signal transduction of neurons in mouse hypothalamus were investigated. Methods In the present study competitive protein binding assay, radioimmunoassay, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to observe the effects of whole-body irradiation with 75 mGy X-rays on the contents of cAMP and cGMP and the expressions of c-fos mRNA, Fos protein and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA in the neurons of mouse hypothalamus. Results The results showed that cAMP content in mouse hypothalamus immediately increased significantly and reached the peak value in 15 min after irradiation, and then returned to near sham-irradiation level 1 h after irradiation, followed by a small fluctuation of increase and decrease; the changes of cGMP content were basically opposite to those of cAMP content, while the changes of cAMP/cGMP ratio were basically consistent with those of cAMP content. The expression of c-fos mRNA in the neurons of hypothalamus appeared 15 min after irradiation, reached its peak value within 1 h, began to abate 2 h with its total disappearance 8 h after irradiation; the expression of Fos protein reached its peak value 8 h after irradiation, and then gradually returned to sham-irradiation level 48 h after irradiation; the expression of POMC mRNA decreased significantly 1 h after irradiation and remained at a lower level in the observation period of 12 h. Conclusion These findings implicate that low dose radiation may potentiate the activity of the neurons in mouse hypothalamus, expedite their signal transduction, and down-regulate the functions of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis.

  17. Expression of SMAD signal transduction molecules in the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorson, Michael; Hougaard, D.; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis;

    2001-01-01

    Members of the TGF-beta superfamily of cytokines have been implicated in pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis and in regulation and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine cells. Different TGF-beta members signal through phosphorylation of different signal transduction proteins, which eve...

  18. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S;

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  19. Diffusion wave and signal transduction in biological live cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Tian You

    2012-01-01

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals is a fundamental subject for cell physics. In the experiments of FRET signal in cells a wave propagation in nanoscope was observed. We here develop a diffusion wave concept and try to give an explanation to the experimental observation. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement to result of the experiment.

  20. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Phosphoinositide pathway and the signal transduction network in neural development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenza Rita Lo Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The development of the nervous system is under the strict control of a number of signal transduction pathways,often interconnected.Among them,the phosphoinositide (PI) pathway and the related phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family of enzymes have been attracting much attention.Besides their well-known role in the regulation of intracellular calcium levels,PI-PLC enzymes interact with a number of molecules belonging to further signal transduction pathways,contributing to a specific and complex network in the developing nervous system.In this review,the connections of PI signalling with further transduction pathways acting during neural development are discussed,with special regard to the role of the PI-PLC family of enzymes.

  2. Microenvironment Dependent Photobiomodulation on Function-Specific Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Cheng-Yi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular photobiomodulation on a cellular function has been shown to be homeostatic. Its function-specific pathway mechanism would be further discussed in this paper. The signal transduction pathways maintaining a normal function in its function-specific homeostasis (FSH, resisting the activation of many other irrelative signal transduction pathways, are so sparse that it can be supposed that there may be normal function-specific signal transduction pathways (NSPs. A low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light may promote the activation of partially activated NSP and/or its redundant NSP so that it may induce the second-order phase transition of a function from its dysfunctional one far from its FSH to its normal one in a function-specific microenvironment and may also induce the first-order functional phase transition of the normal function from low level to high level.

  3. Cell cycle and cell signal transduction in marine phytoplankton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingwen; JIAO Nianzhi; CAI Huinong

    2006-01-01

    As unicellular phytoplankton, the growth of a marine phytoplankton population results directly from the completion of a cell cycle, therefore, cell-environment communication is an important way which involves signal transduction pathways to regulate cell cycle progression and contribute to growth, metabolism and primary production and respond to their surrounding environment in marine phytoplankton. Cyclin-CDK and CaM/Ca2+ are essentially key regulators in control of cell cycle and signal transduction pathway, which has important values on both basic research and applied biotechnology. This paper reviews progress made in this research field, which involves the identification and characterization of cyclins and cell signal transduction system, cell cycle control mechanisms in marine phytoplankton cells, cell cycle proteins as a marker of a terminal event to estimate the growth rate of phytoplankton at the species level, cell cycle-dependent toxin production of toxic algae and cell cycle progression regulated by environmental factors.

  4. Hypergravity signal transduction in HeLa cells with concomitant phosphorylation of proteins immunoprecipitated with anti-microtubule-associated protein antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumei, Yasuhiro; Whitson, Peggy A.; Sato, Atsushige; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that hypergravity (35g) stimulates the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and decreases adenosine 3-prime,5-prime-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) levels in HeLa cells. It is proposed that IP3 and cAMP may act as second messengers in hypergravity signal transduction. Phosphorylation of microtubule-associated proteins in both the detergent-soluble and -insoluble fractions suggests that cytoskeletal structures may be influenced by gravity.

  5. The sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue: prospecting signal transduction in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Mendes Souza

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available EST sequencing has enabled the discovery of many new genes in a vast array of organisms, and the utility of this approach to the scientific community is greatly increased by the establishment of fully annotated databases. The present study aimed to identify sugarcane ESTs sequenced in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br that corresponded to signal transduction components. We also produced a sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br/private/mining-reports/QG/QG-mining.htm that covered the main categories and pathways. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs encoding enzymes for hormone (gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathways were found and tissue specificity was inferred from their relative frequency of occurrence in the different libraries. Whenever possible, transducers of hormones and plant peptide signaling were catalogued to the respective pathway. Over 100 receptors were found in sugarcane, which contains a large family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors and also photoreceptors, histidine kinase receptors and their response regulators. G-protein and small GTPases were analyzed and compared to known members of these families found in mammalian and plant systems. Major kinase and phosphatase pathways were mapped, with special attention being given to the MAP kinase and the inositol pathway, both of which are well known in plants.O sequenciamento de ESTs (etiquetas de sequencias transcritas tem possibilitado a descoberta de muitos novos genes em uma ampla variedade de organismos. Um aumento do aproveitamento desta informação pela comunidade científica tem sido possível graças ao desenvolvimento de base de dados contendo seqüências completamente anotadas. O trabalho aqui relatado teve como objetivo a identificação de ESTs de cana de açúcar seqüenciadas através do projeto SUCEST (http://sucest.lad.ic. unicamp.br que

  6. Revisiting cAMP signaling in the carotid body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita eNunes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic carotid body (CB activation is now recognized as being essential in the development of hypertension and promoting insulin resistance; thus, it is imperative to characterize the chemotransduction mechanisms of this organ in order to modulate its activity and improve patient outcomes. For several years, and although controversial, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP was considered an important player in initiating the activation of the CB. However, its relevance was partially displaced in the 90s by the emerging role of the mitochondria and molecules such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and O2-sensitive K+ channels. Neurotransmitters/neuromodulators binding to metabotropic receptors are essential to chemotransmission in the CB, and cAMP is central to this process. cAMP also contributes to raise intracellular Ca2+ levels, and is intimately related to the cellular energetic status (AMP/ATP ratio. Furthermore, cAMP signaling is a target of multiple current pharmacological agents used in clinical practice. This review provides an outline on 1 the classical view of the cAMP-signaling pathway in the CB that originally supported its role in the O2/CO2 sensing mechanism, 2 present recent evidence on CB cAMP neuromodulation and 3 discuss how CB activity is affected by current clinical therapies that modify cAMP-signaling, namely dopaminergic drugs, caffeine (modulation of A2A/A2B receptors and roflumilast (PDE4 inhibitors. cAMP is key to any process that involves metabotropic receptors and the intracellular pathways involved in CB disease states are likely to involve this classical second messenger. Research examining the potential modification of cAMP levels and/or interactions with molecules associated with CB hyperactivity is currently in its beginning and this review will open doors for future explorations.

  7. Signaling transduction by IgG receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘銮凤; 裴鹏

    2003-01-01

    Objective To review and summarize literature regarding stimulatory and inhibitory signaling pathways from different types of Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs).Data source Articles were obtained from Medline from January 1991 to April 2002. Study selection Over 100 English language papers and reviews published over the last 11 years were selected.Results and Conclusions Stimulatory Fcγ receptors include FcγRI, FcγRIIA, FcγRIIC, and FcγRIII A. They transduce signals through the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) in subunits or in the cytoplasmic domain. Inhibitory Fcγ receptors, such as FcγRIIB, are single chain receptors, transducing signals through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in cytoplasmic domains. Stimulatory signals include protein phosphorylation, increase in intracellular free calcium, the production of 1,4,5-triphosphate inositol (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG) mainly through the Src-family kinases, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) and phospholipase C (PLC). Inhibitory signaling has been implicated in the repression of the above activities as well as inhibition of B cell responses through Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP).

  8. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M.

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  9. MAPK cascades in guard cell signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuree eLee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions.

  10. Coordinate gene regulation by fimbriae-induced signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    of Ag43 production. No effect was observed in an oxyR mutant. We conclude that fimbriae expression per se constitutes a signal transduction mechanism that affects a number of unrelated genes via the thiol-disulfide status of OxyR. Thus, phase variation in fimbrial expression is coordinated...

  11. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-09-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies.

  12. Exploring signal transduction networks using mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, L.A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics can be used to answer a diversity of biological questions. In this thesis, we describe the application of several MS-based proteomics approaches to get insight into several aspects of signal transduction. In Chapter 2, quantitative global phosphoproteomics are

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Testerink, C.; Wang, M.

    1998-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), c

  14. Regulation of Signal Transduction by Glutathione Transferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Pajaud

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione transferases (GST are essentially known as enzymes that catalyse the conjugation of glutathione to various electrophilic compounds such as chemical carcinogens, environmental pollutants, and antitumor agents. However, this protein family is also involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds which play critical roles in the regulation of signaling pathways. For example, the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE and the prostaglandin 15-deoxy-,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 are metabolized by GSTs and these compounds are known to influence the activity of transcription factors and protein kinases involved in stress response, proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis. Furthermore, several studies have demonstrated that GSTs are able to interact with different protein partners such as mitogen activated protein kinases (i.e., c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 which are also involved in cell signaling. New functions of GSTs, including S-glutathionylation of proteins by GSTs and ability to be a nitric oxide (NO carrier have also been described. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that GST might play a crucial role during normal or cancer cells proliferation or apoptosis.

  15. Regulation of signal transduction by glutathione transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaud, Julie; Kumar, Sandeep; Rauch, Claudine; Morel, Fabrice; Aninat, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are essentially known as enzymes that catalyse the conjugation of glutathione to various electrophilic compounds such as chemical carcinogens, environmental pollutants, and antitumor agents. However, this protein family is also involved in the metabolism of endogenous compounds which play critical roles in the regulation of signaling pathways. For example, the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) are metabolized by GSTs and these compounds are known to influence the activity of transcription factors and protein kinases involved in stress response, proliferation, differentiation, or apoptosis. Furthermore, several studies have demonstrated that GSTs are able to interact with different protein partners such as mitogen activated protein kinases (i.e., c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)) which are also involved in cell signaling. New functions of GSTs, including S-glutathionylation of proteins by GSTs and ability to be a nitric oxide (NO) carrier have also been described. Taken together, these observations strongly suggest that GST might play a crucial role during normal or cancer cells proliferation or apoptosis.

  16. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  17. Role of the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway in the endometrium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenza Rita Lo Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium concentration triggers physiological events in all cell types. Unregulated elevation in calcium concentrations is often cytotoxic.In fact, uncontrolled calcium levels alter proteins’ function, apoptosis regulation, as well as proliferation, secretion and contraction.Calcium levels are tightly regulated.A great interest was paid to signal transduction pathways for their role in mammalian reproduction.The role of phosphoinositide(PI) signal transduction pathway and related phosphoinositide-specific phospholipaseC(PI-PLC) enzymes in the regulation of calcium levels was actively studied and characterized.However, the role of PI signaling andPI-PLC enzymes in the endometrium is far to be completely highlighted.In the present review the role ofPI, the expression of selectedPI-PLC enzymes and the crosstalk with further signaling systems in the endometrium will be discussed.

  18. Signal Transduction Pathways of TNAP: Molecular Network Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Négyessy, László; Györffy, Balázs; Hanics, János; Bányai, Mihály; Fonta, Caroline; Bazsó, Fülöp

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of evidence pointing on the involvement of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in brain function and diseases like epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease, our understanding about the role of TNAP in the regulation of neurotransmission is severely limited. The aim of our study was to integrate the fragmented knowledge into a comprehensive view regarding neuronal functions of TNAP using objective tools. As a model we used the signal transduction molecular network of a pyramidal neuron after complementing with TNAP related data and performed the analysis using graph theoretic tools. The analyses show that TNAP is in the crossroad of numerous pathways and therefore is one of the key players of the neuronal signal transduction network. Through many of its connections, most notably with molecules of the purinergic system, TNAP serves as a controller by funnelling signal flow towards a subset of molecules. TNAP also appears as the source of signal to be spread via interactions with molecules involved among others in neurodegeneration. Cluster analyses identified TNAP as part of the second messenger signalling cascade. However, TNAP also forms connections with other functional groups involved in neuronal signal transduction. The results indicate the distinct ways of involvement of TNAP in multiple neuronal functions and diseases.

  19. Molecular signal transduction in vascular cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Apoptosis is a form of genetically programmed cell death, which plays a key role in regulation of cellularity in a variety of tissue and cell types including the cardiovascular tissues. Under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions, various biophysiological and biochemical factors, including mechanical forces, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, cytokines, growth factors, oxidized lipoproteins, etc., may influence apoptosis of vascular cells. The Fas/Fas ligand/caspase death-signaling pathway, Bcl-2 protein family/mitochondria, the tumor suppressive gene p53, and the proto-oncogene c-myc may be activated in atherosclerotic lesions, and mediates vascular apoptosis during the development of atherosclerosis. Abnormal expression and dysfunction of these apoptosis-regulating genes may attenuate or accelerate vascular cell apoptosis and affect the integrity and stability of atherosclerotic plaques. Clarification of the molecular mechanism that regulates apoptosis may help design a new strategy for treatment of atherosclerosis and its major complication, the acute vascular syndromes.

  20. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  1. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  2. Signal transduction pathways in liver and the influence of hepatitis C virus infection on their activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena M Dabrowska; Anatol Panasiuk; Robert Flisiak

    2009-01-01

    In liver, the most intensively studied transmembrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways are the Janus kinase signal transduction pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinases signal transduction pathway, the transforming growth factor b signal transduction pathway, the tumor necrosis factor a signal transduction pathway and the recently discovered sphingolipid signal transduction pathway. All of them are activated by many different cytokines and growth factors. They regulate specific cell mechanisms such as hepatocytes proliferation, growth, differentiation, adhesion, apoptosis, and synthesis and degradation of the extracellular matrix. The replication cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is intracellular and requires signal transduction to the nucleus to regulate transcription of its genes. Moreover, HCV itself, by its structural and nonstructural proteins, could influence the activity of the second signal messengers. Thus, the inhibition of the transmembrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways could be a new therapeutic target in chronic hepatitis C treatment.

  3. Effects of Low Dose Radiation on Signal Transduction of Neurons in Mouse Hyothalamus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANHONG; GONGSHOU-LIANG; 等

    2001-01-01

    Objective:Effects of low dose radiation on signal trasduction of neurons in mouse hypothalamus were investigated.Methods:In the present study competitive protein binding assay,radioimmunoassay,in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were used to observe the effects of whloe-body irradiation with 75mGy X-rays on the cotents of cAMP and cGMP and the expressions of c-fos mRNA,FOs protein and proopiomelanocortin(POMC)mRNA in the neurons of mouse hypothalamus,Results:The results showed that cAMP content in mouse hypothalamus immediately increased significantly and reasched the peak value in 15min after irradiation,and then returned to near shwm-irradiation level 1h after irradiation,followed by a small fluctuation of increase and decrease;the Changes of cGMP content were basicvally opposite to those of cAMP content,while the changes of cAMP/cGMP ratio were basically consistent with those of cAMP content.The expression of c-fos mRNA in the neurons of hypothalamus appeared 15min after irradiation,reached its peak value within 1h,began to abate 2h with its total disappearance 8h after irradiation;the expression of FOs protein reached its peak value 8h after irradiation,and then gradually returned to sham-irradiation level 48h after irradiation;the expression of POMC mRNA decreased significantly 1h after irradiation and reained at a lwoer level in the observation period of 12h.Conclustion:These Findings implicate that low dose radiation may potentiate the activity of the neurons in mouse hypothalamus ,expedite their signal transduction,and down-regulate the functions of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis.

  4. Identification of photoperception and light signal transduction pathways in citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Quecini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies employing model species have elucidated several aspects of photoperception and light signal transduction that control plant development. However, the information available for economically important crops is scarce. Citrus genome databases of expressed sequence tags (EST were investigated in order to identify genes coding for functionally characterized proteins responsible for light-regulated developmental control in model plants. Approximately 176,200 EST sequences from 53 libraries were queried and all bona fide and putative photoreceptor gene families were found in citrus species. We have identified 53 orthologs for several families of transcriptional regulators and cytoplasmic proteins mediating photoreceptor-induced responses although some important Arabidopsis phytochrome- and cryptochrome-signaling components are absent from citrus sequence databases. The main gene families responsible for phototropin-mediated signal transduction were present in citrus transcriptome, including general regulatory factors (14-3-3 proteins, scaffolding elements and auxin-responsive transcription factors and transporters. A working model of light perception, signal transduction and response-eliciting in citrus is proposed based on the identified key components. These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and economically important crop species to elucidate several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  5. Bio-inspired signal transduction with heterogeneous networks of nanoscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafé, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    Networks of single-electron transistors mimic some of the essential properties of neuron populations, because weak electrical signals trigger network oscillations with a frequency proportional to the input signal. Input potentials representing the pixel gray level of a grayscale image can then be converted into rhythms and the image can be recovered from these rhythms. Networks of non-identical nanoscillators complete the noisy transduction more reliably than identical ones. These results are important for signal processing schemes and could support recent studies suggesting that neuronal variability enhances the processing of biological information.

  6. The new sideway of CNTF signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The action of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on intercellular free Ca2+ concentrations [Ca2+]I induced by glutamate (Glu) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons were detected with Fura2/AM,a Ca2+-sensitive fluorophore,and the morphological influence of G-protein on it was ob- jected. Glu could induce rapid increase of [Ca2+]I in hippo- campal neurons. CNTF had no significant action on [Ca2+]I in resting hippocampal neurons. However,after incubation of CNTF for 5 min,the increase of [Ca2+]I in hippocampal neurons rapidly induced by Glu was inhibited. Pretussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G protein could block the action. These results indicate that a new non-genomic rapid sideway might exist in the upper stream of CNTF signal transduction pathway,which was related to Ca2+ signal transduction.

  7. Study of spatial signal transduction in bistable switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Yao, Cheng-Gui; Tang, Jun; Liu, Li-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Bistable switch modules are among the most important fundamental motifs in signal-transduction pathways. To better understand their spatial signal transduction, we model the diffusion process in the one-dimensional (1-D) domain. We find that when none of the elements diffuse, the response of the system exhibits a spatial switch-like property. However, when one of the elements is highly diffusible, the response of the system does not show any spatial switching behavior. Furthermore, we observe that the spatial responses of the system are more sensitive to the time constant of the switch when none of the elements are diffusible. Further, a slow loop keeps the system in the high steady state more positions than that in the fast loop. Finally, we consolidate our numerical results analytically by performing a mathematical method.

  8. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mike eMerrick

    2015-01-01

    The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII prot...

  9. State-time spectrum of signal transduction logic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNamara, Aidan; Terfve, Camille; Henriques, David; Peñalver Bernabé, Beatriz; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2012-08-01

    Despite the current wealth of high-throughput data, our understanding of signal transduction is still incomplete. Mathematical modeling can be a tool to gain an insight into such processes. Detailed biochemical modeling provides deep understanding, but does not scale well above relatively a few proteins. In contrast, logic modeling can be used where the biochemical knowledge of the system is sparse and, because it is parameter free (or, at most, uses relatively a few parameters), it scales well to large networks that can be derived by manual curation or retrieved from public databases. Here, we present an overview of logic modeling formalisms in the context of training logic models to data, and specifically the different approaches to modeling qualitative to quantitative data (state) and dynamics (time) of signal transduction. We use a toy model of signal transduction to illustrate how different logic formalisms (Boolean, fuzzy logic and differential equations) treat state and time. Different formalisms allow for different features of the data to be captured, at the cost of extra requirements in terms of computational power and data quality and quantity. Through this demonstration, the assumptions behind each formalism are discussed, as well as their advantages and disadvantages and possible future developments.

  10. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor... Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signal transduction by the lip

  11. Characterization of the ABA signal transduction pathway in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Uri; Biton, Iris; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-05-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many key processes in plants including the response to abiotic stress. ABA signal transduction consists of a double-negative regulatory mechanism, whereby ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. We studied and analyzed the various genes participating in the ABA signaling cascade of the grape (Vitis vinifera). The grape ABA signal transduction consists of at least six SnRK2s. Yeast two-hybrid system was used to test direct interactions between core components of grape ABA signal transduction. We found that a total of forty eight interactions can occur between the various components. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stresses such as drought, high salt concentration and cold, were applied to vines growing in a hydroponic system. These stresses regulated the expression of various grape SnRK2s as well as ABFs in leaves and roots. Based on the interactions between SnRK2s and its targets and the expression pattern, we suggest that VvSnRK2.1 and VvSnRK2.6, can be considered the major VvSnRK2 candidates involved in the stomata response to abiotic stress. Furthermore, we found that the expression pattern of the two grape ABF genes indicates organ specificity of these genes. The key role of ABA signaling in response to abiotic stresses makes the genes involve in this signaling potential candidates for manipulation in programs designed to improve fruit tree performance in extreme environments.

  12. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles ...... of beta1 and beta2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR)....

  13. Roles of lipid turnover in transmembrane signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, B R

    1991-11-01

    Cells of higher organisms respond to external stimuli with a cascade of intracellular biochemical events initiated by binding of a hormone, growth factor, or neurotransmitter to a specific cell surface receptor. Previously well-characterized signal transduction pathways involve cyclic nucleotides as intracellular second messengers. Over the past decade, increasing attention has been focused on other signaling pathways in which membrane lipids serve as second messengers or their precursors. This review describes current understanding of these pathways and points to recent discoveries likely to open new frontiers in the coming decade.

  14. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarunendu Mapder

    Full Text Available To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  15. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique.

  16. Deciphering Parameter Sensitivity in the BvgAS Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapder, Tarunendu; Talukder, Srijeeta; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Banik, Suman K.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the switching of different phenotypic phases of Bordetella pertussis, we propose an optimized mathematical framework for signal transduction through BvgAS two-component system. The response of the network output to the sensory input has been demonstrated in steady state. An analysis in terms of local sensitivity amplification characterizes the nature of the molecular switch. The sensitivity analysis of the model parameters within the framework of various correlation coefficients helps to decipher the contribution of the modular structure in signal propagation. Once classified, the model parameters are tuned to generate the behavior of some novel strains using simulated annealing, a stochastic optimization technique. PMID:26812153

  17. Downstream reporter gene imaging for signal transduction pathway of dopamine type 2 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Uyenchi N.; Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Midicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The Dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) signal pathway regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of proteins including cAMP reponse element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor. In this study, we developed a reporter strategy using the GAL4 fusion CREB to assess the phosphorylation of CREB, one of the targets of the D2R signal transduction pathway. We used three plasmids: GAL4 fusion transactivator (pCMV-CREB), firefly luciferase reporter with GAL4 binding sites (pG5-FLUC), and D2R plasmid (pCMV-D2R). Group 1 293T cells were transiently transfected with pCMV-CREB and pG5-FLUC, and group 2 cells were transfected with all three plasmids. Transfected cells were stimulated with different concentrations of dopamine (0-200 M). For animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells (1x10{sup 6}) were subcutaneously injected on the left and right thigh of six nude mice, respectively. Dopamine stimiulation was performed with intraperitoneal injection of L-DOPA incombination with carbidopa, a peripheral DOPA decarboxylase inhibitor. Bioluminescence optical imaging studies were performed before and after L-DOPA injection. In cell culture studies, group 1 cells showed strong luciferase activity which implies direct activation of the signaling pathway due to growth factors contained in culture medium. Group 2 cells showed strong luciferase activity and a further increase after administration of dopamine. In animal studies, group 1 and 2 cells showed bioluminescence signal before L-DOPA injection, but signal from group 2 cells significantly increased 12 h after L-DOPA injection. The signal from group 1 cells disappeared thereafter, but group 2 cells continued to show signal until 36 h of L-DOPA injection. This study demonstrates imaging of the D2R signal transduction pathway and should be useful for noninvasive imaging of downstream effects of G-coupled protein pathways.

  18. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  19. Novel cAMP signalling paradigms: therapeutic implications for airway disease

    OpenAIRE

    Billington, Charlotte K; Hall, Ian P

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery over 50 years ago, cAMP has been the archetypal second messenger introducing students to the concept of cell signalling at the simplest level. As explored in this review, however, there are many more facets to cAMP signalling than the path from Gs-coupled receptor to adenylyl cyclase (AC) to cAMP to PKA to biological effect. After a brief description of this canonical cAMP signalling pathway, a snapshot is provided of the novel paradigms of cAMP signalling. As in the airwa...

  20. Signal Transduction and Intracellular Trafficking by the Interleukin 36 Receptor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Siddhartha S.; Singh, Divyendu; Raymond, Ernest L.; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Caviness, Gary; Grimaldi, Christine; Woska, Joseph R.; Mennerich, Detlev; Brown, Su-Ellen; Mbow, M. Lamine; Kao, C. Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Improper signaling of the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R), a member of the IL-1 receptor family, has been associated with various inflammation-associated diseases. However, the requirements for IL-36R signal transduction remain poorly characterized. This work seeks to define the requirements for IL-36R signaling and intracellular trafficking. In the absence of cognate agonists, IL-36R was endocytosed and recycled to the plasma membrane. In the presence of IL-36, IL-36R increased accumulation in LAMP1+ lysosomes. Endocytosis predominantly used a clathrin-mediated pathway, and the accumulation of the IL-36R in lysosomes did not result in increased receptor turnover. The ubiquitin-binding Tollip protein contributed to IL-36R signaling and increased the accumulation of both subunits of the IL-36R. PMID:26269592

  1. [Regulation of plant height by gibberellins biosynthesis and signal transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lingzhu; Cheng, Jianhui; Li, Lin; Wu, Jiang

    2012-02-01

    Plant height is one of the most important agronomic traits that could affect both crop yield and quality. Among all the hormones, gibberellins are crucial to regulate plant height. Cloning and molecular mechanism research of the plant height genes associated gibberellins have extremely important value for the regulation of crop growth and agricultural production, and have been widely used in rice, wheat and other grain crops breeding. In order to promote utilization of gibberellins in fruit trees, flowers and other horticultural crops breeding, we reviewed the regulation of plant height by gibberellins biosynthesis and signal transduction at the molecular level in this paper.

  2. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004; 1(6):425-435.

  3. Advances in NF-κB Signaling Transduction and Transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Xiao

    2004-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription have been the most attractive subjects for both basic research and pharmaceutical industries due to its important roles in both physiological and pathogenesis, particularly the close association of dysregulated NF-κB with tumorgenesis and inflammation. Several novel intracellular molecular events that regulate NF-κB activity have been described recently, including the discovery of an alternative signaling pathway that appears inducing a specific subset genes involved in adoptive immune response. Multi-level and multi-dimensional regulation of NF-κB activity by phosphorylation and acetylation modifications have unveiled and became the hottest targets for potentially tissue specific molecular interventions. Another emerging mechanism for NF-κB-responsive gene's regulation where NF-κB participates the transcriptional regulation independent of its cognate regulatory binding site within the target gene's promoter but facilitating the transaction activity of other involved transcription factors,that implicated an novel transcriptional activities for NF-κB. Thus, the current review will focus on these recent progresses that have been made on NF-κB signaling transduction and transcription. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):425-435.

  4. Genetic analysis of gravity signal transduction in roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Baldwin, Katherine

    To grow downward into the soil, roots use gravity as a guide. Specialized cells, named stato-cytes, enable this directional growth response by perceiving gravity. Located in the columella region of the cap, these cells sense a reorientation of the root within the gravity field through the sedimentation of, and/or tension/pressure exerted by, dense amyloplasts. This process trig-gers a gravity signal transduction pathway that leads to a fast alkalinization of the cytoplasm and a change in the distribution of the plasma membrane-associated auxin-efflux carrier PIN3. The latter protein is uniformly distributed within the plasma membrane on all sides of the cell in vertically oriented roots. However, it quickly accumulates at the bottom side upon gravis-timulation. This process correlates with a preferential transport of auxin to the bottom side of the root cap, resulting in a lateral gradient across the tip. This gradient is then transported to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cellular elongation, resulting in downward curvature. We isolated mutations that affect gravity signal transduction at a step that pre-cedes cytoplasmic alkalinization and/or PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport across the cap. arg1 and arl2 mutations identify a common genetic pathway that is needed for all three gravity-induced processes in the cap statocytes, indicating these genes function early in the pathway. On the other hand, adk1 affects gravity-induced PIN3 relocalization and lateral auxin transport, but it does not interfere with cytoplasmic alkalinization. ARG1 and ARL2 encode J-domain proteins that are associated with membranes of the vesicular trafficking path-way whereas ADK1 encodes adenosine kinase, an enzyme that converts adenosine derived from nucleic acid metabolism and the AdoMet cycle into AMP, thereby alleviating feedback inhibi-tion of this important methyl-donor cycle. Because mutations in ARG1 (and ARL2) do not completely eliminate

  5. Perspective: Adhesion Mediated Signal Transduction in Bacterial Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Sudha; Keklak, Julia; Klein, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    During the infection process, pathogenic bacteria undergo large-scale transcriptional changes to promote virulence and increase intrahost survival. While much of this reprogramming occurs in response to changes in chemical environment, such as nutrient availability and pH, there is increasing evidence that adhesion to host-tissue can also trigger signal transduction pathways resulting in differential gene expression. Determining the molecular mechanisms of adhesion-mediated signaling requires disentangling the contributions of chemical and mechanical stimuli. Here we highlight recent work demonstrating that surface attachment drives a transcriptional response in bacterial pathogens, including uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), and discuss the complexity of experimental design when dissecting the specific role of adhesion-mediated signaling during infection. PMID:26901228

  6. Melusin Promotes a Protective Signal Transduction Cascade in Stressed Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorge, Matteo; Brancaccio, Mara

    2016-01-01

    Melusin is a chaperone protein selectively expressed in heart and skeletal muscles. Melusin expression levels correlate with cardiac function in pre-clinical models and in human patients with aortic stenosis. Indeed, previous studies in several animal models indicated that Melusin plays a broad cardioprotective role in different pathological conditions. Chaperone proteins, besides playing a role in protein folding, are also able to facilitate supramolecular complex formation and conformational changes due to activation/deactivation of signaling molecules. This role sets chaperone proteins as crucial regulators of intracellular signal transduction pathways. In particular Melusin activates AKT and ERK1/2 signaling, protects cardiomyocytes from apoptosis and induces a compensatory hypertrophic response in several pathological conditions. Therefore, selective delivery of the Melusin gene in heart via cardiotropic adenoviral associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9), may represent a new promising gene-therapy approach for different cardiac pathologies. PMID:27672636

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Two-Component Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Keidel, Victoria; Szurmant, Hendrik

    2016-09-25

    Two-component systems (TCS) comprising sensor histidine kinases and response regulator proteins are among the most important players in bacterial and archaeal signal transduction and also occur in reduced numbers in some eukaryotic organisms. Given their importance to cellular survival, virulence, and cellular development, these systems are among the most scrutinized bacterial proteins. In the recent years, a flurry of bioinformatics, genetic, biochemical, and structural studies have provided detailed insights into many molecular mechanisms that underlie the detection of signals and the generation of the appropriate response by TCS. Importantly, it has become clear that there is significant diversity in the mechanisms employed by individual systems. This review discusses the current knowledge on common themes and divergences from the paradigm of TCS signaling. An emphasis is on the information gained by a flurry of recent structural and bioinformatics studies.

  8. BowTieBuilder: modeling signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schröder Adrian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory proteins react to changing environmental conditions by transducing signals into the cell. These signals are integrated into core proteins that activate downstream target proteins such as transcription factors (TFs. This structure is referred to as a bow tie, and allows cells to respond appropriately to complex environmental conditions. Understanding this cellular processing of information, from sensory proteins (e.g., cell-surface proteins to target proteins (e.g., TFs is important, yet for many processes the signaling pathways remain unknown. Results Here, we present BowTieBuilder for inferring signal transduction pathways from multiple source and target proteins. Given protein-protein interaction (PPI data signaling pathways are assembled without knowledge of the intermediate signaling proteins while maximizing the overall probability of the pathway. To assess the inference quality, BowTieBuilder and three alternative heuristics are applied to several pathways, and the resulting pathways are compared to reference pathways taken from KEGG. In addition, BowTieBuilder is used to infer a signaling pathway of the innate immune response in humans and a signaling pathway that potentially regulates an underlying gene regulatory network. Conclusion We show that BowTieBuilder, given multiple source and/or target proteins, infers pathways with satisfactory recall and precision rates and detects the core proteins of each pathway.

  9. Genetic Analysis of Gravity Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Patrick; Strohm, Allison; Barker, Richard; Su, Shih-Heng

    Like most other plant organs, roots use gravity as a directional guide for growth. Specialized cells within the columella region of the root cap (the statocytes) sense the direction of gravity through the sedimentation of starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts). Amyloplast movement and/or pressure on sensitive membranes triggers a gravity signal transduction pathway within these cells, which leads to a fast transcytotic relocalization of plasma-membrane associated auxin-efflux carrier proteins of the PIN family (PIN3 and PIN7) toward the bottom membrane. This leads to a polar transport of auxin toward the bottom flank of the cap. The resulting lateral auxin gradient is then transmitted toward the elongation zones where it triggers a curvature that ultimately leads to a restoration of vertical downward growth. Our laboratory is using strategies derived from genetics and systems biology to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that modulate gravity sensing and signal transduction in the columella cells of the root cap. Our previous research uncovered two J-domain-containing proteins, ARG1 and ARL2, as contributing to this process. Mutations in the corresponding paralogous genes led to alterations of root and hypocotyl gravitropism accompanied by an inability for the statocytes to develop a cytoplasmic alkalinization, relocalize PIN3, and transport auxin laterally, in response to gravistimulation. Both proteins are associated peripherally to membranes belonging to various compartments of the vesicular trafficking pathway, potentially modulating the trafficking of defined proteins between plasma membrane and endosomes. MAR1 and MAR2, on the other end, are distinct proteins of the plastidic outer envelope protein import TOC complex (the transmembrane channel TOC75 and the receptor TOC132, respectively). Mutations in the corresponding genes enhance the gravitropic defects of arg1. Using transformation-rescue experiments with truncated versions of TOC132 (MAR2), we have shown

  10. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1 shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2 shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  11. MAPK Assays in Arabidopsis MAMP-PRR Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoo Sun; Sheen, Jen

    2017-01-01

    Activation of MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) cascades after MAMP (Microbe-Associated Molecular Pattern) perception through PRR (Pattern Recognition Receptor) is one of the first conserved responses when plants encounter microbial organisms. Phosphorylation of various cellular factors in the MAMP-PRR pathway by MAPK cascades is critical for broad-spectrum plant innate immunity. Measurement of MAPK activation and identification of MAPK phosphorylation targets in the MAMP-PRR signal transduction pathway are essential to understand how plants reprogram their cellular processes to cope with unfavorable microbial attack. Here, we describe detailed protocols of three assays measuring MAPK activity after MAMP perception: (1) immune-blotting analysis with anti-phospho ERK1/2 antibody; (2) in-gel kinase assay using a general substrate myelin basic protein (MBP); (3) an in vitro kinase assay to evaluate phosphorylation of MAPK substrate candidates during MAMP-PRR signaling based on a protoplast expression system.

  12. Signal Transduction Model of Magnetic Sensing in Cryptochrome Mediated Photoreception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Phillise Tiffeny

    While migratory birds have long been known to use the Earth's magnetic field for navigation, the precise biophysical mechanism behind this magnetic sense remains unconfirmed. A leading theory of magnetoreception suggests a chemical compass model with a yet undetermined molecular reaction site and unknown magnetically sensitive reactants. The cryptochrome photoreceptor has emerged as a promising candidate site. This investigation numerically models the first order kinetics of cryptochrome mediated photoreception, in order to evaluate its ability to function as a magnetic sensor and transduce orientation information along a neural pathway. A signal-to-noise ratio is defined to quantify the threshold for the functioning of a cryptochrome-based chemical compass. The model suggests that a flavin-superoxide radical pair in cryptochrome functions as the chemical reactants for magnetoreception. Such a cryptochrome-based signal transduction model reasonably predicts the general light intensity and wavelength effects that have been experimentally observed in migratory birds.

  13. Genetic Basis of Ethylene Perception and Signal Transduction in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziqiang Zhu; Hongwei Guo

    2008-01-01

    Ethylene is a simple gaseous hormone in plants. It plays important roles in plant development and stress tolerance. In the presence of ethylene treatment, all ethylene receptors are in an activated form, which can physically interact with CTR1 and consequently recruit CTR1 protein to endoplasmic reticulum membrane to activate it. Activated CTR1 suppresses the downstream signal transduction by an unknown mechanism. Upon binding to its receptors, ethylene will inactivate the receptor/CTR1 module and in turn alleviate their inhibitory effect on two positive regulators acting downstream of CTRI: EIN2 and EIN3. Genetic study reveals that EIN2 is an essential component in the ethylene signaling pathway but its biochemical function remains a mystery. EIN3 is a plant-specific transcription factor and its protein abundance in the nucleus is rapidly induced upon ethylene treatment. In the absence of ethylene signal, EIN3 protein is degraded by an SCF complex containing one of the two F-box proteins EBF1/EBF2 in a 26S proteasome-dependent manner. EIN3 can bind to the promoter sequences of a number of downstream components, such as ERFs, which in turn bind to a GCC box,a cis-element found in many ethylene-regulated defense genes. Ethylene has been shown to also regulate many other hormones' signaling pathways including auxin, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid, implying the existence of complicated signaling networks in the growth, development and defense responses of various plants.

  14. Phosphoproteomics-based systems analysis of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eKozuka-Hata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems coordinate complex cellular information to regulate biological events such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the accumulating evidence on widespread association of signaling molecules has revealed essential contribution of phosphorylation-dependent interaction networks to cellular regulation, their dynamic behavior is mostly yet to be analyzed. Recent technological advances regarding mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics have enabled us to describe the comprehensive status of phosphorylated molecules in a time-resolved manner. Computational analyses based on the phosphoproteome dynamics accelerate generation of novel methodologies for mathematical analysis of cellular signaling. Phosphoproteomics-based numerical modeling can be used to evaluate regulatory network elements from a statistical point of view. Integration with transcriptome dynamics also uncovers regulatory hubs at the transcriptional level. These omics-based computational methodologies, which have firstly been applied to representative signaling systems such as the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway, have now opened up a gate for systems analysis of signaling networks involved in immune response and cancer.

  15. Decoding the phosphorylation code in Hedgehog signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongbin Chen; Jin Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis,and its deregulation leads to numerous human disorders including cancer.Binding of Hh to Patched (Ptc),a twelve-transmembrane protein,alleviates its inhibition of Smoothened (Smo),a seven-transmembrane protein related to G-proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs),leading to Smo phosphorylation and activation.Smo acts through intracellular signaling complexes to convert the latent transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/Gli from a truncated repressor to a fulllength activator,leading to derepression/activation of Hh target genes.Increasing evidence suggests that phosphorylation participates in almost every step in the signal relay from Smo to Ci/Gli,and that differential phosphorylation of several key pathway components may be crucial for translating the Hh morphogen gradient into graded pathway activities.In this review,we focus on the multifaceted roles that phosphorylation plays in Hh signal transduction,and discuss the conservation and difference between Drosophila and mammalian Hh signaling mechanisms.

  16. Analysis of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Adeel

    Abstract Euglena gracilis is a photosynthetic, eukaryotic flagellate. It can adapt autotrophic and heterotrophic mode of growth and respond to different stimuli, this makes it an organism of choice for different research disciplines. It swims to reach a suitable niche by employing different stimuli such as oxygen, light, gravity and different chemicals. Among these stimuli light and gravity are the most important. Phototaxis (locomotion under light stimulus) and gravitaxis (locomotion under gravity stimulus) synergistically help cells to attain an optimal niche in the environment. However, in the complete absence of light or under scarcity of detectable light, cells can totally depend on gravity to find its swimming path. Therefore gravity has certain advantages over other stimuli.Unlike phototatic signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis no clear primary gravity receptor has been identified in Euglena cells so far. However, there are some convincing evidence that TRP like channels act as a primary gravity receptor in Euglena gracilis.Use of different inhibitors gave rise to the involvement of protein kinase and calmodulin proteins in signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis. Recently, specific calmodulin (Calmodulin 2) and protein kinase (PKA) have been identified as potential candidates of gravitactic signal transduction chain. Further characterization and investigation of these candidates was required. Therefore a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques was employed to localize proteins in cells and also to find interacting partners. For localization studies, specific antibodies were raised and characterized. Specificity of antibodies was validated by knockdown mutants, Invitro-translated proteins and heterologously expressed proteins. Cell fractionation studies, involving separation of the cell body and flagella for western blot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence studies were performed for subcellular localization. In order to find

  17. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  18. Simulation of signal transduction in model multiprotein systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Julius

    2009-03-01

    To simulate the dynamics of multiprotein machines, I have developed a method called multiconformer Brownian dynamics (mcBD). In this method, proteins rotate and translate via Brownian motion while their conformations are varied among a prestored set of structures on a simplified energy landscape, taking into account inter-protein interactions. As an example, I build a simple model of a G-protein coupled receptor/G-protein complex, and show that ligand binding causes conformational shifts, which induce GDP to leave, GTP to bind, and the complex to dissociate. The two proteins couple their fast fluctuations together into large-scale coordinated functional motions, resulting in signal transduction. I vary the shapes, electrostatics, and energy landscapes of the proteins independently and examine the impact this has on the system's function. In one result, increasing the binding between proteins improves the fidelity of communication, but at the expense of overall switching frequency.

  19. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Druszczynska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms.

  20. Reactive oxygen species mediate insulin signal transduction in mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Takeshi; Goto, Motomitsu; Tominaga, Takashi; Sugiyama, Mariko; Tsunekawa, Taku; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Banno, Ryoichi; Suga, Hidetaka; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Arima, Hiroshi

    2016-04-21

    In the hypothalamus, several reports have implied that ROS mediate physiological effects of insulin. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of insulin-induced ROS production and the effect of ROS on insulin signal transduction in mouse hypothalamic organotypic cultures. Insulin increased intracellular ROS, which were suppressed by NADPH oxidase inhibitor. H2O2 increased phospho-insulin receptor β (p-IRβ) and phospho-Akt (p-Akt) levels. Insulin-induced increases in p-IRβ and p-Akt levels were attenuated by ROS scavenger or NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Our data suggest that insulin-induced phosphorylation of IRβ and Akt is mediated via ROS which are predominantly produced by NADPH oxidase in mouse hypothalamus.

  1. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C. [Unite d`Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Jouy en Josas (France)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Signal transduction pathway profiling of individual tumor samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson Carsten

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction pathways convey information from the outside of the cell to transcription factors, which in turn regulate gene expression. Our objective is to analyze tumor gene expression data from microarrays in the context of such pathways. Results We use pathways compiled from the TRANSPATH/TRANSFAC databases and the literature, and three publicly available cancer microarray data sets. Variation in pathway activity, across the samples, is gauged by the degree of correlation between downstream targets of a pathway. Two correlation scores are applied; one considers all pairs of downstream targets, and the other considers only pairs without common transcription factors. Several pathways are found to be differentially active in the data sets using these scores. Moreover, we devise a score for pathway activity in individual samples, based on the average expression value of the downstream targets. Statistical significance is assigned to the scores using permutation of genes as null model. Hence, for individual samples, the status of a pathway is given as a sign, + or -, and a p-value. This approach defines a projection of high-dimensional gene expression data onto low-dimensional pathway activity scores. For each dataset and many pathways we find a much larger number of significant samples than expected by chance. Finally, we find that several sample-wise pathway activities are significantly associated with clinical classifications of the samples. Conclusion This study shows that it is feasible to infer signal transduction pathway activity, in individual samples, from gene expression data. Furthermore, these pathway activities are biologically relevant in the three cancer data sets.

  3. The information highways of a biotechnological workhorse – signal transduction in Hypocrea jecorina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmoll Monika

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ascomycete Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei is one of the most prolific producers of biomass-degrading enzymes and frequently termed an industrial workhorse. To compete for nutrients in its habitat despite its shortcoming in certain degradative enzymes, efficient perception and interpretation of environmental signals is indispensable. A better understanding of these signals as well as their transmission machinery can provide sources for improvement of biotechnological processes. Results The genome of H. jecorina was analysed for the presence and composition of common signal transduction pathways including heterotrimeric G-protein cascades, cAMP signaling, mitogen activated protein kinases, two component phosphorelay systems, proteins involved in circadian rhythmicity and light response, calcium signaling and the superfamily of Ras small GTPases. The results of this survey are discussed in the context of current knowledge in order to assess putative functions as well as potential impact of alterations of the respective pathways. Conclusion Important findings include an additional, bacterial type phospholipase C protein and an additional 6-4 photolyase. Moreover the presence of 4 RGS-(Regulator of G-protein Signaling proteins and 3 GprK-type G-protein coupled receptors comprising an RGS-domain suggest a more complex posttranslational regulation of G-protein signaling than in other ascomycetes. Also the finding, that H. jecorina, unlike yeast possesses class I phosducins which are involved in phototransduction in mammals warrants further investigation. An alteration in the regulation of circadian rhythmicity may be deduced from the extension of both the class I and II of casein kinases, homologues of which are implicated in phosphorylation of FRQ in Neurospora crassa. On the other hand, a shortage in the number of the pathogenicity related PTH11-type G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs as well as a lack of

  4. NO, nitrotyrosine, and cyclic GMP in signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafy, K. A.; Krumenacker, J. S.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in biology has evolved from being recognized as an environmental pollutant to an endogenously produced substance involved in cell communication and signal transduction. NO is produced by a family of enzymes called nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), which can be stimulated by a variety of factors that mediate responses to various stimuli. NO can initiate its biological effects through activation of the heterodimeric enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), or through several other chemical reactions. Activation of sGC results in the production of 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), an intracellular second messenger signaling molecule, which can subsequently mediate such diverse physiological events such as vasodilatation and immunomodulation. Chemically reactive NO can affect physiological changes through modifications to cellular proteins, one of which is tyrosine nitration. The demonstration that NO is involved in so many biological pathways indicates the importance of this endogenously produced substance, and suggests that there is much more to be discovered about its role in biology in years to come.

  5. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway in depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yingquan; Qiao, Mingqi

    2013-03-25

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  6. Signal transduction through the IL-4 and insulin receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A; Frankel, M; Paul, W E; Pierce, J H

    1995-07-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase-containing receptors and intracellular tyrosine kinases by ligand stimulation is known to be crucial for mediating initial and subsequent events involved in mitogenic signal transduction. Receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) contain cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains that undergo autophosphorylation upon ligand stimulation. Activation of these receptors also leads to pronounced and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in cells of connective tissue origin. A related substrate, designated 4PS, is similarly phosphorylated by insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in many hematopoietic cell types. IRS-1 and 4PS possess a number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites that are within motifs that bind specific SH2-containing molecules known to be involved in mitogenic signaling such as PI-3 kinase, SHPTP-2 (Syp) and Grb-2. Thus, they appear to act as docking substrates for a variety of signaling molecules. The majority of hematopoietic cytokines bind to receptors that do not possess intrinsic kinase activity, and these receptors have been collectively termed as members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Despite their lack of tyrosine kinase domains, stimulation of these receptors has been demonstrated to activate intracellular kinases leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple substrates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of different members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases is involved in mediating tyrosine phosphorylation events by specific cytokines. Stimulation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor, a member of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily, is thought to result in activation of Jak1, Jak3, and/or Fes tyrosine kinases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Roles of ABA Signal Transduction during Higher Plant Seed Development and Germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Hongbo; Liang Zongsuo; Shao Mingan

    2003-01-01

    ABA is one of the 5 phytohormones in higher plants, which is also the most important hormone that regulates higher plants in response to environmental stress, by ABA signal transduction. Understanding ABA signal transduction at the molecular level is crucial to biology and ecology, and rational breeding complied with corresponding eco-environmental changes.Great advancements have taken place over the past 10 years by application of the 4rabidopsis experimental system. Many components involved in ABA signal transduction have been isolated and identified and a clear overall picture of gene expression and control for this transduction has become an Accepted fact. On the basis of the work in our laboratory, in conjunction with the data available at the moment, the authors have attempted to integrate ABA signal transduction pathways into a common one and give some insights into the relationship between ABA signal transduction and other hormone signal transduction pathways, with an emphasis upon the ABA signal transduction during higher plant seed development. A future challenge in this field is that different experimental systems are applied and various receptors and genes need to be characterized through the utilization of microarray chips.

  8. Signal Transduction at the Single-Cell Level: Approaches to Study the Dynamic Nature of Signaling Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handly, L Naomi; Yao, Jason; Wollman, Roy

    2016-09-25

    Signal transduction, or how cells interpret and react to external events, is a fundamental aspect of cellular function. Traditional study of signal transduction pathways involves mapping cellular signaling pathways at the population level. However, population-averaged readouts do not adequately illuminate the complex dynamics and heterogeneous responses found at the single-cell level. Recent technological advances that observe cellular response, computationally model signaling pathways, and experimentally manipulate cells now enable studying signal transduction at the single-cell level. These studies will enable deeper insights into the dynamic nature of signaling networks.

  9. SELF-ADAPTIVE CONTROLS OF A COMPLEX CELLULAR SIGNALING TRANSDUCTION SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; ZHOU Zhiyuan; DAI Rongyang; LUO Bo; ZHENG Xiaoli; YANG Wenli; HE Tao; WU Minglu

    2004-01-01

    In cells, the interactions of distinct signaling transduction pathways originating from cross-talkings between signaling molecules give rise to the formation of signaling transduction networks, which contributes to the changes (emergency) of kinetic behaviors of signaling system compared with single molecule or pathway. Depending on the known experimental data, we have constructed a model for complex cellular signaling transduction system, which is derived from signaling transduction of epidermal growth factor receptor in neuron. By the computational simulating methods, the self-adaptive controls of this system have been investigated. We find that this model exhibits a relatively stable selfadaptive system, especially to over-stimulation of agonist, and the amplitude and duration of signaling intermediates in it could be controlled by multiple self-adaptive effects, such as "signal scattering", "positive feedback", "negative feedback" and "B-Raf shunt". Our results provide an approach to understanding the dynamic behaviors of complex biological systems.

  10. FIST: a sensory domain for diverse signal transduction pathways in prokaryotes and ubiquitin signaling in eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borziak, Kirill [ORNL; Jouline, Igor B [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Sensory domains that are conserved among Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya are important detectors of common signals detected by living cells. Due to their high sequence divergence, sensory domains are difficult to identify. We systematically look for novel sensory domains using sensitive profile-based searches initi-ated with regions of signal transduction proteins where no known domains can be identified by current domain models. Results: Using profile searches followed by multiple sequence alignment, structure prediction, and domain architecture analysis, we have identified a novel sensory domain termed FIST, which is present in signal transduction proteins from Bacteria, Archaea and Eucarya. Remote similarity to a known ligand-binding fold and chromosomal proximity of FIST-encoding genes to those coding for proteins involved in amino acid metabolism and transport suggest that FIST domains bind small ligands, such as amino acids.

