WorldWideScience

Sample records for camera phone-based wayfinding

  1. Comparison of the temperature accuracy between smart phone based and high-end thermal cameras using a temperature gradient phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaessens, John H.; van der Veen, Albert; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2017-03-01

    Recently, low cost smart phone based thermal cameras are being considered to be used in a clinical setting for monitoring physiological temperature responses such as: body temperature change, local inflammations, perfusion changes or (burn) wound healing. These thermal cameras contain uncooled micro-bolometers with an internal calibration check and have a temperature resolution of 0.1 degree. For clinical applications a fast quality measurement before use is required (absolute temperature check) and quality control (stability, repeatability, absolute temperature, absolute temperature differences) should be performed regularly. Therefore, a calibrated temperature phantom has been developed based on thermistor heating on both ends of a black coated metal strip to create a controllable temperature gradient from room temperature 26 °C up to 100 °C. The absolute temperatures on the strip are determined with software controlled 5 PT-1000 sensors using lookup tables. In this study 3 FLIR-ONE cameras and one high end camera were checked with this temperature phantom. The results show a relative good agreement between both low-cost and high-end camera's and the phantom temperature gradient, with temperature differences of 1 degree up to 6 degrees between the camera's and the phantom. The measurements were repeated as to absolute temperature and temperature stability over the sensor area. Both low-cost and high-end thermal cameras measured relative temperature changes with high accuracy and absolute temperatures with constant deviations. Low-cost smart phone based thermal cameras can be a good alternative to high-end thermal cameras for routine clinical measurements, appropriate to the research question, providing regular calibration checks for quality control.

  2. Camera phone-based quantitative analysis of C-reactive protein ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeough, Cathy M; O'Driscoll, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of a camera phone as a low-cost optical detector for quantitative analysis of a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The camera phone was used to acquire images of the ELISA carried out in a conventional 96 well plate. Colorimetric analysis of the images was used to determine a standard curve that exhibited excellent agreement with a fitted 4-parameter logistic model (R²=0.998). The limit of detection (LOD) for this approach was determined to be 0.026 ± 0.002 μg/ml (1.035 ± 0.079 μM) CRP. Furthermore, these results were found to be in very close agreement with measurements obtained for the same assay using a laboratory-based instrument. These findings indicate the basic technology to enable low-cost quantitative home-based monitoring of an important clinical biomarker of inflammatory disease may already be present in the patient's home.

  3. A camera-phone based study reveals erratic eating pattern and disrupted daily eating-fasting cycle among adults in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neelu Jain; Kumar, Vinod; Panda, Satchidananda

    2017-01-01

    The daily rhythm of feeding-fasting and meal-timing are emerging as important determinants of health. Circadian rhythm research in animal models and retrospective analyses of human nutrition data have shown that reduced length of overnight fasting or increased late night eating increases risk for metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes. However, the daily rhythm in eating pattern in humans is rarely measured. Traditional methods to collect nutrition information through food diary and food log pay little attention to the timing of eating which may also change from day to day. We adopted a novel cell-phone based approach to longitudinally record all events of food and beverage intake in adults. In a feasibility study daily food-eating patterns of 93 healthy individuals were recorded for 21 days using camera phones. Analysis of the daily eating patterns of these individuals indicates deviation from conventional assumption that people eat three meals-a-day within a 12 h interval. We found that eating events are widespread throughout the day, with 30% consumed in evening and late night hours. There was little difference in eating pattern between weekdays and weekends. In this cohort more than 50% of people spread their caloric intake events over 15 h or longer. One decile of the cohort who were spouses of shift-workers or had flexible work schedule spread their caloric intake over 20 h. Although the nutrition quality and diversity of food consumed is different between South-East Asian and Western countries, such overall disruption of daily eating-fasting rhythm is similar. Therefore, in view of hypothesis that disrupted daily eating pattern may contribute to the global increase in metabolic diseases and modification of daily eating pattern is a potential modifiable behavior to contain these diseases, monitoring eating pattern is an important aspect of lifestyle.

  4. A camera-phone based study reveals erratic eating pattern and disrupted daily eating-fasting cycle among adults in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelu Jain Gupta

    Full Text Available The daily rhythm of feeding-fasting and meal-timing are emerging as important determinants of health. Circadian rhythm research in animal models and retrospective analyses of human nutrition data have shown that reduced length of overnight fasting or increased late night eating increases risk for metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes. However, the daily rhythm in eating pattern in humans is rarely measured. Traditional methods to collect nutrition information through food diary and food log pay little attention to the timing of eating which may also change from day to day. We adopted a novel cell-phone based approach to longitudinally record all events of food and beverage intake in adults. In a feasibility study daily food-eating patterns of 93 healthy individuals were recorded for 21 days using camera phones. Analysis of the daily eating patterns of these individuals indicates deviation from conventional assumption that people eat three meals-a-day within a 12 h interval. We found that eating events are widespread throughout the day, with 30% consumed in evening and late night hours. There was little difference in eating pattern between weekdays and weekends. In this cohort more than 50% of people spread their caloric intake events over 15 h or longer. One decile of the cohort who were spouses of shift-workers or had flexible work schedule spread their caloric intake over 20 h. Although the nutrition quality and diversity of food consumed is different between South-East Asian and Western countries, such overall disruption of daily eating-fasting rhythm is similar. Therefore, in view of hypothesis that disrupted daily eating pattern may contribute to the global increase in metabolic diseases and modification of daily eating pattern is a potential modifiable behavior to contain these diseases, monitoring eating pattern is an important aspect of lifestyle.

  5. Cell phone based balance trainer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Beom-Chan; Kim, Jeonghee; Chen, Shu; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2012-01-01

    ..., weight, complexity, calibration procedures, cost, and fragility. We have designed and developed a cell phone based vibrotactile feedback system for potential use in balance rehabilitation training in clinical and home environments...

  6. Indoor wayfinding and navigation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Due to the widespread use of navigation systems for wayfinding and navigation in the outdoors, researchers have devoted their efforts in recent years to designing navigation systems that can be used indoors. This book is a comprehensive guide to designing and building indoor wayfinding and navigation systems. It covers all types of feasible sensors (for example, Wi-Fi, A-GPS), discussing the level of accuracy, the types of map data needed, the data sources, and the techniques for providing routes and directions within structures.

  7. Cell phone based balance trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Beom-Chan; Kim, Jeonghee; Chen, Shu; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2012-02-08

    In their current laboratory-based form, existing vibrotactile sensory augmentation technologies that provide cues of body motion are impractical for home-based rehabilitation use due to their size, weight, complexity, calibration procedures, cost, and fragility. We have designed and developed a cell phone based vibrotactile feedback system for potential use in balance rehabilitation training in clinical and home environments. It comprises an iPhone with an embedded tri-axial linear accelerometer, custom software to estimate body tilt, a "tactor bud" accessory that plugs into the headphone jack to provide vibrotactile cues of body tilt, and a battery. Five young healthy subjects (24 ± 2.8 yrs, 3 females and 2 males) and four subjects with vestibular deficits (42.25 ± 13.5 yrs, 2 females and 2 males) participated in a proof-of-concept study to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Healthy subjects used the system with eyes closed during Romberg, semi-tandem Romberg, and tandem Romberg stances. Subjects with vestibular deficits used the system with both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions during semi-tandem Romberg stance. Vibrotactile feedback was provided when the subject exceeded either an anterior-posterior (A/P) or a medial-lateral (M/L) body tilt threshold. Subjects were instructed to move away from the vibration. The system was capable of providing real-time vibrotactile cues that informed corrective postural responses. When feedback was available, both healthy subjects and those with vestibular deficits significantly reduced their A/P or M/L RMS sway (depending on the direction of feedback), had significantly smaller elliptical area fits to their sway trajectory, spent a significantly greater mean percentage time within the no feedback zone, and showed a significantly greater A/P or M/L mean power frequency. The results suggest that the real-time feedback provided by this system can be used to reduce body sway. Its advantages over more complex

  8. Cell phone based balance trainer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Beom-Chan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In their current laboratory-based form, existing vibrotactile sensory augmentation technologies that provide cues of body motion are impractical for home-based rehabilitation use due to their size, weight, complexity, calibration procedures, cost, and fragility. Methods We have designed and developed a cell phone based vibrotactile feedback system for potential use in balance rehabilitation training in clinical and home environments. It comprises an iPhone with an embedded tri-axial linear accelerometer, custom software to estimate body tilt, a "tactor bud" accessory that plugs into the headphone jack to provide vibrotactile cues of body tilt, and a battery. Five young healthy subjects (24 ± 2.8 yrs, 3 females and 2 males and four subjects with vestibular deficits (42.25 ± 13.5 yrs, 2 females and 2 males participated in a proof-of-concept study to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Healthy subjects used the system with eyes closed during Romberg, semi-tandem Romberg, and tandem Romberg stances. Subjects with vestibular deficits used the system with both eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions during semi-tandem Romberg stance. Vibrotactile feedback was provided when the subject exceeded either an anterior-posterior (A/P or a medial-lateral (M/L body tilt threshold. Subjects were instructed to move away from the vibration. Results The system was capable of providing real-time vibrotactile cues that informed corrective postural responses. When feedback was available, both healthy subjects and those with vestibular deficits significantly reduced their A/P or M/L RMS sway (depending on the direction of feedback, had significantly smaller elliptical area fits to their sway trajectory, spent a significantly greater mean percentage time within the no feedback zone, and showed a significantly greater A/P or M/L mean power frequency. Conclusion The results suggest that the real-time feedback provided by this system can be used

  9. Wayfinding concept in University of Brawijaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firjatullah, H.; Kurniawan, E. B.; Purnamasari, W. D.

    2017-06-01

    Wayfinding is an activity related to the orientation and motion from first point to point of destination. Benefits of wayfinding in the area of education, namely as a means of helping direct a person to a destination so as to reduce the lostness and assist users in remembering the way through the role of space and objects wayfinding. Around 48% new students of University of Brawijaya (UB) 2015 that was ever lost when entering the campus. This shows the need for wayfinding concept to someone who was unfamiliar with the surrounding area as freshmen. This study uses mental map analysis to find the objects hierarchy wayfinding determination based on the respondents and the space syntax (visual graph analysis) as a hierarchy based on the determination of the configuration space. The overlay result say that hierarchy between both of analysis shows there are several objects which are potentially in wayfinding process on the campus of UB. The concept of wayfinding generate different treatment of the selected object based of wayfinding classification, both in maintaining the function of the object in space and develop the potential of the object wayfinding.

  10. Learning as way-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    Based on empirical case-study findings and the theoretical framework of learning by Illeris coupled with Nonaka & Takeuchis´s perspectives on knowledge creation, it is stressed that learning are conditioned by contextual orientations-processes in spaces near the body (peripersonal spaces) through...... motions of humans and non-human agencies. The findings reveal that learning; formal and informal can be conceptualized by the metaphor of way-finding; embodied, emotionally and/or cognitive both individually and socially. Way-finding, is argued, to be a contemporary concept for learning processes......, knowledge development and identity-shaping, where learning emerges through motions, feeling and thinking within an information rich world in constant change....

  11. Route complexity and simulated physical ageing negatively influence wayfinding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Emma; Hagedoorn, Mariet; Krijnen, Wim P.; Schans, van der Cornelis; Mobach, Mark P.

    The aim of this age-simulation field experiment was to assess the influence of route complexity and physical ageing on wayfinding. Seventy-five people (aged 18-28) performed a total of 108 wayfinding tasks (i.e., 42 participants performed two wayfinding tasks and 33 performed one wayfinding task),

  12. Way-Finding Assistance System for Underground Facilities Using Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, K.; Yabuki, N.; Fukuda, T.; Michikawa, T.; Motamedi, A.

    2015-05-01

    Way-finding is one of main challenges for pedestrians in large subterranean spaces with complex network of connected labyrinths. This problem is caused by the loss of their sense of directions and orientation due to the lack of landmarks that are occluded by ceilings, walls, and skyscraper. This paper introduces an assistance system for way-finding problem in large subterranean spaces using Augmented Reality (AR). It suggests displaying known landmarks that are invisible in indoor environments on tablet/handheld devices to assist users with relative positioning and indoor way-finding. The location and orientation of the users can be estimated by the indoor positioning systems and sensors available in the common tablet or smartphones devices. The constructed 3D model of a chosen landmark that is in the field of view of the handheld's camera is augmented on the camera's video feed. A prototype system has been implemented to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed system for way-finding.

  13. The dynamic nature of cognition during wayfinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Hugo J; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2008-09-01

    Much of our day-to-day wayfinding behaviour takes place in familiar large-scale urban environments, yet there is a dearth of studies examining how wayfinding unfolds on a second-by-second basis in this context. Here we used a retrospective verbal report protocol, eye tracking and a highly accurate virtual reality simulation of a real city (London, UK) to examine this issue. Subjects, who were taxi drivers, were able to produce extremely detailed accounts of what they had been thinking during wayfinding, which were validated by independent eye-tracking data. There was a high degree of consistency in the types of thoughts across subjects, permitting classification into a number of distinct categories. Moreover, it was possible to quantify the number of thoughts in each category, their durations and temporal order. Detailed analysis of the verbal reports provided new insights into the processes and strategies involved, and highlighted a greater range of thoughts than has previously been reported in studies of wayfinding. By analysing the temporal order of thoughts it was possible to identify specific relationships between categories. Some of these relationships were predicted by current cognitive models of wayfinding, others were novel, thus shedding new light on how navigation unfolds in a busy city.

  14. Mobile phone based SCADA for industrial automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Engin; Karacor, Mevlut

    2006-01-01

    SCADA is the acronym for "Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition." SCADA systems are widely used in industry for supervisory control and data acquisition of industrial processes. Conventional SCADA systems use PC, notebook, thin client, and PDA as a client. In this paper, a Java-enabled mobile phone has been used as a client in a sample SCADA application in order to display and supervise the position of a sample prototype crane. The paper presents an actual implementation of the on-line controlling of the prototype crane via mobile phone. The wireless communication between the mobile phone and the SCADA server is performed by means of a base station via general packet radio service (GPRS) and wireless application protocol (WAP). Test results have indicated that the mobile phone based SCADA integration using the GPRS or WAP transfer scheme could enhance the performance of the crane in a day without causing an increase in the response times of SCADA functions. The operator can visualize and modify the plant parameters using his mobile phone, without reaching the site. In this way maintenance costs are reduced and productivity is increased.

  15. Mobile Phone Based Participatory Sensing in Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, C.; Fienen, M. N.; Böhlen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Although many observations in the hydrologic sciences are easy to obtain, requiring very little training or equipment, spatial and temporally-distributed data collection is hindered by associated personnel and telemetry costs. Lack of data increases the uncertainty and can limit applications of both field and modeling studies. However, modern society is much more digitally connected than the past, which presents new opportunities to collect real-time hydrologic data through the use of participatory sensing. Participatory sensing in this usage refers to citizens contributing distributed observations of physical phenomena. Real-time data streams are possible as a direct result of the growth of mobile phone networks and high adoption rates of mobile users. In this research, we describe an example of the development, methodology, barriers to entry, data uncertainty, and results of mobile phone based participatory sensing applied to groundwater and surface water characterization. Results are presented from three participatory sensing experiments that focused on stream stage, surface water temperature, and water quality. Results demonstrate variability in the consistency and reliability across the type of data collected and the challenges of collecting research grade data. These studies also point to needed improvements and future developments for widespread use of low cost techniques for participatory sensing.

  16. Development of mobile phone based transcutaneous billirubinometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alexander P.; Harrison, Brandon; McCormick, Zachary T.; Ganesh Kumar, Nishant; Patil, Chetan A.

    2017-03-01

    Infants in the US are routinely screened for risk of neurodevelopmental impairment due to neonatal jaundice using transcutaneous bilirubinometry (TcB). In low-resource settings, such as sub-Saharan Africa, TcB devices are not common, however, mobile camera-phones are now widespread. We provide an update on the development of TcB using the built-in camera and flash of a mobile phone, along with a snap-on adapter containing optical filters. We will present Monte Carlo Extreme modeling of diffuse reflectance in neonatal skin, implications in design, and refined analysis methods.

  17. Creating a Supportive Environment using Cues for Wayfinding in Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Rebecca; Weisbeck, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The ability to find one?s way in the world, known as wayfinding, is impaired in persons with Alzheimer?s disease. Senior residential environments such as independent living, assisted living, and nursing home residences are often especially difficult for wayfinding, with long, non-distinctive hallways and poorly differentiated routes. Wayfinding problems can cause anxiety, distress, and decreased interaction in persons with dementia. Visual cues are one promising intervention to help persons w...

  18. Mobile phone based mini-spectrometer for rapid screening of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anshuman; Swedish, Tristan; Wahi, Akshat; Moufarrej, Mira; Noland, Marie; Gurry, Thomas; Aranda-Michel, Edgar; Aksel, Deniz; Wagh, Sneha; Sadashivaiah, Vijay; Zhang, Xu; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate a highly sensitive mobile phone based spectrometer that has potential to detect cancerous skin lesions in a rapid, non-invasive manner. Earlier reports of low cost spectrometers utilize the camera of the mobile phone to image the field after moving through a diffraction grating. These approaches are inherently limited by the closed nature of mobile phone image sensors and built in optical elements. The system presented uses a novel integrated grating and sensor that is compact, accurate and calibrated. Resolutions of about 10 nm can be achieved. Additionally, UV and visible LED excitation sources are built into the device. Data collection and analysis is simplified using the wireless interfaces and logical control on the smart phone. Furthermore, by utilizing an external sensor, the mobile phone camera can be used in conjunction with spectral measurements. We are exploring ways to use this device to measure endogenous fluorescence of skin in order to distinguish cancerous from non-cancerous lesions with a mobile phone based dermatoscope.

  19. Wayfinding Services for Open Educational Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kalz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available To choose suitable resources for personalcompetence development in the vast amount of openeducational resources is a challenging task for a learner.Starting with a needs analysis of lifelong learners andlearning designers we introduce two wayfinding servicesthat are currently researched and developed in theframework of the Integrated Project TENCompetence.Then we discuss the role of these services to supportlearners in finding and selecting open educational resourcesand finally we give an outlook on future research.

  20. WAYFINDING STUDY IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS: THE ELDERLY VS. THE YOUNGER-AGED GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seunghae Lee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the impact of architectural wayfinding aids on wayfinding performances in comparison of the elderly group and the younger aged group. An ambulatory healthcare facility was simulated using Virtual Reality (VR to develop two levels of wayfinding aids for the same environments. The base model included minimal wayfinding aids, and the design model included more wayfinding aids. The VR environment was presented in the form of video in order to test wayfinding performances at three different wayfinding decision points. Results showed that age and wayfinding aids impacted wayfinding performances. The younger-aged group performed wayfinding better compared to the elderly group. Participants who were tested in the design model were more successful in wayfinding compared to the elderly group. The elderly group reported that more salient wayfinding aids such as a big logo and paint colors helped their wayfinding while the younger-aged group reported less salient aids such as door designs as helpful wayfinding aids. When there were minimal wayfinding aids, the elderly participants needed to rely mostly on memory recall by remembering turns or paying close attention. When participants felt that the wayfinding test was difficult, their performances were less successful. Findings in this study suggest that wayfinding design for the elderly should consider the limited ability of recall and therefore, design wayfinding aids more frequently with more salient aids to avoid confusion. The elderly group needed to rely on their limited cognitive ability when there were not enough wayfinding aids, which make them experience difficulties in wayfinding.

  1. Neurobehavioral effects among inhabitants around mobile phone base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rassoul, G; El-Fateh, O Abou; Salem, M Abou; Michael, A; Farahat, F; El-Batanouny, M; Salem, E

    2007-03-01

    There is a general concern on the possible hazardous health effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiations (RFR) emitted from mobile phone base station antennas on the human nervous system. To identify the possible neurobehavioral deficits among inhabitants living nearby mobile phone base stations. A cross-sectional study was conducted on (85) inhabitants living nearby the first mobile phone station antenna in Menoufiya governorate, Egypt, 37 are living in a building under the station antenna while 48 opposite the station. A control group (80) participants were matched with the exposed for age, sex, occupation and educational level. All participants completed a structured questionnaire containing: personal, educational and medical histories; general and neurological examinations; neurobehavioral test battery (NBTB) [involving tests for visuomotor speed, problem solving, attention and memory]; in addition to Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ). The prevalence of neuropsychiatric complaints as headache (23.5%), memory changes (28.2%), dizziness (18.8%), tremors (9.4%), depressive symptoms (21.7%), and sleep disturbance (23.5%) were significantly higher among exposed inhabitants than controls: (10%), (5%), (5%), (0%), (8.8%) and (10%), respectively (Pmemory [Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT)]. Also, the inhabitants opposite the station exhibited a lower performance in the problem solving test (block design) than those under the station. All inhabitants exhibited a better performance in the two tests of visuomotor speed (Digit symbol and Trailmaking B) and one test of attention (Trailmaking A) than controls. The last available measures of RFR emitted from the first mobile phone base station antennas in Menoufiya governorate were less than the allowable standard level. Inhabitants living nearby mobile phone base stations are at risk for developing neuropsychiatric problems and some changes in the performance of neurobehavioral functions

  2. Applicability of an exposure model for the determination of emissions from mobile phone base stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breckenkamp, J; Neitzke, H P; Bornkessel, C

    2008-01-01

    Applicability of a model to estimate radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) strength in households from mobile phone base stations was evaluated with technical data of mobile phone base stations available from the German Net Agency, and dosimetric measurements, performed...

  3. Evaluation of the Historic Triangle Wayfinding Sign System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The "Historic Triangle" in Virginia is named for the historic areas comprising and surrounding Williamsburg, Jamestown, and Yorktown, Virginia. A Historic Triangle Wayfinding Sign System was designed to lead travelers from I-64 to historic sites in W...

  4. An Indoor Wayfinding System Based on Geometric Features Aided Graph SLAM for the Visually Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Ye, Cang

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a 6-degree of freedom (DOF) pose estimation (PE) method and an indoor wayfinding system based on the method for the visually impaired. The PE method involves two-graph simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) processes to reduce the accumulative pose error of the device. In the first step, the floor plane is extracted from the 3-D camera's point cloud and added as a landmark node into the graph for 6-DOF SLAM to reduce roll, pitch, and Z errors. In the second step, the wall lines are extracted and incorporated into the graph for 3-DOF SLAM to reduce X , Y , and yaw errors. The method reduces the 6-DOF pose error and results in more accurate pose with less computational time than the state-of-the-art planar SLAM methods. Based on the PE method, a wayfinding system is developed for navigating a visually impaired person in an indoor environment. The system uses the estimated pose and floor plan to locate the device user in a building and guides the user by announcing the points of interest and navigational commands through a speech interface. Experimental results validate the effectiveness of the PE method and demonstrate that the system may substantially ease an indoor navigation task.

  5. Wayfinding Research in Library and Information Studies: State of the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren H. Mandel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective – Often people enter libraries focused on their primary information needs and haven't considered their need for spatial information to find their way to what they need. This presents unique wayfinding information challenges for libraries. Papers on library wayfinding often include some discussion of the lack of wayfinding research in libraries, but apparently there has been no comprehensive review of the LIS literature on wayfinding. Methods – This paper is a comprehensive review of library wayfinding literature, using the Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text (via EBSCOhost database to collect the dataset. Results – Findings indicate a small collection of library wayfinding research, primarily focused on academic libraries. Conclusion – Empirical research in this area is limited. Suggestions for future research on library wayfinding, including potential foci for that research, are presented.

  6. Mobile phone-based interventions for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Robyn; McRobbie, Hayden; Bullen, Chris; Rodgers, Anthony; Gu, Yulong

    2016-04-10

    Access to mobile phones continues to increase exponentially globally, outstripping access to fixed telephone lines, fixed computers and the Internet. Mobile phones are an appropriate and effective option for the delivery of smoking cessation support in some contexts. This review updates the evidence on the effectiveness of mobile phone-based smoking cessation interventions. To determine whether mobile phone-based smoking cessation interventions increase smoking cessation in people who smoke and want to quit. For the most recent update, we searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register in April 2015. We also searched the UK Clinical Research Network Portfolio for current projects in the UK, and the ClinicalTrials.gov register for ongoing or recently completed studies. We searched through the reference lists of identified studies and attempted to contact the authors of ongoing studies. We applied no restrictions on language or publication date. We included randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Participants were smokers of any age who wanted to quit. Studies were those examining any type of mobile phone-based intervention for smoking cessation. This included any intervention aimed at mobile phone users, based around delivery via mobile phone, and using any functions or applications that can be used or sent via a mobile phone. Review authors extracted information on risk of bias and methodological details using a standardised form. We considered participants who dropped out of the trials or were lost to follow-up to be smoking. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each included study. Meta-analysis of the included studies used the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect method. Where meta-analysis was not possible, we presented a narrative summary and descriptive statistics. This updated search identified 12 studies with six-month smoking cessation outcomes, including seven studies completed since the previous review. The

  7. Mobile phone-based interventions for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Robyn; Borland, Ron; Bullen, Chris; Lin, Ruey B; McRobbie, Hayden; Rodgers, Anthony

    2009-10-07

    Innovative effective smoking cessation interventions are required to appeal to those who are not accessing traditional cessation services. Mobile phones are widely used and are now well integrated into the daily lives of many, particularly young adults. Mobile phones are a potential medium for the delivery of health programmes such as smoking cessation. To determine whether mobile phone-based interventions are effective at helping people who smoke, to quit. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cinahl, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, the National Research Register and the ClinicalTrials register, with no restrictions placed on language or publication date. We included randomized or quasi-randomized trials. Participants were smokers of any age who wanted to quit. Studies were those examining any type of mobile phone-based intervention. This included any intervention aimed at mobile phone users, based around delivery via mobile phone, and using any functions or applications that can be used or sent via a mobile phone. Information on the specified quality criteria and methodological details was extracted using a standardised form. Participants who dropped out of the trials or were lost to follow up were considered to be smoking. Meta-analysis of the included studies was undertaken using the Mantel-Haenszel Risk Ratio fixed-effect method provided that there was no evidence of substantial statistical heterogeneity as assessed by the I(2) statistic. Where meta-analysis was not possible, summary and descriptive statistics are presented. Four studies were excluded as they were small non-randomized feasibility studies, and two studies were excluded because follow up was less than six months. Four trials (reported in five papers) are included: a text message programme in New Zealand; a text message programme in the UK; and an Internet and mobile phone programme involving two different groups in Norway. The different types of interventions are analysed separately. When combined by

  8. Evaluation of a cell phone-based physical activity diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternfeld, Barbara; Jiang, Sheng-Fang; Picchi, Teresa; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Ainsworth, Barbara; Quesenberry, Charles P

    2012-03-01

    Physical activity (PA) diaries reduce the recall error inherent in self-reported PA but are burdensome. The purpose of this study was to compare a cell phone-based diary with a paper diary and examine the reliability and validity of the cell phone diary. In a pilot study, 25 women and 23 men, age 45-65 yr, completed cell phone and paper PA diaries 4 d·wk(-1) for three consecutive weeks and a user satisfaction survey. In the subsequent validation study, 623 middle-age participants (52.5% women) were asked to complete the cell phone diary and wear an accelerometer for two 7-d periods, approximately 6 months apart. They also completed two PA questionnaires. Fitness, body mass index, and percent body fat were obtained as indirect validation criteria. Estimates of PA from the cell phone and paper diaries were similar (mean within person difference = -43.8 MET·min·d(-1) of total PA, SD = 360, P = 0.49, 7.4 min·d(-1) of moderate-vigorous PA, SD = 66, P = 0.53). Users preferred the cell phone diary over the paper diary (59.6% vs 35.4%). In the subsequent study, intraclass correlations for the cell phone diary ranged from 0.55 for light PA to 0.63 for vigorous PA. Although PA estimates from the cell phone diary were generally significantly higher than those from the accelerometer and the questionnaires, correlations for moderate and vigorous PA were moderate (ρ = 0.25-0.59 with the questionnaires and 0.27-0.35 with the accelerometer). The correlations between the cell phone diary and the indirect validation criteria were generally in the expected direction and of moderate magnitude. A cell phone-based PA diary is equivalent to a paper diary, acceptable to users, and a relatively reliable and valid approach to self-reported PA.

  9. Mobile phone based clinical microscopy for global health applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breslauer, David N; Maamari, Robi N; Switz, Neil A; Lam, Wilbur A; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    .... Counterintuitively, these same regions are often well served by mobile phone networks, suggesting the possibility of leveraging portable, camera-enabled mobile phones for diagnostic imaging and telemedicine...

  10. Multi-floor buildings and human wayfinding cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Christoph; Büchner, Simon; Strube, Gerhard

    2013-10-01

    Multilevel wayfinding research in environmental psychology and architecture exhibits a strong compatibility with Jeffery et al.'s "bicoded" representation of space. We identify a need for capturing verticality in spatial analysis techniques such as space syntax and argue for investigating inter-individual differences in the ability to mentally integrate the cognitive maps of separate floors in buildings.

  11. Swarm-based wayfinding support in open and distance learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tattersall, Colin; Manderveld, Jocelyn; Van den Berg, Bert; Van Es, René; Janssen, José; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Please refer to the original source: Tattersall, C. Manderveld, J., Van den Berg, B., Van Es, R., Janssen, J., & Koper, R. (2005). Swarm-based wayfinding support in open and distance learning. In Alkhalifa, E.M. (Ed). Cognitively Informed Systems: Utilizing Practical Approaches to Enrich Information

  12. Rapid Prototyping a Collections-Based Mobile Wayfinding Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jim; Morales, Alaina

    2011-01-01

    This research presents the results of a project that investigated how students use a library developed mobile app to locate books in the library. The study employed a methodology of formative evaluation so that the development of the mobile app would be informed by user preferences for next generation wayfinding systems. A key finding is the…

  13. Neural correlates of human wayfinding in stroke patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselen, M. van; Kessels, R.P.C.; Kappelle, L.J.; Neggers, S.F.W.; Frijns, C.J.M.; Postma, A.

    2006-01-01

    Wayfinding is a complex cognitive function involving different types of information, such as knowledge about landmarks and direction information. This variety of processes suggest that multiple neural mechanisms are involved, e.g., the hippocampal system, the posterior parietal and temporal cortical

  14. Way-finding behaviour and technical guidance systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L.C.; Vredevelt, A.

    1999-01-01

    Three way-finding systems were tested with large number of human voluteers: an existing system (IMO-compliant) and two new systems: one offering directional information along the skirting board; the other an electrical system, programmable in direction. The tests used almost 300 volunteers who

  15. Cell phone-based health education messaging improves health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Runsen; Xiang, Yueying; Han, Tieguang; Yang, Guo-An; Zhang, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    The ubiquity of cell phones, which allow for short message service (SMS), provides new and innovative opportunities for disease prevention and health education. To explore the use of cell phone-based health education SMS to improve the health literacy of community residents in China. A multi-stage random sampling method was used to select representative study communities and participants ≥ 18 years old. Intervention participants were sent health education SMSs once a week for 1 year and controls were sent conventional, basic health education measures. Health literacy levels of the residents before and after the intervention were evaluated between intervention and control groups. Public health literacy scores increased 1.5 points, from 61.8 to 63.3, after SMS intervention for 1 year (Pliteracy scores was greater for the intervention than control group (22.03% to 30.93% vs. 22.07% to 20.82%). With health literacy as a cost-effective index, the cost-effectiveness per intervention was 0.54. SMS may be a useful tool for improving health literacy.

  16. Mobile phone-based interventions for improving contraception use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris; Gold, Judy; Ngo, Thoai D; Sumpter, Colin; Free, Caroline

    2015-06-26

    Contraception provides significant benefits for women's and children's health, yet an estimated 225 million women had an unmet need for modern contraceptive methods in 2014. Interventions delivered by mobile phone have been demonstrated to be effective in other health areas, but their effects on use of contraception have not been established. To assess the effects of mobile phone-based interventions for improving contraception use. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of client-provider interventions delivered by mobile phone to improve contraception use compared with standard care or another intervention. We searched the electronic databases Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health, PsycINFO, POPLINE, Africa-Wide Information and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) from January 1993 to October 2014, as well as clinical trials registries, online mHealth resources and abstracts from key conferences. Randomised controlled trials of mobile phone-based interventions to improve any form of contraception use amongst users or potential users of contraception. Outcome measures included uptake of contraception, measures of adherence, pregnancy and abortion. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of studies retrieved using the search strategy and extracted data from the included studies. We calculated the Mantel-Haenszel risk ratio (RR) for dichotomous outcomes and the mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes, together with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Differences in interventions and outcome measures did not permit us to undertake meta-analysis. Five RCTs met our inclusion criteria. Three trials aimed to improve adherence to a specific method of contraception amongst existing or new contraception users by comparing automated text message interventions versus standard care. Two trials aimed to improve both uptake and adherence, not limited to one method, in

  17. Mobile phones, mobile phone base stations and cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulder, J E; Foster, K R; Erdreich, L S; McNamee, J P

    2005-03-01

    There have been reports in the media and claims in the courts that radiofrequency (RF) emissions from mobile phones are a cause of cancer, and there have been numerous public objections to the siting of mobile phone base antennas because of a fear of cancer. This review summarizes the current state of evidence concerning whether the RF energy used for wireless communication might be carcinogenic. Relevant studies were identified by searching MedLine with a combination of exposure and endpoint terms. This was supplemented by a review of the over 1700 citations assembled by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety as part of their updating of the IEEE C95.1 RF energy safety guidelines. Where there were multiple studies, preference was given to recent reports, to positive reports of effects and to attempts to confirm such positive reports. Biophysical considerations indicate that there is little theoretical basis for anticipating that RF energy would have significant biological effects at the power levels used by modern mobile phones and their base station antennas. The epidemiological evidence for a causal association between cancer and RF energy is weak and limited. Animal studies have provided no consistent evidence that exposure to RF energy at non-thermal intensities causes or promotes cancer. Extensive in vitro studies have found no consistent evidence of genotoxic potential, but in vitro studies assessing the epigenetic potential of RF energy are limited. Overall, a weight-of-evidence evaluation shows that the current evidence for a causal association between cancer and exposure to RF energy is weak and unconvincing. However, the existing epidemiology is limited and the possibility of epigenetic effects has not been thoroughly evaluated, so that additional research in those areas will be required for a more thorough assessment of the possibility of a causal connection between cancer and the

  18. Seeing the Axial Line: Evidence from Wayfinding Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Emo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Space-geometric measures are proposed to explain the location of fixations during wayfinding. Results from an eye tracking study based on real-world stimuli are analysed; the gaze bias shows that attention is paid to structural elements in the built environment. Three space-geometric measures are used to explain the data: sky area, floor area and longest line of sight. Together with the finding that participants choose the more connected street, a relationship is proposed between the individual cognitive processes that occur during wayfinding, relative street connectivity measured through space syntactic techniques and the spatial geometry of the environment. The paper adopts an egocentric approach to gain a greater understanding on how individuals process the axial map.

  19. Seeing the axial line: evidence from wayfinding experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emo, Beatrix

    2014-09-01

    Space-geometric measures are proposed to explain the location of fixations during wayfinding. Results from an eye tracking study based on real-world stimuli are analysed; the gaze bias shows that attention is paid to structural elements in the built environment. Three space-geometric measures are used to explain the data: sky area, floor area and longest line of sight. Together with the finding that participants choose the more connected street, a relationship is proposed between the individual cognitive processes that occur during wayfinding, relative street connectivity measured through space syntactic techniques and the spatial geometry of the environment. The paper adopts an egocentric approach to gain a greater understanding on how individuals process the axial map.

  20. Spatial factors affecting wayfinding and orientation in a shopping mall

    OpenAIRE

    Doğu, Güler Ufuk

    1997-01-01

    Ankara : Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design and Institute of Fine Arts, Bilkent University, 1997. Includes bibliographical refences. The aim of this thesis is to study the main factors which affect the wayfinding and orientation of individuals in a shopping mall and explain how their behaviors are influenced by these factors. The spatial and individual factors and their properties are defined. Among the spatiaf factors, shape and dimensions, light and color, bu...

  1. Radiofrequency radiation injures trees around mobile phone base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann-Selsam, Cornelia; Balmori-de la Puente, Alfonso; Breunig, Helmut; Balmori, Alfonso

    2016-12-01

    In the last two decades, the deployment of phone masts around the world has taken place and, for many years, there has been a discussion in the scientific community about the possible environmental impact from mobile phone base stations. Trees have several advantages over animals as experimental subjects and the aim of this study was to verify whether there is a connection between unusual (generally unilateral) tree damage and radiofrequency exposure. To achieve this, a detailed long-term (2006-2015) field monitoring study was performed in the cities of Bamberg and Hallstadt (Germany). During monitoring, observations and photographic recordings of unusual or unexplainable tree damage were taken, alongside the measurement of electromagnetic radiation. In 2015 measurements of RF-EMF (Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields) were carried out. A polygon spanning both cities was chosen as the study site, where 144 measurements of the radiofrequency of electromagnetic fields were taken at a height of 1.5m in streets and parks at different locations. By interpolation of the 144 measurement points, we were able to compile an electromagnetic map of the power flux density in Bamberg and Hallstadt. We selected 60 damaged trees, in addition to 30 randomly selected trees and 30 trees in low radiation areas (n=120) in this polygon. The measurements of all trees revealed significant differences between the damaged side facing a phone mast and the opposite side, as well as differences between the exposed side of damaged trees and all other groups of trees in both sides. Thus, we found that side differences in measured values of power flux density corresponded to side differences in damage. The 30 selected trees in low radiation areas (no visual contact to any phone mast and power flux density under 50μW/m2) showed no damage. Statistical analysis demonstrated that electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone masts is harmful for trees. These results are consistent with the fact that

  2. Simulating bicycle wayfinding mechanisms in an urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Rybarczyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increased recognition that bicycling is a sustainable transportation mode choice, there is a continued interest in understanding how the built environment affects bicyclist travel behavior. Research on the influence of small-scale built form elements, such as street characteristics, on bicyclist wayfinding is limited. wayfinding is defined as a purposeful way of reaching from point A to point B; it is comprised of decision-making and subsequent movement. This research uses an agent-based model to investigate how small-scale urban design affects bicyclist wayfinding. Using geographic information systems and statistical analysis, different types of simulated bicycle agents were compared to observed bicycle volumes. Statistically significant positive relationships between bicycle agent types and observational data existed. The largest correspondence between agents and field observations occurred along central routes that were accessible from other streets (R2 = .377 and that had fewer decision-making junctions (R2 = .352. Bicyclists selected streets that were wider and with fewer obstructions to one’s forward view. The results support the need to design streetscapes that offer a high level of visibility and reduced stops to promote bicycling. The study also describes a modeling approach that can be replicated by urban planners to understand bicyclist travel patterns.

  3. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Knowlton

    Full Text Available Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  4. Smart-Phone Based Magnetic Levitation for Measuring Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Jain, Nupur; Ghiran, Ionita Calin; Tasoglu, Savas

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic levitation, which uses a magnetic field to suspend objects in a fluid, is a powerful and versatile technology. We develop a compact magnetic levitation platform compatible with a smart-phone to separate micro-objects and estimate the density of the sample based on its levitation height. A 3D printed attachment is mechanically installed over the existing camera unit of a smart-phone. Micro-objects, which may be either spherical or irregular in shape, are suspended in a paramagnetic medium and loaded in a microcapillary tube which is then inserted between two permanent magnets. The micro-objects are levitated and confined in the microcapillary at an equilibrium height dependent on their volumetric mass densities (causing a buoyancy force toward the edge of the microcapillary) and magnetic susceptibilities (causing a magnetic force toward the center of the microcapillary) relative to the suspending medium. The smart-phone camera captures magnified images of the levitating micro-objects through an additional lens positioned between the sample and the camera lens cover. A custom-developed Android application then analyzes these images to determine the levitation height and estimate the density. Using this platform, we were able to separate microspheres with varying densities and calibrate their levitation heights to known densities to develop a technique for precise and accurate density estimation. We have also characterized the magnetic field, the optical imaging capabilities, and the thermal state over time of this platform.

  5. Walking and Walkability: Is Wayfinding a Missing Link? Implications for Public Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberg, Ann E; Hunter, Rebecca H; Anderson, Lynda A; Bryant, Lucinda L; Hooker, Steven P; Satariano, William A

    2016-02-01

    Research on walking and walkability has yet to focus on wayfinding, the interactive, problem-solving process by which people use environmental information to locate themselves and navigate through various settings. We reviewed the literature on outdoor pedestrian-oriented wayfinding to examine its relationship to walking and walkability, 2 areas of importance to physical activity promotion. Our findings document that wayfinding is cognitively demanding and can compete with other functions, including walking itself. Moreover, features of the environment can either facilitate or impede wayfinding, just as environmental features can influence walking. Although there is still much to be learned about wayfinding and walking behaviors, our review helps frame the issues and lays out the importance of this area of research and practice.

  6. Dynamic Operations Wayfinding System (DOWS) for Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boring, Ronald Laurids [Idaho National Laboratory; Ulrich, Thomas Anthony [Idaho National Laboratory; Lew, Roger Thomas [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-08-01

    A novel software tool is proposed to aid reactor operators in respond- ing to upset plant conditions. The purpose of the Dynamic Operations Wayfind- ing System (DOWS) is to diagnose faults, prioritize those faults, identify paths to resolve those faults, and deconflict the optimal path for the operator to fol- low. The objective of DOWS is to take the guesswork out of the best way to combine procedures to resolve compound faults, mitigate low threshold events, or respond to severe accidents. DOWS represents a uniquely flexible and dy- namic computer-based procedure system for operators.

  7. Mobile phone based clinical microscopy for global health applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslauer, David N; Maamari, Robi N; Switz, Neil A; Lam, Wilbur A; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2009-07-22

    Light microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases. In many regions of the world, however, the required equipment is either unavailable or insufficiently portable, and operators may not possess adequate training to make full use of the images obtained. Counterintuitively, these same regions are often well served by mobile phone networks, suggesting the possibility of leveraging portable, camera-enabled mobile phones for diagnostic imaging and telemedicine. Toward this end we have built a mobile phone-mounted light microscope and demonstrated its potential for clinical use by imaging P. falciparum-infected and sickle red blood cells in brightfield and M. tuberculosis-infected sputum samples in fluorescence with LED excitation. In all cases resolution exceeded that necessary to detect blood cell and microorganism morphology, and with the tuberculosis samples we took further advantage of the digitized images to demonstrate automated bacillus counting via image analysis software. We expect such a telemedicine system for global healthcare via mobile phone -- offering inexpensive brightfield and fluorescence microscopy integrated with automated image analysis -- to provide an important tool for disease diagnosis and screening, particularly in the developing world and rural areas where laboratory facilities are scarce but mobile phone infrastructure is extensive.

  8. Modelling indoor electromagnetic fields (EMF) from mobile phone base stations for epidemiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekhuizen, J.; Vermeulen, R.; van Eijsden, M.; van Strien, R.; Bürgi, A.; Loomans, E.; Guxens, M.; Kromhout, H.; Huss, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from mobile phone base stations can be reliably modelled for outdoor locations, using 3D radio wave propagation models that consider antenna characteristics and building geometry. For exposure assessment in epidemiological studies, however, it is

  9. [Study on mobile phone based wireless ECG monitoring technology system realization and performance test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Liu, Jing

    2010-11-01

    This paper introduces a novel mobile phone based wireless real-time ECG monitoring system. And experiments were conducted to demonstrate the reliability and stability of the device. This novel system not only addresses the contradiction between continuous monitoring and device cost, but also represents advanced concepts of low cost medicine and personal health management.

  10. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what

  11. Wayfinding characteristics and familiarity indexes in an urban environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Najafpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people are encountered with finding the best way to reach to their destination. One definition for wayfinding is “the act of travelling to the destination by continuous processes of making route-choices whilst evaluating previous spatial decisions against stable cognition of the environment.  General understanding and keen appraisal of the environment can aid decision-making process of how to navigate around an area in the form of mental schemas. However, having a level of familiarity and attachment to a place is the underlying factor. The study is aimed at evaluating what is the level of familiarity of people and what is their attachment to notable landmarks in the town of Muar, Malaysia. To do so, the traditional survey analysis with the focus on data set that is attributed to a specific phenomenon and the quantifiable variable using statistical analysis on the tabularized format is undertaken.

  12. MAGELLAN: A cognitive map-based model of human wayfinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jeremy R.; Lew, Timothy F.; Li, Ningcheng; Sekuler, Robert; Kahana, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    In an unfamiliar environment, searching for and navigating to a target requires that spatial information be acquired, stored, processed, and retrieved. In a study encompassing all of these processes, participants acted as taxicab drivers who learned to pick up and deliver passengers in a series of small virtual towns. We used data from these experiments to refine and validate MAGELLAN, a cognitive map-based model of spatial learning and wayfinding. MAGELLAN accounts for the shapes of participants’ spatial learning curves, which measure their experience-based improvement in navigational efficiency in unfamiliar environments. The model also predicts the ease (or difficulty) with which different environments are learned and, within a given environment, which landmarks will be easy (or difficult) to localize from memory. Using just two free parameters, MAGELLAN provides a useful account of how participants’ cognitive maps evolve over time with experience, and how participants use the information stored in their cognitive maps to navigate and explore efficiently. PMID:24490847

  13. Mobile Phone-Based Unobtrusive Ecological Momentary Assessment of Day-to-Day Mood: An Explorative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselbergs, Joost; Ruwaard, Jeroen; Ejdys, Michal; Schrader, Niels; Sijbrandij, Marit; Riper, Heleen

    2016-03-29

    Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is a useful method to tap the dynamics of psychological and behavioral phenomena in real-world contexts. However, the response burden of (self-report) EMA limits its clinical utility. The aim was to explore mobile phone-based unobtrusive EMA, in which mobile phone usage logs are considered as proxy measures of clinically relevant user states and contexts. This was an uncontrolled explorative pilot study. Our study consisted of 6 weeks of EMA/unobtrusive EMA data collection in a Dutch student population (N=33), followed by a regression modeling analysis. Participants self-monitored their mood on their mobile phone (EMA) with a one-dimensional mood measure (1 to 10) and a two-dimensional circumplex measure (arousal/valence, -2 to 2). Meanwhile, with participants' consent, a mobile phone app unobtrusively collected (meta) data from six smartphone sensor logs (unobtrusive EMA: calls/short message service (SMS) text messages, screen time, application usage, accelerometer, and phone camera events). Through forward stepwise regression (FSR), we built personalized regression models from the unobtrusive EMA variables to predict day-to-day variation in EMA mood ratings. The predictive performance of these models (ie, cross-validated mean squared error and percentage of correct predictions) was compared to naive benchmark regression models (the mean model and a lag-2 history model). A total of 27 participants (81%) provided a mean 35.5 days (SD 3.8) of valid EMA/unobtrusive EMA data. The FSR models accurately predicted 55% to 76% of EMA mood scores. However, the predictive performance of these models was significantly inferior to that of naive benchmark models. Mobile phone-based unobtrusive EMA is a technically feasible and potentially powerful EMA variant. The method is young and positive findings may not replicate. At present, we do not recommend the application of FSR-based mood prediction in real-world clinical settings. Further

  14. Mobile phone based imaging system for selected tele-healthcare applications

    OpenAIRE

    Condominas Guàrdia, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    A mobile phone based telemedicine study is developed to see how feasible phone usage is in selected health care applications. The research is divided into three different objectives. The first objective is to compile the technical characteristics of selected mobile phones from telemedicine perspective. The second objective is to develop techniques to acquire quality images of skin with mobile phones. Finally a smartphone based telemedicine application will be developed to asses...

  15. Mobile Phone Based RIMS for Traffic Control a Case Study of Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Angela-Aida Karugila Runyoro; Jesuk Ko

    2015-01-01

    Vehicles saturation in transportation infrastructure causes traffic congestion, accidents, transportation delays and environment pollution. This problem can be resolved with proper management of traffic flow. Existing traffic management systems are challenged on capturing and processing real-time road data from wide area road networks. The main purpose of this study is to address the gap by implementing a mobile phone based Road Information Management System. The proposed...

  16. Novel versatile smart phone based Microplate readers for on-site diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Wu, Ze; Li, Xiuqing; Yao, Cuize; Yu, Shiting; Xiao, Wei; Tang, Yong

    2016-07-15

    Microplate readers are important diagnostic instruments, used intensively for various readout test kits (biochemical analysis kits and ELISA kits). However, due to their expensive and non-portability, commercial microplate readers are unavailable for home testing, community and rural hospitals, especially in developing countries. In this study, to provide a field-portable, cost-effective and versatile diagnostic tool, we reported a novel smart phone based microplate reader. The basic principle of this devise relies on a smart phone's optical sensor that measures transmitted light intensities of liquid samples. To prove the validity of these devises, developed smart phone based microplate readers were applied to readout results of various analytical targets. These targets included analanine aminotransferase (ALT; limit of detection (LOD) was 17.54 U/L), alkaline phosphatase (AKP; LOD was 15.56 U/L), creatinine (LOD was 1.35μM), bovine serum albumin (BSA; LOD was 0.0041mg/mL), prostate specific antigen (PSA; LOD was 0.76pg/mL), and ractopamine (Rac; LOD was 0.31ng/mL). The developed smart phone based microplate readers are versatile, portable, and inexpensive; they are unique because of their ability to perform under circumstances where resources and expertize are limited. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing a Behavioral Model for Mobile Phone-Based Diabetes Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nundy, Shantanu; Dick, Jonathan J.; Solomon, Marla C.; Peek, Monica E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Behavioral models for mobile phone-based diabetes interventions are lacking. This study explores the potential mechanisms by which a text message-based diabetes program affected self-management among African-Americans. Methods We conducted in-depth, individual interviews among 18 African-American patients with type 2 diabetes who completed a 4-week text message-based diabetes program. Each interview was audio- taped, transcribed verbatim, and imported into Atlas.ti software. Coding was done iteratively. Emergent themes were mapped onto existing behavioral constructs and then used to develop a novel behavioral model for mobile phone-based diabetes self-management programs. Results The effects of the text message-based program went beyond automated reminders. The constant, daily communications reduced denial of diabetes and reinforced the importance of self-management (Rosenstock Health Belief Model). Responding positively to questions about self-management increased mastery experience (Bandura Self-Efficacy). Most surprisingly, participants perceived the automated program as a “friend” and “support group” that monitored and supported their self-management behaviors (Barrera Social Support). Conclusions A mobile phone-based diabetes program affected self-management through multiple behavioral constructs including health beliefs, self-efficacy, and social support. Practice implications: Disease management programs that utilize mobile technologies should be designed to leverage existing models of behavior change and can address barriers to self-management associated with health disparities. PMID:23063349

  18. User Interface Preferences in the Design of a Camera-Based Navigation and Wayfinding Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arditi, Aries; Tian, YingLi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Development of a sensing device that can provide a sufficient perceptual substrate for persons with visual impairments to orient themselves and travel confidently has been a persistent rehabilitation technology goal, with the user interface posing a significant challenge. In the study presented here, we enlist the advice and ideas of…

  19. Location Dependency and Antenna/Body/Sensor-Lead Interaction Effects in a Cell-Phone Based GSM 1800 Telemedicine Link

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Troulis, S

    2001-01-01

    The error-free requirement of today's cell-phone based telemedicine systems demands investigations into the potential causes of service degradation, Measuring the Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI...

  20. Comparison of the effectiveness of three retinal camera technologies for malarial retinopathy detection in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, Peter; Nemeth, Sheila C.; Barriga, E. Simon; Harding, Simon P.; Lewallen, Susan; Taylor, Terrie E.; MacCormick, Ian J.; Joshi, Vinayak S.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the suitability of three available camera technologies (desktop, portable, and iphone based) for imaging comatose children who presented with clinical symptoms of malaria. Ultimately, the results of the project would form the basis for a design of a future camera to screen for malaria retinopathy (MR) in a resource challenged environment. The desktop, portable, and i-phone based cameras were represented by the Topcon, Pictor Plus, and Peek cameras, respectively. These cameras were tested on N=23 children presenting with symptoms of cerebral malaria (CM) at a malaria clinic, Queen Elizabeth Teaching Hospital in Malawi, Africa. Each patient was dilated for binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy (BIO) exam by an ophthalmologist followed by imaging with all three cameras. Each of the cases was graded according to an internationally established protocol and compared to the BIO as the clinical ground truth. The reader used three principal retinal lesions as markers for MR: hemorrhages, retinal whitening, and vessel discoloration. The study found that the mid-priced Pictor Plus hand-held camera performed considerably better than the lower price mobile phone-based camera, and slightly the higher priced table top camera. When comparing the readings of digital images against the clinical reference standard (BIO), the Pictor Plus camera had sensitivity and specificity for MR of 100% and 87%, respectively. This compares to a sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 75% for the i-phone based camera and 100% and 75% for the desktop camera. The drawback of all the cameras were their limited field of view which did not allow complete view of the periphery where vessel discoloration occurs most frequently. The consequence was that vessel discoloration was not addressed in this study. None of the cameras offered real-time image quality assessment to ensure high quality images to afford the best possible opportunity for reading by a remotely located

  1. Signage and wayfinding design a complete guide to creating environmental graphic design systems

    CERN Document Server

    Calori, Chris

    2015-01-01

    A new edition of the market-leading guide to signage and wayfinding design This new edition of Signage and Wayfinding Design: A Complete Guide to Creating Environmental Graphic Design Systems has been fully updated to offer you the latest, most comprehensive coverage of the environmental design process-from research and design development to project execution. Utilizing a cross-disciplinary approach that makes the information relevant to architects, interior designers, landscape architects, graphic designers, and industrial engineers alike, the book arms you with the skills needed to apply a

  2. Wayfinding with simulated prosthetic vision: performance comparison with regular and structure-enhanced renderings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergnieux, Victor; Macé, Marc J-M; Jouffrais, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used a simulation of upcoming low-resolution visual neuroprostheses to evaluate the benefit of embedded computer vision techniques in a wayfinding task. We showed that augmenting the classical phosphene rendering with the basic structure of the environment - displaying the ground plane with a different level of brightness - increased both wayfinding performance and cognitive mapping. In spite of the low resolution of current and upcoming visual implants, the improvement of these cognitive functions may already be possible with embedded artificial vision algorithms.