  11. Modulation of signal transduction by tea catechins and related phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Masahito [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States); Weinstein, I. Bernard [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States)]. E-mail: ibw1@columbia.edu

    2005-12-11

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations and experimental studies in rodents provide evidence that green tea and its constituents can inhibit both the development and growth of tumors at a variety of tissue sites. In addition, EGCG, a major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence that these effects are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of the activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream pathways of signal transduction. We also review evidence indicating that the antitumor effects of the related polyphenolic phytochemicals resveratrol, genistein, curcumin, and capsaicin are exerted via similar mechanisms. Some of these agents (EGCG, genistein, and curcumin) appear to directly target specific RTKs, and all of these compounds cause inhibition of the activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Critical areas of future investigation include: (1) identification of the direct molecular target(s) of EGCG and related polyphenolic compounds in cells; (2) the in vivo metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds; (3) the ancillary effects of these compounds on tumor-stromal interactions; (4) the development of synergistic combinations with other antitumor agents to enhance efficacy in cancer prevention and therapy, and also minimize potential toxicities.

  12. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  13. Mannotriose regulates learning and memory signal transduction in the hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lina Zhang; Weiwei Dai; Xueli Zhang; Zhangbin Gong; Guoqin Jin

    2013-01-01

    Rehmannia is a commonly used Chinese herb, which improves learning and memory. However, the crucial components of the signal transduction pathway associated with this effect remain elusive. Pri-mary hippocampal neurons were cultured in vitro, insulted with high-concentration (1 × 10-4 mol/L) cor-ticosterone, and treated with 1 × 10-4 mol/L mannotriose. Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay and western blot analysis showed that hippocampal neuron survival rates and protein levels of glucocorti-coid receptor, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were al dramatical y decreased after high-concentration corticosterone-induced injury. This effect was reversed by mannotriose, to a similar level as RU38486 and donepezil. Our findings indicate that mannotriose could protect hippocampal neurons from high-concentration corticosterone-induced injury. The mechanism by which this occurred was associated with levels of glucocorticoid receptor protein, serum and glucocorticoid-regulated protein kinase, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  14. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  15. Post-translational modification of PII signal transduction proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike eMerrick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The PII proteins constitute one of the most widely distributed families of signal transduction proteins in nature. They are pivotal players in the control of nitrogen metabolism in bacteria and archaea, and are also found in the plastids of plants. Quite remarkably PII proteins control the activities of a diverse range of enzymes, transcription factors and membrane transport proteins, and in all known cases they achieve their regulatory effect by direct interaction with their target. PII proteins in the Proteobacteria and the Actinobacteria are subject to post-translational modification by uridylylation or adenylylation respectively, whilst in some Cyanobacteria they can be modified by phosphorylation. In all these cases the protein’s modification state is influenced by the cellular nitrogen status and is thought to regulate its activity. However in many organisms there is no evidence for modification of PII proteins and indeed the ability of these proteins to respond to the cellular nitrogen status is fundamentally independent of post-translational modification. In this review we explore the role of post-translational modification in PII proteins in the light of recent studies.

  16. Multiple Facets of cAMP Signalling and Physiological Impact: cAMP Compartmentalization in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Schmidt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelling, processes encompassed by increased airway smooth muscle mass, epithelial changes, goblet cell and submucosal gland hyperplasia. In addition to inflammatory cells, airway smooth muscle cells and (myofibroblasts, epithelial cells underpin a variety of key responses in the airways such as inflammatory cytokine release, airway remodelling, mucus hypersecretion and airway barrier function. Cigarette smoke, being next to environmental pollution the main cause of COPD, is believed to cause epithelial hyperpermeability by disrupting the barrier function. Here we will focus on the most recent progress on compartmentalized signalling by cAMP. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, cAMP-specific phospho-diesterases (PDEs maintain compartmentalized cAMP signalling. Intriguingly, spatially discrete cAMP-sensing signalling complexes seem also to involve distinct members of the A-kinase anchoring (AKAP superfamily and IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAPs. In this review, we will highlight the interaction between cAMP and the epithelial barrier to retain proper lung function and to alleviate COPD symptoms and focus on the possible molecular mechanisms involved in this process. Future studies should include the development of cAMP-sensing multiprotein complex specific disruptors and/or stabilizers to orchestrate cellular functions. Compartmentalized cAMP signalling regulates important cellular processes in the lung and may serve as a therapeutic target.

  17. cAMP Signals in Drosophila Motor Neurons Are Confined to Single Synaptic Boutons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Maiellaro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. Although there is evidence for local control of synaptic transmission and plasticity, it is less clear whether a similar spatial confinement of cAMP signaling exists. Here, we suggest a possible biophysical basis for the site-specific regulation of synaptic plasticity by cAMP, a highly diffusible small molecule that transforms the physiology of synapses in a local and specific manner. By exploiting the octopaminergic system of Drosophila, which mediates structural synaptic plasticity via a cAMP-dependent pathway, we demonstrate the existence of local cAMP signaling compartments of micrometer dimensions within single motor neurons. In addition, we provide evidence that heterogeneous octopamine receptor localization, coupled with local differences in phosphodiesterase activity, underlies the observed differences in cAMP signaling in the axon, cell body, and boutons.

  18. Global and local missions of cAMP signaling in neural plasticity, learning and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daewoo eLee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been a popular model to study cAMP signaling and resultant behaviors due to its powerful genetic approaches. All molecular components (AC, PDE, PKA, CREB, etc essential for cAMP signaling have been identified in the fly. Among them, adenylyl cyclase (AC gene rutabaga and phosphodiesterase (PDE gene dunce have been intensively studied to understand the role of cAMP signaling. Interestingly, these two mutant genes were originally identified on the basis of associative learning deficits. This commentary summarizes findings on the role of cAMP in Drosophila neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and memory. It mainly focuses on two distinct mechanisms (global versus local regulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic plasticity related to cAMP homeostasis. This dual regulatory role of cAMP is to increase the strength of excitatory neural circuits on one hand, but to act locally on postsynaptic GABA receptors to decrease inhibitory synaptic plasticity on the other. Thus the action of cAMP could result in a global increase in the neural circuit excitability and memory. Implications of this cAMP signaling related to drug discovery for neural diseases are also described.

  19. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles of β1 andβ2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR). Methods Basophils (purity of 10%-50%) were preincubated with anti-CD29 or anti-CD18 blocking antibodies before used for adhesion study. Basophils were preincubated with the pharmacological inhibitors wortmannin, PP1, PD98059 before used for adhesion and HR study. Cell adherence to bovine serum albumin (BSA) or fibronectin (Fn) was monitored using cell associated histamine as a basophil marker and the histamine was measured by the glass fiber assay.Results Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn was inhibited by anti-CD29. Interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) induced adhesion to BSA was inhibited by anti-CD18. Wortmannin at 1 μmol/L and PP1 at 20 μmol/L strongly interfered with, whereas PD98059 at 50 μmol/L weakly inhibited basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn. One μmol/L wortmannin strongly inhibited IL-3, IL-5, GM-CSF and anti-IgE induced adhesion to BSA. PP1 at 20 μmol/L partly inhibited anti-IgE induced adhesion. Fifty μmol/L PD98059 marginally inhibited IL-5, weakly inhibited anti-IgE, partly inhibited GM-CSF induced adhesion. Wortmannin, PP1 and PD98059 inhibited anti-IgE (1:100 or 1:1000) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner. They inhibited calcium ionophore A23187 (10 μmol/L, 5 μmol/L) induced basophil HR in a dose dependent manner, but to different extend with PP1 being the most efficient.Conclusions Basophil spontaneous adhesion to Fn is mediated by β1-integrins whereas cytokine induced adhesion

  20. Second-chance signal transduction explains cooperative flagellar switching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry G Zot

    Full Text Available The reversal of flagellar motion (switching results from the interaction between a switch complex of the flagellar rotor and a torque-generating stationary unit, or stator (motor unit. To explain the steeply cooperative ligand-induced switching, present models propose allosteric interactions between subunits of the rotor, but do not address the possibility of a reaction that stimulates a bidirectional motor unit to reverse direction of torque. During flagellar motion, the binding of a ligand-bound switch complex at the dwell site could excite a motor unit. The probability that another switch complex of the rotor, moving according to steady-state rotation, will reach the same dwell site before that motor unit returns to ground state will be determined by the independent decay rate of the excited-state motor unit. Here, we derive an analytical expression for the energy coupling between a switch complex and a motor unit of the stator complex of a flagellum, and demonstrate that this model accounts for the cooperative switching response without the need for allosteric interactions. The analytical result can be reproduced by simulation when (1 the motion of the rotor delivers a subsequent ligand-bound switch to the excited motor unit, thereby providing the excited motor unit with a second chance to remain excited, and (2 the outputs from multiple independent motor units are constrained to a single all-or-none event. In this proposed model, a motor unit and switch complex represent the components of a mathematically defined signal transduction mechanism in which energy coupling is driven by steady-state and is regulated by stochastic ligand binding. Mathematical derivation of the model shows the analytical function to be a general form of the Hill equation (Hill AV (1910 The possible effects of the aggregation of the molecules of haemoglobin on its dissociation curves. J Physiol 40: iv-vii.

  1. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  2. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

  3. Sensory cilia and integration of signal transduction in human health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Lotte B; Schneider, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The primary cilium is a hallmark of mammalian tissue cells. Recent research has shown that these organelles display unique sets of selected signal transduction modules including receptors, ion channels, effector proteins and transcription factors that relay chemical and physical stimuli from the ...... in vertebrate cells, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRalpha), hedgehog and Wnt signaling pathways. Finally, we discuss the functions of these cilia-associated signal transduction pathways and their role in human health and development....

  4. Modeling Signal Transduction Networks: A comparison of two Stochastic Kinetic Simulation Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettigrew, Michel F.; Resat, Haluk

    2005-09-15

    Simulations of a scalable four compartment reaction model based on the well known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal transduction system are used to compare two stochastic algorithms ? StochSim and the Gibson-Gillespie. It is concluded that the Gibson-Gillespie is the algorithm of choice for most realistic cases with the possible exception of signal transduction networks characterized by a moderate number (< 100) of complex types, each with a very small population, but with a high degree of connectivity amongst the complex types. Keywords: Signal transduction networks, Stochastic simulation, StochSim, Gillespie

  5. Phosphodiesterase 10A in the rat pineal gland: localization, daily and seasonal regulation of expression and influence on signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiwoks-Becker, Isabella; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Rickes, Oliver; Kelleher, Debra K; Rohleder, Nils; Weyer, Veronika; Spessert, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is highly expressed in striatal spiny projection neurons and represents a therapeutic target for the treatment of psychotic symptoms. As reported previously [J Biol Chem 2009; 284:7606-7622], in this study PDE10A was seen to be additionally expressed in the pineal gland where the levels of PDE10A transcript display daily changes. As with the transcript, the amount of PDE10A protein was found to be under daily and seasonal regulation. The observed cyclicity in the amount of PDE10A mRNA persists under constant darkness, is blocked by constant light and is modulated by the lighting regime. It therefore appears to be driven by the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Since adrenergic agonists and dibutyryl-cAMP induce PDE10A mRNA, the in vitro clock-dependent control of Pde10a appears to be mediated via a norepinephrine → β-adrenoceptor → cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. With regard to the physiological role of PDE10A in the pineal gland, the specific PDE10A inhibitor papaverine was seen to enhance the adrenergic stimulation of the second messenger cAMP and cGMP. This indicates that PDE10A downregulates adrenergic cAMP and cGMP signaling by decreasing the half-life of both nucleotides. Consistent with its effect on cAMP, PDE10A inhibition also amplifies adrenergic induction of the cAMP-inducible gene arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (Aanat) which codes the rate-limiting enzyme in pineal melatonin formation. The findings of this study suggest that Pde10a expression is under circadian and seasonal regulation and plays a modulatory role in pineal signal transduction and gene expression.

  6. cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway involved in the inhibitory effect of CNP on gastric motility in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying-Lan; Sun, Qian; Huang, Xu; Jiang, Jing-Zhi; Zhang, Mo-Han; Piao, Li-Hua; Jin, Zheng; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2013-01-10

    In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-induced inhibitory effect on spontaneous contraction of gastric antral smooth muscle to clarify CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP downstream signal transduction pathway using organ bath and ELISA methods in rat. CNP significantly reduced the amplitude of the spontaneous contraction and increased the contents of cGMP and cAMP in the gastric antral smooth muscle tissue. In the presence of IBMX, a non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, the inhibitory effect of CNP on spontaneous contraction was significantly suppressed; however, the production of cGMP but not cAMP was still increased by CNP. EHNA, a PDE2 inhibitor, did not affect both CNP-induced inhibition of the contraction and CNP-induced increase of cGMP and cAMP generations in gastric smooth muscle tissue, while milrinone, a PDE3 inhibitor, similar to IBMX, attenuated the CNP-induced inhibitory effect on spontaneous contraction and increased the content of cGMP but not cAMP. The results suggest that cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway is also involved in the CNP-induced inhibition of gastric motility in rat.

  7. Sentra : a database of signal transduction proteins for comparative genome analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Souza, M.; Glass, E. M.; Syed, M. H.; Zhang, Y.; Rodriguez, A.; Maltsev, N.; Galerpin, M. Y.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; NIH

    2007-01-01

    Sentra (http://compbio.mcs.anl.gov/sentra), a database of signal transduction proteins encoded in completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes, has been updated to reflect recent advances in understanding signal transduction events on a whole-genome scale. Sentra consists of two principal components, a manually curated list of signal transduction proteins in 202 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and an automatically generated listing of predicted signaling proteins in 235 sequenced genomes that are awaiting manual curation. In addition to two-component histidine kinases and response regulators, the database now lists manually curated Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases and protein phosphatases, as well as adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases, as defined in several recent reviews. All entries in Sentra are extensively annotated with relevant information from public databases (e.g. UniProt, KEGG, PDB and NCBI). Sentra's infrastructure was redesigned to support interactive cross-genome comparisons of signal transduction capabilities of prokaryotic organisms from a taxonomic and phenotypic perspective and in the framework of signal transduction pathways from KEGG. Sentra leverages the PUMA2 system to support interactive analysis and annotation of signal transduction proteins by the users.

  8. FASEB summer research conference on signal transduction in plants. Final report, June 16, 1996--June 21, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, T.L.; Quatrano, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This is the program from the second FASEB conference on Signal Transduction in Plants. Topic areas included the following: environmental signaling; perception and transduction of light signals; signaling in plant microbe interactions; signaling in plant pathogen interactions; cell, cell communication; cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and cellwall continuum; signaling molecules in plant growth and development I and II. A list of participants is included.

  9. The MiST2 database: a comprehensive genomics resource on microbial signal transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Luke E.; Igor B Zhulin

    2009-01-01

    The MiST2 database (http://mistdb.com) identifies and catalogs the repertoire of signal transduction proteins in microbial genomes. Signal transduction systems regulate the majority of cellular activities including the metabolism, development, host-recognition, biofilm production, virulence, and antibiotic resistance of human pathogens. Thus, knowledge of the proteins and interactions that comprise these communication networks is an essential component to furthering biomedical discovery. Thes...

  10. Signal transduction, receptors, mediators and genes: younger than ever - the 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society focused on aging and immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klotz Lars-Oliver

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 13th meeting of the Signal Transduction Society was held in Weimar, from October 28 to 30, 2009. Special focus of the 2009 conference was "Aging and Senescence", which was co-organized by the SFB 728 "Environmentally-Induced Aging Processes" of the University of Düsseldorf and the study group 'Signal Transduction' of the German Society for Cell Biology (DGZ. In addition, several other areas of signal transduction research were covered and supported by different consortia associated with the Signal Transduction Society including the long-term associated study groups of the German Society for Immunology and the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and for instance the SFB/Transregio 52 "Transcriptional Programming of Individual T Cell Subsets" located in Würzburg, Mainz and Berlin. The different research areas that were introduced by outstanding keynote speakers attracted more than 250 scientists, showing the timeliness and relevance of the interdisciplinary concept and exchange of knowledge during the three days of the scientific program. This report gives an overview of the presentations of the conference.

  11. DMPD: When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18631453 When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-...l) Show When signaling pathways collide: positive and negative regulation of toll-likereceptor signal transd...uction. PubmedID 18631453 Title When signaling pathways collide: positive and neg

  12. cAMP signaling in blood platelets - old friends and new players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher eRaslan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Atherothrombosis, the pathology underlying numerous cardiovascular diseases, is a major cause of death globally. Hyperactive blood platelets play a key role in the atherothrombotic process through the release of inflammatory mediators and formation of thrombi. In healthy blood vessels, excessive platelet activation is restricted by endothelial-derived prostacyclin (PGI2 through cyclic adenosine-5’-monophosphate (cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA-dependent mechanisms. Elevation in intracellular cAMP is associated with the control of a number of distinct platelet functions including actin polymerisation, granule secretion, calcium mobilisation and integrin activation. Unfortunately, in atherosclerotic disease the protective effects of cAMP are compromised, which may contribute to pathological thrombosis. The cAMP signalling network in platelets is highly complex with the presence of multiple isoforms of adenylyl cyclase (AC, PKA and phosphodiesterases (PDE. However, a precise understanding of the relationship between specific AC, PKA and PDE isoforms, and how individual signalling substrates are targeted to control distinct platelet functions is still lacking. In other cells types, compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling has emerged as a key mechanism to allow precise control of specific cell functions. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs play an important role in this spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signalling networks. Evidence of AKAP-mediated compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling in blood platelets has begun to emerge and is providing new insights into the regulation of platelet function. Dissecting the mechanisms that allow cAMP to control excessive platelet activity without preventing effective haemostasis may unleash the possibility of therapeutic targeting of the pathway to control unwanted platelet activity.

  13. The cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway is involved in the pyrogenic effect of CRH in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The primary action of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is stimulation of the synthesis and release of adrenocorticotropic hormone and β-endorphin from the pituitary in response to stress. In addition, a number of studies indicate that CRH exerts other physiological actions within the central nervous system which are independent of the pituitary. These include increased body temperature and thermogenesis. However, the intracellular mechanism responsible for pyrogenic action of CRH is still unclear. The purpose of these studies was to determine whether or not cAMP was involved in the pyrogenic action of CRH in the rat. Intracerebroventricular (icv) microinjection of CRH (2.5 μg, 5.0 μg, 10 μg) caused increases in colonic temperature and hypothalamus cAMP level in conscious rats. The pyrogenic effects of CRH were abolished or markedly inhibited by prior injection (icv) of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2,,3,-dideoxyadenosine (DDA, 30 μg) or an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, adenosine-3,,5,-(cyclic) monophosphorothionate (Rp-cAMPs, 15 μg). This is the first report demonstrating the pyrogenic effcet of centrally administration of CRH on the rat via the cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway.

  14. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  15. Linking cellular actin status with cAMP signaling in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Zou, Hao; Fang, Hao-Ming; Zhu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans has a remarkable ability to switch growth forms. Particularly, the yeast-to-hyphae switch is closely linked with its virulence. A range of chemicals and conditions can promote hyphal growth including serum, peptidoglycan, CO2, neutral pH, and elevated temperature. All these signals act essentially through the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 that synthesizes cAMP. Cells lacking Cyr1 are completely defective in hyphal growth. Recently, cellular actin status is found to influence cAMP synthesis. However, how Cyr1 senses and processes multiple external and internal signals to produce a contextually proper level of cAMP remains unclear. We hypothesized that Cyr1 itself possesses multiple sensors for different signals and achieves signal integration through a combined allosteric effect on the catalytic center. To test this hypothesis, we affinity-purified a Cyr1-containing complex and found that it could enhance cAMP synthesis upon treatment with serum, peptidoglycan or CO2 in vitro. The data indicate that the complex is an essentially intact sensor/effector apparatus for cAMP synthesis. The complex contains two more subunits, the cyclase-associated protein Cap1 and G-actin. We discovered that G-actin plays a regulatory role, rendering cAMP synthesis responsive to actin dynamics. These findings shed new lights on the mechanisms that regulate cAMP-mediated responses in fungi.

  16. cAMP and cGMP signaling: sensory systems with prokaryotic roots adopted by eukaryotic cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jacque-Lynne F; Leroux, Michel R

    2010-08-01

    An exciting discovery of the new millennium is that primary cilia, organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, play crucial roles in vertebrate development by modulating Hedgehog, Wnt and PDGF signaling. Analysis of the literature and sequence databases reveals that the ancient signal transduction pathway, which uses cGMP in eukaryotes or related cyclic di-GMP in bacteria, exists in virtually all eukaryotes. However, many eukaryotes that secondarily lost cilia during evolution, including flowering plants, slime molds and most fungi, lack otherwise evolutionarily conserved cGMP signaling components. Based on this intriguing phylogenetic distribution, the presence of cGMP signaling proteins within cilia, and the indispensable roles that cGMP plays in transducing environmental signals in divergent ciliated cells (e.g. vertebrate photoreceptors and Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons), we propose that cGMP signaling has a strong ciliary basis. cAMP signaling, also inherent to bacteria and crucial for cilium-dependent olfaction, similarly appears to have widespread usage in diverse cilia. Thus, we argue here that both cyclic nucleotides play essential and potentially ubiquitous roles in modulating ciliary functions.

  17. Evaluating the Role of Wnt Signal Transduction in Promoting the Development of the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard M. Eisenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wnts are a family of secreted signaling proteins that are encoded by 19 distinct genes in the vertebrate genome. These molecules initiate several signal transduction pathways: the canonical Wnt, Wnt/Ca2+, and Wnt/planar cell polarity pathways. Wnt proteins have major impact on embryonic development, tumor progression, and stem cell differentiation. Wnt signal transduction also influences the formation of the heart, yet many issues concerning the involvement of Wnt regulation in initiating cardiac development remain unresolved. In this review, we will examine the published record to discern (a what has been shown by experimental studies on the participation of Wnt signaling in cardiogenesis, and (b what are the important questions that need to be addressed to understand the importance and function of Wnt signal transduction in facilitating the development of the heart.

  18. Modulation of the cAMP signaling pathway after traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Coleen M.; Oliva, Anthony A.; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Pearse, Damien D.; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in both focal and diffuse brain pathologies that are exacerbated by the inflammatory response and progress from hours to days after the initial injury. Using a clinically relevant model of TBI, the parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (FPI) model, we found injury-induced impairments in the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway. Levels of cAMP were depressed in the ipsilateral parietal cortex and hippocampus, as well as activation of its downstream targ...

  19. Oxysterols stimulate Sonic hedgehog signal transduction and proliferation of medulloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Ryan B; Scott, Matthew P

    2006-05-30

    Sterol synthesis is required for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction. Errors in Shh signal transduction play important roles in the formation of human tumors, including medulloblastoma (MB). It is not clear which products of sterol synthesis are necessary for Shh signal transduction or how they act. Here we show that cholesterol or specific oxysterols are the critical products of sterol synthesis required for Shh pathway signal transduction in MB cells. In MB cells, sterol synthesis inhibitors reduce Shh target gene transcription and block Shh pathway-dependent proliferation. These effects of sterol synthesis inhibitors can be reversed by exogenous cholesterol or specific oxysterols. We also show that certain oxysterols can maximally activate Shh target gene transcription through the Smoothened (Smo) protein as effectively as the known Smo full agonist, SAG. Thus, sterols are required and sufficient for Shh pathway activation. These results suggest that oxysterols may be critical regulators of Smo, and thereby Shh signal transduction. Inhibition of Shh signaling by sterol synthesis inhibitors may offer a novel approach to the treatment of MB and other Shh pathway-dependent human tumors.

  20. Neuro-protective effects of CNTF on hippocampal neurons via an unknown signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we proposed that there may be an unknown pathway in the upper stream of the known signal transduction pathway of Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) that mediates the neuro-protective function of CNTF. In the present experiment, we observed that the neuro-protective function of the non-classic signal transduction pathway in a L-NMDA (a glutamic acid ion type receptor atagonist) induced hippocampal neuron injury model, using primary culture rat hippocampal neurons, continuous photography and gp130 immunohistochemical assay. The results showed that L-NMDA induced injurious reaction of hippocampal neurons, and CNTF was able to inhibit the toxic action of L-NMDA on hippocampal neurons. Additionally, when JAK/STATs in the known classic signal transduction pathway of CNTF were blocked by PTPi-2, the protective effect of CNTF against L-NMDA injury still existed. L-NMDA caused a rapid increase in the concentration of hippocampal intracellular free [Ca2+]i. CNTF was able to attenuate L-NMDA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, and blocking JAK/STATs in the known classic signal trans- duction pathway of CNTF did not affect L-NMDA- induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, indicating that, apart from the known classic signal transduction pathway, there may be some other transduction pathways for CNTF to exert the protective effect on hippocampal neurons, and this pathway is related to [Ca2+].

  1. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  2. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  3. Analysis of nitrated proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in mating signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong Won; Lee, Na Young; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Lee, Min Young; Choi, Do-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a PTM that regulates signal transduction and inflammatory responses, and is related to neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. The cellular function of PTN remains unclear because the low stoichiometry of PTN limits the identification and quantification of nitrated peptides. Effective enrichment is an important aspect of PTN analysis. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo nitroproteome elicited by mating signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a novel chemical enrichment method followed by LC-MS/MS. Nitroproteome profiling successfully identified changes in the nitration states of 14 proteins during mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae, making this the first reported in vivo nitroproteome in yeast. We investigated the biological functions of these nitroproteins and their relationships to mating signal transduction in S. cerevisiae using a protein-protein interaction network. Our results suggest that PTN and denitration may be involved in nonreactive nitrogen species-mediated signal transduction and can provide clues for understanding the functional roles of PTN in vivo.

  4. The role of the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) in adrenomedullin receptor signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2001-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are usually thought to act as monomer receptors that bind ligand and then interact with G proteins to initiate signal transduction. In this study we report an intracellular peripheral membrane protein named the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) required for signal transduction at the G protein-coupled receptor for adrenomedullin. Cell lines were made that expressed an antisense construct of the RCP cDNA, and in these cells diminished RCP expression correlated with loss of adrenomedullin signal transduction. In contrast, loss of RCP did not diminish receptor density or affinity, therefore RCP does not appear to act as a chaperone protein. Instead, RCP represents a novel class of protein required to couple the adrenomedullin receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway. A candidate adrenomedullin receptor named the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been described, which forms high affinity adrenomedullin receptors when co-expressed with the accessory protein receptor-activity modifying protein 2 (RAMP2). RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR and RAMP2, indicating that a functional adrenomedullin receptor is composed of at least three proteins: the ligand binding protein (CRLR), an accessory protein (RAMP2), and a coupling protein for signal transduction (RCP).

  5. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  6. Eviprostat Activates cAMP Signaling Pathway and Suppresses Bladder Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Takeda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eviprostat is a popular phytotherapeutic agent for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. At present, the signaling mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are still poorly understood. Given that cAMP has been reported to suppress cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy in various pathological situations, we asked whether the effect of Eviprostat could be ascribed to the activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. In the study, exposure of cAMP response element (CRE-secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP (CRE-SEAP-reporter cells to Eviprostat elevated SEAP secretion, which was associated with an increased phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB, as well as enhanced expression of CRE-regulated protein connexin43, indicating an activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. Consistent with these observations, Eviprostat-induced expression of Cx43 was abolished in the presence of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or PKA inhibitor H89, whereas it was mimicked by adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin. Further analysis demonstrated that Eviprostat significantly potentiated the effect of phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3 inhibitor, but not that of PDE4 inhibitor, on CRE activation. Moreover, Eviprostat suppressed PDGF-induced activation of ERK and Akt and inhibited cell proliferation and hillock formation in both mesangial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. Collectively, activation of the cAMP signaling pathway could be an important mechanism by which Eviprostat exerts its therapeutic effects for LUTS.

  7. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xingguo; HUANG Wei; WU Qingyu

    2006-01-01

    Two-component systems are signal transduction systems which enable bacteria to regulate cellular functions in response to changing environmental conditions. The unicellular Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 has become a model organism for a range of biochemical and molecular biology studies aiming at investigating environmental stress response. The publication of the complete genome sequence of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 provided a tremendous stimulus for research in this field, and at least 80 open reading frames were identified as members of the two-component signal transduction systems in this single species of cyanobacteria. To date, functional roles have been determined for only a limited number of such proteins. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the two-component signal transduction systems in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and describes recent achievements in elucidating the functional roles of these systems.

  8. Analysis of a signal transduction pathway involved in leaf epidermis differentiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip W. Becraft

    2005-05-23

    The major objective of this study was to identify and analyze signal transduction factors that function with the CR4 receptor kinase. We pursued this analysis in Arabidopsis. Analysis of other members of the ACR4 related receptor (CRR) family produced biochemical evidence consistent with some of them functioning in ACR4 signal transduction. Yeast 2-hybrid identified six proteins that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of ACR4, representing putative downstream signal transduction components. The interactions for all 6 proteins were verified by in vitro pull down assays. Five of the interacting proteins were phosphorylated by ACR4. We also identified candidate interactors with the extracellular TNFR domain. We hypothesize this may be the ligand binding domain for ACR4. In one approach, yeast 2-hybrid was again used and five candidate proteins identified. Nine additional candidates were identified in a genome wide scan of Arabidopsis amino acid sequences that threaded onto the TNF structure.

  9. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2006-01-16

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  10. Signal Transduction Pathways that Regulate CAB Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chory, Joanne

    2004-12-31

    The process of chloroplast differentiation, involves the coordinate regulation of many nuclear and chloroplast genes. The cues for the initiation of this developmental program are both extrinsic (e.g., light) and intrinsic (cell-type and plastid signals). During this project period, we utilized a molecular genetic approach to select for Arabidopsis mutants that did not respond properly to environmental light conditions, as well as mutants that were unable to perceive plastid damage. These latter mutants, called gun mutants, define two retrograde signaling pathways that regulate nuclear gene expression in response to chloroplasts. A major finding was to identify a signal from chloroplasts that regulates nuclear gene transcription. This signal is the build-up of Mg-Protoporphyrin IX, a key intermediate of the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway. The signaling pathways downstream of this signal are currently being studied. Completion of this project has provided an increased understanding of the input signals and retrograde signaling pathways that control nuclear gene expression in response to the functional state of chloroplasts. These studies should ultimately influence our abilities to manipulate plant growth and development, and will aid in the understanding of the developmental control of photosynthesis.

  11. Regulation of apoptotic signal transduction pathways by the heat shock proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Zhengyu; ZHAO; Xia; WEI; Yuquan

    2004-01-01

    The study about apoptotic signal transductions has become a project to reveal the molecular mechanisms of apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (hsps), which play an important role in cell growth and apoptosis, have attracted great attentions. A lot of researches have showed there is a hsps superfamily including hsp90, hsp70, hsp60 and hsp27, etc., which regulates the biological behaviors of cells, particularly apoptotic signal transduction in Fas pathway, JNK/SAPK pathway and caspases pathway at different levels, partly by the function of molecular chaperone.

  12. PathFinder: mining signal transduction pathway segments from protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Signal transduction pathway is the chain of processes by which a cell converts an extracellular signal into a response. In most unicellular organisms, the number of signal transduction pathways influences the number of ways the cell can react and respond to the environment. Discovering signal transduction pathways is an arduous problem, even with the use of systematic genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies. These techniques lead to an enormous amount of data and how to interpret and process this data becomes a challenging computational problem. Results In this study we present a new framework for identifying signaling pathways in protein-protein interaction networks. Our goal is to find biologically significant pathway segments in a given interaction network. Currently, protein-protein interaction data has excessive amount of noise, e.g., false positive and false negative interactions. First, we eliminate false positives in the protein-protein interaction network by integrating the network with microarray expression profiles, protein subcellular localization and sequence information. In addition, protein families are used to repair false negative interactions. Then the characteristics of known signal transduction pathways and their functional annotations are extracted in the form of association rules. Conclusion Given a pair of starting and ending proteins, our methodology returns candidate pathway segments between these two proteins with possible missing links (recovered false negatives. In our study, S. cerevisiae (yeast data is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  13. Study of orexins signal transduction pathways in rat olfactory mucosa and in olfactory sensory neurons-derived cell line Odora: multiple orexin signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorojankina, Tatiana; Grébert, Denise; Salesse, Roland; Tanfin, Zahra; Caillol, Monique

    2007-06-07

    Orexins A and B (OxA and OxB) are multifunctional neuropeptides implicated in the regulation of energy metabolism, wakefulness but also in a broad range of motivated behaviours. They signal through two G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin receptor 1 and 2 (Ox1R and Ox2R). The orexins and their receptors are present at all levels of the rat olfactory system: epithelium, bulb, piriform cortex but their signalling mechanisms remain unknown. We have studied orexins signal transduction pathways in the rat olfactory mucosa (OM) and in the Odora cell line derived from olfactory sensory neurons and heterologously expressing Ox1R or Ox2R. We have demonstrated by western blot and RT-PCR that multiple components of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways were identical in OM and Odora cells. OxA and OxB induced a weak increase in IP3 in OM; they induced a significant rise in cAMP and IP3 in Odora transfected cells, suggesting the activation of AC and PLC pathways. Both OxA and OxB induced intracellular calcium elevation and transient activation of MAP kinases (ERK42/44) in Odora/Ox1R and Odora/Ox2R cells. These results suggest the existence of multiple orexins signalling pathways in Odora cells and probably in OM, corresponding to different possible roles of these peptides.

  14. G beta gamma signaling reduces intracellular cAMP to promote meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Arvind; Hammes, Stephen R

    2007-02-01

    In nearly every vertebrate species, elevated intracellular cAMP maintains oocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Prior to ovulation, gonadotropins trigger various intra-ovarian processes, including the breakdown of gap junctions, the activation of EGF receptors, and the secretion of steroids. These events in turn decrease intracellular cAMP levels in select oocytes to allow meiotic progression, or maturation, to resume. Studies suggest that cAMP levels are kept elevated in resting oocytes by constitutive G protein signaling, and that the drop in intracellular cAMP that accompanies maturation may be due in part to attenuation of this inhibitory G protein-mediated signaling. Interestingly, one of these G protein regulators of meiotic arrest is the Galpha(s) protein, which stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise intracellular cAMP in two important animal models of oocyte development: Xenopus leavis frogs and mice. In addition to G(alpha)(s), constitutive Gbetagamma activity similarly stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise cAMP and prevent maturation in Xenopus oocytes; however, the role of Gbetagamma in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes has not been examined. Here we show that Gbetagamma does not contribute to the maintenance of murine oocyte meiotic arrest. In fact, contrary to observations in frog oocytes, Gbetagamma signaling in mouse oocytes reduces cAMP and promotes oocyte maturation, suggesting that Gbetagamma might in fact play a positive role in promoting oocyte maturation. These observations emphasize that, while many general concepts and components of meiotic regulation are conserved from frogs to mice, specific differences exist that may lead to important insights regarding ovarian development in vertebrates.

  15. Cytokinin signal transduction: Known simplicity and unknown complexity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Binglian; SUN Jiaqiang; ZHANG Suzhi; DENG Yan; ZUO Jianru

    2003-01-01

    Cytokinin plays a critical role in plant growth and development by regulating cell divisions and cell differentiation. Recent studies suggest that cytokinin signaling is presumably mediated by a two-component system analogous to those found in bacteria and fungi, which transduces an external signal via a phosphorelay from the plasma membrane-anchored receptors to downstream effectors andregulators. Moreover, cytokinin signaling is highly interactive with other pathways, and many components of the pathway appear to be functionally redundant. Proper address of these questions will be crucial for our further understanding onthis important network.

  16. Towards the systematic discovery of signal transduction networks using phosphorylation dynamics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachie Nozomu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous and fundamental regulatory mechanism that controls signal transduction in living cells. The number of identified phosphoproteins and their phosphosites is rapidly increasing as a result of recent mass spectrometry-based approaches. Results We analyzed time-course phosphoproteome data obtained previously by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with the stable isotope labeling using amino acids in cell culture (SILAC method. This provides the relative phosphorylation activities of digested peptides at each of five time points after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF. We initially calculated the correlations between the phosphorylation dynamics patterns of every pair of peptides and connected the strongly correlated pairs to construct a network. We found that peptides extracted from the same intracellular fraction (nucleus vs. cytoplasm tended to be close together within this phosphorylation dynamics-based network. The network was then analyzed using graph theory and compared with five known signal-transduction pathways. The dynamics-based network was correlated with known signaling pathways in the NetPath and Phospho.ELM databases, and especially with the EGF receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. Although the phosphorylation patterns of many proteins were drastically changed by the EGF stimulation, our results suggest that only EGFR signaling transduction was both strongly activated and precisely controlled. Conclusions The construction of a phosphorylation dynamics-based network provides a useful overview of condition-specific intracellular signal transduction using quantitative time-course phosphoproteome data under specific experimental conditions. Detailed prediction of signal transduction based on phosphoproteome dynamics remains challenging. However, since the phosphorylation profiles of kinase-substrate pairs on the specific pathway were localized in the dynamics

  17. Systemic Acquired Resistance and Signal Transduction in Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shu-qing; GUO Jian-bo

    2003-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR), known as the broad-spectrum, inducible plant immunity,is a defense response triggered by pathogen infection. The response starts from the recognition of plant resist-ance (R) with the corresponding avirulence (avr) gene from the pathogen. There are some genes for conver-gence of signals downstream of different R/avr interacting partners into a single signaling pathway. Salicylicacid (SA) is required for the induction of SAR and involved in transducing the signal in target tissues. The SAsignal is transduced through NPR1, a nuclear-localized protein that interacts with transcription factors thatare involved in regulating SA-mediated gene expression. Some chemicals that mimic natural signaling com-pounds can also activate SAR. The application of biochemical activators to agriculture for plant protection is anovel idea for developing green chemical pesticide.

  18. Signal transduction during mating and meiosis in S. pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Nielsen, Olaf

    1993-01-01

    When starved, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe responds by producing mating factors or pheromones that signal to cells of the opposite sex to initiate mating. Like its distant relative Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells of the two mating types of S. pombe each produce a distinct pheromone...... that binds to receptors on the opposite cell type to induce the morphological changes required for mating. While the pathways are basically very similar in the two yeasts, pheromone signalling in S. pombe differs in several important ways from that of the more familiar budding yeast. In this article, Olaf...... Nielsen describes the pheromones and their effects in S. pombe, and compares the signalling pathways of the two yeasts....

  19. Knowledge representation model for systems-level analysis of signal transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yup; Zimmer, Ralf; Lee, Sang-Yup; Hanisch, Daniel; Park, Sunwon

    2004-01-01

    A Petri-net based model for knowledge representation has been developed to describe as explicitly and formally as possible the molecular mechanisms of cell signaling and their pathological implications. A conceptual framework has been established for reconstructing and analyzing signal transduction networks on the basis of the formal representation. Such a conceptual framework renders it possible to qualitatively understand the cell signaling behavior at systems-level. The mechanisms of the complex signaling network are explored by applying the established framework to the signal transduction induced by potent proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha The corresponding expert-knowledge network is constructed to evaluate its mechanisms in detail. This strategy should be useful in drug target discovery and its validation.

  20. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfei Hu

    Full Text Available Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process.

  1. Signal Transduction Pathways of EMT Induced by TGF-β, SHH, and WNT and Their Crosstalks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Xing, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step in development, wound healing, and cancer development. It involves cooperation of signaling pathways, such as transformation growth factor-β (TGF-β), Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), and WNT pathways. These signaling pathways crosstalk to each other and converge to key transcription factors (e.g., SNAIL1) to initialize and maintain the process of EMT. The functional roles of multi-signaling pathway crosstalks in EMT are sophisticated and, thus, remain to be explored. In this review, we focused on three major signal transduction pathways that promote or regulate EMT in carcinoma. We discussed the network structures, and provided a brief overview of the current therapy strategies and drug development targeted to these three signal transduction pathways. Finally, we highlighted systems biology approaches that can accelerate the process of deconstructing complex networks and drug discovery. PMID:27043642

  2. Signal Transduction Pathways of EMT Induced by TGF-β, SHH, and WNT and Their Crosstalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Tian, Xiao-Jun; Xing, Jianhua

    2016-03-28

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step in development, wound healing, and cancer development. It involves cooperation of signaling pathways, such as transformation growth factor-β (TGF-β), Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), and WNT pathways. These signaling pathways crosstalk to each other and converge to key transcription factors (e.g., SNAIL1) to initialize and maintain the process of EMT. The functional roles of multi-signaling pathway crosstalks in EMT are sophisticated and, thus, remain to be explored. In this review, we focused on three major signal transduction pathways that promote or regulate EMT in carcinoma. We discussed the network structures, and provided a brief overview of the current therapy strategies and drug development targeted to these three signal transduction pathways. Finally, we highlighted systems biology approaches that can accelerate the process of deconstructing complex networks and drug discovery.

  3. Signal Transduction Pathways of EMT Induced by TGF-β, SHH, and WNT and Their Crosstalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a key step in development, wound healing, and cancer development. It involves cooperation of signaling pathways, such as transformation growth factor-β (TGF-β, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, and WNT pathways. These signaling pathways crosstalk to each other and converge to key transcription factors (e.g., SNAIL1 to initialize and maintain the process of EMT. The functional roles of multi-signaling pathway crosstalks in EMT are sophisticated and, thus, remain to be explored. In this review, we focused on three major signal transduction pathways that promote or regulate EMT in carcinoma. We discussed the network structures, and provided a brief overview of the current therapy strategies and drug development targeted to these three signal transduction pathways. Finally, we highlighted systems biology approaches that can accelerate the process of deconstructing complex networks and drug discovery.

  4. Signal transduction during mating and meiosis in S. pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Nielsen, Olaf

    1993-01-01

    When starved, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe responds by producing mating factors or pheromones that signal to cells of the opposite sex to initiate mating. Like its distant relative Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells of the two mating types of S. pombe each produce a distinct pheromone...

  5. Nod factor signal transduction in the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, E.H.M.; Bisseling, T.

    2008-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between Rhizobium bacteria and most legume plants is initiated by the perception of bacterial signal molecules, the nodulation (Nod) factors, at the root hairs of the plant. This induces responses both in the root hairs, leading to infection by the bacteria, as well as at a

  6. Plant Genes Involved in Symbiotic Sinal Perception/Signal Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, A; Soyano, T; Hayashi, H

    2014-01-01

    to nodule primordia formation, and the infection thread initiation in the root hairs guiding bacteria towards dividing cortical cells. This chapter focuses on the plant genes involved in the recognition of the symbiotic signal produced by rhizobia, and the downstream genes, which are part of a complex...

  7. Adaptation of signal transduction and muscle proteome in trained horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, Mireille Maria Elisabeth van

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the localization and activation of signaling proteins, known from human studies, in equine muscle were investigated under conditions of rest, after an acute bout of exercise and before and after a period of (intensified) training. Proteins of interest (protein kinase C (PKC), m

  8. Molecular mechanisms of novel regulators in cytokine signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiaofei, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    By identifying and studying novel regulators, the studies described in this thesis give substantive insights into the molecular mechanisms and different levels of control of TGF-β/BMP, IL-1β and Wnt signaling pathways. Crucially, our work for the first time demonstrated the monoubiquitination of an

  9. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  10. A mathematical model of the mating signal transduction pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Ivan Milac

    1998-09-14

    Outline of two major goals in my proposal for this fellowship. First goal having no previous training in biology, was to become knowledgeable of the paradigms, experimental techniques, and current research interests of molecular biology. Second goal was to construct a mathematical model of the mating signal transduction pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  11. Combinations of SNPs related to signal transduction in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Pernille; Andreassen, Ole A; Bennike, Bente

    2011-01-01

    of complex diseases, it may be useful to look at combinations of genotypes. Genes related to signal transmission, e.g., ion channel genes, may be of interest in this respect in the context of bipolar disorder. In the present study, we analysed 803 SNPs in 55 genes related to aspects of signal transmission...... and calculated all combinations of three genotypes from the 3×803 SNP genotypes for 1355 controls and 607 patients with bipolar disorder. Four clusters of patient-specific combinations were identified. Permutation tests indicated that some of these combinations might be related to bipolar disorder. The WTCCC...... in the clusters in the two datasets. The present analyses of the combinations of SNP genotypes support a role for both genetic heterogeneity and interactions in the genetic architecture of bipolar disorder....

  12. Dynamic Testing of Signal Transduction Deregulation During Breast Cancer Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    pollution, such as chlorine, sulfur and ozone . When these substances react with the silver layer, it becomes tarnished so that the required optical...Evaluation of the effectiveness of anticancer drugs such as the onset of apoptosis in living cells is an important process in drug development and therapy ...quantitatively monitoring the changes in fluorescence signals, caspase-9 activity within a single living MCF- 7 cell was detected. Photodynamic therapy (PDT

  13. Signal transduction regulating meristem development in Arabidopsis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cark, Steven E.

    2003-09-10

    Research support by DE-FG02-96ER20227 focused on the CLV loci and their regulation of organ formation at the Arabidopsis shoot meristem. Shoot meristem function is central to plant development as all of the above-ground organs and tissues of the plant are derived post-embryonically from the shoot meristem. At the shoot meristem, stem cells are maintained, and progeny cells undergo a switch toward differentiation and organ formation. The CLV loci, represented by three genes CLV1, CLV2 and CLV3 are key regulators of meristem development. Each of the CLV loci encode a putative receptor-mediated signaling component. When this work began, virtually nothing was known about receptor-mediated signaling in plants. Thus, our goal was to both characterize these genes and the proteins they encode as regulators of meristem development, and to investigate how receptor-mediated signaling might function in plants. Our work lead to several major publications that were significant contributions to understanding this system.

  14. Developmental regulation and evolution of cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez-Curto, Elisa

    2007-01-01

    Through evolution the social amoebas have developed mechanisms to adapt to environmental changes and ensure survival. This thesis explores the evolutionary origins of cAMP signalling and regulation of developmental decisions in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. It also shows the first mol

  15. 2R and remodeling of vertebrate signal transduction engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huminiecki Lukasz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole genome duplication (WGD is a special case of gene duplication, observed rarely in animals, whereby all genes duplicate simultaneously through polyploidisation. Two rounds of WGD (2R-WGD occurred at the base of vertebrates, giving rise to an enormous wave of genetic novelty, but a systematic analysis of functional consequences of this event has not yet been performed. Results We show that 2R-WGD affected an overwhelming majority (74% of signalling genes, in particular developmental pathways involving receptor tyrosine kinases, Wnt and transforming growth factor-β ligands, G protein-coupled receptors and the apoptosis pathway. 2R-retained genes, in contrast to tandem duplicates, were enriched in protein interaction domains and multifunctional signalling modules of Ras and mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. 2R-WGD had a fundamental impact on the cell-cycle machinery, redefined molecular building blocks of the neuronal synapse, and was formative for vertebrate brains. We investigated 2R-associated nodes in the context of the human signalling network, as well as in an inferred ancestral pre-2R (AP2R network, and found that hubs (particularly involving negative regulation were preferentially retained, with high connectivity driving retention. Finally, microarrays and proteomics demonstrated a trend for gradual paralog expression divergence independent of the duplication mechanism, but inferred ancestral expression states suggested preferential subfunctionalisation among 2R-ohnologs (2ROs. Conclusions The 2R event left an indelible imprint on vertebrate signalling and the cell cycle. We show that 2R-WGD preferentially retained genes are associated with higher organismal complexity (for example, locomotion, nervous system, morphogenesis, while genes associated with basic cellular functions (for example, translation, replication, splicing, recombination; with the notable exception of cell cycle tended to be excluded. 2R

  16. Molecular mechanism of cellular reception of ionizing radiation and of activation of signal transduction pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    The author reviewed what in cells receives ionizing radiation as a stress and which signal transduction pathway is activated to induce the stress reaction in the following order: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway by radiation, activation of MAP kinase superfamily by radiation, induction of p53 function by radiation, and radiation exposure and stress reaction pathway. Conclusion was as follows: Cellular receptors to radiation can be cell membrane and DNA. Membrane reception of radiation induces activation of tyrosine kinase and sphingomyelinase, which resulting in activation of PKC- and MAP kinase-mediated signal transduction. The signal generated in the nucleus participates in regulation of cell cycle and in DNA repair. Therefore, it seems that irradiation of ionizing radiation gives energy to various cellular receptor sites as well as DNA, which generate various independent signals to be transduced and accumulated in the nucleus, and leading to cellular response. (K.H.). 63 refs.

  17. Specificity in stress response: epidermal keratinocytes exhibit specialized UV-responsive signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Makoto; Gazel, Alix; Pintucci, Giuseppe; Shuck, Alyssa; Shifteh, Shiva; Ginsburg, Dov; Rao, Laxmi S; Kaneko, Takehiko; Freedberg, Irwin M; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Blumenberg, Miroslav

    2003-10-01

    UV light, a paradigmatic initiator of cell stress, invokes responses that include signal transduction, activation of transcription factors, and changes in gene expression. Consequently, in epidermal keratinocytes, its principal and frequent natural target, UV regulates transcription of a distinctive set of genes. Hypothesizing that UV activates distinctive epidermal signal transduction pathways, we compared the UV-responsive activation of the JNK and NFkappaB pathways in keratinocytes, with the activation of the same pathways by other agents and in other cell types. Using of inhibitors and antisense oligonucleotides, we found that in keratinocytes only UVB/UVC activate JNK, while in other cell types UVA, heat shock, and oxidative stress do as well. Keratinocytes express JNK-1 and JNK-3, which is unexpected because JNK-3 expression is considered brain-specific. In keratinocytes, ERK1, ERK2, and p38 are activated by growth factors, but not by UV. UVB/UVC in keratinocytes activates Elk1 and AP1 exclusively through the JNK pathway. JNKK1 is essential for UVB/UVC activation of JNK in keratinocytes in vitro and in human skin in vivo. In contrast, in HeLa cells, used as a control, crosstalk among signal transduction pathways allows considerable laxity. In parallel, UVB/UVC and TNFalpha activate the NFkappaB pathway via distinct mechanisms, as shown using antisense oligonucleotides targeted against IKKbeta, the active subunit of IKK. This implies a specific UVB/UVC responsive signal transduction pathway independent from other pathways. Our results suggest that in epidermal keratinocytes specific signal transduction pathways respond to UV light. Based on these findings, we propose that the UV light is not a genetic stress response inducer in these cells, but a specific agent to which epidermis developed highly specialized responses.

  18. The signal transduction mechanisms on the intestinal mucosa of rat following irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, J. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lee, K. J.; Lee, J. S. [Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1997-06-01

    Phospholipase C(PLC) isozymes play significant roles in signal transduction mechanism. The exact mechanisms of these signal transduction following irradiation, however, were not clearly documented. Thus, this study was planned to determine the biological significance of PLC, ras oncoprotein, EGFR, and PKC in damage and regeneration of rat intestinal mucosa following irradiation. Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated to entire body with a single dose of 8Gy. The rats were divided into 5 groups according to the sacrifice days after irradiation. The expression of PLC, ras oncoprotein, EGRF PKC in each group were examined by the immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The histopathologic findings were observed using H and E stain, and the mitoses for the evidence of regeneration were counted using the light microscopy and PCNA kit. The phosphoinositide(PI) hydrolyzing activity assay was also done for the indirect evaluation of PLC-{gamma}1 activity. In the immunohistochemistry, the expression of PLC-{beta} was negative for all groups. The expression of PLC-{gamma}1 was highest in the group III followed by group II in the proliferative zone of mucosa. The expression of PKC-{delta}1 was strongly positive in group I followed by group II in the damaged surface epithelium. The above findings were also confirmed in the immunoblotting study. In the immunoblotting study, the expressions of PLC-{beta}, PLC-{gamma}1, and PLC-{delta}1 were the same as the results of immunohistochemistry. The expression of ras oncoprotein was weakly positive in groups II, III and IV and the expression of PKC was weakly positive in the group II and III. PLC-{gamma}1 mediated signal transduction including ras oncoprotein, EGFR, and PKC play a significant role in mucosal regeneration after irradiation. PLC-{delta}1 mediated signal transduction might have an important role in mucosal damage after irradiation. Further studies will be necessary to confirm the signal transduction mediating the PLC

  19. Mucin-like glycoprotein secretion is mediated by cyclic-AMP and protein kinase C signal transduction pathways in rat corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M; Endo, K; Nakata, K

    1998-05-01

    Ocular surface mucin is secreted from both goblet cells in the conjunctival epithelium and corneal epithelial cells. To clarify its mechanism of secretion in corneal epithelial cells, a rat cornea organ culture system was used to evaluate the second messenger roles of cyclic-AMP (cAMP), cyclic-GMP (cGMP) and protein kinase C (PKC) in modulating mucin-like glycoprotein secretion. Rat cornea sections (3 mm diameter) were cultured in TC-199 medium, and radiolabeled with sodium sulfate for 18 hr. After washing, the corneas were treated with various second messenger modulating agents for 30 min. The culture media were reacted with Dolichos biflorus (DBA)-lectin, and mucin-like glycoprotein was isolated. Then the radioactivity of DBA-binding mucin-like glycoprotein was isolated. Then the radioactivity of DBA-binding mucin-like glycoprotein was measured. There was a time-dependent increase in mucin-like glycoprotein was measured. There was a time-dependent increase in mucin-like glycoprotein secretion, whereas after corneal epithelial debridement the secretion was markedly inhibited by 81%. Mucin-like glycoprotein secretion was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner following elevation of cAMP levels by exposure to either forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Concomitant exposure to the cAMP dependent protein kinase inhibitor, KT5720 completely inhibited their stimulatory effects. Neither exposure to dibutyryl cGMP nor nitroprusside affected mucin-like glycoprotein secretion. Stimulation by PKC, phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) also increased mucin-like glycoprotein secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. The PKC inhibitor, calphostin C completely inhibited the stimulation by PDBu of mucine-like glycoprotein secretion. These results demonstrate that corneal epithelial cells secrete mucin-like glycoprotein, which is mediated by cAMP and PKC signal transduction pathways.

  20. Role of acetylcholine on plant root-shoot signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The role of acetylcholine (ACh) on plant root- shoot communication was investigated using the root-split system of Vicia faba L. In the experiments, slight osmotic stress caused the decrease of ACh content in root tips and the xylem sap transported up per time unit from root tip to the shoot when the water potential of the shoot was kept unchanged. It also caused the decrease of ACh content in the abaxial epidermis. The decrease was highly correlative to the changes of transpiration rate, suggesting that the decrease of ACh content probably functions as a signal to regulate stomatal behavior. The effect of osmotic stress might be mainly through the inhibition of the ACh synthesis in root tip; thus further influences the ACh content in root tip, xylem sap and abaxial epidermis and resulting in the changes of stomatal behavior. These results provide new evidence that plants transduce positive and negative signals among roots and shoots to coordinate stomatal behavior and adapt to variable environments.

  1. Correlative study on the JAK-STAT/PSMβ3 signal transduction pathway in asthenozoospermia

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Junguo; ZHANG Li; LI, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanism of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transduction and activator of transcription (STAT)/PSMβ3 signaling in the occurrence of asthenozoospermia. We examined seminal fluid samples from 30 cases of asthenozoospermia and 30 healthy controls. Sperm was collected using the Percoll density gradient centrifugation method. The expression of JAK, STAT and PSMβ3 mRNA was assessed by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR and the protein leve...

  2. Viral Infection: An Evolving Insight into the Signal Transduction Pathways Responsible for the Innate Immune Response

    OpenAIRE

    Kotwal, Girish J.; Steven Hatch; Marshall, William L.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune response is initiated by the interaction of stereotypical pathogen components with genetically conserved receptors for extracytosolic pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or intracytosolic nucleic acids. In multicellular organisms, this interaction typically clusters signal transduction molecules and leads to their activations, thereby initiating signals that activate innate immune effector mechanisms to protect the host. In some cases programmed cell death—a funda...

  3. Increased entropy of signal transduction in the cancer metastasis phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teschendorff Andrew E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The statistical study of biological networks has led to important novel biological insights, such as the presence of hubs and hierarchical modularity. There is also a growing interest in studying the statistical properties of networks in the context of cancer genomics. However, relatively little is known as to what network features differ between the cancer and normal cell physiologies, or between different cancer cell phenotypes. Results Based on the observation that frequent genomic alterations underlie a more aggressive cancer phenotype, we asked if such an effect could be detectable as an increase in the randomness of local gene expression patterns. Using a breast cancer gene expression data set and a model network of protein interactions we derive constrained weighted networks defined by a stochastic information flux matrix reflecting expression correlations between interacting proteins. Based on this stochastic matrix we propose and compute an entropy measure that quantifies the degree of randomness in the local pattern of information flux around single genes. By comparing the local entropies in the non-metastatic versus metastatic breast cancer networks, we here show that breast cancers that metastasize are characterised by a small yet significant increase in the degree of randomness of local expression patterns. We validate this result in three additional breast cancer expression data sets and demonstrate that local entropy better characterises the metastatic phenotype than other non-entropy based measures. We show that increases in entropy can be used to identify genes and signalling pathways implicated in breast cancer metastasis and provide examples of de-novo discoveries of gene modules with known roles in apoptosis, immune-mediated tumour suppression, cell-cycle and tumour invasion. Importantly, we also identify a novel gene module within the insulin growth factor signalling pathway, alteration of which may

  4. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koul Sweaty

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy.

  5. Novel aspects on pancreatic beta-cell signal-transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibiger, Ingo B; Brismar, Kerstin; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2010-05-21

    Pancreatic beta-cells release insulin in appropriate amounts in order to keep blood glucose levels within physiological limits. Failure to do so leads to the most common metabolic disorder in man, diabetes mellitus. The glucose-stimulus/insulin-secretion coupling represents a sophisticated interplay between glucose and a variety of modulatory factors. These factors are provided by the blood supply (such as nutrients, vitamins, incretins etc.), the nerval innervations, cell-cell contacts as well as by paracrine and autocrine feedback loops within the pancreatic islet of Langerhans. However, the underlying mechanisms of their action remain poorly understood. In the present mini-review we discuss novel aspects of selective insulin signaling in the beta-cell and novel insights into the role of higher inositol phosphates in insulin secretion. Finally we present a newly developed experimental platform that allows non-invasive and longitudinal in vivo imaging of pancreatic islet/beta-cell biology at single-cell resolution.

  6. The merged basins of signal transduction pathways in spatiotemporal cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yingchun; Hou, Yang; He, Siyu; Ma, Caixia; Sun, Mengyao; He, Huimin; Gao, Ning

    2014-03-01

    Numerous evidences have indicated that a signal system is composed by signal pathways, each pathway is composed by sub-pathways, and the sub-pathway is composed by the original signal terminals initiated with a protein/gene. We infer the terminal signals merged signal transduction system as "signal basin". In this article, we discussed the composition and regulation of signal basins, and the relationship between the signal basin control and triple W of spatiotemporal cell biology. Finally, we evaluated the importance of the systemic regulation to gene expression by signal basins under triple W. We hope our discussion will be the beginning to cause the attention for this area from the scientists of life science.

  7. Control of cancer-related signal transduction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Reka

    2013-03-01

    Intra-cellular signaling networks are crucial to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and for cell behavior (growth, survival, apoptosis, movement). Mutations or alterations in the expression of elements of cellular signaling networks can lead to incorrect behavioral decisions that could result in tumor development and/or the promotion of cell migration and metastasis. Thus, mitigation of the cascading effects of such dysregulations is an important control objective. My group at Penn State is collaborating with wet-bench biologists to develop and validate predictive models of various biological systems. Over the years we found that discrete dynamic modeling is very useful in molding qualitative interaction information into a predictive model. We recently demonstrated the effectiveness of network-based targeted manipulations on mitigating the disease T cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia. The root of this disease is the abnormal survival of T cells which, after successfully fighting an infection, should undergo programmed cell death. We synthesized the relevant network of within-T-cell interactions from the literature, integrated it with qualitative knowledge of the dysregulated (abnormal) states of several network components, and formulated a Boolean dynamic model. The model indicated that the system possesses a steady state corresponding to the normal cell death state and a T-LGL steady state corresponding to the abnormal survival state. For each node, we evaluated the restorative manipulation consisting of maintaining the node in the state that is the opposite of its T-LGL state, e.g. knocking it out if it is overexpressed in the T-LGL state. We found that such control of any of 15 nodes led to the disappearance of the T-LGL steady state, leaving cell death as the only potential outcome from any initial condition. In four additional cases the probability of reaching the T-LGL state decreased dramatically, thus these nodes are also possible control

  8. Cooperation between cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea in insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, T; Takahashi, T; Takahashi, H; Seino, S

    2014-09-01

    Although glucose is physiologically the most important regulator of insulin secretion, glucose-induced insulin secretion is modulated by hormonal and neural inputs to pancreatic β-cells. Most of the hormones and neurotransmitters evoke intracellular signals such as cAMP, Ca²⁺ , and phospholipid-derived molecules by activating G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In particular, cAMP is a key second messenger that amplifies insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner. The action of cAMP on insulin secretion is mediated by both protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent and Epac2A-dependent mechanisms. Many of the proteins expressed in β-cells are phosphorylated by PKA in vitro, but only a few proteins in which PKA phosphorylation directly affects insulin secretion have been identified. On the other hand, Epac2A activates the Ras-like small G protein Rap in a cAMP-dependent manner. Epac2A is also directly activated by various sulfonylureas, except for gliclazide. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analogue, and glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea, synergistically activate Epac2A and Rap1, whereas adrenaline, which suppresses cAMP production in pancreatic β-cells, blocks activation of Epac2A and Rap1 by glibenclamide. Thus, cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea cooperatively activate Epac2A and Rap1. This interaction could account, at least in part, for the synergistic effects of incretin-related drugs and sulfonylureas in insulin secretion. Accordingly, clarification of the mechanism of Epac2A activation may provide therapeutic strategies to improve insulin secretion in diabetes.

  9. Nanomechanoelectronic signal transduction scheme with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor-embedded microcantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tark, Soo-Hyun; Srivastava, Arvind; Chou, Stanley; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak P.

    2009-03-01

    We explore various metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET)-embedded microcantilever designs to assess their performance as an efficient nanomechanoelectronic signal transduction platform for monitoring deflection in microcantilever-based phenomena such as biochemical sensing and actuation. The current-voltage characteristics of embedded MOSFETs show current noise in the nanoampere range with a large signal-to-noise ratio sufficient to provide measureable output signal. The change in drain current with cantilever deflection is consistent with the effect of stress on carrier mobility and drain current reported in previous studies, validating that the MOSFET cantilevers can directly transduce deflection of a microcantilever into reproducible change in electrical signal.

  10. Modelling and simulation of signal transductions in an apoptosis pathway by using timed Petri nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chen Li; Qi-Wei Ge; Mitsuru Nakata; Hiroshi Matsuno; Satoru Miyano

    2007-01-01

    This paper first presents basic Petri net components representing molecular interactions and mechanisms of signalling pathways, and introduces a method to construct a Petri net model of a signalling pathway with these components. Then a simulation method of determining the delay time of transitions, by using timed Petri nets – i.e. the time taken in firing of each transition – is proposed based on some simple principles that the number of tokens flowed into a place is equivalent to the number of tokens flowed out. Finally, the availability of proposed method is confirmed by observing signalling transductions in biological pathways through simulation experiments of the apoptosis signalling pathways as an example.

  11. Crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome: Photoconversion and signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith (UC)

    2008-11-12

    Phytochromes are red-light photoreceptors that regulate light responses in plants, fungi, and bacteria via reversible photoconversion between red (Pr) and far-red (Pfr) light-absorbing states. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution of a bacteriophytochrome from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an intact, fully photoactive photosensory core domain in its dark-adapted Pfr state. This structure reveals how unusual interdomain interactions, including a knot and an 'arm' structure near the chromophore site, bring together the PAS (Per-ARNT-Sim), GAF (cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenyl cyclase/FhlA), and PHY (phytochrome) domains to achieve Pr/Pfr photoconversion. The PAS, GAF, and PHY domains have topologic elements in common and may have a single evolutionary origin. We identify key interactions that stabilize the chromophore in the Pfr state and provide structural and mutational evidence to support the essential role of the PHY domain in efficient Pr/Pfr photoconversion. We also identify a pair of conserved residues that may undergo concerted conformational changes during photoconversion. Modeling of the full-length bacteriophytochrome structure, including its output histidine kinase domain, suggests how local structural changes originating in the photosensory domain modulate interactions between long, cross-domain signaling helices at the dimer interface and are transmitted to the spatially distant effector domain, thereby regulating its histidine kinase activity.

  12. XB130: A novel adaptor protein in cancer signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, RUIYAO; ZHANG, JINGYAO; WU, QIFEI; MENG, FANDI; LIU, CHANG

    2016-01-01

    Adaptor proteins are functional proteins that contain two or more protein-binding modules to link signaling proteins together, which affect cell growth and shape and have no enzymatic activity. The actin filament-associated protein (AFAP) family is an important member of the adaptor proteins, including AFAP1, AFAP1L1 and AFAP1L2/XB130. AFAP1 and AFAP1L1 share certain common characteristics and function as an actin-binding protein and a cSrc-activating protein. XB130 exhibits certain unique features in structure and function. The mRNA of XB130 is expressed in human spleen, thyroid, kidney, brain, lung, pancreas, liver, colon and stomach, and the most prominent disease associated with XB130 is cancer. XB130 has a controversial effect on cancer. Studies have shown that XB130 can promote cancer progression and downregulation of XB130-reduced growth of tumors derived from certain cell lines. A higher mRNA level of XB130 was shown to be associated with a better survival in non-small cell lung cancer. Previous studies have shown that XB130 can regulate cell growth, migration and invasion and possibly has the effect through the cAMP-cSrc-phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Except for cancer, XB130 is also associated with other pathological or physiological procedures, such as airway repair and regeneration. PMID:26998266

  13. Regulation between nitric oxide and MAPK signal transduction in mammals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Yong; ZHANG Meijia; HONG Haiyan; XIA Guoliang

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important biological messenger in the regulation of tissue homeostasis. It exhibits a wide range of effects during physiological and pathophysiological processes. Typical beneficial properties of NO include the regulation of vascular tone,the protection of cells against apoptosis, the modulation of immune responses, and the killing of microbial pathogens. On the other hand,NO may cause severe vasodilation and myocardial depression during bacterial sepsis or act as a cytotoxic and tissue-damaging molecule in autoimmune diseases. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a family of serine/threonine protein kinases that are widely distributed in mammalian cells. MAPK cascade plays pivotal roles in gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, neuronal survival and programmed cell death under a variety of experimental conditions. MAPKs transduce the signal for the cellular response to extracellular stresses or stimuli. The relation between them, however, has never been reviewed. Based on our researches and other reports in the field, we review their reciprocal regulatory functions.

  14. Neural signal transduction aided by noise in multisynaptic excitatory and inhibitory pathways with saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2011-08-01

    We study the stochastic resonance phenomenon in saturating dynamical models of neural signal transduction, at the synaptic stage, wherein the noise in multipathways enhances the processing of neuronal information integrated by excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. For an excitatory synaptic pathway, the additive intervention of an inhibitory pathway reduces the stochastic resonance effect. However, as the number of synaptic pathways increases, the signal transduction is greatly improved for parallel multipathways that feature both excitation and inhibition. The obtained results lead us to the realization that the collective property of inhibitory synapses assists neural signal transmission, and a parallel array of neurons can enhance their responses to multiple synaptic currents by adjusting the contributions of excitatory and inhibitory currents.

  15. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  16. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  17. Information content and cross-talk in biological signal transduction: An information theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ashok; Lyons, Samanthe

    2014-03-01

    Biological cells respond to chemical cues provided by extra-cellular chemical signals, but many of these chemical signals and the pathways they activate interfere and overlap with one another. How well cells can distinguish between interfering extra-cellular signals is thus an important question in cellular signal transduction. Here we use information theory with stochastic simulations of networks to address the question of what happens to total information content when signals interfere. We find that both total information transmitted by the biological pathway, as well as its theoretical capacity to discriminate between overlapping signals, are relatively insensitive to cross-talk between the extracellular signals, until significantly high levels of cross-talk have been reached. This robustness of information content against cross-talk requires that the average amplitude of the signals are large. We predict that smaller systems, as exemplified by simple phosphorylation relays (two-component systems) in bacteria, should be significantly much less robust against cross-talk. Our results suggest that mammalian signal transduction can tolerate a high amount of cross-talk without degrading information content, while smaller bacterial systems cannot.

  18. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Li

    Full Text Available Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator, PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  19. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoying; Tao, Hua; Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  20. Interplay of Specific Trans- and Juxtamembrane Interfaces in Plexin A3 Dimerization and Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Rachael; Khakbaz, Pouyan; Bera, Indrani; Klauda, Jeffery B; Iovine, M Kathryn; Berger, Bryan W

    2016-09-01

    Plexins are transmembrane proteins that serve as guidance receptors during angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, neuronal development, and zebrafish fin regeneration, with a putative role in cancer metastasis. Receptor dimerization or clustering, induced by extracellular ligand binding but modulated in part by the plexin transmembrane (TM) and juxtamembrane (JM) domains, is thought to drive plexin activity. Previous studies indicate that isolated plexin TM domains interact through a conserved, small-x3-small packing motif, and the cytosolic JM region interacts through a hydrophobic heptad repeat; however, the roles and interplay of these regions in plexin signal transduction remain unclear. Using an integrated experimental and simulation approach, we find disruption of the small-x3-small motifs in the Danio rerio Plexin A3 TM domain enhances dimerization of the TM-JM domain by enhancing JM-mediated dimerization. Furthermore, mutations of the cytosolic JM heptad repeat that disrupt dimerization do so even in the presence of TM domain mutations. However, mutations to the small-x3-small TM interfaces also disrupt Plexin A3 signaling in a zebrafish axonal guidance assay, indicating the importance of this TM interface in signal transduction. Collectively, our experimental and simulation results demonstrate that multiple TM and JM interfaces exist in the Plexin A3 homodimer, and these interfaces independently regulate dimerization that is important in Plexin A3 signal transduction.

  1. Image informatics for studying signal transduction in cells interacting with 3D matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; Guo, Jin; Chen, Chengpin; Yannas, Ioannis V.; Wei, Xunbin; So, Peter T. C.

    2014-03-01

    Cells sense and respond to chemical stimuli on their environment via signal transduction pathways, complex networks of proteins whose interactions transmit chemical information. This work describes an implementation of image informatics, imaging-based methodologies for studying signal transduction networks. The methodology developed focuses on studying signal transduction networks in cells that interact with 3D matrices. It utilizes shRNA-based knock down of network components, 3D high-content imaging of cells inside the matrix by spectral multi-photon microscopy, and single-cell quantification using features that describe both cell morphology and cell-matrix adhesion pattern. The methodology is applied in a pilot study of TGFβ signaling via the SMAD pathway in fibroblasts cultured inside porous collagen-GAG scaffolds, biomaterials similar to the ones used clinically to induce skin regeneration. Preliminary results suggest that knocking down all rSMAD components affects fibroblast response to TGFβ1 and TGFβ3 isoforms in different ways, and suggest a potential role for SMAD1 and SMAD5 in regulating TGFβ isoform response. These preliminary results need to be verified with proteomic results that can provide solid evidence about the particular role of individual components of the SMAD pathway.

  2. Model for external influences on cellular signal transduction pathways including cytosolic calcium oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichwald, C.; Kaiser, F. [Technical Univ. of Darmstadt (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Experiments on the effects of extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields on cells of the immune system, T-lymphocytes in particular, suggest that the external field interacts with the cell at the level of intracellular signal transduction pathways. These are directly connected with changes in the calcium-signaling processes of the cell. Based on these findings, a theoretical model for receptor-controlled cytosolic calcium oscillations and for external influences on the signal transduction pathway is presented. The authors discuss the possibility that the external field acts on the kinetics of the signal transduction between the activated receptors at the cell membrane and the G-proteins. It is shown that, depending on the specific combination of cell internal biochemical and external physical parameters, entirely different responses of the cell can occur. The authors compare the effects of a coherent (periodic) modulation and of incoherent perturbations (noise). The model and the calculations are based on the theory of self-sustained, nonlinear oscillators. It is argued that these systems form an ideal basis for information-encoding processes in biological systems.

  3. The Cyclic Nucleotide Specificity of Three cAMP Receptors in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Kimmel, Alan R.; Saxe III, Charles L.; Jastorff, Bernd; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1992-01-01

    cAMP receptors mediate signal transduction pathways during development in Dictyostelium. A cAMP receptor (cAR1) has been cloned and sequenced (Klein, P., Sun, T. J., Saxe, C. L., Kimmel, A. R., Johnson, R. L., and Devreotes, P. N. (1988) Science 241, 1467-1472) and recently several other cAR genes h

  4. Hypergravity modifies the signal transduction of ionizing radiation through p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okaichi, Kumio; Usui, Aya; Okumura, Yutaka [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Atomic Disease Inst.; Ohnishi, Takeo [Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    To determine the possible effect of hypergravity to modify the signal transduction of ionizing radiation, we analyzed the accumulation of p53 and the expression of p53-dependent genes, Waf-1 and Bax, using the western blot analysis. Hypergravity (20 x g) induced the accumulation of p53 in the human glioblastoma cell line A172 after 3 h of incubation. Low-dose (0.5 Gy) irradiation to the cells accumulated p53 1.5 h after irradiation, and induced Waf-1 and Bax. Under the condition of hypergravity (20 x g), the peak of p53 accumulation was shifted from 1.5 h to 3 h after irradiation, and the inductions of Waf-1 and Bax were suppressed entirely. These results indicate that hypergravity modifies the signal transduction of ionizing radiation through p53 in the cells. (author)

  5. Role of functionality in two-component signal transduction: A stochastic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Alok Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Arnab; Chaudhury, Pinaki; Banik, Suman K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a stochastic formalism for signal transduction processes in a bacterial two-component system. Using elementary mass action kinetics, the proposed model takes care of signal transduction in terms of a phosphotransfer mechanism between the cognate partners of a two-component system, viz., the sensor kinase and the response regulator. Based on the difference in functionality of the sensor kinase, the noisy phosphotransfer mechanism has been studied for monofunctional and bifunctional two-component systems using the formalism of the linear noise approximation. Steady-state analysis of both models quantifies different physically realizable quantities, e.g., the variance, the Fano factor (variance/mean), and mutual information. The resultant data reveal that both systems reliably transfer information of extracellular environment under low external stimulus and in a high-kinase-and-phosphatase regime. We extend our analysis further by studying the role of the two-component system in downstream gene regulation.

  6. Involvement of Ca2+/CaM in the signal transduction of acetylcholine regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    It has been known that the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) also exists in plants and is able to regulate the movement of stomata. In another aspect, Ca2+/CaM as the second messengers have a critical role of signal transduction in stomatal guard-cell. Here we showed that Ca2+/CaM were also involved in theACh regulated stomatal movement. In the medium containing Ca2+, the Ca2+ channel blockers (NIF and Ver) and CaM inhibitors (TFP and W7) could neutralize the ACh induced stomatal opening, however, they are ineffective in the medium containing K+. Those results indicated that Ca2+/CaM were involved in the signal transduction pathway of ACh regulating stomatal movement.

  7. An Integrated Model of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Trafficking and Signal Transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resat, Haluk; Ewald, Jonathan A.; Dixon, David A.; Wiley, H. S.

    2003-08-01

    Endocytic trafficking of many types of receptors can have profound effects on subsequent signaling events. Quantitative models of these processes, however, have usually considered trafficking and signaling independently. Here, we present an integrated model of both the trafficking and signaling pathway of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) using a probability weighted-dynamic Monte Carlo simulation. Our model consists of hundreds of distinct endocytic compartments and about 13,000 reactions/events that occur over a broad spatio-temporal range. By using a realistic multi-compartment model, we can investigate the distribution of the receptors among cellular compartments as well as their potential signal transduction characteristics. Our new model also allows the incorporation of physio-chemical aspects of ligand-receptor interactions, such as pH-dependent binding in different endosomal compartments. To determine the utility of this approach, we simulated the differential activation of the EGFR by two of its ligands, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor- alpha (TGF-a). Our simulations predict that when EGFR is activated with TGF-a, receptor activation is biased toward the cell surface whereas EGF produces a signaling bias towards the endosomal compartment. Experiments confirm these predictions from our model and simulations. Our model accurately predicts the kinetics and extent of receptor down-regulation induced by either EGF or TGF-a. Our results suggest that receptor trafficking controls the compartmental bias of signal transduction, rather than simply modulating signal magnitude. Our model provides a new approach to evaluating the complex effect of receptor trafficking on signal transduction. Importantly, the stochastic and compartmental nature of the simulation allows these models to be directly tested by high-throughput approaches, such as quantitative image analysis.

  8. DMPD: LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SVG File (.svg) HTML File (.html) CSML File (.csml) Open .csml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIOP...2008 May;42(2):145-51. Epub 2008 Mar 4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS/TLR4 signal transduction path...layer - ※CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  9. Regulation of human androgen receptor by corepressors and signal transduction in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The thesis primarily addresses the role of transcriptional corepressor and signal transduction cascades in regulating androgen receptor (AR) activity. AR is a ligand-activated transcription factor and is important for the development of male phenotype. Malfunctioning of AR function has been implicated in the progression of the prostate cancer (CaP). Clinical management of the CaP most often involves the administration of anti-hormones (Cas, CPA) that bind to AR and turn it transcr...

  10. Histidine Phosphotransfer Proteins in Fungal Two-Component Signal Transduction Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) protein Ypd1 is an important participant in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae multistep two-component signal transduction pathway and, unlike the expanded histidine kinase gene family, is encoded by a single gene in nearly all model and pathogenic fungi. Ypd1 is essential for viability in both S. cerevisiae and in Cryptococcus neoformans. These and other aspects of Ypd1 biology, combined with the availability of structural and mutational data in S. cerevisiae, s...

  11. Role of Glycolytic Intermediates in Global Regulation and Signal Transduction. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.C.

    2000-05-08

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of glycolytic intermediates in regulation of cell physiology. It is known that many glycolytic intermediates are involved in regulation of enzyme activities at the kinetic level. However, little is known regarding the role of these metabolites in global regulation and signal transduction. This project aims to investigate the role of glycolytic intermediates in the regulation of gene expression.

  12. Screening and identification of key signal transduction pathways in pulmonary silicotic fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛荣

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the differential gene expression profile of the lung tissues in experimental silicosis rats and to screen for and identify the key signal transduction pathways in pulmonary silicotic fibrosis.Methods A total of 80 rats were randomly divided into control group(n=40)and silica-instilled group(n=40).Each group was equally divided into five subgroups,and each subgroup was treated at 1,7,14,21,

  13. Sensing of aqueous phosphates by polymers with dual modes of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldakov, Dmitry; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2004-04-21

    A new approach to sensing of aqueous phosphate-related anions based on chromogenic conductive polymers is demonstrated. This method utilizes synergy between low-level p-doping in a polythiophene polymer and hydrogen bonding to increase anion-sensor affinity. These chromogenic conductive polymers show anion-specific changes both in color and in conductivity upon increasing concentration of anions, thus providing two independent modes of signal transduction.

  14. Effects of toluene exposure on signal transduction: toluene reduced the signaling via stimulation of human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuga, Hirofumi; Haga, Tatsuya; Honma, Takeshi

    2002-07-01

    The organic solvent toluene is used widely in industry and is toxic to the central nervous system (CNS). To clarify the mechanisms of CNS toxicity following toluene exposure, especially with respect to the G protein-coupling of receptors, we determined the effects of toluene on the activation of Gi by stimulating human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (hm2 receptors) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. We first examined whether toluene affects the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by Gi. The attenuation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by the stimulation of hm2 receptors was reduced in a medium containing toluene. Next, we determined the effects of toluene on carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding using membrane fractions of CHO cell expressing hm2 receptors. Carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was markedly reduced when assayed using reaction buffers containing toluene. However, carbamylcholine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding activity was essentially unchanged following pretreatment of the cells with a toluene-saturated medium prior to membrane isolation. Toluene pretreatment and the toluene itself did not alter the characteristics of the binding of carbamylcholine and [3H]N-methylscopolamine to hm2 receptors. On the contrary of the effect of toluene for [35S]GTPgammaS binding, the effect of toluene for attenuation of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation by the stimulation of hm2 receptors was irreversible. These observations indicate that toluene acts as an inhibitor of the signal transduction via hm2 receptor stimulation in CHO cells, and at least two mechanisms exist in the inhibition mechanisms by toluene.

  15. Receptor clustering affects signal transduction at the membrane level in the reaction-limited regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caré, Bertrand R.; Soula, Hédi A.

    2013-01-01

    Many types of membrane receptors are found to be organized as clusters on the cell surface. We investigate the potential effect of such receptor clustering on the intracellular signal transduction stage. We consider a canonical pathway with a membrane receptor (R) activating a membrane-bound intracellular relay protein (G). We use Monte Carlo simulations to recreate biochemical reactions using different receptor spatial distributions and explore the dynamics of the signal transduction. Results show that activation of G by R is severely impaired by R clustering, leading to an apparent blunted biological effect compared to control. Paradoxically, this clustering decreases the half maximal effective dose (ED50) of the transduction stage, increasing the apparent affinity. We study an example of inter-receptor interaction in order to account for possible compensatory effects of clustering and observe the parameter range in which such interactions slightly counterbalance the loss of activation of G. The membrane receptors’ spatial distribution affects the internal stages of signal amplification, suggesting a functional role for membrane domains and receptor clustering independently of proximity-induced receptor-receptor interactions.

  16. Influence of arsenate and arsenite on signal transduction pathways: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Vaillancourt, Richard R. [The University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Arsenic has been a recognized contaminant and toxicant, as well as a medicinal compound throughout human history. Populations throughout the world are exposed to arsenic and these exposures have been associated with a number of human cancers. Not much is known about the role of arsenic as a human carcinogen and more recently its role in non-cancerous diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes mellitus have been uncovered. The health effects associated with arsenic are numerous and the association between arsenic exposure and human disease has intensified the search for molecular mechanisms that describe the biological activity of arsenic in humans and leads to the aforementioned disease states. Arsenic poses a human health risk due in part to the regulation of cellular signal transduction pathways and over the last few decades, some cellular mechanisms that account for arsenic toxicity, as well as, signal transduction pathways have been discovered. However, given the ubiquitous nature of arsenic in the environment, making sense of all the data remains a challenge. This review will focus on our knowledge of signal transduction pathways that are regulated by arsenic. (orig.)

  17. The signal transduction pathway in the proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells induced by urotensin Ⅱ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈亚红; 赵鸣武; 姚婉贞; 庞永政; 唐朝枢

    2004-01-01

    Background Human urotensin Ⅱ (UⅡ) is the most potent mammalian vasoconstrictor identified so far. Our previous study showed that UⅡ is a potent mitogen of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC) inducing ASMC proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The signal transduction pathway of UⅡ mitogenic effect remains to be clarified. This study was conducted to investigate the signal transduction pathway in the proliferation of ASMC induced by UⅡ.Methods In primary cultures of rat ASMCs, activities of protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and calcineurin (CaN) induced by UⅡ were measured. The effect of CaN on PKC and MAPK was studied by adding cyclosporin A (CsA), a specific inhibitor of CaN. Using H7 and PD98059, inhibitors of PKC and MAPK, respectively, to study the effect of PKC and MAPK on CaN. The cytosolic free calcium concentration induced by UⅡ was measured using Fura-2/AM. Results UⅡ 10-7 mol/L stimulated ASMC PKC and MAPK activities by 44% and 24% (P0.05). CsA 10-6 mol/L inhibited UⅡ-stimulated PKC activity by 14% (P0.05).Conclusions UⅡ increases cytosolic free calcium concentration and activates PKC, MAPK and CaN. The signal transduction pathway between PKC and CaN has cross-talk.

  18. Molecular characterization of a calmodulin involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiker, Viktor; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Häder, Donat-Peter

    2010-04-01

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis shows a negative gravitactic behavior. This is based on physiological mechanisms which in the past have been indirectly assessed. Meanwhile, it was possible to isolate genes involved in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis. The DNA sequences of five calmodulins were found in Euglena, one of which was only known in its protein structure (CaM.1); the other four are new. The biosynthesis of the corresponding proteins of CaM.1-CaM.5 was inhibited by means of RNA interference to determine their involvement in the gravitactic signal transduction chain. RNAi of CaM.1 inhibits free swimming of the cells and pronounced cell-form aberrations. The division of cells was also hampered. After recovery from RNAi the cell showed precise negative gravitaxis again. Blockage of CaM.3 to CaM. 5 did not impair gravitaxis. In contrast, the blockage of CaM.2 has only a transient and not pronounced influence on motility and cell form, but leads to a total loss of gravitactic orientation for more than 30 days. This indicates that CaM.2 is an element in the signal transduction chain of gravitaxis in E. gracilis. The results are discussed with regard to the current working model of gravitaxis in E. gracilis.

  19. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    Full Text Available We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of

  20. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species) with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of individual transfer

  1. Participation of intracellular signal transduction in the radio-adaptive response induced by low-dose X-irradiation in human embryonic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Keiichiro; Hoshi, Yuko; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.; Watanabe, Masami

    1996-11-01

    To elucidate the induction mechanism of radio-adaptive response in normal cells, we searched the literatures of the intracellular signal transduction. Furthermore, we examined the induction of radio-adaptive response with or without inhibitors of several kinds of protein kinase. The major results obtained were as follows; (1) According to the literature survey it is revealed that there are 4 intracellular signal transduction pathways which are possibly involved in the induction of radio-adaptive response: pathways depending on cAMP, calcium, cGMP, or protein-tyrosine kinase. (2) Addition of either inhibitor of protein-tyrosine kinase or protein kinase C to the cell culture medium during the low-dose X-irradiation inhibited the induction of radio-adaptive response. However, the addition of inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cGMP-dependent protein kinase, or Ca{sup 2+}-calmodulin kinase II failed to inhibit the induction of radio-adaptive response. (3) These results suggest that the signal induced in cells by low-dose X-irradiation was transduced from protein-tyrosine kinase to protein kinase C via either pathway of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase or splitting of profilin binding phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. (author)

  2. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pathways media

  3. Multiple facets of cAMP signalling and physiological impact : cAMP compartmentalization in the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburger, Anouk; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP) are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelli

  4. Trichoderma Biocontrol: Signal Transduction Pathways Involved in Host Sensing and Mycoparasitism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Zeilinger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungi of the genus Trichoderma are used as biocontrol agents against several plant pathogenic fungi like Rhizoctonia spp., Pythium spp., Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium spp. which cause both soil-borne and leaf- or flower-borne diseases of agricultural plants. Plant disease control by Trichoderma is based on complex interactions between Trichoderma, the plant pathogen and the plant. Until now, two main components of biocontrol have been identified: direct activity of Trichoderma against the plant pathogen by mycoparasitism and induced systemic resistance in plants. As the mycoparasitic interaction is host-specific and not merely a contact response, it is likely that signals from the host fungus are recognised by Trichoderma and provoke transcription of mycoparasitism-related genes.In the last few years examination of signalling pathways underlying Trichoderma biocontrol started and it was shown that heterotrimeric G-proteins and mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases affected biocontrol-relevant processes such as the production of hydrolytic enzymes and antifungal metabolites and the formation of infection structures. MAPK signalling was also found to be involved in induction of plant systemic resistance in Trichoderma virens and in the hyperosmotic stress response in Trichoderma harzianum. Analyses of the function of components of the cAMP pathway during Trichoderma biocontrol revealed that mycoparasitism-associated coiling and chitinase production as well as secondary metabolism are affected by the internal cAMP level; in addition, a cross talk between regulation of light responses and the cAMP signalling pathway was found in Trichoderma atroviride.

  5. Towards biochemical filters with a sigmoidal response to pH changes: buffered biocatalytic signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Marcos; Privman, Vladimir; Arugula, Mary A; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Bocharova, Vera; Katz, Evgeny

    2011-03-14

    We realize a biochemical filtering process by introducing a buffer in a biocatalytic signal-transduction logic system based on the function of an enzyme, esterase. The input, ethyl butyrate, is converted into butyric acid--the output signal, which in turn is measured by the drop in the pH value. The developed approach offers a versatile "network element" for increasing the complexity of biochemical information processing systems. Evaluation of an optimal regime for quality filtering is accomplished in the framework of a kinetic rate-equation model.

  6. Towards biochemical filters with a sigmoidal response to pH changes: buffered biocatalytic signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pita, Marcos; Privman, Vladimir; Arugula, Mary A.; Melnikov, Dmitriy; Bocharova, Vera; Katz, Evgeny

    We realize a biochemical filtering process by introducing a buffer in a biocatalytic signal-transduction logic system based on the function of an enzyme, esterase. The input, ethyl butyrate, is converted into butyric acid-the output signal, which in turn is measured by the drop in the pH value. The developed approach offers a versatile "network element" for increasing the complexity of biochemical information processing systems. Evaluation of an optimal regime for quality filtering is accomplished in the framework of a kinetic rate-equation model.

  7. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picas, Laura; Gaits-Iacovoni, Frederique; Goud, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction. PMID:27092250

  8. Synaptic signal transduction aided by noise in a dynamical saturating model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Duan, Fabing; Abbott, Derek

    2010-02-01

    A generic dynamical model with saturation for neural signal transduction at the synaptic stage is presented. Analysis of this model of a synaptic pathway demonstrates its ability to give rise to stochastic resonance or improvement by noise, at this stage of signal transmission. Beyond the case of the intrinsic threshold nonlinearity of the neuron response, the results extend the feasibility of stochastic resonance to neural saturating dynamics at the synaptic stage. The present results also constitute the exposition of a new type of nonlinear (saturating) dynamics capable of stochastic resonance.

  9. The molecular machinery regulating apoptosis signal transduction and its implication in human physiology and pathophysiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, C T; Passante, E; Rehm, M

    2011-02-01

    The regulation of apoptotic cell death, a terminal and fatal cell fate decision, has been intensely investigated and, due to its paramount implications for human health and disease, has sparked one of the most prolific and competitive research fields in biological and biomedical sciences of the past decades. Many key components of the molecular machinery processing and transducing apoptotic cell death signals have been described in great detail by now, dramatically advancing our understanding of how the network of apoptosis signaling proteins integrates and regulates cell death signals, and ultimately executes apoptosis. Building on the latest significant advances in deciphering apoptosis signal transduction as well as on the central original groundbreaking discoveries in cell death research, we here present an in-depth description of the current knowledge on the core molecular machinery of apoptotic signaling and how it is implicated in human physiology and pathophysiologies.

  10. Effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on insulin signal transduction and glucose transporters in ovine fetal skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marianne S; Thamotharan, M; Kao, Doris; Devaskar, Sherin U; Qiao, Liping; Friedman, Jacob E; Hay, William W

    2005-02-01

    To test the effects of acute fetal hyperinsulinemia on the pattern and time course of insulin signaling in ovine fetal skeletal muscle, we measured selected signal transduction proteins in the mitogenic, protein synthetic, and metabolic pathways in the skeletal muscle of normally growing fetal sheep in utero. In experiment 1, 4-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps were conducted in anesthetized twin fetuses to produce selective fetal hyperinsulinemia-euglycemia in one twin and euinsulinemia-euglycemia in the other. Serial skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from each fetus during the clamp and assayed by Western blot for selected insulin signal transduction proteins. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate-1, and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase doubled at 30 min and gradually returned to control values by 240 min. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1,2 was increased fivefold through 120 min of insulin infusion and decreased to control concentration by 240 min. Protein kinase B phosphorylation doubled at 30 min and remained elevated throughout the study. Phosphorylation of p70 S6K increased fourfold at 30, 60, and 120 min. In the second experiment, a separate group of nonanesthetized singleton fetuses was clamped to intermediate and high hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic conditions for 1 h. GLUT4 increased fourfold in the plasma membrane at 1 h, and hindlimb glucose uptake increased significantly at the higher insulin concentration. These data demonstrate that an acute increase in fetal plasma insulin concentration stimulates a unique pattern of insulin signal transduction proteins in intact skeletal muscle, thereby increasing pathways for mRNA translation, glucose transport, and cell growth.

  11. Signal transduction meets vesicle traffic: the software and hardware of GLUT4 translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klip, Amira; Sun, Yi; Chiu, Tim Ting; Foley, Kevin P

    2014-05-15

    Skeletal muscle is the major tissue disposing of dietary glucose, a function regulated by insulin-elicited signals that impart mobilization of GLUT4 glucose transporters to the plasma membrane. This phenomenon, also central to adipocyte biology, has been the subject of intense and productive research for decades. We focus on muscle cell studies scrutinizing insulin signals and vesicle traffic in a spatiotemporal manner. Using the analogy of an integrated circuit to approach the intersection between signal transduction and vesicle mobilization, we identify signaling relays ("software") that engage structural/mechanical elements ("hardware") to enact the rapid mobilization and incorporation of GLUT4 into the cell surface. We emphasize how insulin signal transduction switches from tyrosine through lipid and serine phosphorylation down to activation of small G proteins of the Rab and Rho families, describe key negative regulation step of Rab GTPases through the GTPase-activating protein activity of the Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160), and focus on the mechanical effectors engaged by Rabs 8A and 10 (the molecular motor myosin Va), and the Rho GTPase Rac1 (actin filament branching and severing through Arp2/3 and cofilin). Finally, we illustrate how actin filaments interact with myosin 1c and α-Actinin4 to promote vesicle tethering as preamble to fusion with the membrane.

  12. New insights into the organization of plasma membrane and its role in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kenichi G N

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membranes have heterogeneous structures for efficient signal transduction, required to perform cell functions. Recent evidence indicates that the heterogeneous structures are produced by (1) compartmentalization by actin-based membrane skeleton, (2) raft domains, (3) receptor-receptor interactions, and (4) the binding of receptors to cytoskeletal proteins. This chapter provides an overview of recent studies on diffusion, clustering, raft association, actin binding, and signal transduction of membrane receptors, especially glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored receptors. Studies on diffusion of GPI-anchored receptors suggest that rafts may be small and/or short-lived in plasma membranes. In steady state conditions, GPI-anchored receptors form transient homodimers, which may represent the "standby state" for the stable homodimers and oligomers upon ligation. Furthermore, It is proposed that upon ligation, the binding of GPI-anchored receptor clusters to cytoskeletal actin filaments produces a platform for downstream signaling, and that the pulse-like signaling easily maintains the stability of the overall signaling activity.

  13. Uncovering signal transduction networks from high-throughput data by integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xing-Ming; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-05-01

    Signal transduction is an important process that transmits signals from the outside of a cell to the inside to mediate sophisticated biological responses. Effective computational models to unravel such a process by taking advantage of high-throughput genomic and proteomic data are needed to understand the essential mechanisms underlying the signaling pathways. In this article, we propose a novel method for uncovering signal transduction networks (STNs) by integrating protein interaction with gene expression data. Specifically, we formulate STN identification problem as an integer linear programming (ILP) model, which can be actually solved by a relaxed linear programming algorithm and is flexible for handling various prior information without any restriction on the network structures. The numerical results on yeast MAPK signaling pathways demonstrate that the proposed ILP model is able to uncover STNs or pathways in an efficient and accurate manner. In particular, the prediction results are found to be in high agreement with current biological knowledge and available information in literature. In addition, the proposed model is simple to be interpreted and easy to be implemented even for a large-scale system.

  14. Excitation and Adaptation in Bacteria–a Model Signal Transduction System that Controls Taxis and Spatial Pattern Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xue

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The machinery for transduction of chemotactic stimuli in the bacterium E. coli is one of the most completely characterized signal transduction systems, and because of its relative simplicity, quantitative analysis of this system is possible. Here we discuss models which reproduce many of the important behaviors of the system. The important characteristics of the signal transduction system are excitation and adaptation, and the latter implies that the transduction system can function as a “derivative sensor” with respect to the ligand concentration in that the DC component of a signal is ultimately ignored if it is not too large. This temporal sensing mechanism provides the bacterium with a memory of its passage through spatially- or temporally-varying signal fields, and adaptation is essential for successful chemotaxis. We also discuss some of the spatial patterns observed in populations and indicate how cell-level behavior can be embedded in population-level descriptions.

  15. The RGS protein Crg2 regulates both pheromone and cAMP signalling in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chaoyang; Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Chen, Lydia; Heitman, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    G proteins orchestrate critical cellular functions by transducing extracellular signals into internal signals and controlling cellular responses to environmental cues. G proteins typically function as switches that are activated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and negatively controlled by regulator of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins. In the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, three G protein alpha subunits (Gpa1, Gpa2 and Gpa3) have been identified. In a previous study, we identified the RGS protein Crg2 involved in regulating the pheromone response pathway through Gpa2 and Gpa3. In this study, a role for Crg2 was established in the Gpa1-cAMP signalling pathway that governs mating and virulence. We show that Crg2 physically interacts with Gpa1 and crg2 mutations increase cAMP production. crg2 mutations also enhance mating filament hyphae production, but reduce cell-cell fusion and sporulation efficiency during mating. Although crg2 mutations and the Gpa1 dominant active allele GPA1(Q284L) enhanced melanin production under normally repressive conditions, virulence was attenuated in a murine model. We conclude that Crg2 participates in controlling both Gpa1-cAMP-virulence and pheromone-mating signalling cascades and hypothesize it may serve as a molecular interface between these two central signalling conduits.

  16. Opposing needling promotes behavior recovery and exerts neuroprotection via the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway in transient MCAO rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIANG, YIJING; YANG, SHANLI; TAO, JING; LIN, ZHICHENG; YE, XIAOQIAN; YOU, YONGMEI; PENG, JUN; HONG, ZHENFENG; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A(PKA)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) signal transduction pathway triggered by γ-aminobutyric acid class B (GABAB) receptor activation is involved in neuroprotection against ischemia and behavioral recovery induced by opposing needling (ON). A total of 80 rats were randomly divided into four groups: A sham operation group, an ischemia group, an ON group and an ON group effectively inhibited by the GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP35384 (n=20/group). The behavior of the rats was assessed by their neurological deficit score, whereas the impairment of gait was examined using the CatWalk system. The volume of cerebral infarction was examined upon treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The expression levels of CREB, GABAB1 and GABAB2 were examined by western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC), cAMP and PKA in the serum was detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the present study, in comparison with other groups, the ON group exhibited a reduced score for the neurological deficit, the stride length and swing speed were improved, and the volume of infarction was reduced. However, these effects were reversed upon administration of CGP35384. Additionally, the expression levels of CREB, GABAB1 and GABAB2 were increased in the ON group. The levels of AC, cAMP and PKA in the serum were also increased in the ON group, whereas the addition of CGP35384 reversed these effects. The results of the present study demonstrated that ON markedly protected the brain against transient cerebral ischemic injury, and this effect was possibly mediated by the activation of the GABAB/cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway. These findings implied that ON may be a potential therapeutic method for treating stroke. PMID:26780954

  17. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anna W.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Moreno Morales, Neydis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacterium Ramlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, the R. tataouinensis bacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems. IMPORTANCE BphP histidine kinases and their cognate response regulators comprise widespread red light-sensing two-component systems. Much work on BphPs has focused on structural understanding of light sensing and on enhancing the natural infrared fluorescence of these

  18. Do signal transduction cascades influence survival in triple-negative breast cancer? A preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Jan-Niclas; Kölbl, Alexandra C; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Background Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a rather aggressive form of breast cancer, comprised by early metastasis formation and reduced overall survival of the affected patients. Steroid hormone receptors and the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 are not overexpressed, limiting therapeutic options. Therefore, new treatment options have to be investigated. The aim of our preliminary study was to detect coherences between some molecules of intracellular signal transduction pathways and survival of patients with TNBC, in order to obtain some hints for new therapeutical solutions. Methods Thirty-one paraffin-embedded tumor tissue samples, which were determined to be negative for steroid hormone receptors as well as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, were immunohistochemically stained for a number of signal transduction molecules from several signaling pathways. β-Catenin, HIF1α, MCL, Notch1, LRP6, XBP1, and FOXP3 were stained with specific antibodies, and their staining was correlated with patient survival by Kaplan–Meier analyses. Results Only two of the investigated molecules have shown correlation with overall survival. Cytoplasmic staining of HIF1α and centro-tumoral lymphocyte FOXP3 staining showed statistically significant correlations with survival. Conclusion The coherence of signal transduction molecules with survival of patients with TNBC is still controversially discussed in the literature. Our study comprises one more mosaic stone in the elucidation of these intracellular processes and their influences on patient outcome. Lots of research still has to be done in this field, but it would be worthwhile as it may offer new therapeutic targets for a group of patients with breast cancer, which is still hard to treat. PMID:27307757

  19. The ubiquitin–proteasome system and signal transduction pathways regulating Epithelial Mesenchymal transition of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voutsadakis Ioannis A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT in cancer, a process permitting cancer cells to become mobile and metastatic, has a signaling hardwire forged from development. Multiple signaling pathways that regulate carcinogenesis enabling characteristics in neoplastic cells such as proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and angiogenesis are also the main players in EMT. These pathways, as almost all cellular processes, are in their turn regulated by ubiquitination and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS. Ubiquitination is the covalent link of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and serves as a signal to target protein degradation by the proteasome or to other outcomes such as endocytosis, degradation by the lysosome or specification of cellular localization. This paper reviews signal transduction pathways regulating EMT and being regulated by ubiquitination.

  20. [Estimating the parameters of signal transduction pathways with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiyuan; Jia, Jianfang; Wang, Hong; Yue, Hong

    2009-02-01

    The modeling of signal transduction pathways is a task of systems biology. However, such a task is very difficult because of the structure complexity, the strong nonlinearity of signaling pathways and the noised and incomplete measurements. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (LM algorithm) is applied to estimate the unknown parameters of the signaling pathways. With this method, the identifiability of unknown parameters is appraised, and the sensitivity equations of original model are evaluated. Then we append the sensitivity equations to the original model in order to form the augmented model, and we apply the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to the augmented model in order to estimate parameters. TNFalpha mediated NF-kappaB signaling pathway is taken as an example to illustrate the effectiveness of this method, and the simulation results are given.

  1. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Barrett-Wilt, Greg A; Masson, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant's perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in TOC132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  2. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction.

  3. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  4. Developing Itô stochastic differential equation models for neuronal signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Tiina; Linne, Marja-Leena; Ruohonen, Keijo

    2006-08-01

    Mathematical modeling and simulation of dynamic biochemical systems are receiving considerable attention due to the increasing availability of experimental knowledge of complex intracellular functions. In addition to deterministic approaches, several stochastic approaches have been developed for simulating the time-series behavior of biochemical systems. The problem with stochastic approaches, however, is the larger computational time compared to deterministic approaches. It is therefore necessary to study alternative ways to incorporate stochasticity and to seek approaches that reduce the computational time needed for simulations, yet preserve the characteristic behavior of the system in question. In this work, we develop a computational framework based on the Itô stochastic differential equations for neuronal signal transduction networks. There are several different ways to incorporate stochasticity into deterministic differential equation models and to obtain Itô stochastic differential equations. Two of the developed models are found most suitable for stochastic modeling of neuronal signal transduction. The best models give stable responses which means that the variances of the responses with time are not increasing and negative concentrations are avoided. We also make a comparative analysis of different kinds of stochastic approaches, that is the Itô stochastic differential equations, the chemical Langevin equation, and the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Different kinds of stochastic approaches can be used to produce similar responses for the neuronal protein kinase C signal transduction pathway. The fine details of the responses vary slightly, depending on the approach and the parameter values. However, when simulating great numbers of chemical species, the Gillespie algorithm is computationally several orders of magnitude slower than the Itô stochastic differential equations and the chemical Langevin equation. Furthermore, the chemical

  5. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  6. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated...... a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to mediate GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH...

  7. A model for signal transduction during quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Suman K.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2009-12-01

    We present a framework for analyzing luminescence regulation during quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using a simplified model for signal transduction in the quorum sensing pathway, we identify key dimensionless parameters that control the system's response. These parameters are estimated using experimental data on luminescence phenotypes for different mutant strains. The corresponding model predictions are consistent with results from other experiments which did not serve as input for determining model parameters. Furthermore, the proposed framework leads to novel testable predictions for luminescence phenotypes and for responses of the network to different perturbations.