  3. MAGELLAN: a cognitive map-based model of human wayfinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jeremy R; Lew, Timothy F; Li, Ningcheng; Sekuler, Robert; Kahana, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    In an unfamiliar environment, searching for and navigating to a target requires that spatial information be acquired, stored, processed, and retrieved. In a study encompassing all of these processes, participants acted as taxicab drivers who learned to pick up and deliver passengers in a series of small virtual towns. We used data from these experiments to refine and validate MAGELLAN, a cognitive map-based model of spatial learning and wayfinding. MAGELLAN accounts for the shapes of participants' spatial learning curves, which measure their experience-based improvement in navigational efficiency in unfamiliar environments. The model also predicts the ease (or difficulty) with which different environments are learned and, within a given environment, which landmarks will be easy (or difficult) to localize from memory. Using just 2 free parameters, MAGELLAN provides a useful account of how participants' cognitive maps evolve over time with experience, and how participants use the information stored in their cognitive maps to navigate and explore efficiently. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Mobile phone-based telemonitoring for heart failure management: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Emily; Leonard, Kevin J; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Barnsley, Jan; Masino, Caterina; Ross, Heather J

    2012-02-16

    Previous trials of telemonitoring for heart failure management have reported inconsistent results, largely due to diverse intervention and study designs. Mobile phones are becoming ubiquitous and economical, but the feasibility and efficacy of a mobile phone-based telemonitoring system have not been determined. The objective of this trial was to investigate the effects of a mobile phone-based telemonitoring system on heart failure management and outcomes. One hundred patients were recruited from a heart function clinic and randomized into telemonitoring and control groups. The telemonitoring group (N = 50) took daily weight and blood pressure readings and weekly single-lead ECGs, and answered daily symptom questions on a mobile phone over 6 months. Readings were automatically transmitted wirelessly to the mobile phone and then to data servers. Instructions were sent to the patients' mobile phones and alerts to a cardiologist's mobile phone as required. Baseline questionnaires were completed and returned by 94 patients, and 84 patients returned post-study questionnaires. About 70% of telemonitoring patients completed at least 80% of their possible daily readings. The change in quality of life from baseline to post-study, as measured with the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, was significantly greater for the telemonitoring group compared to the control group (P = .05). A between-group analysis also found greater post-study self-care maintenance (measured with the Self-Care of Heart Failure Index) for the telemonitoring group (P = .03). Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels, self-care management, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved significantly for both groups from baseline to post-study, but did not show a between-group difference. However, a subgroup within-group analysis using the data from the 63 patients who had attended the heart function clinic for more than 6 months revealed the telemonitoring group had significant

  5. Highly Stable and Sensitive Nucleic Acid Amplification and Cell-Phone-Based Readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Janay E; Wei, Qingshan; Tseng, Derek; Zhang, Jingzi; Pan, Eric; Lewinski, Michael; Garner, Omai B; Ozcan, Aydogan; Di Carlo, Dino

    2017-03-28

    Key challenges with point-of-care (POC) nucleic acid tests include achieving a low-cost, portable form factor, and stable readout, while also retaining the same robust standards of benchtop lab-based tests. We addressed two crucial aspects of this problem, identifying a chemical additive, hydroxynaphthol blue, that both stabilizes and significantly enhances intercalator-based fluorescence readout of nucleic acid concentration, and developing a cost-effective fiber-optic bundle-based fluorescence microplate reader integrated onto a mobile phone. Using loop-mediated isothermal amplification on lambda DNA we achieve a 69-fold increase in signal above background, 20-fold higher than the gold standard, yielding an overall limit of detection of 25 copies/μL within an hour using our mobile-phone-based platform. Critical for a point-of-care system, we achieve a >60% increase in fluorescence stability as a function of temperature and time, obviating the need for manual baseline correction or secondary calibration dyes. This field-portable and cost-effective mobile-phone-based nucleic acid amplification and readout platform is broadly applicable to other real-time nucleic acid amplification tests by similarly modulating intercalating dye performance and is compatible with any fluorescence-based assay that can be run in a 96-well microplate format, making it especially valuable for POC and resource-limited settings.

  6. Effect of electromagnetic radiations from mobile phone base stations on general health and salivary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kushpal; Nagaraj, Anup; Yousuf, Asif; Ganta, Shravani; Pareek, Sonia; Vishnani, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Cell phones use electromagnetic, nonionizing radiations in the microwave range, which some believe may be harmful to human health. The present study aimed to determine the effect of electromagnetic radiations (EMRs) on unstimulated/stimulated salivary flow rate and other health-related problems between the general populations residing in proximity to and far away from mobile phone base stations. A total of four mobile base stations were randomly selected from four zones of Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Twenty individuals who were residing in proximity to the selected mobile phone towers were taken as the case group and the other 20 individuals (control group) who were living nearly 1 km away in the periphery were selected for salivary analysis. Questions related to sleep disturbances were measured using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and other health problems were included in the questionnaire. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. It was unveiled that a majority of the subjects who were residing near the mobile base station complained of sleep disturbances, headache, dizziness, irritability, concentration difficulties, and hypertension. A majority of the study subjects had significantly lesser stimulated salivary secretion (P mobile phone base stations on the health and well-being of the general population cannot be ruled out. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the effect of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on general health and more specifically on oral health.

  7. A Randomized Pilot Study of a Phone-Based Mindfulness and Weight Loss Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kelly M; Vickerman, Katrina A; Salmon, Erica E; Javitz, Harold S; Epel, Elissa S; Lovejoy, Jennifer C

    2017-10-06

    This study evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of integrating mindfulness training into a phone-based weight loss program to improve outcomes in those with high levels of emotional eating. Participants were 75 enrollees into an employer-sponsored weight loss program who reported high levels of overeating in response to thoughts and feelings. Seventy-five overweight and obese participants (92% female, 65% Caucasian, aged 26 to 68 years) were randomized to the new mindfulness weight loss program (n = 50) or the standard behavioral weight loss program (n = 25). Both programs consisted of 11 coaching calls with health coaches and registered dietitians with supplemental online materials. Satisfaction, engagement, and percent weight lost did not significantly differ for intervention vs. control at six months. Intervention participants had significantly better scores at six-month follow-up on mindful eating, binge eating, experiential avoidance, and one mindfulness subscale. Exploratory analyses showed that improvements on several measures predicted more weight loss in the intervention group. This pilot study found that integrating mindfulness into a brief phone-based behavioral weight loss program was feasible and acceptable to participants, but did not produce greater weight loss on average, despite hypothesized changes in mindful eating. Only one third of intervention participants reported participating in mindfulness exercises regularly. Mechanisms of change observed within the intervention group suggest that for adults with high levels of emotional eating those who embrace mindful eating and meditation may lose more weight with a mindfulness intervention.

  8. A cell-phone-based brain-computer interface for communication in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Te; Wang, Yijun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2011-04-01

    Moving a brain-computer interface (BCI) system from a laboratory demonstration to real-life applications still poses severe challenges to the BCI community. This study aims to integrate a mobile and wireless electroencephalogram (EEG) system and a signal-processing platform based on a cell phone into a truly wearable and wireless online BCI. Its practicality and implications in a routine BCI are demonstrated through the realization and testing of a steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP)-based BCI. This study implemented and tested online signal processing methods in both time and frequency domains for detecting SSVEPs. The results of this study showed that the performance of the proposed cell-phone-based platform was comparable, in terms of the information transfer rate, with other BCI systems using bulky commercial EEG systems and personal computers. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a truly portable, cost-effective and miniature cell-phone-based platform for online BCIs.

  9. Mobile phone-based clinical guidance for rural health providers in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautham, Meenakshi; Iyengar, M Sriram; Johnson, Craig W

    2015-12-01

    There are few tried and tested mobile technology applications to enhance and standardize the quality of health care by frontline rural health providers in low-resource settings. We developed a media-rich, mobile phone-based clinical guidance system for management of fevers, diarrhoeas and respiratory problems by rural health providers. Using a randomized control design, we field tested this application with 16 rural health providers and 128 patients at two rural/tribal sites in Tamil Nadu, Southern India. Protocol compliance for both groups, phone usability, acceptability and patient feedback for the experimental group were evaluated. Linear mixed-model analyses showed statistically significant improvements in protocol compliance in the experimental group. Usability and acceptability among patients and rural health providers were very high. Our results indicate that mobile phone-based, media-rich procedural guidance applications have significant potential for achieving consistently standardized quality of care by diverse frontline rural health providers, with patient acceptance. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Wayfinding in ageing and Alzheimer's disease within a virtual senior residence: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rebecca; Ohman, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    To report a study protocol that examines the impact of adding salient cues in a virtual reality simulation of a senior residential building on wayfinding for older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease. An early symptom of Alzheimer's disease is the inability to find one's way (wayfinding). Senior residential environments are especially difficult for wayfinding. Salient cues may be able to help persons with Alzheimer's disease find their way more effectively so they can maintain independence. A repeated measures, within and between subjects design. This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health (August 2012). Older adults (N = 40) with normal cognition and older adults with early stage Alzheimer's disease/mild cognitive impairment (N = 40) will try to find their way to a location repeatedly in a virtual reality simulation of senior residence. There are two environments: standard (no cues) and salient (multiple cues). Outcome measures include how often and how quickly participants find the target location in each cue condition. The results of this study have the potential to provide evidence for ways to make the environment more supportive for wayfinding for older adults with Alzheimer's disease. This study is registered at Trialmatch.alz.org (Identifier 260425-5). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Haptic Cues Used for Outdoor Wayfinding by Individuals with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoklenis, Athanasios; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The study presented here examines which haptic cues individuals with visual impairments use more frequently and determines which of these cues are deemed by these individuals to be the most important for way-finding in urban environments. It also investigates the ways in which these haptic cues are used by individuals with visual…

  12. Design and Development of a Mobile Sensor Based the Blind Assistance Wayfinding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati, F.; Delavar, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The blind and visually impaired people are facing a number of challenges in their daily life. One of the major challenges is finding their way both indoor and outdoor. For this reason, routing and navigation independently, especially in urban areas are important for the blind. Most of the blind undertake route finding and navigation with the help of a guide. In addition, other tools such as a cane, guide dog or electronic aids are used by the blind. However, in some cases these aids are not efficient enough in a wayfinding around obstacles and dangerous areas for the blind. As a result, the need to develop effective methods as decision support using a non-visual media is leading to improve quality of life for the blind through their increased mobility and independence. In this study, we designed and implemented an outdoor mobile sensor-based wayfinding system for the blind. The objectives of this study are to guide the blind for the obstacle recognition and the design and implementation of a wayfinding and navigation mobile sensor system for them. In this study an ultrasonic sensor is used to detect obstacles and GPS is employed for positioning and navigation in the wayfinding. This type of ultrasonic sensor measures the interval between sending waves and receiving the echo signals with respect to the speed of sound in the environment to estimate the distance to the obstacles. In this study the coordinates and characteristics of all the obstacles in the study area are already stored in a GIS database. All of these obstacles were labeled on the map. The ultrasonic sensor designed and constructed in this study has the ability to detect the obstacles in a distance of 2cm to 400cm. The implementation and the results obtained from the interview of a number of blind persons who employed the sensor verified that the designed mobile sensor system for wayfinding was very satisfactory.

  13. Spatial problem-solving strategies of middle school students: Wayfinding with geographic information systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigglesworth, John C.

    2000-06-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a powerful computer software package that emphasizes the use of maps and the management of spatially referenced environmental data archived in a systems data base. Professional applications of GIS have been in place since the 1980's, but only recently has GIS gained significant attention in the K--12 classroom. Students using GIS are able to manipulate and query data in order to solve all manners of spatial problems. Very few studies have examined how this technological innovation can support classroom learning. In particular, there has been little research on how experience in using the software correlates with a child's spatial cognition and his/her ability to understand spatial relationships. This study investigates the strategies used by middle school students to solve a wayfinding (route-finding) problem using the ArcView GIS software. The research design combined an individual background questionnaire, results from the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking (GALT) test, and analysis of reflective think-aloud sessions to define the characteristics of the strategies students' used to solve this particular class of spatial problem. Three uniquely different spatial problem solving strategies were identified. Visual/Concrete Wayfinders used a highly visual strategy; Logical/Abstract Wayfinders used GIS software tools to apply a more analytical and systematic approach; Transitional Wayfinders used an approach that showed evidence of one that was shifting from a visual strategy to one that was more analytical. The triangulation of data sources indicates that this progression of wayfinding strategy can be correlated both to Piagetian stages of logical thought and to experience with the use of maps. These findings suggest that GIS teachers must be aware that their students' performance will lie on a continuum that is based on cognitive development, spatial ability, and prior experience with maps. To be most effective, GIS teaching

  14. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF A MOBILE SENSOR BASED THE BLIND ASSISTANCE WAYFINDING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Barati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The blind and visually impaired people are facing a number of challenges in their daily life. One of the major challenges is finding their way both indoor and outdoor. For this reason, routing and navigation independently, especially in urban areas are important for the blind. Most of the blind undertake route finding and navigation with the help of a guide. In addition, other tools such as a cane, guide dog or electronic aids are used by the blind. However, in some cases these aids are not efficient enough in a wayfinding around obstacles and dangerous areas for the blind. As a result, the need to develop effective methods as decision support using a non-visual media is leading to improve quality of life for the blind through their increased mobility and independence. In this study, we designed and implemented an outdoor mobile sensor-based wayfinding system for the blind. The objectives of this study are to guide the blind for the obstacle recognition and the design and implementation of a wayfinding and navigation mobile sensor system for them. In this study an ultrasonic sensor is used to detect obstacles and GPS is employed for positioning and navigation in the wayfinding. This type of ultrasonic sensor measures the interval between sending waves and receiving the echo signals with respect to the speed of sound in the environment to estimate the distance to the obstacles. In this study the coordinates and characteristics of all the obstacles in the study area are already stored in a GIS database. All of these obstacles were labeled on the map. The ultrasonic sensor designed and constructed in this study has the ability to detect the obstacles in a distance of 2cm to 400cm. The implementation and the results obtained from the interview of a number of blind persons who employed the sensor verified that the designed mobile sensor system for wayfinding was very satisfactory.

  15. Precise observation of C. elegans dynamic behaviours under controlled thermal stimulus using a mobile phone-based microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, T; Shin, D-M; Kim, S; Lee, S; Lee, T G; Kim, K

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the temperature-dependent locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans by using the mobile phone-based microscope. We developed the customized imaging system with mini incubator and smartphone to effectively control the thermal stimulation for precisely observing the temperature-dependent locomotory behaviours of C. elegans. Using the mobile phone-based microscope, we successfully followed the long-term progress of specimens of C. elegans in real time as they hatched and explored their temperature-dependent locomotory behaviour. We are convinced that the mobile phone-based microscope is a useful device for real time and long-term observations of biological samples during incubation, and can make it possible to carry out live observations via wireless communications regardless of location. In addition, this microscope has the potential for widespread use owing to its low cost and compact design. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Mobile Phone-Based Unobtrusive Ecological Momentary Assessment of Day-to-Day Mood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asselbergs, Joost; Ruwaard, Jeroen; Ejdys, Michal

    2016-01-01

    is a technically feasible and potentially powerful EMA variant. The method is young and positive findings may not replicate. At present, we do not recommend the application of FSR-based mood prediction in real-world clinical settings. Further psychometric studies and more advanced data mining techniques are needed...... by a regression modeling analysis. Participants self-monitored their mood on their mobile phone (EMA) with a one-dimensional mood measure (1 to 10) and a two-dimensional circumplex measure (arousal/valence, -2 to 2). Meanwhile, with participants' consent, a mobile phone app unobtrusively collected (meta) data......%) provided a mean 35.5 days (SD 3.8) of valid EMA/unobtrusive EMA data. The FSR models accurately predicted 55% to 76% of EMA mood scores. However, the predictive performance of these models was significantly inferior to that of naive benchmark models. Conclusions: Mobile phone-based unobtrusive EMA...

  17. Determinants and stability over time of perception of health risks related to mobile phone base stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowall, Bernd; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Blettner, Maria

    2012-01-01

    about other environmental and health risks, is associated with psychological strain, and is stable on the individual level over time. METHODS: Self-administered questionnaires filled in by 3,253 persons aged 15-69 years in 2004 and 2006 in Germany. RESULTS: Risk perception of MPBS was strongly...... in 2004 expressed these concerns again 2 years later, the corresponding figure for attribution of health complaints to MPBS was 31.3%. CONCLUSION: Risk perception of MPBS is strongly associated with general concern, anxiety, depression, and stress, and rather instable over time.......OBJECTIVE: Perception of possible health risks related to mobile phone base stations (MPBS) is an important factor in citizens' opposition against MPBS and is associated with health complaints. The aim of the present study is to assess whether risk perception of MPBS is associated with concerns...

  18. How We Do It: A DIY Smart Phone based ENT Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Duvvi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a simple method of preparing a smart phone based ENT endoscopy for OPD clinic and for on call ENT to provide emergency ENT care in Accident and Emergency department when required. In our experience, this method is efficient, economical and ensures mobility and flexibility of remote visual inspection and documentation. This aids in better care for patients especially where there is no easy access to traditional ENT treatment room facility. This provides a fast and cost-effective solution to simultaneously view capture and save photos and videos with a smartphone and, if required, send these pictures to oncall Consultant. This enables quicker identification, documentation and support regardless of location.

  19. Modelling indoor electromagnetic fields (EMF) from mobile phone base stations for epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekhuizen, J; Vermeulen, R; van Eijsden, M; van Strien, R; Bürgi, A; Loomans, E; Guxens, M; Kromhout, H; Huss, A

    2014-06-01

    Radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from mobile phone base stations can be reliably modelled for outdoor locations, using 3D radio wave propagation models that consider antenna characteristics and building geometry. For exposure assessment in epidemiological studies, however, it is especially important to determine indoor exposure levels as people spend most of their time indoors. We assessed the accuracy of indoor RF-EMF model predictions, and whether information on building characteristics could increase model accuracy. We performed 15-minute spot measurements in 263 rooms in 101 primary schools and 30 private homes in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. At each measurement location, we collected information on building characteristics that can affect indoor exposure to RF-EMF, namely glazing and wall and window frame materials. Next, we modelled RF-EMF at the measurement locations with the 3D radio wave propagation model NISMap. We compared model predictions with measured values to evaluate model performance, and explored if building characteristics modified the association between modelled and measured RF-EMF using a mixed effect model. We found a Spearman correlation of 0.73 between modelled and measured total downlink RF-EMF from base stations. The average modelled and measured RF-EMF were 0.053 and 0.041mW/m(2), respectively, and the precision (standard deviation of the differences between predicted and measured values) was 0.184mW/m(2). Incorporating information on building characteristics did not improve model predictions. Although there is exposure misclassification, we conclude that it is feasible to reliably rank indoor RF-EMF from mobile phone base stations for epidemiological studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of postpartum mobile phone-based education on maternal and infant health in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslowsky, Julie; Frost, Sara; Hendrick, C Emily; Trujillo Cruz, Freddy O; Merajver, Sofia D

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of a mobile phone-based intervention on postnatal maternal health behavior and maternal and infant health in a middle-income country. A prospective evaluation enrolled consecutive postpartum women at two public hospitals in Quito, Ecuador, between June and August 2012. Inclusion criteria were live birth, no neonatal intensive care admission, and Spanish speaking. Intervention and control groups were assigned via random number generation. The intervention included a telephone-delivered educational session and phone/text access to a nurse for 30days after delivery. Maternal and infant health indicators were recorded at delivery and 3months after delivery via chart review and written/telephone-administered survey. Overall, 102 women were assigned to the intervention group and 76 to the control group. At 3months, intervention participants were more likely to attend the infant's postnatal check-up (P=0.022) and to breastfeed exclusively (P=0.005), and less likely to feed formula (P=0.016). They used more effective forms of contraception (more implants P=0.023; fewer condoms P=0.036) and reported fewer infant illnesses (P=0.010). There were no differences in maternal acute illness or check-up attendance. Mobile phone-based postnatal patient education is a promising strategy for improving breastfeeding, contraceptive use, and infant health in low-resource settings; different strategies are needed to influence postpartum maternal health behavior. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Field portable mobile phone based fluorescence microscopy for detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Gorocs, Zoltan; McLeod, Euan; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-01

    Giardia lamblia is a waterborne parasite that causes an intestinal infection, known as giardiasis, and it is found not only in countries with inadequate sanitation and unsafe water but also streams and lakes of developed countries. Simple, sensitive, and rapid detection of this pathogen is important for monitoring of drinking water. Here we present a cost-effective and field portable mobile-phone based fluorescence microscopy platform designed for automated detection of Giardia lamblia cysts in large volume water samples (i.e., 10 ml) to be used in low-resource field settings. This fluorescence microscope is integrated with a disposable water-sampling cassette, which is based on a flow-through porous polycarbonate membrane and provides a wide surface area for fluorescence imaging and enumeration of the captured Giardia cysts on the membrane. Water sample of interest, containing fluorescently labeled Giardia cysts, is introduced into the absorbent pads that are in contact with the membrane in the cassette by capillary action, which eliminates the need for electrically driven flow for sample processing. Our fluorescence microscope weighs ~170 grams in total and has all the components of a regular microscope, capable of detecting individual fluorescently labeled cysts under light-emitting-diode (LED) based excitation. Including all the sample preparation, labeling and imaging steps, the entire measurement takes less than one hour for a sample volume of 10 ml. This mobile phone based compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform together with its machine learning based cyst counting interface is easy to use and can even work in resource limited and field settings for spatio-temporal monitoring of water quality.

  2. Psychotherapeutic Applications of Mobile Phone-based Technologies: A Systematic Review of Current Research and Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vikas; Rajan, Tess Maria; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using mobile phone technology to offer real-time psychological interventions and support. However, questions remain on the clinical effectiveness and feasibility of such approaches in psychiatric populations. Our aim was to systematically review the published literature on mobile phone apps and other mobile phone-based technology for psychotherapy in mental health disorders. To achieve this, electronic searches of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar were carried out in January 2016. Generated abstracts were systematically screened for eligibility to be included in the review. Studies employing psychotherapy in any form, being delivered through mobile-based technology and reporting core mental health outcomes in mental illness were included in the study. We also included trials in progress with published protocols reporting at least some outcome measures of such interventions. From a total of 1563 search results, 24 eligible articles were identified and reviewed. These included trials in anxiety disorders (8), substance use disorders (5), depression (4), bipolar disorders (3), schizophrenia and psychotic disorders (3), and attempted suicide (1). Of these, eight studies involved the use of smartphone apps and others involved personalized text messages, automated programs, or delivered empirically supported treatments. Trial lengths varied from 6 weeks to 1 year. Good overall retention rates indicated that the treatments were feasible and largely acceptable. Benefits were reported on core outcomes in mental health illness indicating efficacy of such approaches though sample sizes were small. To conclude, mobile phone-based psychotherapies are a feasible and acceptable treatment option for patients with mental disorders. However, there remains a paucity of data on their effectiveness in real-world settings, especially from low- and middle-income countries.

  3. Color Targets: Fiducials to Help Visually Impaired People Find Their Way by Camera Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Manduchi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge faced by the blind and visually impaired population is that of wayfinding—the ability of a person to find his or her way to a given destination. We propose a new wayfinding aid based on a camera cell phone, which is held by the user to find and read aloud specially designed machine-readable signs, which we call color targets, in indoor environments (labeling locations such as offices and restrooms. Our main technical innovation is that we have designed the color targets to be detected and located in fractions of a second on the cell phone CPU, even at a distance of several meters. Once the sign has been quickly detected, nearby information in the form of a barcode can be read, an operation that typically requires more computational time. An important contribution of this paper is a principled method for optimizing the design of the color targets and the color target detection algorithm based on training data, instead of relying on heuristic choices as in our previous work. We have implemented the system on Nokia 7610 cell phone, and preliminary experiments with blind subjects demonstrate the feasibility of using the system as a real-time wayfinding aid.

  4. Improved Academic Performance and Student Perceptions of Learning through Use of a Cell Phone-Based Personal Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sihui; Steger, Daniel G.; Doolittle, Peter E.; Stewart, Amanda C.

    2018-01-01

    Personal response systems, such as clickers, have been widely used to improve the effectiveness of teaching in various classroom settings. Although hand-held clicker response systems have been the subject of multiple prior studies, few studies have focused on the use of cell phone-based personal response system (CPPRS) specifically. This study…

  5. Clinically defined non-specific symptoms in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations: A retrospective before-after study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baliatsas, C.; Kamp, I. van; Bolte, J.; Kelfkens, G.; Dijk, C. van; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Lebret, E.; Yzermans, J.

    2016-01-01

    The number of mobile phone base station(s) (MPBS) has been increasing to meet the rapid technological changes and growing needs for mobile communication. The primary objective of the present study was to test possible changes in prevalence and number of NSS in relation to MPBS exposure before and

  6. Modeled and perceived RF-EMF exposure from mobile phone base stations in relation to symptom reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375286063

    2017-01-01

    Technological changes have led to a rapid increase in the use of mobile technology. This is coupled with an increase in the number of mobile phone base stations that emit radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). There are concerns about the potential health effects of this exposure among

  7. Clinically defined non-specific symptoms in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations : A retrospective before-after study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baliatsas, Christos; van Kamp, Irene; Bolte, John; Kelfkens, Gert; van Dijk, Christel; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Hooiveld, Mariette; Lebret, Erik; Yzermans, Joris

    2016-01-01

    The number of mobile phone base station(s) (MPBS) has been increasing to meet the rapid technological changes and growing needs for mobile communication. The primary objective of the present study was to test possible changes in prevalence and number of NSS in relation to MPBS exposure before and

  8. Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A sensitive infrared camera that observes the blazing plumes from the Space Shuttle or expendable rocket lift-offs is capable of scanning for fires, monitoring the environment and providing medical imaging. The hand-held camera uses highly sensitive arrays in infrared photodetectors known as quantum well infrared photo detectors (QWIPS). QWIPS were developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Center for Space Microelectronics Technology in partnership with Amber, a Raytheon company. In October 1996, QWIP detectors pointed out hot spots of the destructive fires speeding through Malibu, California. Night vision, early warning systems, navigation, flight control systems, weather monitoring, security and surveillance are among the duties for which the camera is suited. Medical applications are also expected.

  9. Wayfinding with words: spatial learning and navigation using dynamically updated verbal descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Nicholas A; Bakdash, Jonathan Z; Legge, Gordon E

    2007-05-01

    This work investigates whether large-scale indoor layouts can be learned and navigated non-visually, using verbal descriptions of layout geometry that are updated, e.g. contingent on a participant's location in a building. In previous research, verbal information has been used to facilitate route following, not to support free exploration and wayfinding. Our results with blindfolded-sighted participants demonstrate that accurate learning and wayfinding performance is possible using verbal descriptions and that it is sufficient to describe only local geometric detail. In addition, no differences in learning or navigation performance were observed between the verbal study and a control study using visual input. Verbal learning was also compared to the performance of a random walk model, demonstrating that human search behavior is not based on chance decision-making. However, the model performed more like human participants after adding a constraint that biased it against reversing direction.

  10. Computationally determining the salience of decision points for real-time wayfinding support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Takemiya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study introduces the concept of computational salience to explain the discriminatory efficacy of decision points, which in turn may have applications to providing real-time assistance to users of navigational aids. This research compared algorithms for calculating the computational salience of decision points and validated the results via three methods: high-salience decision points were used to classify wayfinders; salience scores were used to weight a conditional probabilistic scoring function for real-time wayfinder performance classification; and salience scores were correlated with wayfinding-performance metrics. As an exploratory step to linking computational and cognitive salience, a photograph-recognition experiment was conducted. Results reveal a distinction between algorithms useful for determining computational and cognitive saliences. For computational salience, information about the structural integration of decision points is effective, while information about the probability of decision-point traversal shows promise for determining cognitive salience. Limitations from only using structural information and motivations for future work that include non-structural information are elicited.

  11. Augmented Reality: Sustaining Autonomous Way-Finding in the Community for Older Persons with Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejunaite, K; Lanza, C; Ganders, S; Iljaitsch, A; Riepe, M W

    2017-01-01

    Impairment of autonomous way-finding subsequent to a multitude of neurodegenerative and other diseases impedes independence of older persons and their everyday activities. It was the goal to use augmented reality to aid autonomous way-finding in a community setting. A spatial map and directional information were shown via head-up display to guide patients from the start zone on the hospital campus to a bakery in the nearby community. Hospital campus and nearby community. Patients with mild cognitive impairment (age 63 to 89). A head-up display was used to help patients find their way. Time needed to reach goal and number of assists needed. With use of augmented reality device, patients preceded along the correct path in 113 out of 120 intersections. Intermittent reassurance was needed for most patients. Patients affirmed willingness to use such an augmented reality device in everyday life if needed or even pay for it. Augmented reality guided navigation is a promising means to sustain autonomous way-finding as a prerequisite for autonomy of older persons in everyday activities. Thus, this study lays ground for a field trial in the community using assistive technology for older persons with cognitive impairment.

  12. CCD Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Roger R.

    1983-01-01

    A CCD camera capable of observing a moving object which has varying intensities of radiation eminating therefrom and which may move at varying speeds is shown wherein there is substantially no overlapping of successive images and wherein the exposure times and scan times may be varied independently of each other.

  13. Developing a Mobile Phone Based GUI for Users in the Construction Industry: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yammiyavar, Pradeep; Kate, Prasanna

    This paper reports work done in conceptualizing, developing and testing of a mobile phone based graphical user interface (GUI) package targeted at users from the construction industry. System analysis and information design principles were adopted during the development processes. Starting from user requirements based on field studies the development of graphic icons and their testing has been outlined. In addition to integrating individual icons into a GUI, coding and loading the application on a mobile phone has been done to enable testing of the GUI prototype. Users from the construction trade (sample size = 29), randomly selected, were asked to evaluate the designed icons in terms of their acceptance, adaptability and learnability aspects. It was found that learnability of the new GUI was more dependent on age and education level of the user rather than on the length of prior experience they had with mobile phones in general. The length of experience of using mobiles may not be an indicator of learnability in new applications for such user segments due to rapid rise in 'digital literacy' levels amongst semi literate users.

  14. Ethics Considerations in Global Mobile Phone-Based Surveys of Noncommunicable Diseases: A Conceptual Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Joseph; Labrique, Alain B; Gionfriddo, Kara; Pariyo, George; Gibson, Dustin G; Pratt, Bridget; Deutsch-Feldman, Molly; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-05-05

    Mobile phone coverage has grown, particularly within low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), presenting an opportunity to augment routine health surveillance programs. Several LMICs and global health partners are seeking opportunities to launch basic mobile phone-based surveys of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). The increasing use of such technology in LMICs brings forth a cluster of ethical challenges; however, much of the existing literature regarding the ethics of mobile or digital health focuses on the use of technologies in high-income countries and does not consider directly the specific ethical issues associated with the conduct of mobile phone surveys (MPS) for NCD risk factor surveillance in LMICs. In this paper, we explore conceptually several of the central ethics issues in this domain, which mainly track the three phases of the MPS process: predata collection, during data collection, and postdata collection. These include identifying the nature of the activity; stakeholder engagement; appropriate design; anticipating and managing potential harms and benefits; consent; reaching intended respondents; data ownership, access and use; and ensuring LMIC sustainability. We call for future work to develop an ethics framework and guidance for the use of mobile phones for disease surveillance globally. ©Joseph Ali, Alain B Labrique, Kara Gionfriddo, George Pariyo, Dustin G Gibson, Bridget Pratt, Molly Deutsch-Feldman, Adnan A Hyder. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 05.05.2017.

  15. Time Averaged Transmitter Power and Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields from Mobile Phone Base Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Bürgi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Models for exposure assessment of high frequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations need the technical data of the base stations as input. One of these parameters, the Equivalent Radiated Power (ERP, is a time-varying quantity, depending on communication traffic. In order to determine temporal averages of the exposure, corresponding averages of the ERP have to be available. These can be determined as duty factors, the ratios of the time-averaged power to the maximum output power according to the transmitter setting. We determine duty factors for UMTS from the data of 37 base stations in the Swisscom network. The UMTS base stations sample contains sites from different regions of Switzerland and also different site types (rural/suburban/urban/hotspot. Averaged over all regions and site types, a UMTS duty factor  for the 24 h-average is obtained, i.e., the average output power corresponds to about a third of the maximum power. We also give duty factors for GSM based on simple approximations and a lower limit for LTE estimated from the base load on the signalling channels.

  16. Constant connections: piloting a mobile phone-based peer support program for Nuer (southern Sudanese) women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollersheim, Dennis; Koh, Lee; Walker, Rae; Liamputtong, Pranee

    2013-01-01

    Refugee women have poor psychosocial health as a result of past trauma and difficulties associated with settlement. This study was a pilot to find out how to use mobile phone-based peer support to improve the psychosocial health of, and facilitate settlement in a group of nine Nuer refugee women in Melbourne, Australia. Nine participants recruited by a community leader received peer support training over two five-week periods. They were further provided with mobile phone recharge vouchers to call one another to practice peer support techniques. The fifth and final sessions were focus groups to evaluate the intervention. Notes from the focus groups were thematically analysed. The women reported greater confidence and empowerment as they received more support, had better connections within the group and better access to information. Relationships with friends, family and the community became richer as they adopted and experienced more functional communication patterns. Using mobile phones for peer support helped to re-create community by bridging the geographical distance that separates refugee women. It allowed the women, from similar backgrounds and with similar experiences, to provide mutual support and exchange information through a verbal channel, the form of communication they are most comfortable with. The program demonstrates the positive psychosocial effect of peer support in a refugee community, and provides a viable model for using mobile phones in health promotion interventions. The successful outcomes, as perceived by the participants, are indicative of the potential of using technology to bridge health inequities in a marginalised group.

  17. What input data are needed to accurately model electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Kromhout, Hans; Bürgi, Alfred; Huss, Anke; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    The increase in mobile communication technology has led to concern about potential health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phone base stations. Different RF-EMF prediction models have been applied to assess population exposure to RF-EMF. Our study examines what input data are needed to accurately model RF-EMF, as detailed data are not always available for epidemiological studies. We used NISMap, a 3D radio wave propagation model, to test models with various levels of detail in building and antenna input data. The model outcomes were compared with outdoor measurements taken in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Results showed good agreement between modelled and measured RF-EMF when 3D building data and basic antenna information (location, height, frequency and direction) were used: Spearman correlations were >0.6. Model performance was not sensitive to changes in building damping parameters. Antenna-specific information about down-tilt, type and output power did not significantly improve model performance compared with using average down-tilt and power values, or assuming one standard antenna type. We conclude that 3D radio wave propagation modelling is a feasible approach to predict outdoor RF-EMF levels for ranking exposure levels in epidemiological studies, when 3D building data and information on the antenna height, frequency, location and direction are available.

  18. Age-related wayfinding differences in real large-scale environments: detrimental motor control effects during spatial learning are mediated by executive decline?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Taillade

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate motor control activity (active vs. passive condition with regards to wayfinding and spatial learning difficulties in large-scale spaces for older adults. We compared virtual reality (VR-based wayfinding and spatial memory (survey and route knowledge performances between 30 younger and 30 older adults. A significant effect of age was obtained on the wayfinding performances but not on the spatial memory performances. Specifically, the active condition deteriorated the survey measure in all of the participants and increased the age-related differences in the wayfinding performances. Importantly, the age-related differences in the wayfinding performances, after an active condition, were further mediated by the executive measures. All of the results relative to a detrimental effect of motor activity are discussed in terms of a dual task effect as well as executive decline associated with aging.

  19. Experiences With a Self-Reported Mobile Phone-Based System Among Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background In cancer care, mobile phone-based systems are becoming more widely used in the assessment, monitoring, and management of side effects. Objective To explore the experiences of patients with colorectal cancer on using a mobile phone-based system for reporting neurotoxic side effects. Methods Eleven patients were interviewed (ages 44-68 years). A semistructured interview guide was used to perform telephone interviews. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Results The patients' experiences of using a mobile phone-based system were identified and constructed as: “being involved,” “pacing oneself,” and “managing the questions.” “Being involved” refers to their individual feelings. Patients were participating in their own care by being observant of the side effects they were experiencing. They were aware that the answers they gave were monitored in real time and taken into account by health care professionals when planning further treatment. “Pacing oneself” describes how the patients can have an impact on the time and place they choose to answer the questions. Answering the questionnaire was easy, and despite the substantial number of questions, it was quickly completed. “Managing the questions” pointed out that the patients needed to be observant because of the construction of the questions. They could not routinely answer all the questions. Patients understood that side effects can vary during the cycles of treatment and need to be assessed repeatedly during treatment. Conclusions This mobile phone-based system reinforced the patients’ feeling of involvement in their own care. The patients were comfortable with the technology and appreciated that the system was not time consuming. PMID:27282257

  20. Impact of newer self-monitoring technology and brief phone-based intervention on weight loss: A randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathryn M; Wing, Rena R

    2016-08-01

    Despite the proliferation of newer self-monitoring technology (e.g., activity monitors and smartphone apps), their impact on weight loss outside of structured in-person behavioral intervention is unknown. A randomized, controlled pilot study was conducted to examine efficacy of self-monitoring technology, with and without phone-based intervention, on 6-month weight loss in adults with overweight and obesity. Eighty participants were randomized to receive standard self-monitoring tools (ST, n = 26), technology-based self-monitoring tools (TECH, n = 27), or technology-based tools combined with phone-based intervention (TECH + PHONE, n = 27). All participants attended one introductory weight loss session and completed assessments at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. Weight loss from baseline to 6 months differed significantly between groups P = 0.042; there was a trend for TECH + PHONE (-6.4 ± 1.2 kg) to lose more weight than ST (-1.3 ± 1.2 kg); weight loss in TECH (-4.1 ± 1.4 kg) was between ST and TECH + PHONE. Fewer ST (15%) achieved ≥5% weight losses compared with TECH and TECH + PHONE (44%), P = 0.039. Adherence to self-monitoring caloric intake was higher in TECH + PHONE than TECH or ST, Ps self-monitoring technology plus brief phone-based intervention improves adherence and weight loss compared with traditional self-monitoring tools. Further research should determine cost-effectiveness of adding phone-based intervention when providing self-monitoring technology. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  1. Impact of mobile phone-based technology to improve health, population and nutrition services in Rural Bangladesh: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Jasim; Biswas, Tuhin; Adhikary, Gourab; Ali, Wazed; Alam, Nurul; Palit, Rajesh; Uddin, Nizam; Uddin, Aftab; Khatun, Fatema; Bhuiya, Abbas

    2017-07-06

    Mobile phone-based technology has been used in improving the delivery of healthcare services in many countries. However, data on the effects of this technology on improving primary healthcare services in resource-poor settings are limited. The aim of this study is to develop and test a mobile phone-based system to improve health, population and nutrition services in rural Bangladesh and evaluate its impact on service delivery. The study will use a quasi-experimental pre-post design, with intervention and comparison areas. Outcome indicators will include: antenatal care (ANC), delivery care, postnatal care (PNC), neonatal care, expanded programme on immunization (EPI) coverage, and contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR). The study will be conducted over a period of 30 months, using the existing health systems of Bangladesh. The intervention will be implemented through the existing service-delivery personnel at various primary-care levels, such as community clinic, union health and family welfare centre, and upazila health complex. These healthcare providers will be given mobile phones equipped with Apps for sending text and voice messages, along with the use of Internet and device for data-capturing. Training on handling of the Smartphones, data-capturing and monitoring will be given to selected service providers. They will also be trained on inputs, editing, verifying, and monitoring the outcome variables. Mobile phone-based technology has the potential to improve primary healthcare services in low-income countries, like Bangladesh. It is expected that our study will contribute to testing and developing a mobile phone-based intervention to improve the coverage and quality of services. The learning can be used in other similar settings in the low-and middle-income countries.

  2. Subjective symptoms related to GSM radiation from mobile phone base stations: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Perretta, Claudio; Navarro, Enrique A; Segura, Jaume; Portolés, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We performed a re-analysis of the data from Navarro et al (2003) in which health symptoms related to microwave exposure from mobile phone base stations (BSs) were explored, including data obtained in a retrospective inquiry about fear of exposure from BSs. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting La Ñora (Murcia), Spain. Participants Participants with known illness in 2003 were subsequently disregarded: 88 participants instead of 101 (in 2003) were analysed. Since weather circumstances can influence exposure, we restricted data to measurements made under similar weather conditions. Outcomes and methods A statistical method indifferent to the assumption of normality was employed: namely, binary logistic regression for modelling a binary response (eg, suffering fatigue (1) or not (0)), and so exposure was introduced as a predictor variable. This analysis was carried out on a regular basis and bootstrapping (95% percentile method) was used to provide more accurate CIs. Results The symptoms most related to exposure were lack of appetite (OR=1.58, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.03); lack of concentration (OR=1.54, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.89); irritability (OR=1.51, 95% CI 1.23 to 1.85); and trouble sleeping (OR=1.49, 95% CI 1.20 to 1.84). Changes in –2 log likelihood showed similar results. Concerns about the BSs were strongly related with trouble sleeping (OR =3.12, 95% CI 1.10 to 8.86). The exposure variable remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. The bootstrapped values were similar to asymptotic CIs. Conclusions This study confirms our preliminary results. We observed that the incidence of most of the symptoms was related to exposure levels—independently of the demographic variables and some possible risk factors. Concerns about adverse effects from exposure, despite being strongly related with sleep disturbances, do not influence the direct association between exposure and sleep. PMID:24381254

  3. Mobile Phone-Based mHealth Approaches for Public Health Surveillance in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, Johanna; Krämer, Alexander; Krumkamp, Ralf; May, Jürgen; Fobil, Julius

    2014-01-01

    Whereas mobile phone-based surveillance has the potential to provide real-time validated data for disease clustering and prompt respond and investigation, little evidence is available on current practice in sub-Sahara Africa. The objective of this review was to examine mobile phone-based mHealth interventions for Public Health surveillance in the region. We conducted electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, IEE Xplore, African Index Medicus (AIM), BioMed Central, PubMed Central (PMC), the Public Library of Science (PLoS) and IRIS for publications used in the review. In all, a total of nine studies were included which focused on infectious disease surveillance of malaria (n = 3), tuberculosis (n = 1) and influenza-like illnesses (n = 1) as well as on non-infectious disease surveillance of child malnutrition (n = 2), maternal health (n = 1) and routine surveillance of various diseases and symptoms (n = 1). Our review revealed that mobile phone-based surveillance projects in the sub-Saharan African countries are on small scale, fragmented and not well documented. We conclude by advocating for a strong drive for more research in the applied field as well as a better reporting of lessons learned in order to create an epistemic community to help build a more evidence-based field of practice in mHealth surveillance in the region. PMID:25396767

  4. Mobile Phone-Based mHealth Approaches for Public Health Surveillance in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Brinkel

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Whereas mobile phone-based surveillance has the potential to provide real-time validated data for disease clustering and prompt respond and investigation, little evidence is available on current practice in sub-Sahara Africa. The objective of this review was to examine mobile phone-based mHealth interventions for Public Health surveillance in the region. We conducted electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, IEE Xplore, African Index Medicus (AIM, BioMed Central, PubMed Central (PMC, the Public Library of Science (PLoS and IRIS for publications used in the review. In all, a total of nine studies were included which focused on infectious disease surveillance of malaria (n = 3, tuberculosis (n = 1 and influenza-like illnesses (n = 1 as well as on non-infectious disease surveillance of child malnutrition (n = 2, maternal health (n = 1 and routine surveillance of various diseases and symptoms (n = 1. Our review revealed that mobile phone-based surveillance projects in the sub-Saharan African countries are on small scale, fragmented and not well documented. We conclude by advocating for a strong drive for more research in the applied field as well as a better reporting of lessons learned in order to create an epistemic community to help build a more evidence-based field of practice in mHealth surveillance in the region.

  5. Mobile phone-based mHealth approaches for public health surveillance in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, Johanna; Krämer, Alexander; Krumkamp, Ralf; May, Jürgen; Fobil, Julius

    2014-11-12

    Whereas mobile phone-based surveillance has the potential to provide real-time validated data for disease clustering and prompt respond and investigation, little evidence is available on current practice in sub-Sahara Africa. The objective of this review was to examine mobile phone-based mHealth interventions for Public Health surveillance in the region. We conducted electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, IEE Xplore, African Index Medicus (AIM), BioMed Central, PubMed Central (PMC), the Public Library of Science (PLoS) and IRIS for publications used in the review. In all, a total of nine studies were included which focused on infectious disease surveillance of malaria (n = 3), tuberculosis (n = 1) and influenza-like illnesses (n = 1) as well as on non-infectious disease surveillance of child malnutrition (n = 2), maternal health (n = 1) and routine surveillance of various diseases and symptoms (n = 1). Our review revealed that mobile phone-based surveillance projects in the sub-Saharan African countries are on small scale, fragmented and not well documented. We conclude by advocating for a strong drive for more research in the applied field as well as a better reporting of lessons learned in order to create an epistemic community to help build a more evidence-based field of practice in mHealth surveillance in the region.

  6. Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Inger; Taft, Charles; Ranerup, Agneta; Bengtsson, Ulrika; Hoffmann, Mikael; Höfer, Stefan; Kasperowski, Dick; Mäkitalo, Asa; Lundin, Mona; Ring, Lena; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Kjellgren, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke worldwide. Effective treatment regimens exist; however, treatment adherence rates are poor (30%-50%). Improving self-management may be a way to increase adherence to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phases in the development and preliminary evaluation of an interactive mobile phone-based system aimed at supporting patients in self-managing their hypertension. A person-centered and participatory framework emphasizing patient involvement was used. An interdisciplinary group of researchers, patients with hypertension, and health care professionals who were specialized in hypertension care designed and developed a set of questions and motivational messages for use in an interactive mobile phone-based system. Guided by the US Food and Drug Administration framework for the development of patient-reported outcome measures, the development and evaluation process comprised three major development phases (1, defining; 2, adjusting; 3, confirming the conceptual framework and delivery system) and two evaluation and refinement phases (4, collecting, analyzing, interpreting data; 5, evaluating the self-management system in clinical practice). Evaluation of new mobile health systems in a structured manner is important to understand how various factors affect the development process from both a technical and human perspective. Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the effectiveness and utility of the mobile phone-based system in supporting the self-management of hypertension.

  7. Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Inger; Taft, Charles; Ranerup, Agneta; Bengtsson, Ulrika; Hoffmann, Mikael; Höfer, Stefan; Kasperowski, Dick; Mäkitalo, Åsa; Lundin, Mona; Ring, Lena; Rosenqvist, Ulf; Kjellgren, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke worldwide. Effective treatment regimens exist; however, treatment adherence rates are poor (30%–50%). Improving self-management may be a way to increase adherence to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phases in the development and preliminary evaluation of an interactive mobile phone-based system aimed at supporting patients in self-managing their hypertension. A person-centered and participatory framework emphasizing patient involvement was used. An interdisciplinary group of researchers, patients with hypertension, and health care professionals who were specialized in hypertension care designed and developed a set of questions and motivational messages for use in an interactive mobile phone-based system. Guided by the US Food and Drug Administration framework for the development of patient-reported outcome measures, the development and evaluation process comprised three major development phases (1, defining; 2, adjusting; 3, confirming the conceptual framework and delivery system) and two evaluation and refinement phases (4, collecting, analyzing, interpreting data; 5, evaluating the self-management system in clinical practice). Evaluation of new mobile health systems in a structured manner is important to understand how various factors affect the development process from both a technical and human perspective. Forthcoming analyses will evaluate the effectiveness and utility of the mobile phone-based system in supporting the self-management of hypertension. PMID:24910510

  8. Proposing a Multi-Criteria Path Optimization Method in Order to Provide a Ubiquitous Pedestrian Wayfinding Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahelgozin, M.; Sadeghi-Niaraki, A.; Dareshiri, S.

    2015-12-01

    A myriad of novel applications have emerged nowadays for different types of navigation systems. One of their most frequent applications is Wayfinding. Since there are significant differences between the nature of the pedestrian wayfinding problems and of those of the vehicles, navigation services which are designed for vehicles are not appropriate for pedestrian wayfinding purposes. In addition, diversity in environmental conditions of the users and in their preferences affects the process of pedestrian wayfinding with mobile devices. Therefore, a method is necessary that performs an intelligent pedestrian routing with regard to this diversity. This intelligence can be achieved by the help of a Ubiquitous service that is adapted to the Contexts. Such a service possesses both the Context-Awareness and the User-Awareness capabilities. These capabilities are the main features of the ubiquitous services that make them flexible in response to any user in any situation. In this paper, it is attempted to propose a multi-criteria path optimization method that provides a Ubiquitous Pedestrian Way Finding Service (UPWFS). The proposed method considers four criteria that are summarized in Length, Safety, Difficulty and Attraction of the path. A conceptual framework is proposed to show the influencing factors that have effects on the criteria. Then, a mathematical model is developed on which the proposed path optimization method is based. Finally, data of a local district in Tehran is chosen as the case study in order to evaluate performance of the proposed method in real situations. Results of the study shows that the proposed method was successful to understand effects of the contexts in the wayfinding procedure. This demonstrates efficiency of the proposed method in providing a ubiquitous pedestrian wayfinding service.

  9. WAYFINDING AND ACCESSIBILITY IN THE SAN ANTONIO RIVERWALK: A MODEL FOR URBAN DESIGN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza Kamal

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The San Antonio RiverWalk is an exquisite and dynamic destination for tourists from Texas, as well as from other states in the US. Because of its location in downtown area, the entire area including the RiverWalk, has been incorporated into various guides and maps, all of which seem to be disregarding the interrelationship between the RiverWalk level and the street level. While most maps show either the street level or river level, there are none that illustrate the accessibility the RiverWalk offers to major attractions and buildings at both levels, and none offer an orientation for pedestrians to the destinations on the RiverWalk level, which encountered the lack of visual clarity due to the multilayered terrain. This study investigates the visual obstacles of wayfinding in, and accessibility to the East RiverWalk area. This study, which represents the first phase of a multi-phase analysis of a broader research, emerged from urban research undertaken by a group of architecture educators and students which sought to allow students to become more involved in empirical and action research. A number of tools to investigate pedestrians’ ease of wayfinding and efficiency of identifying accessible transition points in the East RiverWalk area were developed. These tools categorize a number of spatial urban and accessibility features (i.e., entryways, ramps, staircases, and circulation elements which were used to create 3-D virtual environments demonstrated on two focus groups. The study concluded with a number of recommendations for improving the existing visual and graphic tools, enhancing planning and design considerations, and incorporating the voice of community businesses in addressing wayfinding and accessibility concerns. This study and its outcomes not only engage architecture students in urban research, but also emphasize the significance of the RiverWalk in creating a more livable downtown San Antonio.

  10. The feasibility of cell phone based electronic diaries for STI/HIV research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hensel Devon J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-reports of sensitive, socially stigmatized or illegal behavior are common in STI/HIV research, but can raise challenges in terms of data reliability and validity. The use of electronic data collection tools, including ecological momentary assessment (EMA, can increase the accuracy of this information by allowing a participant to self-administer a survey or diary entry, in their own environment, as close to the occurrence of the behavior as possible. In this paper, we evaluate the feasibility of using cell phone-based EMA as a tool for understanding sexual risk and STI among adult men and women. Methods As part of a larger prospective clinical study on sexual risk behavior and incident STI in clinically recruited adult men and women, using study-provided cell phones, participants (N = 243 completed thrice–daily EMA diaries monitoring individual and partner-specific emotional attributes, non-sexual activities, non-coital or coital sexual behaviors, and contraceptive behaviors. Using these data, we assess feasibility in terms of participant compliance, behavior reactivity, general method acceptability and method efficacy for capturing behaviors. Results Participants were highly compliant with diary entry protocol and schedule: over the entire 12 study weeks, participants submitted 89.7% (54,914/61,236 of the expected diary entries, with an average of 18.86 of the 21 expected diaries (85.7% each week. Submission did not differ substantially across gender, race/ethnicity and baseline sexually transmitted infection status. A sufficient volume and range of sexual behaviors were captured, with reporting trends in different legal and illegal behaviors showing small variation over time. Participants found the methodology to be acceptable, enjoyed and felt comfortable participating in the study. Conclusion Achieving the correct medium of data collection can drastically improve, or degrade, the timeliness and quality of an

  11. Where is my car? Examining wayfinding behavior in a parking lot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Mora

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This article examines wayfinding behavior in an extended parking lot belonging to one of the largest shopping malls in Santiago, Chile. About 500 people were followed while going to the mall and returning from it, and their trajectories were mapped and analyzed. The results indicate that inbound paths were, in average, 10% shorter that outbound paths, and that people stopped three times more frequently when leaving the mall than when accessing it. It is argued that these results are in line with previous research on the subject, which stress the importance of environmental information in shaping people`s behavior.

  12. Women's views and experiences of a mobile phone-based intervention to support post-abortion contraception in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris; Ly, Sokhey; Uk, Vannak; Warnock, Ruby; Free, Caroline

    2017-06-12

    The MObile Technology for Improved Family Planning (MOTIF) trial assessed a mobile phone-based intervention comprising voice messages and counsellor support to increase post-abortion contraception at four Marie Stopes International clinics in Cambodia. The aim of this process evaluation was to assess women's views and experiences of receiving the MOTIF intervention, gain insights into the mechanism of action of the intervention and seek recommendations for improvements. We conducted a qualitative study comprising15 semi-structured interviews with women who had received the intervention and undertook a simple thematic analysis. We identified themes relating to communication via mobile phone, supporting contraception use, broader post-abortion care, interaction with family and friends and suggestions for improvement. The majority of women were positive about the mobile phone-based intervention to support contraception use and reported it to be a convenient way to ask questions or get advice without going to a health centre, although a few women found the voice messages intrusive. The intervention supported contraception use by provision of information, encouragement, reminders to return to clinic, reassurance and advice for problems and had a positive effect on contraceptive uptake and continuation. Women reported a sense of being cared for and received support for additional physical and emotional issues. Most women thought that the duration of the intervention and frequency of messages were acceptable. The majority of women were positive about the mobile phone-based intervention which provided support for contraception use as well as additional physical and emotional issues. The study provides some insights into how the intervention might have worked and considers how the intervention could be improved.

  13. lmplementing lifestyle change through phone-based motivational interviewing in rural-based women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Judith A; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Grzegrzulka, Richard; Timperley, Jennifer G

    2012-04-01

    Substantial numbers of women with past gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In northern New South Wales 23% of women attending diabetes services between 2007 and 2010 with T2DM previously had GDM. This study investigated whether phone-based lifestyle education using motivational interviewing resulted in positive lifestyle change post GDM for women in a large rural area. Thirty-eight women were recruited to this pilot study following GDM diagnosis and randomly allocated to either the control or intervention group. Following baseline assessment, the intervention group received a 6-month phone-based motivational interviewing program, and access to usual care. The control group received usual care only. Measures were collected at baseline (6 weeks postnatal), and at 6 months follow-up. Outcome measures included body mass index, diet, and physical activity. At follow-up, the intervention group compared to the control group significantly reduced total fat intake by -19 g/d (95%CI: -37 to -1), total carbohydrate intake by -42 g/d (95%CI: -82 to -1), and glycaemic load by -26 units (95%CI: -48 to -4). These women also increased leisure physical activity compared to the control group by 11 min/d (95%CI: 1 to 22); no significant change in total physical activity levels occurred. At follow-up, body mass index in the intervention group improved by -1.5 kg/m2 (95%CI: -2.8 to -0.1) compared to the control group. The intervention group showed positive trends across lifestyle variables compared to the control group. Further large-scale research on the effectiveness of phone-based lifestyle counselling following GDM is warranted.

  14. Mobile Phone-Based Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Overall Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Guangzhou, China: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiting Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid and widespread adoption of mobile devices, mobile phones offer an opportunity to deliver cardiovascular disease (CVD interventions. This study evaluated the efficacy of a mobile phone-based lifestyle intervention aimed at reducing the overall CVD risk at a health management center in Guangzhou, China. We recruited 589 workers from eight work units. Based on a group-randomized design, work units were randomly assigned either to receive the mobile phone-based lifestyle interventions or usual care. The reduction in 10-year CVD risk at 1-year follow-up for the intervention group was not statistically significant (–1.05%, p = 0.096. However, the mean risk increased significantly by 1.77% (p = 0.047 for the control group. The difference of the changes between treatment arms in CVD risk was –2.83% (p = 0.001. In addition, there were statistically significant changes for the intervention group relative to the controls, from baseline to year 1, in systolic blood pressure (–5.55 vs. 6.89 mmHg; p < 0.001, diastolic blood pressure (–6.61 vs. 5.62 mmHg; p < 0.001, total cholesterol (–0.36 vs. –0.10 mmol/L; p = 0.005, fasting plasma glucose (–0.31 vs. 0.02 mmol/L; p < 0.001, BMI (–0.57 vs. 0.29 kg/m2; p < 0.001, and waist hip ratio (–0.02 vs. 0.01; p < 0.001. Mobile phone-based intervention may therefore be a potential solution for reducing CVD risk in China.

  15. An Exploratory Study Investigating Gender Effects on Using 3D Maps for Spatial Orientation in Wayfinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Liao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available 3D representations in applications that provide self-localization and orientation in wayfinding have become increasingly popular in recent years because of technical advances in the field. However, human factors have been largely ignored while designing 3D representations in support of pedestrian navigation. This exploratory study aims to explore gender effects on using 3D maps for spatial orientation. We designed a 3D map that combines salient 3D landmarks and 2D layouts, and evaluated gender differences in their performance during direction-pointing tasks by administrating an eye tracking experiment. The results indicate there was no significant overall gender difference on performance and visual attention. However, we observed that males using the 3D map paid more attention to landmarks in the environment and performed better than when using the conventional 2D map, whereas female performance did not show any significant difference between the two types of map usage. We also observed contrary gender differences in visual attention on landmarks between the 3D and 2D maps. While males fixated longer on landmarks than females when using the 3D map, females paid more visual attention to landmarks than males when using the 2D map. In addition, verbal protocols showed that males had more confidence while make decisions. These empirical results can be helpful in the design of map-based wayfinding enhancement tools.