  8. Do certain signal transduction mechanisms explain the comorbidity of epilepsy and mood disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luisa; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; Alcántara-González, David; Cruzblanca, Humberto; Castro, Elena

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that mood disorders are highly prevalent in patients with epilepsy. Although several studies have aimed to characterize alterations in different types of receptors associated with both disturbances, there is a lack of studies focused on identifying the causes of this comorbidity. Here, we described some changes at the biochemical level involving serotonin, dopamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors as well as signal transduction mechanisms that may explain the coexistence of both epilepsy and mood disorders. Finally, the identification of common pathophysiological mechanisms associated with receptor-receptor interaction (heterodimers) could allow designing new strategies for treatment of patients with epilepsy and comorbid mood disorders.

  9. Effect of the opioid methionine enkephalinamide on signal transduction in human T-lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A N; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1998-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR/CD3) induced fluctuations in intracellular free ionizied calcium, [Ca2+]i, was analysed in the human T leukemia cell clone, Jurkat, cultured in the presence of the opioid methionine enkephalinamide (Met-Enk) in titrated concentrations (10[-7] to 10[-15] M) or saline (PBS....... Moreover, the levels of [Ca2+]i in this particular fraction were lower than control levels prior to ligation of the TCR/CD3 complex. The data support the idea that signal transduction in T cells can be influenced by endogenous opioid. The data therefore give credit to the evolving hypothesis...

  10. Controlling fertilization and cAMP signaling in sperm by optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Vera; Alvarez, Luis; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Hegemann, Peter; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2015-01-20

    Optogenetics is a powerful technique to control cellular activity by light. The light-gated Channelrhodopsin has been widely used to study and manipulate neuronal activity in vivo, whereas optogenetic control of second messengers in vivo has not been examined in depth. In this study, we present a transgenic mouse model expressing a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (bPAC) in sperm. In transgenic sperm, bPAC mimics the action of the endogenous soluble adenylyl cyclase (SACY) that is required for motility and fertilization: light-stimulation rapidly elevates cAMP, accelerates the flagellar beat, and, thereby, changes swimming behavior of sperm. Furthermore, bPAC replaces endogenous adenylyl cyclase activity. In mutant sperm lacking the bicarbonate-stimulated SACY activity, bPAC restored motility after light-stimulation and, thereby, enabled sperm to fertilize oocytes in vitro. We show that optogenetic control of cAMP in vivo allows to non-invasively study cAMP signaling, to control behaviors of single cells, and to restore a fundamental biological process such as fertilization.

  11. Correlative study on the JAK-STAT/PSMβ3 signal transduction pathway in asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junguo; Zhang, Li; Li, Bing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible mechanism of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transduction and activator of transcription (STAT)/PSMβ3 signaling in the occurrence of asthenozoospermia. We examined seminal fluid samples from 30 cases of asthenozoospermia and 30 healthy controls. Sperm was collected using the Percoll density gradient centrifugation method. The expression of JAK, STAT and PSMβ3 mRNA was assessed by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR and the protein levels of p-JAK, p-STAT and PSMβ3 were measured by western blot analysis. The PSMβ3 mRNA and protein expression levels were also measured after application of a JAK inhibitor, AG-490, to the control group, with a FITC-labeled monoclonal rabbit anti-human PSMβ3 primary antibody. The cells were observed under a laser confocal microscope. The mRNA levels of JAK, STAT and PSMβ3 in asthenozoospermia were decreased significantly (Pasthenozoospermia were also reduced and the differences were statistically significant (Pasthenozoospermia group. PSMβ3 was mainly expressed in round-headed sperm, and less in asthenozoospermia. In conclusion, the JAK-STAT/PSMβ3 signaling transduction pathway may be involved in the pathogenic mechanism of asthenozoospermia.

  12. Measurement of the formation of complexes in tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladbury, John E., E-mail: j.ladbury@biochem.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    The use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a full thermodynamic characterization of an interaction in one experiment. The determination of the affinity is an important value; however, the additional layer of information provided by the change in enthalpy and entropy can help in understanding the biology. This is demonstrated with respect to tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides highly complementary data to high-resolution structural detail. An overview of the methodology of the technique is provided. Ultimately, the correlation of the thermodynamic parameters determined by ITC with structural perturbation observed on going from the free to the bound state should be possible at an atomic level. Currently, thermodynamic data provide some insight as to potential changes occurring on complex formation. Here, this is demonstrated in the context of in vitro quantification of intracellular tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction and the issue of specificity of the important interactions. The apparent lack of specificity in the interactions of domains of proteins involved in early signalling from membrane-bound receptors is demonstrated using data from ITC.

  13. STAT1 is involved in signal transduction in the EPO induced HEL cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGCHU; CHANGYUNGUI; 等

    1998-01-01

    Erythropoietin(EPO) is the major regulator of mamalian erythropoisis,which stimulates the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic cells through interaction with its receptor(EPO-R),Here we use HEL cells (a human erythro-leukemia cell line) as a model to elucidate the pathway of signal transduction in the EPO-induced HEL cells.Our data show that the EPOR (EPO receptor) on the surface of HEL cells interacts with the Janus tyrosine protein kinase(Jak2) to transduce intracellular signals through phosphorylation of cytoplasmic proteins in EPO-treated HEL cells.Both STAT1 and STAT5 in this cell line are tyrosine-phosphorylated and translocated to nucleus following the dinding of EPO to HEL cells.Furthermore,the dinding of both STAT1 and STAT5 proteins to specific DNA elements(SIE and PIE elements) is revealed in an EPO-dependent manner,Our data demonstrate that the pathway of signal transduction following the binding of EPO to HEL cells is similar to immature eryhroid cell from the spleen of mice infected with anemia strain of Friend virus.

  14. Studies on the mitogenic effect of transferrin by membrane signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEUNGTM; PLLIM; 等

    1990-01-01

    One of the earliest events leading to cell activation and growth is the hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids producing various membrane signals induced by an interaction between growth factors or hormones with their respective receptors on the cell membrane [1].To demonstrate the mitogenic action of transferrin,our results show that an addition of transferrin to “serum-deprived” rat hepatoma cells produced a rapid but transient rise in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate(IP3) level,and at the same time,an increased intracellular Ca2+ activity and a cytoplasmic alkalinization were observed.These signal transductions further lend support to the mitogenic nature of transferrin.In addition,a possible link between the receptor-mediated endocytosis of transferrin with the generation of intracellular signals is discussed herewith.

  15. An Efficient Method to Identify Conditionally Activated Transcription Factors and their Corresponding Signal Transduction Pathway Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Hu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A signal transduction pathway (STP is a cascade composed of a series of signal transferring steps, which often activate one or more transcription factors (TFs to control the transcription of target genes. Understanding signaling pathways is important to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Many condition-annotated pathways have been deposited in public databases. However, condition-annotated pathways are far from complete, considering the large number of possible conditions. Computational methods to assist in the identification of conditionally activated pathways are greatly needed. In this paper, we propose an efficient method to identify conditionally activated pathway segments starting from the identification of conditionally activated TFs, by incorporating protein-DNA binding data, gene expression data and protein interaction data. Applying our methods on several microarray datasets, we have discovered many significantly activated TFs and their corresponding pathway segments, which are supported by evidence in the literature.

  16. Broad-minded links cell cycle-related kinase to cilia assembly and hedgehog signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyuk Wan; Norman, Ryan X; Tran, John; Fuller, Kimberly P; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Eggenschwiler, Jonathan T

    2010-02-16

    Recent findings indicate that mammalian Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction occurs within primary cilia, although the cell biological mechanisms underlying both Shh signaling and ciliogenesis have not been fully elucidated. We show that an uncharacterized TBC domain-containing protein, Broad-minded (Bromi), is required for high-level Shh responses in the mouse neural tube. We find that Bromi controls ciliary morphology and proper Gli2 localization within the cilium. By use of a zebrafish model, we further show that Bromi is required for proper association between the ciliary membrane and axoneme. Bromi physically interacts with cell cycle-related kinase (CCRK), whose Chlamydomonas homolog regulates flagellar length. Biochemical and genetic interaction data indicate that Bromi promotes CCRK stability and function. We propose that Bromi and CCRK control the structure of the primary cilium by coordinating assembly of the axoneme and ciliary membrane, allowing Gli proteins to be properly activated in response to Shh signaling.

  17. Signal transduction across cellular membranes can be mediated by coupling of the clustering of anchored proteins in both leaflets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tongtao; Zhang, Xianren

    2012-01-01

    One key question in signal transduction is how the signal is relayed from the outer leaflet of a cellular membrane to the inner leaflet. Using a simulation model, a mechanism for the mediation of signal transduction is proposed here in which the coupling between membrane proteins in different leaflets can be achieved by the clustering of anchored proteins, without recruiting transmembrane proteins. Depending on the hydrophobic length of the anchored proteins, three coupling patterns, including face-to-face clustering, interdigitated clustering, and weak-coupled clustering, are observed in this work. This observation provides a possible explanation of how a particular downstream signaling pathway is selected.

  18. Signal transduction and Nobel Prize%信号转导与诺贝尔奖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓强; 王跃民

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction is one of frontiers in life sciences, and many achievements in this field were awarded Nobel Prize. From the initial signal molecular to the subsequent second messenger and reversible phosphorylation, to the G-protein and receptor, and until today signal network system, these researches had greatly expanded the understanding of the phenomenon of life and provided new alternative for a lot of diseases. In this article, the brief history of signal transduction is reviewed according to the research course of classical signaling pathway. It is comprehensively introduced including background, history, significance and utilization of Nobel Prize-related achievements.%信号转导是生命科学前沿领域之一,至今已有多项成果荣获诺贝尔奖。从最初的信号分子,到第二信使和可逆磷酸化,再到G蛋白和G蛋白偶联受体,直到今天的信号网络系统,这些研究极大地拓展了人们对生命现象的理解和认识,从而为多种疾病的治疗提供了新的选择。笔者以经典信号通路研究历程为主线,回顾了信号转导研究的发展简史,全面地介绍了诺贝尔奖相关成果的研究背景、历程、意义和应用。

  19. Plasma membrane calcium ATPase proteins as novel regulators of signal transduction pathways

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary; Louisa; Holton; Michael; Emerson; Ludwig; Neyses; Angel; L; Armesilla

    2010-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that plasma membrane calcium ATPases (PMCAs) play a key role as regulators of calcium-triggered signal transduction pathways via interaction with partner proteins. PMCAs regulate these pathways by targeting specific proteins to cellular sub-domains where the levels of intracellular freecalcium are kept low by the calcium ejection properties of PMCAs. According to this model, PMCAs have been shown to interact functionally with the calcium-sensitive proteins neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calmodulindependent serine protein kinase, calcineurin and endothelial nitric oxidase synthase. Transgenic animals with altered expression of PMCAs are being used to evaluate the physiological significance of these interactions. To date, PMCA interactions with calcium-dependent partner proteins have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system via regulation of the nitric oxide and calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells pathways. This new evidence suggests that PMCAs play a more sophisticated role than the mere ejection of calcium from the cells, by acting as modulators of signaling transduction pathways.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Two-component Signal Transduction System in Two Streptomycete Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu WEI; Yixue LI; Weihua WANG; Zhiwei CAO; Hong YU; Xiaojing WANG; Jing ZHAO; Hao TAN; Hao XU; Weihong JIANG

    2007-01-01

    Species of the genus Streptomyces are major bacteria responsible for producing most natural antibiotics. Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces avermitilis were sequenced in 2002 and 2003,respectively. Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), consisting of a histidine sensor kinase (SK) and a cognate response regulator (RR), form the most common mechanism of transmembrane signal transduction in prokaryotes. TCSs in S. coelicolor A3(2) have been analyzed in detail. Here, we identify and classify the SK and RR of S. avermitilis and compare the TCSs with those of S. coelicolor A3(2) by computational approaches. Phylogenetic analysis of the cognate SK-RR pairs of the two species indicated that the cognate SK-RR pairs fall into four classes according to the distribution of their orthologs in other organisms. In addition to the cognate SK-RR pairs, some potential partners of non-cognate SK-RR were found, including those of unpaired SK and orphan RR and the cross-talk between different components in either strain. Our study provides new clues for further exploration of the molecular regulation mechanism of streptomycetes with industrial importance.

  1. P2CS: a two-component system resource for prokaryotic signal transduction research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Méjean Vincent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the escalation of high throughput prokaryotic genome sequencing, there is an ever-increasing need for databases that characterise, catalogue and present data relating to particular gene sets and genomes/metagenomes. Two-component system (TCS signal transduction pathways are the dominant mechanisms by which micro-organisms sense and respond to external as well as internal environmental changes. These systems respond to a wide range of stimuli by triggering diverse physiological adjustments, including alterations in gene expression, enzymatic reactions, or protein-protein interactions. Description We present P2CS (Prokaryotic 2-Component Systems, an integrated and comprehensive database of TCS signal transduction proteins, which contains a compilation of the TCS genes within 755 completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and 39 metagenomes. P2CS provides detailed annotation of each TCS gene including family classification, sequence features, functional domains, as well as genomic context visualization. To bypass the generic problem of gene underestimation during genome annotation, we also constituted and searched an ORFeome, which improves the recovery of TCS proteins compared to searches on the equivalent proteomes. Conclusion P2CS has been developed for computational analysis of the modular TCSs of prokaryotic genomes and metagenomes. It provides a complete overview of information on TCSs, including predicted candidate proteins and probable proteins, which need further curation/validation. The database can be browsed and queried with a user-friendly web interface at http://www.p2cs.org/.

  2. Two-Component Signal Transduction System SaeRS Positively Regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  3. Creating and analyzing pathway and protein interaction compendia for modelling signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirouac Daniel C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the information-processing capabilities of signal transduction networks, how those networks are disrupted in disease, and rationally designing therapies to manipulate diseased states require systematic and accurate reconstruction of network topology. Data on networks central to human physiology, such as the inflammatory signalling networks analyzed here, are found in a multiplicity of on-line resources of pathway and interactome databases (Cancer CellMap, GeneGo, KEGG, NCI-Pathway Interactome Database (NCI-PID, PANTHER, Reactome, I2D, and STRING. We sought to determine whether these databases contain overlapping information and whether they can be used to construct high reliability prior knowledge networks for subsequent modeling of experimental data. Results We have assembled an ensemble network from multiple on-line sources representing a significant portion of all machine-readable and reconcilable human knowledge on proteins and protein interactions involved in inflammation. This ensemble network has many features expected of complex signalling networks assembled from high-throughput data: a power law distribution of both node degree and edge annotations, and topological features of a “bow tie” architecture in which diverse pathways converge on a highly conserved set of enzymatic cascades focused around PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, JAK/STAT, NFκB, and apoptotic signaling. Individual pathways exhibit “fuzzy” modularity that is statistically significant but still involving a majority of “cross-talk” interactions. However, we find that the most widely used pathway databases are highly inconsistent with respect to the actual constituents and interactions in this network. Using a set of growth factor signalling networks as examples (epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor, and wingless, we find a multiplicity of network topologies in which receptors couple to downstream

  4. Role of signal transduction crosstalk between adenylyl cyclase and MAP kinase in hippocampus-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2012-08-16

    One of the intriguing questions in neurobiology is how long-term memory (LTM) traces are established and maintained in the brain. Memory can be divided into at least two temporally and mechanistically distinct forms. Short-term memory (STM) lasts no longer than several hours, while LTM persists for days or longer. A crucial step in the generation of LTM is consolidation, a process in which STM is converted to LTM. Hippocampus-dependent LTM depends on activation of Ca(2+), Erk/MAP kinase (MAPK), and cAMP signaling pathways, as well as de novo gene expression and translation. One of the transcriptional pathways strongly implicated in LTM is the CREB/CRE (calcium, cAMP response element) transcriptional pathway. Interestingly, this transcriptional pathway may also contribute to other forms of neuroplasticity including adaptive responses to drugs. Evidence discussed in this review indicates that activation of the Erk1/2 MAP Kinase (MAPK)/CRE transcriptional pathway during the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory depends on calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated adenylyl cyclases.

  5. Bacterial Signal Transduction by Cyclic Di-GMP and Other Nucleotide Second Messengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengge, Regine; Gründling, Angelika; Jenal, Urs; Ryan, Robert; Yildiz, Fitnat

    2016-01-01

    The first International Symposium on c-Di-GMP Signaling in Bacteria (22 to 25 March 2015, Harnack-Haus, Berlin, Germany)brought together 131 molecular microbiologists from 17 countries to discuss recent progress in our knowledge of bacterial nucleotide second messenger signaling. While the focus was on signal input, synthesis, degradation, and the striking diversity of the modes of action of the current second messenger paradigm, i.e., cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), “classics” like cAMP and (p)ppGpp were also presented, in novel facets, and more recent “newcomers,” such as c-di-AMP and c-AMP-GMP, made an impressive appearance. A number of clear trends emerged during the 30 talks, on the 71 posters, and in the lively discussions, including (i)c-di-GMP control of the activities of various ATPases and phosphorylation cascades, (ii) extensive cross talk between c-di-GMP and other nucleotide second messenger signaling pathways, and (iii) a stunning number of novel effectors for nucleotide second messengers that surprisingly include some long-known master regulators of developmental pathways. Overall, the conference made it amply clear that second messenger signaling is currently one of the most dynamic fields within molecular microbiology,with major impacts in research fields ranging from human health to microbial ecology.

  6. Novel aspects on signal-transduction in the pancreatic beta-cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Per-Olof; Leibiger, Ingo B

    2006-03-01

    The glucose-stimulus/insulin-secretion-coupling by the pancreatic beta-cell, which guarantees the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in man, is regulated by a sophisticated interplay between glucose and a plethora of additional factors. Besides other nutrients, incretins, nerval innervation, systemic growth factors as well as autocrine and paracrine regulatory loops within the islet of Langerhans modulate the function of the insulin-producing beta-cell. Although the modulatory role of these factors is well appreciated, the underlying molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. However, in most cases beta-cell membrane receptors coupled primarily to either G-proteins or tyrosine kinases, which subsequently activate respective second messenger cascades, are involved. In the present mini-review we will discuss the role of signaling through some of these receptor-operated effector systems in the light of pancreatic beta-cell signal-transduction.

  7. THE TRANSMEMBRANE SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION IN HEp-2 CELLS INDUCED BY BACTERIAL ADHERENCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ In order to understand the role of transmembrane signal transduction of host cells in the early steps of infection,the adherence of E. coli to HEp-2 cells and the change of activity of phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) induced by the adherence were investigated.The adherence of enteropathogenic E.coli (EPEC), strain E.7, induced a significant increase of inositol-triphosphat (IP-3) level in HEp-2 cells. The adherence of the bacteria and the increase of IP-3 was kinetically correlated. Whereas the increase of IP3 level induced by the adherence of the control strain EPEC (H511), a non-piliated strain, was much meager than that by E7, a piliated strain. The results highlighted an important role of transmembrane signals like IP-3 in the pathogenesis of EPEC.

  8. A CRISPR-Based Toolbox for Studying T Cell Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shen; Weiss, Arthur; Wang, Haopeng

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful technology to perform genome editing in a variety of cell types. To facilitate the application of Cas9 in mapping T cell signaling pathways, we generated a toolbox for large-scale genetic screens in human Jurkat T cells. The toolbox has three different Jurkat cell lines expressing distinct Cas9 variants, including wild-type Cas9, dCas9-KRAB, and sunCas9. We demonstrated that the toolbox allows us to rapidly disrupt endogenous gene expression at the DNA level and to efficiently repress or activate gene expression at the transcriptional level. The toolbox, in combination with multiple currently existing genome-wide sgRNA libraries, will be useful to systematically investigate T cell signal transduction using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic screens. PMID:27057542

  9. MAPKs and Signal Transduction in the Control of Gastrointestinal Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana H. Osaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways are activated by several stimuli and transduce the signal inside cells, generating diverse responses including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. Each MAPK cascade comprises a series of molecules, and regulation takes place at different levels. They communicate with each other and with additional pathways, creating a signaling network that is important for cell fate determination. In this review, we focus on ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5, the major MAPKs, and their interactions with PI3K-Akt, TGFβ/Smad and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. More importantly, we describe how MAPKs regulate cell proliferation and differentiation in the rapidly renewing epithelia that lines the gastrointestinal tract and, finally, we highlight the recent findings on nutritional aspects that affect MAPK transduction cascades.

  10. A CRISPR-Based Toolbox for Studying T Cell Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Chi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful technology to perform genome editing in a variety of cell types. To facilitate the application of Cas9 in mapping T cell signaling pathways, we generated a toolbox for large-scale genetic screens in human Jurkat T cells. The toolbox has three different Jurkat cell lines expressing distinct Cas9 variants, including wild-type Cas9, dCas9-KRAB, and sunCas9. We demonstrated that the toolbox allows us to rapidly disrupt endogenous gene expression at the DNA level and to efficiently repress or activate gene expression at the transcriptional level. The toolbox, in combination with multiple currently existing genome-wide sgRNA libraries, will be useful to systematically investigate T cell signal transduction using both loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic screens.

  11. A computational approach for ordering signal transduction pathway components from genomics and proteomics Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Hongyu

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction is one of the most important biological processes by which cells convert an external signal into a response. Novel computational approaches to mapping proteins onto signaling pathways are needed to fully take advantage of the rapid accumulation of genomic and proteomics information. However, despite their importance, research on signaling pathways reconstruction utilizing large-scale genomics and proteomics information has been limited. Results We have developed an approach for predicting the order of signaling pathway components, assuming all the components on the pathways are known. Our method is built on a score function that integrates protein-protein interaction data and microarray gene expression data. Compared to the individual datasets, either protein interactions or gene transcript abundance measurements, the integrated approach leads to better identification of the order of the pathway components. Conclusions As demonstrated in our study on the yeast MAPK signaling pathways, the integration analysis of high-throughput genomics and proteomics data can be a powerful means to infer the order of pathway components, enabling the transformation from molecular data into knowledge of cellular mechanisms.

  12. The ABA signal transduction mechanism in commercial crops: learning from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-08-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) affects a wide range of stages of plant development as well as the plant's response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Manipulation of ABA signaling in commercial crops holds promising potential for improving crop yields. Several decades of research have been invested in attempts to identify the first components of the ABA signaling cascade. It was only in 2009, that two independent groups identified the PYR/PYL/RCAR protein family as the plant ABA receptor. This finding was followed by a surge of studies on ABA signal transduction, many of them using Arabidopsis as their model. The ABA signaling cascade was found to consist of a double-negative regulatory mechanism assembled from three protein families. These include the ABA receptors, the PP2C family of inhibitors, and the kinase family, SnRK2. It was found that ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and that PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. Researchers today are examining how the elucidation of the ABA signaling cascade in Arabidopsis can be applied to improvements in commercial agriculture. In this article, we have attempted to review recent studies which address this issue. In it, we discuss various approaches useful in identifying the genetic and protein components involved. Finally, we suggest possible commercial applications of genetic manipulation of ABA signaling to improve crop yields.

  13. The sulfiredoxin-peroxiredoxin (Srx-Prx) axis in cell signal transduction and cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Murli; Jiang, Hong; Wu, Lisha; Chawsheen, Hedy A; Wei, Qiou

    2015-10-01

    Redox signaling is a critical component of cell signaling pathways that are involved in the regulation of cell growth, metabolism, hormone signaling, immune regulation and variety of other physiological functions. Peroxiredoxin (Prx) is a family of thiol-based peroxidase that acts as a regulator of redox signaling. Members of Prx family can act as antioxidants and chaperones. Sulfiredoxin (Srx) is an antioxidant protein that exclusively reduces over-oxidized typical 2-Cys Prx. Srx has different affinities for individual Prx and it also catalyzes the deglutathionylation of variety of substrates. Individual component of the Srx-Prx system plays critical role in carcinogenesis by modulating cell signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, migration and metastasis. Expression levels of individual component of the Srx-Prx axis have been correlated with patient survival outcome in multiple cancer types. This review will summarize the molecular basis of differences in the affinity of Srx for individual Prx and the role of individual component of the Srx-Prx system in tumor progression and metastasis. This enhanced understanding of molecular aspects of Srx-Prx interaction and its role in cell signal transduction will help define the Srx-Prx system as a future therapeutic target in human cancer.

  14. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B;

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether defects in the insulin signal transduction cascade are present in skeletal muscle from prediabetic individuals, we excised biopsies from eight glucose-intolerant male first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes (IGT relatives) and nine matched control subjects...... in signal transduction noted for IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase may be attributed to elevated basal phosphorylation/activity of these parameters, because absolute phosphorylation/activity under insulin-stimulated conditions was similar between IGT relatives and control subjects. Insulin increased Akt serine......, the elevated basal activity of these signaling intermediates and the lack of a strong correlation between these parameters to glucose metabolism suggests that other defects of insulin signal transduction and/or downstream components of glucose metabolism may play a greater role in the development of insulin...

  15. Receptor component protein (RCP): a member of a multi-protein complex required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Dickerson, I M

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP) is a 148-amino-acid intracellular protein that is required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction at receptors for the neuropeptide CGRP. RCP works in conjunction with two other proteins to constitute a functional CGRP receptor: calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). CRLR has the stereotypical seven-transmembrane topology of a G-protein-coupled receptor; it requires RAMP1 for trafficking to the cell surface and for ligand specificity, and requires RCP for coupling to the cellular signal transduction pathway. We have made cell lines that expressed an antisense construct of RCP and determined that CGRP-mediated signal transduction was reduced, while CGRP binding was unaffected. Furthermore, signalling at two other endogenous G-protein-coupled receptors was unaffected, suggesting that RCP was specific for a limited subset of receptors.

  16. Signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUO, LIQIANG; LIU, YUQIANG; DING, ZHIBO; SUN, WENDONG; YUAN, MINGZHEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential mechanisms used during signal transduction by M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRM3) in prostate cancer. The microarray datasets of GSE3325, including 5 clinically localized primary prostate cancers and 4 benign prostate tissues, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) in primary prostate cancer tissues compared with benign controls were screened using the Limma package. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using the Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Next, a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed. Additionally, microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with DEGs were predicted and miRNA-target DEG analysis was performed using a Web-based Gene Set Analysis Toolkit. Finally, the PPI network and the miRNA-target DEG network were integrated using Cytoscape. In total, 224 DEGs were screened in the prostate cancer tissues, including 113 upregulated and 111 downregulated genes. CHRM3 and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were enriched in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. EGF and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (Myc) were enriched in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. EGF with the highest degree of connectivity was the hub node in the PPI network, and miR-34b could interact with Myc directly in the miRNA-target DEG network. EGF and Myc may exhibit significant roles in the progression of prostate cancer via regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and the MAPK signaling pathway. CHRM3 may activate these two pathways in prostate cancer progression. Thus, these two key factors and pathways may be crucial mechanisms during signal transduction by CHRM3 in prostate cancer. PMID:26870222

  17. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE - and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slowik Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1 and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2 and RAGE in amyloid-β 1–42 (Aβ1-42-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. Results We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections.

  18. The Roles of Peroxiredoxin and Thioredoxin in Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing and in Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Luis E. S.; Antunes, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in the redox field is the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms, by which H2O2 mediates signal transduction in cells. This is relevant since redox pathways are disturbed in some pathologies. The transcription factor OxyR is the H2O2 sensor in bacteria, whereas Cys-based peroxidases are involved in the perception of this oxidant in eukaryotic cells. Three possible mechanisms may be involved in H2O2 signaling that are not mutually exclusive. In the simplest pathway, H2O2 signals through direct oxidation of the signaling protein, such as a phosphatase or a transcription factor. Although signaling proteins are frequently observed in the oxidized state in biological systems, in most cases their direct oxidation by H2O2 is too slow (101 M−1s−1 range) to outcompete Cys-based peroxidases and glutathione. In some particular cellular compartments (such as vicinity of NADPH oxidases), it is possible that a signaling protein faces extremely high H2O2 concentrations, making the direct oxidation feasible. Alternatively, high H2O2 levels can hyperoxidize peroxiredoxins leading to local building up of H2O2 that then could oxidize a signaling protein (floodgate hypothesis). In a second model, H2O2 oxidizes Cys-based peroxidases that then through thiol-disulfide reshuffling would transmit the oxidized equivalents to the signaling protein. The third model of signaling is centered on the reducing substrate of Cys-based peroxidases that in most cases is thioredoxin. Is this model, peroxiredoxins would signal by modulating the thioredoxin redox status. More kinetic data is required to allow the identification of the complex network of thiol switches. PMID:26813662

  19. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPNP-A) has been assigned a role in abiotic and biotic stress responses, and the recombinant protein has been demonstrated to elicit cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent stomatal guard cell opening, regulate ion movements, and induce osmoticum-dependent water uptake. Although the importance of the hormone in maintaining ion and fluid homeostasis has been established, key components of the AtPNP-A-dependent signal transduction pathway remain unknown. Since identification of the binding partners of AtPNP-A, including its receptor(s), is fundamental to understanding the mode of its action at the molecular level, comprehensive protein-protein interaction studies, involving yeast two-hybrid screening, affinity-based assays, protein cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric (MS) analyses have been performed. Several candidate binding partners of AtPNP-A identified with at least two independent methods were subsequently expressed as recombinant proteins, purified, and the specificity of their interactions with the recombinant AtPNP-A was verified using surface plasmon resonance. Several specific binary interactants of AtPNP-A were subjected to functional assays aimed at unraveling the consequences of the interactions in planta. These experiments have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are novel secondary messengers involved in the transduction of AtPNP-A signal in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana (Col-0). Further insight into the AtPNP-A dependent signalling events occurring in suspension-cultured cells in ROS-dependent or ROS-independent manner have been obtained from the large-scale proteomics study employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labelling followed by MS analysis to

  20. Molecular hydrogen suppresses FcepsilonRI-mediated signal transduction and prevents degranulation of mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Tomohiro; Fujita, Yasunori; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ohno, Kinji; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Kojima, Toshio; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Ito, Masafumi

    2009-11-27

    Molecular hydrogen ameliorates oxidative stress-associated diseases in animal models. We found that oral intake of hydrogen-rich water abolishes an immediate-type allergic reaction in mice. Using rat RBL-2H3 mast cells, we demonstrated that hydrogen attenuates phosphorylation of the FcepsilonRI-associated Lyn and its downstream signal transduction, which subsequently inhibits the NADPH oxidase activity and reduces the generation of hydrogen peroxide. We also found that inhibition of NADPH oxidase attenuates phosphorylation of Lyn in mast cells, indicating the presence of a feed-forward loop that potentiates the allergic responses. Hydrogen accordingly inhibits all tested signaling molecule(s) in the loop. Hydrogen effects have been solely ascribed to exclusive removal of hydroxyl radical. In the immediate-type allergic reaction, hydrogen exerts its beneficial effect not by its radical scavenging activity but by modulating a specific signaling pathway. Effects of hydrogen in other diseases are possibly mediated by modulation of yet unidentified signaling pathways. Our studies also suggest that hydrogen is a gaseous signaling molecule like nitric oxide.

  1. Molecular Insights into Toluene Sensing in the TodS/TodT Signal Transduction System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Serry; Hwang, Jungwon; Guchhait, Koushik; Lee, Eun-Gyeong; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Sujin; Lee, Sangmin; Chung, Jeong Min; Jung, Hyun Suk; Lee, Sang Jun; Ryu, Choong-Min; Lee, Seung-Goo; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kwon, Ohsuk; Kim, Myung Hee

    2016-01-01

    TodS is a sensor kinase that responds to various monoaromatic compounds, which either cause an agonistic or antagonistic effect on phosphorylation of its cognate response regulator TodT, and controls tod operon expression in Pseudomonas putida strains. We describe a molecular sensing mechanism of TodS that is activated in response to toluene. The crystal structures of the TodS Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) 1 sensor domain (residues 43–164) and its complex with toluene (agonist) or 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene (antagonist) show a typical β2α3β3 PAS fold structure (residues 45–149), forming a hydrophobic ligand-binding site. A signal transfer region (residues 150–163) located immediately after the canonical PAS fold may be intrinsically flexible and disordered in both apo-PAS1 and antagonist-bound forms and dramatically adapt an α-helix upon toluene binding. This structural change in the signal transfer region is proposed to result in signal transmission to activate the TodS/TodT two-component signal transduction system. Site-directed mutagenesis and β-galactosidase assays using a P. putida reporter strain system verified the essential residues involved in ligand sensing and signal transfer and suggest that the Phe46 residue acts as a ligand-specific switch. PMID:26903514

  2. Signal transduction pathways provide opportunities to enhance HDL and apoAI-dependent reverse cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Vishwaroop; Wood, Peta; Rentero, Carles; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Binding of High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) to cell surface receptors is believed to initiate a plethora of signaling cascades that promote atheroprotective cell behavior, including the removal of excess cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages. More specifically, HDL and apoA-I binding to scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 has been shown to activate protein kinase A and C (PKA, PKC), Rac/Rho GTPases, Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2), calmodulin as well as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Some of these signaling events upregulate mobilization of cholesterol from cellular pools, while others promote efflux pathways through increased expression, stability, and cell surface localization of SR-BI and ABCA1. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of HDL- and apoA-I -induced signal transduction pathways that are linked to cholesterol efflux and discusses the underlying mechanisms that could couple ligand binding to SR-BI and ABCA1 with signaling and cholesterol export. Additional focus is given on the potential of pharmacological intervention to modulate the activity of signaling cascades for the inhibition or regression of cholesterol accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions.

  3. Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation for quantitative modeling of protein signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsos, Alexander; Melas, Ioannis N; Morris, Melody K; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G

    2012-01-01

    Modeling of signal transduction pathways plays a major role in understanding cells' function and predicting cellular response. Mathematical formalisms based on a logic formalism are relatively simple but can describe how signals propagate from one protein to the next and have led to the construction of models that simulate the cells response to environmental or other perturbations. Constrained fuzzy logic was recently introduced to train models to cell specific data to result in quantitative pathway models of the specific cellular behavior. There are two major issues in this pathway optimization: i) excessive CPU time requirements and ii) loosely constrained optimization problem due to lack of data with respect to large signaling pathways. Herein, we address both issues: the former by reformulating the pathway optimization as a regular nonlinear optimization problem; and the latter by enhanced algorithms to pre/post-process the signaling network to remove parts that cannot be identified given the experimental conditions. As a case study, we tackle the construction of cell type specific pathways in normal and transformed hepatocytes using medium and large-scale functional phosphoproteomic datasets. The proposed Non Linear Programming (NLP) formulation allows for fast optimization of signaling topologies by combining the versatile nature of logic modeling with state of the art optimization algorithms.

  4. Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Auburn

    Full Text Available With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other important components of the Gs pathway. Using meta-analysis across case-control and family trio (affected child and parental controls studies of severe malaria from The Gambia and Malawi, we sought evidence of association in six Gs pathway candidate genes: adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A and 2B (ADORA2B, beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1, adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9, G protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3, and regulator of G protein signalling 2 (RGS2. Our study amassed a total of 2278 cases and 2364 controls. Allele-based models of association were investigated in all genes, and genotype and haplotype-based models were investigated where significant allelic associations were identified. Although no significant associations were observed in the other genes, several were identified in ADORA2A. The most significant association was observed at the rs9624472 locus, where the G allele (approximately 20% frequency appeared to confer enhanced risk to severe malaria [OR = 1.22 (1.09-1.37; P = 0.001]. Further investigation of the ADORA2A gene region is required to validate the associations identified here, and to identify and functionally characterize the responsible causal variant(s. Our results provide further evidence supporting a role of the Gs signal transduction pathway in the regulation of severe malaria, and request further exploration of this pathway in future studies.

  5. Molecular Analysis of the Graviperception Signal Transduction in the Flagellate Euglena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, Donat; Daiker, Viktor; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis perceives and reacts to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that the orientation can be explained by passive orientation only to a small extend while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. Our current working hypothesis is based on the fact that the cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently exerts pressure onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. We recently succeeded in identifying these channels as gene products of the TRP family. RNAi of the corresponding gene abolished graviperception. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. The inwardly gated calcium binds to a specific calmodulin which is likewise an intrinsic element of the signal transduction chain. RNAi of the related mRNA also stopped graviperception. This calmodulin is thought to activate an adenylyl cyclase which generates cyclic AMP which in turn modulates the beating pattern of the flagellum.

  6. Lipid Rafts and Signal Transduction of Cell%脂筏与细胞信号转导

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范玉贞

    2011-01-01

    论述了脂筏的组成、结构与功能,脂筏在细胞信号转导正负调控、T细胞的信号转导、精子膜的信号转导过程中的作用及其机制.小窝蛋白及其参与的信号转导过程与葡萄糖运输、糖尿病及其并发症有密切关系.%This article discusses the composition,structure and function of lipid rafts and the mechanism of lipid rafts in signal transduction plus or minus regulation,T cell signal transduction,signal transduction process of sperm membrane.Caveolins and its partic

  7. Both membrane-dependent and DNA damage-dependent signal transduction chains are activated following UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, C.; Knebel, A.; Bender, K.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Herrlich, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Genetik

    1997-03-01

    Irradiation of cultured cells with short wave length ultraviolet light (UVC) activates at least two types of signal transduction chains which ultimately lead to changes in gene expression. One type involves cell surface receptors and is activated with very rapid kinetics. One or several membrane associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are inhibited in less than one minute following UV exposure. Consequently the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated growth factor receptors is impaired. This process is ligand-independent and suggests spontaneous autophosphorylation activity of receptor tyrosine kinases. The UV-induced auto-phosphorylations trigger-signal transduction to the nucleus and activate transcription of immediate early genes such as c-fos. The other type of signal transduction chain has its origin in DNA damage. It occurs with delayed kinetics. We analyzed several human fibroblastic cell lines with distinct deficiencies in nucleotide excision repair mechanisms for the dose dependence of UV-induced late appearing and stable collagenase I mRNA. Several cell lines with deficiencies in the preferential repair of transcribed genes required lower doses of UV than wild type cells or cells solely deficient in the repair of the overall genome. These data suggest the existence of a signal transduction cascade whose stimulation is elicited by lesions in transcribed genes. It appears that similar or identical transcription factors are activated by both types of UV-induced signal transduction. For instance the transcription factor NF{kappa}B is activated by both, a DNA damage independent and a DNA damage dependent signal transduction chain. (authors)

  8. Viral infection: an evolving insight into the signal transduction pathways responsible for the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwal, Girish J; Hatch, Steven; Marshall, William L

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune response is initiated by the interaction of stereotypical pathogen components with genetically conserved receptors for extracytosolic pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or intracytosolic nucleic acids. In multicellular organisms, this interaction typically clusters signal transduction molecules and leads to their activations, thereby initiating signals that activate innate immune effector mechanisms to protect the host. In some cases programmed cell death-a fundamental form of innate immunity-is initiated in response to genotoxic or biochemical stress that is associated with viral infection. In this paper we will summarize innate immune mechanisms that are relevant to viral pathogenesis and outline the continuing evolution of viral mechanisms that suppress the innate immunity in mammalian hosts. These mechanisms of viral innate immune evasion provide significant insight into the pathways of the antiviral innate immune response of many organisms. Examples of relevant mammalian innate immune defenses host defenses include signaling to interferon and cytokine response pathways as well as signaling to the inflammasome. Understanding which viral innate immune evasion mechanisms are linked to pathogenesis may translate into therapies and vaccines that are truly effective in eliminating the morbidity and mortality associated with viral infections in individuals.

  9. Interleukin-1 beta impairs brain derived neurotrophic factor-induced signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Liqi; Balazs, Robert; Soiampornkul, Rungtip; Thangnipon, Wipawan; Cotman, Carl W

    2008-09-01

    The expression of IL-1 is elevated in the CNS in diverse neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. The hypothesis was tested that IL-1 beta renders neurons vulnerable to degeneration by interfering with BDNF-induced neuroprotection. In trophic support-deprived neurons, IL-1 beta compromised the PI3-K/Akt pathway-mediated protection by BDNF and suppressed Akt activation. The effect was specific as in addition to Akt, the activation of MAPK/ERK, but not PLC gamma, was decreased. Activation of CREB, a target of these signaling pathways, was severely depressed by IL-1 beta. As the cytokine did not influence TrkB receptor and PLC gamma activation, IL-1 beta might have interfered with BDNF signaling at the docking step conveying activation to the PI3-K/Akt and Ras/MAPK pathways. Indeed, IL-1 beta suppressed the activation of the respective scaffolding proteins IRS-1 and Shc; this effect might involve ceramide generation. IL-1-induced interference with BDNF neuroprotection and signal transduction was corrected, in part, by ceramide production inhibitors and mimicked by the cell-permeable C2-ceramide. These results suggest that IL-1 beta places neurons at risk by interfering with BDNF signaling involving a ceramide-associated mechanism.

  10. Noninvasive imaging of receptor function: signal transduction pathways and physiological readouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Markus

    2008-09-01

    Intracellular signaling describes the process of information propagation from the cell surface to the location within the cell where a biological response is executed. Signaling pathways involve a complex network of interacting molecular species. It is obvious that information on the activation of individual pathways is highly relevant in biomedical research, both from a diagnostic point of view and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. Modern molecular imaging approaches are capable of providing such information in a temporo-spatially resolved manner. Two strategies can be pursued: imaging individual pathway molecules or targeting protein-protein interactions, which are key elements of the signaling networks. Assays such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer, two-hybrid, protein fragment complementation or protein splicing have been adapted to allow studies in live mice. The major issues in imaging signal transduction are sensitivity, as critical species occur at low concentration, and the fact that the processes targeted are intracellular, that is, exogenous probes have to cross the cell membrane. Currently, the majority of these imaging methods are based on genetic engineering approaches and are therefore confined to experimental studies in animals. Exogenous probes for targeting intracellular pathway molecules are being developed and may allow translation into the clinic.

  11. Signal transduction pathway of nitric oxide inducing PC12 cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study signal transduction pathway of nitric oxideinducing death of PC12 cells.Methods: Cell survival rate was measured with MTT assay, and caspase-3 activity with caspase-3 assay kits after PC12 cells were incubated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ plus SNP or p38 inhibitor-SB203580 plus SNP.Results: SNP induced death of PC12 cells in dose- and time-dependent manner and enhanced caspase-3 activity gradually. Both caspase-3 inhibitor Ⅱ and SB203580 reduced cell death, but SB203580 reduced caspase-3 activity significantly.Conclusions: NO may induce death of PC12 cells through activation of p38 and caspase-3.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of signal transduction in three-dimensional ECM-based tumor cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Eke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of signal transduction and protein phosphorylation is fundamental to understand physiological and pathological cell behavior as well as identification of novel therapeutic targets. Despite the fact that more physiological three-dimensional cell culture assays are increasingly used, particularly proteomics and phosphoproteomics remain challenging due to easy, robust and reproducible sample preparation. Here, we present an easy-to-perform, reliable and time-efficient method for the production of 3D cell lysates without compromising cell adhesion before cell lysis. The samples can be used for Western blotting as well as phosphoproteome array technology. This technique would be of interest for researchers working in all fields of biology and drug development.

  13. Histidine phosphotransfer proteins in fungal two-component signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassler, Jan S; West, Ann H

    2013-08-01

    The histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) protein Ypd1 is an important participant in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae multistep two-component signal transduction pathway and, unlike the expanded histidine kinase gene family, is encoded by a single gene in nearly all model and pathogenic fungi. Ypd1 is essential for viability in both S. cerevisiae and in Cryptococcus neoformans. These and other aspects of Ypd1 biology, combined with the availability of structural and mutational data in S. cerevisiae, suggest that the essential interactions between Ypd1 and response regulator domains would be a good target for antifungal drug development. The goal of this minireview is to summarize the wealth of data on S. cerevisiae Ypd1 and to consider the potential benefits of conducting related studies in pathogenic fungi.

  14. Real-time neutron scattering investigations of biological signal transduction dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Roland [Institut Laue-Langevinx, Grenoble Cedex (France); Hendriks, Johnny [Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Crielaard, Wim [Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences and Academic Center for Dentistry, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    During their catalytic cycle, proteins involved in biological signal transduction undergo unexpectedly large conformational changes, which are at the core of their biological functioning. Until now it has been extremely difficult to obtain experimental insight into the nature of these conformational changes. Mathematical modeling and time-resolved X-ray crystallography have resulted in probable routes along which these conformational changes may take place, but so far this fundamental biological phenomenon has hardly been tackled experimentally. Here, we report on an attempt to observe structural changes in Photoactive Yellow Protein with time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering using diffractometer D22 at the high-flux reactor of the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France.

  15. Smartphone Operated Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) Amplifier for Nanopore Sensors: Design and Analytical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Kahnemouyi, Sina; Fan, Hsinwen; Mak, Wai Han; Lohith, Akshar; Seger, Adam; Teodorescu, Mircea; Pourmand, Nader

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we demonstrated a handheld wireless voltage-clamp amplifier for current measurement of nanopore sensors. This amplifier interfaces a sensing probe and connects wirelessly with a computer or smartphone for the required stimulus input, data processing and storage. To test the proposed Signal Transduction by Ion Nanogating (STING) wireless amplifier, in the current study the system was tested with a nano-pH sensor to measure pH of standard buffer solutions and the performance was compared against the commercial voltage-clamp amplifier. To our best knowledge, STING amplifier is the first miniaturized wireless voltage-clamp platform operated with a customized smart-phone application (app). PMID:27602408

  16. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Analysis of Sensitivity Amplification in Biological Signal Transduction

    CERN Document Server

    Qian, H

    2003-01-01

    Based on a thermodynamic analysis of the kinetic model for the protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, we study the ATP (or GTP) energy utilization of this ubiquitous biological signal transduction process. It was shown that the free energy from hydrolysis inside cells, Delta G (phosphorylation potential), controls the amplification and sensitivity of the switch-like cellular module; the response coefficient of the sensitivity amplification approaches the optimal 1 and the Hill coefficeint increases with increasing Delta G. Futhermore, we show the high amplification in zero-order ultrasensitivity is mechanistically related to the proofreading kinetics for protein biosynthesis. Both utilize multiple kinetic cycles in time to gain temporal cooperativity, in contrast to allosteric cooperativity that utilizes multiple subunits in a protein.

  17. Transcriptional Crosstalk between Nuclear Receptors and Cytokine Signal Transduction Pathways in Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Wang; Xiaohu Zhang; William L. Farrar; Xiaoyi Yang

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear receptor superfamily and the transcriptional factors associated with cytokines are inherently different families of signaling molecules and activate gene transcription by binding to their respective responsive element. However, it has become increasingly clear from our works and others that nuclear receptors are important regulators of cytokine production and function through complex and varied interactions between these distinct transcriptional factors. This review provides a general overview of the mechanism of action of nuclear receptors and their transcriptional crosstalk with transcriptional factors associated with cytokine transduction pathways. One of the most important mechanistic aspects is protein to protein interaction through a direct or co-regulator-mediated indirect manner. Such crosstalk is crucially involved in physiological and therapeutic roles of nuclear receptors and their ligands in immunity,inflammation and cytokine-related tumors. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):416-424.

  18. Auxin as a Model for the Integration of Hormonal Signal Processing and Transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.D.Teale; F.A.Ditengou; A.D.Dovzhenko; X.Li; A.M.Molendijk; B.Ruperti; I.Paponov; K.Palme

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of plant growth responds to many stimuli.These responses allow environmental adaptation,thereby increasing fitness.In many cases,the relay of information about a plant's environment is through plant hormones.These messengers integrate environmental information into developmental pathways to determine plant shape.This review will use,as an example,auxin in the root ofArabidopsis thaliana to illustrate the complex nature of hormonal signal processing and transduction.It will then make the case that the application of a systems-biology approach is necessary,if the relationship between a plant's environment and its growth/developmental responses is to be properly understood.

  19. Architecture and signal transduction mechanism of the bacterial chemosensory array: progress, controversies, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falke, Joseph J; Piasta, Kene N

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has deepened our understanding of the ancient, conserved chemosensory array that detects small molecule attractants and repellents, and directs the chemotaxis of bacterial and archaeal cells towards an optimal chemical environment. Here we review advances towards a molecular description of the ultrastable lattice architecture and ultrasensitive signal transduction mechanism of the chemosensory array, as well as controversies and challenges requiring further research. Ultimately, a full molecular understanding of array structure and on-off switching will foster (i) the design of novel therapies that block pathogenic wound seeking and infection, (ii) the development of highly specific, sensitive, stable biosensors, and (iii) the elucidation of general functional principles shared by receptor patches in all branches of life.

  20. Real-time monitoring of intracellular signal transduction in PC12 cells by non-adiabatic tapered optical fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Asadollahi, A.; Noraeipoor, Z.; Dargahi, L.

    2014-05-01

    Real-time observation of intracellular process of signal transduction is very useful for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications as well as for basic research work of cell biology. For feasible and reagentless observation of intracellular alterations in real time, we examined the use of a nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber (NATOF) biosensor for monitoring of intracellular signal transduction that was mainly translocation of protein kinase C via refractive index change in PC12 cells adhered on tapered fiber sensor without any indicator reagent. PC12 cells were stimulated with KCl . Our results suggest that complex intracellular reactions could be real-time monitored and characterized by NATOF biosensor.

  1. Involvement of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction pathway in burns-induced lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xu-lin; XIA Zhao-fan; WEI Duo; WANG Yong-jie; WANG Chang-rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Acute lung injury (ALI) is a leading complication in extensively burned patients, especially those with inhalation injury.1 It can cause hypoxia resulting in injury of remote organs and dysfunction. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) is a stress activated protein kinase in the MAPK family.2 Most of the previous studies have demonstrated that p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway mediated ALI in rats with acute severe pancreatitis, sepsis etc.3-5 However, there is little information regarding the role of p38 MAPK signal transduction pathway in ALI after severe burn trauma.

  2. Chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism as adaptive strategies during citrus canker induction by Xanthomonas citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Leandro Marcio; Facincani, Agda Paula; Ferreira, Cristiano Barbalho; Ferreira, Rafael Marine; Ferro, Maria Inês Tiraboshi; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Ferro, Jesus Aparecido; Soares, Márcia Regina

    2015-03-01

    The genome of Xanthomonas citri subsp. Citri strain 306 pathotype A (Xac) was completely sequenced more than 10 years; to date, few studies involving functional genomics Xac and its host compatible have been developed, specially related to adaptive events that allow the survival of Xac within the plant. Proteomic analysis of Xac showed that the processes of chemotactic signal transduction and phosphate metabolism are key adaptive strategies during the interaction of a pathogenic bacterium with its plant host. The results also indicate the importance of a group of proteins that may not be directly related to the classical virulence factors, but that are likely fundamental to the success of the initial stages of the infection, such as methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (Mcp) and phosphate specific transport (Pst). Furthermore, the analysis of the mutant of the gene pstB which codifies to an ABC phosphate transporter subunit revealed a complete absence of citrus canker symptoms when inoculated in compatible hosts. We also conducted an in silico analysis which established the possible network of genes regulated by two-component systems PhoPQ and PhoBR (related to phosphate metabolism), and possible transcriptional factor binding site (TFBS) motifs of regulatory proteins PhoB and PhoP, detaching high degree of conservation of PhoB TFBS in 84 genes of Xac genome. This is the first time that chemotaxis signal transduction and phosphate metabolism were therefore indicated to be fundamental to the process of colonization of plant tissue during the induction of disease associated with Xanthomonas genus bacteria.

  3. MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis and its prognostic impact in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hong-hua; Zhang, Xi; Cao, Pei-guo [Department of Oncology, the Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province (China)

    2011-11-18

    The matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1)/protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) signal transduction axis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. To explore the expression and prognostic value of MMP-1 and PAR-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), we evaluated the expression of two proteins in resected specimens from 85 patients with ESCC by immunohistochemistry. Sixty-two (72.9%) and 58 (68.2%) tumors were MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive, respectively, while no significant staining was observed in normal esophageal squamous epithelium. MMP-1 and PAR-1 overexpression was significantly associated with tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage and regional lymph node involvement. Patients with MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive tumors, respectively, had poorer disease-free survival (DFS) than those with negative ESCC (P = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively). Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between TNM stage [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.836, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.866-4.308], regional lymph node involvement (HR = 2.955, 95%CI = 1.713-5.068), MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.669, 95%CI = 1.229-6.127), and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.762, 95%CI = 1.156-2.883) and DFS. Multivariate analysis including the above four parameters identified TNM stage (HR = 2.035, 95%CI = 1.167-3.681), MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.109, 95%CI = 1.293-3.279), and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.967, 95%CI = 1.256-2.881) as independent and significant prognostic factors for DFS. Our data suggest for the first time that MMP-1 and PAR-1 were both overexpressed in ESCC and are novel predictors of poor patient prognosis after curative resection. The MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis might be a new therapeutic target for future therapies tailored against ESCC.

  4. Effect of Ligustrazine on Bone Marrow Microenvironment and Signal Transduction Path in Irradiation Injured Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙岚; 刘文励; 孙汉英; 任天华; 李登举; 徐惠珍; 路武

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of ligustrazine on bone marrow hematopoietic microenvi-ronment and signal transduction in irradiation injured mice. Methods:After being irradiated by 6.0 Gy 60Coγ-ray, the mice in the ligustrazine group were orally given ligustrazine 4 mg/mouse twice a day to the endof the experiment. For the control group, normal saline was given instead of ligustrazine and the mice inthe normal group was untreated. The mice were sacrificed separately on the 3rd, 7th and 14th day after ra-diation, bone marrow of them was taken and managed as follows: (1) Make stromal cell culture to observethe growth state and the expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) of the cells; (2) Make the bone mar-row section to examine the pathological and immunohistochemistry changes, including the expression of fe-tal liver kinase-1 (Flk-1) and Fvm: RAg. The data were recorded and compared among groups. Results:Af-ter radiation, the hematopoietic cells in bone marrow decreased and the micro-vessels dilated and congestedwith bleeding; bone marrow became thinner, red colored with cells of irregular shape and few cells adhereto the bottom of culture flask. These changes began to recover at the 7th day and approached to normalwithin 2 weeks. The recovery was better, earlier and quicker in the ligustrazine group than that in the con-trol group. The expression levels of Flk-1 decreased significantly. Conclusion: Ligustrazine could promotethe recovery of hematopoietic function of radiation damaged bone marrow, the mechanisms might bethrough improving the microenvironment and signal transduction path for recovery.

  5. MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis and its prognostic impact in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-hua Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1/protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1 signal transduction axis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. To explore the expression and prognostic value of MMP-1 and PAR-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC, we evaluated the expression of two proteins in resected specimens from 85 patients with ESCC by immunohistochemistry. Sixty-two (72.9% and 58 (68.2% tumors were MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive, respectively, while no significant staining was observed in normal esophageal squamous epithelium. MMP-1 and PAR-1 overexpression was significantly associated with tumor node metastasis (TNM stage and regional lymph node involvement. Patients with MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive tumors, respectively, had poorer disease-free survival (DFS than those with negative ESCC (P = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between TNM stage [hazard ratio (HR = 2.836, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.866-4.308], regional lymph node involvement (HR = 2.955, 95%CI = 1.713-5.068, MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.669, 95%CI = 1.229-6.127, and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.762, 95%CI = 1.156-2.883 and DFS. Multivariate analysis including the above four parameters identified TNM stage (HR = 2.035, 95%CI = 1.167-3.681, MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.109, 95%CI = 1.293-3.279, and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.967, 95%CI = 1.256-2.881 as independent and significant prognostic factors for DFS. Our data suggest for the first time that MMP-1 and PAR-1 were both overexpressed in ESCC and are novel predictors of poor patient prognosis after curative resection. The MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis might be a new therapeutic target for future therapies tailored against ESCC.

  6. Mutations in the gravity persistence signal loci in Arabidopsis disrupt the perception and/or signal transduction of gravitropic stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Rashotte, Aaron M.; Shipp, Matthew J.; Robertson, Dominique; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development, yet little is understood about the early events of gravitropism. To identify genes affected in the signal perception and/or transduction phase of the gravity response, a mutant screen was devised using cold treatment to delay the gravity response of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis. Inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis show no response to gravistimulation at 4 degrees C for up to 3 h. However, when gravistimulated at 4 degrees C and then returned to vertical at room temperature (RT), stems bend in response to the previous, horizontal gravistimulation (H. Fukaki, H. Fujisawa, M. Tasaka [1996] Plant Physiology 110: 933-943). This indicates that gravity perception, but not the gravitropic response, occurs at 4 degrees C. Recessive mutations were identified at three loci using this cold effect on gravitropism to screen for gravity persistence signal (gps) mutants. All three mutants had an altered response after gravistimulation at 4 degrees C, yet had phenotypically normal responses to stimulations at RT. gps1-1 did not bend in response to the 4 degrees C gravity stimulus upon return to RT. gps2-1 responded to the 4 degrees C stimulus but bent in the opposite direction. gps3-1 over-responded after return to RT, continuing to bend to an angle greater than wild-type plants. At 4 degrees C, starch-containing statoliths sedimented normally in both wild-type and the gps mutants, but auxin transport was abolished at 4 degrees C. These results are consistent with GPS loci affecting an aspect of the gravity signal perception/transduction pathway that occurs after statolith sedimentation, but before auxin transport.

  7. Gene network homology in prokaryotes using a similarity search approach: queries of quorum sensing signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N Quan

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell-cell communication is mediated by small signaling molecules known as autoinducers. Importantly, autoinducer-2 (AI-2 is synthesized via the enzyme LuxS in over 80 species, some of which mediate their pathogenicity by recognizing and transducing this signal in a cell density dependent manner. AI-2 mediated phenotypes are not well understood however, as the means for signal transduction appears varied among species, while AI-2 synthesis processes appear conserved. Approaches to reveal the recognition pathways of AI-2 will shed light on pathogenicity as we believe recognition of the signal is likely as important, if not more, than the signal synthesis. LMNAST (Local Modular Network Alignment Similarity Tool uses a local similarity search heuristic to study gene order, generating homology hits for the genomic arrangement of a query gene sequence. We develop and apply this tool for the E. coli lac and LuxS regulated (Lsr systems. Lsr is of great interest as it mediates AI-2 uptake and processing. Both test searches generated results that were subsequently analyzed through a number of different lenses, each with its own level of granularity, from a binary phylogenetic representation down to trackback plots that preserve genomic organizational information. Through a survey of these results, we demonstrate the identification of orthologs, paralogs, hitchhiking genes, gene loss, gene rearrangement within an operon context, and also horizontal gene transfer (HGT. We found a variety of operon structures that are consistent with our hypothesis that the signal can be perceived and transduced by homologous protein complexes, while their regulation may be key to defining subsequent phenotypic behavior.

  8. Ensembles of signal transduction models using Pareto Optimal Ensemble Techniques (POETs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang Ok; Chakrabarti, Anirikh; Varner, Jeffrey D

    2010-07-01

    Mathematical modeling of complex gene expression programs is an emerging tool for understanding disease mechanisms. However, identification of large models sometimes requires training using qualitative, conflicting or even contradictory data sets. One strategy to address this challenge is to estimate experimentally constrained model ensembles using multiobjective optimization. In this study, we used Pareto Optimal Ensemble Techniques (POETs) to identify a family of proof-of-concept signal transduction models. POETs integrate Simulated Annealing (SA) with Pareto optimality to identify models near the optimal tradeoff surface between competing training objectives. We modeled a prototypical-signaling network using mass-action kinetics within an ordinary differential equation (ODE) framework (64 ODEs in total). The true model was used to generate synthetic immunoblots from which the POET algorithm identified the 117 unknown model parameters. POET generated an ensemble of signaling models, which collectively exhibited population-like behavior. For example, scaled gene expression levels were approximately normally distributed over the ensemble following the addition of extracellular ligand. Also, the ensemble recovered robust and fragile features of the true model, despite significant parameter uncertainty. Taken together, these results suggest that experimentally constrained model ensembles could capture qualitatively important network features without exact parameter information.

  9. The mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter: regulation by auxiliary subunits and signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhun, Bong Sook; Mishra, Jyotsna; Monaco, Sarah; Fu, Deming; Jiang, Wenmin; Sheu, Shey-Shing; O-Uchi, Jin

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis, the Ca(2+) influx-efflux balance, is responsible for the control of numerous cellular functions, including energy metabolism, generation of reactive oxygen species, spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca(2+) signaling, and cell growth and death. Recent discovery of the molecular identity of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) provides new possibilities for application of genetic approaches to study the mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx mechanism in various cell types and tissues. In addition, the subsequent discovery of various auxiliary subunits associated with MCU suggests that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is not solely regulated by a single protein (MCU), but likely by a macromolecular protein complex, referred to as the MCU-protein complex (mtCUC). Moreover, recent reports have shown the potential role of MCU posttranslational modifications in the regulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake through mtCUC. These observations indicate that mtCUCs form a local signaling complex at the inner mitochondrial membrane that could significantly regulate mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, as well as numerous mitochondrial and cellular functions. In this review we discuss the current literature on mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake mechanisms, with a particular focus on the structure and function of mtCUC, as well as its regulation by signal transduction pathways, highlighting current controversies and discrepancies.

  10. Signal Transduction of Platelet-Induced Liver Regeneration and Decrease of Liver Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Murata

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Platelets contain three types of granules: alpha granules, dense granules, and lysosomal granules. Each granule contains various growth factors, cytokines, and other physiological substances. Platelets trigger many kinds of biological responses, such as hemostasis, wound healing, and tissue regeneration. This review presents experimental evidence of platelets in accelerating liver regeneration and improving liver fibrosis. The regenerative effect of liver by platelets consists of three mechanisms; i.e., the direct effect on hepatocytes, the cooperative effect with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, and the collaborative effect with Kupffer cells. Many signal transduction pathways are involved in hepatocyte proliferation. One is activation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2, which are derived from direct stimulation from growth factors in platelets. The other is signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3 activation by interleukin (IL-6 derived from liver sinusoidal endothelial cells and Kupffer cells, which are stimulated by contact with platelets during liver regeneration. Platelets also improve liver fibrosis in rodent models by inactivating hepatic stellate cells to decrease collagen production. The level of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP is increased by adenosine through its receptors on hepatic stellate cells, resulting in inactivation of these cells. Adenosine is produced by the degradation of adenine nucleotides such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP, which are stored in abundance within the dense granules of platelets.

  11. Stress and glucocorticoids impair memory retrieval via β2-adrenergic, Gi/o-coupled suppression of cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutsky, Keith; Ouyang, Ming; Castelino, Christina B; Zhang, Lei; Thomas, Steven A

    2011-10-05

    Acute stress impairs the retrieval of hippocampus-dependent memory, and this effect is mimicked by exogenous administration of stress-responsive glucocorticoid hormones. It has been proposed that glucocorticoids affect memory by promoting the release and/or blocking the reuptake of norepinephrine (NE), a stress-responsive neurotransmitter. It has also been proposed that this enhanced NE signaling impairs memory retrieval by stimulating β(1)-adrenergic receptors and elevating levels of cAMP. In contrast, other evidence indicates that NE, β(1), and cAMP signaling is transiently required for the retrieval of hippocampus-dependent memory. To resolve this discrepancy, wild-type rats and mice with and without gene-targeted mutations were stressed or treated with glucocorticoids and/or adrenergic receptor drugs before testing memory for inhibitory avoidance or fear conditioning. Here we report that glucocorticoids do not require NE to impair retrieval. However, stress- and glucocorticoid-induced impairments of retrieval depend on the activation of β(2) (but not β(1))-adrenergic receptors. Offering an explanation for the opposing functions of these two receptors, the impairing effects of stress, glucocorticoids and β(2) agonists on retrieval are blocked by pertussis toxin, which inactivates signaling by G(i/o)-coupled receptors. In hippocampal slices, β(2) signaling decreases cAMP levels and greatly reduces the increase in cAMP mediated by β(1) signaling. Finally, augmenting cAMP signaling in the hippocampus prevents the impairment of retrieval by systemic β(2) agonists or glucocorticoids. These results demonstrate that the β(2) receptor can be a critical effector of acute stress, and that β(1) and β(2) receptors can have quite distinct roles in CNS signaling and cognition.

  12. Peroxiredoxins in Regulation of MAPK Signalling Pathways; Sensors and Barriers to Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Heather R.; Veal, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are highly conserved and abundant peroxidases. Although the thioredoxin peroxidase activity of peroxiredoxin (Prx) is important to maintain low levels of endogenous hydrogen peroxide, Prx have also been shown to promote hydrogen peroxide-mediated signalling. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways mediate cellular responses to a variety of stimuli, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we review the evidence that Prx can act as both sensors and barriers to the activation of MAPK and discuss the underlying mechanisms involved, focusing in particular on the relationship with thioredoxin. PMID:26813660

  13. The cytoplasmic and the transmembrane domains are not sufficient for class I MHC signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, H; Geppert, T D; Wacholtz, M C; Lipsky, P E

    1999-02-01

    Class I MHC molecules deliver activation signals to T cells. To analyze the role of the cytoplasmic and the transmembrane (TM) domains of class I MHC molecules in T cell activation, Jurkat cells were transfected with genes for truncated class I MHC molecules which had only four intracytoplasmic amino acids and no potential phosphorylation sites or native molecules or both. Cross-linking either the native or the truncated molecules induced IL-2 production even under limiting stimulation conditions of low engagement of the stimulating mAb. Moreover, direct comparison of transfected truncated and native class I MHC molecules expressed on the same cell revealed significant stimulation induced by cross-linking the truncated molecules, despite low expression. In addition, truncated class I MHC molecules were as able to synergize with CD3, CD2, or CD28 initiated IL-2 production as native molecules. In further experiments, hybrid constructs made of the extracellular portion of the murine CD8 alpha chain and of the TM and the intracytoplasmic domains of H-2Kk class I MHC molecule were transfected into Jurkat T cells. The expression of the transfected hybrid molecules was comparable to that of the native HLA-B7 molecules. Cross-linking the intact monomorphic HLA-A,B,C epitope or the polymorphic HLA-B7 epitope induced IL-2 production upon costimulation with PMA. In contrast, cross-linking the hybrid molecules generated neither an increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) nor stimulated IL-2 production. By contrast, cross-linking intact murine class I MHC molecules induced [Ca2+]i, signal and IL-2 production in transfected Jurkat cells. The data therefore indicate that unlike many other signaling molecules, signaling via class I MHC molecules does not involve the cytoplasmic and the TM portions of the molecule, but rather class I MHC signal transduction is likely to be mediated by the extracellular domain of the molecule.

  14. Transduction motif analysis of gastric cancer based on a human signaling network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.; Li, D.Z.; Jiang, C.S.; Wang, W. [Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou, China, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-04-04

    To investigate signal regulation models of gastric cancer, databases and literature were used to construct the signaling network in humans. Topological characteristics of the network were analyzed by CytoScape. After marking gastric cancer-related genes extracted from the CancerResource, GeneRIF, and COSMIC databases, the FANMOD software was used for the mining of gastric cancer-related motifs in a network with three vertices. The significant motif difference method was adopted to identify significantly different motifs in the normal and cancer states. Finally, we conducted a series of analyses of the significantly different motifs, including gene ontology, function annotation of genes, and model classification. A human signaling network was constructed, with 1643 nodes and 5089 regulating interactions. The network was configured to have the characteristics of other biological networks. There were 57,942 motifs marked with gastric cancer-related genes out of a total of 69,492 motifs, and 264 motifs were selected as significantly different motifs by calculating the significant motif difference (SMD) scores. Genes in significantly different motifs were mainly enriched in functions associated with cancer genesis, such as regulation of cell death, amino acid phosphorylation of proteins, and intracellular signaling cascades. The top five significantly different motifs were mainly cascade and positive feedback types. Almost all genes in the five motifs were cancer related, including EPOR, MAPK14, BCL2L1, KRT18, PTPN6, CASP3, TGFBR2, AR, and CASP7. The development of cancer might be curbed by inhibiting signal transductions upstream and downstream of the selected motifs.

  15. A Small G Protein as a Novel Component of the Rice Brassinosteroid Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Song, Xiaoguang; Guo, Hongyan; Wu, Yao; Chen, Xiaoying; Fang, Rongxiang

    2016-09-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a class of steroid hormones that are essential for plant growth and development. The BR signal transduction pathway in the dicot model plant Arabidopsis is well established, but the components connecting the BR signaling steps in rice have not been fully explored. For example, how the BR signaling is fine-tuned in rice, especially at the BR receptor level, is largely unknown. Here we show that OsPRA2, a rice small G protein, plays a repressive role in the BR signaling pathway. Lamina inclination, coleoptile elongation, and root inhibition assays indicated that rice plants with suppressed expression of OsPRA2 were more sensitive to exogenously applied brassinolide than the wild-type plants. Conversely, rice overexpressing OsPRA2 was less sensitive to exogenous brassinolide. Further study uncovered that OsPRA2 inhibited the dephosphorylation of, and thus inactivated the transcription factor BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT 1 (OsBZR1). More importantly, OsPRA2 was found to co-localize with and directly bind to rice BR receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 1 (OsBRI1) at the plasma membrane. Additionally, the in vitro assays showed that OsPRA2 inhibits its autophosphorylation. This OsPRA2-OsBRI1 interaction led to the dissociation of OsBRI1 from its co-receptor OsBAK1, and abolished OsBRI1-mediated phosphorylation of OsBAK1. Together, these results reveal a possible working mechanism of OsPRA2 as a novel negative regulator on OsBRI1 and OsBZR1 and extend the knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of rice BR signaling.

  16. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  17. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling : how complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodkin, Alexey N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Plant, Nick; Mone, Martijn J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Campbell, Moray J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Carlberg, Carsten; Snoep, Jacky L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2010-01-01

    The topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of 'design' aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic models of

  18. Induction of drug metabolism by forskolin: the role of the pregnane X receptor and the protein kinase a signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xunshan; Staudinger, Jeff L

    2005-02-01

    An extract of the plant Coleus forskohlii has been used for centuries in Ayurvedic medicine to treat various diseases such as hypothyroidism, heart disease, and respiratory disorders. Additionally, complex herbal mixtures containing this extract are gaining popularity in United States for their putative "fat-burning" properties. The active ingredient in C. forskohlii extract is the diterpene compound forskolin. Forskolin is a widely used biochemical tool that activates adenyl cyclase, thereby increasing intracellular concentration of cAMP and thus activating the protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathway. We show herein that both forskolin and its nonadenyl cyclase-activating analog 1,9 dideoxyforskolin induce CYP3A gene expression in primary hepatocytes by functioning as agonists of the pregnane X receptor (PXR). We show that activation of PKA signaling potentiates PXR-mediated induction of CYP3A gene expression in cultured hepatocytes and increases the strength of PXR-coactivator protein-protein interaction in cell-based assays. Kinase assays show that PXR can serve as a substrate for catalytically active PKA in vitro. Our data provide important insights into the molecular mechanism of both the PKA-dependent and -independent effects of forskolin on the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes in liver. Finally, our data suggest that herbal therapy with C. forskohlii extract should be approached cautiously due to the potential for herb-drug interactions in patients on combination therapy.

  19. DMPD: Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1916089 Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneuk...ep;5(12):2652-60. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects...tive endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. Authors Raetz

  20. Inquiry into Chemotherapy-Induced P53 Activation in Cancer Cells as a Model for Teaching Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srougi, Melissa C.; Carson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular and extracellular communication is conducted through an intricate and interwoven network of signal transduction pathways. The mechanisms for how cells speak with one another are of significant biological importance to both basic and industrial scientists from a number of different disciplines. We have therefore developed and…

  1. Restoration of autophagy alleviates hepatic ER stress and impaired insulin signalling transduction in high fructose-fed male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Ruo-Qiong; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Zhou, Xiu; Li, Songpei; Jo, Eunjung; Molero, Juan C; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2015-01-01

    High-carbohydrate (mainly fructose) consumption is a major dietary factor for hepatic insulin resistance, involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid accumulation. Because autophagy has been implicated in ER stress, the present study investigated the role of autophagy in high-fructose (HFru) diet-induced hepatic ER stress and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice. The results show that chronic HFru feeding induced glucose intolerance and impaired insulin signaling transduction in the liver, associated with ER stress and the accumulation of lipids. Intriguingly, hepatic autophagy was suppressed as a result of activation of mammalian target of rapamycin. The suppressed autophagy was detected within 6 hours after HFru feeding along with activation of both inositol-requiring enzyme 1 and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase pathways. These events occurred prior to lipid accumulation or lipogenesis and were sufficient to blunt insulin signaling transduction with activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/inhibitory-κB kinase and serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1. The stimulation of autophagy attenuated ER stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase/inhibitory-κB kinase-associated impairment in insulin signaling transduction in a mammalian target of rapamycin -independent manner. Taken together, our data suggest that restoration of autophagy functions disrupted by fructose is able to alleviate ER stress and improve insulin signaling transduction.

  2. HLA-DR molecules enhance signal transduction through the CD3/Ti complex in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in activated human T cells. Here we have studied the effect of DR on CD3-induced signal transduction...

  3. Cloning of a two-component signal transduction system of Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans strain BXPF65

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, JWYF; Maynard, Scott; Goodwin, PH

    1998-01-01

    A putative two-component signal transduction system was amplified and cloned from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans isolate BXPF65. The 620 bp amplified fragment was sequenced and analyzed with the BLAST Enhanced Alignment Utility (BEAUTY). BEAUTY ana...

  4. Comparative analysis of two-component signal transduction systems of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus anthracis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Been, M.W.H.J. de; Francke, C.; Moezelaar, R.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bacillus cereus group are ubiquitously present in the environment and can adapt to a wide range of environmental fluctuations. In bacteria, these adaptive responses are generally mediated by two-component signal transduction systems (TCSs), which consist of a histidine kinase (HK) and

  5. Nitric oxide agents impair insulin-mediated signal transduction in rat skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragoobirsingh Dalip

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence demonstrates that exogenously administered nitric oxide (NO can induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. We have investigated the modulatory effects of two NO donors, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO on the early events in insulin signaling in rat skeletal myocytes. Results Skeletal muscle cells from 6–8 week old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with SNAP or GSNO (25 ng/ml in the presence or absence of glucose (25 mM and insulin (100 nM. Cellular insulin receptor-β levels and tyrosine phosphorylation in IRS-1 were significantly reduced, while serine phosphorylation in IRS-1 was significantly increased in these cells, when compared to the insulin-stimulated control. Reversal to near normal levels was achieved using the NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO. Conclusion These data suggest that NO is a potent modulator of insulin-mediated signal transduction and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Bone marrow X kinase-mediated signal transduction in irradiated vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Tianxiang; Thotala, Dinesh; Geng, Ling; Hallahan, Dennis E; Willey, Christopher D

    2008-04-15

    Radiation-induced activation of the phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase/Akt signal transduction pathway requires Akt binding to phosphatidyl-inositol phosphates (PIP) on the cell membrane. The tyrosine kinase bone marrow X kinase (Bmx) binds to membrane-associated PIPs in a manner similar to Akt. Because Bmx is involved in cell growth and survival pathways, it could contribute to the radiation response within the vascular endothelium. We therefore studied Bmx signaling within the vascular endothelium. Bmx was activated rapidly in response to clinically relevant doses of ionizing radiation. Bmx inhibition enhanced the efficacy of radiotherapy in endothelial cells as well as tumor vascular endothelium in lung cancer tumors in mice. Retroviral shRNA knockdown of Bmx protein enhanced human umbilical vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) radiosensitization. Furthermore, pretreatment of HUVEC with a pharmacologic inhibitor of Bmx, LFM-A13, produced significant radiosensitization of endothelial cells as measured by clonogenic survival analysis and apoptosis as well as functional assays including cell migration and tubule formation. In vivo, LFM-A13, when combined with radiation, resulted in significant tumor microvascular destruction as well as enhanced tumor growth delay. Bmx therefore represents a molecular target for the development of novel radiosensitizing agents.

  7. Small Molecule Inhibition of Ligand-Stimulated RAGE-DIAPH1 Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigrasso, Michaele B.; Pan, Jinhong; Rai, Vivek; Zhang, Jinghua; Reverdatto, Sergey; Quadri, Nosirudeen; DeVita, Robert J.; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Shekhtman, Alexander; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2016-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) binds diverse ligands linked to chronic inflammation and disease. NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallization studies of the extracellular domains of RAGE indicate that RAGE ligands bind by distinct charge- and hydrophobicity-dependent mechanisms. The cytoplasmic tail (ct) of RAGE is essential for RAGE ligand-mediated signal transduction and consequent modulation of gene expression and cellular properties. RAGE signaling requires interaction of ctRAGE with the intracellular effector, mammalian diaphanous 1 or DIAPH1. We screened a library of 58,000 small molecules and identified 13 small molecule competitive inhibitors of ctRAGE interaction with DIAPH1. These compounds, which exhibit in vitro and in vivo inhibition of RAGE-dependent molecular processes, present attractive molecular scaffolds for the development of therapeutics against RAGE-mediated diseases, such as those linked to diabetic complications, Alzheimer’s disease, and chronic inflammation, and provide support for the feasibility of inhibition of protein-protein interaction (PPI). PMID:26936329

  8. Small Molecule Inhibition of Ligand-Stimulated RAGE-DIAPH1 Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manigrasso, Michaele B; Pan, Jinhong; Rai, Vivek; Zhang, Jinghua; Reverdatto, Sergey; Quadri, Nosirudeen; DeVita, Robert J; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Shekhtman, Alexander; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2016-03-03

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) binds diverse ligands linked to chronic inflammation and disease. NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallization studies of the extracellular domains of RAGE indicate that RAGE ligands bind by distinct charge- and hydrophobicity-dependent mechanisms. The cytoplasmic tail (ct) of RAGE is essential for RAGE ligand-mediated signal transduction and consequent modulation of gene expression and cellular properties. RAGE signaling requires interaction of ctRAGE with the intracellular effector, mammalian diaphanous 1 or DIAPH1. We screened a library of 58,000 small molecules and identified 13 small molecule competitive inhibitors of ctRAGE interaction with DIAPH1. These compounds, which exhibit in vitro and in vivo inhibition of RAGE-dependent molecular processes, present attractive molecular scaffolds for the development of therapeutics against RAGE-mediated diseases, such as those linked to diabetic complications, Alzheimer's disease, and chronic inflammation, and provide support for the feasibility of inhibition of protein-protein interaction (PPI).

  9. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  10. Signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. Another graviresponse in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, T.; Saito, Y.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.

    Resistance to the gravitational force is a serious problem that plants have had to solve to survive on land. Mechanical resistance to the pull of gravity is thus a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. Nevertheless, only limited information has been obtained for this gravity response. We have examined the mechanism of gravity-induced mechanical resistance using hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation. As a result, we have clarified the outline of the sequence of events leading to the development of mechanical resistance. The gravity signal may be perceived by mechanoreceptors (mechanosensitive ion channels) on the plasma membrane and it appears that amyloplast sedimentation in statocytes is not involved. Transformation and transduction of the perceived signal may be mediated by the structural or physiological continuum of microtubule-cell membrane-cell wall. As the final step in the development of mechanical resistance, plants construct a tough body by increasing cell wall rigidity. The increase in cell wall rigidity is brought about by modification of the metabolism of certain wall constituents and modification of the cell wall environment, especially pH. We need to clarify the details of each step by future space and ground-based experiments.

  11. Information theory and signal transduction systems: from molecular information processing to network inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Mahon, Siobhan S; Sim, Aaron; Filippi, Sarah; Johnson, Robert; Liepe, Juliane; Smith, Dominic; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2014-11-01

    Sensing and responding to the environment are two essential functions that all biological organisms need to master for survival and successful reproduction. Developmental processes are marshalled by a diverse set of signalling and control systems, ranging from systems with simple chemical inputs and outputs to complex molecular and cellular networks with non-linear dynamics. Information theory provides a powerful and convenient framework in which such systems can be studied; but it also provides the means to reconstruct the structure and dynamics of molecular interaction networks underlying physiological and developmental processes. Here we supply a brief description of its basic concepts and introduce some useful tools for systems and developmental biologists. Along with a brief but thorough theoretical primer, we demonstrate the wide applicability and biological application-specific nuances by way of different illustrative vignettes. In particular, we focus on the characterisation of biological information processing efficiency, examining cell-fate decision making processes, gene regulatory network reconstruction, and efficient signal transduction experimental design.

  12. Intracellular calcium during signal transduction in the lymphocyte is altered by ELF magnetic and electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liburdy, R.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-02-26

    Research has shown that ELF magnetic and electric fields alter calcium transport in rat thymic T-lymphocytes during signal transduction initiated by mitogen. Interestingly activated T-lymphocytes display a nonlinear dose-response for this basic field interaction which scales with the induced electric field in contrast to the applied magnetic field. Specialized multiring annular well cell culture plates based on Faraday's Law of Current Induction were used to demonstrate that the electric field associated with the magnetic field is the exposure metric of biological interest. The first real-time measurements of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} were recently presented and (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} was shown to be altered by sinusoidal 60 Hz electric fields; magnetic fields that induced comparable electric fields yielded similar alterations in (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}. The author now presents evidence that both parameters, (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} and calcium transport, are altered by ELF fields during calcium signaling in thymocytes and scale with the induced electric field. In addition, (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} studies have been conducted that provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that the mitogen-gated calcium channel present in the plasma cell membrane represents a specific site of interaction for ELF fields.

  13. Converting mid-infrared signals to near-infrared through optomechanical transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsalis, A.; Mesaritakis, C.; Bogris, A.; Syvridis, D.

    2015-01-01

    Mid-infrared silicon photonics emerge as the dominant technology to bridge photonics and electronics in multifunctional high-speed integrated chips. The transmission and processing of optical signals lying at the mid-infrared wavelength region is ideal for sensing, absorption-spectroscopy and free-space communications and the use of group IV materials becomes principally promising as the vehicle towards their realization. In parallel, optical forces originating from modes and cavities can reach to outstandingly large values when sizes drop into the nanoscale. In this work, we propose the exploitation of large gradient optical forces generated between suspended silicon beams and optomechanical transduction as a means of converting signals from the mid-infrared to the near-infrared region. A midinfrared signal is injected into the waveguide system so as to excite the fundamental symmetric mode. In the 2-5μm wavelength range, separation gaps in the 100nm order and waveguide widths ranging from 300-600nm, the mode is mostly guided in the air slot between the waveguides which maximizes the optomechanical coupling coefficient and optical force. The resulting attractive force deflects the waveguides and the deflection is linearly dependent on the midinfrared optical power. A simple read-out technique using 1.55μm signals with conventional waveguiding in the directional coupler formed by the two beams is analyzed. A positive conversion efficiency (index unconventional guiding in mid-infrared could be a key component towards multifunctional lab-on-a-chip devices.

  14. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport: a design principles study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish Shankaran

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor-ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation.

  15. Signal Transduction in Primary Human T Lymphocytes in Altered Gravity During Parabolic Flight and Clinostat Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svantje Tauber

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Several limiting factors for human health and performance in microgravity have been clearly identified arising from the immune system, and substantial research activities are required in order to provide the basic information for appropriate integrated risk management. The gravity-sensitive nature of cells of the immune system renders them an ideal biological model in search for general gravity-sensitive mechanisms and to understand how the architecture and function of human cells is related to the gravitational force and therefore adapted to life on Earth. Methods: We investigated the influence of altered gravity in parabolic flight and 2D clinostat experiments on key proteins of activation and signaling in primary T lymphocytes. We quantified components of the signaling cascade 1. in non-activated T lymphocytes to assess the “basal status” of the cascade and 2. in the process of activation to assess the signal transduction. Results: We found a rapid decrease of CD3 and IL-2R surface expression and reduced p-LAT after 20 seconds of altered gravity in non-activated primary T lymphocytes during parabolic flight. Furthermore, we observed decreased CD3 surface expression, reduced ZAP-70 abundance and increased histone H3-acetylation in activated T lymphocytes after 5 minutes of clinorotation and a transient downregulation of CD3 and stable downregulation of IL-2R during 60 minutes of clinorotation. Conclusion: CD3 and IL-2R are downregulated in primary T lymphocytes in altered gravity. We assume that a gravity condition around 1g is required for the expression of key surface receptors and appropriate regulation of signal molecules in T lymphocytes.

  16. Signal transduction in Plasmodium-Red Blood Cells interactions and in cytoadherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura N. Cruz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is responsible for more than 1.5 million deaths each year, especially among children (Snow et al. 2005. Despite of the severity of malaria situation and great effort to the development of new drug targets (Yuan et al. 2011 there is still a relative low investment toward antimalarial drugs. Briefly there are targets classes of antimalarial drugs currently being tested including: kinases, proteases, ion channel of GPCR, nuclear receptor, among others (Gamo et al. 2010. Here we review malaria signal transduction pathways in Red Blood Cells (RBC as well as infected RBCs and endothelial cells interactions, namely cytoadherence. The last process is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of severe malaria. The molecules displayed on the surface of both infected erythrocytes (IE and vascular endothelial cells (EC exert themselves as important mediators in cytoadherence, in that they not only induce structural and metabolic changes on both sides, but also trigger multiple signal transduction processes, leading to alteration of gene expression, with the balance between positive and negative regulation determining endothelial pathology during a malaria infection.A Malária é responsavel por mais de 1.5 milhões de mortes anualmente, especialmente entre crianças (Snow et al. 2005. Apesar da gravidade da situação e grande esforço para o desenvolvimento de novas drogas (Yuan et al. 2011, os investimentos em drogas antimaláricas ainda é relativamente baixo. Brevemente, os alvos antimaláricos atualmente testados incluem: quinases, proteases, canais iônicos para GPCR, receptores nucleares entre outros (Gamo et al. 2010. No presente trabalho nós revisamos as vias de transdução de sinal em eritrócitos assim como eritrócitos infectados e interações com células endoteliais, denominada citoaderência. Este processo é conhecido por sua importante função na patogenicidade da malária severa. As moléculas expressas na superf

  17. Regulation of Early Steps of GPVI Signal Transduction by Phosphatases: A Systems Biology Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne L Dunster

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a data-driven mathematical model of a key initiating step in platelet activation, a central process in the prevention of bleeding following Injury. In vascular disease, this process is activated inappropriately and causes thrombosis, heart attacks and stroke. The collagen receptor GPVI is the primary trigger for platelet activation at sites of injury. Understanding the complex molecular mechanisms initiated by this receptor is important for development of more effective antithrombotic medicines. In this work we developed a series of nonlinear ordinary differential equation models that are direct representations of biological hypotheses surrounding the initial steps in GPVI-stimulated signal transduction. At each stage model simulations were compared to our own quantitative, high-temporal experimental data that guides further experimental design, data collection and model refinement. Much is known about the linear forward reactions within platelet signalling pathways but knowledge of the roles of putative reverse reactions are poorly understood. An initial model, that includes a simple constitutively active phosphatase, was unable to explain experimental data. Model revisions, incorporating a complex pathway of interactions (and specifically the phosphatase TULA-2, provided a good description of the experimental data both based on observations of phosphorylation in samples from one donor and in those of a wider population. Our model was used to investigate the levels of proteins involved in regulating the pathway and the effect of low GPVI levels that have been associated with disease. Results indicate a clear separation in healthy and GPVI deficient states in respect of the signalling cascade dynamics associated with Syk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Our approach reveals the central importance of this negative feedback pathway that results in the temporal regulation of a specific class of protein tyrosine phosphatases in

  18. A cytosolic juxtamembrane interface modulates plexin A3 oligomerization and signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Barton

    Full Text Available Plexins (plxns are transmembrane (TM receptors involved in the guidance of vascular, lymphatic vessel, and neuron growth as well as cancer metastasis. Plxn signaling results in cytosolic GTPase-activating protein activity, and previous research implicates dimerization as important for activation of plxn signaling. Purified, soluble plxn extracellular and cytosolic domains exhibit only weak homomeric interactions, suggesting a role for the plxn TM and juxtamembrane regions in homooligomerization. In this study, we consider a heptad repeat in the Danio rerio PlxnA3 cytosolic juxtamembrane domain (JM for its ability to influence PlxnA3 homooligomerization in TM-domain containing constructs. Site-directed mutagenesis in conjunction with the AraTM assay and bioluminescent energy transfer (BRET² suggest an interface involving a JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, regulates PlxnA3 homomeric interactions when examined in constructs containing an ectodomain, TM and JM domain. In the presence of a neuropilin-2a co-receptor and semaphorin 3F ligand, disruption to PlxnA3 homodimerization caused by an M1281F mutation is eliminated, suggesting destabilization of the PlxnA3 homodimer in the JM is not sufficient to disrupt co-receptor complex formation. In contrast, enhanced homodimerization of PlxnA3 caused by mutation M1281L remains even in the presence of ligand semaphorin 3F and co-receptor neuropilin-2a. Consistent with this pattern of PlxnA3 dimerization in the presence of ligand and co-receptor, destabilizing mutations to PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281F are able to rescue motor patterning defects in sidetracked zebrafish embryos, whereas mutations that enhance PlxnA3 homodimerization (M1281L are not. Collectively, our results indicate the JM heptad repeat, in particular residue M1281, forms a switchable interface that modulates both PlxnA3 homomeric interactions and signal transduction.

  19. Pheromone signal transduction in humans: what can be learned from olfactory loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivanka; Hedén-Blomqvist, Ebba; Berglund, Hans

    2009-09-01

    Because humans seem to lack neuronal elements in the vomeronasal organ (VNO), many scientists believe that humans are unable to detect pheromones. This view is challenged by the observations that pheromone-like compounds, 4,16-androstadien-3-one (AND) and oestra-1,3,5(10),16-tetraen-3-ol (EST), activate the human hypothalamus. Whether these activations are mediated via VNO, venous blood or olfactory mucosa is presently unknown. To disentangle between the three alternatives, we conducted activation studies in 12 heterosexual males with chronic anosmia because of nasal polyps. Polyposis hampers signal transduction via the olfactory mucosa without interfering with the VNO or the pheromone transport via venous blood. Twelve healthy men served as controls. Subjects were investigated with (15)O-H(2)O PET during smelling of odorless air (base line), AND, EST, vanillin, and acetone. Smelling of EST activated the anterior hypothalamus in controls, but not anosmics. Neither did the anosmics display cerebral activations with AND or vanillin. Clusters were detected only with the trigeminal odorant acetone, and only in the thalamus, brainstem, the anterior cingulate, and parts of the sensorimotor cortex. Direct comparisons with controls (controls-anosmics) showed clusters in the olfactory cortex (amygdala and piriform cortex) with AND, vanillin, and acetone, and in the anterior hypothalamus with EST. The observed absence of olfactory and presence of trigeminal activations in anosmics indicates that polyposis primarily affected signal processing via the olfactory mucosa. The anosmics inability to activate the hypothalamus with EST, therefore, suggests that in healthy men EST signals were primarily transmitted via the olfactory system.

  20. Ubiquitin-Related Roles of β-Arrestins in Endocytic Trafficking and Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Rajiv, Vishwaesh; Shenoy, Sudha K

    2016-10-01

    The non-visual arrestins, β-arrestin1, and β-arrestin2 were originally identified as proteins that bind to seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs, also called G protein-coupled receptors, GPCRs) and block heterotrimeric G protein activation, thus leading to desensitization of transmembrane signaling. However, as subsequent discoveries have continually demonstrated, their functionality is not constrained to desensitization. They are now recognized for their critical roles in mediating intracellular trafficking of 7TMRs, growth factor receptors, ion transporters, ion channels, nuclear receptors, and non-receptor proteins. Additionally, they function as crucial mediators of ubiquitination of 7TMRs as well as other receptors and non-receptor proteins. Recently, emerging studies suggest that a class of proteins with predicted structural features of β-arrestins regulate substrate ubiquitination in yeast and higher mammals, lending support to the idea that the adaptor role of β-arrestins in protein ubiquitination is evolutionarily conserved. β-arrestins also function as scaffolds for kinases and transduce signals from 7TMRs through pathways that do not require G protein activation. Remarkably, the endocytic and scaffolding functions of β-arrestin are intertwined with its ubiquitination status; the dynamic and site specific ubiquitination on β-arrestin plays a critical role in stabilizing β-arrestin-7TMR association and the formation of signalosomes. This review summarizes the current findings on ubiquitin-dependent regulation of 7TMRs as well as β-arrestins and the potential role of reversible ubiquitination as a "biological switch" in signal transduction. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2071-2080, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Estrogen Stimulates Proliferation and Differentiation of Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells through Different Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Okada

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study indicated that both 17β-estradiol (E2, known to be an endogenous estrogen, and bisphenol A (BPA, known to be a xenoestrogen, could positively influence the proliferation or differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs. The aim of the present study was to identify the signal transduction pathways for estrogenic activities promoting proliferation and differentiation of NS/PCs via well known nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs or putative membrane-associated ERs. NS/PCs were cultured from the telencephalon of 15-day-old rat embryos. In order to confirm the involvement of nuclear ERs for estrogenic activities, their specific antagonist, ICI-182,780, was used. The presence of putative membrane-associated ER was functionally examined as to whether E2 can activate rapid intracellular signaling mechanism. In order to confirm the involvement of membrane-associated ERs for estrogenic activities, a cell-impermeable E2, bovine serum albumin-conjugated E2 (E2-BSA was used. We showed that E2 could rapidly activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK 1/2, which was not inhibited by ICI-182,780. ICI-182,780 abrogated the stimulatory effect of these estrogens (E2 and BPA on the proliferation of NS/PCs, but not their effect on the differentiation of the NS/PCs into oligodendroglia. Furthermore, E2-BSA mimicked the activity of differentiation from NS/PCs into oligodendroglia, but not the activity of proliferation. Our study suggests that (1 the estrogen induced proliferation of NS/PCs is mediated via nuclear ERs; (2 the oligodendroglial generation from NS/PCs is likely to be stimulated via putative membrane‑associated ERs.

  2. The allosteric behavior of Fur mediates oxidative stress signal transduction in Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePelliciari

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is exposed to oxidative stress originating from the aerobic environment, the oxidative burst of phagocytes and the formation of reactive oxygen species, catalyzed by iron excess. Accordingly, the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress defense have been repeatedly linked to the ferric uptake regulator Fur. Moreover, mutations in the Fur protein affect the resistance to metronidazole, likely due to loss-of-function in the regulation of genes involved in redox control. Although many advances in the molecular understanding of HpFur function were made, little is known about the mechanisms that enable Fur to mediate the responses to oxidative stress.Here we show that iron-inducible, apo-Fur repressed genes, such as pfr and hydA, are induced shortly after oxidative stress, while their oxidative induction is lost in a fur knockout strain. On the contrary, holo-Fur repressed genes, such as frpB1 and fecA1, vary modestly in response to oxidative stress. This indicates that the oxidative stress signal specifically targets apo-Fur repressed genes, rather than impairing indiscriminately the regulatory function of Fur. Footprinting analyses showed that the oxidative signal strongly impairs the binding affinity of Fur towards apo-operators, while the binding towards holo-operators is less affected. Further evidence is presented that a reduced state of Fur is needed to maintain apo-repression, while oxidative conditions shift the preferred binding architecture of Fur towards the holo-operator binding conformation, even in the absence of iron. Together the results demonstrate that the allosteric regulation of Fur enables transduction of oxidative stress signals in H. pylori, supporting the concept that apo-Fur repressed genes can be considered oxidation inducible Fur regulatory targets. These findings may have important implications in the study of H. pylori treatment and resistance to

  3. Signal transduction induced in Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes during the invasion of mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yoshida

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into mammalian cells depends on the activation of the parasite's protein tyrosine kinase and on the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. We used metacyclic trypomastigotes, the T. cruzi developmental forms that initiate infection in mammalian hosts, to investigate the association of these two events and to identify the various components of the parasite signal transduction pathway involved in host cell invasion. We have found that i both the protein tyrosine kinase activation, as measured by phosphorylation of a 175-kDa protein (p175, and Ca2+ mobilization were induced in the metacyclic forms by the HeLa cell extract but not by the extract of T. cruzi-resistant K562 cells; ii treatment of parasites with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein blocked both p175 phosphorylation and the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration; iii the recombinant protein J18, which contains the full-length sequence of gp82, a metacyclic stage surface glycoprotein involved in target cell invasion, interfered with tyrosine kinase and Ca2+ responses, whereas the monoclonal antibody 3F6 directed at gp82 induced parasite p175 phosphorylation and Ca2+ mobilization; iv treatment of metacyclic forms with phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 blocked Ca2+ signaling and impaired the ability of the parasites to enter HeLa cells, and v drugs such as heparin, a competitive IP3-receptor blocker, caffeine, which affects Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive stores, in addition to thapsigargin, which depletes intracellular Ca2+ compartments and lithium ion, reduced the parasite infectivity. Taken together, these data suggest that protein tyrosine kinase, phospholipase C and IP3 are involved in the signaling cascade that is initiated on the parasite cell surface by gp82 and leads to Ca2+ mobilization required for target cell invasion.

  4. Signaling transcript profile of the asexual intraerythrocytic development cycle of Plasmodium falciparum induced by melatonin and cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Andrei; Parreira, Kleber S.; Moraes, Miriam S.; Martins, David C.; Hashimoto, Ronaldo F.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Garcia, Célia R.S.

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Plasmodium falciparum is the deadliest parasite among all species. This parasite possesses the ability to sense molecules, including melatonin (MEL) and cAMP, and modulate its cell cycle accordingly. MEL synchronizes the development of this malaria parasite by activating several cascades, including the generation of the second messenger cAMP. Therefore, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis in P. falciparum erythrocytic stages (ring, trophozoite and schizont) treated with MEL and cAMP. To investigate the expression profile of P. falciparum genes regulated by MEL and cAMP, we performed RNA-Seq analysis in three P. falciparum strains (control, 3D7; protein kinase 7 knockout, PfPK7-; and PfPK7 complement, PfPK7C). In the 3D7 strain, 38 genes were differentially expressed upon MEL treatment; however, none of the genes in the trophozoite (T) stage PfPK7- knockout parasites were differentially expressed upon MEL treatment for 5 hours compared to untreated controls, suggesting that PfPK7 may be involved in the signaling leading to differential gene expression. Moreover, we found that MEL modified the mRNA expression of genes encoding membrane proteins, zinc ion-binding proteins and nucleic acid-binding proteins, which might influence numerous functions in the parasite. The RNA-Seq data following treatment with cAMP show that this molecule modulates different genes throughout the intraerythrocytic cycle, namely, 75, 101 and 141 genes, respectively, in the ring (R), T and schizont (S) stages. Our results highlight P. falciparum's perception of the external milieu through the signaling molecules MEL and cAMP, which are able to drive to changes in gene expression in the parasite. PMID:28050233

  5. Signal transduction mechanisms within the entorhinal cortex that support latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael C; Gould, Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Latent inhibition is a phenomenon by which pre-exposure to a conditioned-stimulus (CS), prior to subsequent pairings of that same CS with an unconditioned-stimulus (US), results in decreased conditioned responding to the CS. Previous work in our laboratory has suggested that the entorhinal cortex is critically involved in the establishment of latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Furthermore, utilizing systemic pharmacology, we have demonstrated a role for of NMDA receptors, protein kinase A (PKA), and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK, also known as ERK) in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning, but until now, where these cell signaling cascades are critically activated during latent inhibition of cued fear was unknown. Here, we use direct drug infusion to demonstrate that cell signaling via NMDA receptors, the cAMP/PKA pathway, and the MAPK pathway within the entorhinal cortex are critically involved in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. In the present study, CS pre-exposed mice received 20 CS pre-exposures 24h prior to two pairings of the same CS with a 0.53 mA foot shock US, while control animals receive no pre-exposure to the CS. The NMDA antagonist APV (0.25 or 2.5 microg/side), the cAMP inhibitor Rp-cAMP (1.8 or 18.0 microg/side), or the MAPK inhibitor U0126 (0.1 or 1.0 microg/side) were directly infused into the entorhinal cortex prior to pre-exposure. All three drugs produced dose-dependent disruptions in latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning. Importantly, none of the drugs had any effect on cued fear conditioning when administered on training day, suggesting that the effects of each of the drugs were specific to CS pre-exposure. These results are discussed in relation to the potential mechanisms of plasticity that support latent inhibition of cued fear conditioning.

  6. Involvement of the Cpx signal transduction pathway of E. coli in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorel, C; Vidal, O; Prigent-Combaret, C; Vallet, I; Lejeune, P

    1999-09-01

    In a genetic screening directed to identify genes involved in biofilm formation, mutations in the cpxA gene were found to reduce biofilm formation by affecting microbial adherence to solid surfaces. This effect was detected in Escherichia coli K12 as well as in E. coli strains isolated from patients with catheter-related bacteremia. We show that the negative effect of the cpxA mutation on biofilm formation results from a decreased transcription of the curlin encoding csgA gene. The effect of the cpxA mutation could not be observed in cpxR- mutants, suggesting that they affect the same regulatory pathway. The cpxA101 mutation abolishes cpxA phosphatase activity and results in the accumulation of phosphorylated CpxR. Features of the strain carrying the cpxA101 mutation are a reduced ability to form biofilm and low levels of csgA transcription. Our results indicate that the cpxA gene increases the levels of csgA transcription by dephosphorylation of CpxR, which acts as a negative regulator at csgA. Thus, we propose the existence of a new signal transduction pathway involved in the adherence process in addition to the EnvZ-OmpR two-component system.

  7. Remodeling the clock: coactivators and signal transduction in the circadian clockworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Frank

    2009-03-01

    Most organisms on earth such as cyanobacteria, fungi, plants, insects, animals, and humans synchronize their physiological and behavioral activities with the environmental cycles of day and night. Significant progress has been made in unraveling the genetic components that constitute a molecular circadian clock, which facilitates the temporal control of physiology and behavior. Clock genes assemble interlocked transcriptional/translational feedback loops that underlie the circadian oscillations. Recent investigations revealed that posttranslational regulation of clock proteins is crucial for functioning of the molecular oscillator and for precise temporal control of circadian transcription. This review provides an overview of the homologous clockworks in Drosophila and mammals, with a special focus on recent insights in the posttranslational regulation of clock proteins as well as the role of coactivators, repressors, and signal transduction for circadian controlled genome-wide transcription. The emerging mechanisms of clock gene regulation provide an understanding of the temporal control of transcription in general and the circadian orchestration of physiology and behavior in particular.

  8. Mouse hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin responses to probes of signal transduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1993-01-01

    Signal transduction mechanisms involved in mouse growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH) release were investigated using an in vitro perifusion system. Hypothalamic fragments were exposed to depolarizing agents, protein kinase A and C activators, and a calcium ionophore. The depolarizing agents, KCl (60 mM) and veratridine (50 microM), induced similar patterns of GRH and SRIH release. Somatostatin release in response to both agents was twofold greater than that of GRH. Forskolin (10 microM and 100 microM), an adenylate cyclase activator, stimulated both GRH and SRIH release, though with different secretory profiles. The SRIH response was prolonged and persisted beyond removal of the drug from the system, while the GRH response was brief, ending even prior to forskolin removal. Neither GRH nor SRIH were stimulated by 1,9-dideoxy-forskolin (100 microM), a forskolin analog with cAMP-independent actions. A23187 (5 microM), a calcium ionophore, stimulated the release of SRIH to a much greater extent than that of GRH. The GRH and SRIH secretory responses to PMA (1 microM), a protein kinase C activator, were similar, though delayed. The results suggest that 1) GRH and SRIH secretion are regulated by both protein kinase A and C pathways, and 2) depolarizing agents are important for the release of both hormones.

  9. Short- and long-term memory: differential involvement of neurotransmitter systems and signal transduction cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÔNICA R.M. VIANNA

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Since William James (1890 first distinguished primary from secondary memory, equivalent to short- and long-term memory, respectively, it has been assumed that short-term memory processes are in charge of cognition while long-term memory is being consolidated. From those days a major question has been whether short-term memory is merely a initial phase of long-term memory, or a separate phenomena. Recent experiments have shown that many treatments with specific molecular actions given into the hippocampus and related brain areas after one-trial avoidance learning can effectively cancel short-term memory without affecting long-term memory formation. This shows that short-term memory and long-term memory involve separate mechanisms and are independently processed. Other treatments, however, influence both memory types similarly, suggesting links between both at the receptor and at the post-receptor level, which should not be surprising as they both deal with nearly the same sensorimotor representations. This review examines recent advances in short- and long-term memory mechanisms based on the effect of intra-hippocampal infusion of drugs acting upon neurotransmitter and signal transduction systems on both memory types.