  16. Mapping Cyclists’ Experiences and Agent-Based Modelling of Their Wayfinding Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snizek, Bernhard

    This dissertation is about modelling cycling transport behaviour. It is partly about urban experiences seen by the cyclist and about modelling, more specifically the agent-based modelling of cyclists' wayfinding behaviour. The dissertation consists of three papers. The first deals with the develo......This dissertation is about modelling cycling transport behaviour. It is partly about urban experiences seen by the cyclist and about modelling, more specifically the agent-based modelling of cyclists' wayfinding behaviour. The dissertation consists of three papers. The first deals......-based model of cycling transport behaviour using geodata, data from the Danish travel survey as well as behavioural data extracted from trajectories recorded utilising GPS units. Mapping Bicyclists’ Experiences in Copenhagen This paper presents an approach to the collection, mapping and analysing of cyclists......’ experiences. By relating spatial experiences to urban indicators such as land-use, street characteristics, cycle infrastructure, centrality and other aspects of the urban environment, their influence on cyclists’ experiences were analysed. 398 cyclists responded and plotted their most recent cycle route...

  17. Mobile phone-based biosensing: An emerging "diagnostic and communication" technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-González, Daniel; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-06-15

    In this review we discuss recent developments on the use of mobile phones and similar devices for biosensing applications in which diagnostics and communications are coupled. Owing to the capabilities of mobile phones (their cameras, connectivity, portability, etc.) and to advances in biosensing, the coupling of these two technologies is enabling portable and user-friendly analytical devices. Any user can now perform quick, robust and easy (bio)assays anywhere and at any time. Among the most widely reported of such devices are paper-based platforms. Herein we provide an overview of a broad range of biosensing possibilities, from optical to electrochemical measurements; explore the various reported designs for adapters; and consider future opportunities for this technology in fields such as health diagnostics, safety & security, and environment monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Phases in development of an interactive mobile phone-based system to support self-management of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallberg I

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inger Hallberg,1,11 Charles Taft,1,11 Agneta Ranerup,2,11 Ulrika Bengtsson,1,11 Mikael Hoffmann,3,10 Stefan Höfer,4 Dick Kasperowski,5 Åsa Mäkitalo,6 Mona Lundin,6 Lena Ring,7,8 Ulf Rosenqvist,9 Karin Kjellgren1,10,11 1Institute of Health and Care Sciences, 2Department of Applied Information Technology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 3The NEPI Foundation, Linköping, Sweden; 4Department of Medical Psychology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck, Austria; 5Department of Philosophy, Linguistics and Theory of Science, 6Department of Education, Communication and Learning, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 7Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics, Uppsala University, 8Department of Use of Medical Products, Medical Products Agency, Uppsala, 9Department of Medical Specialist and Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Motala, 10Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, 11Centre for Person-Centred Care, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: Hypertension is a significant risk factor for heart disease and stroke worldwide. Effective treatment regimens exist; however, treatment adherence rates are poor (30%–50%. Improving self-management may be a way to increase adherence to treatment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the phases in the development and preliminary evaluation of an interactive mobile phone-based system aimed at supporting patients in self-managing their hypertension. A person-centered and participatory framework emphasizing patient involvement was used. An interdisciplinary group of researchers, patients with hypertension, and health care professionals who were specialized in hypertension care designed and developed a set of questions and motivational messages for use in an interactive mobile phone-based system. Guided by the US Food and Drug Administration framework for the development of patient-reported outcome

  19. The efficacy of mobile phone-based text message interventions ('Happy Quit') for smoking cessation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yanhui; Wu, Qiuxia; Tang, Jinsong; Zhang, Fengyu; Wang, Xuyi; Qi, Chang; He, Haoyu; Long, Jiang; Kelly, Brian C; Cohen, Joanna

    2016-08-19

    Considering the extreme shortage of smoking cessation services in China, and the acceptability, feasibility and efficacy of mobile phone-based text message interventions for quitting smoking in other countries, here we propose a study of "the efficacy of mobile phone-based text message interventions ('Happy Quit') for smoking cessation in China". The primary objective of this proposed project is to assess whether a program of widely accessed mobile phone-based text message interventions ('Happy Quit') will be effective at helping people in China who smoke, to quit. Based on the efficacy of previous studies in smoking cessation, we hypothesize that 'Happy Quit' will be an effective, feasible and affordable smoking cessation program in China. In this single-blind, randomized trial, undertaken in China, about 2000 smokers willing to make a quit attempt will be randomly allocated, using an independent telephone randomization system that includes a minimization algorithm balancing for sex (male, female), age (19-34 or >34 years), educational level (≤ or >12 years), and Fagerstrom score for nicotine addiction (≤5, >5), to 'Happy Quit', comprising motivational messages and behavioral-change support, or to a control group that receives text messages unrelated to quitting. Messages will be developed to be suitable for Chinese. A pilot study will be conducted before the intervention to modify the library of messages and interventions. The primary outcome will be self-reported continuous smoking abstinence. A secondary outcome will be point prevalence of abstinence. Abstinence will be assessed at six time points (4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 weeks post-intervention). A third outcome will be reductions in number of cigarettes smoked per day. The results will provide valuable insights into bridging the gap between need and services received for smoking cessation interventions and tobacco use prevention in China. It will also serve as mHealth model for extending the public

  20. The efficacy of mobile phone-based text message interventions (‘Happy Quit’ for smoking cessation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Liao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering the extreme shortage of smoking cessation services in China, and the acceptability, feasibility and efficacy of mobile phone-based text message interventions for quitting smoking in other countries, here we propose a study of “the efficacy of mobile phone-based text message interventions (‘Happy Quit’ for smoking cessation in China”. The primary objective of this proposed project is to assess whether a program of widely accessed mobile phone-based text message interventions (‘Happy Quit’ will be effective at helping people in China who smoke, to quit. Based on the efficacy of previous studies in smoking cessation, we hypothesize that ‘Happy Quit’ will be an effective, feasible and affordable smoking cessation program in China. Methods/Design In this single-blind, randomized trial, undertaken in China, about 2000 smokers willing to make a quit attempt will be randomly allocated, using an independent telephone randomization system that includes a minimization algorithm balancing for sex (male, female, age (19–34 or >34 years, educational level (≤ or >12 years, and Fagerstrom score for nicotine addiction (≤5, >5, to ‘Happy Quit’, comprising motivational messages and behavioral-change support, or to a control group that receives text messages unrelated to quitting. Messages will be developed to be suitable for Chinese. A pilot study will be conducted before the intervention to modify the library of messages and interventions. The primary outcome will be self-reported continuous smoking abstinence. A secondary outcome will be point prevalence of abstinence. Abstinence will be assessed at six time points (4, 8, 12, 16, 20 and 24 weeks post-intervention. A third outcome will be reductions in number of cigarettes smoked per day. Discussion/Implications The results will provide valuable insights into bridging the gap between need and services received for smoking cessation interventions and

  1. Mapping Cyclists’ Experiences and Agent-Based Modelling of Their Wayfinding Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snizek, Bernhard

    This dissertation is about modelling cycling transport behaviour. It is partly about urban experiences seen by the cyclist and about modelling, more specifically the agent-based modelling of cyclists' wayfinding behaviour. The dissertation consists of three papers. The first deals......-based model of cycling transport behaviour using geodata, data from the Danish travel survey as well as behavioural data extracted from trajectories recorded utilising GPS units. Mapping Bicyclists’ Experiences in Copenhagen This paper presents an approach to the collection, mapping and analysing of cyclists...... amenities indicate that positive experiences or the absence of negative experiences are clearly related to the presence of en-route cycling facilities and attractive natural environments within a short distance of large water bodies or green edges along the route. Modelling cyclists' GPS trajectories...

  2. Mobile phone base stations and adverse health effects: phase 1 of a population-based, cross-sectional study in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blettner, M; Schlehofer, B; Breckenkamp, J

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this first phase of a cross-sectional study from Germany was to investigate whether proximity of residence to mobile phone base stations as well as risk perception is associated with health complaints. METHODS: The researchers conducted a population-based, multi-phase, cross......-sectional study within the context of a large panel survey regularly carried out by a private research institute in Germany. In the initial phase, reported on in this paper, 30,047 persons from a total of 51,444 who took part in the nationwide survey also answered questions on how mobile phone base stations...... affected their health. A list of 38 health complaints was used. A multiple linear regression model was used to identify predictors of health complaints including proximity of residence to mobile phone base stations and risk perception. RESULTS: Of the 30,047 participants (response rate 58.6%), 18...

  3. Kilohoku Ho`okele Wa`a : Astronomy of the Modern Hawaiian Wayfinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha`o, Celeste; Dye, Ahia G.; Slater, Stephanie J.; Slater, Timothy F.; Baybayan, Kalepa

    2015-08-01

    This paper provides an introduction to Kilohoku Ho`okele Wa`a, the astronomy of the Hawaiian wayfinders. Rooted in a legacy of navigation across the Polynesian triangle, wayfinding astronomy has been part of a suite of skills that allows navigators to deliberately hop between the small islands of the Pacific, for thousands of years. Forty years ago, in one manifestation of the Hawaiian Renaissance, our teachers demonstrated that ancient Hawaiians were capable of traversing the wide Pacific to settle and trade on islands separated by thousands of miles. Today those same mentors train a new generation of navigators, making Hawaiian voyaging a living, evolving, sustainable endeavor. This paper presents two components of astronomical knowledge that all crewmen, but particularly those in training to become navigators, learn early in their training. Na Ohana Hoku, the Hawaiian Star Families constitute the basic units of the Hawaiian sky. In contrast to the Western system of 88 constellations, Na Ohana Hoku divides the sky into four sections that each run from the northern to the southern poles. This configuration reduces cognitive load, allowing the navigator to preserve working memory for other complex tasks. In addition, these configurations of stars support the navigator in finding and generatively using hundreds of individual, and navigationally important pairs of stars. The Hawaiian Star Compass divides the celestial sphere into a directional system that uses 32 rather than 8 cardinal points. Within the tropics, the rising and setting of celestial objects are consistent within the Hawaiian Star Compass, providing for extremely reliable direction finding. Together, Na Ohana Hoku and the Hawaiian Star Compass provide the tropical navigator with astronomical assistance that is not available to, and would have been unknown to Western navigators trained at higher latitudes.

  4. Structural hippocampal anomalies in a schizophrenia population correlate with navigation performance on a wayfinding task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrée-Anne eLedoux

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory, related to the hippocampus, has been found to be impaired in schizophrenia. Further, hippocampal anomalies have also been observed in schizophrenia. This study investigated whether average hippocampal grey matter (GM would differentiate performance on a hippocampus-dependent memory task in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Twenty-one patients with schizophrenia and twenty-two control participants were scanned with an MRI while being tested on a wayfinding task in a virtual town (e.g., find the grocery store from the school. Regressions were performed for both groups individually and together using GM and performance on the wayfinding task. Results indicate that controls successfully completed the task more often than patients, took less time, and made fewer errors. Additionally, controls had significantly more hippocampal GM than patients. Poor performance was associated with a GM decrease in the right hippocampus for both groups. Within group regressions found an association between right hippocampi GM and performance in controls and an association between the left hippocampi GM and performance in patients. A second analysis revealed that different anatomical GM regions, known to be associated with the hippocampus, such as the parahippocampal cortex, amygdala, medial and orbital prefrontal cortices, covaried with the hippocampus in the control group. Interestingly, the cuneus and cingulate gyrus also covaried with the hippocampus in the patient group but the orbital frontal cortex did not, supporting the hypothesis of impaired connectivity between the hippocampus and the frontal cortex in schizophrenia. These results present important implications for creating intervention programs aimed at measuring functional and structural changes in the hippocampus in schizophrenia.

  5. Color Targets: Fiducials to Help Visually Impaired People Find Their Way by Camera Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manduchi Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge faced by the blind and visually impaired population is that of wayfinding—the ability of a person to find his or her way to a given destination. We propose a new wayfinding aid based on a camera cell phone, which is held by the user to find and read aloud specially designed machine-readable signs, which we call color targets, in indoor environments (labeling locations such as offices and restrooms. Our main technical innovation is that we have designed the color targets to be detected and located in fractions of a second on the cell phone CPU, even at a distance of several meters. Once the sign has been quickly detected, nearby information in the form of a barcode can be read, an operation that typically requires more computational time. An important contribution of this paper is a principled method for optimizing the design of the color targets and the color target detection algorithm based on training data, instead of relying on heuristic choices as in our previous work. We have implemented the system on Nokia 7610 cell phone, and preliminary experiments with blind subjects demonstrate the feasibility of using the system as a real-time wayfinding aid.

  6. Modeled and Perceived Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields From Mobile-Phone Base Stations and the Development of Symptoms Over Time in a General Population Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Astrid L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375286063; Slottje, Pauline|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/299345351; Timmermans, Danielle R M; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Reedijk, Marije|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413319431; Vermeulen, Roel C H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Smid, Tjabe

    2017-01-01

    We assessed associations between modeled and perceived exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from mobile-phone base stations and the development of nonspecific symptoms and sleep disturbances over time. A population-based Dutch cohort study, the Occupational and Environmental

  7. Mobile phone base stations and adverse health effects: phase 2 of a cross-sectional study with measured radio frequency electromagnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Blettner, M; Kowall, B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that exposure to continuous low-level radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) emitted from mobile phone base stations was related to various health disturbances. METHODS: For the investigation people living mainly...

  8. Use of portable exposure meters for comparing mobile phone base station radiation in different types of areas in the cities of Basel and Amsterdam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbinello, Damiano; Huss, Anke; Beekhuizen, Johan; Vermeulen, Roel; Röösli, Martin

    2014-01-15

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) are highly variable and differ considerably within as well as between areas. Exposure assessment studies characterizing spatial and temporal variation are limited so far. Our objective was to evaluate sources of data variability and the repeatability of daily measurements using portable exposure meters (PEMs). Data were collected at 12 days between November 2010 and January 2011 with PEMs in four different types of urban areas in the cities of Basel (BSL) and Amsterdam (AMS). Exposure from mobile phone base stations ranged from 0.30 to 0.53 V/m in downtown and business areas and in residential areas from 0.09 to 0.41 V/m. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that measurements from various days were highly reproducible (measurement duration of approximately 30 min) with only 0.6% of the variance of all measurements from mobile phone base station radiation being explained by the measurement day and only 0.2% by the measurement time (morning, noon, afternoon), whereas type of area (30%) and city (50%) explained most of the data variability. We conclude that mobile monitoring of exposure from mobile phone base station radiation with PEMs is useful due to the high repeatability of mobile phone base station exposure levels, despite the high spatial variation. © 2013.

  9. A portable smart phone-based plasmonic nanosensor readout platform that measures transmitted light intensities of nanosubstrates using an ambient light sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiangqiang; Wu, Ze; Xu, Fangxiang; Li, Xiuqing; Yao, Cuize; Xu, Meng; Sheng, Liangrong; Yu, Shiting; Tang, Yong

    2016-05-21

    Plasmonic nanosensors may be used as tools for diagnostic testing in the field of medicine. However, quantification of plasmonic nanosensors often requires complex and bulky readout instruments. Here, we report the development of a portable smart phone-based plasmonic nanosensor readout platform (PNRP) for accurate quantification of plasmonic nanosensors. This device operates by transmitting excitation light from a LED through a nanosubstrate and measuring the intensity of the transmitted light using the ambient light sensor of a smart phone. The device is a cylinder with a diameter of 14 mm, a length of 38 mm, and a gross weight of 3.5 g. We demonstrated the utility of this smart phone-based PNRP by measuring two well-established plasmonic nanosensors with this system. In the first experiment, the device measured the morphology changes of triangular silver nanoprisms (AgNPRs) in an immunoassay for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). In the second experiment, the device measured the aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in an aptamer-based assay for the detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The results from the smart phone-based PNRP were consistent with those from commercial spectrophotometers, demonstrating that the smart phone-based PNRP enables accurate quantification of plasmonic nanosensors.

  10. Validity of at home model predictions as a proxy for personal exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from mobile phone base stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, A.L.; Bolte, J.F.B.; Beekhuizen, J.; Kromhout, H.; Smid, T.; Vermeulen, R.C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidemiological studies on the potential health effects of RF-EMF from mobile phone base stations require efficient and accurate exposure assessment methods. Previous studies have demonstrated that the 3D geospatial model NISMap is able to rank locations by indoor and outdoor RF-EMF

  11. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  12. Adapting Virtual Camera Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    In a three-dimensional virtual environment aspects such as narrative and interaction completely depend on the camera since the camera defines the player’s point of view. Most research works in automatic camera control aim to take the control of this aspect from the player to automatically gen...

  13. Digital Pinhole Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancor, Rachael; Lancor, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we describe how the classic pinhole camera demonstration can be adapted for use with digital cameras. Students can easily explore the effects of the size of the pinhole and its distance from the sensor on exposure time, magnification, and image quality. Instructions for constructing a digital pinhole camera and our method for…

  14. Mobile phone-based asthma self-management aid for adolescents (mASMAA: a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhee H

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyekyun Rhee,1 James Allen,2 Jennifer Mammen,1 Mary Swift21School of Nursing, 2Department of Computer Science, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USAPurpose: Adolescents report high asthma-related morbidity that can be prevented by adequate self-management of the disease. Therefore, there is a need for a developmentally appropriate strategy to promote effective asthma self-management. Mobile phone-based technology is portable, commonly accessible, and well received by adolescents. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a comprehensive mobile phone-based asthma self-management aid for adolescents (mASMAA that was designed to facilitate symptom monitoring, treatment adherence, and adolescent–parent partnership. The system used state-of-the-art natural language-understanding technology that allowed teens to use unconstrained English in their texts, and to self-initiate interactions with the system.Materials and methods: mASMAA was developed based on an existing natural dialogue system that supports broad coverage of everyday natural conversation in English. Fifteen adolescent–parent dyads participated in a 2-week trial that involved adolescents' daily scheduled and unscheduled interactions with mASMAA and parents responding to daily reports on adolescents' asthma condition automatically generated by mASMAA. Subsequently, four focus groups were conducted to systematically obtain user feedback on the system. Frequency data on the daily usage of mASMAA over the 2-week period were tabulated, and content analysis was conducted for focus group interview data.Results: Response rates for daily text messages were 81%–97% in adolescents. The average number of self-initiated messages to mASMAA was 19 per adolescent. Symptoms were the most common topic of teen-initiated messages. Participants concurred that use of mASMAA improved awareness of symptoms and triggers, promoted treatment adherence and

  15. Perceptions and experiences of heart failure patients and clinicians on the use of mobile phone-based telemonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Emily; Leonard, Kevin J; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Barnsley, Jan; Masino, Caterina; Ross, Heather J

    2012-02-10

    Previous trials of heart failure telemonitoring systems have produced inconsistent findings, largely due to diverse interventions and study designs. The objectives of this study are (1) to provide in-depth insight into the effects of telemonitoring on self-care and clinical management, and (2) to determine the features that enable successful heart failure telemonitoring. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 heart failure patients attending a heart function clinic who had used a mobile phone-based telemonitoring system for 6 months. The telemonitoring system required the patients to take daily weight and blood pressure readings, weekly single-lead ECGs, and to answer daily symptom questions on a mobile phone. Instructions were sent to the patient's mobile phone based on their physiological values. Alerts were also sent to a cardiologist's mobile phone, as required. All clinicians involved in the study were also interviewed post-trial (N = 5). The interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then analyzed using a conventional content analysis approach. The telemonitoring system improved patient self-care by instructing the patients in real-time how to appropriately modify their lifestyle behaviors. Patients felt more aware of their heart failure condition, less anxiety, and more empowered. Many were willing to partially fund the use of the system. The clinicians were able to manage their patients' heart failure conditions more effectively, because they had physiological data reported to them frequently to help in their decision-making (eg, for medication titration) and were alerted at the earliest sign of decompensation. Essential characteristics of the telemonitoring system that contributed to improved heart failure management included immediate self-care and clinical feedback (ie, teachable moments), how the system was easy and quick to use, and how the patients and clinicians perceived tangible benefits from telemonitoring. Some clinical concerns

  16. Integrating mobile-phone based assessment for psychosis into people’s everyday lives and clinical care: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmier-Claus Jasper E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past decade policy makers have emphasised the importance of healthcare technology in the management of long-term conditions. Mobile-phone based assessment may be one method of facilitating clinically- and cost-effective intervention, and increasing the autonomy and independence of service users. Recently, text-message and smartphone interfaces have been developed for the real-time assessment of symptoms in individuals with schizophrenia. Little is currently understood about patients’ perceptions of these systems, and how they might be implemented into their everyday routine and clinical care. Method 24 community based individuals with non-affective psychosis completed a randomised repeated-measure cross-over design study, where they filled in self-report questions about their symptoms via text-messages on their own phone, or via a purpose designed software application for Android smartphones, for six days. Qualitative interviews were conducted in order to explore participants’ perceptions and experiences of the devices, and thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Three themes emerged from the data: i the appeal of usability and familiarity, ii acceptability, validity and integration into domestic routines, and iii perceived impact on clinical care. Although participants generally found the technology non-stigmatising and well integrated into their everyday activities, the repetitiveness of the questions was identified as a likely barrier to long-term adoption. Potential benefits to the quality of care received were seen in terms of assisting clinicians, faster and more efficient data exchange, and aiding patient-clinician communication. However, patients often failed to see the relevance of the systems to their personal situations, and emphasised the threat to the person centred element of their care. Conclusions The feedback presented in this paper suggests that patients are conscious of the

  17. Traffic camera system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Toshi

    1997-04-01

    The intelligent transportation system has generated a strong need for the development of intelligent camera systems to meet the requirements of sophisticated applications, such as electronic toll collection (ETC), traffic violation detection and automatic parking lot control. In order to achieve the highest levels of accuracy in detection, these cameras must have high speed electronic shutters, high resolution, high frame rate, and communication capabilities. A progressive scan interline transfer CCD camera, with its high speed electronic shutter and resolution capabilities, provides the basic functions to meet the requirements of a traffic camera system. Unlike most industrial video imaging applications, traffic cameras must deal with harsh environmental conditions and an extremely wide range of light. Optical character recognition is a critical function of a modern traffic camera system, with detection and accuracy heavily dependent on the camera function. In order to operate under demanding conditions, communication and functional optimization is implemented to control cameras from a roadside computer. The camera operates with a shutter speed faster than 1/2000 sec. to capture highway traffic both day and night. Consequently camera gain, pedestal level, shutter speed and gamma functions are controlled by a look-up table containing various parameters based on environmental conditions, particularly lighting. Lighting conditions are studied carefully, to focus only on the critical license plate surface. A unique light sensor permits accurate reading under a variety of conditions, such as a sunny day, evening, twilight, storms, etc. These camera systems are being deployed successfully in major ETC projects throughout the world.

  18. An Efficient Power Harvesting Mobile Phone-Based Electrochemical Biosensor for Point-of-Care Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Alexander C; Yao, Chengyang; Venkatesh, A G; Hall, Drew A

    2016-11-01

    Cellular phone penetration has grown continually over the past two decades with the number of connected devices rapidly approaching the total world population. Leveraging the worldwide ubiquity and connectivity of these devices, we developed a mobile phone-based electrochemical biosensor platform for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics and wellness tracking. The platform consists of an inexpensive electronic module (< $20) containing a low-power potentiostat that interfaces with and efficiently harvests power from a wide variety of phones through the audio jack. Active impedance matching improves the harvesting efficiency to 79%. Excluding loses from supply rectification and regulation, the module consumes 6.9 mW peak power and can measure < 1 nA bidirectional current. The prototype was shown to operate within the available power budget set by mobile devices and produce data that matches well with that of an expensive laboratory grade instrument. We demonstrate that the platform can be used to track the concentration of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), a biomarker for monitoring lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients, in its physiological range via an electrochemical sandwich assay on disposable screen-printed electrodes with a 1 nM limit of detection.

  19. Evaluation of a Mobile Phone-Based Microscope for Screening of Schistosoma haematobium Infection in Rural Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Koydemir, Hatice C; Tseng, Derek; Ephraim, Richard K D; Duah, Evans; Tee, Joseph; Andrews, Jason R; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-06-01

    AbstractSchistosomiasis affects over 170 million people in Africa. Here we compare a novel, low-cost mobile phone microscope to a conventional light microscope for the label-free diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium infections in a rural Ghanaian school setting. We tested the performance of our handheld microscope using 60 slides that were randomly chosen from an ongoing epidemiologic study in school-aged children. The mobile phone microscope had a sensitivity of 72.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.1-84.2), specificity of 100% (95% CI: 75.9-100), positive predictive value of 100% (95% CI: 86.3-100), and a negative predictive value of 57.1% (95% CI: 37.4-75.0). With its modest sensitivity and high specificity, this handheld and cost-effective mobile phone-based microscope is a stepping-stone toward developing a powerful tool in clinical and public health settings where there is limited access to conventional laboratory diagnostic support.

  20. Putting Prevention in Their Pockets: Developing Mobile Phone-Based HIV Interventions for Black Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Emily C.; Fowler, Beth; LeGrand, Sara; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Bull, Sheana S.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Wohl, David A.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Young black men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a disproportionate burden of HIV. Rapid expansion of mobile technologies, including smartphone applications (apps), provides a unique opportunity for outreach and tailored health messaging. We collected electronic daily journals and conducted surveys and focus groups with 22 black MSM (age 18–30) at three sites in North Carolina to inform the development of a mobile phone-based intervention. Qualitative data was analyzed thematically using NVivo. Half of the sample earned under $11,000 annually. All participants owned smartphones and had unlimited texting and many had unlimited data plans. Phones were integral to participants' lives and were a primary means of Internet access. Communication was primarily through text messaging and Internet (on-line chatting, social networking sites) rather than calls. Apps were used daily for entertainment, information, productivity, and social networking. Half of participants used their phones to find sex partners; over half used phones to find health information. For an HIV-related app, participants requested user-friendly content about test site locators, sexually transmitted diseases, symptom evaluation, drug and alcohol risk, safe sex, sexuality and relationships, gay-friendly health providers, and connection to other gay/HIV-positive men. For young black MSM in this qualitative study, mobile technologies were a widely used, acceptable means for HIV intervention. Future research is needed to measure patterns and preferences of mobile technology use among broader samples. PMID:23565925

  1. Health effects of living near mobile phone base transceiver station (BTS) antennae: a report from Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Karbalae, Mojtaba; Moradi, Habib Allah; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, by tremendous use of mobile phone telecommunication, a growing concern about the possible health hazards has increased greatly among public and scientists. The mobile phone exposure has been shown to have many effects upon the immune functions, stimulating hormones, mammalian brain, sperm motility and morphology, and neurological pathologies syndrome. The aim of this study was to find out the psychological and psychobiological reactions of the people who are living near mobile phone base transceiver stations (BTS) antenna, in Isfahan, Iran. A cross-sectional study on 250 randomly selected inhabitants (133 women and 117 men) was performed in October 2012 till November 2012. The inhabitants were requested to complete a standardized questionnaire that focused on the relevant psychological and psychobiological reactions parameters. A computer program (SPSS version16.0, Chicago, IL) was used for statistical analysis using the Chi-square test with Yates correction. All the data were tested using a criterion level of p = 0.05. The results showed that most of the symptoms such as nausea, headache, dizziness, irritability, discomfort, nervousness, depression, sleep disturbance, memory loss and lowering of libido were statistically significant in the inhabitants living near the BTS antenna (300 m). It is suggested that cellular phone BTS antenna should not be sited closer than 300 m to populations to minimize exposure of neighbors.

  2. Wayfinding: a quality factor in human design approach to healthcare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Nord, R

    1999-01-01

    The specific aim of this paper is the systematic analysis of interactions and reciprocal conditions existing between the physical space of hospital buildings and the different categories of individuals that come in contact with them. The physical and environmental facilities of hospital architecture often influence the therapeutic character of space and the employees. If the values of the individual are to be safeguarded in this context, priority needs to be given to such factors as communication, privacy, etc. This would mean the involvement of other professional groups such as psychologists, sociologists, ergonomists, etc. at the hospital building planning stage. This paper will outline the result of some research conducted at the University Research Center "TESIS" of Florence to provide better understanding of design strategies applied to reduce the pathology of spaces within the healthcare environment. The case studies will highlight the parameters and the possible architectural solutions to wayfinding and the humanization of spaces, with particular emphasis on lay-outs, technologies, furniture and finishing design.

  3. RETHINKING THE GROCERY STORE: INCLUSIVE WAYFINDING SYSTEM FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED SHOPPERS IN GROCERY STORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doaa Khattab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Many people with disabilities face considerable barriers while shopping in grocery stores.  One such barrier is that they cannot find their way around easily, especially when they visit the grocery store for the first time and have not yet built a cognitive map in their memory. They may also experience delays in finding the right product or waiting for assistance from store employees, thus leading them to rely on family, friends, relatives, or volunteers to help them with their shopping. Problems start when these people are not available, in which case the individual is forced to cancel their visit to the grocery store and reschedule the trip. Grocery stores include many different zones and services, the aisles area being one of the main barriers to access for people with different disabilities. This area features many different sections such as canned goods, dry packaged goods, spices, drinks and snacks, baking supplies, baby items, cereals, cleaning products, pet supplies, and health and beauty items. For visually impaired individuals, however, it can be hard to reach these various sections and find the relevant products. The objective of this research is to design an inclusive and innovative wayfinding system in grocery stores for visually impaired shoppers in order to help them find the center zone, orient between different aisles, decide where to go, move easily between different sections, and select products with ease. The research approach will be based on the literature review and the application of the Delphi method.

  4. Toward a Computer Vision-based Wayfinding Aid for Blind Persons to Access Unfamiliar Indoor Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingli; Yang, Xiaodong; Yi, Chucai; Arditi, Aries

    2013-04-01

    Independent travel is a well known challenge for blind and visually impaired persons. In this paper, we propose a proof-of-concept computer vision-based wayfinding aid for blind people to independently access unfamiliar indoor environments. In order to find different rooms (e.g. an office, a lab, or a bathroom) and other building amenities (e.g. an exit or an elevator), we incorporate object detection with text recognition. First we develop a robust and efficient algorithm to detect doors, elevators, and cabinets based on their general geometric shape, by combining edges and corners. The algorithm is general enough to handle large intra-class variations of objects with different appearances among different indoor environments, as well as small inter-class differences between different objects such as doors and door-like cabinets. Next, in order to distinguish intra-class objects (e.g. an office door from a bathroom door), we extract and recognize text information associated with the detected objects. For text recognition, we first extract text regions from signs with multiple colors and possibly complex backgrounds, and then apply character localization and topological analysis to filter out background interference. The extracted text is recognized using off-the-shelf optical character recognition (OCR) software products. The object type, orientation, location, and text information are presented to the blind traveler as speech.

  5. The 'wayfinding' experience of family carers who learn to manage technical health procedures at home: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Janet; McKinlay, Eileen; Keeling, Sally; Levack, William

    2017-12-01

    With more care taking place in the home, family carers play an important role in supporting patients. Some family carers undertake technical health procedures generally managed by health professionals in hospital settings (e.g. managing a tracheostomy or enteral feeding). To explore how family carers learn to manage technical health procedures in order to help health professionals better understand and support this process. A grounded theory study using data from interviews with 26 New Zealand family carers who managed technical health procedures including nasogastric or gastrostomy feeding, stoma care, urinary catheterisation, tracheostomy management, intravenous therapy, diabetes management and complex wound dressings. Most (20 participants) were caring for their child and the remaining six for their spouse, parent or grandparent. Following grounded theory methods, each interview was coded soon after completion. Additional data were compared with existing material, and as analysis proceeded, initial codes were grouped into higher order concepts until a core concept was developed. Interviewing continued until no new ideas emerged and concepts were well defined. The core concept of 'wayfinding' indicates that the learning process for family carers is active, individualised and multi-influenced, developing over time as a response to lived experience. Health professional support was concentrated on the initial phase of carers' training, reducing and becoming more reactive as carers took responsibility for day-to-day management. Wayfinding involves self-navigation by carers, in contrast to patient navigator models which provide continuing professional assistance to patients receiving cancer or chronic care services. Wayfinding by carers raises questions about how carers should be best supported in their initial and ongoing learning as the management of these procedures changes over time. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. The VISTA infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, G. B.; Caldwell, M.; Ward, A. K.; Whalley, M. S.; Woodhouse, G.; Edeson, R. L.; Clark, P.; Beard, S. M.; Gallie, A. M.; Todd, S. P.; Strachan, J. M. D.; Bezawada, N. N.; Sutherland, W. J.; Emerson, J. P.

    2006-06-01

    We describe the integration and test phase of the construction of the VISTA Infrared Camera, a 64 Megapixel, 1.65 degree field of view 0.9-2.4 micron camera which will soon be operating at the cassegrain focus of the 4m VISTA telescope. The camera incorporates sixteen IR detectors and six CCD detectors which are used to provide autoguiding and wavefront sensing information to the VISTA telescope control system.

  7. Streak camera meeting summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bliss, David E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Streak cameras are important for high-speed data acquisition in single event experiments, where the total recorded information (I) is shared between the number of measurements (M) and the number of samples (S). Topics of this meeting included: streak camera use at the national laboratories; current streak camera production; new tube developments and alternative technologies; and future planning. Each topic is summarized in the following sections.

  8. Solid state video cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Cristol, Y

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Video Cameras reviews the state of the art in the field of solid-state television cameras as compiled from patent literature. Organized into 10 chapters, the book begins with the basic array types of solid-state imagers and appropriate read-out circuits and methods. Documents relating to improvement of picture quality, such as spurious signal suppression, uniformity correction, or resolution enhancement, are also cited. The last part considerssolid-state color cameras.

  9. Airborne Network Camera Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Optical Systems Group Document 466-15 AIRBORNE NETWORK CAMERA STANDARD DISTRIBUTION A: APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...Airborne Network Camera Standard 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...without the focus of standardization for interoperable command and control, storage, and data streaming has been the airborne network camera systems used

  10. Non-specific physical symptoms in relation to actual and perceived proximity to mobile phone base stations and powerlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolte John

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence about a possible causal relationship between non-specific physical symptoms (NSPS and exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF emitted by sources such as mobile phone base stations (BS and powerlines is insufficient. So far little epidemiological research has been published on the contribution of psychological components to the occurrence of EMF-related NSPS. The prior objective of the current study is to explore the relative importance of actual and perceived proximity to base stations and psychological components as determinants of NSPS, adjusting for demographic, residency and area characteristics. Methods Analysis was performed on data obtained in a cross-sectional study on environment and health in 2006 in the Netherlands. In the current study, 3611 adult respondents (response rate: 37% in twenty-two Dutch residential areas completed a questionnaire. Self-reported instruments included a symptom checklist and assessment of environmental and psychological characteristics. The computation of the distance between household addresses and location of base stations and powerlines was based on geo-coding. Multilevel regression models were used to test the hypotheses regarding the determinants related to the occurrence of NSPS. Results After adjustment for demographic and residential characteristics, analyses yielded a number of statistically significant associations: Increased report of NSPS was predominantly predicted by higher levels of self-reported environmental sensitivity; perceived proximity to base stations and powerlines, lower perceived control and increased avoidance (coping behavior were also associated with NSPS. A trend towards a moderator effect of perceived environmental sensitivity on the relation between perceived proximity to BS and NSPS was verified (p = 0.055. There was no significant association between symptom occurrence and actual distance to BS or powerlines. Conclusions Perceived proximity to BS

  11. [Optimization of measurement methods for a multi-frequency electromagnetic field from mobile phone base station using broadband EMF meter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieńkowski, Paweł; Cała, Paweł; Zubrzak, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the characteristics of the mobile phone base station (BS) as an electromagnetic field (EMF) source. The most common system configurations with their construction are described. The parameters of radiated EMF in the context of the access to methods and other parameters of the radio transmission are discussed. Attention was also paid to antennas that are used in this technology. The influence of individual components of a multi-frequency EMF, most commonly found in the BS surroundings, on the resultant EMF strength value indicated by popular broadband EMF meters was analyzed. The examples of metrological characteristics of the most common EMF probes and 2 measurement scenarios of the multisystem base station, with and without microwave relays, are shown. The presented method for measuring the multi-frequency EMF using 2 broadband probes allows for the significant minimization of measurement uncertainty. Equations and formulas that can be used to calculate the actual EMF intensity from multi-frequency sources are shown. They have been verified in the laboratory conditions on a specific standard setup as well as in real conditions in a survey of the existing base station with microwave relays. Presented measurement methodology of multi-frequency EMF from BS with microwave relays, validated both in laboratory and real conditions. It has been proven that the described measurement methodology is the optimal approach to the evaluation of EMF exposure in BS surrounding. Alternative approaches with much greater uncertainty (precaution method) or more complex measuring procedure (sources exclusion method) are also presented). This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  12. Residential exposure to RF-EMF from mobile phone base stations: Model predictions versus personal and home measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Astrid L; Slottje, Pauline; Meima, Marie Y; Beekhuizen, Johan; Timmermans, Danielle; Kromhout, Hans; Smid, Tjabe; Vermeulen, Roel C H

    2016-04-15

    Geospatial models have been demonstrated to reliably and efficiently estimate RF-EMF exposure from mobile phone base stations (downlink) at stationary locations with the implicit assumption that this reflects personal exposure. In this study we evaluated whether RF-EMF model predictions at the home address are a good proxy of personal 48h exposure. We furthermore studied potential modification of this association by degree of urbanisation. We first used an initial NISMap estimation (at an assumed height of 4.5m) for 9563 randomly selected addresses in order to oversample addresses with higher exposure levels and achieve exposure contrast. We included 47 individuals across the range of potential RF-EMF exposure and used NISMap to re-assess downlink exposure at the home address (at bedroom height). We computed several indicators to determine the accuracy of the NISMap model predictions. We compared residential RF-EMF model predictions with personal 48h, at home, and night-time (0:00-8:00AM) ExpoM3 measurements, and with EME-SPY 140 spot measurements in the bedroom. We obtained information about urbanisation degree and compared the accuracy of model predictions in high and low urbanised areas. We found a moderate Spearman correlation between model predictions and personal 48h (rSp=0.47), at home (rSp=0.49), at night (rSp=0.51) and spot measurements (rSp=0.54). We found no clear differences between high and low urbanised areas (48h: high rSp=0.38, low rSp=0.55, bedroom spot measurements: high rSp=0.55, low rSp=0.50). We achieved a meaningful ranking of personal downlink exposure irrespective of degree of urbanisation, indicating that these models can provide a good proxy of personal exposure in areas with varying build-up. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An exploratory study of ageing women's perception on access to health informatics via a mobile phone-based intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lishan; Yen, Ching Chiuan; Chang, Leanne; Chan, Hock Chuan; Tai, Bee Choo; Tan, Say Beng; Duh, Henry Been Lirn; Choolani, Mahesh

    2012-09-01

    This is an exploratory study examining the perceived attitudes and readiness of women aged 50 years or older on adopting a mobile phone-based intervention named as Infohealth in Singapore. Infohealth is designed as a health informatics to tailor personalized healthcare advice for the well-being for women - very little is known about the acceptability level of self-care technology, especially the older among the female population. To explore participants' perceptions and acceptance, a telephone survey was developed from concepts identified from various user acceptance theories and models. Correlation was used to identify significant dependent variables while partial least square and boot-strapping procedures were used to estimate the significance of the path coefficients. Analysis supports the validity and reliability of the 27-item research model consisting of 8 constructs. 700 women aged 50years and older responded to the survey. Findings show the extent of ageing women's existing dependency on others for help, regard for close ones whom they care for, opinion from family and friends, and guarding the health of people who are important for them do not directly affect the intention of using Infohealth, but are rather mediated by perceived usefulness. This study validated some ageing-specific and female-posited variables to suggest as main constructs in future innovation adoption studies about older women. Technological anxiety and perceived physical condition both have no direct relationship with perceived ease of use and usefulness, lifestyle and intention to use. Findings reinforced the significant roles of perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, compatibility, and subjective norm in predicting the adoption intention of Infohealth among ageing women. More extensive statistical analysis is needed to discover more interesting findings while qualitative analysis can help to detect humanistic design opportunities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  14. Comparison of the Effectiveness of a Mobile Phone-based Education Program in Educating Mothers as Oral Health Providers in Two Regions of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlKlayb, Saleh Ali; Assery, Mansour K; AlQahtani, AlJohara; AlAnazi, Madawy; Pani, Sharat Chandra

    2017-01-01

    The penetration of mobile phone devices is widespread across the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Recently, there has been evidence of the success of phone-based applications in the provision of preventive oral health care to children and their parents. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a mobile phone-based application in educating mothers of children aged below 6 years of age in preventive dental care. A mobile phone-based application (iTeethey™) was developed for iPhone and Android and made freely available on Google Play and App Store. The application was then distributed to 3879 mothers of children below 6 years of age (1989 in Riyadh Region and 1890 in Najran region). The mothers were subjected to a standardized knowledge attitude and practice of oral hygiene questionnaire before being asked to download the application. A total of 1055 mothers who downloaded the application completed 3-month recall process. Significant improvement in the knowledge of the mothers was reported after the use of the application from both regions. The mothers from Najran showed significantly greater improvement in knowledge when compared to the mothers from Riyadh region. The application was also more effective in mothers with more than one child when compared to first-time mothers. Within the limitations of this study, we can state that the mobile phone application used in this study significantly improves the knowledge of mothers toward their child's oral health.

  15. Technology Use and Preferences for Mobile Phone-Based HIV Prevention and Treatment Among Black Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: Exploratory Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Ian W; Winder, Terrell Ja; Lea, Charles Herbert; Tan, Diane; Boyd, Donte; Novak, David

    2017-04-13

    Black young men who have sex with men (BYMSM) experience higher human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) incidence than their white and Latino counterparts. The aim of our study was to understand BYMSM's preferences for mobile phone-based HIV prevention and treatment in order to inform culturally tailored interventions to reduce the spread of HIV and improve HIV treatment outcomes in this population. Qualitative focus groups (N=6) with BYMSM aged 18-29 years (N=41; 46%, 19/41 HIV-positive) were conducted to elucidate their preferences for the design and delivery of mobile phone-based HIV prevention and treatment interventions. A modified grounded theory approach to data analysis was undertaken using ATLAS.ti textual analysis software. Participants preferred holistic health interventions that did not focus exclusively on HIV prevention and treatment. Issues of privacy and confidentiality were paramount. Participants preferred functionality that enables discreet connections to culturally competent health educators and treatment providers who can address the range of health and psychosocial concerns faced by BYMSM. Mobile phone-based HIV prevention has the potential to increase engagement with HIV prevention and treatment resources among BYMSM. For these approaches to be successful, researchers must include BYMSM in the design and creation of these interventions.

  16. Thermal Cameras and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal cameras are passive sensors that capture the infrared radiation emitted by all objects with a temperature above absolute zero. This type of camera was originally developed as a surveillance and night vision tool for the military, but recently the price has dropped, significantly opening up...

  17. Flying solo: A review of the literature on wayfinding for older adults experiencing visual or cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Sheila J; Gharaveis, Arsalan

    2017-01-01

    Accessible tourism is a growing market within the travel industry, but little research has focused on travel barriers for older adults who may be experiencing visual and cognitive decline as part of the normal aging process, illness, or other disabling conditions. Travel barriers, such as difficulty finding one's way throughout an airport, may adversely affect older adults' travel experience, thereby reducing their desire to travel. This review of the literature investigates wayfinding strategies to ensure that older passengers who have planned to travel independently can do so with dignity. These include facility planning and design strategies (e.g., layout, signage) and technological solutions. Although technological approaches, such as smart phone apps, appear to offer the most promising new solutions for enhancing airport navigation, more traditional approaches, such as designing facilities with an intuitive building layout, are still heavily relied upon in the aviation industry. While there are many design guidelines for enhancing wayfinding for older adults, many are not based on scientific investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Engagement Within a Mobile Phone-Based Smoking Cessation Intervention for Adolescents and its Association With Participant Characteristics and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz Castro, Raquel; Haug, Severin; Filler, Andreas; Kowatsch, Tobias; Schaub, Michael P

    2017-11-01

    over all three models, with greater reductions in daily tobacco use than nonengagement. The majority of tobacco-smoking adolescents engaged extensively with a mobile phone-based smoking cessation program. However, not only stable engagement but also decreasing engagement with a program might be an indicator of behavioral change. Measures to avoid nonengagement among adolescents appear especially necessary for older smokers with an immigrant background who do not drink excessively. In addition, future studies should not only examine the use of specific program components but also users' engagement trajectories to better understand the mechanisms behind behavioral change.

  19. A multimedia mobile phone-based youth smoking cessation intervention: findings from content development and piloting studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Robyn; Maddison, Ralph; McRobbie, Hayden; Bullen, Chris; Denny, Simon; Dorey, Enid; Ellis-Pegler, Mary; van Rooyen, Jaco; Rodgers, Anthony

    2008-11-25

    While most young people who smoke want to quit, few access cessation support services. Mobile phone-based cessation programs are ideal for young people: mobile phones are the most common means of peer communication, and messages can be delivered in an anonymous manner, anywhere, anytime. Following the success of our text messaging smoking cessation program, we developed an innovative multimedia mobile phone smoking cessation intervention. The aim of the study was to develop and pilot test a youth-oriented multimedia smoking cessation intervention delivered solely by mobile phone. Development included creating content and building the technology platform. Content development was overseen by an expert group who advised on youth development principles, observational learning (from social cognitive theory), effective smoking cessation interventions, and social marketing. Young people participated in three content development phases (consultation via focus groups and an online survey, content pre-testing, and selection of role models). Video and text messages were then developed, incorporating the findings from this research. Information technology systems were established to support the delivery of the multimedia messages by mobile phone. A pilot study using an abbreviated 4-week program of video and text content tested the reliability of the systems and the acceptability of the intervention. Approximately 180 young people participated in the consultation phase. There was a high priority placed on music for relaxation (75%) and an interest in interacting with others in the program (40% would read messages, 36% would read a blog). Findings from the pre-testing phase (n = 41) included the importance of selecting "real" and "honest" role models with believable stories, and an interest in animations (37%). Of the 15 participants who took part in the pilot study, 13 (87%) were available for follow-up interviews at 4 weeks: 12 participants liked the program or liked it most

  20. Clinically defined non-specific symptoms in the vicinity of mobile phone base stations: A retrospective before-after study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baliatsas, Christos, E-mail: c.baliatsas@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands); Kamp, Irene van, E-mail: irene.van.kamp@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Bolte, John, E-mail: john.bolte@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Kelfkens, Gert, E-mail: gert.kelfkens@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dijk, Christel van, E-mail: Christel.Van.Dijk@amsterdam.nl [Department of Research, Information and Statistics (OIS), Municipality of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Spreeuwenberg, Peter, E-mail: p.spreeuwenberg@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands); Hooiveld, Mariette, E-mail: m.hooiveld@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands); Lebret, Erik, E-mail: erik.lebret@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Yzermans, Joris, E-mail: J.Yzermans@nivel.nl [Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL), Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-09-15

    The number of mobile phone base station(s) (MPBS) has been increasing to meet the rapid technological changes and growing needs for mobile communication. The primary objective of the present study was to test possible changes in prevalence and number of NSS in relation to MPBS exposure before and after increase of installed MPBS antennas. A retrospective cohort study was conducted, comparing two time periods with high contrast in terms of number of installed MPBS. Symptom data were based on electronic health records from 1069 adult participants, registered in 9 general practices in different regions in the Netherlands. All participants were living within 500 m from the nearest bases station. Among them, 55 participants reported to be sensitive to MPBS at T1. A propagation model combined with a questionnaire was used to assess indoor exposure to RF-EMF from MPBS at T1. Estimation of exposure at T0 was based on number of antennas at T0 relative to T1. At T1, there was a > 30% increase in the total number of MPBS antennas. A higher prevalence for most NSS was observed in the MPBS-sensitive group at T1 compared to baseline. Exposure estimates were not associated with GP-registered NSS in the total sample. Some significant interactions were observed between MPBS-sensitivity and exposure estimates on risk of symptoms. Using clinically defined outcomes and a time difference of > 6 years it was demonstrated that RF-EMF exposure to MPBS was not associated with the development of NSS. Nonetheless, there was some indication for a higher risk of NSS for the MPBS-sensitive group, mainly in relation to exposure to UMTS, but this should be interpreted with caution. Results have to be verified by future longitudinal studies with a particular focus on potentially susceptible population subgroups of large sample size and integrated exposure assessment. - Highlights: • There was an important increase in the total number of MPBS at T1 compared to T0. • Prevalence of NSS was

  1. Kitt Peak speckle camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckinridge, J B; McAlister, H A; Robinson, W G

    1979-04-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  2. Mars Observer Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Malin, M. C.; Danielson, G. E.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Masursky, H.; J. Veverka(Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, U.S.A.); Ravine, M. A.; Soulanille, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The Mars Observer camera (MOC) is a three-component system (one narrow-angle and two wide-angle cameras) designed to take high spatial resolution pictures of the surface of Mars and to obtain lower spatial resolution, synoptic coverage of the planet's surface and atmosphere. The cameras are based on the “push broom” technique; that is, they do not take “frames” but rather build pictures, one line at a time, as the spacecraft moves around the planet in its orbit. MOC is primarily a telescope f...

  3. Camera as Cultural Critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    What does the use of cameras entail for the production of cultural critique in anthropology? Visual anthropological analysis and cultural critique starts at the very moment a camera is brought into the field or existing visual images are engaged. The framing, distances, and interactions between...... researchers, cameras, and filmed subjects already inherently comprise analytical decisions. It is these ethnographic qualities inherent in audiovisual and photographic imagery that make it of particular value to a participatory anthropological enterprise that seeks to resist analytic closure and seeks instead...

  4. Advanced CCD camera developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condor, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  5. TARGETLESS CAMERA CALIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barazzetti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In photogrammetry a camera is considered calibrated if its interior orientation parameters are known. These encompass the principal distance, the principal point position and some Additional Parameters used to model possible systematic errors. The current state of the art for automated camera calibration relies on the use of coded targets to accurately determine the image correspondences. This paper presents a new methodology for the efficient and rigorous photogrammetric calibration of digital cameras which does not require any longer the use of targets. A set of images depicting a scene with a good texture are sufficient for the extraction of natural corresponding image points. These are automatically matched with feature-based approaches and robust estimation techniques. The successive photogrammetric bundle adjustment retrieves the unknown camera parameters and their theoretical accuracies. Examples, considerations and comparisons with real data and different case studies are illustrated to show the potentialities of the proposed methodology.

  6. Neutron cameras for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Batistoni, P. [ITER San Diego Joint Work Site, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Neutron cameras with horizontal and vertical views have been designed for ITER, based on systems used on JET and TFTR. The cameras consist of fan-shaped arrays of collimated flight tubes, with suitably chosen detectors situated outside the biological shield. The sight lines view the ITER plasma through slots in the shield blanket and penetrate the vacuum vessel, cryostat, and biological shield through stainless steel windows. This paper analyzes the expected performance of several neutron camera arrangements for ITER. In addition to the reference designs, the authors examine proposed compact cameras, in which neutron fluxes are inferred from {sup 16}N decay gammas in dedicated flowing water loops, and conventional cameras with fewer sight lines and more limited fields of view than in the reference designs. It is shown that the spatial sampling provided by the reference designs is sufficient to satisfy target measurement requirements and that some reduction in field of view may be permissible. The accuracy of measurements with {sup 16}N-based compact cameras is not yet established, and they fail to satisfy requirements for parameter range and time resolution by large margins.

  7. Do mobile phone base stations affect sleep of residents? Results from an experimental double-blind sham-controlled field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Dorn, Hans; Bornkessel, Christian; Sauter, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present double-blind, sham-controlled, balanced randomized cross-over study was to disentangle effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) and non-EMF effects of mobile phone base stations on objective and subjective sleep quality. In total 397 residents aged 18-81 years (50.9% female) from 10 German sites, where no mobile phone service was available, were exposed to sham and GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications, 900 MHz and 1,800 MHz) base station signals by an experimental base station while their sleep was monitored at their homes during 12 nights. Participants were randomly exposed to real (GSM) or sham exposure for five nights each. Individual measurement of EMF exposure, questionnaires on sleep disorders, overall sleep quality, attitude towards mobile communication, and on subjective sleep quality (morning and evening protocols) as well as objective sleep data (frontal EEG and EOG recordings) were gathered. Analysis of the subjective and objective sleep data did not reveal any significant differences between the real and sham condition. During sham exposure nights, objective and subjective sleep efficiency, wake after sleep onset, and subjective sleep latency were significantly worse in participants with concerns about possible health risks resulting from base stations than in participants who were not concerned. The study did not provide any evidence for short-term physiological effects of EMF emitted by mobile phone base stations on objective and subjective sleep quality. However, the results indicate that mobile phone base stations as such (not the electromagnetic fields) may have a significant negative impact on sleep quality. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Modeled and Perceived Exposure to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields From Mobile-Phone Base Stations and the Development of Symptoms Over Time in a General Population Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Astrid L; Slottje, Pauline; Timmermans, Danielle R M; Kromhout, Hans; Reedijk, Marije; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Smid, Tjabe

    2017-07-15

    We assessed associations between modeled and perceived exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from mobile-phone base stations and the development of nonspecific symptoms and sleep disturbances over time. A population-based Dutch cohort study, the Occupational and Environmental Health Cohort Study (AMIGO) (n = 14,829; ages 31-65 years), was established in 2011/2012 (T0), with follow-up of a subgroup (n = 3,992 invited) in 2013 (T1; n = 2,228) and 2014 (T2; n = 1,740). We modeled far-field RF-EMF exposure from mobile-phone base stations at the home addresses of the participants using a 3-dimensional geospatial model (NISMap). Perceived exposure (0 = not at all; 6 = very much), nonspecific symptoms, and sleep disturbances were assessed by questionnaire. We performed cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, including fixed-effects regression. We found small correlations between modeled and perceived exposure in AMIGO participants at baseline (n = 14,309; rSpearman = 0.10). For 222 follow-up participants, modeled exposure increased substantially (>0.030 mW/m2) between T0 and T1. This increase in modeled exposure was associated with an increase in perceived exposure during the same time period. In contrast to modeled RF-EMF exposure from mobile-phone base stations, perceived exposure was associated with higher symptom reporting scores in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, as well as with sleep disturbances in cross-sectional analyses. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ~9 fold higher density of fiber optic cables on its top facet compared to the bottom one and is illuminated by an incoherent light source, e.g., a simple light-emitting-diode (LED). The transmitted light pattern through the object is then sampled by this array of fiber optic cables, delivering a transmission image of the sample onto the other side of the taper, with ~3× magnification in each direction. This magnified image of the object, located at the bottom facet of the fiber array, is then projected onto the CMOS image sensor of the cellphone using two lenses. While keeping the sample and the cellphone camera at a fixed position, the fiber-optic array is then manually rotated with discrete angular increments of e.g., 1-2 degrees. At each angular position of the fiber-optic array, contact images are captured using the cellphone camera, creating a sequence of transmission images for the same sample. These multi-frame images are digitally fused together based on a shift-and-add algorithm through a custom-developed Android application running on the smart-phone, providing the final microscopic image of the sample, visualized through the screen of the phone. This final computation step improves the resolution and also removes spatial artefacts that arise due to non-uniform sampling of the transmission intensity at the fiber optic array surface. We validated the performance of this cellphone based Contact Scope by imaging resolution test charts and blood smears.

  10. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array

    OpenAIRE

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ∼9 fold higher density of fiber opt...