  10. The condensed chromatin fiber: an allosteric chemo-mechanical machine for signal transduction and genome processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesne, Annick; Bécavin, Christophe; Victor, Jean–Marc

    2012-02-01

    Allostery is a key concept of molecular biology which refers to the control of an enzyme activity by an effector molecule binding the enzyme at another site rather than the active site (allos = other in Greek). We revisit here allostery in the context of chromatin and argue that allosteric principles underlie and explain the functional architecture required for spacetime coordination of gene expression at all scales from DNA to the whole chromosome. We further suggest that this functional architecture is provided by the chromatin fiber itself. The structural, mechanical and topological features of the chromatin fiber endow chromosomes with a tunable signal transduction from specific (or nonspecific) effectors to specific (or nonspecific) active sites. Mechanical constraints can travel along the fiber all the better since the fiber is more compact and regular, which speaks in favor of the actual existence of the (so-called 30 nm) chromatin fiber. Chromatin fiber allostery reconciles both the physical and biochemical approaches of chromatin. We illustrate this view with two supporting specific examples. Moreover, from a methodological point of view, we suggest that the notion of chromatin fiber allostery is particularly relevant for systemic approaches. Finally we discuss the evolutionary power of allostery in the context of chromatin and its relation to modularity.

  11. Comprehensive characterization of genes associated with the TP53 signal transduction pathway in various tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnami, Shumpei; Ohshima, Keiichi; Nagashima, Takeshi; Urakami, Kenichi; Shimoda, Yuji; Saito, Junko; Naruoka, Akane; Hatakeyama, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Tohru; Serizawa, Masakuni; Ohnami, Sumiko; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2017-03-03

    The TP53 signal transduction pathway is an attractive target for cancer treatments. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 907 patients with cancer in Japan to identify genomic alterations in the TP53 pathway. TP53 mutations were frequently detected in many cancers, except melanoma, thymic tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and renal cancers. The frequencies of non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the TP53 family members TP63 and TP73 were relatively low, although genes with increased frequencies of SNVs were as follows: PTEN (11.7%) in breast cancer, CDKN2A (11.1 and 9.6%) in pancreas and head and neck cancers, and ATM (18.0 and 11.1%) in liver and esophageal cancers. MDM2 expression was decreased or increased in patients with mutant or wild-type TP53, respectively. CDKN1A expression was increased with mutant TP53 in head and neck cancers. Moreover, TP63 overexpression was characteristically observed in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, esophagus, and head and neck region. Additionally, overexpression of TP63 and TP73 was frequently observed in thymomas. Our results reveal a spectrum of genomic alterations in the TP53 pathway that is characteristic of many tumor types, and these data may be useful in the trials of targeted therapies.

  12. Functional characterization of WalRK: A two-component signal transduction system from Bacillus anthracis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisha Dhiman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems (TCS, consisting of a sensor histidine protein kinase and its cognate response regulator, are an important mode of environmental sensing in bacteria. Additionally, they have been found to regulate virulence determinants in several pathogens. Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a bioterrorism agent, harbours 41 pairs of TCS. However, their role in its pathogenicity has remained largely unexplored. Here, we show that WalRK of B. anthracis forms a functional TCS which exhibits some species-specific functions. Biochemical studies showed that domain variants of WalK, the histidine kinase, exhibit classical properties of autophosphorylation and phosphotransfer to its cognate response regulator WalR. Interestingly, these domain variants also show phosphatase activity towards phosphorylated WalR, thereby making WalK a bifunctional histidine kinase/phosphatase. An in silico regulon determination approach, using a consensus binding sequence from Bacillus subtilis, provided a list of 30 genes that could form a putative WalR regulon in B. anthracis. Further, electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to show direct binding of purified WalR to the upstream regions of three putative regulon candidates, an S-layer protein EA1, a cell division ABC transporter FtsE and a sporulation histidine kinase KinB3. Our work lends insight into the species-specific functions and mode of action of B. anthracis WalRK.

  13. Involvement of nitric oxide in the signal transduction of salicylic acid regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The effects and the relationship between salicylic acid (SA) and nitric oxide (NO) on Vicia faba L. stomatal movement were studied. The results here showed that exogenous SA and NO induced stomatal closure, 100 μmol/L SA induced a rapid and striking NO increase in the cytosol of guard cells. This phenomenon was largely pre-vented by 200 μmol/L 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimida-zoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO), a specific NO scavenger, and 25 μmol/L NG-nitro-L-Arg-methyl eater (L-NAME), an in-hibitor of NO synthase (NOS) in mammalian cells that also inhibits plant NOS. In addition, SA-induced stomatal closure was largely prevented by PTIO and L-NAME. These results provide evidence that guard cells generate NO in response to SA via NOS-like activity, and that such NO production is required for full stomatal closure in response to SA. H-(1,2,4)-oxadiazole-[4,3-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, and nicotinamide, an antago-nist of cADPR production, inhibited the effects of SA- and NO-induced stomatal closure. It suggests that both cGMP and cADPR might mediate the signal transduction of SA and NO-induced stomatal closure.

  14. Development of automated high throughput single molecular microfluidic detection platform for signal transduction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung; Baghbani Kordmahale, Sina; Chou, Chao-Kai; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Hung, Mien-Chie; Kameoka, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Signal transductions including multiple protein post-translational modifications (PTM), protein-protein interactions (PPI), and protein-nucleic acid interaction (PNI) play critical roles for cell proliferation and differentiation that are directly related to the cancer biology. Traditional methods, like mass spectrometry, immunoprecipitation, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy require a large amount of sample and long processing time. "microchannel for multiple-parameter analysis of proteins in single-complex (mMAPS)"we proposed can reduce the process time and sample volume because this system is composed by microfluidic channels, fluorescence microscopy, and computerized data analysis. In this paper, we will present an automated mMAPS including integrated microfluidic device, automated stage and electrical relay for high-throughput clinical screening. Based on this result, we estimated that this automated detection system will be able to screen approximately 150 patient samples in a 24-hour period, providing a practical application to analyze tissue samples in a clinical setting.

  15. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase signal transduction in mecobalamin-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, S; Watanabe, M; Ikeda, H; Kamada, H; Saito, T; Ohshika, H

    1995-11-30

    This study examined alterations in the beta-adrenoceptor-G5-adenylyl cyclase system in cerebral cortex membranes from vitamin B12-deficient rats fed a diet lacking vitamin B12 (mecobalamin) for 15 weeks. Basal, 5(7)-guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp)-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities were significantly reduced in mecobalamin-deficient rats compared with those in control rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the amount and function of G5- estimated by immunoblotting and guanine nucleotide photoaffinity labeling, respectively, or in the densities and the dissociation constants of beta-adrenoceptors, estimated by [125I] pindolol binding, between control and the deficient rats. These results indicate that vitamin B12 deficiency results in the impairment of the coupling among the beta-adrenoceptor, G5- and the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase, and in dysfunction of the catalytic subunit of the enzyme, suggesting that vitamin B12 participates in the regulation of neuronal adenylyl cyclase signal transduction.

  16. Effects of a Caenorhabditis elegans dauer pheromone ascaroside on physiology and signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Marco; Riddle, Donald L

    2009-02-01

    Daumone is one of the three purified and artificially synthesized components of the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer pheromone. It affects the major signal transduction pathways known to discriminate between developmental arrest at the dauer stage and growth to the adult [the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and daf-2/IGF1R pathways], just as natural pheromone extracts do. Transcription of daf-7/TGF-beta is reduced in pre-dauer larvae, and nuclear localization of the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor is increased in embryos and L1 larvae exposed to synthetic daumone. However, daumone does not require the cilia in the amphidial neurons to produce these effects nor does it require the Galpha protein GPA-3 to induce dauer entry, although GPA-3 is required for dauer induction by natural dauer pheromone extracts. Synthetic daumone has physiological effects that have not been observed with natural pheromone. It is toxic at the concentrations required for bioassay and is lethal to mutants with defective cuticles. The molecular and physiological effects of daumone and natural dauer pheromone are only partially overlapping.

  17. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmin, Thomas; Soto, Cinque S; Clinthorne, Graham; DeGrado, William F; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM) domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  18. Assembly of the transmembrane domain of E. coli PhoQ histidine kinase: implications for signal transduction from molecular simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lemmin

    Full Text Available The PhoQP two-component system is a signaling complex essential for bacterial virulence and cationic antimicrobial peptide resistance. PhoQ is the histidine kinase chemoreceptor of this tandem machine and assembles in a homodimer conformation spanning the bacterial inner membrane. Currently, a full understanding of the PhoQ signal transduction is hindered by the lack of a complete atomistic structure. In this study, an atomistic model of the key transmembrane (TM domain is assembled by using molecular simulations, guided by experimental cross-linking data. The formation of a polar pocket involving Asn202 in the lumen of the tetrameric TM bundle is crucial for the assembly and solvation of the domain. Moreover, a concerted displacement of the TM helices at the periplasmic side is found to modulate a rotation at the cytoplasmic end, supporting the transduction of the chemical signal through a combination of scissoring and rotational movement of the TM helices.

  19. Topological peculiarities of mammalian networks with different functionalities: transcription, signal transduction and metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Goemann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have comparatively investigated three different mammalian networks - on transcription, signal transduction and metabolic processes - with respect to their common and individual topological traits. The networks have been constructed based on genome- wide data collected from human, mouse and rat. None of these three networks exhibits a pure power-law degree distribution and, therefore, could be considered scalefree. Rather, the degree distributions of all three networks were best fitted by mixed models of a power law with an exponential tail. The networks differ from one another in the quantitative parameters of the models. Moreover, the transcription network can also be very well approximated by an exponential law. The connectivity within each network is rather robust, as is seen when removing individual nodes and computing the values of their pairwise disconnectivity index (PDI, which characterizes the topological significance of each node v by the number of direct or indirect connections in the network that critically depend on the presence of v. The results evidence that the networks are not centralized: none of nodes globally controls the integrity of each network. Just a few vertices appeared to strongly affect the coherence of the networks. These nodes are characterized by a broad range of degrees, thereby indicating that the degree alone is not the decisive criteria of a node's importance. The networks reveal distinct architectures: The transcriptional network exhibits a hierarchical modularity, whereas the signaling network is mainly comprised of semi-autonomous modules. The metabolic network seems to be made by a more complex mixture of substructures. Thus, despite being encoded by the same genomes, the networks significantly differ from one another in their general architectural design. Altogether, our results indicate that the subsets of genes and relationships that constitute these networks have co-evolved very differently and

  20. Signal transduction pathways regulating cyclooxygenase-2 expression: potential molecular targets for chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Kyung-Soo; Surh, Young-Joon

    2004-09-15

    Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been reported to be elevated in human colorectal adenocarcinoma and other tumors, including those of breast, cervical, prostate, and lung. Genetic knock-out or pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 has been shown to protect against experimentally-induced carcinogenesis. Results from epidemiological and laboratory studies indicate that regular intake of selective COX-2 inhibitors reduces the risk of several forms of human malignancies. Thus, it is conceivable that targeted inhibition of abnormally or improperly elevated COX-2 provides one of the most effective and promising strategies for cancer chemoprevention. The COX-2 promoter contains a TATA box and binding sites for several transcription factors including nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), nuclear factor for interleukin-6/CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (NF-IL6/C/EBP) and cyclic AMP response element (CRE) binding protein. Upregulation of COX-2 is mediated by a variety of stimuli including tumor promoters, oncogenes, and growth factors. Stimulation of either protein kinase C (PKC) or Ras signaling enhances mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, which, in turn, activates transcription of cox-2. Celecoxib, the first US FDA approved selective COX-2 inhibitor, initially developed for the treatment of adult rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, has been reported to reduce the formation of polyps in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. This COX-2 specific inhibitor also protects against experimentally-induced carcinogenesis, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The present review covers the signal transduction pathways responsible for regulating COX-2 expression as novel molecular targets of chemopreventive agents with celecoxib as a specific example.

  1. Microgravity-induced alterations in signal transduction in cells of the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Katrin; Thiel, Cora; Timm, Johanna; Schmidt, Peter M.; Huber, Kathrin; Tauber, Svantje; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Seibt, Dieter; Kroll, Hartmut; Grote, Karl-Heinrich; Zipp, Frauke; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Cogoli, Augusto; Hilliger, Andre; Engelmann, Frank; Ullrich, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Since decades it is known that the activity of cells of the immune system is severely dysregulated in microgravity, however, the underlying molecular aspects have not been elucidated yet. The identification of gravity-sensitive molecular mechanisms in cells of the immune system is an important and indispensable prerequisite for the development of counteractive measures to prevent or treat disturbed immune cell function of astronauts during long-term space missions. Moreover, their sensitivity to altered gravity renders immune cells an ideal model system to understand if and how gravity on Earth is required for normal mammalian cell function and signal transduction. We investigated the effect of simulated weightlessness (2D clinostat) and of real microgravity (parabolic flights) on key signal pathways in a human monocytic and a T lymphocyte cell line. We found that cellular responses to microgravity strongly depend on the cell-type and the conditions in which the cells are subjected to microgravity. In Jurkat T cells, enhanced phosphorylation of the MAP kinases ERK-1/2, MEK and p38 and inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-kB were the predominant responses to simulated weightlessness, in either stimulated or non-stimulated cells. In contrast, non-stimulated monocytic U937 cells responded to simulated weightlessness with enhanced overall tyrosine-phosphorylation and activation of c-jun, whereas PMA-stimulated U937 cells responded the opposite way with reduced tyrosine-phosphorylation and reduced activation of c-jun, compared with PMA-stimulated 1 g controls. P53 protein was phosphorylated rapidly in microgravity. The identification of gravi-sensitive mechanisms in cells of the immune system will not only enable us to understand and prevent the negative effects of long time exposure to microgravity on Astronauts, but could also lead to novel therapeutic targets in general.

  2. Direct sensing and signal transduction during bacterial chemotaxis toward aromatic compounds in Comamonas testosteroni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhou; Ni, Bin; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Wu, Yu-Fan; He, Yun-Zhe; Parales, Rebecca E; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Micro-organisms sense and chemotactically respond to aromatic compounds. Although the existence of chemoreceptors that bind to aromatic attractants and subsequently trigger chemotaxis have long been speculated, such a chemoreceptor has not been demonstrated. In this report, we demonstrated that the chemoreceptor MCP2901 from Comamonas testosteroni CNB-1 binds to aromatic compounds and initiates downstream chemotactic signaling in addition to its ability to trigger chemotaxis via citrate binding. The function of gene MCP2901 was investigated by genetic deletion from CNB-1 and genetic complementation of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP)-null mutant CNB-1Δ20. Results showed that the expression of MCP2901 in the MCP-null mutant restored chemotaxis toward nine tested aromatic compounds and nine carboxylic acids. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses demonstrated that the ligand-binding domain of MCP2901 (MCP2901LBD) bound to citrate, and weakly to gentisate and 4-hydroxybenzoate. Additionally, ITC assays indicated that MCP2901LBD bound strongly to 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate and 2-hydroxybenzoate, which are isomers of gentisate and 4-hydroxybenzoate respectively that are not metabolized by CNB-1. Agarose-in-plug and capillary assays showed that these two molecules serve as chemoattractants for CNB-1. Through constructing membrane-like MCP2901-inserted Nanodiscs and phosphorelay activity assays, we demonstrated that 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate and 2-hydroxybenzoate altered kinase activity of CheA. This is the first evidence of an MCP binding to an aromatic molecule and triggering signal transduction for bacterial chemotaxis.

  3. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billestrup, N.; Allevato, G.; Moldrup, A. [Hagedorn Research Lab., Gentofte (Denmark)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to medite GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH-stimulated metabolic effects such as protein synthesis and lipolysis. Furthermore, this mutant GH receptor internalized rapidly following GH binding. Another truncated GH receptor lacking all but five amino acids of the cytoplasmic domain could not mediate any effects of GH nor did it internalize. Deletion of the proline-rich region or changing the four prolines to alanines also resulted in a GH receptor deficient in signaling. Mutation of phenylalanine 346 to alanine resulted in a GH receptor which did not internalize rapidly; however, this mutant GH receptor was capable of mediating GH-stimulated transcription as well as metabolic effects. These results indicate that the intracellular part of the GH receptor can be divided into at least three functional domains: (1) for transcriptional activity, two domains are involved, one located in the C-terminal 184 amino acids and the other in the proline-rich domain; (2) for metabolic effects, a domain located in or near the proline-rich region is of importance; and (3) for internalization, phenylalanine 346 is necessary. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  4. NPY Y1 receptors differentially modulate GABAA and NMDA receptors via divergent signal-transduction pathways to reduce excitability of amygdala neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molosh, Andrei I; Sajdyk, Tammy J; Truitt, William A; Zhu, Weiguo; Oxford, Gerry S; Shekhar, Anantha

    2013-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) administration into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) decreases anxiety-like behavior, mediated in part through the Y1 receptor (Y1R) isoform. Activation of Y1Rs results in G-protein-mediated reduction of cAMP levels, which results in reduced excitability of amygdala projection neurons. Understanding the mechanisms linking decreased cAMP levels to reduced excitability in amygdala neurons is important for identifying novel anxiolytic targets. We studied the intracellular mechanisms of activation of Y1Rs on synaptic transmission in the BLA. Activating Y1Rs by [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-NPY (L-P NPY) reduced the amplitude of evoked NMDA-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs), without affecting AMPA-mediated eEPSCs, but conversely increased the amplitude of GABAA-mediated evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs). Both effects were abolished by the Y1R antagonist, PD160170. Intracellular GDP-β-S, or pre-treatment with either forskolin or 8Br-cAMP, eliminated the effects of L-P NPY on both NMDA- and GABAA-mediated currents. Thus, both the NMDA and GABAA effects of Y1R activation in the BLA are G-protein-mediated and cAMP-dependent. Pipette inclusion of protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit blocked the effect of L-P NPY on GABAA-mediated eIPSCs, but not on NMDA-mediated eEPSCs. Conversely, activating the exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) with 8CPT-2Me-cAMP blocked the effect of L-P NPY on NMDA-mediated eEPSCs, but not on GABAA-mediated eIPSCs. Thus, NPY regulates amygdala excitability via two signal-transduction events, with reduced PKA activity enhancing GABAA-mediated eIPSCs and Epac deactivation reducing NMDA-mediated eEPSCs. This multipathway regulation of NMDA- and GABAA-mediated currents may be important for NPY plasticity and stress resilience in the amygdala.

  5. Melanocortin 1 receptor mutations impact differentially on signalling to the cAMP and the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; Zanna, Paola; García-Borrón, José C

    2009-10-06

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a Gs protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, is a major determinant of skin pigmentation, phototype and cancer risk. MC1R activates cAMP and mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/ERK2 signalling. When expressed in rat pheochromocytoma cell line cells, the R151C, R160W and D294H MC1R variants associated with melanoma and impaired cAMP signalling mediated ERK activation and ERK-dependent, agonist-induced neurite outgrowth comparable with wild-type. Dose-response curves for ERK activation and cAMP production indicated higher sensitivity of the ERK response. Thus, the melanoma-associated MC1R mutations impact differently on cAMP and ERK signalling, suggesting that cAMP is not responsible for functional coupling of MC1R to the ERK cascade.

  6. Fyn is a redox sensor involved in solar ultraviolet light-induced signal transduction in skin carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Roh, Eunmiri; Lee, Mee Hyun; Yu, Dong Hoon; Kim, Dong Joon; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Jung, Sung Keun; Peng, Cong; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dickinson, Sally; Alberts, Dave; Bowden, G. Tim; Einspahr, Janine; Stratton, Steven P; Curiel, Clara; Bode, Ann M.; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) light is a major etiological factor in skin carcinogenesis, with solar UV-stimulated signal transduction inducing pathological changes and skin damage. The primary sensor of solar UV-induced cellular signaling has not been identified. We use an experimental system of solar simulated light (SSL) to mimic solar UV and we demonstrate that Fyn is a primary redox sensor involved in SSL-induced signal transduction. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by SSL exposure directly oxidize Cys488 of Fyn, resulting in increased Fyn kinase activity. Fyn oxidation was increased in mouse skin after SSL exposure, and Fyn knockout (Fyn−/−) mice formed larger and more tumors compared to Fyn wildtype mice when exposed to SSL for an extended period of time. Murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Fyn as well as cells in which Fyn expression was knocked down were resistant to SSL-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, cells expressing mutant Fyn (C448A) were resistant to SSL-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that Fyn acts as a regulatory nexus between solar UV, ROS and signal transduction during skin carcinogenesis. PMID:26686094

  7. Signal transduction factors on the modulation of radiosusceptibility in K562 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kwang Mo; Jeong, Soo Jin [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Seon Min [College of Medicine, Eulji Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, K562, expresses the chimeric bcr-abl oncoprotein, whose deregulated protein tyrosine kinase activity antagonizes the induction of apoptosis via DNA damaging agents. Previous experiments have shown that nanomolar concentrations of herbimycin A [HMA] coupled with X-irradiation have a synergistic effect in inducing apoptosis in the Ph-positive K562 leukemia cell line, but genistein, a PTK inhibitor, is non selective for the radiation-induced apoptosis of p210{sup bcr}/{sup abl} protected K562 cells. In these experiments, the cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways, the induction of a number of transcription factors and the differential gene expression in this model were investigated. K562 cells in the exponential growth phase were used in this study. The cells were irradiated with 0.5-12 Gy, using a 6 MeV Linac (Clinac 1800, Varian, USA). Immediately after irradiation, the cells were treated with 0.25{mu}M of HMA and 25{mu}M of genistein, and the expressions and the activities of ablkinase, MAPK family, NF-KB, c-fos, c-myc, and thymidine kinase1 (TK1) were examined. The differential gene expressions induced by PTK inhibitors were also investigated. The modulating effects of herbimycin A and genistein on the radiosensitivity of K562 cells were not related to the bcr-abl kinase activity. The signaling responses through the MAPK family of proteins, were not involved either. In association with the radiation-induced apoptosis, which is accelerated by HMA, the expression of c-myc was increased. The combined treatment of genistein, with irradiation, enhanced NF-KB activity and the TK 1 expression and activity. The effects of HMA and genistein on the radiosensitivity of the K562 cells were not related to the bcr-abl kinase activity. In this study, another signaling pathway, besides the MAPK family responses to radiation to K562 cells, was found. Further evaluation using this model will provide valuable information for the

  8. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis and Deduction of Putative Cognate Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-01-20

    ABSTRACT-Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTS) composed of sensory histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), constitute a key element of the mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to changes in environments. A large number of TCSTSs including 59 putative HKs and 55 RRs were identified from the Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome, indicating their important roles in regulation of cellular metabolism. In this study, the structural and phylogenetic analysis of all putative TCSTSs in D. vulgaris was performed. The results showed D. vulgaris contained an unexpectedly large number of hybrid-type HKs, implying that multiple-step phosphorelay may be a common signal transduction mechanism in D. vulgaris. Most TCSTS components of D. vulgaris were found clustered into several subfamilies previously recognized in other bacteria and extensive co-evolution between D. vulgaris HKs and RRs was observed, suggesting that the concordance of HKs and RRs in cognate phylogenetic groups could be indicative of cognate TCSTSs...

  9. A Model for Direction Sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum: Ras Activity and Symmetry Breaking Driven by a Gβγ-Mediated, Gα2-Ric8 -- Dependent Signal Transduction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yougan; Othmer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Chemotaxis is a dynamic cellular process, comprised of direction sensing, polarization and locomotion, that leads to the directed movement of eukaryotic cells along extracellular gradients. As a primary step in the response of an individual cell to a spatial stimulus, direction sensing has attracted numerous theoretical treatments aimed at explaining experimental observations in a variety of cell types. Here we propose a new model of direction sensing based on experiments using Dictyostelium discoideum (Dicty). The model is built around a reaction-diffusion-translocation system that involves three main component processes: a signal detection step based on G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for cyclic AMP (cAMP), a transduction step based on a heterotrimetic G protein Gα2βγ, and an activation step of a monomeric G-protein Ras. The model can predict the experimentally-observed response of cells treated with latrunculin A, which removes feedback from downstream processes, under a variety of stimulus protocols. We show that Gα2βγ cycling modulated by Ric8, a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for Gα2 in Dicty, drives multiple phases of Ras activation and leads to direction sensing and signal amplification in cAMP gradients. The model predicts that both Gα2 and Gβγ are essential for direction sensing, in that membrane-localized Gα2*, the activated GTP-bearing form of Gα2, leads to asymmetrical recruitment of RasGEF and Ric8, while globally-diffusing Gβγ mediates their activation. We show that the predicted response at the level of Ras activation encodes sufficient ‘memory’ to eliminate the ‘back-of-the wave’ problem, and the effects of diffusion and cell shape on direction sensing are also investigated. In contrast with existing LEGI models of chemotaxis, the results do not require a disparity between the diffusion coefficients of the Ras activator GEF and the Ras inhibitor GAP. Since the signal pathways we study are highly conserved between Dicty

  10. A Model for Direction Sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum: Ras Activity and Symmetry Breaking Driven by a Gβγ-Mediated, Gα2-Ric8 -- Dependent Signal Transduction Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yougan; Othmer, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Chemotaxis is a dynamic cellular process, comprised of direction sensing, polarization and locomotion, that leads to the directed movement of eukaryotic cells along extracellular gradients. As a primary step in the response of an individual cell to a spatial stimulus, direction sensing has attracted numerous theoretical treatments aimed at explaining experimental observations in a variety of cell types. Here we propose a new model of direction sensing based on experiments using Dictyostelium discoideum (Dicty). The model is built around a reaction-diffusion-translocation system that involves three main component processes: a signal detection step based on G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) for cyclic AMP (cAMP), a transduction step based on a heterotrimetic G protein Gα2βγ, and an activation step of a monomeric G-protein Ras. The model can predict the experimentally-observed response of cells treated with latrunculin A, which removes feedback from downstream processes, under a variety of stimulus protocols. We show that [Formula: see text] cycling modulated by Ric8, a nonreceptor guanine exchange factor for [Formula: see text] in Dicty, drives multiple phases of Ras activation and leads to direction sensing and signal amplification in cAMP gradients. The model predicts that both [Formula: see text] and Gβγ are essential for direction sensing, in that membrane-localized [Formula: see text], the activated GTP-bearing form of [Formula: see text], leads to asymmetrical recruitment of RasGEF and Ric8, while globally-diffusing Gβγ mediates their activation. We show that the predicted response at the level of Ras activation encodes sufficient 'memory' to eliminate the 'back-of-the wave' problem, and the effects of diffusion and cell shape on direction sensing are also investigated. In contrast with existing LEGI models of chemotaxis, the results do not require a disparity between the diffusion coefficients of the Ras activator GEF and the Ras inhibitor GAP. Since

  11. From stress to inflammation and major depressive disorder: a social signal transduction theory of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M; Irwin, Michael R

    2014-05-01

    Major life stressors, especially those involving interpersonal stress and social rejection, are among the strongest proximal risk factors for depression. In this review, we propose a biologically plausible, multilevel theory that describes neural, physiologic, molecular, and genomic mechanisms that link experiences of social-environmental stress with internal biological processes that drive depression pathogenesis. Central to this social signal transduction theory of depression is the hypothesis that experiences of social threat and adversity up-regulate components of the immune system involved in inflammation. The key mediators of this response, called proinflammatory cytokines, can in turn elicit profound changes in behavior, which include the initiation of depressive symptoms such as sad mood, anhedonia, fatigue, psychomotor retardation, and social-behavioral withdrawal. This highly conserved biological response to adversity is critical for survival during times of actual physical threat or injury. However, this response can also be activated by modern-day social, symbolic, or imagined threats, leading to an increasingly proinflammatory phenotype that may be a key phenomenon driving depression pathogenesis and recurrence, as well as the overlap of depression with several somatic conditions including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pain, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and neurodegeneration. Insights from this theory may thus shed light on several important questions including how depression develops, why it frequently recurs, why it is strongly predicted by early life stress, and why it often co-occurs with symptoms of anxiety and with certain physical disease conditions. This work may also suggest new opportunities for preventing and treating depression by targeting inflammation.

  12. Partial Decay of Thiamine Signal Transduction Pathway Alters Growth Properties of Candida glabrata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Noor F.; Neal, Erin M.; Leone, Sarah G.; Cali, Brian J.; Peel, Michael T.; Grannas, Amanda M.; Wykoff, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylated form of thiamine (Vitamin B1), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) is essential for the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates in all organisms. Plants and microorganisms, such as yeast, synthesize thiamine de novo whereas animals do not. The thiamine signal transduction (THI) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is well characterized. The ~10 genes required for thiamine biosynthesis and uptake are transcriptionally upregulated during thiamine starvation by THI2, THI3, and PDC2. Candida glabrata, a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, is closely related to S. cerevisiae but is missing half of the biosynthetic pathway, which limits its ability to make thiamine. We investigated the changes to the THI pathway in C. glabrata, confirming orthologous functions. We found that C. glabrata is unable to synthesize the pyrimidine subunit of thiamine as well as the thiamine precursor vitamin B6. In addition, THI2 (the gene encoding a transcription factor) is not present in C. glabrata, indicating a difference in the transcriptional regulation of the pathway. Although the pathway is upregulated by thiamine starvation in both species, C. glabrata appears to upregulate genes involved in thiamine uptake to a greater extent than S. cerevisiae. However, the altered regulation of the THI pathway does not alter the concentration of thiamine and its vitamers in the two species as measured by HPLC. Finally, we demonstrate potential consequences to having a partial decay of the THI biosynthetic and regulatory pathway. When the two species are co-cultured, the presence of thiamine allows C. glabrata to rapidly outcompete S. cerevisiae, while absence of thiamine allows S. cerevisiae to outcompete C. glabrata. This simplification of the THI pathway in C. glabrata suggests its environment provides thiamine and/or its precursors to cells, whereas S. cerevisiae is not as reliant on environmental sources of thiamine. PMID:27015653

  13. Signal transduction through p53-dependent pathway after low-dose ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Wang Xinjiang [Nara Medical Univ., Nara (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    In the study of cell-cycle events, recent attention has focused on the signal transduction pathway in which a tumor-suppressor protein, wild-type (wt) p53 protein, acts as the key protein. A major advance in recent years has been the partial elucidation of the G{sub 1}-arrest mechanism. However, the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of components of the cell-cycle machinery remain unknown. We have investigated the induction of p53, WAF1, and cdk2 after gamma-ray irradiation using two human glioblastoma cell lines, U-87MG bearing the wt p53 gene and the other, T98G, a mutant gene. After the cells have been irradiated with gamma rays at 3 Gy, the level of p53 and WAF1 mRNAs in U-87MG increased gradually for up to 10 h, whereas these mRNAs were overexpressed in T98G, and these levels remained relatively stable after irradiation. In an attempt to examine the induction of cdk2 after gamma-ray irradiation, we analyzed the level of cdk2 mRNA using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. We calculated the amounts of cdk2 mRNA relative to that of b-actin mRNA in both cell lines, then plotted them against those in nonirradiated cells. After irradiation, the level of cdk2 mRNA in U-87MG gradually increased more than twofold by 10 h after gamma-ray irradiation, whereas the level of the mRNA in T98G remained relatively stable after irradiation. This result demonstrates that wtp53 induces the expression of not only WAF1 but also cdk2. The induction of wt p53 protein accumulation in rats exposed to x radiation is also discussed.

  14. Aluminium-induced phospholipid signal transduction pathway in Coffea arabica suspension cells and its amelioration by silicic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintal-Tun, Fausto; Muñoz-Sánchez, J Armando; Ramos-Díaz, Ana; Escamilla-Bencomo, Armando; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel; Exley, Christopher; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2007-02-01

    Coffee (Coffea arabica L.) is of economic importance worldwide. Its growth in organic-rich acidic soils is influenced by aluminium such that coffee yield may be impaired. Herein we have used the Al-sensitive C. arabica suspension cell line L2 to analyse the effect of two different Al species on the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway. Our results have shown that the association of Al with coffee cells was affected by the pH and the form of Al in media. More Al was associated with cells at pH 4.3 than 5.8, whereas when Al was present as hydroxyaluminosilicates (HAS) the association was halved at pH 4.3 and unchanged at pH 5.8. Two signal transduction elements were also evaluated; phospholipase C (PLC) activity and phosphatidic acid (PA) formation. PLC was inhibited ( approximately 50%) when cells were incubated for 2 h in the presence of either AlCl(3) or Al in the form of HAS. PA formation was tested as a short-term response to Al. By way of contrast to what was found for PLC, incubation of cells for 15 min in the presence of AlCl(3) decreased the formation of PA whereas the same concentration of Al as HAS produced no effect upon its formation. These results suggest that Al is capable to exert its effects upon signal transduction as Al((aq))(3+) acting upon a mechanism linked to the phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway.

  15. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Cho; Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Park, Jae-Ho

    2015-12-10

    Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC), has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST) has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca(2+) and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca(2+) and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca(2+) and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  16. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo Cho Yoon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC, has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca2+ and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca2+ and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca2+ and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  17. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  18. Is Ca2+ involved in the signal transduction pathway of boron deficiency? New hypotheses for sensing boron deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fontes, Agustín; Navarro-Gochicoa, M Teresa; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Herrera-Rodríguez, M Begoña; Quiles-Pando, Carlos; Rexach, Jesús

    2014-03-01

    Plants sense and transmit nutrient-deprivation signals to the nucleus. This increasingly interesting research field advances knowledge of signal transduction pathways for mineral deficiencies. The understanding of this topic for most micronutrients, especially boron (B), is more limited. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain how a B deprivation signal would be conveyed to the nucleus, which are briefly summarized in this review. These hypotheses do not explain how so many metabolic and physiological processes quickly respond to B deficiency. Short-term B deficiency affects the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels as well as root expression of genes involved in Ca(2+) signaling. We propose and discuss that Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)-related proteins - channels/transporters, sensor relays, and sensor responders - might have major roles as intermediates in a transduction pathway triggered by B deprivation. This hypothesis may explain how plants sense and convey the B-deprivation signal to the nucleus and modulate physiological responses. The possible role of arabinogalactan-proteins in the B deficiency signaling pathway is also taken into account.

  19. Nutrient-regulated antisense and intragenic RNAs modulate a signal transduction pathway in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Nishizawa

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae alters its gene expression profile in response to a change in nutrient availability. The PHO system is a well-studied case in the transcriptional regulation responding to nutritional changes in which a set of genes (PHO genes is expressed to activate inorganic phosphate (Pi metabolism for adaptation to Pi starvation. Pi starvation triggers an inhibition of Pho85 kinase, leading to migration of unphosphorylated Pho4 transcriptional activator into the nucleus and enabling expression of PHO genes. When Pi is sufficient, the Pho85 kinase phosphorylates Pho4, thereby excluding it from the nucleus and resulting in repression (i.e., lack of transcription of PHO genes. The Pho85 kinase has a role in various cellular functions other than regulation of the PHO system in that Pho85 monitors whether environmental conditions are adequate for cell growth and represses inadequate (untimely responses in these cellular processes. In contrast, Pho4 appears to activate some genes involved in stress response and is required for G1 arrest caused by DNA damage. These facts suggest the antagonistic function of these two players on a more general scale when yeast cells must cope with stress conditions. To explore general involvement of Pho4 in stress response, we tried to identify Pho4-dependent genes by a genome-wide mapping of Pho4 and Rpo21 binding (Rpo21 being the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II using a yeast tiling array. In the course of this study, we found Pi- and Pho4-regulated intragenic and antisense RNAs that could modulate the Pi signal transduction pathway. Low-Pi signal is transmitted via certain inositol polyphosphate (IP species (IP7 that are synthesized by Vip1 IP6 kinase. We have shown that Pho4 activates the transcription of antisense and intragenic RNAs in the KCS1 locus to down-regulate the Kcs1 activity, another IP6 kinase, by producing truncated Kcs1 protein via hybrid formation with the KCS1 m

  20. The emerging role of phosphoinositide clustering in intracellular trafficking and signal transduction [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Picas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositides are master regulators of multiple cellular processes: from vesicular trafficking to signaling, cytoskeleton dynamics, and cell growth. They are synthesized by the spatiotemporal regulated activity of phosphoinositide-metabolizing enzymes. The recent observation that some protein modules are able to cluster phosphoinositides suggests that alternative or complementary mechanisms might operate to stabilize the different phosphoinositide pools within cellular compartments. Herein, we discuss the different known and potential molecular players that are prone to engage phosphoinositide clustering and elaborate on how such a mechanism might take part in the regulation of intracellular trafficking and signal transduction.

  1. The human keratinocyte two-dimensional gel protein database (update 1995): mapping components of signal transduction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Rasmussen, H H; Gromov, P

    1995-01-01

    )vaccinia virus expression of full length cDNAs, and (vi) in vitro transcription/translation of full-length cDNAs. This year, special emphasis has been given to the identification of signal transduction components by using 2-D gel immunoblotting of crude keratinocyte lysates in combination with enhanced......--through a systematic study of ekeratinocytes--qualitative and quantitative information on proteins and their genes that may allow us to identify abnormal patterns of gene expression and to pinpoint signaling pathways and components affected in various skin diseases, cancer included. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Dec...

  2. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 6 (SOCS6) Negatively Regulates Flt3 Signal Transduction through Direct Binding to Phosphorylated Tyrosines 591 and 919 of Flt3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazi, Julhash U; Sun, Jianmin; Phung, Bengt;

    2012-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3 is an important growth factor receptor in hematopoiesis, and gain-of-function mutations of the receptor contribute to the transformation of acute myeloid leukemia. SOCS6 (suppressor of cytokine signaling 6) is a member of the SOCS family of E3 ubiquitin ligases...... that can regulate receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction. In this study, we analyzed the role of SOCS6 in Flt3 signal transduction. The results show that ligand stimulation of Flt3 can induce association of SOCS6 and Flt3 and tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS6. Phosphopeptide fishing indicated...... that SOCS6 binds directly to phosphotyrosines 591 and 919 of Flt3. By using stably transfected Ba/F3 cells with Flt3 and/or SOCS6, we show that the presence of SOCS6 can enhance ubiquitination of Flt3, as well as internalization and degradation of the receptor. The presence of SOCS6 also induces weaker...

  3. Differential CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor-inotropic response of rat isolated atria: endogenous signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Del Zar, Claudia F; Borda, Enri

    2005-06-15

    In this study, we have determined the contractile effects of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor activation on rat isolated atria and the different signaling pathways involved. Anandamide did not has significantly effect on atria contractility, however, the treatment with both CB1 (AM251) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists, the endocannabinoids triggered stimulation or inhibition on contractility respectively. The ACEA stimulation of CB1 receptor exerted decrease on contractility, that significantly correlated with the decrement of cAMP and the stimulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the accumulation of cyclic GMP (cGMP). On the contrary, JWH 015 stimulation of CB2 receptor triggered positive contractile response that significantly correlated with the increase cAMP production. The inhibiton of adenylate cyclase activity impaired the JWH 015 activation of CB1 receptor induced positive contractile effect, while inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), NOS and soluble nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive guanylate cyclase blocked the dose-response curves of ACEA on contractility. Those inhibitors also attenuated the CB1 receptor-dependent increase in activation of NOS and cGMP accumulation. These results suggest that CB2 receptor agonist mediated positive contractile effect associated with increased production on cAMP while CB1 receptor agonist mediated decrease on contractility associated with decreased cAMP accumulation and increase production of NO and cGMP; that occur secondarily to stimulation of PLC, NOS and soluble guanylate cyclase. Data give pharmacological evidence for the existence of functional CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in rat isolated atria and may contribute to a better understanding the effects of cannabinoids in the cardiovascular system.

  4. prpC-related signal transduction is influenced by copper, membrane integrity and the alpha cleavage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cathryn L Haigh; Victoria A Lewis; Laura J Vella; Colin L Masters; Andrew F Hill; Victoria A Lawson; Steven J Collins

    2009-01-01

    The copper-binding, membrane-anchored, cellular prion protein (PrPC) has two constitutive cleavage sites pro-ducing distinct N- and C-terminal fragments (N1/C1 and N2/C2). Using RKI3 cells expressing either human PrPC, mouse PrPC or mouse PrPC carrying the 3F4 epitope, this study explored the influence of the PrPC primary sequence on endoproteolytic cleavage and one putative PrPC function, MAP kinase signal transduction, in response to exoge-nous copper with or without a perturbed membrane environment. PrPC primary sequence, especially that around the N1/C1 cleavage site, appeared to influence basal levels of proteolysis at this location and extracellular signal-regulat-ed kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, with increased processing demonstrating an inverse relationship with basal ERK1/2 activation. Human PrPC showed increased N1/C1 cleavage in response to copper alone, accompanied by spe-cific p38 and JNK/SAPK phosphorylation. Combined exposure to copper plus the cholesterol-sequestering antibiotic filipin resulted in a mouse PrPC-specific substantial increase in signal protein phosphorylation, accompanied by an increase in N1/C1 cleavage. Mouse PrPC harboring the human N1/C1 cleavage site assumed more human-like profiles basally and in response to copper and altered membrane environments. Our results demonstrate that the PrPC pri-mary sequence around the N1/C1 cleavage site influences endoproteolytic processing at this location, which appears linked to MAP kinase signal transduction both basally and in response to copper. Further, the primary sequence ap-pears to confer a mutual dependence of N1/C1 cleavage and membrane integrity on the fidelity of prpC-related signal transduction in response to exogenous stimuli.

  5. Heavy metal accumulation and signal transduction in herbaceous and woody plants: Paving the way for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhi-Bin; He, Jiali; Polle, Andrea; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Heavy metal (HM)-accumulating herbaceous and woody plants are employed for phytoremediation. To develop improved strategies for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency, knowledge of the microstructural, physiological and molecular responses underlying HM-accumulation is required. Here we review the progress in understanding the structural, physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying HM uptake, transport, sequestration and detoxification, as well as the regulation of these processes by signal transduction in response to HM exposure. The significance of genetic engineering for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency is also discussed. In herbaceous plants, HMs are taken up by roots and transported into the root cells via transmembrane carriers for nutritional ions. The HMs absorbed by root cells can be further translocated to the xylem vessels and unloaded into the xylem sap, thereby reaching the aerial parts of plants. HMs can be sequestered in the cell walls, vacuoles and the Golgi apparatuses. Plant roots initially perceive HM stress and trigger the signal transduction, thereby mediating changes at the molecular, physiological, and microstructural level. Signaling molecules such as phytohormones, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), modulate plant responses to HMs via differentially expressed genes, activation of the antioxidative system and coordinated cross talk among different signaling molecules. A number of genes participated in HM uptake, transport, sequestration and detoxification have been functionally characterized and transformed to target plants for enhancing phytoremediation efficiency. Fast growing woody plants hold an advantage over herbaceous plants for phytoremediation in terms of accumulation of high HM-amounts in their large biomass. Presumably, woody plants accumulate HMs using similar mechanisms as herbaceous counterparts, but the processes of HM accumulation and signal transduction can be more complex in woody plants.

  6. Signal transduction pathways involving phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate: convergences and divergences among eukaryotic kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delage, Elise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are minor constituents of eukaryotic membranes but participate in a wide range of cellular processes. The most abundant and best characterized phosphoinositide species are phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P₂) and its main precursor, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P). PI4P and PI(4,5)P₂ regulate various structural and developmental functions but are also centrally involved in a plethora of signal transduction pathways in all eukaryotic models. They are not only precursors of second messengers but also directly interact with many protein effectors, thus regulating their localisation and/or activity. Furthermore, the discovery of independent PI(4,5)P₂ signalling functions in the nucleus of mammalian cells have open a new perspective in the field. Striking similarities between mammalian, yeast and higher plant phosphoinositide signalling are noticeable, revealing early appearance and evolutionary conservation of this intracellular language. However, major differences have also been highlighted over the years, suggesting that organisms may have evolved different PI4P and PI(4,5)P₂ functions over the course of eukaryotic diversification. Comparative studies of the different eukaryotic models is thus crucial for a comprehensive view of this fascinating signalling system. The present review aims to emphasize convergences and divergences between eukaryotic kingdoms in the mechanisms underlying PI4P and PI(4,5)P₂ roles in signal transduction, in response to extracellular stimuli.

  7. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to Gi/o and Gq signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Zheng, Maohua; Salom, David; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) initiates signal transduction cascades that affect many physiological responses. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans expresses >1000 of these receptors along with their cognate heterotrimeric G proteins. Here, we report properties of 9-cis-retinal regenerated bovine opsin [(b)isoRho] and human melanopsin [(h)Mo], two light-activated, heterologously expressed GPCRs in the nervous system of C. elegans with various genetically engineered alterations. Profound transient photoactivation of Gi/o signaling by (b)isoRho led to a sudden and transient loss of worm motility dependent on cyclic adenosine monophosphate, whereas transient photoactivation of Gq signaling by (h)Mo enhanced worm locomotion dependent on phospholipase Cβ. These transgenic C. elegans models provide a unique way to study the consequences of Gi/o and Gq signaling in vivo with temporal and spatial precision and, by analogy, their relationship to human neuromotor function.—Cao, P., Sun, W., Kramp, K., Zheng, M., Salom, D., Jastrzebska, B., Jin, H., Palczewski, K., Feng, Z. Light-sensitive coupling of rhodopsin and melanopsin to Gi/o and Gq signal transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:22090313

  8. Towards understanding the nitrogen signal transduction for nif gene expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöer, Jens; Thummer, Robert; Ullrich, Heike; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2008-12-01

    In the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae, the nitrogen sensory protein GlnK mediates the cellular nitrogen status towards the NifL/NifA system that regulates transcription of the nitrogen fixation genes in response to ammonium and molecular oxygen. To identify amino acids of GlnK essential for this signal transduction by protein-protein interaction, we performed random point mutagenesis by PCR amplification under conditions of reduced Taq polymerase fidelity. Three thousand two hundred mutated glnK genes were screened to identify those that would no longer complement a K. pneumoniaeDeltaglnK strain for growth under nitrogen fixing conditions. Twenty-four candidates resulting in a Nif(-) phenotype were identified, carrying 1-11 amino acid changes in GlnK. Based on these findings, as well as structural data, several single mutations were introduced into glnK by site-directed mutagenesis, and the Nif phenotype and the respective effects on NifA-mediated nif gene induction was monitored in K. pneumoniae using a chromosomal nifK'-'lacZ fusion. Single amino acid changes resulting in significant nif gene inhibition under nitrogen limiting conditions were located within the highly conserved T-loop (A43G, A49T and N54D), the body of the protein (G87V and K79E) and in the C-terminal region (I100M, R103S, E106Q and D108G). Complex formation analyses between GlnK (wild-type or derivatives) and NifL or NifA in response to 2-oxoglutarate indicated that: (a) besides the T-loop, the C-terminal region of GlnK is essential for the interaction with NifL and NifA and (b) GlnK binds both proteins in the absence of 2-oxoglutarate, whereas, in the presence of 2-oxoglutarate, NifA is released but NifL remains bound to GlnK.

  9. Signal transduction-related responses to phytohormones and environmental challenges in sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Flávia R; Papini-Terzi, Flávia S; Nishiyama, Milton Y; Vêncio, Ricardo ZN; Vicentini, Renato; Duarte, Rodrigo DC; de Rosa, Vicente E; Vinagre, Fabiano; Barsalobres, Carla; Medeiros, Ane H; Rodrigues, Fabiana A; Ulian, Eugênio C; Zingaretti, Sônia M; Galbiatti, João A; Almeida, Raul S; Figueira, Antonio VO; Hemerly, Adriana S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C; Menossi, Marcelo; Souza, Gláucia M

    2007-01-01

    Background Sugarcane is an increasingly economically and environmentally important C4 grass, used for the production of sugar and bioethanol, a low-carbon emission fuel. Sugarcane originated from crosses of Saccharum species and is noted for its unique capacity to accumulate high amounts of sucrose in its stems. Environmental stresses limit enormously sugarcane productivity worldwide. To investigate transcriptome changes in response to environmental inputs that alter yield we used cDNA microarrays to profile expression of 1,545 genes in plants submitted to drought, phosphate starvation, herbivory and N2-fixing endophytic bacteria. We also investigated the response to phytohormones (abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate). The arrayed elements correspond mostly to genes involved in signal transduction, hormone biosynthesis, transcription factors, novel genes and genes corresponding to unknown proteins. Results Adopting an outliers searching method 179 genes with strikingly different expression levels were identified as differentially expressed in at least one of the treatments analysed. Self Organizing Maps were used to cluster the expression profiles of 695 genes that showed a highly correlated expression pattern among replicates. The expression data for 22 genes was evaluated for 36 experimental data points by quantitative RT-PCR indicating a validation rate of 80.5% using three biological experimental replicates. The SUCAST Database was created that provides public access to the data described in this work, linked to tissue expression profiling and the SUCAST gene category and sequence analysis. The SUCAST database also includes a categorization of the sugarcane kinome based on a phylogenetic grouping that included 182 undefined kinases. Conclusion An extensive study on the sugarcane transcriptome was performed. Sugarcane genes responsive to phytohormones and to challenges sugarcane commonly deals with in the field were identified. Additionally, the protein kinases

  10. Signal transduction-related responses to phytohormones and environmental challenges in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemerly Adriana S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane is an increasingly economically and environmentally important C4 grass, used for the production of sugar and bioethanol, a low-carbon emission fuel. Sugarcane originated from crosses of Saccharum species and is noted for its unique capacity to accumulate high amounts of sucrose in its stems. Environmental stresses limit enormously sugarcane productivity worldwide. To investigate transcriptome changes in response to environmental inputs that alter yield we used cDNA microarrays to profile expression of 1,545 genes in plants submitted to drought, phosphate starvation, herbivory and N2-fixing endophytic bacteria. We also investigated the response to phytohormones (abscisic acid and methyl jasmonate. The arrayed elements correspond mostly to genes involved in signal transduction, hormone biosynthesis, transcription factors, novel genes and genes corresponding to unknown proteins. Results Adopting an outliers searching method 179 genes with strikingly different expression levels were identified as differentially expressed in at least one of the treatments analysed. Self Organizing Maps were used to cluster the expression profiles of 695 genes that showed a highly correlated expression pattern among replicates. The expression data for 22 genes was evaluated for 36 experimental data points by quantitative RT-PCR indicating a validation rate of 80.5% using three biological experimental replicates. The SUCAST Database was created that provides public access to the data described in this work, linked to tissue expression profiling and the SUCAST gene category and sequence analysis. The SUCAST database also includes a categorization of the sugarcane kinome based on a phylogenetic grouping that included 182 undefined kinases. Conclusion An extensive study on the sugarcane transcriptome was performed. Sugarcane genes responsive to phytohormones and to challenges sugarcane commonly deals with in the field were identified

  11. Genomic Targets and Features of BarA-UvrY (-SirA Signal Transduction Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfalem R Zere

    Full Text Available The two-component signal transduction system BarA-UvrY of Escherichia coli and its orthologs globally regulate metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, virulence of pathogens and quorum sensing by activating the transcription of genes for regulatory sRNAs, e.g. CsrB and CsrC in E. coli. These sRNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA away from lower affinity mRNA targets. In this study, we used ChIP-exo to identify, at single nucleotide resolution, genomic sites for UvrY (SirA binding in E. coli and Salmonella enterica. The csrB and csrC genes were the strongest targets of crosslinking, which required UvrY phosphorylation by the BarA sensor kinase. Crosslinking occurred at two sites, an inverted repeat sequence far upstream of the promoter and a site near the -35 sequence. DNAse I footprinting revealed specific binding of UvrY in vitro only to the upstream site, indicative of additional binding requirements and/or indirect binding to the downstream site. Additional genes, including cspA, encoding the cold-shock RNA-binding protein CspA, showed weaker crosslinking and modest or negligible regulation by UvrY. We conclude that the global effects of UvrY/SirA on gene expression are primarily mediated by activating csrB and csrC transcription. We also used in vivo crosslinking and other experimental approaches to reveal new features of csrB/csrC regulation by the DeaD and SrmB RNA helicases, IHF, ppGpp and DksA. Finally, the phylogenetic distribution of BarA-UvrY was analyzed and found to be uniquely characteristic of γ-Proteobacteria and strongly anti-correlated with fliW, which encodes a protein that binds to CsrA and antagonizes its activity in Bacillus subtilis. We propose that BarA-UvrY and orthologous TCS transcribe sRNA antagonists of CsrA throughout the γ-Proteobacteria, but rarely or never perform this function in other species.