  11. The VISTA IR camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Caldwell, Martin; Ward, Kim; Whalley, Martin S.; Burke, Kevin; Lucas, John M.; Richards, Tony; Ferlet, Marc; Edeson, Ruben L.; Tye, Daniel; Shaughnessy, Bryan M.; Strachan, Mel; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; Leclerc, Melanie R.; Gallie, Angus; Bezawada, Nagaraja N.; Clark, Paul; Bissonauth, Nirmal; Luke, Peter; Dipper, Nigel A.; Berry, Paul; Sutherland, Will; Emerson, Jim

    2004-09-01

    The VISTA IR Camera has now completed its detailed design phase and is on schedule for delivery to ESO"s Cerro Paranal Observatory in 2006. The camera consists of 16 Raytheon VIRGO 2048x2048 HgCdTe arrays in a sparse focal plane sampling a 1.65 degree field of view. A 1.4m diameter filter wheel provides slots for 7 distinct science filters, each comprising 16 individual filter panes. The camera also provides autoguiding and curvature sensing information for the VISTA telescope, and relies on tight tolerancing to meet the demanding requirements of the f/1 telescope design. The VISTA IR camera is unusual in that it contains no cold pupil-stop, but rather relies on a series of nested cold baffles to constrain the light reaching the focal plane to the science beam. In this paper we present a complete overview of the status of the final IR Camera design, its interaction with the VISTA telescope, and a summary of the predicted performance of the system.

  12. Commercialization of radiation tolerant camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Bum; Choi, Young Soo; Kim, Sun Ku; Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Bung Hun; Lee, Nam Ho; Byun, Eiy Gyo; Yoo, Seun Wook; Choi, Bum Ki; Yoon, Sung Up; Kim, Hyun Gun; Sin, Jeong Hun; So, Suk Il

    1999-12-01

    In this project, radiation tolerant camera which tolerates 10{sup 6} - 10{sup 8} rad total dose is developed. In order to develop radiation tolerant camera, radiation effect of camera components was examined and evaluated, and camera configuration was studied. By the result of evaluation, the components were decided and design was performed. Vidicon tube was selected to use by image sensor and non-browning optics and camera driving circuit were applied. The controller needed for CCTV camera system, lens, light, pan/tilt controller, was designed by the concept of remote control. And two type of radiation tolerant camera were fabricated consider to use in underwater environment or normal environment. (author)

  13. A cross-sectional case control study on genetic damage in individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Gursatej; Kaur, Gurpreet; Nisar, Uzma

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone base stations facilitate good communication, but the continuously emitting radiations from these stations have raised health concerns. Hence in this study, genetic damage using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay was assessed in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals residing in the vicinity of a mobile phone base station and comparing it to that in healthy controls. The power density in the area within 300 m from the base station exceeded the permissive limits and was significantly (p = 0.000) higher compared to the area from where control samples were collected. The study participants comprised 63 persons with residences near a mobile phone tower, and 28 healthy controls matched for gender, age, alcohol drinking and occupational sub-groups. Genetic damage parameters of DNA migration length, damage frequency (DF) and damage index were significantly (p = 0.000) elevated in the sample group compared to respective values in healthy controls. The female residents (n = 25) of the sample group had significantly (p = 0.004) elevated DF than the male residents (n = 38). The linear regression analysis further revealed daily mobile phone usage, location of residence and power density as significant predictors of genetic damage. The genetic damage evident in the participants of this study needs to be addressed against future disease-risk, which in addition to neurodegenerative disorders, may lead to cancer.

  14. HIGH SPEED CAMERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, B.T. Jr.; Davis, W.C.

    1957-12-17

    This patent relates to high speed cameras having resolution times of less than one-tenth microseconds suitable for filming distinct sequences of a very fast event such as an explosion. This camera consists of a rotating mirror with reflecting surfaces on both sides, a narrow mirror acting as a slit in a focal plane shutter, various other mirror and lens systems as well as an innage recording surface. The combination of the rotating mirrors and the slit mirror causes discrete, narrow, separate pictures to fall upon the film plane, thereby forming a moving image increment of the photographed event. Placing a reflecting surface on each side of the rotating mirror cancels the image velocity that one side of the rotating mirror would impart, so as a camera having this short a resolution time is thereby possible.

  15. Smart-phone based computational microscopy using multi-frame contact imaging on a fiber-optic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navruz, Isa; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Wong, Justin; Mohammad, Saqib; Tseng, Derek; Nagi, Richie; Phillips, Stephen; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a cellphone based contact microscopy platform, termed Contact Scope, which can image highly dense or connected samples in transmission mode. Weighing approximately 76 grams, this portable and compact microscope is installed on the existing camera unit of a cellphone using an opto-mechanical add-on, where planar samples of interest are placed in contact with the top facet of a tapered fiber-optic array. This glass-based tapered fiber array has ∼9 fold higher density of fiber optic cables on its top facet compared to the bottom one and is illuminated by an incoherent light source, e.g., a simple light-emitting-diode (LED). The transmitted light pattern through the object is then sampled by this array of fiber optic cables, delivering a transmission image of the sample onto the other side of the taper, with ∼3× magnification in each direction. This magnified image of the object, located at the bottom facet of the fiber array, is then projected onto the CMOS image sensor of the cellphone using two lenses. While keeping the sample and the cellphone camera at a fixed position, the fiber-optic array is then manually rotated with discrete angular increments of e.g., 1-2 degrees. At each angular position of the fiber-optic array, contact images are captured using the cellphone camera, creating a sequence of transmission images for the same sample. These multi-frame images are digitally fused together based on a shift-and-add algorithm through a custom-developed Android application running on the smart-phone, providing the final microscopic image of the sample, visualized through the screen of the phone. This final computation step improves the resolution and also gets rid of spatial artefacts that arise due to non-uniform sampling of the transmission intensity at the fiber optic array surface. We validated the performance of this cellphone based Contact Scope by imaging resolution test charts and blood smears. PMID:23939637

  16. Wide angle pinhole camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Hemispherical refracting element gives pinhole camera 180 degree field-of-view without compromising its simplicity and depth-of-field. Refracting element, located just behind pinhole, bends light coming in from sides so that it falls within image area of film. In contrast to earlier pinhole cameras that used water or other transparent fluids to widen field, this model is not subject to leakage and is easily loaded and unloaded with film. Moreover, by selecting glass with different indices of refraction, field at film plane can be widened or reduced.

  17. GoPro as an Ethnographic Tool: A Wayfinding Study in an Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsley, Kirsten M.; Schoonover, Dan; Spitler, Jasmine

    2016-01-01

    In this study, researchers sought to capture students' authentic experience of finding books in the main library using a GoPro camera and the think-aloud protocol. The GoPro provided a first-person perspective and was an effective ethnographic tool for observing a student's individual experience, while also demonstrating what tools they use to…

  18. Automatic Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Preuss, Mike

    2014-01-01

    camera. We approach this problem by modelling it as a dynamic multi-objective optimisation problem and show how this metaphor allows a much richer expressiveness than a classical single objective approach. Finally, we showcase the application of a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm to generate a shot...

  19. Make a Pinhole Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Diane K.; Novati, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    On Earth, using ordinary visible light, one can create a single image of light recorded over time. Of course a movie or video is light recorded over time, but it is a series of instantaneous snapshots, rather than light and time both recorded on the same medium. A pinhole camera, which is simple to make out of ordinary materials and using ordinary…

  20. The canopy camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry E. Brown

    1962-01-01

    The canopy camera is a device of new design that takes wide-angle, overhead photographs of vegetation canopies, cloud cover, topographic horizons, and similar subjects. Since the entire hemisphere is photographed in a single exposure, the resulting photograph is circular, with the horizon forming the perimeter and the zenith the center. Photographs of this type provide...

  1. Cellular Phone-Based Image Acquisition and Quantitative Ratiometric Method for Detecting Cocaine and Benzoylecgonine for Biological and Forensic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Cadle

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe the first report of using low-cost cellular or web-based digital cameras to image and quantify standardized rapid immunoassay strips as a new point-of-care diagnostic and forensics tool with health applications. Quantitative ratiometric pixel density analysis (QRPDA is an automated method requiring end-users to utilize inexpensive (~ $1 USD/each immunotest strips, a commonly available web or mobile phone camera or scanner, and internet or cellular service. A model is described whereby a central computer server and freely available IMAGEJ image analysis software records and analyzes the incoming image data with time-stamp and geo-tag information and performs the QRPDA using custom JAVA based macros ( http://www.neurocloud.org . To demonstrate QRPDA we developed a standardized method using rapid immunotest strips directed against cocaine and its major metabolite, benzoylecgonine. Images from standardized samples were acquired using several devices, including a mobile phone camera, web cam, and scanner. We performed image analysis of three brands of commercially available dye-conjugated anti-cocaine/benzoylecgonine (COC/BE antibody test strips in response to three different series of cocaine concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 300 ng/ml and BE concentrations ranging from 0.003 to 0.1 ng/ml. This data was then used to create standard curves to allow quantification of COC/BE in biological samples. Across all devices, QRPDA quantification of COC and BE proved to be a sensitive, economical, and faster alternative to more costly methods, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, or high pressure liquid chromatography. The limit of detection was determined to be between 0.1 and 5 ng/ml. To simulate conditions in the field, QRPDA was found to be robust under a variety of image acquisition and testing conditions that varied temperature, lighting, resolution, magnification and concentrations of biological fluid

  2. Cellular phone-based image acquisition and quantitative ratiometric method for detecting cocaine and benzoylecgonine for biological and forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadle, Brian A; Rasmus, Kristin C; Varela, Juan A; Leverich, Leah S; O'Neill, Casey E; Bachtell, Ryan K; Cooper, Donald C

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe the first report of using low-cost cellular or web-based digital cameras to image and quantify standardized rapid immunoassay strips as a new point-of-care diagnostic and forensics tool with health applications. Quantitative ratiometric pixel density analysis (QRPDA) is an automated method requiring end-users to utilize inexpensive (∼ $1 USD/each) immunotest strips, a commonly available web or mobile phone camera or scanner, and internet or cellular service. A model is described whereby a central computer server and freely available IMAGEJ image analysis software records and analyzes the incoming image data with time-stamp and geo-tag information and performs the QRPDA using custom JAVA based macros (http://www.neurocloud.org). To demonstrate QRPDA we developed a standardized method using rapid immunotest strips directed against cocaine and its major metabolite, benzoylecgonine. Images from standardized samples were acquired using several devices, including a mobile phone camera, web cam, and scanner. We performed image analysis of three brands of commercially available dye-conjugated anti-cocaine/benzoylecgonine (COC/BE) antibody test strips in response to three different series of cocaine concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 300 ng/ml and BE concentrations ranging from 0.003 to 0.1 ng/ml. This data was then used to create standard curves to allow quantification of COC/BE in biological samples. Across all devices, QRPDA quantification of COC and BE proved to be a sensitive, economical, and faster alternative to more costly methods, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, or high pressure liquid chromatography. The limit of detection was determined to be between 0.1 and 5 ng/ml. To simulate conditions in the field, QRPDA was found to be robust under a variety of image acquisition and testing conditions that varied temperature, lighting, resolution, magnification and concentrations of biological fluid in a sample. To

  3. MISR radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This file contains the Radiometric camera-by-camera Cloud Mask dataset. It is used to determine whether a scene is classified as clear or cloudy. A new parameter has...

  4. Goniometer to calibrate system cameras or amateur cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, J.

    An accurate and rapid horizontal goniometer was developed to determine the optical properties of film cameras. Radial and decentering distortion, color defects, optical resolution, and small object transmission factors are measured according to light wavelengths and symmetry. The goniometer can be used to calibrate cameras for photogrammetry, to determine the effects of remoteness on image geometry, distortion symmetry, efficiency of lens lighting film systems, to develop quality criteria for lenses, and to test camera lens and camera defects after an incident.

  5. Dual cameras acquisition and display system of retina-like sensor camera and rectangular sensor camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nan; Cao, Fengmei; Lin, Yabin; Bai, Tingzhu; Song, Shengyu

    2015-04-01

    For a new kind of retina-like senor camera and a traditional rectangular sensor camera, dual cameras acquisition and display system need to be built. We introduce the principle and the development of retina-like senor. Image coordinates transformation and interpolation based on sub-pixel interpolation need to be realized for our retina-like sensor's special pixels distribution. The hardware platform is composed of retina-like senor camera, rectangular sensor camera, image grabber and PC. Combined the MIL and OpenCV library, the software program is composed in VC++ on VS 2010. Experience results show that the system can realizes two cameras' acquisition and display.

  6. Mobile Phone-Based Measures of Activity, Step Count, and Gait Speed: Results From a Study of Older Ambulatory Adults in a Naturalistic Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye Hanton, Cassia; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Aung, Thawda; Whittington, Jackie; High, Robin R; Goulding, Evan H; Schenk, A Katrin; Bonasera, Stephen J

    2017-10-03

    Cellular mobile telephone technology shows much promise for delivering and evaluating healthcare interventions in cost-effective manners with minimal barriers to access. There is little data demonstrating that these devices can accurately measure clinically important aspects of individual functional status in naturalistic environments outside of the laboratory. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that data derived from ubiquitous mobile phone technology, using algorithms developed and previously validated by our lab in a controlled setting, can be employed to continuously and noninvasively measure aspects of participant (subject) health status including step counts, gait speed, and activity level, in a naturalistic community setting. A second objective was to compare our mobile phone-based data against current standard survey-based gait instruments and clinical physical performance measures in order to determine whether they measured similar or independent constructs. A total of 43 ambulatory, independently dwelling older adults were recruited from Nebraska Medicine, including 25 (58%, 25/43) healthy control individuals from our Engage Wellness Center and 18 (42%, 18/43) functionally impaired, cognitively intact individuals (who met at least 3 of 5 criteria for frailty) from our ambulatory Geriatrics Clinic. The following previously-validated surveys were obtained on study day 1: (1) Late Life Function and Disability Instrument (LLFDI); (2) Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE); (3) Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), short form version 1.0 Physical Function 10a (PROMIS-PF); and (4) PROMIS Global Health, short form version 1.1 (PROMIS-GH). In addition, clinical physical performance measurements of frailty (10 foot Get up and Go, 4 Meter walk, and Figure-of-8 Walk [F8W]) were also obtained. These metrics were compared to our mobile phone-based metrics collected from the participants in the community

  7. Body worn camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishwariya, A.; Pallavi Sudhir, Gulavani; Garg, Nemesa; Karthikeyan, B.

    2017-11-01

    A body worn camera is small video camera worn on the body, typically used by police officers to record arrests, evidence from crime scenes. It helps preventing and resolving complaints brought by members of the public; and strengthening police transparency, performance, and accountability. The main constants of this type of the system are video format, resolution, frames rate, and audio quality. This system records the video in .mp4 format with 1080p resolution and 30 frames per second. One more important aspect to while designing this system is amount of power the system requires as battery management becomes very critical. The main design challenges are Size of the Video, Audio for the video. Combining both audio and video and saving it in .mp4 format, Battery, size that is required for 8 hours of continuous recording, Security. For prototyping this system is implemented using Raspberry Pi model B.

  8. The NEAT Camera Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jr., Ray L. Newburn

    1995-01-01

    The NEAT (Near Earth Asteroid Tracking) camera system consists of a camera head with a 6.3 cm square 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, fast electronics, and a Sun Sparc 20 data and control computer with dual CPUs, 256 Mbytes of memory, and 36 Gbytes of hard disk. The system was designed for optimum use with an Air Force GEODSS (Ground-based Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance) telescope. The GEODSS telescopes have 1 m f/2.15 objectives of the Ritchey-Chretian type, designed originally for satellite tracking. Installation of NEAT began July 25 at the Air Force Facility on Haleakala, a 3000 m peak on Maui in Hawaii.

  9. A risk factor analysis of accumulated postoperative pain and swelling sensation after dental implant surgery using a cellular phone-based real-time assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroi, Ryuta; Minakuchi, Hajime; Hara, Emilio Satoshi; Kawakami, Aya; Maekawa, Kenji; Okada, Hiroki; Kuboki, Takuo

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the related risk factors of dental implant accumulated postoperative pain and swelling by cellular phone-based assessment. Subjects were a consecutive series of patients who received oral implant surgery at Okayama University Hospital. Cellular phone-based questionnaire was sent at pre-set schedule to each subject every 2h on the day of surgery, and every 24h from the 2nd to 7th day post-surgery. Subjects replied in real-time the pain and swelling levels at the operated sites by an 11- and 4-grade rating-scale questionnaire. Overall intensity of individual pain and swelling was calculated by means of area under curve that drew by their time-dependent changes. Predictor variables were age, gender, presence of diabetes mellitus and/or hypertension (DM/HT), history of implant surgery, number of inserted implants, flap operation, surgical duration, pre-surgery anxiety, osteoplasty, bone quality, premedication, dosage of prescribed analgesics and local anesthesia and accumulated postoperative pain/swelling. Compliance rate and risk factors correlated with accumulated postoperative pain and swelling were calculated by multiple regression analysis. Final subjects were 18 females and 7 male (mean age: 59.3±7.32 yrs). Significant factors correlated with accumulated postoperative pain were DM/HT, surgical duration, premedication, bone quality, pre-surgery anxiety and postoperative swelling (R(2)=0.769, p=0.001, 0.013, 0.032, 0.007, 0.035 and 0.007, respectively). Meanwhile, significant factors associated with postoperative swelling were postoperative pain, DM/HT and bone quality (R(2)=0.365, p=0.002, 0.004, 0.008, respectively). These results suggested DM/HT and bone quality are correlated to overall intensity of postoperative pain and swelling. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Streak camera techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avara, R.

    1977-06-01

    An introduction to streak camera geometry, experimental techniques, and limitations are presented. Equations, graphs and charts are included to provide useful data for optimizing the associated optics to suit each experiment. A simulated analysis is performed on simultaneity and velocity measurements. An error analysis is also performed for these measurements utilizing the Monte Carlo method to simulate the distribution of uncertainties associated with simultaneity-time measurements.

  11. Visual odometry from omnidirectional camera

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří DIVIŠ

    2012-01-01

    We present a system that estimates the motion of a robot relying solely on images from onboard omnidirectional camera (visual odometry). Compared to other visual odometry hardware, ours is unusual in utilizing high resolution, low frame-rate (1 to 3 Hz) omnidirectional camera mounted on a robot that is propelled using continuous tracks. We focus on high precision estimates in scenes, where objects are far away from the camera. This is achieved by utilizing omnidirectional camera that is able ...

  12. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  13. The DRAGO gamma camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, C; Gola, A; Peloso, R; Longoni, A; Lechner, P; Soltau, H; Strüder, L; Ottobrini, L; Martelli, C; Lui, R; Madaschi, L; Belloli, S

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we present the results of the experimental characterization of the DRAGO (DRift detector Array-based Gamma camera for Oncology), a detection system developed for high-spatial resolution gamma-ray imaging. This camera is based on a monolithic array of 77 silicon drift detectors (SDDs), with a total active area of 6.7 cm(2), coupled to a single 5-mm-thick CsI(Tl) scintillator crystal. The use of an array of SDDs provides a high quantum efficiency for the detection of the scintillation light together with a very low electronics noise. A very compact detection module based on the use of integrated readout circuits was developed. The performances achieved in gamma-ray imaging using this camera are reported here. When imaging a 0.2 mm collimated (57)Co source (122 keV) over different points of the active area, a spatial resolution ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 mm was measured. The depth-of-interaction capability of the detector, thanks to the use of a Maximum Likelihood reconstruction algorithm, was also investigated by imaging a collimated beam tilted to an angle of 45 degrees with respect to the scintillator surface. Finally, the imager was characterized with in vivo measurements on mice, in a real preclinical environment.

  14. Hemispherical Laue camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, James C. M.; Chu, Sungnee G.

    1980-01-01

    A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

  15. A new mobile phone-based tool for assessing energy and certain food intakes in young children: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Hanna; Bonn, Stephanie E; Bergström, Anna; Bälter, Katarina; Bälter, Olle; Delisle, Christine; Forsum, Elisabet; Löf, Marie

    2015-04-24

    Childhood obesity is an increasing health problem globally. Obesity may be established already at pre-school age. Further research in this area requires accurate and easy-to-use methods for assessing the intake of energy and foods. Traditional methods have limited accuracy, and place large demands on the study participants and researchers. Mobile phones offer possibilities for methodological advancements in this area since they are readily available, enable instant digitalization of collected data, and also contain a camera to photograph pre- and post-meal food items. We have recently developed a new tool for assessing energy and food intake in children using mobile phones called the Tool for Energy Balance in Children (TECH). The main aims of our study are to (1) compare energy intake by means of TECH with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using a criterion method, the doubly labeled water (DLW) method, and (2) to compare intakes of fruits and berries, vegetables, juice, and sweetened beverages assessed by means of TECH with intakes obtained using a Web-based food frequency questionnaire (KidMeal-Q) in 3 year olds. In this study, 30 Swedish 3 year olds were included. Energy intake using TECH was compared to TEE measured using the DLW method. Intakes of vegetables, fruits and berries, juice, as well as sweetened beverages were assessed using TECH and compared to the corresponding intakes assessed using KidMeal-Q. Wilcoxon matched pairs test, Spearman rank order correlations, and the Bland-Altman procedure were applied. The mean energy intake, assessed by TECH, was 5400 kJ/24h (SD 1500). This value was not significantly different (P=.23) from TEE (5070 kJ/24h, SD 600). However, the limits of agreement (2 standard deviations) in the Bland-Altman plot for energy intake estimated using TECH compared to TEE were wide (2990 kJ/24h), and TECH overestimated high and underestimated low energy intakes. The Bland-Altman plots for foods showed similar patterns. The mean

  16. Rapid imaging, detection and quantification of Giardia lamblia cysts using mobile-phone based fluorescent microscopy and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koydemir, Hatice Ceylan; Gorocs, Zoltan; Tseng, Derek; Cortazar, Bingen; Feng, Steve; Chan, Raymond Yan Lok; Burbano, Jordi; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-03-07

    Rapid and sensitive detection of waterborne pathogens in drinkable and recreational water sources is crucial for treating and preventing the spread of water related diseases, especially in resource-limited settings. Here we present a field-portable and cost-effective platform for detection and quantification of Giardia lamblia cysts, one of the most common waterborne parasites, which has a thick cell wall that makes it resistant to most water disinfection techniques including chlorination. The platform consists of a smartphone coupled with an opto-mechanical attachment weighing ~205 g, which utilizes a hand-held fluorescence microscope design aligned with the camera unit of the smartphone to image custom-designed disposable water sample cassettes. Each sample cassette is composed of absorbent pads and mechanical filter membranes; a membrane with 8 μm pore size is used as a porous spacing layer to prevent the backflow of particles to the upper membrane, while the top membrane with 5 μm pore size is used to capture the individual Giardia cysts that are fluorescently labeled. A fluorescence image of the filter surface (field-of-view: ~0.8 cm(2)) is captured and wirelessly transmitted via the mobile-phone to our servers for rapid processing using a machine learning algorithm that is trained on statistical features of Giardia cysts to automatically detect and count the cysts captured on the membrane. The results are then transmitted back to the mobile-phone in less than 2 minutes and are displayed through a smart application running on the phone. This mobile platform, along with our custom-developed sample preparation protocol, enables analysis of large volumes of water (e.g., 10-20 mL) for automated detection and enumeration of Giardia cysts in ~1 hour, including all the steps of sample preparation and analysis. We evaluated the performance of this approach using flow-cytometer-enumerated Giardia-contaminated water samples, demonstrating an average cyst capture

  17. Three-dimensional camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Thorsten; Gesierich, Achim; Legarda-Saenz, Ricardo; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2003-05-01

    Industrial- and multimedia applications need cost effective, compact and flexible 3D profiling instruments. In the talk we will show the principle of, applications for and results from a new miniaturized 3-D profiling system for macroscopic scenes. The system uses a compact housing and is usable like a camera with minimum stabilization like a tripod. The system is based on common fringe projection technique. Camera and projector are assembled with parallel optical axes having coplanar projection and imaging plane. Their axes distance is comparable to the human eyes distance altogether giving a complete system of 21x20x11 cm size and allowing to measure high gradient objects like the interior of tubes. The fringe projector uses a LCD which enables fast and flexible pattern projection. Camera and projector have a short focal length and a high system aperture as well as a large depth of focus. Thus, objects can be measured from a shorter distance compared to common systems (e.g. 1 m sized objects in 80 cm distance). Actually, objects with diameters up to 4 m can be profiled because the set-up allows working with completely opened aperture combined with bright lamps giving a big amount of available light and a high Signal to Noise Ratio. Normally a small basis has the disadvantage of reduced sensitivity. We investigated in methods to compensate the reduced sensitivity via setup and enhanced evaluation methods. For measurement we use synthetic wavelengths. The developed algorithms are completely adaptable concerning the users needs of speed and accuracy. The 3D camera is built from low cost components, robust, nearly handheld and delivers insights also into difficult technical objects like tubes and inside volumes. Besides the realized high resolution phase measurement the system calibration is an important task for usability. While calibrating with common photogrammetric models (which are typically used for actual fringe projection systems) problems were found that

  18. Digital camera in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Mitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ophthalmology is an expensive field and imaging is an indispensable modality in ophthalmology; and in developing countries including India, it is not possible for every ophthalmologist to afford slit-lamp photography unit. We here present our experience of slit-lamp photography using digital camera. Good quality pictures of anterior and posterior segment disorders were captured using readily available devices. It can be a used as a good teaching tool for residents learning ophthalmology and can also be a method to document lesions which at many times is necessary for medicolegal purposes. It's a technique which is simple, inexpensive, and has a short learning curve.

  19. Interpretation of way-finding healthcare symbols by a multicultural population: navigation signage design for global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Muhammad Jawad; Alkaabi, Mariam Salem Khamis Matar; Bharwani, Sulaiman

    2014-05-01

    The interpretation of way-finding symbols for healthcare facilities in a multicultural community was assessed in a cross-sectional study. One hundred participants recruited from Al Ain city in the United Arab Emirates were asked to interpret 28 healthcare symbols developed at Hablamos Juntos (such as vaccinations and laboratory) as well as 18 general-purpose symbols (such as elevators and restrooms). The mean age was 27.6 years (16-55 years) of whom 84 (84%) were females. Healthcare symbols were more difficult to comprehend than general-purpose signs. Symbols referring to abstract concepts were the most misinterpreted including oncology, diabetes education, outpatient clinic, interpretive services, pharmacy, internal medicine, registration, social services, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and infectious diseases. Interpretation rates varied across cultural backgrounds and increased with higher education and younger age. Signage within healthcare facilities should be tested among older persons, those with limited literacy and across a wide range of cultures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  20. NFC - Narrow Field Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have been introducing a low-cost CCTV video system for faint meteor monitoring and here we describe the first results from 5 months of two-station operations. Our system called NFC (Narrow Field Camera) with a meteor limiting magnitude around +6.5mag allows research on trajectories of less massive meteoroids within individual parent meteor showers and the sporadic background. At present 4 stations (2 pairs with coordinated fields of view) of NFC system are operated in the frame of CEMeNt (Central European Meteor Network). The heart of each NFC station is a sensitive CCTV camera Watec 902 H2 and a fast cinematographic lens Meopta Meostigmat 1/50 - 52.5 mm (50 mm focal length and fixed aperture f/1.0). In this paper we present the first results based on 1595 individual meteors, 368 of which were recorded from two stations simultaneously. This data set allows the first empirical verification of theoretical assumptions for NFC system capabilities (stellar and meteor magnitude limit, meteor apparent brightness distribution and accuracy of single station measurements) and the first low mass meteoroid trajectory calculations. Our experimental data clearly showed the capabilities of the proposed system for low mass meteor registration and for calculations based on NFC data to lead to a significant refinement in the orbital elements for low mass meteoroids.

  1. Compact 3D camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothe, Thorsten; Osten, Wolfgang; Gesierich, Achim; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    2002-06-01

    A new, miniaturized fringe projection system is presented which has a size and handling that approximates to common 2D cameras. The system is based on the fringe projection technique. A miniaturized fringe projector and camera are assembled into a housing of 21x20x11 cm size with a triangulation basis of 10 cm. The advantage of the small triangulation basis is the possibility to measure difficult objects with high gradients. Normally a small basis has the disadvantage of reduced sensitivity. We investigated in methods to compensate the reduced sensitivity via setup and enhanced evaluation methods. Special hardware issues are a high quality, bright light source (and components to handle the high luminous flux) as well as adapted optics to gain a large aperture angle and a focus scan unit to increase the usable measurement volume. Adaptable synthetic wavelengths and integration times were used to increase the measurement quality and allow robust measurements that are adaptable to the desired speed and accuracy. Algorithms were developed to generate automatic focus positions to completely cover extended measurement volumes. Principles, setup, measurement examples and applications are shown.

  2. Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Justin N.; Thiessen, David L.; Pourangi, Ali M.; Kobzeff, Peter A.; Lee, Steven W.; Dingizian, Arsham; Schwochert, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover, which launched to Mars in 2011, is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) cameras, which were sent to Mars in 2003. The engineering cameras weigh less than 300 grams each and use less than 3 W of power. Images returned from the engineering cameras are used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The hazard avoidance cameras (Haz - cams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a frame-transfer CCD (charge-coupled device) with a 1024x1024 imaging region and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer A and the other set is connected to rover computer B. The MSL rover carries 8 Hazcams and 4 Navcams.

  3. ACCURACY EVALUATION OF STEREO CAMERA SYSTEMS WITH GENERIC CAMERA MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rueß

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades the consumer and industrial market for non-projective cameras has been growing notably. This has led to the development of camera description models other than the pinhole model and their employment in mostly homogeneous camera systems. Heterogeneous camera systems (for instance, combine Fisheye and Catadioptric cameras can also be easily thought of for real applications. However, it has not been quite clear, how accurate stereo vision with these cameras and models can be. In this paper, different accuracy aspects are addressed by analytical inspection, numerical simulation as well as real image data evaluation. This analysis is generic, for any camera projection model, although only polynomial and rational projection models are used for distortion free, Catadioptric and Fisheye lenses. Note that this is different to polynomial and rational radial distortion models which have been addressed extensively in literature. For single camera analysis it turns out that point features towards the image sensor borders are significantly more accurate than in center regions of the sensor. For heterogeneous two camera systems it turns out, that reconstruction accuracy decreases significantly towards image borders as different projective distortions occur.

  4. E-Rehabilitation – an Internet and mobile phone based tailored intervention to enhance self-management of Cardiovascular Disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antypas Konstantinos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac rehabilitation is very important for the recovery and the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, and one of its main strategies is to increase the level of physical activity. Internet and mobile phone based interventions have been successfully used to help people to achieve this. One of the components that are related to the efficacy of these interventions is tailoring of content to the individual. This trial is studying the effect of a longitudinally tailored Internet and mobile phone based intervention that is based on models of health behaviour, on the level of physical activity and the adherence to the intervention, as an extension of a face-to-face cardiac rehabilitation stay. Methods/Design A parallel group, cluster randomized controlled trial. The study population is adult participants of a cardiac rehabilitation programme in Norway with home Internet access and mobile phone, who in monthly clusters are randomized to the control or the intervention condition. Participants have access to a website with information regarding cardiac rehabilitation, an online discussion forum and an online activity calendar. Those randomized to the intervention condition, receive in addition tailored content based on models of health behaviour, through the website and mobile text messages. The objective is to assess the effect of the intervention on maintenance of self-management behaviours after the rehabilitation stay. Main outcome is the level of physical activity one month, three months and one year after the end of the cardiac rehabilitation programme. The randomization of clusters is based on a true random number online service, and participants, investigators and outcome assessor are blinded to the condition of the clusters. Discussion The study suggests a theory-based intervention that combines models of health behaviour in an innovative way, in order to tailor the delivered content. The users have been actively

  5. E-Rehabilitation - an Internet and mobile phone based tailored intervention to enhance self-management of cardiovascular disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antypas, Konstantinos; Wangberg, Silje C

    2012-07-09

    Cardiac rehabilitation is very important for the recovery and the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, and one of its main strategies is to increase the level of physical activity. Internet and mobile phone based interventions have been successfully used to help people to achieve this. One of the components that are related to the efficacy of these interventions is tailoring of content to the individual. This trial is studying the effect of a longitudinally tailored Internet and mobile phone based intervention that is based on models of health behaviour, on the level of physical activity and the adherence to the intervention, as an extension of a face-to-face cardiac rehabilitation stay. A parallel group, cluster randomized controlled trial. The study population is adult participants of a cardiac rehabilitation programme in Norway with home Internet access and mobile phone, who in monthly clusters are randomized to the control or the intervention condition. Participants have access to a website with information regarding cardiac rehabilitation, an online discussion forum and an online activity calendar. Those randomized to the intervention condition, receive in addition tailored content based on models of health behaviour, through the website and mobile text messages. The objective is to assess the effect of the intervention on maintenance of self-management behaviours after the rehabilitation stay. Main outcome is the level of physical activity one month, three months and one year after the end of the cardiac rehabilitation programme. The randomization of clusters is based on a true random number online service, and participants, investigators and outcome assessor are blinded to the condition of the clusters. The study suggests a theory-based intervention that combines models of health behaviour in an innovative way, in order to tailor the delivered content. The users have been actively involved in its design, and because of the use of Open

  6. The feasibility of using mobile-phone based SMS reminders and conditional cash transfers to improve timely immunization in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakadha, Hotenzia; Chandir, Subhash; Were, Elijah Victor; Rubin, Alan; Obor, David; Levine, Orin S; Gibson, Dustin G; Odhiambo, Frank; Laserson, Kayla F; Feikin, Daniel R

    2013-01-30

    Demand-side strategies could contribute to achieving high and timely vaccine coverage in rural Africa, but require platforms to deliver either messages or conditional cash transfers (CCTs). We studied the feasibility of using short message services (SMS) reminders and mobile phone-based conditional cash transfers (CCTs) to reach parents in rural Western Kenya. In a Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS), mothers with children aged 0-3 weeks old were approached to determine who had access to a mobile phone. SMS reminders were sent three days prior to and on the scheduled day of immunization for 1st (age 6 weeks) and 2nd doses (age 10 weeks) of DTP-HepB-Hib (Pentavalent) vaccine, using open-source Rapid SMS software. Approximately $2.00 USD was sent as cash using mPESA, a mobile money transfer platform (2/3 of mothers), or airtime (1/3 of mothers) via phone if the child was vaccinated within 4 weeks of the scheduled date. Follow-up surveys were done when children reached 14 weeks of age. We approached 77 mothers; 72 were enrolled into the study (26% owned a phone and 74% used someone else's). Of the 63 children with known vaccination status at 14 weeks of age, 57 (90%) received pentavalent1 and 54 (86%) received pentavalent2 within 4 weeks of their scheduled date. Of the 61 mothers with follow-up surveys administered at 14 weeks of age, 55 (90%) reported having received SMS reminders. Of the 54 women who reported having received SMS reminders and answered the CCT questions on the survey, 45 (83%) reported receiving their CCT. Most (89%) of mothers in the mPESA group obtained their cash within 3 days of being sent their credit via mobile phone. All mothers stated they preferred CCTs as cash via mobile phone rather than airtime. Of the 9 participants who did not vaccinate their children at the designated clinic 2(22%) cited refusals by husbands to participate in the study. The data show that in rural Western Kenya mobile phone-based strategies are a

  7. A Mobile Phone-Based Health Coaching Intervention for Weight Loss and Blood Pressure Reduction in a National Payer Population: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Alice Yuqing; Chen, Connie; Magana, Candy; Caballero Barajas, Karla; Olayiwola, J Nwando

    2017-06-08

    The prevalence of obesity and associated metabolic conditions continue to be challenging and costly to address for health care systems; 71% of American adults were overweight, with 35% of men and 40% of women diagnosed with obesity in 2014. Digital health coaching is an innovative approach to decreasing the barriers of cost and accessibility of receiving health coaching for the prevention and management of chronic disease in overweight or obese individuals. To evaluate the early impact of a mobile phone-based health coaching service on weight loss and blood pressure management in a commercially insured population. This was a retrospective study using existing registry data from a pilot commercial collaboration between Vida Health and a large national insurance provider, which enrolled adult members who were overweight (body mass index >25 kg/m2) and able to engage in a mobile phone-based coaching intervention. Participants received 4 months of intensive health coaching via live video, phone, and text message through the Vida Health app. Participants were also provided with a wireless scale, pedometer, and blood pressure cuff. Of the 1012 enrolled, 763 (75.40%) participants had an initial weight upon enrollment and final weight between 3 and 5 months from enrollment; they served as our intervention group. There were 73 participants out of the 1012 (7.21%) who had weight data 4 months prior to and after Vida coaching, who served as the matched-pair control group. Participants in the intervention group lost an average of 3.23% total body weight (TBW) at 4 months of coaching and 28.6% (218/763) intervention participants achieved a clinically significant weight loss of 5% or more of TBW, with an average of 9.46% weight loss in this cohort. In the matched-pair control group, participants gained on average 1.81% TBW in 4 months without Vida coaching and lost, on average, 2.47% TBW after 4 months of Vida coaching, demonstrating a statistically significant difference of 4

  8. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Phone Based Care Coordination Pilot on Hospital Utilisation and Costs for Patients With Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Peita; Vincent, Ruth; Tacey, Mark; Gilchrist, Jane; Liew, Danny; Grigg, Leeanne; Naccarella, Lucio

    2017-04-20

    A small percentage of the population represents a disproportionate number of attendances at emergency departments (ED). "Frequent presenters" to ED with chest pain do not always fit into established pathways for acute myocardial events. With accelerated "rule out" protocols, patients are often discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) after short lengths of stay. This research will evaluate the effectiveness of a phone based care-coordination pilot designed to meet the needs of patients attending ED with cardiac and non-cardiac chest pain. A longitudinal, single-arm interventional study with retrospectively recruited control group. Ninety-five patients were enrolled as the intervention group; 97 patients were retrospectively identified as controls. These patients had re-presented with chest pain within 6 months of a cardiac event, or attended hospital within 12 months two or more times with chest pain and/or complex needs. Intervention group patients were holistically assessed then phone-coached to support self-management of chest pain over 6 months. Following descriptive and univariate analysis, multivariate analysis was conducted to adjust for noted differences between the intervention and control groups. Thirty-day representation to ED was significantly less for the intervention group (14.1%) compared to controls (27.7%). After adjusting for baseline differences, intervention patients were more than two-fold less likely to re-present compared to controls (OR=0.42, 95%CI: 0.19-0.96). After adjustment for baseline differences, the savings in subsequent inpatient costs was $1588 per person, as a result of intervention, patients were less likely to have inpatient readmissions (16.3%) compared to controls (20.2%), although this was not statistically significant (p=0.588). A phone based care-coordination pilot with targeted interventions has the potential to reduce ED presentations and hospital readmissions among patients representing with chest pain. Copyright

  9. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  10. Junocam: Juno's Outreach Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Caplinger, M. A.; Ingersoll, A.; Ravine, M. A.; Jensen, E.; Bolton, S.; Orton, G.

    2017-11-01

    Junocam is a wide-angle camera designed to capture the unique polar perspective of Jupiter offered by Juno's polar orbit. Junocam's four-color images include the best spatial resolution ever acquired of Jupiter's cloudtops. Junocam will look for convective clouds and lightning in thunderstorms and derive the heights of the clouds. Junocam will support Juno's radiometer experiment by identifying any unusual atmospheric conditions such as hotspots. Junocam is on the spacecraft explicitly to reach out to the public and share the excitement of space exploration. The public is an essential part of our virtual team: amateur astronomers will supply ground-based images for use in planning, the public will weigh in on which images to acquire, and the amateur image processing community will help process the data.

  11. Reliability and criterion validity of measurements using a smart phone-based measurement tool for the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis during single-leg lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Jeon, In-Cheol; Hwang, Ui-Jae; Weon, Jong-Hyuck

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the intra-rater test-retest reliability of a smart phone-based measurement tool (SBMT) and a three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis system for measuring the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis during single-leg lifting (SLL) and the criterion validity of the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis measurement using SBMT compared with a 3D motion analysis system (3DMAS). Seventeen healthy volunteers performed SLL with their dominant leg without bending the knee until they reached a target placed 20 cm above the table. This study used a 3DMAS, considered the gold standard, to measure the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis to assess the criterion validity of the SBMT measurement. Intra-rater test-retest reliability was determined using the SBMT and 3DMAS using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) [3,1] values. The criterion validity of the SBMT was assessed with ICC [3,1] values. Both the 3DMAS (ICC = 0.77) and SBMT (ICC = 0.83) showed excellent intra-rater test-retest reliability in the measurement of the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis during SLL in a supine position. Moreover, the SBMT showed an excellent correlation with the 3DMAS (ICC = 0.99). Measurement of the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis using the SBMT showed excellent reliability and criterion validity compared with the 3DMAS.

  12. PDA-phone-based instant transmission of radiological images over a CDMA network by combining the PACS screen with a Bluetooth-interfaced local wireless link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Keun; Yoo, Sun K; Park, Jeong Jin; Kim, Sun Ho

    2007-06-01

    Remote teleconsultation by specialists is important for timely, correct, and specialized emergency surgical and medical decision making. In this paper, we designed a new personal digital assistant (PDA)-phone-based emergency teleradiology system by combining cellular communication with Bluetooth-interfaced local wireless links. The mobility and portability resulting from the use of PDAs and wireless communication can provide a more effective means of emergency teleconsultation without requiring the user to be limited to a fixed location. Moreover, it enables synchronized radiological image sharing between the attending physician in the emergency room and the remote specialist on picture archiving and communication system terminals without distorted image acquisition. To enable rapid and fine-quality radiological image transmission over a cellular network in a secure manner, progressive compression and security mechanisms have been incorporated. The proposed system is tested over a code division Multiple Access 1x-Evolution Data-Only network to evaluate the performance and to demonstrate the feasibility of this system in a real-world setting.

  13. CCD camera for an autoguider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, William V.

    1991-06-01

    The requirements of a charge coupled device (CCD) autoguider camera and the specifications of a camera that we propose to build to meet those requirements will be discussed. The design goals of both the package and the electronics will be considered.

  14. Digital camera self-calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clive S.

    Over the 25 years since the introduction of analytical camera self-calibration there has been a revolution in close-range photogrammetric image acquisition systems. High-resolution, large-area 'digital' CCD sensors have all but replaced film cameras. Throughout the period of this transition, self-calibration models have remained essentially unchanged. This paper reviews the application of analytical self-calibration to digital cameras. Computer vision perspectives are touched upon, the quality of self-calibration is discussed, and an overview is given of each of the four main sources of departures from collinearity in CCD cameras. Practical issues are also addressed and experimental results are used to highlight important characteristics of digital camera self-calibration.

  15. An investigation of users' attitudes, requirements and willingness to use mobile phone-based interactive voice response systems for seeking healthcare in Ghana: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkel, J; Dako-Gyeke, P; Krämer, A; May, J; Fobil, J N

    2017-03-01

    In implementing mobile health interventions, user requirements and willingness to use are among the most crucial concerns for success of the investigation and have only rarely been examined in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to specify the requirements of caregivers of children in order to use a symptom-based interactive voice response (IVR) system for seeking healthcare. This included (i) the investigation of attitudes towards mobile phone use and user experiences and (ii) the assessment of facilitators and challenges to use the IVR system. This is a population-based cross-sectional study. Four qualitative focus group discussions were conducted in peri-urban and rural towns in Shai Osudoku and Ga West district, as well as in Tema- and Accra Metropolitan Assembly. Participants included male and female caregivers of at least one child between 0 and 10 years of age. A qualitative content analysis was conducted for data analysis. Participants showed a positive attitude towards the use of mobile phones for seeking healthcare. While no previous experience in using IVR for health information was reported, the majority of participants stated that it offers a huge advantage for improvement in health performance. Barriers to IVR use included concerns about costs, lack of familiarly with the technology, social barriers such as lack of human interaction and infrastructural challenges. The establishment of a toll-free number as well as training prior to IVR system was discussed for recommendation. This study suggests that caregivers in the socio-economic environment of Ghana are interested and willing to use mobile phone-based IVR to receive health information for child healthcare. Important identified users' needs should be considered by health programme implementers and policy makers to help facilitate the development and implementation of IVR systems in the field of seeking healthcare. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  16. Impact of input data uncertainty on environmental exposure assessment models: A case study for electromagnetic field modelling from mobile phone base stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beekhuizen, Johan; Heuvelink, Gerard B M; Huss, Anke; Bürgi, Alfred; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel

    2014-11-01

    With the increased availability of spatial data and computing power, spatial prediction approaches have become a standard tool for exposure assessment in environmental epidemiology. However, such models are largely dependent on accurate input data. Uncertainties in the input data can therefore have a large effect on model predictions, but are rarely quantified. With Monte Carlo simulation we assessed the effect of input uncertainty on the prediction of radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) from mobile phone base stations at 252 receptor sites in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The impact on ranking and classification was determined by computing the Spearman correlations and weighted Cohen's Kappas (based on tertiles of the RF-EMF exposure distribution) between modelled values and RF-EMF measurements performed at the receptor sites. The uncertainty in modelled RF-EMF levels was large with a median coefficient of variation of 1.5. Uncertainty in receptor site height, building damping and building height contributed most to model output uncertainty. For exposure ranking and classification, the heights of buildings and receptor sites were the most important sources of uncertainty, followed by building damping, antenna- and site location. Uncertainty in antenna power, tilt, height and direction had a smaller impact on model performance. We quantified the effect of input data uncertainty on the prediction accuracy of an RF-EMF environmental exposure model, thereby identifying the most important sources of uncertainty and estimating the total uncertainty stemming from potential errors in the input data. This approach can be used to optimize the model and better interpret model output. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. New generation of meteorology cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janout, Petr; Blažek, Martin; Páta, Petr

    2017-12-01

    A new generation of the WILLIAM (WIde-field aLL-sky Image Analyzing Monitoring system) camera includes new features such as monitoring of rain and storm clouds during the day observation. Development of the new generation of weather monitoring cameras responds to the demand for monitoring of sudden weather changes. However, new WILLIAM cameras are ready to process acquired image data immediately, release warning against sudden torrential rains, and send it to user's cell phone and email. Actual weather conditions are determined from image data, and results of image processing are complemented by data from sensors of temperature, humidity, and atmospheric pressure. In this paper, we present the architecture, image data processing algorithms of mentioned monitoring camera and spatially-variant model of imaging system aberrations based on Zernike polynomials.

  18. An Inexpensive Digital Infrared Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive webcam to a camera specifically sensitive to the near infrared (700-1000 nm). Some experiments and practical applications are suggested and illustrated. (Contains 9 figures.)

  19. Scanning laser video camera/ microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. P.; Bow, R. T.

    1984-10-01

    A laser scanning system capable of scanning at standard video rate has been developed. The scanning mirrors, circuit design and system performance, as well as its applications to video cameras and ultra-violet microscopes, are discussed.

  20. Rural patients' access to mobile phones and willingness to receive mobile phone-based pharmacy and other health technology services: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Sallach, Rory E

    2014-02-01

    This pilot study explores the patient-centered demand for mobile phone-based health (mobile health [m-health]) services in the rural United States by documenting rural patients' access to mobile phones and patients' willingness to receive m-health services. An anonymous institutional review board-approved survey was completed by patients visiting two rural pharmacies in Nebraska from August to October 2011. Patients who volunteered to complete the survey provided their demographic data, disease state information, health status, mobile phone access, and willingness to receive (in terms of using and giving time to) m-health services. The majority of the 24 survey respondents were 19-40 years old (52%), female (88%), married (63%), with excellent to very good health status (63%), with no comorbidities (83%), with ≤$100 monthly medication expenses (80%), with private insurance (78%), living within 5 miles of their pharmacy (71%), and reporting that m-health services are important to them (75%; 12/16). Approximately 95%, 81%, 73%, and 55% of respondents reported access to a mobile phone, voice mails, text messaging, and mobile phone applications, respectively. Of the respondents, 65%, 57%, 52%, and 48% were willing to receive prerecorded messages for appointment reminders from the doctor, disease information, medication use/self-care information, and symptom monitoring information, respectively. In total, 70%, 63%, 61%, 54%, and 50% were willing to receive prerecorded messages from the pharmacist containing contact requests, new/refill prescription reminders, information on medication problems, reviewing/monitoring of medication use, and medication self-management/preventive screenings/immunizations, respectively. Of 44% (7/16) respondents willing to give time for m-health services, 83% were willing to give 15 min, and 17% were willing to give 30 min every month. By demonstrating rural patients' demand for m-health (including pharmacy) services, this is one of the

  1. A realist review of mobile phone-based health interventions for non-communicable disease management in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku, Daniel; Stephani, Victor; Quentin, Wilm

    2017-02-06

    The prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the use of mobile phones is rising, expanding the opportunities for the implementation of mobile phone-based health (mHealth) interventions. This review aims to understand how, why, for whom, and in what circumstances mHealth interventions against NCDs improve treatment and care in sub-Saharan Africa. Four main databases (PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Google Scholar) and references of included articles were searched for studies reporting effects of mHealth interventions on patients with NCDs in sub-Saharan Africa. All studies published up until May 2015 were included in the review. Following a realist review approach, middle-range theories were identified and integrated into a Framework for Understanding the Contribution of mHealth Interventions to Improved Access to Care for patients with NCDs in sub-Saharan Africa. The main indicators of the framework consist of predisposing characteristics, needs, enabling resources, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use. Studies were analyzed in depth to populate the framework. The search identified 6137 titles for screening, of which 20 were retained for the realist synthesis. The contribution of mHealth interventions to improved treatment and care is that they facilitate (remote) access to previously unavailable (specialized) services. Three contextual factors (predisposing characteristics, needs, and enabling resources) influence if patients and providers believe that mHealth interventions are useful and easy to use. Only if they believe mHealth to be useful and easy to use, will mHealth ultimately contribute to improved access to care. The analysis of included studies showed that the most important predisposing characteristics are a positive attitude and a common language of communication. The most relevant needs are a high burden of disease and a lack of capacity of first-contact providers

  2. Efficacy and External Validity of Electronic and Mobile Phone-Based Interventions Promoting Vegetable Intake in Young Adults: A Systematic Review Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour, Monica Marina; Chen, Juliana; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2015-07-28

    Despite social marketing campaigns and behavior change interventions, young adults remain among the lowest consumers of vegetables. The digital era offers potential new avenues for both social marketing and individually tailored programs, through texting, web, and mobile applications. The effectiveness and generalizability of such programs have not been well documented. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the efficacy and external validity of social marketing, electronic, and mobile phone-based (mHealth) interventions aimed at increasing vegetable intake in young adults. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) protocol will be used to conduct this systematic review. The search strategy will be executed across eleven electronic databases using combinations of the following search terms: "online intervention", "computer-assisted therapy", "internet", "website", "cell phones", "cyber", "telemedicine", "email", "social marketing", "social media", "mass media", "young adult", and "fruit and vegetables". The reference lists of included studies will also be searched for additional citations. Titles and abstracts will be screened against inclusion criteria and full texts of potentially eligible papers will be assessed by two independent reviewers. Data from eligible papers will be extracted. Quality and risk of bias will be assessed using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies and The Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias assessment tool respectively. The external validity of the studies will be determined based on components such as reach, adoption, and representativeness of participants; intervention implementation and adaption; and program maintenance and institutionalization. Results will be reported quantitatively and qualitatively. Our research is in progress. A draft of the systematic review is currently being produced for publication by the end of 2015

  3. INT prime focus mosaic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Derek J.; Tulloch, Simon; Churchill, John

    1996-03-01

    The INT Prime Focus Mosaic Camera (INT PFC) is designed to provide a large field survey and supernovae search capability for the prime focus of the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT). It is a joint collaboration between the Royal Greenwich Observatory (UK), Kapteyn Sterrenwacht Werkgroep (Netherlands), and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories (USA). The INT PFC consists of a 4 chip mosaic utilizing thinned and anti-reflection coated CCDs. These are LORAL devices of the LICK3 design. They will be operated cryogenically in a purpose built camera assembly. A fifth CCD, of the same type, is co-mounted with the science array in the cryostat to provide autoguider functions. This cryostat then mounts to the main camera assembly at the prime focus. This assembly will include standard filters and a novel shutter wheel which has been specifically designed for this application. The camera will have an unvignetted field of 40 arcminutes and a focal ratio of f/3.3. This results in a very tight mechanical specification for co-planarity and flatness of the array of CCDs and also quite stringent flexure tolerance of the camera assembly. A method of characterizing the co- planarity and flatness of the array will be described. The overall system architecture will also be described. One of the main requirements is to read the whole array out within 100s, with less than 10e rms. noise and very low CCD cross talk.

  4. The Clementine longwave infrared camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, R.E.; Lewis, I.T.; Sewall, N.R.; Park, H.S.; Shannon, M.J.; Ledebuhr, A.G.; Pleasance, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Massie, M.A. [Pacific Advanced Technology, Solvang, CA (United States); Metschuleit, K. [Amber/A Raytheon Co., Goleta, CA (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The Clementine mission provided the first ever complete, systematic surface mapping of the moon from the ultra-violet to the near-infrared regions. More than 1.7 million images of the moon, earth and space were returned from this mission. The longwave-infrared (LWIR) camera supplemented the UV/Visible and near-infrared mapping cameras providing limited strip coverage of the moon, giving insight to the thermal properties of the soils. This camera provided {approximately}100 m spatial resolution at 400 km periselene, and a 7 km across-track swath. This 2.1 kg camera using a 128 x 128 Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) FPA viewed thermal emission of the lunar surface and lunar horizon in the 8.0 to 9.5 {micro}m wavelength region. A description of this light-weight, low power LWIR camera along with a summary of lessons learned is presented. Design goals and preliminary on-orbit performance estimates are addressed in terms of meeting the mission`s primary objective for flight qualifying the sensors for future Department of Defense flights.

  5. Camera Movement in Narrative Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2007-01-01

    Just like art historians have focused on e.g. composition or lighting, this dissertation takes a single stylistic parameter as its object of study: camera movement. Within film studies this localized avenue of middle-level research has become increasingly viable under the aegis of a perspective......, and that a given camera movement may activate one or more of the proposed functions at any given moment. Six main functions are proposed and defined: 1) Orientation: orienting the viewer spatially. 2) Pacing: contributing to the cinematic rhythm of the film. 3) Inflection: inflecting shots in a suggestive...... to illustrate how the functions may mesh in individual camera movements six concrete examples are analyzed. The analyses illustrate how the taxonomy presented can substantiate analysis and interpretation of film style. More generally, the dissertation - and particularly these in-depth analyses - illustrates how...

  6. Perceptual Color Characterization of Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Vazquez-Corral

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Color camera characterization, mapping outputs from the camera sensors to an independent color space, such as \\(XYZ\\, is an important step in the camera processing pipeline. Until now, this procedure has been primarily solved by using a \\(3 \\times 3\\ matrix obtained via a least-squares optimization. In this paper, we propose to use the spherical sampling method, recently published by Finlayson al., to perform a perceptual color characterization. In particular, we search for the \\(3 \\times 3\\ matrix that minimizes three different perceptual errors, one pixel based and two spatially based. For the pixel-based case, we minimize the CIE \\(\\Delta E\\ error, while for the spatial-based case, we minimize both the S-CIELAB error and the CID error measure. Our results demonstrate an improvement of approximately 3for the \\(\\Delta E\\ error, 7& for the S-CIELAB error and 13% for the CID error measures.

  7. Dark Energy Camera for Blanco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binder, Gary A.; /Caltech /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In order to make accurate measurements of dark energy, a system is needed to monitor the focus and alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) to be located on the Blanco 4m Telescope for the upcoming Dark Energy Survey. One new approach under development is to fit out-of-focus star images to a point spread function from which information about the focus and tilt of the camera can be obtained. As a first test of a new algorithm using this idea, simulated star images produced from a model of DECam in the optics software Zemax were fitted. Then, real images from the Mosaic II imager currently installed on the Blanco telescope were used to investigate the algorithm's capabilities. A number of problems with the algorithm were found, and more work is needed to understand its limitations and improve its capabilities so it can reliably predict camera alignment and focus.

  8. Radiation-Tolerant High-Speed Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Radiation -Tolerant High-Speed Camera Esko Mikkola, Andrew Levy, Matt Engelman Alphacore, Inc. Tempe, AZ 85281 Abstract: As part of an... radiation -hardened CMOS image sensor and camera system. Radiation -hardened cameras with frame rates as high as 10 kfps and resolution of 1Mpixel are not...camera solution that is under development with a similar architecture. It also includes a brief description of the radiation -hardened camera that

  9. Directing Performers for the Cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, George P., Jr.

    An excellent way for an undergraduate, novice director of television and film to pick up background experience in directing performers for cameras is by participating in nonbroadcast-film activities, such as theatre, dance, and variety acts, both as performer and as director. This document describes the varieties of activities, including creative,…

  10. The Camera Comes to Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floren, Leola

    After the Lindbergh kidnapping trial in 1935, the American Bar Association sought to eliminate electronic equipment from courtroom proceedings. Eventually, all but two states adopted regulations applying that ban to some extent, and a 1965 Supreme Court decision encouraged the banning of television cameras at trials as well. Currently, some states…

  11. Digital Low Frequency Radio Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullekrug, M.; Mezentsev, A.; Soula, S.; van der Velde, O.; Poupeney, J.; Sudre, C.; Gaffet, S.; Pincon, J.

    2012-04-01

    This contribution reports the design, realization and operation of a novel digital low frequency radio camera towards an exploration of the Earth's electromagnetic environment with particular emphasis on lightning discharges and subsequent atmospheric effects such as transient luminous events. The design of the digital low frequency radio camera is based on the idea of radio interferometry with a network of radio receivers which are separated by spatial baselines comparable to the wavelength of the observed radio waves, i.e., ~1-100 km which corresponds to a frequency range from ~3-300 kHz. The key parameter towards the realization of the radio interferometer is the frequency dependent slowness of the radio waves within the Earth's atmosphere with respect to the speed of light in vacuum. This slowness is measured with the radio interferometer by using well documented radio transmitters. The digital low frequency radio camera can be operated in different modes. In the imaging mode, still photographs show maps of the low frequency radio sky. In the video mode, movies show the dynamics of the low frequency radio sky. The exposure time of the photograhps, the frame rate of the video, and the radio frequency of interest can be adjusted by the observer. Alternatively, the digital radio camera can be used in the monitoring mode, where a particular area of the sky is observed continuously. The first application of the digital low frequency radio camera is to characterize the electromagnetic energy emanating from sprite producing lightning discharges, but it is expected that it can also be used to identify and investigate numerous other radio sources of the Earth's electromagnetic environment.

  12. Dynamic Camera Positioning and Reconfiguration for Multi-Camera Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Konda, Krishna Reddy

    2015-01-01

    The large availability of different types of cameras and lenses, together with the reduction in price of video sensors, has contributed to a widespread use of video surveillance systems, which have become a widely adopted tool to enforce security and safety, in detecting and preventing crimes and dangerous events. The possibility for personalization of such systems is generally very high, letting the user customize the sensing infrastructure, and deploying ad-hoc solutions based on the curren...

  13. Linking Wayfinding and Wayfaring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanng, Ditte Bendix; Jensen, Ole B.

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter we propose to expand and enhance the understanding of wayfi nding beyond the strictly “instrumental” (i.e., getting from point A to point B), to include the qualities and multi-sensorial inputs that inform and shape people’s movement through space. We take as a point of departure...... of environmental information , which includes the embodied, multi-sensorial experience of moving through physical space. We base our examination in part on the classic positions of the wayfi nding literature—for example, Lynch’s seminal study, The Image of the City ( 1960 ). However, we also examine the so...... and wayfaring. Then we explore the concept of wayfaring (Ingold 2007 , 2011 ) as a key to understand embodied, multi-sensorial qualities of movement. We conclude by discussing the implications of a wayfaring perspective on wayfi nding research, design, and policy making....

  14. An optical metasurface planar camera

    CERN Document Server

    Arbabi, Amir; Kamali, Seyedeh Mahsa; Horie, Yu; Han, Seunghoon; Faraon, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Optical metasurfaces are 2D arrays of nano-scatterers that modify optical wavefronts at subwavelength spatial resolution. They are poised to revolutionize optical design by enabling complex low cost systems where multiple metasurfaces are lithographically stacked on top of each other and are integrated with electronics. For imaging applications, metasurface stacks can perform sophisticated image corrections and can be directly integrated with image sensors. Here, we demonstrate this concept with a miniature flat camera integrating a monolithic metasurface lens doublet corrected for monochromatic aberrations, and an image sensor. The doublet lens, which acts as a fisheye photographic objective, has an f-number of 0.9, an angle-of-view larger than 60$^\\circ$$\\times$60$^\\circ$, and operates at 850 nm wavelength with large transmission. The camera exhibits high image quality, which indicates the potential of this technology to produce a paradigm shift in future designs of imaging systems for microscopy, photograp...

  15. GRAVITY acquisition camera: characterization results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anugu, Narsireddy; Garcia, Paulo; Amorim, Antonio; Wiezorrek, Erich; Wieprecht, Ekkehard; Eisenhauer, Frank; Ott, Thomas; Pfuhl, Oliver; Gordo, Paulo; Perrin, Guy; Brandner, Wolfgang; Straubmeier, Christian; Perraut, Karine

    2016-08-01

    GRAVITY acquisition camera implements four optical functions to track multiple beams of Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI): a) pupil tracker: a 2×2 lenslet images four pupil reference lasers mounted on the spiders of telescope secondary mirror; b) field tracker: images science object; c) pupil imager: reimages telescope pupil; d) aberration tracker: images a Shack-Hartmann. The estimation of beam stabilization parameters from the acquisition camera detector image is carried out, for every 0.7 s, with a dedicated data reduction software. The measured parameters are used in: a) alignment of GRAVITY with the VLTI; b) active pupil and field stabilization; c) defocus correction and engineering purposes. The instrument is now successfully operational on-sky in closed loop. The relevant data reduction and on-sky characterization results are reported.

  16. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  17. Graphic design of pinhole cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H. B.; Chu, W. P.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes a graphic technique for the analysis and optimization of pinhole size and focal length. The technique is based on the use of the transfer function of optical elements described by Scott (1959) to construct the transfer function of a circular pinhole camera. This transfer function is the response of a component or system to a pattern of lines having a sinusoidally varying radiance at varying spatial frequencies. Some specific examples of graphic design are presented.

  18. Coordinated Sensing in Intelligent Camera Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Chong

    2013-01-01

    The cost and size of video sensors has led to camera networks becoming pervasive in our lives. However, the ability to analyze these images efficiently is very much a function of the quality of the acquired images. Human control of pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) cameras is impractical and unreliable when high quality images are needed of multiple events distributed over a large area. This dissertation considers the problem of automatically controlling the fields of view of individual cameras in a camera...

  19. Optimising Camera Traps for Monitoring Small Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Glen, Alistair S.; Stuart Cockburn; Margaret Nichols; Jagath Ekanayake; Bruce Warburton

    2013-01-01

    Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera?s field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1) trigger s...

  20. Stereo Pinhole Camera: Assembly and experimental activities

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Gilmário Barbosa; Departamento de Ciência da Computação, Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Joinville; Cunha, Sidney Pinto; Centro de Tecnologia da Informação Renato Archer, Campinas

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the assembling of a stereo pinhole camera for capturing stereo-pairs of images and proposes experimental activities with it. A pinhole camera can be as sophisticated as you want, or so simple that it could be handcrafted with practically recyclable materials. This paper describes the practical use of the pinhole camera throughout history and currently. Aspects of optics and geometry involved in the building of the stereo pinhole camera are presented with illustrations. Fur...

  1. Toward a miniaturized fundus camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliss, Christine; Parel, Jean-Marie; Flynn, John T; Pratisto, Hans; Niederer, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) describes a pathological development of the retina in prematurely born children. In order to prevent severe permanent damage to the eye and enable timely treatment, the fundus of the eye in such children has to be examined according to established procedures. For these examinations, our miniaturized fundus camera is intended to allow the acquisition of wide-angle digital pictures of the fundus for on-line or off-line diagnosis and documentation. We designed two prototypes of a miniaturized fundus camera, one with graded refractive index (GRIN)-based optics, the other with conventional optics. Two different modes of illumination were compared: transscleral and transpupillary. In both systems, the size and weight of the camera were minimized. The prototypes were tested on young rabbits. The experiments led to the conclusion that the combination of conventional optics with transpupillary illumination yields the best results in terms of overall image quality. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  2. Field-testing of a cost-effective mobile-phone based microscope for screening of Schistosoma haematobium infection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan Koydemir, Hatice; Bogoch, Isaac I.; Tseng, Derek; Ephraim, Richard K. D.; Duah, Evans; Tee, Joseph; Andrews, Jason R.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Schistosomiasis is a parasitic and neglected tropical disease, and affects <200-million people across the world, with school-aged children disproportionately affected. Here we present field-testing results of a handheld and cost effective smartphone-based microscope in rural Ghana, Africa, for point-of-care diagnosis of S. haematobium infection. In this mobile-phone microscope, a custom-designed 3D printed opto-mechanical attachment (~150g) is placed in contact with the smartphone camera-lens, creating an imaging-system with a half-pitch resolution of ~0.87µm. This unit includes an external lens (also taken from a mobile-phone camera), a sample tray, a z-stage to adjust the focus, two light-emitting-diodes (LEDs) and two diffusers for uniform illumination of the sample. In our field-testing, 60 urine samples, collected from children, were used, where the prevalence of the infection was 72.9%. After concentration of the sample with centrifugation, the sediment was placed on a glass-slide and S. haematobium eggs were first identified/quantified using conventional benchtop microscopy by an expert diagnostician, and then a second expert, blinded to these results, determined the presence/absence of eggs using our mobile-phone microscope. Compared to conventional microscopy, our mobile-phone microscope had a diagnostic sensitivity of 72.1%, specificity of 100%, positive-predictive-value of 100%, and a negative-predictive-value of 57.1%. Furthermore, our mobile-phone platform demonstrated a sensitivity of 65.7% and 100% for low-intensity infections (≤50 eggs/10 mL urine) and high-intensity infections (<50 eggs/10 mL urine), respectively. We believe that this cost-effective and field-portable mobile-phone microscope may play an important role in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and various other global health challenges.

  3. 16 CFR 501.1 - Camera film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Camera film. 501.1 Section 501.1 Commercial... 500 § 501.1 Camera film. Camera film packaged and labeled for retail sale is exempt from the net... should be expressed, provided: (a) The net quantity of contents on packages of movie film and bulk still...

  4. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forrester, Tavis; O'Brien, Tim; Fegraus, Eric; Jansen, P.A.; Palmer, Jonathan; Kays, Roland; Ahumada, Jorge; Stern, Beth; McShea, William

    2016-01-01

    Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an

  5. Demonstration of a Far Infrared Streak Camera.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drabbels, M.M.J.E.; Lankhuijzen, G.M.; Noordam, L.D.

    1998-01-01

    An atomic infrared (IR) streak camera is demonstrated that operates in the mid- and far-infrared (λ = 5-85 μm), well beyond the long wavelength cutoff of conventional streak cameras. The temporal and spectral characteristics of the streak camera are determined using the FELIX free-electron laser as

  6. 21 CFR 892.1110 - Positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Positron camera. 892.1110 Section 892.1110 Food... DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1110 Positron camera. (a) Identification. A positron camera is a device intended to image the distribution of positron-emitting radionuclides in the body...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1120 - Opthalmic camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Opthalmic camera. 886.1120 Section 886.1120 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1120 Opthalmic camera. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic camera is an AC-powered device intended to take photographs of the eye and the surrounding area...

  8. Relative camera localisation in non-overlapping camera networks using multiple trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    John, V.; Englebienne, G.; Kröse, B.J.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present an automatic camera calibration algorithm using multiple trajectories in a multiple camera network with non-overlapping field-of-views (FOV). Visible trajectories within a camera FOV are assumed to be measured with respect to the camera local co-ordinate system.

  9. Characterization of the Series 1000 Camera System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimbrough, J; Moody, J; Bell, P; Landen, O

    2004-04-07

    The National Ignition Facility requires a compact network addressable scientific grade CCD camera for use in diagnostics ranging from streak cameras to gated x-ray imaging cameras. Due to the limited space inside the diagnostic, an analog and digital input/output option in the camera controller permits control of both the camera and the diagnostic by a single Ethernet link. The system consists of a Spectral Instruments Series 1000 camera, a PC104+ controller, and power supply. The 4k by 4k CCD camera has a dynamic range of 70 dB with less than 14 electron read noise at a 1MHz readout rate. The PC104+ controller includes 16 analog inputs, 4 analog outputs and 16 digital input/output lines for interfacing to diagnostic instrumentation. A description of the system and performance characterization is reported.

  10. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR) Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Alsubaie, Yazeed; Almubarak, Zaid; Almutawa, Hisham; AlQasem, Yazeed; Hasanato, Rana Muhammed

    2015-11-13

    Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR) generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2) were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12-16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12-17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm² at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5-6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22) than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34) (p = 0.007). Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016) relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Ayoub Meo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2 were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12–16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12–17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5–6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22 than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34 (p = 0.007. Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016 relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. Robot Tracer with Visual Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar Lubis, Abdul; Dwi Lestari, Yuyun; Dafitri, Haida; Azanuddin

    2017-12-01

    Robot is a versatile tool that can function replace human work function. The robot is a device that can be reprogrammed according to user needs. The use of wireless networks for remote monitoring needs can be utilized to build a robot that can be monitored movement and can be monitored using blueprints and he can track the path chosen robot. This process is sent using a wireless network. For visual robot using high resolution cameras to facilitate the operator to control the robot and see the surrounding circumstances.

  13. Human tracking over camera networks: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Wan, Wanggen; Hwang, Jenq-Neng; Muhammad, Rizwan; Yang, Mingyang; Han, Kang

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, automated human tracking over camera networks is getting essential for video surveillance. The tasks of tracking human over camera networks are not only inherently challenging due to changing human appearance, but also have enormous potentials for a wide range of practical applications, ranging from security surveillance to retail and health care. This review paper surveys the most widely used techniques and recent advances for human tracking over camera networks. Two important functional modules for the human tracking over camera networks are addressed, including human tracking within a camera and human tracking across non-overlapping cameras. The core techniques of human tracking within a camera are discussed based on two aspects, i.e., generative trackers and discriminative trackers. The core techniques of human tracking across non-overlapping cameras are then discussed based on the aspects of human re-identification, camera-link model-based tracking and graph model-based tracking. Our survey aims to address existing problems, challenges, and future research directions based on the analyses of the current progress made toward human tracking techniques over camera networks.

  14. Using DSLR cameras in digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié-Zuluaga, Diego; Herrera-Ramírez, Jorge; García-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    In Digital Holography (DH), the size of the bidimensional image sensor to record the digital hologram, plays a key role on the performance of this imaging technique; the larger the size of the camera sensor, the better the quality of the final reconstructed image. Scientific cameras with large formats are offered in the market, but their cost and availability limit their use as a first option when implementing DH. Nowadays, DSLR cameras provide an easy-access alternative that is worthwhile to be explored. The DSLR cameras are a wide, commercial, and available option that in comparison with traditional scientific cameras, offer a much lower cost per effective pixel over a large sensing area. However, in the DSLR cameras, with their RGB pixel distribution, the sampling of information is different to the sampling in monochrome cameras usually employed in DH. This fact has implications in their performance. In this work, we discuss why DSLR cameras are not extensively used for DH, taking into account the problem reported by different authors of object replication. Simulations of DH using monochromatic and DSLR cameras are presented and a theoretical deduction for the replication problem using the Fourier theory is also shown. Experimental results of DH implementation using a DSLR camera show the replication problem.

  15. Optimising camera traps for monitoring small mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair S Glen

    Full Text Available Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera's field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1 trigger speed, 2 passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3 white vs. infrared flash, and 4 still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera's field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea, feral cats (Felis catus and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus. Trigger speeds of 0.2-2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera's field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps.

  16. Results of a cross-sectional study on the association of electromagnetic fields emitted from mobile phone base stations and health complaints; Ergebnisse einer Querschnittsstudie zum Zusammenhang von elektromagnetischen Feldern von Mobilfunksendeanlagen und unspezifischen gesundheitlichen Beschwerden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenkamp, Juergen; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Arbeitsgebiet Epidemiologie und International Public Health; Blettner, Maria [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informatik; Kowall, Bernd [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Deutsches Diabetes Zentrum; Schuez, Joachim [Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden (Denmark). Dept. of Biostatistics and Epidemiology; Schlehofer, Brigitte [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum Heidelberg (Germany). Arbeitsgebiet Umweltepidemiologie; Schmiedel, Sven [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Biometrie, Epidemiologie und Informatik; Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden (Denmark). Dept. of Biostatistics and Epidemiology; Bornkessel, Christian [Institut fuer Mobil- und Satellitenfunktechnik (IMST GmbH), Pruefzentrum EMV, Kamp-Lintfort (Germany); Reis, Ursula; Potthoff, Peter [TNS Healthcare GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Background: Despite the fact that adverse health effects are not confirmed for exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RFEMF) levels below the limit values, as defined in the guidelines of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection, many persons are worried about possible adverse health effects caused by the RF-EMF emitted from mobile phone base stations, or they attribute their unspecific health complaints like headache or sleep disturbances to these fields. Method: In the framework of a cross-sectional study a questionnaire was sent to 4150 persons living in predominantly urban areas. Participants were asked whether base stations affected their health. Health complaints were measured with standardized health questionnaires for sleep disturbances, headache, health complaints and mental and physical health. 3,526 persons responded (85%) to the questionnaire and 1,808 (51%) agreed to dosimetric measurements in their flats. Exposure was measured in 1,500 flats. Results: The measurements accomplished in the bedrooms in most cases showed very low exposure values, most often below sensitivity limit of the dosimeter. An association of exposure with the occurrence of health complaints was not found, but an association between the attribution of adverse health effects to base stations and the occurrence of health complaints. Conclusions: However, concerns about health and the attribution of adverse health effects to these mobile phone base stations should be taken serious and require a risk communication with concerned persons. Future research should focus on the processes of perception and appraisal of RF-EMF risks, and ascertain the determinants of concerns and attributions in the context of RF-EMF. (orig.)

  17. High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Sandra D.

    2009-01-01

    A High Speed Digital Camera Technology Review (HSD Review) is being conducted to evaluate the state-of-the-shelf in this rapidly progressing industry. Five HSD cameras supplied by four camera manufacturers participated in a Field Test during the Space Shuttle Discovery STS-128 launch. Each camera was also subjected to Bench Tests in the ASRC Imaging Development Laboratory. Evaluation of the data from the Field and Bench Tests is underway. Representatives from the imaging communities at NASA / KSC and the Optical Systems Group are participating as reviewers. A High Speed Digital Video Camera Draft Specification was updated to address Shuttle engineering imagery requirements based on findings from this HSD Review. This draft specification will serve as the template for a High Speed Digital Video Camera Specification to be developed for the wider OSG imaging community under OSG Task OS-33.

  18. Computational imaging for miniature cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahieh, Basel

    Miniature cameras play a key role in numerous imaging applications ranging from endoscopy and metrology inspection devices to smartphones and head-mount acquisition systems. However, due to the physical constraints, the imaging conditions, and the low quality of small optics, their imaging capabilities are limited in terms of the delivered resolution, the acquired depth of field, and the captured dynamic range. Computational imaging jointly addresses the imaging system and the reconstructing algorithms to bypass the traditional limits of optical systems and deliver better restorations for various applications. The scene is encoded into a set of efficient measurements which could then be computationally decoded to output a richer estimate of the scene as compared with the raw images captured by conventional imagers. In this dissertation, three task-based computational imaging techniques are developed to make low-quality miniature cameras capable of delivering realistic high-resolution reconstructions, providing full-focus imaging, and acquiring depth information for high dynamic range objects. For the superresolution task, a non-regularized direct superresolution algorithm is developed to achieve realistic restorations without being penalized by improper assumptions (e.g., optimizers, priors, and regularizers) made in the inverse problem. An adaptive frequency-based filtering scheme is introduced to upper bound the reconstruction errors while still producing more fine details as compared with previous methods under realistic imaging conditions. For the full-focus imaging task, a computational depth-based deconvolution technique is proposed to bring a scene captured by an ordinary fixed-focus camera to a full-focus based on a depth-variant point spread function prior. The ringing artifacts are suppressed on three levels: block tiling to eliminate boundary artifacts, adaptive reference maps to reduce ringing initiated by sharp edges, and block-wise deconvolution or

  19. The Mars Science Laboratory Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, J.; Thiessen, D.; Pourangi, A.; Kobzeff, P.; Litwin, T.; Scherr, L.; Elliott, S.; Dingizian, A.; Maimone, M.

    2012-09-01

    NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover is equipped with a set of 12 engineering cameras. These cameras are build-to-print copies of the Mars Exploration Rover cameras described in Maki et al. (J. Geophys. Res. 108(E12): 8071, 2003). Images returned from the engineering cameras will be used to navigate the rover on the Martian surface, deploy the rover robotic arm, and ingest samples into the rover sample processing system. The Navigation cameras (Navcams) are mounted to a pan/tilt mast and have a 45-degree square field of view (FOV) with a pixel scale of 0.82 mrad/pixel. The Hazard Avoidance Cameras (Hazcams) are body-mounted to the rover chassis in the front and rear of the vehicle and have a 124-degree square FOV with a pixel scale of 2.1 mrad/pixel. All of the cameras utilize a 1024×1024 pixel detector and red/near IR bandpass filters centered at 650 nm. The MSL engineering cameras are grouped into two sets of six: one set of cameras is connected to rover computer "A" and the other set is connected to rover computer "B". The Navcams and Front Hazcams each provide similar views from either computer. The Rear Hazcams provide different views from the two computers due to the different mounting locations of the "A" and "B" Rear Hazcams. This paper provides a brief description of the engineering camera properties, the locations of the cameras on the vehicle, and camera usage for surface operations.

  20. Movement-based Interaction in Camera Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Eva; Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present three concepts that address movement-based interaction using camera tracking. Based on our work with several movement-based projects we present four selected applications, and use these applications to leverage our discussion, and to describe our three main concepts space......, relations, and feedback. We see these as central for describing and analysing movement-based systems using camera tracking and we show how these three concepts can be used to analyse other camera tracking applications....

  1. Development of biostereometric experiments. [stereometric camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The stereometric camera was designed for close-range techniques in biostereometrics. The camera focusing distance of 360 mm to infinity covers a broad field of close-range photogrammetry. The design provides for a separate unit for the lens system and interchangeable backs on the camera for the use of single frame film exposure, roll-type film cassettes, or glass plates. The system incorporates the use of a surface contrast optical projector.

  2. Omnidirectional Underwater Camera Design and Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Bosch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of an underwater omnidirectional multi-camera system (OMS based on a commercially available six-camera system, originally designed for land applications. A full calibration method is presented for the estimation of both the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, which is able to cope with wide-angle lenses and non-overlapping cameras simultaneously. This method is valid for any OMS in both land or water applications. For underwater use, a customized housing is required, which often leads to strong image distortion due to refraction among the different media. This phenomena makes the basic pinhole camera model invalid for underwater cameras, especially when using wide-angle lenses, and requires the explicit modeling of the individual optical rays. To address this problem, a ray tracing approach has been adopted to create a field-of-view (FOV simulator for underwater cameras. The simulator allows for the testing of different housing geometries and optics for the cameras to ensure a complete hemisphere coverage in underwater operation. This paper describes the design and testing of a compact custom housing for a commercial off-the-shelf OMS camera (Ladybug 3 and presents the first results of its use. A proposed three-stage calibration process allows for the estimation of all of the relevant camera parameters. Experimental results are presented, which illustrate the performance of the calibration method and validate the approach.

  3. Omnidirectional Underwater Camera Design and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Josep; Gracias, Nuno; Ridao, Pere; Ribas, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an underwater omnidirectional multi-camera system (OMS) based on a commercially available six-camera system, originally designed for land applications. A full calibration method is presented for the estimation of both the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, which is able to cope with wide-angle lenses and non-overlapping cameras simultaneously. This method is valid for any OMS in both land or water applications. For underwater use, a customized housing is required, which often leads to strong image distortion due to refraction among the different media. This phenomena makes the basic pinhole camera model invalid for underwater cameras, especially when using wide-angle lenses, and requires the explicit modeling of the individual optical rays. To address this problem, a ray tracing approach has been adopted to create a field-of-view (FOV) simulator for underwater cameras. The simulator allows for the testing of different housing geometries and optics for the cameras to ensure a complete hemisphere coverage in underwater operation. This paper describes the design and testing of a compact custom housing for a commercial off-the-shelf OMS camera (Ladybug 3) and presents the first results of its use. A proposed three-stage calibration process allows for the estimation of all of the relevant camera parameters. Experimental results are presented, which illustrate the performance of the calibration method and validate the approach. PMID:25774707

  4. Low Noise Camera for Suborbital Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, David; Robertson, Bryan; Holloway, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Low-cost, commercial-off-the-shelf- (COTS-) based science cameras are intended for lab use only and are not suitable for flight deployment as they are difficult to ruggedize and repackage into instruments. Also, COTS implementation may not be suitable since mission science objectives are tied to specific measurement requirements, and often require performance beyond that required by the commercial market. Custom camera development for each application is cost prohibitive for the International Space Station (ISS) or midrange science payloads due to nonrecurring expenses ($2,000 K) for ground-up camera electronics design. While each new science mission has a different suite of requirements for camera performance (detector noise, speed of image acquisition, charge-coupled device (CCD) size, operation temperature, packaging, etc.), the analog-to-digital conversion, power supply, and communications can be standardized to accommodate many different applications. The low noise camera for suborbital applications is a rugged standard camera platform that can accommodate a range of detector types and science requirements for use in inexpensive to mid range payloads supporting Earth science, solar physics, robotic vision, or astronomy experiments. Cameras developed on this platform have demonstrated the performance found in custom flight cameras at a price per camera more than an order of magnitude lower.

  5. Camera self-calibration from translation by referring to a known camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bin; Hu, Zhaozheng

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a novel linear method for camera self-calibration by referring to a known (or calibrated) camera. The method requires at least three images, with two images generated by the uncalibrated camera from pure translation and one image generated by the known reference camera. We first propose a method to compute the infinite homography from scene depths. Based on this, we use two images generated by translating the uncalibrated camera to recover scene depths, which are further utilized to linearly compute the infinite homography between an arbitrary uncalibrated image, and the image from the known camera. With the known camera as reference, the computed infinite homography is readily decomposed for camera calibration. The proposed self-calibration method has been tested with simulation and real image data. Experimental results demonstrate that the method is practical and accurate. This paper proposes using a "known reference camera" for camera calibration. The pure translation, as required in the method, is much more maneuverable, compared with some strict motions in the literature, such as pure rotation. The proposed self-calibration method has good potential for solving online camera calibration problems, which has important applications, especially for multicamera and zooming camera systems.

  6. Improving Situational Awareness in camera surveillance by combining top-view maps with camera images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, F.L.; Zeeders, R.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the experiment described is to improve today's camera surveillance in public spaces. Three designs with the camera images combined on a top-view map were compared to each other and to the current situation in camera surveillance. The goal was to test which design makes spatial

  7. Securing Embedded Smart Cameras with Trusted Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winkler Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Camera systems are used in many applications including video surveillance for crime prevention and investigation, traffic monitoring on highways or building monitoring and automation. With the shift from analog towards digital systems, the capabilities of cameras are constantly increasing. Today's smart camera systems come with considerable computing power, large memory, and wired or wireless communication interfaces. With onboard image processing and analysis capabilities, cameras not only open new possibilities but also raise new challenges. Often overlooked are potential security issues of the camera system. The increasing amount of software running on the cameras turns them into attractive targets for attackers. Therefore, the protection of camera devices and delivered data is of critical importance. In this work we present an embedded camera prototype that uses Trusted Computing to provide security guarantees for streamed videos. With a hardware-based security solution, we ensure integrity, authenticity, and confidentiality of videos. Furthermore, we incorporate image timestamping, detection of platform reboots, and reporting of the system status. This work is not limited to theoretical considerations but also describes the implementation of a prototype system. Extensive evaluation results illustrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

  8. Using a Robotic Camera in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Frank M.; Bellaver, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Describes how two professors used a robotic camera to tape their classes and improve their teaching style. The camera was found to be unobtrusive and useful in providing feedback; both professors adjusted their materials and delivery approach as a result. Tapes were used in later classes and for students who missed classes. (AEF)

  9. Rosetta Star Tracker and Navigation Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Gøsta

    1998-01-01

    Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera.......Proposal in response to the Invitation to Tender (ITT) issued by Matra Marconi Space (MSS) for the procurement of the ROSETTA Star Tracker and Navigation Camera....

  10. An Open Standard for Camera Trap Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavis Forrester

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps that capture photos of animals are a valuable tool for monitoring biodiversity. The use of camera traps is rapidly increasing and there is an urgent need for standardization to facilitate data management, reporting and data sharing. Here we offer the Camera Trap Metadata Standard as an open data standard for storing and sharing camera trap data, developed by experts from a variety of organizations. The standard captures information necessary to share data between projects and offers a foundation for collecting the more detailed data needed for advanced analysis. The data standard captures information about study design, the type of camera used, and the location and species names for all detections in a standardized way. This information is critical for accurately assessing results from individual camera trapping projects and for combining data from multiple studies for meta-analysis. This data standard is an important step in aligning camera trapping surveys with best practices in data-intensive science. Ecology is moving rapidly into the realm of big data, and central data repositories are becoming a critical tool and are emerging for camera trap data. This data standard will help researchers standardize data terms, align past data to new repositories, and provide a framework for utilizing data across repositories and research projects to advance animal ecology and conservation.

  11. Solid State Replacement of Rotating Mirror Cameras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, A M; Bartolick, J M

    2006-08-25

    Rotating mirror cameras have been the mainstay of mega-frame per second imaging for decades. There is still no electronic camera that can match a film based rotary mirror camera for the combination of frame count, speed, resolution and dynamic range. The rotary mirror cameras are predominantly used in the range of 0.1 to 100 micro-seconds per frame, for 25 to more than a hundred frames. Electron tube gated cameras dominate the sub microsecond regime but are frame count limited. Video cameras are pushing into the microsecond regime but are resolution limited by the high data rates. An all solid state architecture, dubbed ''In-situ Storage Image Sensor'' or ''ISIS'', by Prof. Goji Etoh, has made its first appearance into the market and its evaluation is discussed. Recent work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has concentrated both on evaluation of the presently available technologies and exploring the capabilities of the ISIS architecture. It is clear though there is presently no single chip camera that can simultaneously match the rotary mirror cameras, the ISIS architecture has the potential to approach their performance.

  12. Digital airborne camera introduction and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sandau, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has seen great innovations on the airborne camera. This book is the first ever written on the topic and describes all components of a digital airborne camera ranging from the object to be imaged to the mass memory device.

  13. Active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation (SINDE) camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simova, E.; Rochefort, P.A., E-mail: eli.simova@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    A proof-of-concept video camera for active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation has been demonstrated. An active multispectral imaging technique has been implemented in the visible and near infrared by using light emitting diodes with wavelengths spanning from 400 to 970 nm. This shows how the camera can be used in nondestructive evaluation to inspect surfaces and spectrally identify materials and corrosion. (author)

  14. Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) tail camera video

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) was a joint research project by NASA and the FAA to test a survivable aircraft impact using a remotely piloted Boeing 720 aircraft. The tail camera movie is one shot running 27 seconds. It shows the impact from the perspective of a camera mounted high on the vertical stabilizer, looking forward over the fuselage and wings.

  15. A Benchmark for Virtual Camera Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    Automatically animating and placing the virtual camera in a dynamic environment is a challenging task. The camera is expected to maximise and maintain a set of properties — i.e. visual composition — while smoothly moving through the environment and avoiding obstacles. A large number of different ...

  16. Driving with head-slaved camera system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oving, A.B.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    In a field experiment, we tested the effectiveness of a head-slaved camera system for driving an armoured vehicle under armour. This system consists of a helmet-mounted display (HMD), a headtracker, and a motion platform with two cameras. Subjects performed several driving tasks on paved and in

  17. Laser Dazzling of Focal Plane Array Cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleijpen, H.M.A.; Dimmeler, A.; Eberle, B; Heuvel, J.C. van den; Mieremet, A.L.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Mellier, B.

    2007-01-01

    Laser countermeasures against infrared focal plane array cameras aim to saturate the full camera image. In this paper we will discuss the results of dazzling experiments performed with MWIR lasers. In the “low energy” pulse regime we observe an increasing saturated area with increasing power. The

  18. Creating and Using a Camera Obscura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinnell, Justin

    2012-01-01

    The camera obscura (Latin for "darkened room") is the earliest optical device and goes back over 2500 years. The small pinhole or lens at the front of the room allows light to enter and this is then "projected" onto a screen inside the room. This differs from a camera, which projects its image onto light-sensitive material.…

  19. Fazendo 3d com uma camera so

    CERN Document Server

    Lunazzi, J J

    2010-01-01

    A simple system to make stereo photography or videos based in just two mirrors was made in 1989 and recently adapted to a digital camera setup. Um sistema simples para fazer fotografia ou videos em estereo baseado em dois espelhos que dividem o campo da imagem foi criado no ano 1989, e recentemente adaptado para camera digital.

  20. Cameras Monitor Spacecraft Integrity to Prevent Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory contracted Malin Space Science Systems Inc. to outfit Curiosity with four of its cameras using the latest commercial imaging technology. The company parlayed the knowledge gained under working with NASA to develop an off-the-shelf line of cameras, along with a digital video recorder, designed to help troubleshoot problems that may arise on satellites in space.

  1. Testing a novel method for improving wayfinding by means of a P3b Virtual Reality Visual Paradigm in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Ricci, Katia; Delussi, Marianna; Montemurno, Anna; Vecchio, Eleonora; Brunetti, Antonio; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio

    2016-01-01

    We propose a virtual reality (VR) model, reproducing a house environment, where color modification of target places, obtainable by home automation in a real ambient, was tested by means of a P3b paradigm. The target place (bathroom door) was designed to be recognized during a virtual wayfinding in a realistic reproduction of a house environment. Different color and luminous conditions, easily obtained in the real ambient from a remote home automation control, were applied to the target and standard places, all the doors being illuminated in white (W), and only target doors colored with a green (G) or red (R) spotlight. Three different Virtual Environments (VE) were depicted, as the bathroom was designed in the aisle (A), living room (L) and bedroom (B). EEG was recorded from 57 scalp electrodes in 10 healthy subjects in the 60-80 year age range (O-old group) and 12 normal cases in the 20-30 year age range (Y-young group). In Young group, all the target stimuli determined a significant increase in P3b amplitude on the parietal, occipital and central electrodes compared to frequent stimuli condition, whatever was the color of the target door, while in elderly group the P3b obtained by the green and red colors was significantly different from the frequent stimulus, on the parietal, occipital, and central derivations, while the White stimulus did not evoke a significantly larger P3b with respect to frequent stimulus. The modulation of P3b amplitude, obtained by color and luminance change of target place, suggests that cortical resources, able to compensate the age-related progressive loss of cognitive performance, need to be facilitated even in normal elderly. The event-related responses obtained by virtual reality may be a reliable method to test the environmental feasibility to age-related cognitive changes.

  2. Incremental activity modeling in multiple disjoint cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Chen Change; Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2012-09-01

    Activity modeling and unusual event detection in a network of cameras is challenging, particularly when the camera views are not overlapped. We show that it is possible to detect unusual events in multiple disjoint cameras as context-incoherent patterns through incremental learning of time delayed dependencies between distributed local activities observed within and across camera views. Specifically, we model multicamera activities using a Time Delayed Probabilistic Graphical Model (TD-PGM) with different nodes representing activities in different decomposed regions from different views and the directed links between nodes encoding their time delayed dependencies. To deal with visual context changes, we formulate a novel incremental learning method for modeling time delayed dependencies that change over time. We validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using a synthetic data set and videos captured from a camera network installed at a busy underground station.

  3. Dust on Mars from MSL Engineering Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Chen, Hao; Sanchez-Lavega, A.; Perez-Hoyos, Santiago

    2017-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) EngineeringCameras were designed for supporting the rover surface operations. Thenavigation camera has a field of view of 45 square degrees, while the hazardavoidance camera, located at the front and rear of the rover and pointingdownwards, counts with a 124 square degrees field of view. Their imagedatabase and sky coverage provides useful information for characterising thedust aerosol physical properties at Gale Crater, complementing the dataretrieved from scientific cameras. In this work, we have reviewed andcalibrated the images from the MSL engineering cameras. The atmosphereextinction values database has been extended. Observations at low scatteringangle have been used to reproduce the dust forward scattering peak and thedust size distribution has been inferred from the sky brightness measurementsusing a discrete ordinates radiative transfer code.

  4. Stereo Cameras for Clouds (STEREOCAM) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oktem, Rusen [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-10-31

    The three pairs of stereo camera setups aim to provide synchronized and stereo calibrated time series of images that can be used for 3D cloud mask reconstruction. Each camera pair is positioned at approximately 120 degrees from the other pair, with a 17o-19o pitch angle from the ground, and at 5-6 km distance from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Central Facility at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) observatory to cover the region from northeast, northwest, and southern views. Images from both cameras of the same stereo setup can be paired together to obtain 3D reconstruction by triangulation. 3D reconstructions from the ring of three stereo pairs can be combined together to generate a 3D mask from surrounding views. This handbook delivers all stereo reconstruction parameters of the cameras necessary to make 3D reconstructions from the stereo camera images.

  5. Lessons Learned from Crime Caught on Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasco, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The widespread use of camera surveillance in public places offers criminologists the opportunity to systematically and unobtrusively observe crime, their main subject matter. The purpose of this essay is to inform the reader of current developments in research on crimes caught on camera. Methods: We address the importance of direct observation of behavior and review criminological studies that used observational methods, with and without cameras, including the ones published in this issue. We also discuss the uses of camera recordings in other social sciences and in biology. Results: We formulate six key insights that emerge from the literature and make recommendations for future research. Conclusions: Camera recordings of real-life crime are likely to become part of the criminological tool kit that will help us better understand the situational and interactional elements of crime. Like any source, it has limitations that are best addressed by triangulation with other sources. PMID:29472728

  6. Gamma camera performance: technical assessment protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolster, A.A. [West Glasgow Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Physics; Waddington, W.A. [University College London Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom). Inst. of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-12-31

    This protocol addresses the performance assessment of single and dual headed gamma cameras. No attempt is made to assess the performance of any associated computing systems. Evaluations are usually performed on a gamma camera commercially available within the United Kingdom and recently installed at a clinical site. In consultation with the manufacturer, GCAT selects the site and liaises with local staff to arrange a mutually convenient time for assessment. The manufacturer is encouraged to have a representative present during the evaluation. Three to four days are typically required for the evaluation team to perform the necessary measurements. When access time is limited, the team will modify the protocol to test the camera as thoroughly as possible. Data are acquired on the camera`s computer system and are subsequently transferred to the independent GCAT computer system for analysis. This transfer from site computer to the independent system is effected via a hardware interface and Interfile data transfer. (author).

  7. VLSI-distributed architectures for smart cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Wayne H.

    2001-03-01

    Smart cameras use video/image processing algorithms to capture images as objects, not as pixels. This paper describes architectures for smart cameras that take advantage of VLSI to improve the capabilities and performance of smart camera systems. Advances in VLSI technology aid in the development of smart cameras in two ways. First, VLSI allows us to integrate large amounts of processing power and memory along with image sensors. CMOS sensors are rapidly improving in performance, allowing us to integrate sensors, logic, and memory on the same chip. As we become able to build chips with hundreds of millions of transistors, we will be able to include powerful multiprocessors on the same chip as the image sensors. We call these image sensor/multiprocessor systems image processors. Second, VLSI allows us to put a large number of these powerful sensor/processor systems on a single scene. VLSI factories will produce large quantities of these image processors, making it cost-effective to use a large number of them in a single location. Image processors will be networked into distributed cameras that use many sensors as well as the full computational resources of all the available multiprocessors. Multiple cameras make a number of image recognition tasks easier: we can select the best view of an object, eliminate occlusions, and use 3D information to improve the accuracy of object recognition. This paper outlines approaches to distributed camera design: architectures for image processors and distributed cameras; algorithms to run on distributed smart cameras, and applications of which VLSI distributed camera systems.

  8. Optimising Camera Traps for Monitoring Small Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glen, Alistair S.; Cockburn, Stuart; Nichols, Margaret; Ekanayake, Jagath; Warburton, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Practical techniques are required to monitor invasive animals, which are often cryptic and occur at low density. Camera traps have potential for this purpose, but may have problems detecting and identifying small species. A further challenge is how to standardise the size of each camera’s field of view so capture rates are comparable between different places and times. We investigated the optimal specifications for a low-cost camera trap for small mammals. The factors tested were 1) trigger speed, 2) passive infrared vs. microwave sensor, 3) white vs. infrared flash, and 4) still photographs vs. video. We also tested a new approach to standardise each camera’s field of view. We compared the success rates of four camera trap designs in detecting and taking recognisable photographs of captive stoats (Mustelaerminea), feral cats (Felis catus) and hedgehogs (Erinaceuseuropaeus). Trigger speeds of 0.2–2.1 s captured photographs of all three target species unless the animal was running at high speed. The camera with a microwave sensor was prone to false triggers, and often failed to trigger when an animal moved in front of it. A white flash produced photographs that were more readily identified to species than those obtained under infrared light. However, a white flash may be more likely to frighten target animals, potentially affecting detection probabilities. Video footage achieved similar success rates to still cameras but required more processing time and computer memory. Placing two camera traps side by side achieved a higher success rate than using a single camera. Camera traps show considerable promise for monitoring invasive mammal control operations. Further research should address how best to standardise the size of each camera’s field of view, maximise the probability that an animal encountering a camera trap will be detected, and eliminate visible or audible cues emitted by camera traps. PMID:23840790

  9. NIR Camera/spectrograph: TEQUILA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, E.; Sohn, E.; Cruz-Gonzalez, I.; Salas, L.; Parraga, A.; Torres, R.; Perez, M.; Cobos, F.; Tejada, C.; Iriarte, A.

    1998-11-01

    We describe the configuration and operation modes of the IR camera/spectrograph called TEQUILA, based on a 1024X1024 HgCdTe FPA (HAWAII). The optical system will allow three possible modes of operation: direct imaging, low and medium resolution spectroscopy and polarimetry. The basic system is being designed to consist of the following: 1) A LN$_2$ dewar that allocates the FPA together with the preamplifiers and a 24 filter position cylinder. 2) Control and readout electronics based on DSP modules linked to a workstation through fiber optics. 3) An optomechanical assembly cooled to -30oC that provides an efficient operation of the instrument in its various modes. 4) A control module for the moving parts of the instrument. The opto-mechanical assembly will have the necessary provisions to install a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer and an adaptive optics correction system. The final image acquisition and control of the whole instrument is carried out in a workstation to provide the observer with a friendly environment. The system will operate at the 2.1 m telescope at the Observatorio Astronomico Nacional in San Pedro Martir, B.C. (Mexico), and is intended to be a first-light instrument for the new 7.8 m Mexican Infrared-Optical Telescope (TIM).

  10. Keck Autoguider and Camera Server Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, W. F.

    On the Keck telescope, autoguiders are not tightly integrated into the telescope control system; an autoguider is just an instrument which happens to have been asked to send guide star positions to the telescope. A standard message interface has been defined, and any source of guide star positions which adheres to this interface can play the role of the autoguider. This means that it would be easy for science instruments with fast readout rates (this of course includes all thermal infra-red instruments) to provide guide star positions. Much of an autoguider's user interface and control logic is independent of the actual source of the guide star positions. Accordingly the Keck telescope has defined an internal ``camera server'' protocol which is used by camera-independent high-level autoguider software to control physical cameras. As yet this protocol is only supported by one type of camera (the Photometrics camera which is used for all Keck autoguiders). Support for other types of camera, for example an infra-red camera, is planned. The poster display will illustrate the Keck approach to autoguiding, will show some of the advantages and disadvantages of the Keck approach, and will discuss future plans.

  11. Uav Cameras: Overview and Geometric Calibration Benchmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, M.; Przybilla, H.-J.; Zurhorst, A.

    2017-08-01

    Different UAV platforms and sensors are used in mapping already, many of them equipped with (sometimes) modified cameras as known from the consumer market. Even though these systems normally fulfil their requested mapping accuracy, the question arises, which system performs best? This asks for a benchmark, to check selected UAV based camera systems in well-defined, reproducible environments. Such benchmark is tried within this work here. Nine different cameras used on UAV platforms, representing typical camera classes, are considered. The focus is laid on the geometry here, which is tightly linked to the process of geometrical calibration of the system. In most applications the calibration is performed in-situ, i.e. calibration parameters are obtained as part of the project data itself. This is often motivated because consumer cameras do not keep constant geometry, thus, cannot be seen as metric cameras. Still, some of the commercial systems are quite stable over time, as it was proven from repeated (terrestrial) calibrations runs. Already (pre-)calibrated systems may offer advantages, especially when the block geometry of the project does not allow for a stable and sufficient in-situ calibration. Especially for such scenario close to metric UAV cameras may have advantages. Empirical airborne test flights in a calibration field have shown how block geometry influences the estimated calibration parameters and how consistent the parameters from lab calibration can be reproduced.

  12. Towards next generation 3D cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit

    2017-03-01

    We are in the midst of a 3D revolution. Robots enabled by 3D cameras are beginning to autonomously drive cars, perform surgeries, and manage factories. However, when deployed in the real-world, these cameras face several challenges that prevent them from measuring 3D shape reliably. These challenges include large lighting variations (bright sunlight to dark night), presence of scattering media (fog, body tissue), and optically complex materials (metal, plastic). Due to these factors, 3D imaging is often the bottleneck in widespread adoption of several key robotics technologies. I will talk about our work on developing 3D cameras based on time-of-flight and active triangulation that addresses these long-standing problems. This includes designing `all-weather' cameras that can perform high-speed 3D scanning in harsh outdoor environments, as well as cameras that recover shape of objects with challenging material properties. These cameras are, for the first time, capable of measuring detailed (<100 microns resolution) scans in extremely demanding scenarios with low-cost components. Several of these cameras are making a practical impact in industrial automation, being adopted in robotic inspection and assembly systems.

  13. First results from the TOPSAT camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Paul; Tosh, Ian; Morris, Nigel; Burton, Gary; Cawley, Steve

    2017-11-01

    The TopSat camera is a low cost remote sensing imager capable of producing 2.5 metre resolution panchromatic imagery, funded by the British National Space Centre's Mosaic programme. The instrument was designed and assembled at the Space Science & Technology Department of the CCLRC's Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK, and was launched on the 27th October 2005 from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia on a Kosmos-3M. The camera utilises an off-axis three mirror system, which has the advantages of excellent image quality over a wide field of view, combined with a compactness that makes its overall dimensions smaller than its focal length. Keeping the costs to a minimum has been a major design driver in the development of this camera. The camera is part of the TopSat mission, which is a collaboration between four UK organisations; QinetiQ, Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL), RAL and Infoterra. Its objective is to demonstrate provision of rapid response high resolution imagery to fixed and mobile ground stations using a low cost minisatellite. The paper "Development of the TopSat Camera" presented by RAL at the 5th ICSO in 2004 described the opto-mechanical design, assembly, alignment and environmental test methods implemented. Now that the spacecraft is in orbit and successfully acquiring images, this paper presents the first results from the camera and makes an initial assessment of the camera's in-orbit performance.

  14. Adapting virtual camera behaviour through player modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2015-01-01

    a novel approach to virtual camera control, which builds upon camera control and player modelling to provide the user with an adaptive point-of-view. To achieve this goal, we propose a methodology to model the player’s preferences on virtual camera movements and we employ the resulting models to tailor...... the viewpoint movements to the player type and her game-play style. Ultimately, the methodology is applied to a 3D platform game and is evaluated through a controlled experiment; the results suggest that the resulting adaptive cinematographic experience is favoured by some player types and it can generate...

  15. Lessons Learned from Crime Caught on Camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Rosenkrantz; Bernasco, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: The widespread use of camera surveillance in public places offers criminologists the opportunity to systematically and unobtrusively observe crime, their main subject matter. The purpose of this essay is to inform the reader of current developments in research on crimes caught on camera...... formulate six key insights that emerge from the literature and make recommendations for future research. Conclusions: Camera recordings of real-life crime are likely to become part of the criminological tool kit that will help us better understand the situational and interactional elements of crime. Like...

  16. Modelling Virtual Camera Behaviour Through Player Gaze

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picardi, Andrea; Burelli, Paolo; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    industry and game AI research focus on the devel- opment of increasingly sophisticated systems to automate the control of the virtual camera integrating artificial intel- ligence algorithms within physical simulations. However, in both industry and academia little research has been carried out...... on the relationship between virtual camera, game-play and player behaviour. We run a game user experiment to shed some light on this relationship and identify relevant dif- ferences between camera behaviours through different game sessions, playing behaviours and player gaze patterns. Re- sults show that users can...

  17. A Dataset for Camera Independent Color Constancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytekin, Caglar; Nikkanen, Jarno; Gabbouj, Moncef

    2017-10-17

    In this paper, we provide a novel dataset designed for camera independent color constancy research. Camera independence corresponds to the robustness of an algorithm's performance when run on images of the same scene taken by different cameras. Accordingly, the images in our database correspond to several lab and field scenes each of which is captured by three different cameras with minimal registration errors. The lab scenes are also captured under five different illuminations. The spectral responses of cameras and the spectral power distributions of the lab light sources are also provided, as they may prove beneficial for training future algorithms to achieve color constancy. For a fair evaluation of future methods, we provide guidelines for supervised methods with indicated training, validation and testing partitions. Accordingly, we evaluate two recently proposed convolutional neural network based color constancy algorithms as baselines for future research. As a side contribution, this dataset also includes images taken by a mobile camera with color shading corrected and uncorrected results. This allows research on the effect of color shading as well.In this paper, we provide a novel dataset designed for camera independent color constancy research. Camera independence corresponds to the robustness of an algorithm's performance when run on images of the same scene taken by different cameras. Accordingly, the images in our database correspond to several lab and field scenes each of which is captured by three different cameras with minimal registration errors. The lab scenes are also captured under five different illuminations. The spectral responses of cameras and the spectral power distributions of the lab light sources are also provided, as they may prove beneficial for training future algorithms to achieve color constancy. For a fair evaluation of future methods, we provide guidelines for supervised methods with indicated training, validation and testing

  18. Mobile Technology for Improved Family Planning (MOTIF): the development of a mobile phone-based (mHealth) intervention to support post-abortion family planning (PAFP) in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Chris; Vannak, Uk; Sokhey, Ly; Ngo, Thoai D; Gold, Judy; Free, Caroline

    2016-01-05

    The objective of this paper is to outline the formative research process used to develop the MOTIF mobile phone-based (mHealth) intervention to support post-abortion family planning in Cambodia. The formative research process involved literature reviews, interviews and focus group discussions with clients, and consultation with clinicians and organisations implementing mHealth activities in Cambodia. This process led to the development of a conceptual framework and the intervention. Key findings from the formative research included identification of the main reasons for non-use of contraception and patterns of mobile phone use in Cambodia. We drew on components of existing interventions and behaviour change theory to develop a conceptual framework. A multi-faceted voice-based intervention was designed to address health concerns and other key determinants of contraception use. Formative research was essential in order to develop an appropriate mHealth intervention to support post-abortion contraception in Cambodia. Each component of the formative research contributed to the final intervention design.

  19. MIOTIC study: a prospective, multicenter, randomized study to evaluate the long-term efficacy of mobile phone-based Internet of Things in the management of patients with stable COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Yuan-Lin; Bai, Chun-Xue

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common disease that leads to huge economic and social burden. Efficient and effective management of stable COPD is essential to improve quality of life and reduce medical expenditure. The Internet of Things (IoT), a recent breakthrough in communication technology, seems promising in improving health care delivery, but its potential strengths in COPD management remain poorly understood. We have developed a mobile phone-based IoT (mIoT) platform and initiated a randomized, multicenter, controlled trial entitled the 'MIOTIC study' to investigate the influence of mIoT among stable COPD patients. In the MIOTIC study, at least 600 patients with stable GOLD group C or D COPD and with a history of at least two moderate-to-severe exacerbations within the previous year will be randomly allocated to the control group, which receives routine follow-up, or the intervention group, which receives mIoT management. Endpoints of the study include (1) frequency and severity of acute exacerbation; (2) symptomatic evaluation; (3) pre- and post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) measurement; (4) exercise capacity; and (5) direct medical cost per year. Results from this study should provide direct evidence for the suitability of mIoT in stable COPD patient management.

  20. Camera Based Navigation System with Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays smart mobile devices have enough processing power, memory, storage and always connected wireless communication bandwidth that makes them available for any type of application. Augmented reality (AR proposes a new type of applications that tries to enhance the real world by superimposing or combining virtual objects or computer generated information with it. In this paper we present a camera based navigation system with augmented reality integration. The proposed system aims to the following: the user points the camera of the smartphone towards a point of interest, like a building or any other place, and the application searches for relevant information about that specific place and superimposes the data over the video feed on the display. When the user moves the camera away, changing its orientation, the data changes as well, in real-time, with the proper information about the place that is now in the camera view.

  1. CALIBRATION PROCEDURES ON OBLIQUE CAMERA SETUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kemper

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna –IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first

  2. Calibration Procedures on Oblique Camera Setups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, G.; Melykuti, B.; Yu, C.

    2016-06-01

    Beside the creation of virtual animated 3D City models, analysis for homeland security and city planning, the accurately determination of geometric features out of oblique imagery is an important task today. Due to the huge number of single images the reduction of control points force to make use of direct referencing devices. This causes a precise camera-calibration and additional adjustment procedures. This paper aims to show the workflow of the various calibration steps and will present examples of the calibration flight with the final 3D City model. In difference to most other software, the oblique cameras are used not as co-registered sensors in relation to the nadir one, all camera images enter the AT process as single pre-oriented data. This enables a better post calibration in order to detect variations in the single camera calibration and other mechanical effects. The shown sensor (Oblique Imager) is based o 5 Phase One cameras were the nadir one has 80 MPIX equipped with a 50 mm lens while the oblique ones capture images with 50 MPix using 80 mm lenses. The cameras are mounted robust inside a housing to protect this against physical and thermal deformations. The sensor head hosts also an IMU which is connected to a POS AV GNSS Receiver. The sensor is stabilized by a gyro-mount which creates floating Antenna -IMU lever arms. They had to be registered together with the Raw GNSS-IMU Data. The camera calibration procedure was performed based on a special calibration flight with 351 shoots of all 5 cameras and registered the GPS/IMU data. This specific mission was designed in two different altitudes with additional cross lines on each flying heights. The five images from each exposure positions have no overlaps but in the block there are many overlaps resulting in up to 200 measurements per points. On each photo there were in average 110 well distributed measured points which is a satisfying number for the camera calibration. In a first step with the help of

  3. POLICE BODY CAMERAS: SEEING MAY BE BELIEVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Otu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available While the concept of body-mounted cameras (BMC worn by police officers is a controversial issue, it is not new. Since in the early-2000s, police departments across the United States, England, Brazil, and Australia have been implementing wearable cameras. Like all devices used in policing, body-mounted cameras can create a sense of increased power, but also additional responsibilities for both the agencies and individual officers. This paper examines the public debate regarding body-mounted cameras. The conclusions drawn show that while these devices can provide information about incidents relating to police–citizen encounters, and can deter citizen and police misbehavior, these devices can also violate a citizen’s privacy rights. This paper outlines several ramifications for practice as well as implications for policy.

  4. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  5. Camera vibration measurement using blinking light-emitting diode array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Kazuki; Matsuda, Yuichi

    2017-01-23

    We present a new method for measuring camera vibrations such as camera shake and shutter shock. This method successfully detects the vibration trajectory and transient waveforms from the camera image itself. We employ a time-varying pattern as the camera test chart over the conventional static pattern. This pattern is implemented using a specially developed blinking light-emitting-diode array. We describe the theoretical framework and pattern analysis of the camera image for measuring camera vibrations. Our verification experiments show that our method has a detection accuracy and sensitivity of 0.1 pixels, and is robust against image distortion. Measurement results of camera vibrations in commercial cameras are also demonstrated.