  12. Genomic Targets and Features of BarA-UvrY (-SirA) Signal Transduction Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zere, Tesfalem R; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Leng, Yuanyuan; Pannuri, Archana; Potts, Anastasia H; Dias, Raquel; Tang, Dongjie; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Georgellis, Dimitris; Ahmer, Brian M M; Romeo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    The two-component signal transduction system BarA-UvrY of Escherichia coli and its orthologs globally regulate metabolism, motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, virulence of pathogens and quorum sensing by activating the transcription of genes for regulatory sRNAs, e.g. CsrB and CsrC in E. coli. These sRNAs act by sequestering the RNA binding protein CsrA (RsmA) away from lower affinity mRNA targets. In this study, we used ChIP-exo to identify, at single nucleotide resolution, genomic sites for UvrY (SirA) binding in E. coli and Salmonella enterica. The csrB and csrC genes were the strongest targets of crosslinking, which required UvrY phosphorylation by the BarA sensor kinase. Crosslinking occurred at two sites, an inverted repeat sequence far upstream of the promoter and a site near the -35 sequence. DNAse I footprinting revealed specific binding of UvrY in vitro only to the upstream site, indicative of additional binding requirements and/or indirect binding to the downstream site. Additional genes, including cspA, encoding the cold-shock RNA-binding protein CspA, showed weaker crosslinking and modest or negligible regulation by UvrY. We conclude that the global effects of UvrY/SirA on gene expression are primarily mediated by activating csrB and csrC transcription. We also used in vivo crosslinking and other experimental approaches to reveal new features of csrB/csrC regulation by the DeaD and SrmB RNA helicases, IHF, ppGpp and DksA. Finally, the phylogenetic distribution of BarA-UvrY was analyzed and found to be uniquely characteristic of γ-Proteobacteria and strongly anti-correlated with fliW, which encodes a protein that binds to CsrA and antagonizes its activity in Bacillus subtilis. We propose that BarA-UvrY and orthologous TCS transcribe sRNA antagonists of CsrA throughout the γ-Proteobacteria, but rarely or never perform this function in other species.

  13. CGRP-RCP, a novel protein required for signal transduction at calcitonin gene-related peptide and adrenomedullin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, B N; Rosenblatt, M I; Mnayer, L O; Oliver, K R; Dickerson, I M

    2000-10-06

    It is becoming clear that receptors that initiate signal transduction by interacting with G-proteins do not function as monomers, but often require accessory proteins for function. Some of these accessory proteins are chaperones, required for correct transport of the receptor to the cell surface, but the function of many accessory proteins remains unknown. We determined the role of an accessory protein for the receptor for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator neuropeptide. We have previously shown that this accessory protein, the CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP), is expressed in CGRP responsive tissues and that RCP protein expression correlates with the biological efficacy of CGRP in vivo. However, the function of RCP has remained elusive. In this study stable cell lines were made that express antisense RCP RNA, and CGRP- and adrenomedullin-mediated signal transduction were greatly reduced. However, the loss of RCP did not effect CGRP binding or receptor density, indicating that RCP did not behave as a chaperone but was instead coupling the CGRP receptor to downstream effectors. A candidate CGRP receptor named calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) has been identified, and in this study RCP co-immunoprecipitated with CRLR indicating that these two proteins interact directly. Since CGRP and adrenomedullin can both signal through CRLR, which has been previously shown to require a chaperone protein for function, we now propose that a functional CGRP or adrenomedullin receptor consists of at least three proteins: the receptor (CRLR), the chaperone protein (RAMP), and RCP that couples the receptor to the cellular signal transduction pathway.

  14. Analysis of signal transduction in brain cells using molecular signal microscope; Bunshi jiho kenbikyo wo mochiita nousaibou no joho henkan kiko no kaiseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawato, Suguru [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Biophysics and Life Sciences

    1999-12-16

    We analyzed the signal transduction in brain neurons by real-time imaging of Ca/NO signals using the Molecular Signal Microscope. We also analyzed synthesis and action of neurosteroids in the hippocampus. We discovered steroid synthesis machinery containing cytochrome P 450 scc in hippocampal neurons. We found that pregnenolone sulfate acutely potentiated NMDA receptor-mediated Ca conductivity in hippocampal neurons. We also found that stress steroid corticosterone acutely prolonged NMDA receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx, resulting in Ca-induced neuro-toxicity. (author)

  15. Structural insights of homotypic interaction domains in the ligand-receptor signal transduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Hoon; Jeong, Mi Suk; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-01-01

    Several members of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily that these members activate caspase-8 from death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) in TNF ligand-receptor signal transduction have been identified. In the extrinsic pathway, apoptotic signal transduction is induced in death domain (DD) superfamily; it consists of a hexahelical bundle that contains 80 amino acids. The DD superfamily includes about 100 members that belong to four subfamilies: death domain (DD), caspase recruitment domain (CARD), pyrin domain (PYD), and death effector domain (DED). This superfamily contains key building blocks: with these blocks, multimeric complexes are formed through homotypic interactions. Furthermore, each DD-binding event occurs exclusively. The DD superfamily regulates the balance between death and survival of cells. In this study, the structures, functions, and unique features of DD superfamily members are compared with their complexes. By elucidating structural insights of DD superfamily members, we investigate the interaction mechanisms of DD domains; these domains are involved in TNF ligand-receptor signaling. These DD superfamily members play a pivotal role in the development of more specific treatments of cancer. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 159-166] PMID:26615973

  16. A census of membrane-bound and intracellular signal transduction proteins in bacteria: Bacterial IQ, extroverts and introverts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galperin Michael Y

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of complete microbial genomes showed that intracellular parasites and other microorganisms that inhabit stable ecological niches encode relatively primitive signaling systems, whereas environmental microorganisms typically have sophisticated systems of environmental sensing and signal transduction. Results This paper presents results of a comprehensive census of signal transduction proteins – histidine kinases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis receptors, Ser/Thr/Tyr protein kinases, adenylate and diguanylate cyclases and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases – encoded in 167 bacterial and archaeal genomes, sequenced by the end of 2004. The data have been manually checked to avoid false-negative and false-positive hits that commonly arise during large-scale automated analyses and compared against other available resources. The census data show uneven distribution of most signaling proteins among bacterial and archaeal phyla. The total number of signal transduction proteins grows approximately as a square of genome size. While histidine kinases are found in representatives of all phyla and are distributed according to the power law, other signal transducers are abundant in certain phylogenetic groups but virtually absent in others. Conclusion The complexity of signaling systems differs even among closely related organisms. Still, it usually can be correlated with the phylogenetic position of the organism, its lifestyle, and typical environmental challenges it encounters. The number of encoded signal transducers (or their fraction in the total protein set can be used as a measure of the organism's ability to adapt to diverse conditions, the 'bacterial IQ', while the ratio of transmembrane receptors to intracellular sensors can be used to define whether the organism is an 'extrovert', actively sensing the environmental parameters, or an 'introvert', more concerned about its internal homeostasis. Some of the microorganisms with the

  17. Reciprocal bystander effect between α-irradiated macrophage and hepatocyte is mediated by cAMP through a membrane signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Li, Jitao; Yuan, Dexiao; Bai, Yang; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated cells can induce biological effects on vicinal non-irradiated bystander cells, meanwhile the bystander cells may rescue the irradiated cells through a feedback signal stress. To elucidate the nature of this reciprocal effect, we examined the interaction between α-irradiated human macrophage cells U937 and its bystander HL-7702 hepatocyte cells using a cell co-culture system. Results showed that after 6h of cell co-culture, mitochondria depolarization corresponding to apoptosis was significantly induced in the HL-7702 cells, but the formation of micronuclei in the irradiated U937 cells was markedly decreased compared to that without cell co-culture treatment. This reciprocal effect was not observed when the cell membrane signaling pathway was blocked by filipin that inhibited cAMP transmission from bystander cells to irradiated cells. After treatment of cells with exogenous cAMP, forskolin (an activator of cAMP) or KH-7 (an inhibitor of cAMP), respectively, it was confirmed that cAMP communication from bystander cells to targeted cells could mitigate radiation damage in U739 cells, and this cAMP insufficiency in the bystander cells contributed to the enhancement of bystander apoptosis. Moreover, the bystander apoptosis in HL-7702 cells was aggravated by cAMP inhibition but it could not be evoked when p53 of HL-7702 cells was knocked down no matter of forskolin and KH-7 treatment. In conclusion, this study disclosed that cAMP could be released from bystander HL-7702 cells and compensated to α-irradiated U937 cells through a membrane signaling pathway and this cAMP communication played a profound role in regulating the reciprocal bystander effects.

  18. Psoralen and Ultraviolet A Light Treatment Directly Affects Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Signal Transduction by Altering Plasma Membrane Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aelst, Britt; Devloo, Rosalie; Zachée, Pierre; t'Kindt, Ruben; Sandra, Koen; Vandekerckhove, Philippe; Compernolle, Veerle; Feys, Hendrik B

    2016-11-18

    Psoralen and ultraviolet A light (PUVA) are used to kill pathogens in blood products and as a treatment of aberrant cell proliferation in dermatitis, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and graft-versus-host disease. DNA damage is well described, but the direct effects of PUVA on cell signal transduction are poorly understood. Because platelets are anucleate and contain archetypal signal transduction machinery, they are ideally suited to address this. Lipidomics on platelet membrane extracts showed that psoralen forms adducts with unsaturated carbon bonds of fatty acyls in all major phospholipid classes after PUVA. Such adducts increased lipid packing as measured by a blue shift of an environment-sensitive fluorescent probe in model liposomes. Furthermore, the interaction of these liposomes with lipid order-sensitive proteins like amphipathic lipid-packing sensor and α-synuclein was inhibited by PUVA. In platelets, PUVA caused poor membrane binding of Akt and Bruton's tyrosine kinase effectors following activation of the collagen glycoprotein VI and thrombin protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1. This resulted in defective Akt phosphorylation despite unaltered phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate levels. Downstream integrin activation was furthermore affected similarly by PUVA following PAR1 (effective half-maximal concentration (EC50), 8.4 ± 1.1 versus 4.3 ± 1.1 μm) and glycoprotein VI (EC50, 1.61 ± 0.85 versus 0.26 ± 0.21 μg/ml) but not PAR4 (EC50, 50 ± 1 versus 58 ± 1 μm) signal transduction. Our findings were confirmed in T-cells from graft-versus-host disease patients treated with extracorporeal photopheresis, a form of systemic PUVA. In conclusion, PUVA increases the order of lipid phases by covalent modification of phospholipids, thereby inhibiting membrane recruitment of effector kinases.

  19. Hyperactivation of NF-κB via the MEK signaling is indispensable for the inhibitory effect of cAMP on DNA damage-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloster, Martine M; Naderi, Elin H; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Heidi K; Naderi, Soheil

    2011-04-21

    With cAMP signaling having a profound inhibitory effect on DNA damage-induced apoptosis in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cells, understanding how this signaling pathway affects the survival capacity of the cell has important implications for cancer therapy. We have recently shown that p53 is critical for the inhibitory effect of cAMP on genotoxic agents-mediated apoptosis in BCP-ALLs. Here, we show that elevation of cAMP levels in cells exposed to DNA damage enhances the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB by accelerating the phosphorylation of IKKβ and thereby phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Furthermore, we show that the ability of cAMP to potentiate the ionizing radiation-induced activation of NF-κB requires the activity of MEK. Importantly, pharmacological or genetic ablation of NF-κB reversed the inhibitory effect of cAMP on DNA damage-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that, in addition to p53, cAMP relies on the activity of NF-κB to provide cells with a survival advantage in the face of DNA damage. Collectively, our results uncover a novel and important interaction between the cAMP and NF-κB pathways that may have implications for the targeted treatment of lymphoid malignancies, such as BCP-ALL, in which aberrant NF-κB activity functions as a driving force for treatment resistance.

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals signal transduction components required for the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to pathogens mediated by plant resistance (R) proteins requires different signaling transduction components and pathways. Our previous studies revealed that a potyvirus resistance gene in pepper, Pvr9, confers a hypersensitive response (HR) to pepper mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results show that the Pvr9-mediated HR against pepper mottle virus infection requires HSP90, SGT1, NDR1, but not EDS1. These results suggest that the Pvr9-mediated HR is possibly related to the SA pathway but not the ET, JA, ROS or NO pathways.

  1. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Cytokine-Mediated STAT1 Signal Transduction In ß-Cells With Improved Aqueous Solubility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scully, Stephen Shane; Tang, Alicia J; Lundh, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported the discovery of BRD0476 (1), a small molecule generated by diversity-oriented synthesis that suppresses cytokine-induced ß-cell apoptosis. Herein, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 1 and analogs with improved aqueous solubility. By replacing naphthyl wit...... with quinoline moieties, we prepared active analogs with up to a 1400-fold increase in solubility from 1. In addition, we demonstrated that compound 1 and analogs inhibit STAT1 signal transduction induced by IFN-¿....

  2. Sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis by activating the Akt signal transduction pathway in a rat model of diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihong Chen; Yaqiang He; Chengjun Song; Zhijun Dong; Zhejun Su; Jingfeng Xue

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by continuous peritoneal injection of streptozotocin. Following intragastric perfusion of sericin for 35 days, blood glucose levels significantly reduced, neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region decreased, hippocampal phosphorylated Akt and nuclear factor kappa B expression were enhanced, but Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 associated death promoter expression decreased. Results demonstrated that sericin can reduce hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in a rat model of diabetes mellitus by regulating abnormal changes in the Akt signal transduction pathway.

  3. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B;

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether defects in the insulin signal transduction cascade are present in skeletal muscle from prediabetic individuals, we excised biopsies from eight glucose-intolerant male first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes (IGT relatives) and nine matched control subjects...... phosphorylation in control subjects and IGT relatives, with a tendency for reduced phosphorylation in IGT relatives (P = 0.12). In conclusion, aberrant phosphorylation/activity of IRS-1, PI 3-kinase, and Akt is observed in skeletal muscle from relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes with IGT. However...... resistance in skeletal muscle from relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes....

  4. Investigation of signal transduction routes within the sensor/transducer protein BlaR1 of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staude, Michael W; Frederick, Thomas E; Natarajan, Sivanandam V; Wilson, Brian D; Tanner, Carol E; Ruggiero, Steven T; Mobashery, Shahriar; Peng, Jeffrey W

    2015-03-03

    The transmembrane antibiotic sensor/signal transducer protein BlaR1 is part of a cohort of proteins that confer β-lactam antibiotic resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) [Fisher, J. F., Meroueh, S. O., and Mobashery, S. (2005) Chem. Rev. 105, 395-424; Llarrull, L. I., Fisher, J. F., and Mobashery, S. (2009) Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 53, 4051-4063; Llarrull, L. I., Toth, M., Champion, M. M., and Mobashery, S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 38148-38158]. Specifically, BlaR1 regulates the inducible expression of β-lactamases that hydrolytically destroy β-lactam antibiotics. The resistance phenotype starts with β-lactam antibiotic acylation of the BlaR1 extracellular domain (BlaRS). The acylation activates the cytoplasmic protease domain through an obscure signal transduction mechanism. Here, we compare protein dynamics of apo versus antibiotic-acylated BlaRS using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our analyses reveal inter-residue interactions that relay acylation-induced perturbations within the antibiotic-binding site to the transmembrane helix regions near the membrane surface. These are the first insights into the process of signal transduction by BlaR1.

  5. [The Role of c-fos in the Production of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone and the Related Signal Transduction Pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, De-Quan; Huang, Jun-Qin; Yi, Xue-Jie; Zhang, Dong-Jun

    2015-12-01

    As an immediate early gene, c-fos plays a critical role in stimulating the synthesis and release of pituitary FSH via GnRH. To better understanding the mechanism how c-fos works in the transcription of FSHbeta under different frequency of pulsatile GnRH stimulation, this paper reviewed the signal trans- ductions initiated by c-fos in pituitary, which include cAMP pathway, MAPK pathway, Ca2+ /calmodulin-dependent kinases pathway and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) pathway. It will be helpful for research in molecular targeted immunotherapy and eventually effective treatment to the infertility which resulted from defection or mutation of c-fos and c-fos related signal pathway elements.

  6. Self-organization of signal transduction [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/zg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model of parameter learning for signal transduction, where the objective function is defined by signal transmission efficiency. We apply this to learn kinetic rates as a form of evolutionary learning, and look for parameters which satisfy the objective. This is a novel approach compared to the usual technique of adjusting parameters only on the basis of experimental data. The resulting model is self-organizing, i.e. perturbations in protein concentrations or changes in extracellular signaling will automatically lead to adaptation. We systematically perturb protein concentrations and observe the response of the system. We find compensatory or co-regulation of protein expression levels. In a novel experiment, we alter the distribution of extracellular signaling, and observe adaptation based on optimizing signal transmission. We also discuss the relationship between signaling with and without transients. Signaling by transients may involve maximization of signal transmission efficiency for the peak response, but a minimization in steady-state responses. With an appropriate objective function, this can also be achieved by concentration adjustment. Self-organizing systems may be predictive of unwanted drug interference effects, since they aim to mimic complex cellular adaptation in a unified way.

  7. The importance of dietary modulation of cAMP and insulin signaling in adipose tissue and the development of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays a pivotal role in whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we summarize knowledge of the seemingly paradoxical roles of insulin and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in adipocyte differentiation and function, emphasizing the interplay between the two...... of obesity by changing energy expenditure and/or feed efficiency. We review results demonstrating how the balance between different classes of carbohydrates and proteins modulates the obesigenic action of saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids pointing to insulin as a key determinant in the regulation...

  8. Aluminum—induced apoptosis in cultured cortical neurons and its effects on SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FuHJ; DongSZ

    2002-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) exposure and apoptotic cell death have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases.the mechanisms by which Al interacts with the nervous system are only partly understood.In this study,we used cultured cortical neurons to investigate the ability of Al to induce the apoptosis of neurons and to explore the role of SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway on the apoptosis induced by Al.It was found that Al-induced degeneration of cortical neurons involved the DNA fragmentation characteristic of apoptosis.The rate of apoptosis increased significantly,which was measured by TdT-mediated dUTKP nick end labeling.Westerm blot analysis showed that SAPK/JNK activities of cortical neurons varied when the dose and exposure time of AlCl3 were different.Our study demonstrates that Al can induce the apoptosis of cortical neurons and SAPK/JNK signal transduction pathway may play a great role in the apoptosis.

  9. Structure of the P{sub II} signal transduction protein of Neisseria meningitidis at 1.85 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Charles E. [Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Sainsbury, Sarah; Berrow, Nick S.; Alderton, David [The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Saunders, Nigel J. [The Bacterial Pathogenesis and Functional Genomics Group, The Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE (United Kingdom); Stammers, David K. [Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Owens, Raymond J., E-mail: ray@strubi.ox.ac.uk [The Oxford Protein Production Facility, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Division of Structural Biology, Henry Wellcome Building for Genomic Medicine, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-01

    The structure of the P{sub II} signal transduction protein of N. meningitidis at 1.85 Å resolution is described. The P{sub II} signal transduction proteins GlnB and GlnK are implicated in the regulation of nitrogen assimilation in Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria. P{sub II}-like proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, archaea and plants. In contrast to other bacteria, Neisseria are limited to a single P{sub II} protein (NMB 1995), which shows a high level of sequence identity to GlnB and GlnK from Escherichia coli (73 and 62%, respectively). The structure of the P{sub II} protein from N. meningitidis (serotype B) has been solved by molecular replacement to a resolution of 1.85 Å. Comparison of the structure with those of other P{sub II} proteins shows that the overall fold is tightly conserved across the whole population of related proteins, in particular the positions of the residues implicated in ATP binding. It is proposed that the Neisseria P{sub II} protein shares functions with GlnB/GlnK of enteric bacteria.

  10. Expression analysis of taste signal transduction molecules in the fungiform and circumvallate papillae of the rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiro Ishimaru

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms of the mammalian gustatory system have been examined in many studies using rodents as model organisms. In this study, we examined the mRNA expression of molecules involved in taste signal transduction in the fungiform papillae (FuP and circumvallate papillae (CvP of the rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta, using in situ hybridization. TAS1R1, TAS1R2, TAS2Rs, and PKD1L3 were exclusively expressed in different subsets of taste receptor cells (TRCs in the FuP and CvP. This finding suggests that TRCs sensing different basic taste modalities are mutually segregated in macaque taste buds. Individual TAS2Rs exhibited a variety of expression patterns in terms of the apparent level of expression and the number of TRCs expressing these genes, as in the case of human TAS2Rs. GNAT3, but not GNA14, was expressed in TRCs of FuP, whereas GNA14 was expressed in a small population of TRCs of CvP, which were distinct from GNAT3- or TAS1R2-positive TRCs. These results demonstrate similarities and differences between primates and rodents in the expression profiles of genes involved in taste signal transduction.

  11. Azelastine hydrochloride (Azeptin) inhibits peplomycin (PLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis by contradicting the up-regulation of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, K; Yamamoto, T; Ueta, E; Osaki, T

    1997-10-01

    Inhibition of peplomycin (PLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis by azelastine hydrochloride (Azeptin) was examined using ICR mice, and the effects of both drugs on signal transduction were investigated. Microscopically, Azeptin (a total of 56 mg/kg for 28 days) suppressed pulmonary fibrosis in mice which received an i.p. injection of a total of 60 or 75 mg/kg PLM. In parallel with the microscopic findings, smaller amounts of collagen were synthesized in the lungs of Azeptin-injected mice. PLM enhanced the expression of interleukin-1 beta- and transforming growth factor-beta-mRNA in lungs. In contrast, Azeptin suppressed the expression. Compatible with these in vivo results, Azeptin and PLM contradictively regulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation and c-myc mRNA expression in human gingival and mouse pulmonary fibroblasts. In addition, NF-kappa B was activated by fibroblast treatment with 5 micrograms/ml PLM for 1 h, but intranuclear NF-kappa B was decreased by cell treatment with 10(-5) M Azeptin. From these results, it is concluded that Azeptin inhibits PLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis by antagonizing the up-regulation of signal transduction.

  12. Diatom acclimation to elevated CO2 via cAMP signalling and coordinated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennon, Gwenn M. M.; Ashworth, Justin; Groussman, Ryan D.; Berthiaume, Chris; Morales, Rhonda L.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Orellana, Mónica V.; Armbrust, E. V.

    2015-08-01

    Diatoms are responsible for ~40% of marine primary productivity, fuelling the oceanic carbon cycle and contributing to natural carbon sequestration in the deep ocean. Diatoms rely on energetically expensive carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to fix carbon efficiently at modern levels of CO2 (refs , , ). How diatoms may respond over the short and long term to rising atmospheric CO2 remains an open question. Here we use nitrate-limited chemostats to show that the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana rapidly responds to increasing CO2 by differentially expressing gene clusters that regulate transcription and chromosome folding, and subsequently reduces transcription of photosynthesis and respiration gene clusters under steady-state elevated CO2. These results suggest that exposure to elevated CO2 first causes a shift in regulation, and then a metabolic rearrangement. Genes in one CO2-responsive cluster included CCM and photorespiration genes that share a putative cAMP-responsive cis-regulatory sequence, implying these genes are co-regulated in response to CO2, with cAMP as an intermediate messenger. We verified cAMP-induced downregulation of CCM gene δ-CA3 in nutrient-replete diatom cultures by inhibiting the hydrolysis of cAMP. These results indicate an important role for cAMP in downregulating CCM and photorespiration genes under elevated CO2 and provide insights into mechanisms of diatom acclimation in response to climate change.

  13. Reciprocal bystander effect between α-irradiated macrophage and hepatocyte is mediated by cAMP through a membrane signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mingyuan [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130033 (China); Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Li, Jitao; Yuan, Dexiao; Bai, Yang [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • α-Irradiation induced reciprocal effects between macrophage and hepatocyte cells. • cAMP played a protective role in regulating the reverse bystander effect. • cAMP communication contributed to the reciprocal effects via membrane signaling. • p53 was required for cAMP-regulated bystander effect in the recipient cells. - Abstract: Irradiated cells can induce biological effects on vicinal non-irradiated bystander cells, meanwhile the bystander cells may rescue the irradiated cells through a feedback signal stress. To elucidate the nature of this reciprocal effect, we examined the interaction between α-irradiated human macrophage cells U937 and its bystander HL-7702 hepatocyte cells using a cell co-culture system. Results showed that after 6 h of cell co-culture, mitochondria depolarization corresponding to apoptosis was significantly induced in the HL-7702 cells, but the formation of micronuclei in the irradiated U937 cells was markedly decreased compared to that without cell co-culture treatment. This reciprocal effect was not observed when the cell membrane signaling pathway was blocked by filipin that inhibited cAMP transmission from bystander cells to irradiated cells. After treatment of cells with exogenous cAMP, forskolin (an activator of cAMP) or KH-7 (an inhibitor of cAMP), respectively, it was confirmed that cAMP communication from bystander cells to targeted cells could mitigate radiation damage in U739 cells, and this cAMP insufficiency in the bystander cells contributed to the enhancement of bystander apoptosis. Moreover, the bystander apoptosis in HL-7702 cells was aggravated by cAMP inhibition but it could not be evoked when p53 of HL-7702 cells was knocked down no matter of forskolin and KH-7 treatment. In conclusion, this study disclosed that cAMP could be released from bystander HL-7702 cells and compensated to α-irradiated U937 cells through a membrane signaling pathway and this cAMP communication played a profound role in

  14. The cyclase-associated protein CAP as regulator of cell polarity and cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and found that the mutant cells have normal levels of the aggregation phase-specific adenylyl cyclase and that receptor-mediated activation is intact. However, cAMP relay that is responsible for the generation of propagating cAMP waves that control the chemotactic aggregation of starving Dictyostelium cells was altered, and the cAMP-induced cGMP production was significantly reduced. The data suggest an interaction of CAP with adenylyl cyclase in Dictyostelium and an influence on signaling pathways directly as well as through its function as a regulatory component of the cytoskeleton.

  15. The NO/cGMP pathway inhibits transient cAMP signals through the activation of PDE2 in striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina ePolito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The NO-cGMP signaling plays an important role in the regulation of striatal function although the mechanisms of action of cGMP specifically in medium spiny neurons (MSNs remain unclear. Using genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, including a novel Epac-based sensor (EPAC-SH150 with increased sensitivity for cAMP, we analyze the cGMP response to NO and whether it affected cAMP/PKA signaling in MSNs. The Cygnet2 sensor for cGMP reported large responses to NO donors in both striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, and this cGMP signal was controlled partially by PDE2. At the level of cAMP brief forskolin stimulations produced transient cAMP signals which differed between D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons. NO inhibited these cAMP transients through cGMP-dependent PDE2 activation, an effect that was translated and magnified downstream of cAMP, at the level of PKA. PDE2 thus appears as a critical effector of NO which modulates the post-synaptic response of MSNs to dopaminergic transmission.

  16. A Case Study of Representing Signal Transduction in Liver Cells as a Feedback Control Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhay; Jayaraman, Arul; Hahn, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways often contain feedback loops where proteins are produced that regulate signaling. While feedback regulatory mechanisms are commonly found in signaling pathways, there is no example available in the literature that is simple enough to be presented in an undergraduate control class. This paper presents a simulation study of…

  17. The Role of Intrinsic Flexibility in Signal Transduction Mediated by the Cell Cycle Regulator, p27Kip1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galea, Charles A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Nourse, Amanda [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Wang, Yuefeng [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Sivakolundu, Sivashankar G. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital; Heller, William T [ORNL; Kriwacki, Richard W [University of Tennessee (UT) Health Science Center, Memphis

    2008-02-01

    p27{sup Kip1} (p27), which controls eukaryotic cell division through interactions with cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), integrates and transduces promitogenic signals from various nonreceptor tyrosine kinases by orchestrating its own phosphorylation, ubiquitination and degradation. Intrinsic flexibility allows p27 to act as a 'conduit' for sequential signaling mediated by tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation and ubiquitination. While the structural features of the Cdk/cyclin-binding domain of p27 are understood, how the C-terminal regulatory domain coordinates multistep signaling leading to p27 degradation is poorly understood. We show that the 100-residue p27 C-terminal domain is extended and flexible when p27 is bound to Cdk2/cyclin A. We propose that the intrinsic flexibility of p27 provides a molecular basis for the sequential signal transduction conduit that regulates p27 degradation and cell division. Other intrinsically unstructured proteins possessing multiple sites of posttranslational modification may participate in similar signaling conduits.

  18. TRAIL-Induced Caspase Activation Is a Prerequisite for Activation of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Signal Transduction Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Sung, Ki Sa; Guo, Zong Sheng; Kwon, William Taehyung; Bartlett, David L; Oh, Sang Cheul; Kwon, Yong Tae; Lee, Yong J

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis can be initially triggered by surface death receptors (the extrinsic pathway) and subsequently amplified through mitochondrial dysfunction (the intrinsic pathway). However, little is known about signaling pathways activated by the TRAIL-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. In this study, we report that TRAIL-induced apoptosis is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells were treated with TRAIL and the ER stress-induced signal transduction pathway was investigated. During TRAIL treatment, expression of ER stress marker genes, in particular the BiP (binding immunoglobulin protein) gene, was increased and activation of the PERK (PKR-like ER kinase)-eIF2α (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α)-ATF4 (activating transcription factor 4)-CHOP (CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein) apoptotic signal transduction pathway occurred. Experimental data from use of a siRNA (small interfering RNA) technique, caspase inhibitor, and caspase-3-deficient cell line revealed that TRAIL-induced caspase activation is a prerequisite for the TRAIL-induced ER stress response. TRAIL-induced ER stress was triggered by caspase-8-mediated cleavage of BAP31 (B cell receptor-associated protein 31). The involvement of the proapoptotic PERK-CHOP pathway in TRAIL-induced apoptosis was verified by using a PERK knockout (PERK(-/-)) mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell line and a CHOP(-/-) MEF cell line. These results suggest that TRAIL-induced the activation of ER stress response plays a role in TRAIL-induced apoptotic death.

  19. Signal transduction in neurons: effects of cellular prion protein on fyn kinase and ERK1/2 kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasi Vittorio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that cellular prion protein (PrPc co-localizes with caveolin-1 and participates to signal transduction events by recruiting Fyn kinase. As PrPc is a secreted protein anchored to the outer surface membrane through a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor (secPrP and caveolin-1 is located in the inner leaflet of plasma membrane, there is a problem of how the two proteins can physically interact each other and transduce signals. Results By using the GST-fusion proteins system we observed that PrPc strongly interacts with caveolin-1 scaffolding domain and with a caveolin-1 hydrophilic C-terminal region, but not with the caveolin-1 N-terminal region. In vitro binding experiments were also performed to define the site(s of PrPc interacting with cav-1. The results are consistent with a participation of PrPc octapeptide repeats motif in the binding to caveolin-1 scaffolding domain. The caveolar localization of PrPc was ascertained by co-immunoprecipitation, by co-localization after flotation in density gradients and by confocal microscopy analysis of PrPc and caveolin-1 distributions in a neuronal cell line (GN11 expressing caveolin-1 at high levels. Conclusions We observed that, after antibody-mediated cross-linking or copper treatment, PrPc was internalized probably into caveolae. We propose that following translocation from rafts to caveolae or caveolae-like domains, secPrP could interact with caveolin-1 and induce signal transduction events.

  20. Host-pathogen systems biology: logical modelling of hepatocyte growth factor and Helicobacter pylori induced c-Met signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kähne Thilo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF stimulates mitogenesis, motogenesis, and morphogenesis in a wide range of tissues, including epithelial cells, on binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met. Abnormal c-Met signalling contributes to tumour genesis, in particular to the development of invasive and metastatic phenotypes. The human microbial pathogen Helicobacter pylori can induce chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration and more rarely, gastric adenocarcinoma. The H. pylori effector protein cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA, which is translocated via a type IV secretion system (T4SS into epithelial cells, intracellularly modulates the c-Met receptor and promotes cellular processes leading to cell scattering, which could contribute to the invasiveness of tumour cells. Using a logical modelling framework, the presented work aims at analysing the c-Met signal transduction network and how it is interfered by H. pylori infection, which might be of importance for tumour development. Results A logical model of HGF and H. pylori induced c-Met signal transduction is presented in this work. The formalism of logical interaction hypergraphs (LIH was used to construct the network model. The molecular interactions included in the model were all assembled manually based on a careful meta-analysis of published experimental results. Our model reveals the differences and commonalities of the response of the network upon HGF and H. pylori induced c-Met signalling. As another important result, using the formalism of minimal intervention sets, phospholipase Cγ1 (PLCγ1 was identified as knockout target for repressing the activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, a signalling molecule directly linked to cell scattering in H. pylori infected cells. The model predicted only an effect on ERK1/2 for the H. pylori stimulus, but not for HGF treatment. This result could be confirmed experimentally in MDCK cells using a specific

  1. Systems Perturbation Analysis of a Large-Scale Signal Transduction Model Reveals Potentially Influential Candidates for Cancer Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Allen, Laura; Hochfelder, Colleen; Majumder, Mahbubul; Helikar, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation in signal transduction pathways can lead to a variety of complex disorders, including cancer. Computational approaches such as network analysis are important tools to understand system dynamics as well as to identify critical components that could be further explored as therapeutic targets. Here, we performed perturbation analysis of a large-scale signal transduction model in extracellular environments that stimulate cell death, growth, motility, and quiescence. Each of the model’s components was perturbed under both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations. Using 1,300 simulations under both types of perturbations across various extracellular conditions, we identified the most and least influential components based on the magnitude of their influence on the rest of the system. Based on the premise that the most influential components might serve as better drug targets, we characterized them for biological functions, housekeeping genes, essential genes, and druggable proteins. The most influential components under all environmental conditions were enriched with several biological processes. The inositol pathway was found as most influential under inactivating perturbations, whereas the kinase and small lung cancer pathways were identified as the most influential under activating perturbations. The most influential components were enriched with essential genes and druggable proteins. Moreover, known cancer drug targets were also classified in influential components based on the affected components in the network. Additionally, the systemic perturbation analysis of the model revealed a network motif of most influential components which affect each other. Furthermore, our analysis predicted novel combinations of cancer drug targets with various effects on other most influential components. We found that the combinatorial perturbation consisting of PI3K inactivation and overactivation of IP3R1 can lead to increased activity levels of apoptosis

  2. The Effect of Minimally Invasive Hematoma Aspiration on the JNK Signal Transduction Pathway after Experimental Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Haitao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Guofang; Li, Zhaoxing; Luo, Kai; An, Jingjiao; Li, Guangcheng; Guo, Yunliang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of minimally invasive hematoma aspiration (MIHA) on the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) signal transduction pathway after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: In this experiment, 300 adult male Wistar rats were randomly and averagely divided into sham-operated group, ICH group and MIHA group. In each group, 60 rats were used in the detection of indexes in this experiment, while the other 40 rats were used to replace rats which reached the exclusion criteria (accidental death or operation failure). In ICH group and MIHA group, ICH was induced by injection of 70 µL of autologous arterial blood into rat brain, while only the rats in MIHA group were treated by MIHA 6 h after ICH. Rats in sham-operated group were injected nothing into brains, and they were not treated either, like rats in ICH group. In each group, six rats were randomly selected to observe their Bederson’s scales persistently (6, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120 h after ICH). According to the time they were sacrificed, the remaining rats in each group were divided into 3 subgroups (24, 72, 120 h). The change of brain water content (BWC) was measured by the wet weight to dry weight ratio method. The morphology of neurons in cortex was observed by the hematoxylin–eosin (HE) staining. The expressions of phospho-c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (pJNK) and JNK in peri-hematomal brain tissue were determined by the immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting (WB). Results: At all time points, compared with the ICH groups, the expression of pJNK decreased obviously in MIHA groups (p < 0.05), while their Bederson’s scales and BWC declined, and neuron injury in the cortex was relieved. The expression level of JNK was not altered at different groups. The data obtained by IHC and WB indicated a high-level of consistency, which provided a certain dependability of the test results. Conclusion: The JNK signal transduction pathway could be activated after intracerebral hemorrhage, with the

  3. Molecular targeted therapy for breast cancer patients based on Notch signal transduction pathway%Notch信号转导通路与乳腺癌靶向治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永渠; 豆晓伟; 张国君

    2013-01-01

    Notch信号转导通路参与调控细胞增生、分化及凋亡.异常的Notch信号转导通路可以诱导转基因鼠乳腺癌的发生,而在乳腺癌患者中,高表达Notch受体和(或)配体则与预后不良相关,因此靶向抑制Notch信号转导通路可能对乳腺癌治疗有益.%Studies show that the Notch signal transduction pathway involves in the regulation and control of cell proliferation,differentiation and apoptosis.Aberrant Notch signaling transduction pathway can induce breast cancer in transgenic mice.High expressions of either Notch receptors or their ligands have been linked to poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer.Inhibition of Notch signal transduction pathway may be beneficial for breast cancer treatment.

  4. Functional status and relationships of melanocortin 1 receptor signaling to the cAMP and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 pathways in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Journé, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2012-12-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a major determinant of skin phototype frequently mutated in melanoma, is a Gs protein-coupled receptor that regulates pigment production in melanocytes. MC1R stimulation activates cAMP synthesis and the extracellular signal-regulated (ERK) ERK1 and ERK2. In human melanocytes, ERK activation by MC1R relies on cAMP-independent transactivation of the c-KIT receptor. Thus MC1R functional coupling to the cAMP and ERK pathways may involve different structural requirements giving raise to biased effects of skin cancer-associated mutations. We evaluated the impact of MC1R mutations on ERK activation, cAMP production and agonist binding. We found that MC1R mutations impair cAMP production much more often than ERK activation, suggesting less stringent requirements for functional coupling to the ERK pathway. We examined the crosstalk of the cAMP and ERK pathways in HBL human melanoma cells (wild-type for MC1R, NRAS and BRAF). ERK activation by constitutively active upstream effectors or pharmacological inhibition had little effect on MC1R-stimulated cAMP synthesis. High cAMP levels were compatible with normal ERK activation but, surprisingly, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin abolished ERK activation by MC1R, most likely by a cAMP-independent mechanism. These results indicate little crosstalk of the cAMP and ERK pathways in HBL melanoma cells. Finally, we studied cAMP accumulation in a panel of 22 human melanoma cell lines stimulated with MC1R agonists or forskolin. cAMP synthesis was often inhibited, even in cells wild-type for MC1R and NRAS. Therefore, the cAMP pathway is more frequently impaired in melanoma than could be predicted by the MC1R or NRAS genotype.

  5. Nitric oxide involved in signal transduction of Jasmonic acid-induced stomatal closure of Vicia faba L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xin; SHI Wuliang; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Jasmonic acid (JA) are two key signaling molecules involved in many and diverse biological pathways in plants. Growing evidence suggested that NO signaling interacts with JA signaling. In this work, Our experiment showed that NO exists in guard cell of Vicia faba L., and NO is involved in signal transduction of JA- induced stomata closuring: (ⅰ) JA enhances NO synthesis in guard cell; (ⅱ) both JA and NO induced stomatal closure, and had dose response to their effects; (ⅲ) there are synergetic correlation between JA and lower NO concentration in regulation of stomatal movement; (ⅳ) JA-induced stomatal closure was largely prevented by 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetrame- thylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO), a specific NO scavenger. An inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) in mammalian cells, NG-nitro-L-Arg-methyl eater (L-NAME) also inhibits plant NOS, repressing JA-induced NO generation and JA-induced stomatal closure. We presumed that NO mainly comes from NOS after JA treatment.

  6. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zequn Jiang; Shasha Li; Yunyi Liu; Pengyi Deng; Jianguo Huang; Guangyuan He

    2011-01-01

    In this study,we confirmed that sesamin,an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil,is a novel skin-tanning compound.The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells.The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin.Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmiaassociated transcription factor (MITF).Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB),but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt.Moreover,sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway.Consistent with these results,sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89,a PKA inhibitor,but not by SB203580,a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002,a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor.Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89.These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase,which was,in turn,due to the activation of cAMP signaling.

  7. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zequn; Li, Shasha; Liu, Yunyi; Deng, Pengyi; Huang, Jianguo; He, Guangyuan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we confirmed that sesamin, an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil, is a novel skin-tanning compound. The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells. The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin. Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB), but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt. Moreover, sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway. Consistent with these results, sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89, a PKA inhibitor, but not by SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89. These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase, which was, in turn, due to the activation of cAMP signaling.

  8. Single molecule narrowfield microscopy of protein-DNA binding dynamics in glucose signal transduction of live yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule narrowfield microscopy is a versatile tool to investigate a diverse range of protein dynamics in live cells and has been extensively used in bacteria. Here, we describe how these methods can be extended to larger eukaryotic, yeast cells, which contain sub-cellular compartments. We describe how to obtain single-molecule microscopy data but also how to analyse these data to track and obtain the stoichiometry of molecular complexes diffusing in the cell. We chose glucose mediated signal transduction of live yeast cells as the system to demonstrate these single-molecule techniques as transcriptional regulation is fundamentally a single molecule problem - a single repressor protein binding a single binding site in the genome can dramatically alter behaviour at the whole cell and population level.

  9. RIP4 is a target of multiple signal transduction pathways in keratinocytes: Implications for epidermal differentiation and cutaneous wound repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Stephanie [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Institute of Physiology, Arnimallee 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Munz, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.munz@charite.de [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Institute of Physiology, Arnimallee 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-01

    Receptor interacting protein 4 (RIP4) is an important regulator of epidermal morphogenesis during embryonic development. We could previously show that expression of the rip4 gene is strongly downregulated in cutaneous wound repair, which might be initiated by a broad variety of growth factors and cytokines. Here, we demonstrate that in keratinocytes, rip4 expression is controlled by a multitude of different signal transduction pathways, such as the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) cascade, in a unique and specific manner. Furthermore, we show that the steroid dexamethasone abolishes the physiological rip4 downregulation after injury and might thus contribute to the phenotype of reduced and delayed wound reepithelialization seen in glucocorticoid-treated patients. As a whole, our data indicate that rip4 expression is regulated in a complex manner, which might have therapeutic implications.

  10. Differences in two-component signal transduction proteins among the genus Brucella: implications for host preference and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binnewies, Tim Terence; Ussery, David; Lavín, JL

    2010-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. Species of the genus Brucella are genetically highly related and differ mainly in mammalian host adaptation and pathogenesis. In this study, TCS proteins encoded in the available genome sequences of Brucella...... species have been identified using bioinformatic methods. All the Brucella species share an identical set of TCS proteins, and the number of TCS proteins in the closely related opportunistic human pathogen Ochrobactrum anthropi was higher than in Brucella species as expected from its lifestyle. O....... anthropi lacks orthologs of the Brucella TCSs NodVW, TceSR and TcfSR, suggesting that these TCS proteins could be necessary for the adaptation of Brucella as an intracellular pathogen. This genomic analysis revealed the presence of a differential distribution of TCS pseudogenes among Brucella species...

  11. Interferometric Motion Detection in Atomic Layer 2D Nanostructures: Visualizing Signal Transduction Efficiency and Optimization Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zenghui; Feng, Philip X.-L.

    2016-07-01

    Atomic layer crystals are emerging building blocks for enabling new two-dimensional (2D) nanomechanical systems, whose motions can be coupled to other attractive physical properties in such 2D systems. Optical interferometry has been very effective in reading out the infinitesimal motions of these 2D structures and spatially resolving different modes. To quantitatively understand the detection efficiency and its dependence on the device parameters and interferometric conditions, here we present a systematic study of the intrinsic motion responsivity in 2D nanomechanical systems using a Fresnel-law-based model. We find that in monolayer to 14-layer structures, MoS2 offers the highest responsivity among graphene, h-BN, and MoS2 devices and for the three commonly used visible laser wavelengths (633, 532, and 405 nm). We also find that the vacuum gap resulting from the widely used 300 nm-oxide substrate in making 2D devices, fortunately, leads to close-to-optimal responsivity for a wide range of 2D flakes. Our results elucidate and graphically visualize the dependence of motion transduction responsivity upon 2D material type and number of layers, vacuum gap, oxide thickness, and detecting wavelength, thus providing design guidelines for constructing 2D nanomechanical systems with optimal optical motion readout.

  12. Signal transduction of the physical environment in the neural differentiation of stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Neural differentiation is largely dependent on extracellular signals within the cell microenvironment. These extracellular signals are mainly in the form of soluble factors that activate intracellular signaling cascades that drive changes in the cell nucleus. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the physical microenvironment provides signals that can also influence lineage commitment and very low modulus surfaces has been repeatedly demonstrated to promote neurogenesis. The molecular mechanisms governing mechano-induced neural differentiation are still largely uncharacterized; however, a growing body of evidence indicates that physical stimuli can regulate known signaling cascades and transcription factors involved in neural differentiation. Understanding how the physical environment affects neural differentiation at the molecular level will enable research and design of materials that will eventually enhance neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation, homogeneity and specificity.

  13. Stimulatory Effects of Coumestrol on Embryonic and Fetal Development Through AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Whasun; Song, Gwonhwa

    2016-12-01

    Successful establishment of pregnancy is required for fetal-maternal interactions regulating implantation, embryonic development and placentation. A uterine environment with insufficient growth factors and nutrients increases the incidence of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) leading to an impaired uterine environment. In the present study, we demonstrated the effects of the phytoestrogen coumestrol on conceptus development in the pig that is regarded as an excellent biomedical animal model for research on IUGR. Results of this study indicated that coumestrol induced migration of porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cells in a concentration-dependent manner. In response to coumestrol, the phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K, S6, ERK1/2 MAPK, and P90RSK proteins were activated in pTr cells and ERK1/2 MAPK and P90RSK phosphorylation was prolonged for a longer period than for the other proteins. To identify the signal transduction pathway induced by coumestrol, pharmacological inhibitors U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) and LY294002 (a PI3K inhibitor) were used to pretreat pTr cells. The results showed that coumestrol-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 MAPK and P90RSK was blocked by U0126. In addition, the increased phosphorylation in response to coumestrol was completely inhibited following pre-treatment incubation of pTr cells in the presence of LY294002 and U0126. Furthermore, these two inhibitors suppressed the ability of coumestrol to induce migration of pTr cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that coumestrol affects embryonic development through activation of the PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 MAPK cell signal transduction pathways and improvement in the uterine environment through coumestrol supplementation may provide beneficial effects of enhancing embryonic and fetal survival and development. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2733-2740, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS Proteins Interact with Ethylene Receptor Signaling Complex, Supporting a Regulatory Role for ARGOS in Ethylene Signal Transduction[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates plant growth and development as well as plant response to environmental cues. ARGOS genes reduce plant sensitivity to ethylene when overexpressed in transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays). A previous genetic study suggested that the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-localized maize ARGOS1 targets the ethylene signal transduction components at or upstream of CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1, but the mechanism of ARGOS modulating ethylene signaling is unknown. Here, we demonstrate in Arabidopsis that ZmARGOS1, as well as the Arabidopsis ARGOS homolog ORGAN SIZE RELATED1, physically interacts with Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1), an ethylene receptor interacting protein that regulates the activity of ETHYLENE RESPONSE1. The protein-protein interaction was also detected with the yeast split-ubiquitin two-hybrid system. Using the same yeast assay, we found that maize RTE1 homolog REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 LIKE4 (ZmRTL4) and ZmRTL2 also interact with maize and Arabidopsis ARGOS proteins. Like AtRTE1 in Arabidopsis, ZmRTL4 and ZmRTL2 reduce ethylene responses when overexpressed in maize, indicating a similar mechanism for ARGOS regulating ethylene signaling in maize. A polypeptide fragment derived from ZmARGOS8, consisting of a Pro-rich motif flanked by two transmembrane helices that are conserved among members of the ARGOS family, can interact with AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins in Arabidopsis. The conserved domain is necessary and sufficient to reduce ethylene sensitivity in Arabidopsis and maize. Overall, these results suggest a physical association between ARGOS and the ethylene receptor signaling complex via AtRTE1 and maize RTL proteins, supporting a role for ARGOS in regulating ethylene perception and the early steps of signal transduction in Arabidopsis and maize. PMID:27268962

  15. Structure of Concatenated HAMP Domains Provides a Mechanism for Signal Transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airola, Michael V.; Watts, Kylie J.; Bilwes, Alexandrine M.; Crane, Brian R. (Cornell); (Lorma Linda U)

    2010-08-23

    HAMP domains are widespread prokaryotic signaling modules found as single domains or poly-HAMP chains in both transmembrane and soluble proteins. The crystal structure of a three-unit poly-HAMP chain from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa soluble receptor Aer2 defines a universal parallel four-helix bundle architecture for diverse HAMP domains. Two contiguous domains integrate to form a concatenated di-HAMP structure. The three HAMP domains display two distinct conformations that differ by changes in helical register, crossing angle, and rotation. These conformations are stabilized by different subsets of conserved residues. Known signals delivered to HAMP would be expected to switch the relative stability of the two conformations and the position of a coiled-coil phase stutter at the junction with downstream helices. We propose that the two conformations represent opposing HAMP signaling states and suggest a signaling mechanism whereby HAMP domains interconvert between the two states, which alternate down a poly-HAMP chain.

  16. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  17. Phosphodiesterase 4 and compartmentalization of cyclic AMP signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhengChao; SHI FangXiong

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), as a second messenger, plays a critical role in cellular signaling transduction. However, it is not clear how this apparently identical cAMP signal induces divergent physiological responses. The potential explanation that cAMP signaling is compartmentalized was proposed by Buxton and Brunton twenty years ago. Compartmentalization of cAMP signaling allows spatially distinct pools of protein kinase A (PKA) to be differently activated. Research on cAMP signaling has regained impetus in many fields of life sciences due to the progress in understanding cAMP signaling complexity and functional diversity. The cAMP/PKA signaling compartments are maintained by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) which bind PKA and other signaling proteins, and by PDEs which hydrolyse cAMP and thus terminate PKA activity. PDE4 enzymes belong to PDE superfamily and stand at a crossroad that allows them to integrate various signaling pathways with that of cAMP in spatially distinct compartments. In the current review, the nomenclature, taxonomy and gene expression of PDE4, and the system and region of its effect are described. In addition, the idiographic molecules, mechanisms, and regulation models of PDE4 are summarized. Furthermore, the important roles PDE4 plays in the maturation of rat granulosa cells and cAMP signaling compartmentalization are discussed.

  18. The protein interaction network of a taxis signal transduction system in a Halophilic Archaeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlesner Matthias

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The taxis signaling system of the extreme halophilic archaeon Halobacterium (Hbt. salinarum differs in several aspects from its model bacterial counterparts Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We studied the protein interactions in the Hbt. salinarum taxis signaling system to gain an understanding of its structure, to gain knowledge about its known components and to search for new members. Results The interaction analysis revealed that the core signaling proteins are involved in different protein complexes and our data provide evidence for dynamic interchanges between them. Fifteen of the eighteen taxis receptors (halobacterial transducers, Htrs can be assigned to four different groups depending on their interactions with the core signaling proteins. Only one of these groups, which contains six of the eight Htrs with known signals, shows the composition expected for signaling complexes (receptor, kinase CheA, adaptor CheW, response regulator CheY. From the two Hbt. salinarum CheW proteins, only CheW1 is engaged in signaling complexes with Htrs and CheA, whereas CheW2 interacts with Htrs but not with CheA. CheY connects the core signaling structure to a subnetwork consisting of the two CheF proteins (which build a link to the flagellar apparatus, CheD (the hub of the subnetwork, two CheC complexes and the receptor methylesterase CheB. Conclusions Based on our findings, we propose two hypotheses. First, Hbt. salinarum might have the capability to dynamically adjust the impact of certain Htrs or Htr clusters depending on its current needs or environmental conditions. Secondly, we propose a hypothetical feedback loop from the response regulator to Htr methylation made from the CheC proteins, CheD and CheB, which might contribute to adaptation analogous to the CheC/CheD system of B. subtilis.