  6. A stereoscopic lens for digital cinema cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Lenny; Rupkalvis, John

    2015-03-01

    Live-action stereoscopic feature films are, for the most part, produced using a costly post-production process to convert planar cinematography into stereo-pair images and are only occasionally shot stereoscopically using bulky dual-cameras that are adaptations of the Ramsdell rig. The stereoscopic lens design described here might very well encourage more live-action image capture because it uses standard digital cinema cameras and workflow to save time and money.

  7. MCP gated x-ray framing camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Houzhi; Liu, Jinyuan; Niu, Lihong; Liao, Hua; Zhou, Junlan

    2009-11-01

    A four-frame gated microchannel plate (MCP) camera is described in this article. Each frame photocathode coated with gold on the MCP is part of a transmission line with open circuit end driven by the gating electrical pulse. The gating pulse is 230 ps in width and 2.5 kV in amplitude. The camera is tested by illuminating its photocathode with ultraviolet laser pulses, 266 nm in wavelength, which shows exposure time as short as 80 ps.

  8. Face identification in videos from mobile cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Meiru; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is still challenging to recognize faces reliably in videos from mobile camera, although mature automatic face recognition technology for still images has been available for quite some time. Suppose we want to be alerted when suspects appear in the recording of a police Body-Cam, even a good face matcher on still images would give many false alarms due to the uncontrolled conditions. This paper presents an approach to identify faces in videos from mobile cameras. A commercial face matcher F...

  9. The Use of Camera Traps in Wildlife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasin Uçarlı

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps are increasingly used in the abundance and density estimates of wildlife species. Camera traps are very good alternative for direct observation in case, particularly, steep terrain, dense vegetation covered areas or nocturnal species. The main reason for the use of camera traps is eliminated that the economic, personnel and time loss in a continuous manner at the same time in different points. Camera traps, motion and heat sensitive, can take a photo or video according to the models. Crossover points and feeding or mating areas of the focal species are addressed as a priority camera trap set locations. The population size can be finding out by the images combined with Capture-Recapture methods. The population density came out the population size divided to effective sampling area size. Mating and breeding season, habitat choice, group structures and survival rates of the focal species can be achieved from the images. Camera traps are very useful to obtain the necessary data about the particularly mysterious species with economically in planning and conservation efforts.

  10. Minimum Requirements for Taxicab Security Cameras*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shengke; Amandus, Harlan E.; Amendola, Alfred A.; Newbraugh, Bradley H.; Cantis, Douglas M.; Weaver, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    Problem The homicide rate of taxicab-industry is 20 times greater than that of all workers. A NIOSH study showed that cities with taxicab-security cameras experienced significant reduction in taxicab driver homicides. Methods Minimum technical requirements and a standard test protocol for taxicab-security cameras for effective taxicab-facial identification were determined. The study took more than 10,000 photographs of human-face charts in a simulated-taxicab with various photographic resolutions, dynamic ranges, lens-distortions, and motion-blurs in various light and cab-seat conditions. Thirteen volunteer photograph-evaluators evaluated these face photographs and voted for the minimum technical requirements for taxicab-security cameras. Results Five worst-case scenario photographic image quality thresholds were suggested: the resolution of XGA-format, highlight-dynamic-range of 1 EV, twilight-dynamic-range of 3.3 EV, lens-distortion of 30%, and shutter-speed of 1/30 second. Practical Applications These minimum requirements will help taxicab regulators and fleets to identify effective taxicab-security cameras, and help taxicab-security camera manufacturers to improve the camera facial identification capability. PMID:26823992

  11. Low light performance of digital still cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wueller, Dietmar

    2013-03-01

    The major difference between a dSLR camera, a consumer camera, and a camera in a mobile device is the sensor size. The sensor size is also related to the over all system size including the lens. With the sensors getting smaller the individual light sensitive areas are also getting smaller leaving less light falling onto each of the pixels. This effect requires higher signal amplification that leads to higher noise levels or other problems that may occur due to denoising algorithms. These Problems become more visible at low light conditions because of the lower signal levels. The fact that the sensitivity of cameras decreases makes customers ask for a standardized way to measure low light performance of cameras. The CEA (Consumer Electronics Association) together with ANSI has addressed this for camcorders in the CEA-639 [1] standard. The ISO technical committee 42 (photography) is currently also thinking about a potential standard on this topic for still picture cameras. This paper is part of the preparation work for this standardization activity and addresses the differences compared to camcorders and also potential additional problems with noise reduction that have occurred over the past few years. The result of this paper is a proposed test procedure with a few open questions that have to be answered in future work.

  12. Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuefer, Martin [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Bailey, J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) takes 9- to 37-micron resolution stereographic photographs of free-falling hydrometers from three angles, while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Information about hydrometeor size, shape orientation, and aspect ratio is derived from MASC photographs. The instrument consists of three commercial cameras separated by angles of 36º. Each camera field of view is aligned to have a common single focus point about 10 cm distant from the cameras. Two near-infrared emitter pairs are aligned with the camera’s field of view within a 10-angular ring and detect hydrometeor passage, with the lower emitters configured to trigger the MASC cameras. The sensitive IR motion sensors are designed to filter out slow variations in ambient light. Fall speed is derived from successive triggers along the fall path. The camera exposure times are extremely short, in the range of 1/25,000th of a second, enabling the MASC to capture snowflake sizes ranging from 30 micrometers to 3 cm.

  13. CALIBRATION PROCEDURES IN MID FORMAT CAMERA SETUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pivnicka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of mid-format cameras are used for aerial surveying projects. To achieve a reliable and geometrically precise result also in the photogrammetric workflow, awareness on the sensitive parts is important. The use of direct referencing systems (GPS/IMU, the mounting on a stabilizing camera platform and the specific values of the mid format camera make a professional setup with various calibration and misalignment operations necessary. An important part is to have a proper camera calibration. Using aerial images over a well designed test field with 3D structures and/or different flight altitudes enable the determination of calibration values in Bingo software. It will be demonstrated how such a calibration can be performed. The direct referencing device must be mounted in a solid and reliable way to the camera. Beside the mechanical work especially in mounting the camera beside the IMU, 2 lever arms have to be measured in mm accuracy. Important are the lever arms from the GPS Antenna to the IMU's calibrated centre and also the lever arm from the IMU centre to the Camera projection centre. In fact, the measurement with a total station is not a difficult task but the definition of the right centres and the need for using rotation matrices can cause serious accuracy problems. The benefit of small and medium format cameras is that also smaller aircrafts can be used. Like that, a gyro bases stabilized platform is recommended. This causes, that the IMU must be mounted beside the camera on the stabilizer. The advantage is, that the IMU can be used to control the platform, the problematic thing is, that the IMU to GPS antenna lever arm is floating. In fact we have to deal with an additional data stream, the values of the movement of the stabiliser to correct the floating lever arm distances. If the post-processing of the GPS-IMU data by taking the floating levers into account, delivers an expected result, the lever arms between IMU and

  14. New developments to improve SO2 cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebcke, P.; Bobrowski, N.; Hoermann, C.; Kern, C.; Klein, A.; Kuhn, J.; Vogel, L.; Platt, U.

    2012-12-01

    The SO2 camera is a remote sensing instrument that measures the two-dimensional distribution of SO2 (column densities) in volcanic plumes using scattered solar radiation as a light source. From these data SO2-fluxes can be derived. The high time resolution of the order of 1 Hz allows correlating SO2 flux measurements with other traditional volcanological measurement techniques, i.e., seismology. In the last years the application of SO2 cameras has increased, however, there is still potential to improve the instrumentation. First of all, the influence of aerosols and ash in the volcanic plume can lead to large errors in the calculated SO2 flux, if not accounted for. We present two different concepts to deal with the influence of ash and aerosols. The first approach uses a co-axial DOAS system that was added to a two filter SO2 camera. The camera used Filter A (peak transmission centred around 315 nm) to measures the optical density of SO2 and Filter B (centred around 330 nm) to correct for the influence of ash and aerosol. The DOAS system simultaneously performs spectroscopic measurements in a small area of the camera's field of view and gives additional information to correct for these effects. Comparing the optical densities for the two filters with the SO2 column density from the DOAS allows not only a much more precise calibration, but also to draw conclusions about the influence from ash and aerosol scattering. Measurement examples from Popocatépetl, Mexico in 2011 are shown and interpreted. Another approach combines the SO2 camera measurement principle with the extremely narrow and periodic transmission of a Fabry-Pérot interferometer. The narrow transmission window allows to select individual SO2 absorption bands (or series of bands) as a substitute for Filter A. Measurements are therefore more selective to SO2. Instead of Filter B, as in classical SO2 cameras, the correction for aerosol can be performed by shifting the transmission window of the Fabry

  15. Dental shade matching using a digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, W K; Lee, H J

    2012-12-01

    Digital cameras could be substitutes for contact-type instruments in shade selection and overcome their drawbacks. The images taken show morphology and color texture of teeth. A new method was proposed to compare the color of shade tabs taken by a digital camera using appropriate color features. Vita 3D-MASTER shade guide and Canon EOS 1100D digital camera were employed. Shade tab images were compared in two reference strategies. The color of tooth surface was presented by a content manually cropped out of the image. The content was divided into 10 × 2 blocks to encode the color distribution. Color features from commonly used color spaces were evaluated. The top n matches were selected when the least n shade distances between the shade tabs were attained. Using Sa*b* features, the top one accuracy was 0.87, where the feature S is defined in HSV color space, a* and b* features are defined in L*a*b* color space. This rate was higher than previous reports using contact-type instruments. The top three matching accuracy was 0.94. Sa*b* were suitable features for shade matching using a digital cameras in this study. Both the color and texture of the tooth surface could be presented by the proposed content-based descriptor. Clinical use of digital cameras in shade matching became possible. This in vitro study proposed a method for shade matching using digital cameras through the comparisons of the color patterns on the shade tab surfaces. The method overcame some drawbacks from the devices such as colorimeters or spectrophotometers. The results supported the use of digital cameras in shade matching. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comments on Meo et al. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2015, 12, 14519–14528

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Alireza Mortazavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With great interest and enthusiasm, we have read the article by Meo et al. entitled “Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus” that is published in the latest issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health [1].[...

  17. How to Build Your Own Document Camera for around $100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Document cameras can have great utility in second language classrooms. However, entry-level consumer document cameras start at around $350. This article describes how the author built three document cameras and offers suggestions for how teachers can successfully build their own quality document camera using a webcam for around $100.

  18. 16 CFR 1025.45 - In camera materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false In camera materials. 1025.45 Section 1025.45... PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 1025.45 In camera materials. (a) Definition. In camera materials are documents... excluded from the public record. (b) In camera treatment of documents and testimony. The Presiding Officer...

  19. Model based scattering correction in time-of-flight cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Henrik; Lenzen, Frank; Garbe, Christoph S

    2014-12-01

    In-camera light scattering is a systematic error of Time-of-Flight depth cameras that significantly reduces the accuracy of the systems. A completely new model is presented, based on raw data calibration and only one additional intrinsic camera parameter. It is shown that the approach effectively removes the errors of in-camera light scattering.

  20. [Analog gamma camera digitalization computer system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, G M; Quintana, J C; Jer, J; Astudillo, S; Arenas, L; Araya, H

    2004-01-01

    Digitalization of analogue gamma cameras systems, using special acquisition boards in microcomputers and appropriate software for acquisition and processing of nuclear medicine images is described in detail. Microcomputer integrated systems interconnected by means of a Local Area Network (LAN) and connected to several gamma cameras have been implemented using specialized acquisition boards. The PIP software (Portable Image Processing) was installed on each microcomputer to acquire and preprocess the nuclear medicine images. A specialized image processing software has been designed and developed for these purposes. This software allows processing of each nuclear medicine exam, in a semiautomatic procedure, and recording of the results on radiological films. . A stable, flexible and inexpensive system which makes it possible to digitize, visualize, process, and print nuclear medicine images obtained from analogue gamma cameras was implemented in the Nuclear Medicine Division. Such a system yields higher quality images than those obtained with analogue cameras while keeping operating costs considerably lower (filming: 24.6%, fixing 48.2% and developing 26%.) Analogue gamma camera systems can be digitalized economically. This system makes it possible to obtain optimal clinical quality nuclear medicine images, to increase the acquisition and processing efficiency, and to reduce the steps involved in each exam.

  1. Calibration of action cameras for photogrammetric purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balletti, Caterina; Guerra, Francesco; Tsioukas, Vassilios; Vernier, Paolo

    2014-09-18

    The use of action cameras for photogrammetry purposes is not widespread due to the fact that until recently the images provided by the sensors, using either still or video capture mode, were not big enough to perform and provide the appropriate analysis with the necessary photogrammetric accuracy. However, several manufacturers have recently produced and released new lightweight devices which are: (a) easy to handle, (b) capable of performing under extreme conditions and more importantly (c) able to provide both still images and video sequences of high resolution. In order to be able to use the sensor of action cameras we must apply a careful and reliable self-calibration prior to the use of any photogrammetric procedure, a relatively difficult scenario because of the short focal length of the camera and its wide angle lens that is used to obtain the maximum possible resolution of images. Special software, using functions of the OpenCV library, has been created to perform both the calibration and the production of undistorted scenes for each one of the still and video image capturing mode of a novel action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 camera that can provide still images up to 12 Mp and video up 8 Mp resolution.

  2. Calibration of Action Cameras for Photogrammetric Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Balletti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of action cameras for photogrammetry purposes is not widespread due to the fact that until recently the images provided by the sensors, using either still or video capture mode, were not big enough to perform and provide the appropriate analysis with the necessary photogrammetric accuracy. However, several manufacturers have recently produced and released new lightweight devices which are: (a easy to handle, (b capable of performing under extreme conditions and more importantly (c able to provide both still images and video sequences of high resolution. In order to be able to use the sensor of action cameras we must apply a careful and reliable self-calibration prior to the use of any photogrammetric procedure, a relatively difficult scenario because of the short focal length of the camera and its wide angle lens that is used to obtain the maximum possible resolution of images. Special software, using functions of the OpenCV library, has been created to perform both the calibration and the production of undistorted scenes for each one of the still and video image capturing mode of a novel action camera, the GoPro Hero 3 camera that can provide still images up to 12 Mp and video up 8 Mp resolution.

  3. Wired and Wireless Camera Triggering with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauhanen, H.; Rönnholm, P.

    2017-10-01

    Synchronous triggering is an important task that allows simultaneous data capture from multiple cameras. Accurate synchronization enables 3D measurements of moving objects or from a moving platform. In this paper, we describe one wired and four wireless variations of Arduino-based low-cost remote trigger systems designed to provide a synchronous trigger signal for industrial cameras. Our wireless systems utilize 315 MHz or 434 MHz frequencies with noise filtering capacitors. In order to validate the synchronization accuracy, we developed a prototype of a rotating trigger detection system (named RoTriDeS). This system is suitable to detect the triggering accuracy of global shutter cameras. As a result, the wired system indicated an 8.91 μs mean triggering time difference between two cameras. Corresponding mean values for the four wireless triggering systems varied between 7.92 and 9.42 μs. Presented values include both camera-based and trigger-based desynchronization. Arduino-based triggering systems appeared to be feasible, and they have the potential to be extended to more complicated triggering systems.

  4. Designing Camera Networks by Convex Quadratic Programming

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard

    2015-05-04

    ​In this paper, we study the problem of automatic camera placement for computer graphics and computer vision applications. We extend the problem formulations of previous work by proposing a novel way to incorporate visibility constraints and camera-to-camera relationships. For example, the placement solution can be encouraged to have cameras that image the same important locations from different viewing directions, which can enable reconstruction and surveillance tasks to perform better. We show that the general camera placement problem can be formulated mathematically as a convex binary quadratic program (BQP) under linear constraints. Moreover, we propose an optimization strategy with a favorable trade-off between speed and solution quality. Our solution is almost as fast as a greedy treatment of the problem, but the quality is significantly higher, so much so that it is comparable to exact solutions that take orders of magnitude more computation time. Because it is computationally attractive, our method also allows users to explore the space of solutions for variations in input parameters. To evaluate its effectiveness, we show a range of 3D results on real-world floorplans (garage, hotel, mall, and airport). ​

  5. Ophthalmic photography using a digital camera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogla Rajesh

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report the application of a digital camera for ophthalmic photography in routine clinical use. Methods: A digital camera (Nikon Coolpix 995 was used both for external macrophotography of the eye and ocular adnexa, and slitlamp photography of the anterior segment of the eye. Results: We were able to take external macrophotographs under high magnification of the eye and ocular adnexa. Slitlamp photography could be performed under diffuse, slit beam, and retroillumination. The structures of the angle, the optic disc and surrounding retina could be photographed using appropriate lenses. The attachment to the operating microscope allowed intra-operative photography. It could also be attached to the laboratory microscope to capture images of various histopathology and microbiology slides. Conclusions: A digital camera is a versatile instrument for ophthalmic photography. It is easy to use in routine clinical practice and provides good quality photographs.

  6. Experiments with synchronized sCMOS cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Iain A.; Jermak, Helen; Copperwheat, Chris M.; Smith, Robert J.; Poshyachinda, Saran; Soonthorntham, Boonrucksar

    2016-07-01

    Scientific-CMOS (sCMOS) cameras can combine low noise with high readout speeds and do not suffer the charge multiplication noise that effectively reduces the quantum efficiency of electron multiplying CCDs by a factor 2. As such they have strong potential in fast photometry and polarimetry instrumentation. In this paper we describe the results of laboratory experiments using a pair of commercial off the shelf sCMOS cameras based around a 4 transistor per pixel architecture. In particular using a both stable and a pulsed light sources we evaluate the timing precision that may be obtained when the cameras readouts are synchronized either in software or electronically. We find that software synchronization can introduce an error of 200-msec. With electronic synchronization any error is below the limit ( 50-msec) of our simple measurement technique.

  7. HIGH SPEED KERR CELL FRAMING CAMERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, W.C.; Gilley, L.F.

    1964-01-01

    The present invention relates to a high speed camera utilizing a Kerr cell shutter and a novel optical delay system having no moving parts. The camera can selectively photograph at least 6 frames within 9 x 10/sup -8/ seconds during any such time interval of an occurring event. The invention utilizes particularly an optical system which views and transmits 6 images of an event to a multi-channeled optical delay relay system. The delay relay system has optical paths of successively increased length in whole multiples of the first channel optical path length, into which optical paths the 6 images are transmitted. The successively delayed images are accepted from the exit of the delay relay system by an optical image focusing means, which in turn directs the images into a Kerr cell shutter disposed to intercept the image paths. A camera is disposed to simultaneously view and record the 6 images during a single exposure of the Kerr cell shutter. (AEC)

  8. Modifications in infrared intraoperative neuromonitoring camera and supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Emily Klerekoper

    2008-09-01

    At my request, modifications were made to the visual oculography (VOG) camera described in the March 2008 article in this journal: "Use of an Infrared Camera to Improve the Outcome of Facial Nerve Monitoring," Am J Electroneurodiagnostic Technol 48.:38-47. The camera now has a wider and a more distant range and a clamp onto a rod. The company (Micromedical Technologies, Inc.) has named the camera the KlereView Camera in honor of my father, Fred Klerekoper.

  9. Vasomotor assessment by camera-based photoplethysmography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trumpp Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Camera-based photoplethysmography (cbPPG is a novel technique that allows the contactless acquisition of cardio-respiratory signals. Previous works on cbPPG most often focused on heart rate extraction. This contribution is directed at the assessment of vasomotor activity by means of cameras. In an experimental study, we show that vasodilation and vasoconstriction both lead to significant changes in cbPPG signals. Our findings underline the potential of cbPPG to monitor vasomotor functions in real-life applications.

  10. Structural optimization of some space camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Wu, Mengyuan; Hu, Bin; Li, Xuyang

    2017-03-01

    Based on some space camera structure as the research subject, the statics analysis and modal analysis were studied using HyperMesh software. With the first order natural frequency being as constraint object, the topology optimization design of the original structure was made using OptiStruct software, which made the static deformation decrease by 42.4%; the fundamental frequency increase by 12.1%, effectively resolving the problem of the vibration of the circuit board components. Some further studies are necessary for the structure design of space camera.

  11. Digital Camera as Gloss Measurement Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihálik A.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays digital cameras with both high resolution and the high dynamic range (HDR can be considered as parallel multiple sensors producing multiple measurements at once. In this paper we describe a technique for processing the captured HDR data and than fit them to theoretical surface reflection models in the form of bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF. Finally, the tabular BRDF can be used to calculate the gloss reflection of the surface. We compare the captured glossiness by digital camera with gloss measured with the industry device and conclude that the results fit well in our experiments.

  12. Camera-enabled techniques for organic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Richard J; O’Brien, Matthew; Browne, Duncan L

    2013-01-01

    Summary A great deal of time is spent within synthetic chemistry laboratories on non-value-adding activities such as sample preparation and work-up operations, and labour intensive activities such as extended periods of continued data collection. Using digital cameras connected to computer vision algorithms, camera-enabled apparatus can perform some of these processes in an automated fashion, allowing skilled chemists to spend their time more productively. In this review we describe recent advances in this field of chemical synthesis and discuss how they will lead to advanced synthesis laboratories of the future. PMID:23766820

  13. Analysis of Brown camera distortion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Artur; Skarbek, Władysław

    2013-10-01

    Contemporary image acquisition devices introduce optical distortion into image. It results in pixel displacement and therefore needs to be compensated for many computer vision applications. The distortion is usually modeled by the Brown distortion model, which parameters can be included in camera calibration task. In this paper we describe original model, its dependencies and analyze orthogonality with regard to radius for its decentering distortion component. We also report experiments with camera calibration algorithm included in OpenCV library, especially a stability of distortion parameters estimation is evaluated.

  14. Increased Automation in Stereo Camera Calibration Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi House

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Robotic vision has become a very popular field in recent years due to the numerous promising applications it may enhance. However, errors within the cameras and in their perception of their environment can cause applications in robotics to fail. To help correct these internal and external imperfections, stereo camera calibrations are performed. There are currently many accurate methods of camera calibration available; however, most or all of them are time consuming and labor intensive. This research seeks to automate the most labor intensive aspects of a popular calibration technique developed by Jean-Yves Bouguet. His process requires manual selection of the extreme corners of a checkerboard pattern. The modified process uses embedded LEDs in the checkerboard pattern to act as active fiducials. Images are captured of the checkerboard with the LEDs on and off in rapid succession. The difference of the two images automatically highlights the location of the four extreme corners, and these corner locations take the place of the manual selections. With this modification to the calibration routine, upwards of eighty mouse clicks are eliminated per stereo calibration. Preliminary test results indicate that accuracy is not substantially affected by the modified procedure. Improved automation to camera calibration procedures may finally penetrate the barriers to the use of calibration in practice.

  15. Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Kee; Pak, Soojong; Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Jeon, Yiseul; Chang, Seunghyuk; Jeong, Hyeonju; Lim, Juhee; Kim, Eunbin

    2012-08-01

    We describe the overall characteristics and the performance of an optical CCD camera system, Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN), which has been used at the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory since 2010 August. CQUEAN was developed for follow-up imaging observations of red sources such as high-redshift quasar candidates (z ≳ 5), gamma-ray bursts, brown dwarfs, and young stellar objects. For efficient observations of the red objects, CQUEAN has a science camera with a deep-depletion CCD chip, which boasts a higher quantum efficiency at 0.7-1.1 μm than conventional CCD chips. The camera was developed in a short timescale () and has been working reliably. By employing an autoguiding system and a focal reducer to enhance the field of view on the classical Cassegrain focus, we achieve a stable guiding in 20 minute exposures, an imaging quality with FWHM≥0.6‧‧ over the whole field (4.8‧ × 4.8‧), and a limiting magnitude of z = 23.4 AB mag at 5-σ with 1 hr total integration time. This article includes data taken at the McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  16. GAMPIX: A new generation of gamma camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmar, M.; Agelou, M.; Carrel, F.; Schoepff, V.

    2011-10-01

    Gamma imaging is a technique of great interest in several fields such as homeland security or decommissioning/dismantling of nuclear facilities in order to localize hot spots of radioactivity. In the nineties, previous works led by CEA LIST resulted in the development of a first generation of gamma camera called CARTOGAM, now commercialized by AREVA CANBERRA. Even if its performances can be adapted to many applications, its weight of 15 kg can be an issue. For several years, CEA LIST has been developing a new generation of gamma camera, called GAMPIX. This system is mainly based on the Medipix2 chip, hybridized to a 1 mm thick CdTe substrate. A coded mask replaces the pinhole collimator in order to increase the sensitivity of the gamma camera. Hence, we obtained a very compact device (global weight less than 1 kg without any shielding), which is easy to handle and to use. In this article, we present the main characteristics of GAMPIX and we expose the first experimental results illustrating the performances of this new generation of gamma camera.

  17. Case on Camera--An Audience Verdict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wober, J. M.

    In July 1984, British Channel 4 began televising Case on Camera, a series based on genuine arbitration of civil cases carried out by a retired judge, recorded as it happened, and edited into half hour programs. Because of the Independent Broadcasting Authority's concern for the rights to privacy, a systematic study of public reaction to the series…

  18. Face identification in videos from mobile cameras

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mu, Meiru; Spreeuwers, Lieuwe Jan; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is still challenging to recognize faces reliably in videos from mobile camera, although mature automatic face recognition technology for still images has been available for quite some time. Suppose we want to be alerted when suspects appear in the recording of a police Body-Cam, even a good face

  19. Teaching Camera Calibration by a Constructivist Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, D.; Santolaria, J.; Pastor, J. J.; Aguilar, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Metrovisionlab simulation software and practical sessions designed to teach the most important machine vision camera calibration aspects in courses for senior undergraduate students. By following a constructivist methodology, having received introductory theoretical classes, students use the Metrovisionlab application to…

  20. Phase camera experiment for Advanced Virgo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Van Beuzekom, Martin; Van Der Schaaf, Laura; Van Den Brand, Jo

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study of the phase camera, which is a frequency selective wave-front sensor of a laser beam. This sensor is utilized for monitoring sidebands produced by phase modulations in a gravitational wave (GW) detector. Regarding the operation of the GW detectors, the laser

  1. Lights, Camera, Read! Arizona Reading Program Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Library, Archives and Public Records, Phoenix.

    This document is the manual for the Arizona Reading Program (ARP) 2003 entitled "Lights, Camera, Read!" This theme spotlights books that were made into movies, and allows readers to appreciate favorite novels and stories that have progressed to the movie screen. The manual consists of eight sections. The Introduction includes welcome…

  2. Digital Camera Control for Faster Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katharine; Siekierski, James D.; Mangieri, Mark L.; Dekome, Kent; Cobarruvias, John; Piplani, Perry J.; Busa, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Digital Camera Control Software (DCCS) is a computer program for controlling a boom and a boom-mounted camera used to inspect the external surface of a space shuttle in orbit around the Earth. Running in a laptop computer in the space-shuttle crew cabin, DCCS commands integrated displays and controls. By means of a simple one-button command, a crewmember can view low- resolution images to quickly spot problem areas and can then cause a rapid transition to high- resolution images. The crewmember can command that camera settings apply to a specific small area of interest within the field of view of the camera so as to maximize image quality within that area. DCCS also provides critical high-resolution images to a ground screening team, which analyzes the images to assess damage (if any); in so doing, DCCS enables the team to clear initially suspect areas more quickly than would otherwise be possible and further saves time by minimizing the probability of re-imaging of areas already inspected. On the basis of experience with a previous version (2.0) of the software, the present version (3.0) incorporates a number of advanced imaging features that optimize crewmember capability and efficiency.

  3. X-ray imaging using digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Nicola M.; Edgar, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The possibility of using the combination of a computed radiography (storage phosphor) cassette and a semiprofessional grade digital camera for medical or dental radiography is investigated. We compare the performance of (i) a Canon 5D Mk II single lens reflex camera with f1.4 lens and full-frame CMOS array sensor and (ii) a cooled CCD-based camera with a 1/3 frame sensor and the same lens system. Both systems are tested with 240 x 180 mm cassettes which are based on either powdered europium-doped barium fluoride bromide or needle structure europium-doped cesium bromide. The modulation transfer function for both systems has been determined and falls to a value of 0.2 at around 2 lp/mm, and is limited by light scattering of the emitted light from the storage phosphor rather than the optics or sensor pixelation. The modulation transfer function for the CsBr:Eu2+ plate is bimodal, with a high frequency wing which is attributed to the light-guiding behaviour of the needle structure. The detective quantum efficiency has been determined using a radioisotope source and is comparatively low at 0.017 for the CMOS camera and 0.006 for the CCD camera, attributed to the poor light harvesting by the lens. The primary advantages of the method are portability, robustness, digital imaging and low cost; the limitations are the low detective quantum efficiency and hence signal-to-noise ratio for medical doses, and restricted range of plate sizes. Representative images taken with medical doses are shown and illustrate the potential use for portable basic radiography.

  4. A novel fully integrated handheld gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massari, R.; Ucci, A.; Campisi, C. [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [University of Rome “La Sapienza”, S. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Soluri, A., E-mail: alessandro.soluri@ibb.cnr.it [Biostructure and Bioimaging Institute (IBB), National Research Council of Italy (CNR), Rome (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present an innovative, fully integrated handheld gamma camera, namely designed to gather in the same device the gamma ray detector with the display and the embedded computing system. The low power consumption allows the prototype to be battery operated. To be useful in radioguided surgery, an intraoperative gamma camera must be very easy to handle since it must be moved to find a suitable view. Consequently, we have developed the first prototype of a fully integrated, compact and lightweight gamma camera for radiopharmaceuticals fast imaging. The device can operate without cables across the sterile field, so it may be easily used in the operating theater for radioguided surgery. The prototype proposed consists of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) array coupled with a proprietary scintillation structure based on CsI(Tl) crystals. To read the SiPM output signals, we have developed a very low power readout electronics and a dedicated analog to digital conversion system. One of the most critical aspects we faced designing the prototype was the low power consumption, which is mandatory to develop a battery operated device. We have applied this detection device in the lymphoscintigraphy technique (sentinel lymph node mapping) comparing the results obtained with those of a commercial gamma camera (Philips SKYLight). The results obtained confirm a rapid response of the device and an adequate spatial resolution for the use in the scintigraphic imaging. This work confirms the feasibility of a small gamma camera with an integrated display. This device is designed for radioguided surgery and small organ imaging, but it could be easily combined into surgical navigation systems.

  5. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A Precision Analysis of Camera Distortion Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhongwei; Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Monasse, Pascal; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-01

    This paper addresses the question of identifying the right camera direct or inverse distortion model, permitting a high subpixel precision to fit to real camera distortion. Five classic camera distortion models are reviewed and their precision is compared for direct or inverse distortion. By definition, the three radially symmetric models can only model a distortion radially symmetric around some distortion center. They can be extended to deal with non-radially symmetric distortions by adding tangential distortion components, but still may be too simple for very accurate modeling of real cameras. The polynomial and the rational models instead miss a physical or optical interpretation, but can cope equally with radially and non-radially symmetric distortions. Indeed, they do not require the evaluation of a distortion center. When requiring high precisions, we found that the distortion modeling must also be evaluated primarily as a numerical problem. Indeed, all models except the polynomial involve a non-linear minimization, which increases the numerical risk. The estimation of a polynomial distortion model leads instead to a linear problem, which is secure and much faster. We concluded by extensive numerical experiments that, although high degree polynomials were required to reach a high precision of 1/100 pixels, such polynomials were easily estimated and produced a precise distortion modeling without overfitting. Our conclusion is validated by three independent experimental setups: the models were compared first on the lens distortion database of the Lensfun library by their distortion simulation and inversion power; second by fitting real camera distortions estimated by a non parametric algorithm; and finally by the absolute correction measurement provided by the photographs of tightly stretched strings, warranting a high straightness.

  7. Control of the movement of a ROV camera; Controle de posicionamento da camera de um ROV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre S. de; Dutra, Max Suell [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE); Reis, Ney Robinson S. dos [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas; Santos, Auderi V. dos [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The ROV's (Remotely Operated Vehicles) are used for installation and maintenance of underwater exploration systems in the oil industry. These systems are operated in distant areas thus being of essential importance the use of a cameras for the visualization of the work area. The synchronization necessary in the accomplishment of the tasks when operating the manipulator and the movement of the camera for the operator is a complex task. For the accomplishment of this synchronization is presented in this work the analysis of the interconnection of the systems. The concatenation of the systems is made through the interconnection of the electric signals of the proportional valves of the actuators of the manipulator with the signals of the proportional valves of the actuators of the camera. With this interconnection the approach accompaniment of the movement of the manipulator for the camera, keeping the object of the visualization of the field of vision of the operator is obtained. (author)

  8. NATIONAL GUIDELINES FOR DIGITAL CAMERA SYSTEMS CERTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yaron

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Digital camera systems are a key component in the production of reliable, geometrically accurate, high-resolution geospatial products. These systems have replaced film imaging in photogrammetric data capturing. Today, we see a proliferation of imaging sensors collecting photographs in different ground resolutions, spectral bands, swath sizes, radiometric characteristics, accuracies and carried on different mobile platforms. In addition, these imaging sensors are combined with navigational tools (such as GPS and IMU, active sensors such as laser scanning and powerful processing tools to obtain high quality geospatial products. The quality (accuracy, completeness, consistency, etc. of these geospatial products is based on the use of calibrated, high-quality digital camera systems. The new survey regulations of the state of Israel specify the quality requirements for each geospatial product including: maps at different scales and for different purposes, elevation models, orthophotographs, three-dimensional models at different levels of details (LOD and more. In addition, the regulations require that digital camera systems used for mapping purposes should be certified using a rigorous mapping systems certification and validation process which is specified in the Director General Instructions. The Director General Instructions for digital camera systems certification specify a two-step process as follows: 1. Theoretical analysis of system components that includes: study of the accuracy of each component and an integrative error propagation evaluation, examination of the radiometric and spectral response curves for the imaging sensors, the calibration requirements, and the working procedures. 2. Empirical study of the digital mapping system that examines a typical project (product scale, flight height, number and configuration of ground control points and process. The study examine all the aspects of the final product including; its accuracy, the

  9. National Guidelines for Digital Camera Systems Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaron, Yaron; Keinan, Eran; Benhamu, Moshe; Regev, Ronen; Zalmanzon, Garry

    2016-06-01

    Digital camera systems are a key component in the production of reliable, geometrically accurate, high-resolution geospatial products. These systems have replaced film imaging in photogrammetric data capturing. Today, we see a proliferation of imaging sensors collecting photographs in different ground resolutions, spectral bands, swath sizes, radiometric characteristics, accuracies and carried on different mobile platforms. In addition, these imaging sensors are combined with navigational tools (such as GPS and IMU), active sensors such as laser scanning and powerful processing tools to obtain high quality geospatial products. The quality (accuracy, completeness, consistency, etc.) of these geospatial products is based on the use of calibrated, high-quality digital camera systems. The new survey regulations of the state of Israel specify the quality requirements for each geospatial product including: maps at different scales and for different purposes, elevation models, orthophotographs, three-dimensional models at different levels of details (LOD) and more. In addition, the regulations require that digital camera systems used for mapping purposes should be certified using a rigorous mapping systems certification and validation process which is specified in the Director General Instructions. The Director General Instructions for digital camera systems certification specify a two-step process as follows: 1. Theoretical analysis of system components that includes: study of the accuracy of each component and an integrative error propagation evaluation, examination of the radiometric and spectral response curves for the imaging sensors, the calibration requirements, and the working procedures. 2. Empirical study of the digital mapping system that examines a typical project (product scale, flight height, number and configuration of ground control points and process). The study examine all the aspects of the final product including; its accuracy, the product pixels size

  10. Learning as way-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne

    to be “blurred ecotones” between studying, leisure, sociality, identity-seeking and daily life which demands for an extension of the concept of learning. It is stressed that learning are conditioned by contextual orientations-processes in peripersonal spaces. Spaces of learning seem to guide how learning can......This paper is based on case study findings from studying undergraduate students’ perceptions of their navigation in a blended learning environment where different learning spaces are offered. In this paper learning is regarded as a multi-level and multi complex concept. In this regard the concept...... of learning used in this paper is inspired by the latest work of the Danish professor Illeris and the interwoven concept of knowledge development as revealed in the SECI-model generated by the Japanese professors Nonaka and Takeuchi. The empirical investigation, which is the basis of the presented assumptions...

  11. World's fastest and most sensitive astronomical camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    The next generation of instruments for ground-based telescopes took a leap forward with the development of a new ultra-fast camera that can take 1500 finely exposed images per second even when observing extremely faint objects. The first 240x240 pixel images with the world's fastest high precision faint light camera were obtained through a collaborative effort between ESO and three French laboratories from the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers (CNRS/INSU). Cameras such as this are key components of the next generation of adaptive optics instruments of Europe's ground-based astronomy flagship facility, the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). ESO PR Photo 22a/09 The CCD220 detector ESO PR Photo 22b/09 The OCam camera ESO PR Video 22a/09 OCam images "The performance of this breakthrough camera is without an equivalent anywhere in the world. The camera will enable great leaps forward in many areas of the study of the Universe," says Norbert Hubin, head of the Adaptive Optics department at ESO. OCam will be part of the second-generation VLT instrument SPHERE. To be installed in 2011, SPHERE will take images of giant exoplanets orbiting nearby stars. A fast camera such as this is needed as an essential component for the modern adaptive optics instruments used on the largest ground-based telescopes. Telescopes on the ground suffer from the blurring effect induced by atmospheric turbulence. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way that delights poets, but frustrates astronomers, since it blurs the finest details of the images. Adaptive optics techniques overcome this major drawback, so that ground-based telescopes can produce images that are as sharp as if taken from space. Adaptive optics is based on real-time corrections computed from images obtained by a special camera working at very high speeds. Nowadays, this means many hundreds of times each second. The new generation instruments require these

  12. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DC-8 CAMERA NADIR GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation DC-8 Camera Nadir GCPEx dataset contains geo-located visible-wavelength imagery of the ground obtained from the nadir camera aboard the...

  13. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DC-8 CAMERA NADIR GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation DC-8 Camera Nadir GCPEx dataset contains geo-located, visible-wavelength imagery of the ground obtained from the nadir camera aboard the...

  14. Advanced EVA Suit Camera System Development Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, Kyla

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is developing a new extra-vehicular activity (EVA) suit known as the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit. All of the improvements to the EVA Suit provide the opportunity to update the technology of the video imagery. My summer internship project involved improving the video streaming capabilities of the cameras that will be used on the Z2 Suit for data acquisition. To accomplish this, I familiarized myself with the architecture of the camera that is currently being tested to be able to make improvements on the design. Because there is a lot of benefit to saving space, power, and weight on the EVA suit, my job was to use Altium Design to start designing a much smaller and simplified interface board for the camera's microprocessor and external components. This involved checking datasheets of various components and checking signal connections to ensure that this architecture could be used for both the Z2 suit and potentially other future projects. The Orion spacecraft is a specific project that may benefit from this condensed camera interface design. The camera's physical placement on the suit also needed to be determined and tested so that image resolution can be maximized. Many of the options of the camera placement may be tested along with other future suit testing. There are multiple teams that work on different parts of the suit, so the camera's placement could directly affect their research or design. For this reason, a big part of my project was initiating contact with other branches and setting up multiple meetings to learn more about the pros and cons of the potential camera placements we are analyzing. Collaboration with the multiple teams working on the Advanced EVA Z2 Suit is absolutely necessary and these comparisons will be used as further progress is made for the overall suit design. This prototype will not be finished in time for the scheduled Z2 Suit testing, so my time was

  15. Declarative camera control for automatic cinematography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson, D.B.; Anderson, S.E.; Li-wei He [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Animations generated by interactive 3D computer graphics applications are typically portrayed either from a particular character`s point of view or from a small set of strategically-placed viewpoints. By ignoring camera placement, such applications fail to realize important storytelling capabilities that have been explored by cinematographers for many years. In this paper, we describe several of the principles of cinematography and show how they can be formalized into a declarative language, called the Declarative Camera Control Language (DCCL). We describe the application of DCCL within the context of a simple interactive video game and argue that DCCL represents cinematic knowledge at the same level of abstraction as expert directors by encoding 16 idioms from a film textbook. These idioms produce compelling animations, as demonstrated on the accompanying videotape.

  16. Relating vanishing points to catadioptric camera calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wenting; Zhang, Hui; Allinson, Nigel M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis and derivation of the geometric relation between vanishing points and camera parameters of central catadioptric camera systems. These vanishing points correspond to the three mutually orthogonal directions of 3D real world coordinate system (i.e. X, Y and Z axes). Compared to vanishing points (VPs) in the perspective projection, the advantages of VPs under central catadioptric projection are that there are normally two vanishing points for each set of parallel lines, since lines are projected to conics in the catadioptric image plane. Also, their vanishing points are usually located inside the image frame. We show that knowledge of the VPs corresponding to XYZ axes from a single image can lead to simple derivation of both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the central catadioptric system. This derived novel theory is demonstrated and tested on both synthetic and real data with respect to noise sensitivity.

  17. Cervical SPECT Camera for Parathyroid Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-08-31

    Primary hyperparathyroidism characterized by one or more enlarged parathyroid glands has become one of the most common endocrine diseases in the world affecting about 1 per 1000 in the United States. Standard treatment is highly invasive exploratory neck surgery called Parathyroidectomy. The surgery has a notable mortality rate because of the close proximity to vital structures. The move to minimally invasive parathyroidectomy is hampered by the lack of high resolution pre-surgical imaging techniques that can accurately localize the parathyroid with respect to surrounding structures. We propose to develop a dedicated ultra-high resolution (~ 1 mm) and high sensitivity (10x conventional camera) cervical scintigraphic imaging device. It will be based on a multiple pinhole-camera SPECT system comprising a novel solid state CZT detector that offers the required performance. The overall system will be configured to fit around the neck and comfortably image a patient.

  18. Infrared camera based on a curved retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Delphine; Fendler, Manuel; Berger, Frédéric; Cloix, Baptiste; Pornin, Cyrille; Baier, Nicolas; Druart, Guillaume; Primot, Jérôme; le Coarer, Etienne

    2012-02-15

    Design of miniature and light cameras requires an optical design breakthrough to achieve good optical performance. Solutions inspired by animals' eyes are the most promising. The curvature of the retina offers several advantages, such as uniform intensity and no field curvature, but this feature is not used. The work presented here is a solution to spherically bend monolithic IR detectors. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, a higher fill factor is obtained and the device fabrication process is not modified. We made an IR eye camera with a single lens and a curved IR bolometer. Images captured are well resolved and have good contrast, and the modulation transfer function shows better quality when comparing with planar systems.

  19. Time-of-Flight Microwave Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charvat, Gregory; Temme, Andrew; Feigin, Micha; Raskar, Ramesh

    2015-10-05

    Microwaves can penetrate many obstructions that are opaque at visible wavelengths, however microwave imaging is challenging due to resolution limits associated with relatively small apertures and unrecoverable "stealth" regions due to the specularity of most objects at microwave frequencies. We demonstrate a multispectral time-of-flight microwave imaging system which overcomes these challenges with a large passive aperture to improve lateral resolution, multiple illumination points with a data fusion method to reduce stealth regions, and a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) receiver to achieve depth resolution. The camera captures images with a resolution of 1.5 degrees, multispectral images across the X frequency band (8 GHz-12 GHz), and a time resolution of 200 ps (6 cm optical path in free space). Images are taken of objects in free space as well as behind drywall and plywood. This architecture allows "camera-like" behavior from a microwave imaging system and is practical for imaging everyday objects in the microwave spectrum.

  20. Multiple-camera tracking: UK government requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmer, Paul

    2007-10-01

    The Imagery Library for Intelligent Detection Systems (i-LIDS) is the UK government's new standard for Video Based Detection Systems (VBDS). The standard was launched in November 2006 and evaluations against it began in July 2007. With the first four i-LIDS scenarios completed, the Home Office Scientific development Branch (HOSDB) are looking toward the future of intelligent vision in the security surveillance market by adding a fifth scenario to the standard. The fifth i-LIDS scenario will concentrate on the development, testing and evaluation of systems for the tracking of people across multiple cameras. HOSDB and the Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure (CPNI) identified a requirement to track targets across a network of CCTV cameras using both live and post event imagery. The Detection and Vision Systems group at HOSDB were asked to determine the current state of the market and develop an in-depth Operational Requirement (OR) based on government end user requirements. Using this OR the i-LIDS team will develop a full i-LIDS scenario to aid the machine vision community in its development of multi-camera tracking systems. By defining a requirement for multi-camera tracking and building this into the i-LIDS standard the UK government will provide a widely available tool that developers can use to help them turn theory and conceptual demonstrators into front line application. This paper will briefly describe the i-LIDS project and then detail the work conducted in building the new tracking aspect of the standard.

  1. Camera Development for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Roberto Jose

    2017-01-01

    With the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the very-high-energy gamma-ray universe, between 30 GeV and 300 TeV, will be probed at an unprecedented resolution, allowing deeper studies of known gamma-ray emitters and the possible discovery of new ones. This exciting project could also confirm the particle nature of dark matter by looking for the gamma rays produced by self-annihilating weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The telescopes will use the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique (IACT) to record Cherenkov photons that are produced by the gamma-ray induced extensive air shower. One telescope design features dual-mirror Schwarzschild-Couder (SC) optics that allows the light to be finely focused on the high-resolution silicon photomultipliers of the camera modules starting from a 9.5-meter primary mirror. Each camera module will consist of a focal plane module and front-end electronics, and will have four TeV Array Readout with GSa/s Sampling and Event Trigger (TARGET) chips, giving them 64 parallel input channels. The TARGET chip has a self-trigger functionality for readout that can be used in higher logic across camera modules as well as across individual telescopes, which will each have 177 camera modules. There will be two sites, one in the northern and the other in the southern hemisphere, for full sky coverage, each spanning at least one square kilometer. A prototype SC telescope is currently under construction at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory in Arizona. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF award AST-1560016.

  2. Geometrical camera calibration with diffractive optical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, M; Griessbach, D; Hermerschmidt, A; Krüger, S; Scheele, M; Schischmanow, A

    2008-12-08

    Traditional methods for geometrical camera calibration are based on calibration grids or single pixel illumination by collimated light. A new method for geometrical sensor calibration by means of diffractive optical elements (DOE) in connection with a laser beam equipment is presented. This method can be especially used for 2D-sensor array systems but in principle also for line scanners. (c) 2008 Optical Society of America

  3. Situational Awareness from a Low-Cost Camera System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.; Ward, David; Lesage, John

    2010-01-01

    A method gathers scene information from a low-cost camera system. Existing surveillance systems using sufficient cameras for continuous coverage of a large field necessarily generate enormous amounts of raw data. Digitizing and channeling that data to a central computer and processing it in real time is difficult when using low-cost, commercially available components. A newly developed system is located on a combined power and data wire to form a string-of-lights camera system. Each camera is accessible through this network interface using standard TCP/IP networking protocols. The cameras more closely resemble cell-phone cameras than traditional security camera systems. Processing capabilities are built directly onto the camera backplane, which helps maintain a low cost. The low power requirements of each camera allow the creation of a single imaging system comprising over 100 cameras. Each camera has built-in processing capabilities to detect events and cooperatively share this information with neighboring cameras. The location of the event is reported to the host computer in Cartesian coordinates computed from data correlation across multiple cameras. In this way, events in the field of view can present low-bandwidth information to the host rather than high-bandwidth bitmap data constantly being generated by the cameras. This approach offers greater flexibility than conventional systems, without compromising performance through using many small, low-cost cameras with overlapping fields of view. This means significant increased viewing without ignoring surveillance areas, which can occur when pan, tilt, and zoom cameras look away. Additionally, due to the sharing of a single cable for power and data, the installation costs are lower. The technology is targeted toward 3D scene extraction and automatic target tracking for military and commercial applications. Security systems and environmental/ vehicular monitoring systems are also potential applications.

  4. The Heterogeneous Treatment Effects of Speed Cameras on Road Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H; Graham, DJ

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses how the effects of fixed speed cameras on road casualties vary across sites with different characteristics and evaluates the criteria for selecting camera sites. A total of 771 camera sites and 4787 potential control sites are observed for a period of 9 years across England. Site characteristics such as road class, crash history and site length are combined into a single index, referred to as a propensity score. We first estimate the average effect at each camera site usin...

  5. Theory and applications of smart cameras

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an overview of smart camera systems, considering practical applications but also reviewing fundamental aspects of the underlying technology.  It introduces in a tutorial style the principles of sensing and signal processing, and also describes topics such as wireless connection to the Internet of Things (IoT) which is expected to be the biggest market for smart cameras. It is an excellent guide to the fundamental of smart camera technology, and the chapters complement each other well as the authors have worked as a team under the auspice of GFP(Global Frontier Project), the largest-scale funded research in Korea.  This is the third of three books based on the Integrated Smart Sensors research project, which describe the development of innovative devices, circuits, and system-level enabling technologies.  The aim of the project was to develop common platforms on which various devices and sensors can be loaded, and to create systems offering significant improvements in information processi...

  6. Remote hardware-reconfigurable robotic camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Estrada, Miguel; Torres-Huitzil, Cesar; Maya-Rueda, Selene E.

    2001-10-01

    In this work, a camera with integrated image processing capabilities is discussed. The camera is based on an imager coupled to an FPGA device (Field Programmable Gate Array) which contains an architecture for real-time computer vision low-level processing. The architecture can be reprogrammed remotely for application specific purposes. The system is intended for rapid modification and adaptation for inspection and recognition applications, with the flexibility of hardware and software reprogrammability. FPGA reconfiguration allows the same ease of upgrade in hardware as a software upgrade process. The camera is composed of a digital imager coupled to an FPGA device, two memory banks, and a microcontroller. The microcontroller is used for communication tasks and FPGA programming. The system implements a software architecture to handle multiple FPGA architectures in the device, and the possibility to download a software/hardware object from the host computer into its internal context memory. System advantages are: small size, low power consumption, and a library of hardware/software functionalities that can be exchanged during run time. The system has been validated with an edge detection and a motion processing architecture, which will be presented in the paper. Applications targeted are in robotics, mobile robotics, and vision based quality control.

  7. Color camera pyrometry for high explosive detonations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, John; Biss, Matthew; Homan, Barrie; McNesby, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    Temperature measurements of high-explosive and combustion processes are difficult because of the speed and environment of the events. We have characterized and calibrated a digital high-speed color camera that may be used as an optical pyrometer to overcome these challenges. The camera provides both high temporal and spatial resolution. The color filter array of the sensor uses three color filters to measure the spectral distribution of the imaged light. A two-color ratio method is used to calculate a temperature using the color filter array raw image data and a gray-body assumption. If the raw image data is not available, temperatures may be calculated from processed images or movies depending on proper analysis of the digital color imaging pipeline. We analyze three transformations within the pipeline (demosaicing, white balance, and gamma-correction) to determine their effect on the calculated temperature. Using this technique with a Vision Research Phantom color camera, we have measured the temperature of exploded C-4 charges. The surface temperature of the resulting fireball rapidly increases after detonation and then decayed to a constant value of approximately 1980 K. Processed images indicates that the temperature remains constant until the light intensity decreased below the background value.

  8. A single pixel camera video ophthalmoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochocki, B.; Gambin, A.; Manzanera, S.; Irles, E.; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.; Artal, P.

    2017-02-01

    There are several ophthalmic devices to image the retina, from fundus cameras capable to image the whole fundus to scanning ophthalmoscopes with photoreceptor resolution. Unfortunately, these devices are prone to a variety of ocular conditions like defocus and media opacities, which usually degrade the quality of the image. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach to image the retina in real-time using a single pixel camera, which has the potential to circumvent those optical restrictions. The imaging procedure is as follows: a set of spatially coded patterns is projected rapidly onto the retina using a digital micro mirror device. At the same time, the inner product's intensity is measured for each pattern with a photomultiplier module. Subsequently, an image of the retina is reconstructed computationally. Obtained image resolution is up to 128 x 128 px with a varying real-time video framerate up to 11 fps. Experimental results obtained in an artificial eye confirm the tolerance against defocus compared to a conventional multi-pixel array based system. Furthermore, the use of a multiplexed illumination offers a SNR improvement leading to a lower illumination of the eye and hence an increase in patient's comfort. In addition, the proposed system could enable imaging in wavelength ranges where cameras are not available.

  9. Toward standardising gamma camera quality control procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alnaaimi, M. A.; Alduaij, M. A.; Mohamed, M. O.; Ibahim, S. Y.; Alkandari, F. A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Attaining high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires appropriate quality control (QC) programs. For instance, the regular evaluation and comparison of extrinsic and intrinsic flood-field uniformity enables the quick correction of many gamma camera problems. Whereas QC tests for uniformity are usually performed by exposing the gamma camera crystal to a uniform flux of gamma radiation from a source of known activity, such protocols can vary significantly. Thus, there is a need for optimization and standardization, in part to allow direct comparison between gamma cameras from different vendors. In the present study, intrinsic uniformity was examined as a function of source distance, source activity, source volume and number of counts. The extrinsic uniformity and spatial resolution were also examined. Proper standard QC procedures need to be implemented because of the continual development of nuclear medicine imaging technology and the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of hybrid imaging system data. The present work seeks to promote a set of standard testing procedures to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective nuclear medicine services.

  10. Camera Network Coverage Improving by Particle Swarm Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Y.C.; Lei, B.; Hendriks, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies how to improve the field of view (FOV) coverage of a camera network. We focus on a special but practical scenario where the cameras are randomly scattered in a wide area and each camera may adjust its orientation but cannot move in any direction. We propose a particle swarm

  11. 16 CFR 3.45 - In camera orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false In camera orders. 3.45 Section 3.45... PRACTICE FOR ADJUDICATIVE PROCEEDINGS Hearings § 3.45 In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, material made subject to an in camera order will be kept confidential and not placed on...

  12. 15 CFR 743.3 - Thermal imaging camera reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Thermal imaging camera reporting. 743... REPORTING § 743.3 Thermal imaging camera reporting. (a) General requirement. Exports of thermal imaging cameras must be reported to BIS as provided in this section. (b) Transactions to be reported. Exports that...

  13. 39 CFR 3001.31a - In camera orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In camera orders. 3001.31a Section 3001.31a Postal... Applicability § 3001.31a In camera orders. (a) Definition. Except as hereinafter provided, documents and testimony made subject to in camera orders are not made a part of the public record, but are kept...

  14. 21 CFR 878.4160 - Surgical camera and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Surgical camera and accessories. 878.4160 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4160 Surgical camera and accessories. (a) Identification. A surgical camera and accessories is a device intended to be used...

  15. 49 CFR 511.45 - In camera materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false In camera materials. 511.45 Section 511.45... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Hearings § 511.45 In camera materials. (a) Definition. In camera materials are documents, testimony, or other data which by order of the Presiding...

  16. Speed cameras : how they work and what effect they have.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Much research has been carried out into the effects of speed cameras, and the research shows consistently positive results. International review studies report that speed cameras produce a reduction of approximately 20% in personal injury crashes on road sections where cameras are used. In the

  17. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera is a device intended to image the distribution of radionuclides in...

  18. A Mobile Phone-Based Life Skills Training Program for Substance Use Prevention Among Adolescents: Pre-Post Study on the Acceptance and Potential Effectiveness of the Program, Ready4life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Severin; Paz Castro, Raquel; Meyer, Christian; Filler, Andreas; Kowatsch, Tobias; Schaub, Michael P

    2017-10-04

    Substance use and misuse often first emerge during adolescence. Generic life skills training that is typically conducted within the school curriculum is effective at preventing the onset and escalation of substance use among adolescents. However, the dissemination of such programs is impeded by their large resource requirements in terms of personnel, money, and time. Life skills training provided via mobile phones might be a more economic and scalable approach, which additionally matches the lifestyle and communication habits of adolescents. The aim of this study was to test the acceptance and initial effectiveness of an individually tailored mobile phone-based life skills training program in vocational school students. The fully automated program, named ready4life, is based on social cognitive theory and addresses self-management skills, social skills, and substance use resistance skills. Program participants received up to 3 weekly text messages (short message service, SMS) over 6 months. Active program engagement was stimulated by interactive features such as quiz questions, message- and picture-contests, and integration of a friendly competition with prizes in which program users collected credits with each interaction. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) analyses were used to investigate for changes between baseline and 6-month follow-up in the following outcomes: perceived stress, self-management skills, social skills, at-risk alcohol use, tobacco smoking, and cannabis use. The program was tested in 118 school classes at 13 vocational schools in Switzerland. A total of 1067 students who owned a mobile phone and were not regular cigarette smokers were invited to participate in the life skills program. Of these, 877 (82.19%, 877/1067; mean age=17.4 years, standard deviation [SD]=2.7; 58.3% females) participated in the program and the associated study. A total of 43 students (4.9%, 43/877) withdrew their program participation during the intervention period

  19. Baz istasyonlarının olası sağlık etkilerine ilişkin bir güncelleme/An update on the possible health effects of mobile phone base stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hür Hassoy

    2012-12-01

    istasyonu antenlerinin ışıma açısı içinde kalan kişilerde, maruz kalınan süre, baz istasyonuna olan mesafe, yayılan elektromanyetik alanın şiddeti ve kişisel vücut dirençleri ile ilişkili olarak baz istasyonlarına bağlı sağlık etkilerinin gelişme olasılığı göz önünde bulundurularak toplumun sağlığını koruyacak yaklaşımlar benimsenmelidir. Anahtar Kelimeler: Baz istasyonu, elektromanyetik alan, sağlık etkisi An update on the possible health effects of mobile phone base stations Objective: This study reviews the up-to-date international literature on the health impacts of mobile phone base stations. Methods: A literature search was conducted up to September 27, 2012 in PubMed and Google Scholar using the keywords "base station" and "health".The references in the articles found were also used and a total of 22 original research papers were identified and included in this review. Results: Among the studies found, 15 have detected an association between electromagnetic fields (EMF and different health indicators. Four of the studies have not found any association and the hypothesis was not totally confirmed. Eleven of the studies have investigated the acute, 8 the chronic and three both the acute and chronic effects of base stations on health. EMF measurements were not conducted in six of the studies and distance to base stations was used as a proxy instead. One of the studies measured EMF but used distance to investigate the health impacts. Twelve of the studies had received financial support from funds or institutions. Half of the funding of two studies was from cellular phone companies. Six of the studies were experimental and three of these found a dose-response relationship. Conclusions: Studies are showing signs of possible health risks due to base stations. Sleep disorders, depressive symptoms, headache, dizziness, concentration difficulties are the most frequently identified symptoms. There is need for prospective studies in this

  20. Traveling wave deflector design for femtosecond streak camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Chengquan; Wu, Shengli; Luo, Duan; Wen, Wenlong; Xu, Junkai; Tian, Jinshou; Zhang, Minrui; Chen, Pin; Chen, Jianzhong; Liu, Rong

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a traveling wave deflection deflector (TWD) with a slow-wave property induced by a microstrip transmission line is proposed for femtosecond streak cameras. The pass width and dispersion properties were simulated. In addition, the dynamic temporal resolution of the femtosecond camera was simulated by CST software. The results showed that with the proposed TWD a femtosecond streak camera can achieve a dynamic temporal resolution of less than 600 fs. Experiments were done to test the femtosecond streak camera, and an 800 fs dynamic temporal resolution was obtained. Guidance is provided for optimizing a femtosecond streak camera to obtain higher temporal resolution.

  1. Traveling wave deflector design for femtosecond streak camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Chengquan; Wu, Shengli [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Luo, Duan [Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Wen, Wenlong [Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China); Xu, Junkai [Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Tian, Jinshou, E-mail: tianjs@opt.ac.cn [Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Zhang, Minrui; Chen, Pin [Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi' an 710119 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Chen, Jianzhong [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Liu, Rong [Xi' an Technological University, Xi' an 710021 (China)

    2017-05-21

    In this paper, a traveling wave deflection deflector (TWD) with a slow-wave property induced by a microstrip transmission line is proposed for femtosecond streak cameras. The pass width and dispersion properties were simulated. In addition, the dynamic temporal resolution of the femtosecond camera was simulated by CST software. The results showed that with the proposed TWD a femtosecond streak camera can achieve a dynamic temporal resolution of less than 600 fs. Experiments were done to test the femtosecond streak camera, and an 800 fs dynamic temporal resolution was obtained. Guidance is provided for optimizing a femtosecond streak camera to obtain higher temporal resolution.

  2. Methods for identification of images acquired with digital cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geradts, Zeno J.; Bijhold, Jurrien; Kieft, Martijn; Kurosawa, Kenji; Kuroki, Kenro; Saitoh, Naoki

    2001-02-01

    From the court we were asked whether it is possible to determine if an image has been made with a specific digital camera. This question has to be answered in child pornography cases, where evidence is needed that a certain picture has been made with a specific camera. We have looked into different methods of examining the cameras to determine if a specific image has been made with a camera: defects in CCDs, file formats that are used, noise introduced by the pixel arrays and watermarking in images used by the camera manufacturer.

  3. Pile volume measurement by range imaging camera in indoor environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Altuntas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Range imaging (RIM camera is recent technology in 3D location measurement. The new study areas have been emerged in measurement and data processing together with RIM camera. It has low-cost and fast measurement technique compared to the current measurement techniques. However its measurement accuracy varies according to effects resulting from the device and the environment. The direct sunlight is affect measurement accuracy of the camera. Thus, RIM camera should be used for indoor measurement. In this study gravel pile volume was measured by SwissRanger SR4000 camera. The measured volume is acquired as different 8.13% from the known.

  4. Presence capture cameras - a new challenge to the image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoketo, Veli-Tapani

    2016-04-01

    Commercial presence capture cameras are coming to the markets and a new era of visual entertainment starts to get its shape. Since the true presence capturing is still a very new technology, the real technical solutions are just passed a prototyping phase and they vary a lot. Presence capture cameras have still the same quality issues to tackle as previous phases of digital imaging but also numerous new ones. This work concentrates to the quality challenges of presence capture cameras. A camera system which can record 3D audio-visual reality as it is has to have several camera modules, several microphones and especially technology which can synchronize output of several sources to a seamless and smooth virtual reality experience. Several traditional quality features are still valid in presence capture cameras. Features like color fidelity, noise removal, resolution and dynamic range create the base of virtual reality stream quality. However, co-operation of several cameras brings a new dimension for these quality factors. Also new quality features can be validated. For example, how the camera streams should be stitched together with 3D experience without noticeable errors and how to validate the stitching? The work describes quality factors which are still valid in the presence capture cameras and defines the importance of those. Moreover, new challenges of presence capture cameras are investigated in image and video quality point of view. The work contains considerations how well current measurement methods can be used in presence capture cameras.

  5. MEDIUM-FORMAT CAMERAS AND THEIR USE IN TOPOGRAPHIC MAPPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Höhle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on practical experiences with large-format aerial cameras the impact of new medium-format digital cameras on topographic mapping tasks is discussed. Two new medium-format cameras are investigated with respect to elevation accuracy, area coverage and image quality. The produced graphs and tables show the potential of these cameras for general mapping tasks. Special attention is given to the image quality of the selected cameras. Applications for the medium-format cameras are discussed. The necessary tools for selected applications are described. The impact of sensors for georeferencing, multi-spectral images, and new matching algo-rithms is also dealt with. Practical investigations are carried out for the production of digital elevation models. A comparison with large-format frame cameras is carried out. It is concluded that the medium-format cameras have a potential for mapping of smaller areas and will be used in future in true orthoimage production, corridor mapping, and updating of maps. Their small dimensions and low weight allow installation in small airplanes, helicopters, and high-end UAVs. The two investigated medium-format cameras are low-cost alternatives for standard mapping tasks and special applications. The detection of changes in topographic databases and DTMs can be carried out by means of those medium-format cameras which can image the same area in four bands of the visible and invisible spectrum of light. Medium-format cameras will play an important role in future mapping tasks.

  6. High-dimensional camera shake removal with given depth map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tao; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-06-01

    Camera motion blur is drastically nonuniform for large depth-range scenes, and the nonuniformity caused by camera translation is depth dependent but not the case for camera rotations. To restore the blurry images of large-depth-range scenes deteriorated by arbitrary camera motion, we build an image blur model considering 6-degrees of freedom (DoF) of camera motion with a given scene depth map. To make this 6D depth-aware model tractable, we propose a novel parametrization strategy to reduce the number of variables and an effective method to estimate high-dimensional camera motion as well. The number of variables is reduced by temporal sampling motion function, which describes the 6-DoF camera motion by sampling the camera trajectory uniformly in time domain. To effectively estimate the high-dimensional camera motion parameters, we construct the probabilistic motion density function (PMDF) to describe the probability distribution of camera poses during exposure, and apply it as a unified constraint to guide the convergence of the iterative deblurring algorithm. Specifically, PMDF is computed through a back projection from 2D local blur kernels to 6D camera motion parameter space and robust voting. We conduct a series of experiments on both synthetic and real captured data, and validate that our method achieves better performance than existing uniform methods and nonuniform methods on large-depth-range scenes.

  7. Initial laboratory evaluation of color video cameras: Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.L.

    1993-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has considerable experience with monochrome video cameras used in alarm assessment video systems. Most of these systems, used for perimeter protection, were designed to classify rather than to identify intruders. The monochrome cameras were selected over color cameras because they have greater sensitivity and resolution. There is a growing interest in the identification function of security video systems for both access control and insider protection. Because color camera technology is rapidly changing and because color information is useful for identification purposes, Sandia National Laboratories has established an on-going program to evaluate the newest color solid-state cameras. Phase One of the Sandia program resulted in the SAND91-2579/1 report titled: Initial Laboratory Evaluation of Color Video Cameras. The report briefly discusses imager chips, color cameras, and monitors, describes the camera selection, details traditional test parameters and procedures, and gives the results reached by evaluating 12 cameras. Here, in Phase Two of the report, we tested 6 additional cameras using traditional methods. In addition, all 18 cameras were tested by newly developed methods. This Phase 2 report details those newly developed test parameters and procedures, and evaluates the results.

  8. Optical designs for the Mars '03 rover cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory H.; Hagerott, Edward C.; Scherr, Lawrence M.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Bell, James F.

    2001-12-01

    In 2003, NASA is planning to send two robotic rover vehicles to explore the surface of Mars. The spacecraft will land on airbags in different, carefully chosen locations. The search for evidence indicating conditions favorable for past or present life will be a high priority. Each rover will carry a total of ten cameras of five various types. There will be a stereo pair of color panoramic cameras, a stereo pair of wide- field navigation cameras, one close-up camera on a movable arm, two stereo pairs of fisheye cameras for hazard avoidance, and one Sun sensor camera. This paper discusses the lenses for these cameras. Included are the specifications, design approaches, expected optical performances, prescriptions, and tolerances.

  9. Calibration of asynchronous smart phone cameras from moving objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Oksana; Istenič, Klemen; Bharti, Vibhav; Dhali, Maruf Ahmed; Barmaimon, Daniel; Houssineau, Jérémie; Clark, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Calibrating multiple cameras is a fundamental prerequisite for many Computer Vision applications. Typically this involves using a pair of identical synchronized industrial or high-end consumer cameras. This paper considers an application on a pair of low-cost portable cameras with different parameters that are found in smart phones. This paper addresses the issues of acquisition, detection of moving objects, dynamic camera registration and tracking of arbitrary number of targets. The acquisition of data is performed using two standard smart phone cameras and later processed using detections of moving objects in the scene. The registration of cameras onto the same world reference frame is performed using a recently developed method for camera calibration using a disparity space parameterisation and the single-cluster PHD filter.

  10. Tracking camera control in endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynski, J R; Smith, P; Tang, L; Hoare, T; Caputo, S; Siddiqui, A A; Tsatsos, M; Saleh, G M

    2015-12-01

    Poor camera control during endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EnDCR) surgery can cause inadequate visualisation of the anatomy and suboptimal surgical outcomes. This study investigates the feasibility of using computer vision tracking in EnDCR surgery as a potential formative feedback tool for the quality of endoscope control. A prospective cohort analysis was undertaken comparing junior versus senior surgeons performing routine EnDCR surgery. Computer vision tracking was applied to endoscopic video footage of the surgery: Total number of movements, camera path length in pixels and surgical time were determined for each procedure. A Mann-Whitney U-test was used to test for a significant difference between juniors and seniors (P theatre. Ten junior surgeons (100 completed procedures). Total number of movements of the endoscope per procedure. Path length of the endoscope per procedure. Twenty videos, 10 from junior surgeons and 10 from senior surgeons were analysed. Feasibility of our tracking system was demonstrated. Mean camera path lengths were significantly different at 119,329px (juniors) versus 43,697px (seniors), P ≪ 0.05. The mean number of movements was significantly different at 9134 (juniors) versus 3690 (seniors), P ≪ 0.05. These quantifiable differences demonstrate construct validity for computer vision endoscope tracking as a measure of surgical experience. Computer vision tracking is a potentially useful structured and objective feedback tool to assist trainees in improving endoscope control. It enables juniors to examine how their pattern of endoscope control differs from that of seniors, focusing in particular on sections where they are most divergent. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Use of cameras for monitoring visibility impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, William; Cismoski, Scott; Prenni, Anthony; Peters, Melanie

    2018-02-01

    Webcams and automated, color photography cameras have been routinely operated in many U.S. national parks and other federal lands as far back as 1988, with a general goal of meeting interpretive needs within the public lands system and communicating effects of haze on scenic vistas to the general public, policy makers, and scientists. Additionally, it would be desirable to extract quantifiable information from these images to document how visibility conditions change over time and space and to further reflect the effects of haze on a scene, in the form of atmospheric extinction, independent of changing lighting conditions due to time of day, year, or cloud cover. Many studies have demonstrated a link between image indexes and visual range or extinction in urban settings where visibility is significantly degraded and where scenes tend to be gray and devoid of color. In relatively clean, clear atmospheric conditions, clouds and lighting conditions can sometimes affect the image radiance field as much or more than the effects of haze. In addition, over the course of many years, cameras have been replaced many times as technology improved or older systems wore out, and therefore camera image pixel density has changed dramatically. It is shown that gradient operators are very sensitive to image resolution while contrast indexes are not. Furthermore, temporal averaging and time of day restrictions allow for developing quantitative relationships between atmospheric extinction and contrast-type indexes even when image resolution has varied over time. Temporal averaging effectively removes the variability of visibility indexes associated with changing cloud cover and weather conditions, and changes in lighting conditions resulting from sun angle effects are best compensated for by restricting averaging to only certain times of the day.

  12. Video inpainting under constrained camera motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Kedar A; Sapiro, Guillermo; Bertalmío, Marcelo

    2007-02-01

    A framework for inpainting missing parts of a video sequence recorded with a moving or stationary camera is presented in this work. The region to be inpainted is general: it may be still or moving, in the background or in the foreground, it may occlude one object and be occluded by some other object. The algorithm consists of a simple preprocessing stage and two steps of video inpainting. In the preprocessing stage, we roughly segment each frame into foreground and background. We use this segmentation to build three image mosaics that help to produce time consistent results and also improve the performance of the algorithm by reducing the search space. In the first video inpainting step, we reconstruct moving objects in the foreground that are "occluded" by the region to be inpainted. To this end, we fill the gap as much as possible by copying information from the moving foreground in other frames, using a priority-based scheme. In the second step, we inpaint the remaining hole with the background. To accomplish this, we first align the frames and directly copy when possible. The remaining pixels are filled in by extending spatial texture synthesis techniques to the spatiotemporal domain. The proposed framework has several advantages over state-of-the-art algorithms that deal with similar types of data and constraints. It permits some camera motion, is simple to implement, fast, does not require statistical models of background nor foreground, works well in the presence of rich and cluttered backgrounds, and the results show that there is no visible blurring or motion artifacts. A number of real examples taken with a consumer hand-held camera are shown supporting these findings.

  13. Thermal imaging cameras characteristics and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ability to see through smoke and mist and the ability to use the variances in temperature to differentiate between targets and their backgrounds are invaluable in military applications and have become major motivators for the further development of thermal imagers. As the potential of thermal imaging is more clearly understood and the cost decreases, the number of industrial and civil applications being exploited is growing quickly. In order to evaluate the suitability of particular thermal imaging cameras for particular applications, it is important to have the means to specify and measur

  14. Computational cameras for moving iris recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Scott; Venkatesha, Sharath

    2015-05-01

    Iris-based biometric identification is increasingly used for facility access and other security applications. Like all methods that exploit visual information, however, iris systems are limited by the quality of captured images. Optical defocus due to a small depth of field (DOF) is one such challenge, as is the acquisition of sharply-focused iris images from subjects in motion. This manuscript describes the application of computational motion-deblurring cameras to the problem of moving iris capture, from the underlying theory to system considerations and performance data.

  15. Camera calibration: estimation, validation and software

    OpenAIRE

    Personnaz, Matthieu; Horaud, Radu

    2002-01-01

    The software tele2 3.1 allows, in particular, to measure the intrinsic parameters of a camera. Nevertheless, a single measure do not allow to characterize the distribution associated to a parameter. Moreover, if the way to obtain measures is incorrect, these measures may be outliers.Also, this document is made up of a method to measure the intrinsic parameters thanks to the software tele2 3.1, and to quantify the quality of the obtained values.An analysis of the experimental data is provided ...

  16. Overview of SWIR detectors, cameras, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marc P.; Malchow, Douglas S.

    2008-03-01

    Imaging in the short wave infrared (SWIR) can bring useful contrast to situations and applications where visible or thermal imaging cameras are ineffective. This paper will define the short wave infrared technology and discuss developing imaging applications; then describe newly available 2-D (area) and 1-D (linear) arrays made with indium-gallium-arsenide (InGaAs), while presenting the wide range of applications with images and videos. Applications mentioned will be web inspection of continuous processes such as high temperature manufacturing processes, agricultural raw material cleaning and sorting, plastics recycling of automotive and consumer products, and a growing biological imaging technique, Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

  17. Digital camera resolution and proximal caries detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapayasatok, S; Janhom, A; Verochana, K; Pramojanee, S

    2006-07-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of proximal caries detection from digitized film images captured by a digital camera at different resolution settings. Twenty-five periapical radiographs of 50 premolar and 25 molar teeth were photographed using a digital camera, Sony Cyber-shot, DSC-S75 at three different resolution settings: 640 x 480, 1280 x 960 and 1600 x 1200. Seventy-five digital images were transferred to a computer, saved and opened using ACDSee software. In addition, a PowerPoint slide was made from each digital image. Five observers scored three groups of images (the films, the displayed 1:1 digital images on the ACDSee software, and the PowerPoint slides) for the existence of proximal caries using a 5-point confidence scale, and the depth of caries on a 4-point scale. Ground sections of the teeth were used as the gold standard. Az values under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of each group of images and at different resolutions were compared using the Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Mean different values between the lesions' depth interpreted by the observers and that of the gold standard were analysed. Films showed the highest Az values. Only the 1280 x 960 images on the ACDSee software showed no significant difference of the Az value from the films (P=0.28). The digital images from three resolution settings on the PowerPoint slides showed no significant differences, either among each other or between them and the films. For caries depth, the 1280 x 960 images showed lower values of mean difference in enamel lesions compared with the other two resolution groups. This study showed that in order to digitize conventional films, it was not necessary to use the highest camera resolution setting to achieve high diagnostic accuracy for proximal caries detection. The 1280 x 960 resolution setting of the digital camera demonstrated comparable diagnostic accuracy with film and was adequate for digitizing radiographs for caries

  18. Quality control of gamma camera systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolster, Alison (ed.)

    2003-07-01

    This report has been prepared by the Radionuclide Special Interest Group of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. It replaces the Institute of Physical Sciences in Medicine Report 66. Since the publication of that report, there have been important advances, particularly with regard to wholebody imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, gamma camera positron emission tomography and gamma camera computer/software development. To reflect this, Chapters 1, 2 and 3 remain relatively unchanged from the previous version, while Chapters 4, 5, 6 and 7 have been added to cover the four topics mentioned above. These chapters include detailed quality control test procedures for each type of imaging. Recommendations on the frequency at which various performance parameters should be assessed are summarised in Chapter 8, and Chapter 9 deals briefly with the subject of specifying equipment. Requirement for Quality Control. There is often some confusion about the distinction between the terms 'quality assurance' and 'quality control'. Quality assurance (QA) is usually taken to refer to all aspects of a procedure which contribute to the quality of the results obtained. In nuclear medicine, this would include staff training, testing of radiopharmaceuticals, assessment of equipment performance and reporting of clinical studies. Quality control (QC) refers to the specification, assessment, optimisation and maintenance of a particular aspect, such as the performance of the imaging equipment. The specification of equipment for tendering purposes may include aspects of performance which are difficult for the purchaser to confirm. Acceptance testing may require access to specialised equipment and may be performed by the supplier's engineers. It is essential that the purchaser, or an appropriately experienced person acting on behalf of the purchaser, should be closely involved in the acceptance testing. However, for routine QC, it is

  19. Far-infrared cameras for automotive safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonnoy, Jacques; Le Guilloux, Yann; Moreira, Raphael

    2005-02-01

    Far Infrared cameras used initially for the driving of military vehicles are slowly coming into the area of commercial (luxury) cars while providing with the FIR imagery a useful assistance for driving at night or in adverse conditions (fog, smoke, ...). However this imagery needs a minimum driver effort as the image understanding is not so natural as the visible or near IR one. A developing field of FIR cameras is ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) where FIR processed imagery fused with other sensors data (radar, ...) is providing a driver warning when dangerous situations are occurring. The communication will concentrate on FIR processed imagery for object or obstacles detection on the road or near the road. FIR imagery highlighting hot spots is a powerful detection tool as it provides a good contrast on some of the most common elements of the road scenery (engines, wheels, gas exhaust pipes, pedestrians, 2 wheelers, animals,...). Moreover FIR algorithms are much more robust than visible ones as there is less variability in image contrast with time (day/night, shadows, ...). We based our detection algorithm on one side on the peculiar aspect of vehicles, pedestrians in FIR images and on the other side on the analysis of motion along time, that allows anticipation of future motion. We will show results obtained with FIR processed imagery within the PAROTO project, supported by the French Ministry of Research, that ended in spring 04.

  20. The design of aerial camera focusing mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changchang; Yang, Hongtao; Niu, Haijun

    2015-10-01

    In order to ensure the imaging resolution of aerial camera and compensating defocusing caused by the changing of atmospheric temperature, pressure, oblique photographing distance and other environmental factor [1,2], and to meeting the overall design requirements of the camera for the lower mass and smaller size , the linear focusing mechanism is designed. Through the target surface support, the target surface component is connected with focusing driving mechanism. Make use of precision ball screws, focusing mechanism transforms the input rotary motion of motor into linear motion of the focal plane assembly. Then combined with the form of linear guide restraint movement, the magnetic encoder is adopted to detect the response of displacement. And the closed loop control is adopted to realize accurate focusing. This paper illustrated the design scheme for a focusing mechanism and analyzed its error sources. It has the advantages of light friction and simple transmission chain and reducing the transmission error effectively. And this paper also analyses the target surface by finite element analysis and lightweight design. Proving that the precision of focusing mechanism can achieve higher than 3um, and the focusing range is +/-2mm.

  1. Oil spill detection using hyperspectral infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhi-jie; Tang, Wei; Tang, Xin; Yue, Song; Wang, Chen-sheng

    2016-11-01

    Oil spill pollution is a severe environmental problem that persists in the marine environment and in inland water systems around the world. Remote sensing is an important part of oil spill response. The hyperspectral images can not only provide the space information but also the spectral information. Pixels of interests generally incorporate information from disparate component that requires quantitative decomposition of these pixels to extract desired information. Oil spill detection can be implemented by applying hyperspectral camera which can collect the hyperspectral data of the oil. By extracting desired spectral signature from hundreds of band information, one can detect and identify oil spill area in vast geographical regions. There are now numerous hyperspectral image processing algorithms developed for target detection. In this paper, we investigate several most widely used target detection algorithm for the identification of surface oil spills in ocean environment. In the experiments, we applied a hyperspectral camera to collect the real life oil spill. The experimental results shows the feasibility of oil spill detection using hyperspectral imaging and the performance of hyperspectral image processing algorithms were also validated.

  2. Mars Cameras Make Panoramic Photography a Snap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    If you wish to explore a Martian landscape without leaving your armchair, a few simple clicks around the NASA Web site will lead you to panoramic photographs taken from the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity. Many of the technologies that enable this spectacular Mars photography have also inspired advancements in photography here on Earth, including the panoramic camera (Pancam) and its housing assembly, designed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Cornell University for the Mars missions. Mounted atop each rover, the Pancam mast assembly (PMA) can tilt a full 180 degrees and swivel 360 degrees, allowing for a complete, highly detailed view of the Martian landscape. The rover Pancams take small, 1 megapixel (1 million pixel) digital photographs, which are stitched together into large panoramas that sometimes measure 4 by 24 megapixels. The Pancam software performs some image correction and stitching after the photographs are transmitted back to Earth. Different lens filters and a spectrometer also assist scientists in their analyses of infrared radiation from the objects in the photographs. These photographs from Mars spurred developers to begin thinking in terms of larger and higher quality images: super-sized digital pictures, or gigapixels, which are images composed of 1 billion or more pixels. Gigapixel images are more than 200 times the size captured by today s standard 4 megapixel digital camera. Although originally created for the Mars missions, the detail provided by these large photographs allows for many purposes, not all of which are limited to extraterrestrial photography.

  3. Vertically Integrated Edgeless Photon Imaging Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim, Farah [Fermilab; Deptuch, Grzegorz [Fermilab; Shenai, Alpana [Fermilab; Maj, Piotr [AGH-UST, Cracow; Kmon, Piotr [AGH-UST, Cracow; Grybos, Pawel [AGH-UST, Cracow; Szczygiel, Robert [AGH-UST, Cracow; Siddons, D. Peter [Brookhaven; Rumaiz, Abdul [Brookhaven; Kuczewski, Anthony [Brookhaven; Mead, Joseph [Brookhaven; Bradford, Rebecca [Argonne; Weizeorick, John [Argonne

    2017-01-01

    The Vertically Integrated Photon Imaging Chip - Large, (VIPIC-L), is a large area, small pixel (65μm), 3D integrated, photon counting ASIC with zero-suppressed or full frame dead-time-less data readout. It features data throughput of 14.4 Gbps per chip with a full frame readout speed of 56kframes/s in the imaging mode. VIPIC-L contain 192 x 192 pixel array and the total size of the chip is 1.248cm x 1.248cm with only a 5μm periphery. It contains about 120M transistors. A 1.3M pixel camera module will be developed by arranging a 6 x 6 array of 3D VIPIC-L’s bonded to a large area silicon sensor on the analog side and to a readout board on the digital side. The readout board hosts a bank of FPGA’s, one per VIPIC-L to allow processing of up to 0.7 Tbps of raw data produced by the camera.

  4. Infrared Camera Analysis of Laser Hardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tesar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of surface properties such as laser hardening becomes very important in present manufacturing. Resulting laser hardening depth and surface hardness can be affected by changes in optical properties of material surface, that is, by absorptivity that gives the ratio between absorbed energy and incident laser energy. The surface changes on tested sample of steel block were made by engraving laser with different scanning velocity and repetition frequency. During the laser hardening the process was observed by infrared (IR camera system that measures infrared radiation from the heated sample and depicts it in a form of temperature field. The images from the IR camera of the sample are shown, and maximal temperatures of all engraved areas are evaluated and compared. The surface hardness was measured, and the hardening depth was estimated from the measured hardness profile in the sample cross-section. The correlation between reached temperature, surface hardness, and hardening depth is shown. The highest and the lowest temperatures correspond to the lowest/highest hardness and the highest/lowest hardening depth.

  5. Foreground extraction for moving RGBD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junejo, Imran N.; Ahmed, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple method to perform foreground extraction for a moving RGBD camera. These cameras have now been available for quite some time. Their popularity is primarily due to their low cost and ease of availability. Although the field of foreground extraction or background subtraction has been explored by the computer vision researchers since a long time, the depth-based subtraction is relatively new and has not been extensively addressed as of yet. Most of the current methods make heavy use of geometric reconstruction, making the solutions quite restrictive. In this paper, we make a novel use RGB and RGBD data: from the RGB frame, we extract corner features (FAST) and then represent these features with the histogram of oriented gradients (HoG) descriptor. We train a non-linear SVM on these descriptors. During the test phase, we make used of the fact that the foreground object has distinct depth ordering with respect to the rest of the scene. That is, we use the positively classified FAST features on the test frame to initiate a region growing to obtain the accurate segmentation of the foreground object from just the RGBD data. We demonstrate the proposed method of a synthetic datasets, and demonstrate encouraging quantitative and qualitative results.

  6. Women's Creation of Camera Phone Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hoo Lee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A major aspect of the relationship between women and the media is the extent to which the new media environment is shaping how women live and perceive the world. It is necessary to understand, in a concrete way, how the new media environment is articulated to our gendered culture, how the symbolic or physical forms of the new media condition women’s experiences, and the degree to which a ‘post-gendered re-codification’ can be realized within a new media environment. This paper intends to provide an ethnographic case study of women’s experiences with camera phones, examining the extent to which these experiences recreate or reconstruct women’s subjectivity or identity. By taking a close look at the ways in which women utilize and appropriate the camera phone in their daily lives, it focuses not only on women’s cultural practices in making meanings but also on their possible effect in the deconstruction of gendered techno-culture.

  7. Electronic Still Camera Project on STS-48

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    On behalf of NASA, the Office of Commercial Programs (OCP) has signed a Technical Exchange Agreement (TEA) with Autometric, Inc. (Autometric) of Alexandria, Virginia. The purpose of this agreement is to evaluate and analyze a high-resolution Electronic Still Camera (ESC) for potential commercial applications. During the mission, Autometric will provide unique photo analysis and hard-copy production. Once the mission is complete, Autometric will furnish NASA with an analysis of the ESC s capabilities. Electronic still photography is a developing technology providing the means by which a hand held camera electronically captures and produces a digital image with resolution approaching film quality. The digital image, stored on removable hard disks or small optical disks, can be converted to a format suitable for downlink transmission, or it can be enhanced using image processing software. The on-orbit ability to enhance or annotate high-resolution images and then downlink these images in real-time will greatly improve Space Shuttle and Space Station capabilities in Earth observations and on-board photo documentation.

  8. Deconvolution of Camera Instrument Response Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John H; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M; Woody, Michael S; Ostap, E Michael; Goldman, Yale E

    2017-03-28

    Temporal sequences of fluorescence intensities in single-molecule experiments are often obtained from stacks of camera images. The dwell times of different macromolecular structural or functional states, correlated with characteristic fluorescence intensities, are extracted from the images and combined into dwell time distributions that are fitted by kinetic functions to extract corresponding rate constants. The frame rate of the camera limits the time resolution of the experiment and thus the fastest rate processes that can be reliably detected and quantified. However, including the influence of discrete sampling (framing) on the detected time series in the fitted model enables rate processes near to the frame rate to be reliably estimated. This influence, similar to the instrument response function in other types of instruments, such as pulsed emission decay fluorometers, is easily incorporated into the fitted model. The same concept applies to any temporal data that is low-pass filtered or decimated to improve signal to noise ratio. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CCD Camera Detection of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, John R

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and precise quantification of the infectivity of HIV is important for molecular virologic studies, as well as for measuring the activities of antiviral drugs and neutralizing antibodies. An indicator cell line, a CCD camera, and image-analysis software are used to quantify HIV infectivity. The cells of the P4R5 line, which express the receptors for HIV infection as well as β-galactosidase under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, are infected with HIV and then incubated 2 days later with X-gal to stain the infected cells blue. Digital images of monolayers of the infected cells are captured using a high resolution CCD video camera and a macro video zoom lens. A software program is developed to process the images and to count the blue-stained foci of infection. The described method allows for the rapid quantification of the infected cells over a wide range of viral inocula with reproducibility, accuracy and at relatively low cost.

  10. Scalable IC Platform for Smart Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Broers

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Smart cameras are among the emerging new fields of electronics. The points of interest are in the application areas, software and IC development. In order to reduce cost, it is worthwhile to invest in a single architecture that can be scaled for the various application areas in performance (and resulting power consumption. In this paper, we show that the combination of an SIMD (single-instruction multiple-data processor and a general-purpose DSP is very advantageous for the image processing tasks encountered in smart cameras. While the SIMD processor gives the very high performance necessary by exploiting the inherent data parallelism found in the pixel crunching part of the algorithms, the DSP offers a friendly approach to the more complex tasks. The paper continues to motivate that SIMD processors have very convenient scaling properties in silicon, making the complete, SIMD-DSP architecture suitable for different application areas without changing the software suite. Analysis of the changes in power consumption due to scaling shows that for typical image processing tasks, it is beneficial to scale the SIMD processor to use the maximum level of parallelism available in the algorithm if the IC supply voltage can be lowered. If silicon cost is of importance, the parallelism of the processor should be scaled to just reach the desired performance given the speed of the silicon.

  11. Online camera-gyroscope autocalibration for cell phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chao; Evans, Brian L

    2014-12-01

    The gyroscope is playing a key role in helping estimate 3D camera rotation for various vision applications on cell phones, including video stabilization and feature tracking. Successful fusion of gyroscope and camera data requires that the camera, gyroscope, and their relative pose to be calibrated. In addition, the timestamps of gyroscope readings and video frames are usually not well synchronized. Previous paper performed camera-gyroscope calibration and synchronization offline after the entire video sequence has been captured with restrictions on the camera motion, which is unnecessarily restrictive for everyday users to run apps that directly use the gyroscope. In this paper, we propose an online method that estimates all the necessary parameters, whereas a user is capturing video. Our contributions are: 1) simultaneous online camera self-calibration and camera-gyroscope calibration based on an implicit extended Kalman filter and 2) generalization of the multiple-view coplanarity constraint on camera rotation in a rolling shutter camera model for cell phones. The proposed method is able to estimate the needed calibration and synchronization parameters online with all kinds of camera motion and can be embedded in gyro-aided applications, such as video stabilization and feature tracking. Both Monte Carlo simulation and cell phone experiments show that the proposed online calibration and synchronization method converge fast to the ground truth values.

  12. Motorcycle detection and counting using stereo camera, IR camera, and microphone array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bo; Gibson, David R. P.; Middleton, Dan

    2013-03-01

    Detection, classification, and characterization are the key to enhancing motorcycle safety, motorcycle operations and motorcycle travel estimation. Average motorcycle fatalities per Vehicle Mile Traveled (VMT) are currently estimated at 30 times those of auto fatalities. Although it has been an active research area for many years, motorcycle detection still remains a challenging task. Working with FHWA, we have developed a hybrid motorcycle detection and counting system using a suite of sensors including stereo camera, thermal IR camera and unidirectional microphone array. The IR thermal camera can capture the unique thermal signatures associated with the motorcycle's exhaust pipes that often show bright elongated blobs in IR images. The stereo camera in the system is used to detect the motorcyclist who can be easily windowed out in the stereo disparity map. If the motorcyclist is detected through his or her 3D body recognition, motorcycle is detected. Microphones are used to detect motorcycles that often produce low frequency acoustic signals. All three microphones in the microphone array are placed in strategic locations on the sensor platform to minimize the interferences of background noises from sources such as rain and wind. Field test results show that this hybrid motorcycle detection and counting system has an excellent performance.

  13. From the Pinhole Camera to the Shape of a Lens: The Camera-Obscura Reloaded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Max; Priemer, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate how the form of a plano-convex lens and a derivation of the thin lens equation can be understood through simple physical considerations. The basic principle is the extension of the pinhole camera using additional holes. The resulting images are brought into coincidence through the deflection of light with an arrangement of prisms.…

  14. Lights, Camera, AG-Tion: Promoting Agricultural and Environmental Education on Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrman, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Viewing of online videos and television segments has become a popular and efficient way for Extension audiences to acquire information. This article describes a unique approach to teaching on camera that may help Extension educators communicate their messages with comfort and personality. The S.A.L.A.D. approach emphasizes using relevant teaching…

  15. A wide-angle camera module for disposable endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Dongha; Yeon, Jesun; Yi, Jason; Park, Jongwon; Park, Soo Nam; Lee, Nanhee

    2016-08-01

    A wide-angle miniaturized camera module for disposable endoscope is demonstrated in this paper. A lens module with 150° angle of view (AOV) is designed and manufactured. All plastic injection-molded lenses and a commercial CMOS image sensor are employed to reduce the manufacturing cost. The image sensor and LED illumination unit are assembled with a lens module. The camera module does not include a camera processor to further reduce its size and cost. The size of the camera module is 5.5 × 5.5 × 22.3 mm3. The diagonal field of view (FOV) of the camera module is measured to be 110°. A prototype of a disposable endoscope is implemented to perform a pre-clinical animal testing. The esophagus of an adult beagle dog is observed. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a cost-effective and high-performance camera module for disposable endoscopy.

  16. Performance evaluation and clinical applications of 3D plenoptic cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan; Shademan, Azad; Opfermann, Justin; Leonard, Simon; Kim, Peter C. W.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-06-01

    The observation and 3D quantification of arbitrary scenes using optical imaging systems is challenging, but increasingly necessary in many fields. This paper provides a technical basis for the application of plenoptic cameras in medical and medical robotics applications, and rigorously evaluates camera integration and performance in the clinical setting. It discusses plenoptic camera calibration and setup, assesses plenoptic imaging in a clinically relevant context, and in the context of other quantitative imaging technologies. We report the methods used for camera calibration, precision and accuracy results in an ideal and simulated surgical setting. Afterwards, we report performance during a surgical task. Test results showed the average precision of the plenoptic camera to be 0.90mm, increasing to 1.37mm for tissue across the calibrated FOV. The ideal accuracy was 1.14mm. The camera showed submillimeter error during a simulated surgical task.

  17. Camera systems in human motion analysis for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lim Chee; Basah, Shafriza Nisha; Yaacob, Sazali; Juan, Yeap Ewe; Kadir, Aida Khairunnisaa Ab.

    2015-05-01

    Human Motion Analysis (HMA) system has been one of the major interests among researchers in the field of computer vision, artificial intelligence and biomedical engineering and sciences. This is due to its wide and promising biomedical applications, namely, bio-instrumentation for human computer interfacing and surveillance system for monitoring human behaviour as well as analysis of biomedical signal and image processing for diagnosis and rehabilitation applications. This paper provides an extensive review of the camera system of HMA, its taxonomy, including camera types, camera calibration and camera configuration. The review focused on evaluating the camera system consideration of the HMA system specifically for biomedical applications. This review is important as it provides guidelines and recommendation for researchers and practitioners in selecting a camera system of the HMA system for biomedical applications.

  18. Development of SED Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN)

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sanghyuk; Jeon, Yiseul; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Ji, Tae-Geun; Hyun, Minhee; Choi, Changsu; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2016-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and performance of a camera system, Spectral energy distribution Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN). It was developed to measure SEDs of high redshift quasar candidates (z $\\gtrsim$ 5) and other targets, e.g., young stellar objects, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts, and to trace the time variability of SEDs of objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SQUEAN consists of an on-axis focal plane camera module, an auto-guiding system, and mechanical...

  19. The Policy of Enforcement: Red Light Cameras and Racial Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Eger, Robert J.; Fortner, C. Kevin; Slade, Catherine P.

    2015-01-01

    The article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1098611115586174 We explore the question of whether some of the often conflicting evidence of racial profiling can be cleared up using red light camera observations to measure racial disparities in traffic violations. Using data from cameras at intersections matched to census data, we find that although citations from the red light cameras are issued to a disproportionate number of minorities based o...

  20. Exploring Computation-Communication Tradeoffs in Camera Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mazumdar, Amrita; Moreau, Thierry; Kim, Sung; Cowan, Meghan; Alaghi, Armin; Ceze, Luis; Oskin, Mark; Sathe, Visvesh

    2017-01-01

    Cameras are the defacto sensor. The growing demand for real-time and low-power computer vision, coupled with trends towards high-efficiency heterogeneous systems, has given rise to a wide range of image processing acceleration techniques at the camera node and in the cloud. In this paper, we characterize two novel camera systems that use acceleration techniques to push the extremes of energy and performance scaling, and explore the computation-communication tradeoffs in their design. The firs...

  1. Resolution of slit-lamp microscopy photography using various cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yufeng; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Huicheng; Karp, Carol L; Zhong, Jianguang; Tao, Aizhu; Shao, Yilei; Wang, Jianhua

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the resolutions of slit-lamp microscopy photography using various cameras. Evaluation of diagnostic test or technology. Healthy subjects were imaged with these adapted cameras through slit-lamp microscopy. A total of 8 cameras, including 6 custom-mounted slit-lamp cameras and 2 commercial slit-lamp cameras, were tested with standard slit-lamp microscopy devices for imaging of the eye. Various magnifications were used during imaging. A standard resolution test plate was used to test the resolutions at different magnifications. These outcomes were compared with commercial slit-lamp cameras. The main measurements included the display spatial resolutions, image spatial resolutions, and ocular resolutions. The outcome also includes the relationships between resolution and the pixel density of the displays and images. All cameras were successfully adapted to the slit-lamp microscopy, and high-quality ocular images were obtained. Differences in the display spatial resolutions were found among cameras [analysis of variance (ANOVA), Pcameras using the high-definition multimedia interface (HDMI) compared with others, including cameras in smart phones. The display resolutions of smart phone displays were greater than cameras with video graphics array displays. The display spatial resolutions were found as a function of display pixel density (r>0.95, P0.85, Pcameras (ANOVA, P0.98, P0.85, Pcamera yielded the highest image spatial resolution. However, the ocular resolution through binocular viewing of the slit-lamp microscopy was found to have the highest resolution compared with the display and image spatial resolutions of all of the cameras. Several cameras can be adapted with slit-lamp microscopy for ophthalmic imaging, yielding various display and image spatial resolutions. However, the resolution seemed to not be as good as ocular viewing through the slit-lamp biomicroscope.

  2. Smart Cameras for Remote Science Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David R.; Abbey, William; Allwood, Abigail; Bekker, Dmitriy; Bornstein, Benjamin; Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Castano, Rebecca; Estlin, Tara; Fuchs, Thomas; Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-01-01

    Communication with remote exploration spacecraft is often intermittent and bandwidth is highly constrained. Future missions could use onboard science data understanding to prioritize downlink of critical features [1], draft summary maps of visited terrain [2], or identify targets of opportunity for followup measurements [3]. We describe a generic approach to classify geologic surfaces for autonomous science operations, suitable for parallelized implementations in FPGA hardware. We map these surfaces with texture channels - distinctive numerical signatures that differentiate properties such as roughness, pavement coatings, regolith characteristics, sedimentary fabrics and differential outcrop weathering. This work describes our basic image analysis approach and reports an initial performance evaluation using surface images from the Mars Exploration Rovers. Future work will incorporate these methods into camera hardware for real-time processing.

  3. CHAMP (Camera, Handlens, and Microscope Probe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, Greg S.; Boynton, John E.; Balzer, Mark A.; Beegle, Luther; Sobel, Harold R.; Fisher, Ted; Klein, Dan; Deans, Matthew; Lee, Pascal; Sepulveda, Cesar A.

    2005-01-01

    CHAMP (Camera, Handlens And Microscope Probe)is a novel field microscope capable of color imaging with continuously variable spatial resolution from infinity imaging down to diffraction-limited microscopy (3 micron/pixel). As a robotic arm-mounted imager, CHAMP supports stereo imaging with variable baselines, can continuously image targets at an increasing magnification during an arm approach, can provide precision rangefinding estimates to targets, and can accommodate microscopic imaging of rough surfaces through a image filtering process called z-stacking. CHAMP was originally developed through the Mars Instrument Development Program (MIDP) in support of robotic field investigations, but may also find application in new areas such as robotic in-orbit servicing and maintenance operations associated with spacecraft and human operations. We overview CHAMP'S instrument performance and basic design considerations below.

  4. CHAMP - Camera, Handlens, and Microscope Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungas, G. S.; Beegle, L. W.; Boynton, J.; Sepulveda, C. A.; Balzer, M. A.; Sobel, H. R.; Fisher, T. A.; Deans, M.; Lee, P.

    2005-01-01

    CHAMP (Camera, Handlens And Microscope Probe) is a novel field microscope capable of color imaging with continuously variable spatial resolution from infinity imaging down to diffraction-limited microscopy (3 micron/pixel). As an arm-mounted imager, CHAMP supports stereo-imaging with variable baselines, can continuously image targets at an increasing magnification during an arm approach, can provide precision range-finding estimates to targets, and can accommodate microscopic imaging of rough surfaces through a image filtering process called z-stacking. Currently designed with a filter wheel with 4 different filters, so that color and black and white images can be obtained over the entire Field-of-View, future designs will increase the number of filter positions to include 8 different filters. Finally, CHAMP incorporates controlled white and UV illumination so that images can be obtained regardless of sun position, and any potential fluorescent species can be identified so the most astrobiologically interesting samples can be identified.

  5. Operational experience with a CID camera system

    CERN Document Server

    Welsch, Carsten P; Burel, Bruno; Lefèvre, Thibaut

    2006-01-01

    In future high intensity, high energy accelerators particle losses must be minimized as activation of the vacuum chambers or other components makes maintenance and upgrade work time consuming and costly. It is imperative to have a clear understanding of the mechanisms that can lead to halo formation, and to have the possibility to test available theoretical models with an adequate experimental setup. Measurements based on optical transition radiation (OTR) provide an interesting opportunity for analyzing the transverse beam profile due to the fast time response and very good linearity of the signal with respect to the beam intensity. On the other hand, the dynamic range of typical acquisition systems as they are used in the CLIC test facility (CTF3) is typically limited and must be improved before these systems can be applied to halo measurements. One possibility for high dynamic range measurements is an innovative camera system based on charge injection device (CID) technology. With possible future measureme...

  6. Relevance of ellipse eccentricity for camera calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordwinzew, W.; Tietz, B.; Boochs, F.; Paulus, D.

    2015-05-01

    Plane circular targets are widely used within calibrations of optical sensors through photogrammetric set-ups. Due to this popularity, their advantages and disadvantages are also well studied in the scientific community. One main disadvantage occurs when the projected target is not parallel to the image plane. In this geometric constellation, the target has an elliptic geometry with an offset between its geometric and its projected center. This difference is referred to as ellipse eccentricity and is a systematic error which, if not treated accordingly, has a negative impact on the overall achievable accuracy. The magnitude and direction of eccentricity errors are dependent on various factors. The most important one is the target size. The bigger an ellipse in the image is, the bigger the error will be. Although correction models dealing with eccentricity have been available for decades, it is mostly seen as a planning task in which the aim is to choose the target size small enough so that the resulting eccentricity error remains negligible. Besides the fact that advanced mathematical models are available and that the influence of this error on camera calibration results is still not completely investigated, there are various additional reasons why bigger targets can or should not be avoided. One of them is the growing image resolution as a by-product from advancements in the sensor development. Here, smaller pixels have a lower S/N ratio, necessitating more pixels to assure geometric quality. Another scenario might need bigger targets due to larger scale differences whereas distant targets should still contain enough information in the image. In general, bigger ellipses contain more contour pixels and therefore more information. This supports the target-detection algorithms to perform better even at non-optimal conditions such as data from sensors with a high noise level. In contrast to rather simple measuring situations in a stereo or multi-image mode, the impact

  7. Neutron camera employing row and column summations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clonts, Lloyd G.; Diawara, Yacouba; Donahue, Jr, Cornelius; Montcalm, Christopher A.; Riedel, Richard A.; Visscher, Theodore

    2016-06-14

    For each photomultiplier tube in an Anger camera, an R.times.S array of preamplifiers is provided to detect electrons generated within the photomultiplier tube. The outputs of the preamplifiers are digitized to measure the magnitude of the signals from each preamplifier. For each photomultiplier tube, a corresponding summation circuitry including R row summation circuits and S column summation circuits numerically add the magnitudes of the signals from preamplifiers for each row and for each column to generate histograms. For a P.times.Q array of photomultiplier tubes, P.times.Q summation circuitries generate P.times.Q row histograms including R entries and P.times.Q column histograms including S entries. The total set of histograms include P.times.Q.times.(R+S) entries, which can be analyzed by a position calculation circuit to determine the locations of events (detection of a neutron).

  8. Calibration of a Stereo Radiation Detection Camera Using Planar Homography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hae Baek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a calibration technique of a stereo gamma detection camera. Calibration of the internal and external parameters of a stereo vision camera is a well-known research problem in the computer vision society. However, few or no stereo calibration has been investigated in the radiation measurement research. Since no visual information can be obtained from a stereo radiation camera, it is impossible to use a general stereo calibration algorithm directly. In this paper, we develop a hybrid-type stereo system which is equipped with both radiation and vision cameras. To calibrate the stereo radiation cameras, stereo images of a calibration pattern captured from the vision cameras are transformed in the view of the radiation cameras. The homography transformation is calibrated based on the geometric relationship between visual and radiation camera coordinates. The accuracy of the stereo parameters of the radiation camera is analyzed by distance measurements to both visual light and gamma sources. The experimental results show that the measurement error is about 3%.

  9. Neutron emissivity profile camera diagnostics considering present and future tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, S. [EURATOM-VR Association, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    This thesis describes the neutron profile camera situated at JET. The profile camera is one of the most important neutron emission diagnostic devices operating at JET. It gives useful information of the total neutron yield rate but also about the neutron emissivity distribution. Data analysis was performed in order to compare three different calibration methods. The data was collected from the deuterium campaign, C4, in the beginning of 2001. The thesis also includes a section about the implication of a neutron profile camera for ITER, where the issue regarding interface difficulties is in focus. The ITER JCT (Joint Central Team) proposal of a neutron camera for ITER is studied in some detail.

  10. Investigating the Suitability of Mirrorless Cameras in Terrestrial Photogrammetric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incekara, A. H.; Seker, D. Z.; Delen, A.; Acar, A.

    2017-11-01

    Digital single-lens reflex cameras (DSLR) which are commonly referred as mirrored cameras are preferred for terrestrial photogrammetric applications such as documentation of cultural heritage, archaeological excavations and industrial measurements. Recently, digital cameras which are called as mirrorless systems that can be used with different lens combinations have become available for using similar applications. The main difference between these two camera types is the presence of the mirror mechanism which means that the incoming beam towards the lens is different in the way it reaches the sensor. In this study, two different digital cameras, one with a mirror (Nikon D700) and the other without a mirror (Sony a6000), were used to apply close range photogrammetric application on the rock surface at Istanbul Technical University (ITU) Ayazaga Campus. Accuracy of the 3D models created by means of photographs taken with both cameras were compared with each other using difference values between field and model coordinates which were obtained after the alignment of the photographs. In addition, cross sections were created on the 3D models for both data source and maximum area difference between them is quite small because they are almost overlapping. The mirrored camera has become more consistent in itself with respect to the change of model coordinates for models created with photographs taken at different times, with almost the same ground sample distance. As a result, it has been determined that mirrorless cameras and point cloud produced using photographs obtained from these cameras can be used for terrestrial photogrammetric studies.

  11. A SPATIO-SPECTRAL CAMERA FOR HIGH RESOLUTION HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Livens

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Imaging with a conventional frame camera from a moving remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS is by design very inefficient. Less than 1 % of the flying time is used for collecting light. This unused potential can be utilized by an innovative imaging concept, the spatio-spectral camera. The core of the camera is a frame sensor with a large number of hyperspectral filters arranged on the sensor in stepwise lines. It combines the advantages of frame cameras with those of pushbroom cameras. By acquiring images in rapid succession, such a camera can collect detailed hyperspectral information, while retaining the high spatial resolution offered by the sensor. We have developed two versions of a spatio-spectral camera and used them in a variety of conditions. In this paper, we present a summary of three missions with the in-house developed COSI prototype camera (600–900 nm in the domains of precision agriculture (fungus infection monitoring in experimental wheat plots, horticulture (crop status monitoring to evaluate irrigation management in strawberry fields and geology (meteorite detection on a grassland field. Additionally, we describe the characteristics of the 2nd generation, commercially available ButterflEYE camera offering extended spectral range (475–925 nm, and we discuss future work.

  12. Camera Traps Can Be Heard and Seen by Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Paul D.; Ballard, Guy-Anthony; Fleming, Peter J. S.; Schaefer, Michael; Williams, Warwick; Falzon, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps are electrical instruments that emit sounds and light. In recent decades they have become a tool of choice in wildlife research and monitoring. The variability between camera trap models and the methods used are considerable, and little is known about how animals respond to camera trap emissions. It has been reported that some animals show a response to camera traps, and in research this is often undesirable so it is important to understand why the animals are disturbed. We conducted laboratory based investigations to test the audio and infrared optical outputs of 12 camera trap models. Camera traps were measured for audio outputs in an anechoic chamber; we also measured ultrasonic (n = 5) and infrared illumination outputs (n = 7) of a subset of the camera trap models. We then compared the perceptive hearing range (n = 21) and assessed the vision ranges (n = 3) of mammals species (where data existed) to determine if animals can see and hear camera traps. We report that camera traps produce sounds that are well within the perceptive range of most mammals’ hearing and produce illumination that can be seen by many species. PMID:25354356

  13. Operator-based homogeneous coordinates: application in camera document scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez-Salazar, Rigoberto; Diaz-Ramirez, Victor H.

    2017-07-01

    An operator-based approach for the study of homogeneous coordinates and projective geometry is proposed. First, some basic geometrical concepts and properties of the operators are investigated in the one- and two-dimensional cases. Then, the pinhole camera model is derived, and a simple method for homography estimation and camera calibration is explained. The usefulness of the analyzed theoretical framework is exemplified by addressing the perspective correction problem for a camera document scanning application. Several experimental results are provided for illustrative purposes. The proposed approach is expected to provide practical insights for inexperienced students on camera calibration, computer vision, and optical metrology among others.

  14. Improved Tracking of Targets by Cameras on a Mars Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won; Ansar, Adnan; Steele, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A paper describes a method devised to increase the robustness and accuracy of tracking of targets by means of three stereoscopic pairs of video cameras on a Mars-rover-type exploratory robotic vehicle. Two of the camera pairs are mounted on a mast that can be adjusted in pan and tilt; the third camera pair is mounted on the main vehicle body. Elements of the method include a mast calibration, a camera-pointing algorithm, and a purely geometric technique for handing off tracking between different camera pairs at critical distances as the rover approaches a target of interest. The mast calibration is an extension of camera calibration in which the camera images of calibration targets at known positions are collected at various pan and tilt angles. In the camerapointing algorithm, pan and tilt angles are computed by a closed-form, non-iterative solution of inverse kinematics of the mast combined with mathematical models of the cameras. The purely geometric camera-handoff technique involves the use of stereoscopic views of a target of interest in conjunction with the mast calibration.