  19. Cross-membrane signal transduction of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs): from systems biology to systems pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Neil; van der Graaf, Piet H; Peletier, Lambertus A

    2013-03-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases are high-affinity cell surface receptors for many polypeptide growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. They straddle the cell wall and play an important role in cross-membrane signalling. We present a two-component systems pharmacology model based on the local physiology and identify characteristic features of its dynamics. We thus present a transparent tool for studying the effects of drug intervention and ways of administration on cross-membrane signalling through these receptors.

  20. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-03

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS.

  1. Hair cell specific NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in vestibular end organs: potential role of purinergic signaling in vestibular sensory transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Mary G; Thorne, Peter R; Housley, Gary D; Robson, Simon C; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2012-01-01

    A complex extracellular nucleotide signalling system acting on P2 receptors is involved in regulation of cochlear function in the mammalian inner ear. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) are ectonucleotidases that regulate P2 receptor signalling pathways in mammalian tissues by hydrolysing extracellular nucleotides to the respective nucleosides. All enzymes from the CD39/ENTPD family (NTPDase1-8) are expressed in the adult rat cochlea, but their expression and distribution in the vestibular end organ is unknown. This report demonstrates selective expression of NTPDase6 by rat vestibular hair cells. Hair cells transducing both angular acceleration (crista ampullaris) and static head position (maculae of the utricle and saccule) exhibited strong immunolabelling with a bias towards the sensory pole and in particular, the hair cell bundle. NTPDase6 is an intracellular enzyme that can be released in a soluble form from cell cultures and shows an enzymatic preference for nucleoside 5'-diphosphates, such as guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) and uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP). The main function of NTPDase6 may be the regulation of nucleotide levels in cellular organelles by regulating the conversion of nucleotides to nucleosides. NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in the vestibular end organ could be linked to the regulation of P2 receptor signalling and sensory transduction, including maintenance of vestibular hair bundles.

  2. A role for ceramide, but not diacylglycerol, in the antagonism of insulin signal transduction by saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Jose Antonio; Knotts, Trina A; Wang, Li-Ping; Li, Guibin; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Florant, Gregory L; Summers, Scott A

    2003-03-21

    Multiple studies suggest that lipid oversupply to skeletal muscle contributes to the development of insulin resistance, perhaps by promoting the accumulation of lipid metabolites capable of inhibiting signal transduction. Herein we demonstrate that exposing muscle cells to particular saturated free fatty acids (FFAs), but not mono-unsaturated FFAs, inhibits insulin stimulation of Akt/protein kinase B, a serine/threonine kinase that is a central mediator of insulin-stimulated anabolic metabolism. These saturated FFAs concomitantly induced the accumulation of ceramide and diacylglycerol, two products of fatty acyl-CoA that have been shown to accumulate in insulin-resistant tissues and to inhibit early steps in insulin signaling. Preventing de novo ceramide synthesis negated the antagonistic effect of saturated FFAs toward Akt/protein kinase B. Moreover, inducing ceramide buildup recapitulated and augmented the inhibitory effect of saturated FFAs. By contrast, diacylglycerol proved dispensable for these FFA effects. Collectively these results identify ceramide as a necessary and sufficient intermediate linking saturated fats to the inhibition of insulin signaling.

  3. Novel mechanisms and signaling pathways of esophageal ulcer healing: the role of prostaglandin EP2 receptors, cAMP, and pCREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Baatar, Dolgor; Jones, Michael K; Tarnawski, Andrzej S

    2014-09-15

    Clinical studies indicate that prostaglandins of E class (PGEs) may promote healing of tissue injury e.g., gastroduodenal and dermal ulcers. However, the precise roles of PGEs, their E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, signaling pathways including cAMP and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and their relation to VEGF and angiogenesis in the tissue injury healing process remain unknown, forming the rationale for this study. Using an esophageal ulcer model in rats, we demonstrated that esophageal mucosa expresses predominantly EP2 receptors and that esophageal ulceration triggers an increase in expression of the EP2 receptor, activation of CREB (the downstream target of the cAMP signaling), and enhanced VEGF gene expression. Treatment of rats with misoprostol, a PGE1 analog capable of activating EP receptors, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB, stimulated VEGF expression and angiogenesis, and accelerated esophageal ulcer healing. In cultured human esophageal epithelial (HET-1A) cells, misoprostol increased intracellular cAMP levels (by 163-fold), induced phosphorylation of CREB, and stimulated VEGF expression. A cAMP analog (Sp-cAMP) mimicked, whereas an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (Rp-cAMP) blocked, these effects of misoprostol. These results indicate that the EP2/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway mediates the stimulatory effect of PGEs on angiogenesis essential for tissue injury healing via the induction of CREB activity and VEGF expression.

  4. Comprehensive logic based analyses of Toll-like receptor 4 signal transduction pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kumar Padwal

    Full Text Available Among the 13 TLRs in the vertebrate systems, only TLR4 utilizes both Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88 and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR-domain-containing adapter interferon-β-inducing Factor (TRIF adaptors to transduce signals triggering host-protective immune responses. Earlier studies on the pathway combined various experimental data in the form of one comprehensive map of TLR signaling. But in the absence of adequate kinetic parameters quantitative mathematical models that reveal emerging systems level properties and dynamic inter-regulation among the kinases/phosphatases of the TLR4 network are not yet available. So, here we used reaction stoichiometry-based and parameter independent logical modeling formalism to build the TLR4 signaling network model that captured the feedback regulations, interdependencies between signaling kinases and phosphatases and the outcome of simulated infections. The analyses of the TLR4 signaling network revealed 360 feedback loops, 157 negative and 203 positive; of which, 334 loops had the phosphatase PP1 as an essential component. The network elements' interdependency (positive or negative dependencies in perturbation conditions such as the phosphatase knockout conditions revealed interdependencies between the dual-specific phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 and the kinases in MAPK modules and the role of PP2A in the auto-regulation of Calmodulin kinase-II. Our simulations under the specific kinase or phosphatase gene-deficiency or inhibition conditions corroborated with several previously reported experimental data. The simulations to mimic Yersinia pestis and E. coli infections identified the key perturbation in the network and potential drug targets. Thus, our analyses of TLR4 signaling highlights the role of phosphatases as key regulatory factors in determining the global interdependencies among the network elements; uncovers novel signaling connections; identifies potential drug targets for

  5. Effects of Inhibiting JAK on Invasion and Metastasis of the Human Breast Cancer Cells through ERK Signaling Transduction Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Zhao; Hong-fang Chen; Hua-yu Deng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of Janus activated kinase (JAK) inhibitor AG490 on the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK) in human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and the roles of JAK in the invasion and metastasis of the human breast cancer cells through ERK signaling transduction pathways.Methods: MDA-MB-231 cells were treated with 20 (mol/L, 40 (mol/L, 80 (mol/L Janus kinase inhibitor AG490 for 24, 48 and 72 h. Proliferation and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to matrigel were measured with MTT assay. When treated with 40 (mol/L AG490 for 24 h, the expressions of P-ERK and MMP-9 of cells were detected by Western-blot and invasion and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells were evaluated with transwell chamber.Results: After being treated with 20 (mol/L, 40 (mol/L, 80 (mol/L AG490 for 24, 48 and 72 h, the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells was inhibited in a dose-and time-dependent manner. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with 40 (mol/L AG490 for 30, 60, 90 and 120 min resulted in the increasing adhesion of cells to Matrigel in a time-dependent manner. However, capacity of adhesion in the group treated with AG490 was significantly decreased in comparison with the control group (P<0.01). The expression level of P-ERK and MMP-9 were decreased when treated with AG490. After treatment with 40 (mol/L AG490, in invasion assay, the number of cells in AG490 treated group to migrate to filter coated with Matrigel was reduced compared with control group (P<0.05). Meanwhile, in migration assay, the number of cells in AG490 treated group to migrate to filter was also decreased compared with control group (P<0.05).Conclusion: Our study indicates that JAK kinase could affect the activity of ERK signal transduction pathway through the phosphorylation of ERK. The inhibitory effects of JAK kinase on MMP-9 expression and invasion of breast cancer cells were associated with the down-regulation of the ERK signaling pathway.

  6. Methoxychlor enhances degranulation of murine mast cells by regulating FcεRI-mediated signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunaga, Sho; Nishi, Kosuke; Nishimoto, Sogo; Sugahara, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Methoxychlor, an organochlorine insecticide developed to replace DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane), has been reported to induce mast cell degranulation and to enhance IgE-mediated allergic responses. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not clear. To clarify potential mechanisms, the effects of methoxychlor on degranulation of mast cells were examined. Degranulation responses were evaluated using RBL-2H3 cells and mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells with either the antigen-induced or calcium ionophore-induced stimulation. Phosphorylation of enzymes related to signaling events associated with mast cell degranulation was analyzed by immunoblotting. Effects on vascular permeability in the passive cutaneous anaphylaxis reaction were evaluated following oral administration of methoxychlor to BALB/c mice. The results indicated that methoxychlor caused increased mast cell degranulation in the presence of antigen, whereas it had no effect on calcium ionophore-induced degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that the phosphorylation level of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (which plays a central role in mast cell signaling) was increased by methoxychlor during antigen-induced degranulation. In addition, methoxychlor activated the signaling pathway via the high-affinity IgE receptor by inducing phosphorylation of Syk and PLCγ1/2, which transfer the signal for degranulation downstream. Lastly, oral administration of methoxychlor exhibited a tendency to promote vascular permeability in passive cutaneous anaphylaxis model mice. Taken together, the results here suggested that methoxychlor enhanced degranulation through FcεRI-mediated signaling and promoted allergenic symptoms involved in mast cell degranulation.

  7. Cyclase-associated proteins: CAPacity for linking signal transduction and actin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubberstey, Andrew V; Mottillo, Emilio P

    2002-04-01

    Many extracellular signals elicit changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which are mediated through an array of signaling proteins and pathways. One family of proteins that plays a role in regulating actin remodeling in response to cellular signals are the cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs). CAPs are highly conserved monomeric actin binding proteins present in a wide range of organisms including yeast, fly, plants, and mammals. The original CAP was isolated as a component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex that serves as an effector of Ras during nutritional signaling. CAPs are multifunctional molecules that contain domains involved in actin binding, adenylyl cyclase association in yeast, SH3 binding, and oligomerization. Genetic studies in yeast have implicated CAPs in vesicle trafficking and endocytosis. CAPs play a developmental role in multicellular organisms, and studies of Drosophila have illuminated the importance of the actin cytoskeleton during eye development and in establishing oocyte polarity. This review will highlight the critical structural and functional domains of CAPs, describe recent studies that have implied important roles for these proteins in linking cell signaling with actin polymerization, and highlight their roles in vesicle trafficking and development.

  8. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Robert S., E-mail: Robert.Krauss@mssm.edu [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre and Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed.

  9. Chloroplast His-to-Asp signal transduction: a potential mechanism for plastid gene regulation in Heterosigma akashiwo (Raphidophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Michael A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintenance of homeostasis requires that an organism perceive selected physical and chemical signals within an informationally dense environment. Functionally, an organism uses a variety of signal transduction arrays to amplify and convert these perceived signals into appropriate gene transcriptional responses. These changes in gene expression serve to modify selective metabolic processes and thus optimize reproductive success. Here we analyze a chloroplast-encoded His-to-Asp signal transduction circuit in the stramenopile Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada Hada ex Y. Hara et Chihara [syn. H. carterae (Hulburt F.J.R. Taylor]. The presence, structure and putative function of this protein pair are discussed in the context of their evolutionary homologues. Results Bioinformatic analysis of the Heterosigma akashiwo chloroplast genome sequence revealed the presence of a single two-component His-to-Asp (designated Tsg1/Trg1 pair in this stramenopile (golden-brown alga. These data represent the first documentation of a His-to-Asp array in stramenopiles and counter previous reports suggesting that such regulatory proteins are lacking in this taxonomic cluster. Comparison of the 43 kDa H. akashiwo Tsg1 with bacterial sensor kinases showed that the algal protein exhibits a moderately maintained PAS motif in the sensor kinase domain as well as highly conserved H, N, G1 and F motifs within the histidine kinase ATP binding site. Molecular modelling of the 27 kDa H. akashiwo Trg1 regulator protein was consistent with a winged helix-turn-helix identity – a class of proteins that is known to impact gene expression at the level of transcription. The occurrence of Trg1 protein in actively growing H. akashiwo cells was verified by Western analysis. The presence of a PhoB-like RNA polymerase loop in Trg1 and its homologues in the red-algal lineage support the hypothesis that Trg1 and its homologues interact with a sigma 70 (σ70 subunit (encoded by

  10. Signal transduction in cerebral arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage-a phosphoproteomic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Benjamin; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard

    2013-01-01

    After subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), pathologic changes in cerebral arteries contribute to delayed cerebral ischemia and poor outcome. We hypothesize such changes are triggered by early intracellular signals, targeting of which may prevent SAH-induced vasculopathy. We performed an unbiased quanti......-induced signaling components downstream and upstream of ERK1/2.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 29 May 2013; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2013.78....... quantitative analysis of early SAH-induced phosphorylations in cerebral arteries and evaluated identified signaling components as targets for prevention of delayed vasculopathy and ischemia. Labeled phosphopeptides from rat cerebral arteries were quantified by high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry. Selected...

  11. Regulation of Signal Transduction and Role of Platelets in Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nowatari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Among all organs, the liver has a unique regeneration capability after sustaining injury or the loss of tissue that occurs mainly due to mitosis in the hepatocytes that are quiescent under normal conditions. Liver regeneration is induced through a cascade of various cytokines and growth factors, such as, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6, hepatocyte growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor, which activate nuclear factor κB, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase signaling pathways. We previously reported that platelets can play important roles in liver regeneration through a direct effect on hepatocytes and collaborative effects with the nonparenchymal cells of the liver, including Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, which participate in liver regeneration through the production of various growth factors and cytokines. In this paper, the roles of platelets and nonparenchymal cells in liver regeneration, including the associated cytokines, growth factors, and signaling pathways, are described.

  12. Signal Transduction of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate G Protein—Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Young

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive lipid capable of eliciting dramatic effects in a variety of cell types. Signaling by this molecule is by a family of five G protein—coupled receptors named S1P1–5 that signal through a variety of pathways to regulate cell proliferation, migration, cytoskeletal organization, and differentiation. These receptors are expressed in a wide variety of tissues and cell types, and their cellular effects contribute to important biological and pathological functions of S1P in many processes, including angiogenesis, vascular development, lymphocyte trafficking, and cancer. This review will focus on the current progress in the field of S1P receptor signaling and biology.

  13. Two-component signal transduction pathways regulating growth and cell cycle progression in a bacterium: a system-level analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Skerker

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Two-component signal transduction systems, comprised of histidine kinases and their response regulator substrates, are the predominant means by which bacteria sense and respond to extracellular signals. These systems allow cells to adapt to prevailing conditions by modifying cellular physiology, including initiating programs of gene expression, catalyzing reactions, or modifying protein-protein interactions. These signaling pathways have also been demonstrated to play a role in coordinating bacterial cell cycle progression and development. Here we report a system-level investigation of two-component pathways in the model organism Caulobacter crescentus. First, by a comprehensive deletion analysis we show that at least 39 of the 106 two-component genes are required for cell cycle progression, growth, or morphogenesis. These include nine genes essential for growth or viability of the organism. We then use a systematic biochemical approach, called phosphotransfer profiling, to map the connectivity of histidine kinases and response regulators. Combining these genetic and biochemical approaches, we identify a new, highly conserved essential signaling pathway from the histidine kinase CenK to the response regulator CenR, which plays a critical role in controlling cell envelope biogenesis and structure. Depletion of either cenK or cenR leads to an unusual, severe blebbing of cell envelope material, whereas constitutive activation of the pathway compromises cell envelope integrity, resulting in cell lysis and death. We propose that the CenK-CenR pathway may be a suitable target for new antibiotic development, given previous successes in targeting the bacterial cell wall. Finally, the ability of our in vitro phosphotransfer profiling method to identify signaling pathways that operate in vivo takes advantage of an observation that histidine kinases are endowed with a global kinetic preference for their cognate response regulators. We propose that this

  14. Integration of Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation in a Glucose Signal Transduction Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong-Ho; Brachet, Valérie; Moriya, Hisao; Johnston, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Expression of the HXT genes encoding glucose transporters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by two interconnected glucose-signaling pathways: the Snf3/Rgt2-Rgt1 glucose induction pathway and the Snf1-Mig1 glucose repression pathway. The Snf3 and Rgt2 glucose sensors in the membrane generate a signal in the presence of glucose that inhibits the functions of Std1 and Mth1, paralogous proteins that regulate the function of the Rgt1 transcription factor, which binds to th...

  15. Investigation on the role of IGF-1 signal transduction in the biological radiation responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, U Hee; Jo, Sung Kee; Park, Hae Ran; Oh, Soo Jin; Cho, Eun Hee; Eom, Hyun Soo; Ju, Eun Jin

    2009-05-15

    Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the IGF-1 related gene expressions and activations in various cell lines - Various expression patterns of IGF-1 and IGF-1R following {gamma}-irradiation were observed according to the cell lines - The increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in Balb/3T3 and NIH/3T3 cells - Among the IGF-1 downstream signaling molecules, the phosphorylated ERK5 were not changed by {gamma}-irradiation in all three examined cell lines, whereas the phosphorylated p65 were increased by {gamma} -irradiation in all cell lines. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in {gamma}-irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells - In MEF cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules were decreased and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by {gamma}-irradiation - The experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 signaling is involved but not essential in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence and that p38 MAP kinase play a important role in this cellular radiation response. The role of IGF-1 and p38 signaling in {gamma}-irradiated mouse fibroblast (NIH/3T3) cell - In NIH/3T3 cells, IGF-1 signaling molecules and p21/phosphorylated p38 were increased by {gamma} -irradiation. - However, the experiments with IGF-1R inhibitor (AG1024) and p38 inhibitor (SB203580) revealed that IGF-1 and p38 signaling do not play a crucial role in radiation-induced cell growth arrest and senescence in NIH/3T3 cells. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation on the expressions and activations on the genes related to the IGF-1 signaling in mouse tissues - In {gamma}-irradiated mice, the increased expressions of IGF-1 and IGF-1R were observed in the lung and kidney at 2 months after irradiation, and in all the tissues examined (lung, liver and kidney) at 6 months after irradiation. - In the lung of {gamma}-irradiated mice at 6 months after irradiation, the increases of IGF-1R, phosphorylated FOXO3a, p65, p38, p21 were observed. - The

  16. Molecular profiling reveals diversity of stress signal transduction cascades in highly penetrant Alzheimer's disease human skin fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella Mendonsa

    Full Text Available The serious and growing impact of the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD as an individual and societal burden raises a number of key questions: Can a blanket test for Alzheimer's disease be devised forecasting long-term risk for acquiring this disorder? Can a unified therapy be devised to forestall the development of AD as well as improve the lot of present sufferers? Inflammatory and oxidative stresses are associated with enhanced risk for AD. Can an AD molecular signature be identified in signaling pathways for communication within and among cells during inflammatory and oxidative stress, suggesting possible biomarkers and therapeutic avenues? We postulated a unique molecular signature of dysfunctional activity profiles in AD-relevant signaling pathways in peripheral tissues, based on a gain of function in G-protein-coupled bradykinin B2 receptor (BKB2R inflammatory stress signaling in skin fibroblasts from AD patients that results in tau protein Ser hyperphosphorylation. Such a signaling profile, routed through both phosphorylation and proteolytic cascades activated by inflammatory and oxidative stresses in highly penetrant familial monogenic forms of AD, could be informative for pathogenesis of the complex multigenic sporadic form of AD. Comparing stimulus-specific cascades of signal transduction revealed a striking diversity of molecular signaling profiles in AD human skin fibroblasts that express endogenous levels of mutant presenilins PS-1 or PS-2 or the Trisomy 21 proteome. AD fibroblasts bearing the PS-1 M146L mutation associated with highly aggressive AD displayed persistent BKB2R signaling plus decreased ERK activation by BK, correctible by gamma-secretase inhibitor Compound E. Lack of these effects in the homologous PS-2 mutant cells indicates specificity of presenilin gamma-secretase catalytic components in BK signaling biology directed toward MAPK activation. Oxidative stress revealed a JNK-dependent survival

  17. Endoglin promotes endothelial cell proliferation and TGF-beta/ALK1 signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebrin, F; Goumans, MJ; Jonker, L; Carvalho, RLC; Valdimarsdottir, G; Thorikay, M; Mummery, C; Arthur, HM; ten Dijke, P

    2004-01-01

    Endoglin is a transmembrane accessory receptor for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) that is predominantly expressed on proliferating endothelial cells in culture and on angiogenic blood vessels in vivo. Endoglin, as well as other TGF-beta signalling components, is essential during angiogen

  18. Shuffling the cards in signal transduction: Calcium, arachidonic acid and mechanosensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca; Munaron

    2011-01-01

    Cell signaling is a very complex network of biochemical reactions triggered by a huge number of stimuli coming from the external medium. The function of any single signaling component depends not only on its own structure but also on its connections with other biomolecules. During prokaryotic-eukaryotic transition, the rearrangement of cell organization in terms of diffusional compartmentalization exerts a deep change in cell signaling functional potentiality. In this review I briefly introduce an intriguing ancient relationship between pathways involved in cell responses to chemical agonists (growth factors, nutrients, hormones) as well as to mechanical forces (stretch, osmotic changes). Some biomolecules (ion channels and enzymes) act as "hubs", thanks to their ability to be directly or indirectly chemically/mechanically co-regulated. In particular calcium signaling machinery and arachidonic acid metabolism are very ancient networks, already present before eukaryotic appearance. A number of molecular "hubs", including phospholipase A2 and some calcium channels, appear tightly interconnected in a cross regulation leading to the cellular response to chemical and mechanical stimulations.

  19. Multifunctional scaffolds in eggs: sites for localization, signal transduction and meiotic spindle polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, James J; Capco, David G

    2013-01-01

    Molecular scaffolds in the mammalian egg are capable of tethering specific proteins involved in regulation of early development. Scaffolds can take the form of cytoskeletal elements, or involve proteins such as MARCKs or RACKSs during important cellular transitions in the egg. Moreover, with each cellular transition (i.e. germinal vesicle breakdown, meiosis I, meiosis II, etc) comes an extensive rearrangement of architectural elements within the cell. To accomplish this regulatory elements in signaling pathways should be in close molecular proximity to other discrete signaling pathways both to increase the speed of chemical reactions and to promote crosstalk. Crosstalk between signaling pathways is essential to modulate downstream effectors as one pathway can trigger activation/inhibition of another. It also is important to sequester or restrict access to various signaling enzymes for later use. These requirements create both morphological and biochemical heterogeneity, and likely necessitate the use of molecular scaffolds. This review examines the body of literature suggesting cytoskeletal elements serve to meet the aforementioned requirements in the mammalian egg.

  20. Control of Mammary Differentiation by Ras-Dependent Signal Transduction Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    include anti-Stat5, sc-835 ( SantaCruz Bio- with EGF reversed the EGF-induced inhibition of the technology, Santa Cruz, CA), anti-phosphoStat5 (Cell...anti-Stat5, sc-835 producible experiment indicated that DIP stimulation ( SantaCruz ), anti-phosphoStat5 (Cell Signaling), anti- in the presence of the

  1. Brassinosteroid regulated kinases (BRKs) that mediate brassinosteroid signal transduction and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Tang, Wenqiang

    2013-09-24

    The present invention identifies a novel family of kinases regulated by brassinosteroids, referred to as BRKs (brassinosteroid regulated kinases) or BSKs (brassinosteroid signaling kinases). The present invention provides methods for modulating the response of a plant cell to a brassinosteroid using BRKs.

  2. Expansion of Signal Transduction Pathways in Fungi by Extensive Genome Duplication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corrochano, Luis M; Kuo, Alan; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Polaino, Silvia; Salamov, Asaf; Villalobos-Escobedo, José M; Grimwood, Jane; Álvarez, M Isabel; Avalos, Javier; Bauer, Diane; Benito, Ernesto P; Benoit, Isabelle; Burger, Gertraud; Camino, Lola P; Cánovas, David; Cerdá-Olmedo, Enrique; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Domínguez, Angel; Eliáš, Marek; Eslava, Arturo P; Glaser, Fabian; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Heitman, Joseph; Henrissat, Bernard; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Lang, B Franz; Lavín, José L; Lee, Soo Chan; Li, Wenjun; Lindquist, Erika; López-García, Sergio; Luque, Eva M; Marcos, Ana T; Martin, Joel; McCluskey, Kevin; Medina, Humberto R; Miralles-Durán, Alejandro; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Muñoz-Torres, Elisa; Oguiza, José A; Ohm, Robin A; Olmedo, María; Orejas, Margarita; Ortiz-Castellanos, Lucila; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Rodríguez-Romero, Julio; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa; Sanz, Catalina; Schackwitz, Wendy; Shahriari, Mahdi; Shelest, Ekaterina; Silva-Franco, Fátima; Soanes, Darren; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tagua, Víctor G; Talbot, Nicholas J; Thon, Michael R; Tice, Hope; de Vries, Ronald P; Wiebenga, Ad; Yadav, Jagjit S; Braun, Edward L; Baker, Scott E; Garre, Victoriano; Schmutz, Jeremy; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Idnurm, Alexander; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Gabaldón, Toni; Grigoriev, Igor V

    2016-01-01

    Plants and fungi use light and other signals to regulate development, growth, and metabolism. The fruiting bodies of the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus are single cells that react to environmental cues, including light, but the mechanisms are largely unknown [1]. The related fungus Mucor circinello

  3. Signal transduction pathways in the pentameric ligand-gated ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Mowrey

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of allosteric action within pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs remain to be determined. Using crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, and two-electrode voltage clamp measurements, we identified two functionally relevant sites in the extracellular (EC domain of the bacterial pLGIC from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC. One site is at the C-loop region, where the NQN mutation (D91N, E177Q, and D178N eliminated inter-subunit salt bridges in the open-channel GLIC structure and thereby shifted the channel activation to a higher agonist concentration. The other site is below the C-loop, where binding of the anesthetic ketamine inhibited GLIC currents in a concentration dependent manner. To understand how a perturbation signal in the EC domain, either resulting from the NQN mutation or ketamine binding, is transduced to the channel gate, we have used the Perturbation-based Markovian Transmission (PMT model to determine dynamic responses of the GLIC channel and signaling pathways upon initial perturbations in the EC domain of GLIC. Despite the existence of many possible routes for the initial perturbation signal to reach the channel gate, the PMT model in combination with Yen's algorithm revealed that perturbation signals with the highest probability flow travel either via the β1-β2 loop or through pre-TM1. The β1-β2 loop occurs in either intra- or inter-subunit pathways, while pre-TM1 occurs exclusively in inter-subunit pathways. Residues involved in both types of pathways are well supported by previous experimental data on nAChR. The direct coupling between pre-TM1 and TM2 of the adjacent subunit adds new insight into the allosteric signaling mechanism in pLGICs.

  4. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Paula; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity towards H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underline the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  5. Estimation of kinetic parameters related to biochemical interactions between hydrogen peroxide and signal transduction proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Matos de Brito

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The lack of kinetic data concerning the biological effects of reactive oxygen species is slowing down the development of the field of redox signaling. Herein, we deduced and applied equations to estimate kinetic parameters from typical redox signaling experiments. H2O2-sensing mediated by the oxidation of a protein target and the switch-off of this sensor, by being converted back to its reduced form, are the two processes for which kinetic parameters are determined. The experimental data required to apply the equations deduced is the fraction of the H2O2 sensor protein in the reduced or in the oxidized state measured in intact cells or living tissues after exposure to either endogenous or added H2O2. Either non-linear fittings that do not need transformation of the experimental data or linearized plots in which deviations from the equations are easily observed can be used. The equations were shown to be valid by fitting to them virtual time courses simulated with a kinetic model. The good agreement between the kinetic parameters estimated in these fittings and those used to simulate the virtual time courses supported the accuracy of the kinetic equations deduced. Finally, equations were successfully tested with real data taken from published experiments that describe redox signaling mediated by the oxidation of two protein tyrosine phosphatases, PTP1B and SHP-2, which are two of the few H2O2-sensing proteins with known kinetic parameters. Whereas for PTP1B estimated kinetic parameters fitted in general the present knowledge, for SHP-2 results obtained suggest that reactivity towards H2O2 as well as the rate of SHP-2 regeneration back to its reduced form are higher than previously thought. In conclusion, valuable quantitative kinetic data can be estimated from typical redox signaling experiments, thus improving our understanding about the complex processes that underline the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling responses.

  6. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in S100A4-induced activation of the transcription factor NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mælandsmo Gunhild M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metastasis-promoting protein S100A4 activates the transcription factor NF-κB through the classical NF-κB activation pathway. The upstream signal transduction mechanisms leading to increased NF-κB activity are, however, incompletely characterized. Methods The human osteosarcoma cell line II-11b was stimulated with recombinant S100A4 in the presence or absence of inhibitors of common signal transduction pathways, and NF-κB activity was examined using a luciferase-based reporter assay and phosphorylation of IκBα. mRNA expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, protein expression was examined by Western blotting and IKK activity was measured using an in vitro kinase assay. The role of upstream kinases and the cell surface receptor RAGE was investigated by overexpression of dominant negative proteins and by siRNA transfection. Results The Ser/Thr kinase inhibitors H-7 and staurosporine inhibited S100A4-induced IκBα phosphorylation and subsequent NF-κB activation. The protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein and the phospholipase C inhibitor compound 48/80 had a partial inhibitory effect on IκBα phosphorylation, whereas inhibitors of protein kinase C, G-protein coupled receptors and PI 3-kinases had no effect on the level of phosphorylation. Interestingly, S100A4 treatment induced activating phosphorylations of IKKα/β, but neither H-7 nor staurosporine was able to significantly inhibit IKK activation. Dominant negative MEKK1 or NIK did not inhibit S100A4-induced NF-κB activity, and S100A4 stimulation did not influence AKT phosphorylation. Furthermore, diminished expression of the putative S100 protein receptor RAGE did not affect the observed phosphorylation of IκBα. Conclusions S100A4 activates NF-κB by inducing phosphorylation of IKKα/β, leading to increased IκBα phosphorylation. The Ser/Thr kinase inhibitors H-7 and staurosporine attenuated S100A4-induced NF-κB activation and inhibited IKK

  7. Signal transduction by HLA-DR is mediated by tyrosine kinase(s) and regulated by CD45 in activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L;

    1991-01-01

    , but the inhibitory effect of CD45 dominated over the enhancing effect of CD4. These data indicate that PTK activation is obligatory for DR-induced (Ca2+)i responses, suggesting a linkage between these pathways in class II signal transduction. This conclusion is consistent with our observation that in activated human...

  8. Effect of proline rich domain of an RNA-binding protein Sam68 in cell growth process, death and B cell signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qing-hua; FAN Tian-xue; PANG Tian-xiang; YUAN Wen-su; HAN Zhong-chao

    2006-01-01

    Background Sam68 plays an important role as a multiple functional RNA binding nuclear protein in cell cycle progress, RNA usage, signal transduction, and tyrosine phosphorylation by Src during mitosis. However, its precise impact on these essential cellular functions remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to further elucidate Sam68 functions in RNA metabolism, signal transduction regulation of cell growth and cell proliferation in DT40 cell line.Methods By using gene targeting method, we isolated a mutation form of Sam68 in DT40 cells and described its effect on cell growth process and signal transduction. Southern, Northern, and Western blot, phosphorylation and flow-cytometfic analyses were performed to investigate the Sam68 functions.Results A slower growth rate (2.1 hours growth elongation) and longer S phase (1.7 hours elongation) was observed in the Sam68 mutant cells. Serum depletion resulted in increased amounts of dead cells, and expansion of S phase in mutant cells. Upon B cell cross-linking, the maximal level of tyrosine phosphorylation on BLNK was observed to be significantly lower in mutant cells.Conclusions The proline rich domain of Sam68 is involved in cell growth control by modulating the function of mRNAs in S phase or earlier and the functions as an adaptor molecule in B cell signal transduction pathways.

  9. Ca2+ is involved in muscarine-acetylcholine-receptor-mediated acetylcholine signal transduction in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fanxia; MIAO Long; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neurochemical transmitter in animals; it also exists in plants and plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. ACh has been known to induce the stomatal opening. By monitoring the changes of cytosolic Ca2+ with fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM under the confocal microscopy,we found that exogenous ACh increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of guard cells of Vicia faba L. Muscarine, an agonist of muscarine acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), could do so as well. In contrast, atropine, the antagonist of mAChR abolished the ability of ACh to increase Ca2+ in guard cells.This mechanism is similar to mAChR in animals. When EGTA was used to chelate Ca2+ or ruthenium red to block Ca2+ released from vacuole respectively, the results showed that the increased cytosolic Ca2+ mainly come from intracellular Ca2+ store. The evidence supports that Ca2+ is involved in guard-cell response to ACh and that Ca2+ signal is coupled to mAChRs in ACh signal transduction in guard cells.

  10. A comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Helikar

    Full Text Available The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src and receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB1 have been established as collaborators in cellular signaling and their combined dysregulation plays key roles in human cancers, including breast cancer. In part due to the complexity of the biochemical network associated with the regulation of these proteins as well as their cellular functions, the role of Src in EGFR regulation remains unclear. Herein we present a new comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells. This model, constructed manually from published biochemical literature, consists of 245 nodes representing proteins and their post-translational modifications sites, and over 1,000 biochemical interactions. Using computer simulations of the model, we find it is able to reproduce a number of cellular phenomena. Furthermore, the model predicts that overexpression of Src results in increased endocytosis of EGFR in the absence/low amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF. Our subsequent laboratory experiments also suggest increased internalization of EGFR upon Src overexpression under EGF-deprived conditions, further supporting this model-generated hypothesis.

  11. Distinct signal transduction pathways downstream of the (PRR revealed by microarray and ChIP-chip analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Zaade

    Full Text Available The (prorenin receptor ((PRR signaling is involved in different pathophysiologies ranging from cardiorenal end-organ damage via diabetic retinopathy to tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF is an adaptor protein of the (PRR. Furthermore, recent publications suggest that major functions of the (PRR are mediated ligand-independently by its transmembrane and intracellular part, which acts as an accessory protein of V-ATPases. The transcriptome and recruitmentome downstream of the V-ATPase function and PLZF in the context of the (PRR are currently unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of microarray and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip experiments using siRNA against the (PRR, stable overexpression of PLZF, the PLZF translocation inhibitor genistein and the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin to dissect transcriptional pathways downstream of the (PRR. We were able to identify distinct and overlapping genetic signatures as well as novel real-time PCR-validated target genes of the different molecular functions of the (PRR. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses of our data confirm the role of (PRŔs signal transduction pathways in cardiovascular disease and tumorigenesis.

  12. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-xu; Ren, Gao-tong; Xu, Xin-yue; Li, Fei-fei; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities. PMID:27452863

  13. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  14. Lung epithelium as a sentinel and effector system in pneumonia--molecular mechanisms of pathogen recognition and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippenstiel, Stefan; Opitz, Bastian; Schmeck, Bernd; Suttorp, Norbert

    2006-07-08

    Pneumonia, a common disease caused by a great diversity of infectious agents is responsible for enormous morbidity and mortality worldwide. The bronchial and lung epithelium comprises a large surface between host and environment and is attacked as a primary target during lung infection. Besides acting as a mechanical barrier, recent evidence suggests that the lung epithelium functions as an important sentinel system against pathogens. Equipped with transmembranous and cytosolic pathogen-sensing pattern recognition receptors the epithelium detects invading pathogens. A complex signalling results in epithelial cell activation, which essentially participates in initiation and orchestration of the subsequent innate and adaptive immune response. In this review we summarize recent progress in research focussing on molecular mechanisms of pathogen detection, host cell signal transduction, and subsequent activation of lung epithelial cells by pathogens and their virulence factors and point to open questions. The analysis of lung epithelial function in the host response in pneumonia may pave the way to the development of innovative highly needed therapeutics in pneumonia in addition to antibiotics.

  15. Photochemical Modulation of Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction using Caged Farnesyltransferase Inhibitors: Activation via One- and Two-Photon Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Warmka, Janel K.; Dore, Timothy M.; Blank, David A.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates, and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase, Bhc-FTI, is described. The inhibitor was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol functional group with a Bhc moiety; while Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryls. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor (FTI) that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies. PMID:22492666

  16. Photochemical modulation of Ras-mediated signal transduction using caged farnesyltransferase inhibitors: activation by one- and two-photon excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate-Pella, Daniel; Zeliadt, Nicholette A; Ochocki, Joshua D; Warmka, Janel K; Dore, Timothy M; Blank, David A; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Mark D

    2012-05-07

    The creation of caged molecules involves the attachment of protecting groups to biologically active compounds such as ligands, substrates and drugs that can be removed under specific conditions. Photoremovable caging groups are the most common due to their ability to be removed with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, the synthesis and photochemistry of a caged inhibitor of protein farnesyltransferase is described. The inhibitor, FTI, was caged by alkylation of a critical thiol group with a bromohydroxycoumarin (Bhc) moiety. While Bhc is well established as a protecting group for carboxylates and phosphates, it has not been extensively used to cage sulfhydryl groups. The resulting caged molecule, Bhc-FTI, can be photolyzed with UV light to release the inhibitor that prevents Ras farnesylation, Ras membrane localization and downstream signaling. Finally, it is shown that Bhc-FTI can be uncaged by two-photon excitation to produce FTI at levels sufficient to inhibit Ras localization and alter cell morphology. Given the widespread involvement of Ras proteins in signal transduction pathways, this caged inhibitor should be useful in a plethora of studies.

  17. Structure-Function of CD36 and Importance of Fatty Acid Signal Transduction in Fat Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Kuda, Ondrej; Samovski, Dmitri; Abumrad, Nada A.

    2014-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor that functions in high affinity tissue uptake of long chain fatty acids (FA) and contributes under excessive fat supply to lipid accumulation and metabolic dysfunction. This review describes recent evidence regarding the CD36 FA binding site and a potential mechanism for FA transfer. It also presents the view that CD36 and FA signaling coordinate fat utilization based on newly identified CD36 actions that involve oral fat perception, intestinal fat absorption, sec...

  18. The pathway for perception and transduction of low-temperature signals in Synechocystis

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Iwane; Los, Dmitry A.; Kanesaki, Yu; Mikami, Koji; Murata, Norio

    2000-01-01

    Low temperature is an important environmental factor that has effects on all living organisms. Various low-temperature-inducible genes encode products that are essential for acclimation to low temperature, but low-temperature sensors and signal transducers have not been identified. However, systematic disruption of putative genes for histidine kinases and random mutagenesis of almost all the genes in the genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have allowed us to identify two h...

  19. Raf kinase inhibitory protein: a signal transduction modulator and metastasis suppressor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexey E Granovsky; Marsha Rich Rosner

    2008-01-01

    Cells have a multitude of controls to maintain their integrity and prevent random switching from one biological state to another. Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein (PEBP) family, is representative of a new class of modulators of signaling cascades that function to maintain the "yin yang" or balance of biological systems. RKIP inhibits MAP kinase (Raf-MEK-ERK), G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase and NFkB signaling cascades. Because RKIP targets different kinases dependent upon its state of phosphorylation, RKIP also acts to integrate crosstalk initiated by multiple environmental stimuli. Loss or depletion of RKIP results in disruption of the normal cellular stasis and can lead to chromosomal abnormalities and disease states such as cancer. Since RKIP and the PEBP family have been reviewed previously, the goal of this analysis is to provide an update and highlight some of the unique features of RKIP that make it a critical player in the regulation of cellular signaling processes.

  20. A TRPV2–PKA Signaling Module for Transduction of Physical Stimuli in Mast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Alexander J.; Shimoda, Lori M.N.; Koblan-Huberson, Murielle; Adra, Chaker N.; Turner, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Cutaneous mast cell responses to physical (thermal, mechanical, or osmotic) stimuli underlie the pathology of physical urticarias. In vitro experiments suggest that mast cells respond directly to these stimuli, implying that a signaling mechanism couples functional responses to physical inputs in mast cells. We asked whether transient receptor potential (vanilloid) (TRPV) cation channels were present and functionally coupled to signaling pathways in mast cells, since expression of this channel subfamily confers sensitivity to thermal, osmotic, and pressure inputs. Transcripts for a range of TRPVs were detected in mast cells, and we report the expression, surface localization, and oligomerization of TRPV2 protein subunits in these cells. We describe the functional coupling of TRPV2 protein to calcium fluxes and proinflammatory degranulation events in mast cells. In addition, we describe a novel protein kinase A (PKA)–dependent signaling module, containing PKA and a putative A kinase adapter protein, Acyl CoA binding domain protein (ACBD)3, that interacts with TRPV2 in mast cells. We propose that regulated phosphorylation by PKA may be a common pathway for TRPV modulation. PMID:15249591

  1. Regulation of EGFR signal transduction by analogue-to-digital conversion in endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Roberto; Nonaka, Hidenori; Del Conte-Zerial, Perla; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Zerial, Marino

    2015-02-04

    An outstanding question is how receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) determine different cell-fate decisions despite sharing the same signalling cascades. Here, we uncovered an unexpected mechanism of RTK trafficking in this process. By quantitative high-resolution FRET microscopy, we found that phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (p-EGFR) is not randomly distributed but packaged at constant mean amounts in endosomes. Cells respond to higher EGF concentrations by increasing the number of endosomes but keeping the mean p-EGFR content per endosome almost constant. By mathematical modelling, we found that this mechanism confers both robustness and regulation to signalling output. Different growth factors caused specific changes in endosome number and size in various cell systems and changing the distribution of p-EGFR between endosomes was sufficient to reprogram cell-fate decision upon EGF stimulation. We propose that the packaging of p-RTKs in endosomes is a general mechanism to ensure the fidelity and specificity of the signalling response.

  2. Leptin signal transduction underlies the differential metabolic response of LEW and WKY rats to cafeteria diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Micaelo, N; González-Abuín, N; Ardévol, A; Pinent, M; Petretto, E; Behmoaras, J; Blay, M

    2016-01-01

    Although the effect of genetic background on obesity-related phenotypes is well established, the main objective of this study is to determine the phenotypic responses to cafeteria diet (CAF) of two genetically distinct inbred rat strains and give insight into the molecular mechanisms that might be underlying. Lewis (LEW) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were fed with either a standard or a CAF diet. The effects of the diet and the strain in the body weight gain, food intake, respiratory quotient, biochemical parameters in plasma as well as in the expression of genes that regulate leptin signalling were determined. Whereas CAF diet promoted weight gain in LEW and WKY rats, as consequence of increased energy intake, metabolic management of this energy surplus was significantly affected by genetic background. LEW and WKY showed a different metabolic profile, LEW rats showed hyperglycaemia, hypertriglyceridemia and high FFA levels, ketogenesis, high adiposity index and inflammation, but WKY did not. Leptin signalling, and specifically the LepRb-mediated regulation of STAT3 activation and Socs3 gene expression in the hypothalamus were inversely modulated by the CAF diet in LEW (upregulated) and WKY rats (downregulated). In the present study, we show evidence of gene-environment interactions in obesity exerted by differential phenotypic responses to CAF diet between LEW and WKY rats. Specifically, we found the leptin-signalling pathway as a divergent point between the strain-specific adaptations to diet.

  3. Regulation of EGFR signal transduction by analogue-to-digital conversion in endosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Roberto; Nonaka, Hidenori; Del Conte-Zerial, Perla; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Zerial, Marino

    2015-01-01

    An outstanding question is how receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) determine different cell-fate decisions despite sharing the same signalling cascades. Here, we uncovered an unexpected mechanism of RTK trafficking in this process. By quantitative high-resolution FRET microscopy, we found that phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (p-EGFR) is not randomly distributed but packaged at constant mean amounts in endosomes. Cells respond to higher EGF concentrations by increasing the number of endosomes but keeping the mean p-EGFR content per endosome almost constant. By mathematical modelling, we found that this mechanism confers both robustness and regulation to signalling output. Different growth factors caused specific changes in endosome number and size in various cell systems and changing the distribution of p-EGFR between endosomes was sufficient to reprogram cell-fate decision upon EGF stimulation. We propose that the packaging of p-RTKs in endosomes is a general mechanism to ensure the fidelity and specificity of the signalling response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06156.001 PMID:25650738

  4. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revati eWani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of reactive oxygen species (ROS has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g. cancer. New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically-distinct alterations to the protein (e.g. sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides. These post-translational modifications (PTM are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology.

  5. The Na/K-ATPase-mediated signal transduction as a target for new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zijian; Xie, Joe

    2005-09-01

    The Na/K-ATPase, or Na+ pump, is a member of the P-type ATPase superfamily. In addition to pumping ions, the Na/K-ATPase is a receptor that not only regulates the function of protein kinases, but also acts as a scaffold, capable of tethering different proteins into a signalplex. The signaling Na/K-ATPase resides in caveolae and forms a "binary receptor" with the tyrosine kinase Src. Endogenous cardiotonic steroids and digitalis drugs such as ouabain act as agonists and provoke this binary receptor, resulting in tyrosine phosphorylation of the proteins that are either associated with, or in close proximity to, the signaling Na/K-ATPase. Subsequently, this initiates protein kinase cascades including ERKs and PKC isozymes. It also increases mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulates intracellular calcium concentration. Like other receptors, activation of the Na/K-ATPase/Src by ouabain induces the endocytosis of the plasma membrane Na/K-ATPase. Significantly, this newly appreciated signaling function of the Na/K-ATPase appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases, therefore serving as an important target for development of novel therapeutic agents.

  6. Reconstruction of cellular signal transduction networks using perturbation assays and linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Bettina; Kaderali, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Perturbation experiments for example using RNA interference (RNAi) offer an attractive way to elucidate gene function in a high throughput fashion. The placement of hit genes in their functional context and the inference of underlying networks from such data, however, are challenging tasks. One of the problems in network inference is the exponential number of possible network topologies for a given number of genes. Here, we introduce a novel mathematical approach to address this question. We formulate network inference as a linear optimization problem, which can be solved efficiently even for large-scale systems. We use simulated data to evaluate our approach, and show improved performance in particular on larger networks over state-of-the art methods. We achieve increased sensitivity and specificity, as well as a significant reduction in computing time. Furthermore, we show superior performance on noisy data. We then apply our approach to study the intracellular signaling of human primary nave CD4(+) T-cells, as well as ErbB signaling in trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cells. In both cases, our approach recovers known interactions and points to additional relevant processes. In ErbB signaling, our results predict an important role of negative and positive feedback in controlling the cell cycle progression.

  7. Disrupting actions of bisphenol A and malachite green on growth hormone receptor gene expression and signal transduction in seabream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Baowei; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2010-06-01

    Environmental estrogen could mimic natural estrogens thereby disrupting the endocrine systems of human and animals. The actions of such endocrine disruptors have been studied mainly on reproduction and development. However, estrogen could also affect the somatotropic axis via multiple targets such as growth hormone (GH). In the present study, two endocrine disruptors were chosen to investigate their effects on the expression level and signal transduction of growth hormone receptor (GHR) in fish. Using real-time PCR, it was found that exposure to both the estrogenic (bisphenol A) and anti-estrogenic (malachite green) compounds could attenuate the expression levels of GHR1 and GHR2 in black seabream (Acanthopagrus schlegeli) hepatocytes. The expression level of IGF-I, the downstream effector of GHR activation in the liver, was decreased by bisphenol A but not by malachite green. Luciferase reporter assay of the beta-casein promoter was used to monitor GHR signaling in transfected cells. In the fish liver cell line Hepa-T1, both GHR1 and GHR2 signaling were attenuated by bisphenol A and malachite green. This attenuation could only occur in the presence of estrogen receptor, indicating that these agents probably produce their actions via the estrogen receptor. Results of the present study demonstrated that estrogenic or anti-estrogenic compounds could down-regulate the somatotropic axis in fish by affecting both the gene expression and signaling of GHR. In view of the increasing prevalence of these compounds in the environment, the impact on fish growth and development both in the wild and in aquaculture would be considerable.

  8. Low concentration of ethanol induce apoptosis in HepG2 cells: role of various signal transduction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Castaneda, Sigrid Rosin-Steiner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available As we previously demonstrated in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 cells, ethanol at low concentration triggers the Fas apoptotic pathway. However, its role in other intracellular signaling pathways remains unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of low concentration of ethanol on different intracellular signaling pathways. For this purpose, HepG2 cells were treated with 1 mM ethanol for 10 min and the phosphorylation state of protein kinases was determined. In addition, the mRNA levels of transcription factors and genes associated with the Fas apoptotic pathway were determined. Our data demonstrated that ethanol-induced phosphorylation of protein kinases modulates both anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic mechanisms in HepG2 cells. Pro-apoptosis resulted mainly from the strong inhibition of the G-protein couple receptor signaling pathway. Moreover, the signal transduction initiated by ethanol-induced protein kinases phosphorylation lead to increased expression of the transcription factors with subsequent expression of genes associated with the Fas apoptotic pathway (Fas receptor, Fas ligand, FADD and caspase 8. These results indicate that low concentration of ethanol exert their effect by predominant activation of pro-apoptotic events that can be divided in two phases. An early phase characterized by a rapid transient effect on protein kinases phosphorylation, after 10 min exposure, with subsequent increased expression of transcription factors for up to 6 hr. This early phase is followed by a second phase associated with increased gene expression that began after 6 hr and persisted for more than 24 hr. This information provided a novel insight into the mechanisms of action of ethanol (1mM in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  9. Interaction of signal transduction between angiotensin AT1 and AT2 receptor subtypes in rat senescent heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Shu-tian; LI Yan-fang

    2007-01-01

    Background Angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) acting at angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1R) has well documented effects on cardiovascular structure such as the promotion of cardiovascular hypertrophy and fibrosis, which are believed to be opposed by angiotensin AT2 receptor (AT2R) stimulation. The expressions of AT1R and AT2R are up-regulated in senescent hearts. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of signal transduction between AT1R and AT2R, and to detect whether there is any difference in the interaction in rat hearts of different age.Methods In 3.5-, 12-, 18- and 24-month-old rats, the heart cell membrane activities of protein kinase C (PKC) andtyrosine kinase were measured when AT1R and AT2R were both activated by Ang Ⅱ or just the AT1R was activated by Ang Ⅱ and PD123319. The activities of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and the levels of cGMP were investigated when AT1R and AT2R were both activated by Ang Ⅱ or just the AT2R was activated by Ang Ⅱ and Iosartan.Results When AT1R and AT2R were both activated compared to when the AT1R was activated, the activities of PKC were not different in hearts from 3.5- and 12-month-old rats, but decreased significantly in 18- and 24-month-old rats; the activities of tyrosine kinase were not different in 3.5-month-old rats but decreased significantly in 12-, 18- and 24-month-old rats. The activities of cPLA2 were all decreased significantly in rats of different age when AT1R and AT2R were both activated compared to when the AT2R was activated. Treatment with Ang Ⅱ alone compared to Ang Ⅱ and losartan decreased the levels of cGMP (fmol/mg) in rats of different age (102.7±12.7 versus 86.0±8.0 in 3.5-month-old rats, P<0.05; 81.0±9.4 versus 70.0±6.3 in 12-month-old rats, P<0.05; 69.8±5.6 versus 54.2±5.3 in 18-month-old rats,P<0.01; 57.7±8.0 versus 39.0±3.0 in 24-month-old rats, P<0.01).Conclusions The activation of AT1R inhibite