  15. Geometric Stability and Lens Decentering in Compact Digital Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Ablanedo, Enoc; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Ramón; Armesto, Julia; Taboada, María Flor Álvarez

    2010-01-01

    A study on the geometric stability and decentering present in sensor-lens systems of six identical compact digital cameras has been conducted. With regard to geometrical stability, the variation of internal geometry parameters (principal distance, principal point position and distortion parameters) was considered. With regard to lens decentering, the amount of radial and tangential displacement resulting from decentering distortion was related with the precision of the camera and with the offset of the principal point from the geometric center of the sensor. The study was conducted with data obtained after 372 calibration processes (62 per camera). The tests were performed for each camera in three situations: during continuous use of the cameras, after camera power off/on and after the full extension and retraction of the zoom-lens. Additionally, 360 new calibrations were performed in order to study the variation of the internal geometry when the camera is rotated. The aim of this study was to relate the level of stability and decentering in a camera with the precision and quality that can be obtained. An additional goal was to provide practical recommendations about photogrammetric use of such cameras. PMID:22294886

  16. VIDEO-BASED POINT CLOUD GENERATION USING MULTIPLE ACTION CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Teo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the development of action cameras, the use of video technology for collecting geo-spatial data becomes an important trend. The objective of this study is to compare the image-mode and video-mode of multiple action cameras for 3D point clouds generation. Frame images are acquired from discrete camera stations while videos are taken from continuous trajectories. The proposed method includes five major parts: (1 camera calibration, (2 video conversion and alignment, (3 orientation modelling, (4 dense matching, and (5 evaluation. As the action cameras usually have large FOV in wide viewing mode, camera calibration plays an important role to calibrate the effect of lens distortion before image matching. Once the camera has been calibrated, the author use these action cameras to take video in an indoor environment. The videos are further converted into multiple frame images based on the frame rates. In order to overcome the time synchronous issues in between videos from different viewpoints, an additional timer APP is used to determine the time shift factor between cameras in time alignment. A structure form motion (SfM technique is utilized to obtain the image orientations. Then, semi-global matching (SGM algorithm is adopted to obtain dense 3D point clouds. The preliminary results indicated that the 3D points from 4K video are similar to 12MP images, but the data acquisition performance of 4K video is more efficient than 12MP digital images.

  17. Establishing a common coordinate view in multiple moving aerial cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Yaser; Gritai, Alexei; Junejo, Imran; Muise, Robert; Mahalanobis, Abhijit; Shah, Mubarak

    2005-05-01

    A camera mounted on an aerial vehicle provides an excellent means of monitoring large areas of a scene. Utilizing several such cameras on different aerial vehicles allows further flexibility, in terms of increased visual scope and in the pursuit of multiple targets. The underlying concept of such co-operative sensing is to use inter-camera relationships to give global context to 'locally' obtained information at each camera. It is desirable, therefore, that the data collected at each camera and the inter-camera relationship discerned by the system be presented in a coherent visualization. Since the cameras are mounted on UAVs, large swaths of areas may be traversed in a short period of time, coherent visualization is indispensable for applications like surveillance and reconnaissance. While most visualization approaches have hitherto focused on data from a single camera at a time, as a consequence of tracking objects across cameras, we show that widely separated mosaics can be aligned, both in space and color, for concurrent visualization. Results are shown on a number of real sequences, validating our qualitative models.

  18. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  19. Camera traps can be heard and seen by animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Paul D; Ballard, Guy-Anthony; Fleming, Peter J S; Schaefer, Michael; Williams, Warwick; Falzon, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Camera traps are electrical instruments that emit sounds and light. In recent decades they have become a tool of choice in wildlife research and monitoring. The variability between camera trap models and the methods used are considerable, and little is known about how animals respond to camera trap emissions. It has been reported that some animals show a response to camera traps, and in research this is often undesirable so it is important to understand why the animals are disturbed. We conducted laboratory based investigations to test the audio and infrared optical outputs of 12 camera trap models. Camera traps were measured for audio outputs in an anechoic chamber; we also measured ultrasonic (n = 5) and infrared illumination outputs (n = 7) of a subset of the camera trap models. We then compared the perceptive hearing range (n = 21) and assessed the vision ranges (n = 3) of mammals species (where data existed) to determine if animals can see and hear camera traps. We report that camera traps produce sounds that are well within the perceptive range of most mammals' hearing and produce illumination that can be seen by many species.

  20. Camera traps can be heard and seen by animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D Meek

    Full Text Available Camera traps are electrical instruments that emit sounds and light. In recent decades they have become a tool of choice in wildlife research and monitoring. The variability between camera trap models and the methods used are considerable, and little is known about how animals respond to camera trap emissions. It has been reported that some animals show a response to camera traps, and in research this is often undesirable so it is important to understand why the animals are disturbed. We conducted laboratory based investigations to test the audio and infrared optical outputs of 12 camera trap models. Camera traps were measured for audio outputs in an anechoic chamber; we also measured ultrasonic (n = 5 and infrared illumination outputs (n = 7 of a subset of the camera trap models. We then compared the perceptive hearing range (n = 21 and assessed the vision ranges (n = 3 of mammals species (where data existed to determine if animals can see and hear camera traps. We report that camera traps produce sounds that are well within the perceptive range of most mammals' hearing and produce illumination that can be seen by many species.

  1. a Spatio-Spectral Camera for High Resolution Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livens, S.; Pauly, K.; Baeck, P.; Blommaert, J.; Nuyts, D.; Zender, J.; Delauré, B.

    2017-08-01

    Imaging with a conventional frame camera from a moving remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS) is by design very inefficient. Less than 1 % of the flying time is used for collecting light. This unused potential can be utilized by an innovative imaging concept, the spatio-spectral camera. The core of the camera is a frame sensor with a large number of hyperspectral filters arranged on the sensor in stepwise lines. It combines the advantages of frame cameras with those of pushbroom cameras. By acquiring images in rapid succession, such a camera can collect detailed hyperspectral information, while retaining the high spatial resolution offered by the sensor. We have developed two versions of a spatio-spectral camera and used them in a variety of conditions. In this paper, we present a summary of three missions with the in-house developed COSI prototype camera (600-900 nm) in the domains of precision agriculture (fungus infection monitoring in experimental wheat plots), horticulture (crop status monitoring to evaluate irrigation management in strawberry fields) and geology (meteorite detection on a grassland field). Additionally, we describe the characteristics of the 2nd generation, commercially available ButterflEYE camera offering extended spectral range (475-925 nm), and we discuss future work.

  2. Vibration factors impact analysis on aerial film camera imaging quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jun; Han, Wei; Xu, Zhonglin; Tan, Haifeng; Yang, Mingquan

    2017-08-01

    Aerial film camera can acquire ground target image information advantageous, but meanwhile the change of aircraft attitude, the film features and the work of camera inside system could result in a vibration which could depress the image quality greatly. This paper presented a design basis of vibration mitigation stabilized platform based on the vibration characteristic of the aerial film camera and indicated the application analysis that stabilized platform could support aerial camera to realize the shoot demand of multi-angle and large scale. According to the technique characteristics of stabilized platform, the development direction are high precision, more agility, miniaturization and low power.

  3. COMPARISON OF METHODS FOR GEOMETRIC CAMERA CALIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hieronymus

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods for geometric calibration of cameras in close-range photogrammetry are established and well investigated. The most common one is based on test-fields with well-known pattern, which are observed from different directions. The parameters of a distortion model are calculated using bundle-block-adjustment-algorithms. This methods works well for short focal lengths, but is essentially more problematic to use with large focal lengths. Those would require very large test-fields and surrounding space. To overcome this problem, there is another common method for calibration used in remote sensing. It employs measurements using collimator and a goniometer. A third calibration method uses diffractive optical elements (DOE to project holograms of well known pattern. In this paper these three calibration methods are compared empirically, especially in terms of accuracy. A camera has been calibrated with those methods mentioned above. All methods provide a set of distortion correction parameters as used by the photogrammetric software Australis. The resulting parameter values are very similar for all investigated methods. The three sets of distortion parameters are crosscompared against all three calibration methods. This is achieved by inserting the gained distortion parameters as fixed input into the calibration algorithms and only adjusting the exterior orientation. The RMS (root mean square of the remaining image coordinate residuals are taken as a measure of distortion correction quality. There are differences resulting from the different calibration methods. Nevertheless the measure is small for every comparison, which means that all three calibration methods can be used for accurate geometric calibration.

  4. A tiny VIS-NIR snapshot multispectral camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, Bert; Blanch, Carolina; Gonzalez, Pilar; Tack, Nicolaas; Lambrechts, Andy

    2015-03-01

    Spectral imaging can reveal a lot of hidden details about the world around us, but is currently confined to laboratory environments due to the need for complex, costly and bulky cameras. Imec has developed a unique spectral sensor concept in which the spectral unit is monolithically integrated on top of a standard CMOS image sensor at wafer level, hence enabling the design of compact, low cost and high acquisition speed spectral cameras with a high design flexibility. This flexibility has previously been demonstrated by imec in the form of three spectral camera architectures: firstly a high spatial and spectral resolution scanning camera, secondly a multichannel snapshot multispectral camera and thirdly a per-pixel mosaic snapshot spectral camera. These snapshot spectral cameras sense an entire multispectral data cube at one discrete point in time, extending the domain of spectral imaging towards dynamic, video-rate applications. This paper describes the integration of our per-pixel mosaic snapshot spectral sensors inside a tiny, portable and extremely user-friendly camera. Our prototype demonstrator cameras can acquire multispectral image cubes, either of 272x512 pixels over 16 bands in the VIS (470-620nm) or of 217x409 pixels over 25 bands in the VNIR (600-900nm) at 170 cubes per second for normal machine vision illumination levels. The cameras themselves are extremely compact based on Ximea xiQ cameras, measuring only 26x26x30mm, and can be operated from a laptop-based USB3 connection, making them easily deployable in very diverse environments.

  5. Coaxial visible and FIR camera system with accurate geometric calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Yuka; Shibata, Takashi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okutomi, Masatoshi

    2017-05-01

    A far-infrared (FIR) image contains important invisible information for various applications such as night vision and fire detection, while a visible image includes colors and textures in a scene. We present a coaxial visible and FIR camera system accompanied to obtain the complementary information of both images simultaneously. The proposed camera system is composed of three parts: a visible camera, a FIR camera, and a beam-splitter made from silicon. The FIR radiation from the scene is reflected at the beam-splitter, while the visible radiation is transmitted through this beam-splitter. Even if we use this coaxial visible and FIR camera system, the alignment between the visible and FIR images are not perfect. Therefore, we also present the joint calibration method which can simultaneously estimate accurate geometric parameters of both cameras, i.e. the intrinsic parameters of both cameras and the extrinsic parameters between both cameras. In the proposed calibration method, we use a novel calibration target which has a two-layer structure where thermal emission property of each layer is different. By using the proposed calibration target, we can stably and precisely obtain the corresponding points of the checker pattern in the calibration target from both the visible and the FIR images. Widely used calibration tools can accurately estimate both camera parameters. We can obtain aligned visible and FIR images by the coaxial camera system with precise calibration using two-layer calibration target. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed camera system is useful for various applications such as image fusion, image denoising, and image up-sampling.

  6. Structure from motion with wide circular field of view cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micusík, Branislav; Pajdla, Tomás

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a method for fully automatic and robust estimation of two-view geometry, autocalibration, and 3D metric reconstruction from point correspondences in images taken by cameras with wide circular field of view. We focus on cameras which have more than 180 degrees field of view and for which the standard perspective camera model is not sufficient, e.g., the cameras equipped with circular fish-eye lenses Nikon FC-E8 (183 degrees), Sigma 8mm-f4-EX (180 degrees), or with curved conical mirrors. We assume a circular field of view and axially symmetric image projection to autocalibrate the cameras. Many wide field of view cameras can still be modeled by the central projection followed by a nonlinear image mapping. Examples are the above-mentioned fish-eye lenses and properly assembled catadioptric cameras with conical mirrors. We show that epipolar geometry of these cameras can be estimated from a small number of correspondences by solving a polynomial eigenvalue problem. This allows the use of efficient RANSAC robust estimation to find the image projection model, the epipolar geometry, and the selection of true point correspondences from tentative correspondences contaminated by mismatches. Real catadioptric cameras are often slightly noncentral. We show that the proposed autocalibration with approximate central models is usually good enough to get correct point correspondences which can be used with accurate noncentral models in a bundle adjustment to obtain accurate 3D scene reconstruction. Noncentral camera models are dealt with and results are shown for catadioptric cameras with parabolic and spherical mirrors.

  7. A comparison of camera trap and permanent recording video camera efficiency in wildlife underpasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumeau, Jonathan; Petrod, Lana; Handrich, Yves

    2017-09-01

    In the current context of biodiversity loss through habitat fragmentation, the effectiveness of wildlife crossings, installed at great expense as compensatory measures, is of vital importance for ecological and socio-economic actors. The evaluation of these structures is directly impacted by the efficiency of monitoring tools (camera traps…), which are used to assess the effectiveness of these crossings by observing the animals that use them. The aim of this study was to quantify the efficiency of camera traps in a wildlife crossing evaluation. Six permanent recording video systems sharing the same field of view as six Reconyx HC600 camera traps installed in three wildlife underpasses were used to assess the exact proportion of missed events (event being the presence of an animal within the field of view), and the error rate concerning underpass crossing behavior (defined as either Entry or Refusal). A sequence of photographs was triggered by either animals (true trigger) or artefacts (false trigger). We quantified the number of false triggers that had actually been caused by animals that were not visible on the images ("false" false triggers). Camera traps failed to record 43.6% of small mammal events (voles, mice, shrews, etc.) and 17% of medium-sized mammal events. The type of crossing behavior (Entry or Refusal) was incorrectly assessed in 40.1% of events, with a higher error rate for entries than for refusals. Among the 3.8% of false triggers, 85% of them were "false" false triggers. This study indicates a global underestimation of the effectiveness of wildlife crossings for small mammals. Means to improve the efficiency are discussed.

  8. AIP GHz modulation detection using a streak camera: Suitability of streak cameras in the AWAKE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Muggli, P

    2017-01-01

    Using frequency mixing, a modulated light pulse of ns duration is created. We show that, with a ps-resolution streak camera that is usually used for single short pulse measurements, we can detect via an FFT detection approach up to 450 GHz modulation in a pulse in a single measurement. This work is performed in the context of the AWAKE plasma wakefield experiment where modulation frequencies in the range of 80–280 GHz are expected.

  9. Vision System of Mobile Robot Combining Binocular and Depth Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxiang Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize the three-dimensional (3D reconstruction and obtain more precise actual distances of the object, a 3D reconstruction system combining binocular and depth cameras is proposed in this paper. The whole system consists of two identical color cameras, a TOF depth camera, an image processing host, a mobile robot control host, and a mobile robot. Because of structural constraints, the resolution of TOF depth camera is very low, which difficultly meets the requirement of trajectory planning. The resolution of binocular stereo cameras can be very high, but the effect of stereo matching is not ideal for low-texture scenes. Hence binocular stereo cameras also difficultly meet the requirements of high accuracy. In this paper, the proposed system integrates depth camera and stereo matching to improve the precision of the 3D reconstruction. Moreover, a double threads processing method is applied to improve the efficiency of the system. The experimental results show that the system can effectively improve the accuracy of 3D reconstruction, identify the distance from the camera accurately, and achieve the strategy of trajectory planning.

  10. Camera Layout Design for the Upper Stage Thrust Cone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Tevin; Fowler, Bart

    2010-01-01

    Engineers in the Integrated Design and Analysis Division (EV30) use a variety of different tools to aid in the design and analysis of the Ares I vehicle. One primary tool in use is Pro-Engineer. Pro-Engineer is a computer-aided design (CAD) software that allows designers to create computer generated structural models of vehicle structures. For the Upper State thrust cone, Pro-Engineer was used to assist in the design of a layout for two camera housings. These cameras observe the separation between the first and second stage of the Ares I vehicle. For the Ares I-X, one standard speed camera was used. The Ares I design calls for two separate housings, three cameras, and a lighting system. With previous design concepts and verification strategies in mind, a new layout for the two camera design concept was developed with members of the EV32 team. With the new design, Pro-Engineer was used to draw the layout to observe how the two camera housings fit with the thrust cone assembly. Future analysis of the camera housing design will verify the stability and clearance of the camera with other hardware present on the thrust cone.

  11. It's a Snap! Selecting the Right Digital Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Digital cameras can be wonderful teaching/learning tools in the preschool classroom. They can record and document student development, make text-free cues for pre-reading children, and develop learning prompts for discussion. In this article, the author discusses tips on selecting the right digital camera. Above all, it is important to consider…

  12. Improving photometric calibration of meteor video camera systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Suggs, Robert

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of new calibration tests performed by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) designed to help quantify and minimize systematic uncertainties in meteor photometry from video camera observations. These systematic uncertainties can be categorized by two main sources: an imperfect understanding of the linearity correction for the MEO's Watec 902H2 Ultimate video cameras and uncertainties in meteor magnitudes arising from transformations between the Watec camera's Sony EX-View HAD bandpass and the bandpasses used to determine reference star magnitudes. To address the first point, we have measured the linearity response of the MEO's standard meteor video cameras using two independent laboratory tests on eight cameras. Our empirically determined linearity correction is critical for performing accurate photometry at low camera intensity levels. With regards to the second point, we have calculated synthetic magnitudes in the EX bandpass for reference stars. These synthetic magnitudes enable direct calculations of the meteor's photometric flux within the camera bandpass without requiring any assumptions of its spectral energy distribution. Systematic uncertainties in the synthetic magnitudes of individual reference stars are estimated at ∼ 0.20 mag , and are limited by the available spectral information in the reference catalogs. These two improvements allow for zero-points accurate to ∼ 0.05 - 0.10 mag in both filtered and unfiltered camera observations with no evidence for lingering systematics. These improvements are essential to accurately measuring photometric masses of individual meteors and source mass indexes.

  13. Finding suspects in multiple cameras for improved railway protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marck, J.W.; Bouma, H.; Baan, J; Oliveira Filho, J. de; Brink, M. van der

    2014-01-01

    The capability to find individuals using CCTV cameras is important for surveillance applications at large areas such as railway stations, airports and shopping centers. However, it is laborious to track and trace people over multiple cameras post incident. In this paper, we describe the live

  14. Measurement of the nonuniformity of first responder thermal imaging cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Andrew; Amon, Francine

    2008-04-01

    Police, firefighters, and emergency medical personnel are examples of first responders that are utilizing thermal imaging cameras in a very practical way every day. However, few performance metrics have been developed to assist first responders in evaluating the performance of thermal imaging technology. This paper describes one possible metric for evaluating the nonuniformity of thermal imaging cameras. Several commercially available uncooled focal plane array cameras were examined. Because of proprietary property issues, each camera was considered a 'black box'. In these experiments, an extended area black body (18 cm square) was placed very close to the objective lens of the thermal imaging camera. The resultant video output from the camera was digitized at a resolution of 640x480 pixels and a grayscale depth of 10 bits. The nonuniformity was calculated using the standard deviation of the digitized image pixel intensities divided by the mean of those pixel intensities. This procedure was repeated for each camera at several blackbody temperatures in the range from 30° C to 260° C. It has observed that the nonuniformity initially increases with temperature, then asymptotically approaches a maximum value. Nonuniformity is also applied to the calculation of Spatial Frequency Response as well providing a noise floor. The testing procedures described herein are being developed as part of a suite of tests to be incorporated into a performance standard covering thermal imaging cameras for first responders.

  15. CALIBRATION OF LOW COST RGB AND NIR UAV CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fryskowska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-metric digital cameras are being widely used for photogrammetric studies. The increase in resolution and quality of images obtained by non-metric cameras, allows to use it in low-cost UAV and terrestrial photogrammetry. Imagery acquired with non-metric cameras can be used in 3D modeling of objects or landscapes, reconstructing of historical sites, generating digital elevation models (DTM, orthophotos, or in the assessment of accidents. Non-metric digital camcorders are characterized by instability and ignorance of the interior orientation parameters. Therefore, the use of these devices requires prior calibration. Calibration research was conducted using non-metric camera, different calibration tests and various software. The first part of the paper contains a brief theoretical introduction including the basic definitions, like the construction of non-metric cameras or description of different optical distortions. The second part of the paper contains cameras calibration process, details of the calibration methods and models that have been used. Sony Nex 5 camera calibration has been done using software: Image Master Calib, Matlab - Camera Calibrator application and Agisoft Lens. For the study 2D test fields has been used. As a part of the research a comparative analysis of the results have been done.

  16. Imaging Emission Spectra with Handheld and Cellphone Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitar, David

    2012-01-01

    As point-and-shoot digital camera technology advances it is becoming easier to image spectra in a laboratory setting on a shoestring budget and get immediate results. With this in mind, I wanted to test three cameras to see how their results would differ. Two undergraduate physics students and I used one handheld 7.1 megapixel (MP) digital Cannon…

  17. The Camera Never Lies? Photographic Research Methods in Human Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tim

    2009-01-01

    A camera is an essential tool for human geography students. Most students come back from an overseas fieldtrip, for example, with their camera crammed with images captured on the hoof around their destination. Many of these will find their way into essays, reports and presentations. Photographs are also typically a key element of many human…

  18. A color based rangefinder for an omnidirectional camera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Q.; Visser, A.; Balakirsky, S.; Carpin, S.; Lewis, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to use the omnidirectional camera as a rangefinder by using color detection. The omnicam rangefinder has been tested in USARSim for its accuracy and for its practical use to build maps of the environment. The results of the test shows that an omnidirectional camera can

  19. Students' Framing of Laboratory Exercises Using Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Jesper; Jeppsson, Fredrik; Hedberg, David; Schönborn, Konrad J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal science is challenging for students due to its largely imperceptible nature. Handheld infrared cameras offer a pedagogical opportunity for students to see otherwise invisible thermal phenomena. In the present study, a class of upper secondary technology students (N = 30) partook in four IR-camera laboratory activities, designed around the…

  20. Raspberry Pi camera with intervalometer used as crescograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Stefan; Surducan, Vasile

    2017-12-01

    The intervalometer is an attachment or facility on a photo-camera that operates the shutter regularly at set intervals over a period. Professional cameras with built in intervalometers are expensive and quite difficult to find. The Canon CHDK open source operating system allows intervalometer implementation on Canon cameras only. However finding a Canon camera with near infra-red (NIR) photographic lens at affordable price is impossible. On experiments requiring several cameras (used to measure growth in plants - the crescographs, but also for coarse evaluation of the water content of leaves), the costs of the equipment are often over budget. Using two Raspberry Pi modules each equipped with a low cost NIR camera and a WIFI adapter (for downloading pictures stored on the SD card) and some freely available software, we have implemented two low budget intervalometer cameras. The shutting interval, the number of pictures to be taken, image resolution and some other parameters can be fully programmed. Cameras have been in use continuously for three months (July-October 2017) in a relevant environment (outside), proving the concept functionality.

  1. A Simple Spectrophotometer Using Common Materials and a Digital Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiatmoko, Eko; Widayani; Budiman, Maman; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal

    2011-01-01

    A simple spectrophotometer was designed using cardboard, a DVD, a pocket digital camera, a tripod and a computer. The DVD was used as a diffraction grating and the camera as a light sensor. The spectrophotometer was calibrated using a reference light prior to use. The spectrophotometer was capable of measuring optical wavelengths with a…

  2. Development of camera technology for monitoring nests. Chapter 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Andrew Cox; M. Shane Pruett; Thomas J. Benson; Scott J. Chiavacci; Frank R., III Thompson

    2012-01-01

    Photo and video technology has become increasingly useful in the study of avian nesting ecology. However, researchers interested in using camera systems are often faced with insufficient information on the types and relative advantages of available technologies. We reviewed the literature for studies of nests that used cameras and summarized them based on study...

  3. Camera monologue: Cultural critique beyond collaboration, participation, and dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Cameras always seem to capture a little too little and a little too much. In ethnographic films, profound insights are often found in the tension between what we are socially taught to perceive, and the peculiar non-social perception of the camera. Ethnographic filmmakers study the worlds of huma...

  4. Camera Control and Geo-Registration for Video Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, James W.

    With the use of large video networks, there is a need to coordinate and interpret the video imagery for decision support systems with the goal of reducing the cognitive and perceptual overload of human operators. We present computer vision strategies that enable efficient control and management of cameras to effectively monitor wide-coverage areas, and examine the framework within an actual multi-camera outdoor urban video surveillance network. First, we construct a robust and precise camera control model for commercial pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) video cameras. In addition to providing a complete functional control mapping for PTZ repositioning, the model can be used to generate wide-view spherical panoramic viewspaces for the cameras. Using the individual camera control models, we next individually map the spherical panoramic viewspace of each camera to a large aerial orthophotograph of the scene. The result provides a unified geo-referenced map representation to permit automatic (and manual) video control and exploitation of cameras in a coordinated manner. The combined framework provides new capabilities for video sensor networks that are of significance and benefit to the broad surveillance/security community.

  5. Seeing elements by visible-light digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyang; Sakurai, Kenji

    2017-03-31

    A visible-light digital camera is used for taking ordinary photos, but with new operational procedures it can measure the photon energy in the X-ray wavelength region and therefore see chemical elements. This report describes how one can observe X-rays by means of such an ordinary camera - The front cover of the camera is replaced by an opaque X-ray window to block visible light and to allow X-rays to pass; the camera takes many snap shots (called single-photon-counting mode) to record every photon event individually; an integrated-filtering method is newly proposed to correctly retrieve the energy of photons from raw camera images. Finally, the retrieved X-ray energy-dispersive spectra show fine energy resolution and great accuracy in energy calibration, and therefore the visible-light digital camera can be applied to routine X-ray fluorescence measurement to analyze the element composition in unknown samples. In addition, the visible-light digital camera is promising in that it could serve as a position sensitive X-ray energy detector. It may become able to measure the element map or chemical diffusion in a multi-element system if it is fabricated with external X-ray optic devices. Owing to the camera's low expense and fine pixel size, the present method will be widely applied to the analysis of chemical elements as well as imaging.

  6. Demonstrations of Optical Spectra with a Video Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    The use of a video camera may markedly improve demonstrations of optical spectra. First, the output electrical signal from the camera, which provides full information about a picture to be transmitted, can be used for observing the radiant power spectrum on the screen of a common oscilloscope. Second, increasing the magnification by the camera…

  7. 28 CFR 68.42 - In camera and protective orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In camera and protective orders. 68.42 Section 68.42 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE... In camera and protective orders. (a) Privileged communications. Upon application of any person, the...

  8. 32 CFR 813.4 - Combat camera operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Combat camera operations. 813.4 Section 813.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE SALES AND SERVICES VISUAL INFORMATION DOCUMENTATION PROGRAM § 813.4 Combat camera operations. (a) Air Force COMCAM forces document Air...

  9. 24 CFR 180.640 - In camera and protective orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In camera and protective orders. 180.640 Section 180.640 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... at Hearing § 180.640 In camera and protective orders. The ALJ may limit discovery or the introduction...

  10. 29 CFR 18.46 - In camera and protective orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true In camera and protective orders. 18.46 Section 18.46 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES General § 18.46 In camera and protective orders. (a) Privileges. Upon...

  11. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Suggs, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of new calibration tests performed by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Oce (MEO) designed to help quantify and minimize systematic uncertainties in meteor photometry from video camera observations. These systematic uncertainties can be categorized by two main sources: an imperfect understanding of the linearity correction for the MEO's Watec 902H2 Ultimate video cameras and uncertainties in meteor magnitudes arising from transformations between the Watec camera's Sony EX-View HAD bandpass and the bandpasses used to determine reference star magnitudes. To address the rst point, we have measured the linearity response of the MEO's standard meteor video cameras using two independent laboratory tests on eight cameras. Our empirically determined linearity correction is critical for performing accurate photometry at low camera intensity levels. With regards to the second point, we have calculated synthetic magnitudes in the EX bandpass for reference stars. These synthetic magnitudes enable direct calculations of the meteor's photometric ux within the camera band-pass without requiring any assumptions of its spectral energy distribution. Systematic uncertainties in the synthetic magnitudes of individual reference stars are estimated at 0:20 mag, and are limited by the available spectral information in the reference catalogs. These two improvements allow for zero-points accurate to 0:05 ?? 0:10 mag in both ltered and un ltered camera observations with no evidence for lingering systematics.

  12. Camera Ready: Capturing a Digital History of Chester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Armed with digital cameras, voice recorders, and movie cameras, students from Thomas Dale High School in Chester, Virginia, have been exploring neighborhoods, interviewing residents, and collecting memories of their hometown. In this article, the author describes "Digital History of Chester", a project for creating a commemorative DVD.…

  13. Do it yourself smartphone fundus camera – DIYretCAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biju Raju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the method to make a do it yourself smartphone-based fundus camera which can image the central retina as well as the peripheral retina up to the pars plana. It is a cost-effective alternative to the fundus camera.

  14. A GRAPH BASED BUNDLE ADJUSTMENT FOR INS-CAMERA CALIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bender

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a graph based approach for performing the system calibration of a sensor suite containing a fixed mounted camera and an inertial navigation system. The aim of the presented work is to obtain accurate direct georeferencing of camera images collected with small unmanned aerial systems. Prerequisite for using the pose measurements from the inertial navigation system as exterior orientation for the camera is the knowledge of the static offsets between these devices. Furthermore, the intrinsic parameters of the camera obtained in a laboratory tend to deviate slightly from the values during flights. This induces an in-flight calibration of the intrinsic camera parameters in addition to the mounting offsets between the two devices. The optimization of these values can be done by introducing them as parameters into a bundle adjustment process. We show how to solve this by exploiting a graph optimization framework, which is designed for the least square optimization of general error functions.

  15. a Graph Based Bundle Adjustment for Ins-Camera Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, D.; Schikora, M.; Sturm, J.; Cremers, D.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we present a graph based approach for performing the system calibration of a sensor suite containing a fixed mounted camera and an inertial navigation system. The aim of the presented work is to obtain accurate direct georeferencing of camera images collected with small unmanned aerial systems. Prerequisite for using the pose measurements from the inertial navigation system as exterior orientation for the camera is the knowledge of the static offsets between these devices. Furthermore, the intrinsic parameters of the camera obtained in a laboratory tend to deviate slightly from the values during flights. This induces an in-flight calibration of the intrinsic camera parameters in addition to the mounting offsets between the two devices. The optimization of these values can be done by introducing them as parameters into a bundle adjustment process. We show how to solve this by exploiting a graph optimization framework, which is designed for the least square optimization of general error functions.

  16. Unmanned Ground Vehicle Perception Using Thermal Infrared Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo; Huertas, Andres; Matthies, Larry; Bajracharya, Max; Assad, Christopher; Brennan, Shane; Bellutta, Paolo; Sherwin, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform off-road autonomous navigation at any time of day or night is a requirement for some unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) programs. Because there are times when it is desirable for military UGVs to operate without emitting strong, detectable electromagnetic signals, a passive only terrain perception mode of operation is also often a requirement. Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras can be used to provide day and night passive terrain perception. TIR cameras have a detector sensitive to either mid-wave infrared (MWIR) radiation (3-5?m) or long-wave infrared (LWIR) radiation (8-12?m). With the recent emergence of high-quality uncooled LWIR cameras, TIR cameras have become viable passive perception options for some UGV programs. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has used a stereo pair of TIR cameras under several UGV programs to perform stereo ranging, terrain mapping, tree-trunk detection, pedestrian detection, negative obstacle detection, and water detection based on object reflections. In addition, we have evaluated stereo range data at a variety of UGV speeds, evaluated dual-band TIR classification of soil, vegetation, and rock terrain types, analyzed 24 hour water and 12 hour mud TIR imagery, and analyzed TIR imagery for hazard detection through smoke. Since TIR cameras do not currently provide the resolution available from megapixel color cameras, a UGV's daytime safe speed is often reduced when using TIR instead of color cameras. In this paper, we summarize the UGV terrain perception work JPL has performed with TIR cameras over the last decade and describe a calibration target developed by General Dynamics Robotic Systems (GDRS) for TIR cameras and other sensors.

  17. 3-D Flow Visualization with a Light-field Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurow, B.

    2012-12-01

    Light-field cameras have received attention recently due to their ability to acquire photographs that can be computationally refocused after they have been acquired. In this work, we describe the development of a light-field camera system for 3D visualization of turbulent flows. The camera developed in our lab, also known as a plenoptic camera, uses an array of microlenses mounted next to an image sensor to resolve both the position and angle of light rays incident upon the camera. For flow visualization, the flow field is seeded with small particles that follow the fluid's motion and are imaged using the camera and a pulsed light source. The tomographic MART algorithm is then applied to the light-field data in order to reconstruct a 3D volume of the instantaneous particle field. 3D, 3C velocity vectors are then determined from a pair of 3D particle fields using conventional cross-correlation algorithms. As an illustration of the concept, 3D/3C velocity measurements of a turbulent boundary layer produced on the wall of a conventional wind tunnel are presented. Future experiments are planned to use the camera to study the influence of wall permeability on the 3-D structure of the turbulent boundary layer.Schematic illustrating the concept of a plenoptic camera where each pixel represents both the position and angle of light rays entering the camera. This information can be used to computationally refocus an image after it has been acquired. Instantaneous 3D velocity field of a turbulent boundary layer determined using light-field data captured by a plenoptic camera.

  18. Depth Cameras on UAVs: a First Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deris, A.; Trigonis, I.; Aravanis, A.; Stathopoulou, E. K.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate depth information retrieval of a scene is a field under investigation in the research areas of photogrammetry, computer vision and robotics. Various technologies, active, as well as passive, are used to serve this purpose such as laser scanning, photogrammetry and depth sensors, with the latter being a promising innovative approach for fast and accurate 3D object reconstruction using a broad variety of measuring principles including stereo vision, infrared light or laser beams. In this study we investigate the use of the newly designed Stereolab's ZED depth camera based on passive stereo depth calculation, mounted on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with an ad-hoc setup, specially designed for outdoor scene applications. Towards this direction, the results of its depth calculations and scene reconstruction generated by Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) algorithms are compared and evaluated based on qualitative and quantitative criteria with respect to the ones derived by a typical Structure from Motion (SfM) and Multiple View Stereo (MVS) pipeline for a challenging cultural heritage application.

  19. Photometric characterization of the Dark Energy Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, G. M. [Pennsylvania U.; Abbott, T. M.C. [Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Armstrong, R. [Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept.; Burke, D. L. [SLAC; Diehl, H. T. [Fermilab; Gruendl, R. A. [NCSA, Urbana; Johnson, M. D. [NCSA, Urbana; Li, T. S. [Fermilab; Rykoff, E. S. [SLAC; Walker, A. R. [Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Wester, W. [Fermilab; Yanny, B. [Fermilab

    2017-10-30

    We characterize the variation in photometric response of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) across its 520~Mpix science array during 4 years of operation. These variations are measured using high signal-to-noise aperture photometry of $>10^7$ stellar images in thousands of exposures of a few selected fields, with the telescope dithered to move the sources around the array. A calibration procedure based on these results brings the RMS variation in aperture magnitudes of bright stars on cloudless nights down to 2--3 mmag, with <1 mmag of correlated photometric errors for stars separated by $\\ge20$". On cloudless nights, any departures of the exposure zeropoints from a secant airmass law exceeding >1 mmag are plausibly attributable to spatial/temporal variations in aperture corrections. These variations can be inferred and corrected by measuring the fraction of stellar light in an annulus between 6" and 8" diameter. Key elements of this calibration include: correction of amplifier nonlinearities; distinguishing pixel-area variations and stray light from quantum-efficiency variations in the flat fields; field-dependent color corrections; and the use of an aperture-correction proxy. The DECam response pattern across the 2-degree field drifts over months by up to $\\pm7$ mmag, in a nearly-wavelength-independent low-order pattern. We find no fundamental barriers to pushing global photometric calibrations toward mmag accuracy.

  20. DEPTH CAMERAS ON UAVs: A FIRST APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Deris

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate depth information retrieval of a scene is a field under investigation in the research areas of photogrammetry, computer vision and robotics. Various technologies, active, as well as passive, are used to serve this purpose such as laser scanning, photogrammetry and depth sensors, with the latter being a promising innovative approach for fast and accurate 3D object reconstruction using a broad variety of measuring principles including stereo vision, infrared light or laser beams. In this study we investigate the use of the newly designed Stereolab's ZED depth camera based on passive stereo depth calculation, mounted on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with an ad-hoc setup, specially designed for outdoor scene applications. Towards this direction, the results of its depth calculations and scene reconstruction generated by Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM algorithms are compared and evaluated based on qualitative and quantitative criteria with respect to the ones derived by a typical Structure from Motion (SfM and Multiple View Stereo (MVS pipeline for a challenging cultural heritage application.

  1. An ISPA-camera for gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Puertolas, D; Pani, R; Leutz, H; Gys, Thierry; De Notaristefani, F; D'Ambrosio, C

    1995-01-01

    With the recently developed ISPA (Imaging Silicon Pixel Array)-tube attached either to a planar YAlO3(Ce) (YAP) disc (1mm thick) or to a matrix of optically-separated YAP-crystals (5mm high, 0.6 x 0.6 mm2 cross-section) we achieved high spatial resolution of 57Co-122 keV photons. The vacuum-sealed ISPA-tube is only 4 cm long with 3.5 cm diameter and consists of a photocathode viewed at 3 cm distance by a silicon pixel chip, directly detecting the photoelectrons. The chip-anode consists of 1024 rectangular pixels with 75 µm x 500 µm edges, each bump-bonded to their individual front-end electronics. The total pixel array read-out time is 10 µs. The measured intrinsic spatial resolutions (FWHM) of this ISPA-camera are 700 µm (planar YAP) and 310 µm (YAP-matrix). Apart from its already demonstrated application for particle tracking with scintillating fibres, the ISPA-tube provides also an excellent tool in medicine, biology and chemistry.

  2. STRAY DOG DETECTION IN WIRED CAMERA NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Prashanth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Existing surveillance systems impose high level of security on humans but lacks attention on animals. Stray dogs could be used as an alternative to humans to carry explosive material. It is therefore imperative to ensure the detection of stray dogs for necessary corrective action. In this paper, a novel composite approach to detect the presence of stray dogs is proposed. The captured frame from the surveillance camera is initially pre-processed using Gaussian filter to remove noise. The foreground object of interest is extracted utilizing ViBe algorithm. Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG algorithm is used as the shape descriptor which derives the shape and size information of the extracted foreground object. Finally, stray dogs are classified from humans using a polynomial Support Vector Machine (SVM of order 3. The proposed composite approach is simulated in MATLAB and OpenCV. Further it is validated with real time video feeds taken from an existing surveillance system. From the results obtained, it is found that a classification accuracy of about 96% is achieved. This encourages the utilization of the proposed composite algorithm in real time surveillance systems.

  3. Cooling the dark energy camera instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.L.; Cease, H.; /Fermilab; DePoy, D.; /Ohio State U.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; /Fermilab; Kuhlmann, S.; /Ohio State U.; Onal, Birce; Stefanik, A.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    DECam, camera for the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is undergoing general design and component testing. For an overview see DePoy, et al in these proceedings. For a description of the imager, see Cease, et al in these proceedings. The CCD instrument will be mounted at the prime focus of the CTIO Blanco 4m telescope. The instrument temperature will be 173K with a heat load of 113W. In similar applications, cooling CCD instruments at the prime focus has been accomplished by three general methods. Liquid nitrogen reservoirs have been constructed to operate in any orientation, pulse tube cryocoolers have been used when tilt angles are limited and Joule-Thompson or Stirling cryocoolers have been used with smaller heat loads. Gifford-MacMahon cooling has been used at the Cassegrain but not at the prime focus. For DES, the combined requirements of high heat load, temperature stability, low vibration, operation in any orientation, liquid nitrogen cost and limited space available led to the design of a pumped, closed loop, circulating nitrogen system. At zenith the instrument will be twelve meters above the pump/cryocooler station. This cooling system expected to have a 10,000 hour maintenance interval. This paper will describe the engineering basis including the thermal model, unbalanced forces, cooldown time, the single and two-phase flow model.

  4. The Camera Is Not a Methodology: Towards a Framework for Understanding Young Children's Use of Video Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Jo; Colliver, Yeshe; Edwards, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Participatory research methods argue that young children should be enabled to contribute their perspectives on research seeking to understand their worldviews. Visual research methods, including the use of still and video cameras with young children have been viewed as particularly suited to this aim because cameras have been considered easy and…

  5. Range Camera Self-Calibration Based on Integrated Bundle Adjustment via Joint Setup with a 2D Digital Camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Sattari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Time-of-flight cameras, based on Photonic Mixer Device (PMD technology, are capable of measuring distances to objects at high frame rates, however, the measured ranges and the intensity data contain systematic errors that need to be corrected. In this paper, a new integrated range camera self-calibration method via joint setup with a digital (RGB camera is presented. This method can simultaneously estimate the systematic range error parameters as well as the interior and external orientation parameters of the camera. The calibration approach is based on photogrammetric bundle adjustment of observation equations originating from collinearity condition and a range errors model. Addition of a digital camera to the calibration process overcomes the limitations of small field of view and low pixel resolution of the range camera. The tests are performed on a dataset captured by a PMD[vision]-O3 camera from a multi-resolution test field of high contrast targets. An average improvement of 83% in RMS of range error and 72% in RMS of coordinate residual, over that achieved with basic calibration, was realized in an independent accuracy assessment. Our proposed calibration method also achieved 25% and 36% improvement on RMS of range error and coordinate residual, respectively, over that obtained by integrated calibration of the single PMD camera.

  6. Range camera self-calibration based on integrated bundle adjustment via joint setup with a 2D digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mozhdeh; Homayouni, Saeid; Saadatseresht, Mohammad; Sattari, Mehran

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight cameras, based on photonic mixer device (PMD) technology, are capable of measuring distances to objects at high frame rates, however, the measured ranges and the intensity data contain systematic errors that need to be corrected. In this paper, a new integrated range camera self-calibration method via joint setup with a digital (RGB) camera is presented. This method can simultaneously estimate the systematic range error parameters as well as the interior and external orientation parameters of the camera. The calibration approach is based on photogrammetric bundle adjustment of observation equations originating from collinearity condition and a range errors model. Addition of a digital camera to the calibration process overcomes the limitations of small field of view and low pixel resolution of the range camera. The tests are performed on a dataset captured by a PMD[vision]-O3 camera from a multi-resolution test field of high contrast targets. An average improvement of 83% in RMS of range error and 72% in RMS of coordinate residual, over that achieved with basic calibration, was realized in an independent accuracy assessment. Our proposed calibration method also achieved 25% and 36% improvement on RMS of range error and coordinate residual, respectively, over that obtained by integrated calibration of the single PMD camera.

  7. A comparative study of microscopic images captured by a box type digital camera versus a standard microscopic photography camera unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Nandini J; Gupta, B D; Patel, Pratik Narendrabhai; Joshi, Vani Santosh

    2014-10-01

    Obtaining images of slides viewed by a microscope can be invaluable for both diagnosis and teaching.They can be transferred among technologically-advanced hospitals for further consultation and evaluation. But a standard microscopic photography camera unit (MPCU)(MIPS-Microscopic Image projection System) is costly and not available in resource poor settings. The aim of our endeavour was to find a comparable and cheaper alternative method for photomicrography. We used a NIKON Coolpix S6150 camera (box type digital camera) with Olympus CH20i microscope and a fluorescent microscope for the purpose of this study. We got comparable results for capturing images of light microscopy, but the results were not as satisfactory for fluorescent microscopy. A box type digital camera is a comparable, less expensive and convenient alternative to microscopic photography camera unit.

  8. Global Calibration of Multiple Cameras Based on Sphere Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Global calibration methods for multi-camera system are critical to the accuracy of vision measurement. Proposed in this paper is such a method based on several groups of sphere targets and a precision auxiliary camera. Each camera to be calibrated observes a group of spheres (at least three, while the auxiliary camera observes all the spheres. The global calibration can be achieved after each camera reconstructs the sphere centers in its field of view. In the process of reconstructing a sphere center, a parameter equation is used to describe the sphere projection model. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation are carried out to analyze the factors that affect the calibration accuracy. Simulation results show that the parameter equation can largely improve the reconstruction accuracy. In the experiments, a two-camera system calibrated by our method is used to measure a distance about 578 mm, and the root mean squared error is within 0.14 mm. Furthermore, the experiments indicate that the method has simple operation and good flexibility, especially for the onsite multiple cameras without common field of view.

  9. Color reproduction software for a digital still camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong S.; Park, Du-Sik; Nam, Byung D.

    1998-04-01

    We have developed a color reproduction software for a digital still camera. The image taken by the camera was colorimetrically reproduced on the monitor after characterizing the camera and the monitor, and color matching between two devices. The reproduction was performed at three levels; level processing, gamma correction, and color transformation. The image contrast was increased after the level processing adjusting the level of dark and bright portions of the image. The relationship between the level processed digital values and the measured luminance values of test gray samples was calculated, and the gamma of the camera was obtained. The method for getting the unknown monitor gamma was proposed. As a result, the level processed values were adjusted by the look-up table created by the camera and the monitor gamma correction. For a color transformation matrix for the camera, 3 by 3 or 3 by 4 matrix was used, which was calculated by the regression between the gamma corrected values and the measured tristimulus values of each test color samples the various reproduced images were displayed on the dialogue box implemented in our software, which were generated according to four illuminations for the camera and three color temperatures for the monitor. An user can easily choose he best reproduced image comparing each others.

  10. Benchmarking the Optical Resolving Power of Uav Based Camera Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, H.; Cramer, M.; Piltz, B.

    2017-08-01

    UAV based imaging and 3D object point generation is an established technology. Some of the UAV users try to address (very) highaccuracy applications, i.e. inspection or monitoring scenarios. In order to guarantee such level of detail and accuracy high resolving imaging systems are mandatory. Furthermore, image quality considerably impacts photogrammetric processing, as the tie point transfer, mandatory for forming the block geometry, fully relies on the radiometric quality of images. Thus, empirical testing of radiometric camera performance is an important issue, in addition to standard (geometric) calibration, which normally is covered primarily. Within this paper the resolving power of ten different camera/lens installations has been investigated. Selected systems represent different camera classes, like DSLRs, system cameras, larger format cameras and proprietary systems. As the systems have been tested in wellcontrolled laboratory conditions and objective quality measures have been derived, individual performance can be compared directly, thus representing a first benchmark on radiometric performance of UAV cameras. The results have shown, that not only the selection of appropriate lens and camera body has an impact, in addition the image pre-processing, i.e. the use of a specific debayering method, significantly influences the final resolving power.

  11. Active learning in camera calibration through vision measurement application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqin; Guo, Jierong; Wang, Xianchun; Liu, Changqing; Cao, Binfang

    2017-08-01

    Since cameras are increasingly more used in scientific application as well as in the applications requiring precise visual information, effective calibration of such cameras is getting more important. There are many reasons why the measurements of objects are not accurate. The largest reason is that the lens has a distortion. Another detrimental influence on the evaluation accuracy is caused by the perspective distortions in the image. They happen whenever we cannot mount the camera perpendicularly to the objects we want to measure. In overall, it is very important for students to understand how to correct lens distortions, that is camera calibration. If the camera is calibrated, the images are rectificated, and then it is possible to obtain undistorted measurements in world coordinates. This paper presents how the students should develop a sense of active learning for mathematical camera model besides the theoretical scientific basics. The authors will present the theoretical and practical lectures which have the goal of deepening the students understanding of the mathematical models of area scan cameras and building some practical vision measurement process by themselves.

  12. Extended spectrum SWIR camera with user-accessible Dewar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benapfl, Brendan; Miller, John Lester; Vemuri, Hari; Grein, Christoph; Sivananthan, Siva

    2017-02-01

    Episensors has developed a series of extended short wavelength infrared (eSWIR) cameras based on high-Cd concentration Hg1-xCdxTe absorbers. The cameras have a bandpass extending to 3 microns cutoff wavelength, opening new applications relative to traditional InGaAs-based cameras. Applications and uses are discussed and examples given. A liquid nitrogen pour-filled version was initially developed. This was followed by a compact Stirling-cooled version with detectors operating at 200 K. Each camera has unique sensitivity and performance characteristics. The cameras' size, weight and power specifications are presented along with images captured with band pass filters and eSWIR sources to demonstrate spectral response beyond 1.7 microns. The soft seal Dewars of the cameras are designed for accessibility, and can be opened and modified in a standard laboratory environment. This modular approach allows user flexibility for swapping internal components such as cold filters and cold stops. The core electronics of the Stirlingcooled camera are based on a single commercial field programmable gate array (FPGA) that also performs on-board non-uniformity corrections, bad pixel replacement, and directly drives any standard HDMI display.

  13. A method of camera calibration based on image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin; Kong, Chuiliu; Zhang, Dan; Jing, Wenbo

    2008-03-01

    According to the principle of optical measurement, an effective and simple method to measure the distortion of CCD camera and lens is presented in this paper. The method is based on computer active vision and digital image processing technology. The radial distortion of camera lens is considered in the method, while the camera parameters such as the pixel interval and focus of camera are calibrated. The optoelectronic theodolite is used in our experiment system. The light spot can imaging in CCD camera from the theodolite. The position of the light spot should be changed without the camera's rotation, while the optoelectronic theodolite rotates an angle. All view reference points in the image are worked out by computing the angle between actual point and the optical center where the distortion can be ignored. The error correction parameters are computed, and then the camera parameters are calibrated. The sub-pixel subdivision method is used to improve the point detection precision in our method. The experiment result shows that our method is effective, simple and practical.

  14. New calibration technique for a novel stereo camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Xue; Subbarao, Muralidhara

    2009-08-01

    A novel stereo camera architecture has been proposed by some researchers recently. It consists of a single digital camera and a mirror adaptor attached in front of the camera lens. The adaptor functions like a pair of periscopes which split the incoming light to form two stereo images on the left and right half of the image sensor. This novel architecture has many advantages in terms of cost, compactness, and accuracy, relative to a conventional stereo camera system with two separate cameras. However, straightforward extension of the traditional calibration techniques were found to be inaccurate and ineffective. Therefore we present a new technique which fully exploits the physical constraint that the stereo image pair have the same intrinsic camera parameters such as focal length, principle point and pixel size. Our method involves taking one image of a calibration object and estimating one set of intrinsic parameters and two sets of extrinsic parameters corresponding to the mirror adaptor simultaneously. The method also includes lens distortion correction to improve the calibration accuracy. Experimental results on a real camera system are presented to demonstrate that the new calibration technique is accurate and robust.

  15. Determining Vision Graphs for Distributed Camera Networks Using Feature Digests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Radke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a decentralized method for obtaining the vision graph for a distributed, ad-hoc camera network, in which each edge of the graph represents two cameras that image a sufficiently large part of the same environment. Each camera encodes a spatially well-distributed set of distinctive, approximately viewpoint-invariant feature points into a fixed-length “feature digest” that is broadcast throughout the network. Each receiver camera robustly matches its own features with the decompressed digest and decides whether sufficient evidence exists to form a vision graph edge. We also show how a camera calibration algorithm that passes messages only along vision graph edges can recover accurate 3D structure and camera positions in a distributed manner. We analyze the performance of different message formation schemes, and show that high detection rates (>0.8 can be achieved while maintaining low false alarm rates (<0.05 using a simulated 60-node outdoor camera network.

  16. An autonomous sensor module based on a legacy CCTV camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, P. J.; Faulkner, D. A. A.; Marshall, G. F.

    2016-10-01

    A UK MoD funded programme into autonomous sensors arrays (SAPIENT) has been developing new, highly capable sensor modules together with a scalable modular architecture for control and communication. As part of this system there is a desire to also utilise existing legacy sensors. The paper reports upon the development of a SAPIENT-compliant sensor module using a legacy Close-Circuit Television (CCTV) pan-tilt-zoom (PTZ) camera. The PTZ camera sensor provides three modes of operation. In the first mode, the camera is automatically slewed to acquire imagery of a specified scene area, e.g. to provide "eyes-on" confirmation for a human operator or for forensic purposes. In the second mode, the camera is directed to monitor an area of interest, with zoom level automatically optimized for human detection at the appropriate range. Open source algorithms (using OpenCV) are used to automatically detect pedestrians; their real world positions are estimated and communicated back to the SAPIENT central fusion system. In the third mode of operation a "follow" mode is implemented where the camera maintains the detected person within the camera field-of-view without requiring an end-user to directly control the camera with a joystick.

  17. Seeing elements by visible-light digital camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyang; Sakurai, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    A visible-light digital camera is used for taking ordinary photos, but with new operational procedures it can measure the photon energy in the X-ray wavelength region and therefore see chemical elements. This report describes how one can observe X-rays by means of such an ordinary camera - The front cover of the camera is replaced by an opaque X-ray window to block visible light and to allow X-rays to pass; the camera takes many snap shots (called single-photon-counting mode) to record every photon event individually; an integrated-filtering method is newly proposed to correctly retrieve the energy of photons from raw camera images. Finally, the retrieved X-ray energy-dispersive spectra show fine energy resolution and great accuracy in energy calibration, and therefore the visible-light digital camera can be applied to routine X-ray fluorescence measurement to analyze the element composition in unknown samples. In addition, the visible-light digital camera is promising in that it could serve as a position sensitive X-ray energy detector. It may become able to measure the element map or chemical diffusion in a multi-element system if it is fabricated with external X-ray optic devices. Owing to the camera’s low expense and fine pixel size, the present method will be widely applied to the analysis of chemical elements as well as imaging. PMID:28361916

  18. Image responses to x-ray radiation in ICCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jiming; Duan, Baojun; Song, Yan; Song, Guzhou; Han, Changcai; Zhou, Ming; Du, Jiye; Wang, Qunshu; Zhang, Jianqi

    2013-08-01

    When used in digital radiography, ICCD camera will be inevitably irradiated by x-ray and the output image will degrade. In this research, we separated ICCD camera into two optical-electric parts, CCD camera and MCP image intensifier, and irradiated them respectively on Co-60 gamma ray source and pulsed x-ray source. By changing time association between radiation and the shutter of CCD camera, the state of power supply of MCP image intensifier, significant differences have been observed in output images. A further analysis has revealed the influence of the CCD chip, readout circuit in CCD camera, and the photocathode, microchannel plate and fluorescent screen in MCP image intensifier on image quality of an irradiated ICCD camera. The study demonstrated that compared with other parts, irradiation response of readout circuit is very slight and in most cases negligible. The interaction of x-ray with CCD chip usually behaves as bright spots or rough background in output images, which depends on x-ray doses. As to the MCP image intensifier, photocathode and microchannel plate are the two main steps that degrade output images. When being irradiated by x-ray, microchannel plate in MCP image intensifier tends to contribute a bright background in output images. Background caused by the photocathode looks more bright and fluctuant. Image responses of fluorescent screen in MCP image intensifier in ICCD camera and that of a coupling fiber bundle are also evaluated in this presentation.

  19. Analysis of Camera Arrays Applicable to the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiachen; Xu, Ru; Lv, Zhihan; Song, Houbing

    2016-03-22

    The Internet of Things is built based on various sensors and networks. Sensors for stereo capture are essential for acquiring information and have been applied in different fields. In this paper, we focus on the camera modeling and analysis, which is very important for stereo display and helps with viewing. We model two kinds of cameras, a parallel and a converged one, and analyze the difference between them in vertical and horizontal parallax. Even though different kinds of camera arrays are used in various applications and analyzed in the research work, there are few discussions on the comparison of them. Therefore, we make a detailed analysis about their performance over different shooting distances. From our analysis, we find that the threshold of shooting distance for converged cameras is 7 m. In addition, we design a camera array in our work that can be used as a parallel camera array, as well as a converged camera array and take some images and videos with it to identify the threshold.

  20. Kinect Fusion improvement using depth camera calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliari, D.; Menna, F.; Roncella, R.; Remondino, F.; Pinto, L.

    2014-06-01

    Scene's 3D modelling, gesture recognition and motion tracking are fields in rapid and continuous development which have caused growing demand on interactivity in video-game and e-entertainment market. Starting from the idea of creating a sensor that allows users to play without having to hold any remote controller, the Microsoft Kinect device was created. The Kinect has always attract researchers in different fields, from robotics to Computer Vision (CV) and biomedical engineering as well as third-party communities that have released several Software Development Kit (SDK) versions for Kinect in order to use it not only as a game device but as measurement system. Microsoft Kinect Fusion control libraries (firstly released in March 2013) allow using the device as a 3D scanning and produce meshed polygonal of a static scene just moving the Kinect around. A drawback of this sensor is the geometric quality of the delivered data and the low repeatability. For this reason the authors carried out some investigation in order to evaluate the accuracy and repeatability of the depth measured delivered by the Kinect. The paper will present a throughout calibration analysis of the Kinect imaging sensor, with the aim of establishing the accuracy and precision of the delivered information: a straightforward calibration of the depth sensor in presented and then the 3D data are correct accordingly. Integrating the depth correction algorithm and correcting the IR camera interior and exterior orientation parameters, the Fusion Libraries are corrected and a new reconstruction software is created to produce more accurate models.