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Sample records for camelids new world

  1. Pathology of Haemonchus contortus in New World camelids in the southeastern United States: a retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Erin E; Garner, Bridget C; Williamson, Lisa H; Storey, Bob E; Sakamoto, Kaori

    2016-03-01

    Most small ruminant farms in tropical climates are plagued by Haemonchus contortus, a hematophagous, abomasal parasite. Heavy burdens of this parasite can cause anemia, hypoproteinemia, weight loss, and mortality in susceptible animals. Haemonchus contortus is becoming a major health concern in New World camelids as well, namely llamas (Llama glama) and alpacas (Vicugna pacos), yet little research has been conducted regarding its prevalence or pathology in these species. Herein, we present a retrospective review of llamas and alpacas that were admitted to The University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Athens Diagnostic Laboratory between the years 2002 and 2013. Antemortem fecal egg count (FEC) estimates performed on 30 alpacas were negatively correlated with hematocrit, hemoglobin, and red blood cell count. Total protein was not significantly correlated with FEC. On postmortem examination, 55 of 198 camelids, including 2 from the aforementioned antemortem review, were infected with H. contortus, with llamas (42.6%) having a significantly higher infection rate than alpacas (22.2%). In 15.7% of the total cases, the parasite was the major cause of death. Common gross lesions included peritoneal, thoracic, and pericardial effusions, visceral pallor, subcutaneous edema, and serous atrophy of fat. Histologic lesions included centrilobular hepatic necrosis, hepatic atrophy, lymphoplasmacytic inflammation of the mucosa of the third gastric compartment (C3), extramedullary hematopoiesis in both the liver and spleen, and the presence of nematodes in C3. Our study emphasizes the importance of H. contortus diagnosis and herd monitoring in New World camelids, particularly llamas. PMID:26965230

  2. [Testing for BTV, BVDV and BHV-1 in blood samples of new world camelids kept in middle Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locher, Lena; Nieper, Hermann; Volkery, Janine; Fürll, Manfred; Wittek, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of camelids for infectious agents which may result in severe economic losses or which are strictly regulated for epidemiological reasons in farm animals potentially causes a mutual risk of transmission. This study aimed to investigate the presence of antibodies against bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), bluetongue virus (BTV) and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) as well as the presence of pestivirus antigen in new world camelids in Central Germany. Therefore 107 serum samples from 93 alpacas and lamas from this region which had been obtained from 2007 to 2009 were examined using ELISA, serum neutralisation test, RT-PCR and a pestivirus specific gene probe. All sample were negative for BHV-1 antibodies. Antibodies against BVDV-1 could be detected in four animals, titres reaching from 1:64 to > 1:256. One animal was positive for BTV antibodies in the year 2008. This animal had been tested negative for BTV antibodies in 2007. It can be concluded that up to now, these viruses seem to be of minor importance as pathogens in new world camelids in Central Germany. Therefore the risk of infection originating from new world camelids for production animals could be considered to be rather low in this region at the moment. However, it must be taken into consideration that these animals due to lack of antibodies are fully susceptible in case of occurrence of one of these viruses. For maintenance and improvement of the present status, general hygienic precautions should be applied; direct and indirect contact between animals from different herds must be avoided and virological diagnostic and quarantine should be required trading these animals. PMID:21141278

  3. Pulmonary Arterial Lesions in New World Camelids in Association With Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Fasciola hepatica Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbe, M; Robert, N; Pospischil, A; Gerspach, C

    2015-11-01

    In Switzerland, dicrocoeliasis is regarded as the most significant parasitic infection of llamas and alpacas. Fasciola hepatica infestation is also a problem but less common. The aim of the present retrospective study was to evaluate the lungs of New World camelids (NWCs) for evidence of arterial hypertension in association with liver changes due to liver fluke infestation. The lungs of 20 llamas and 20 alpacas with liver fluke infestation were histologically evaluated. The hematoxylin and eosin and van Gieson (VG)-elastica stains as well as immunohistology for the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were used to visualize the structures of arterial walls. Parasitology of fecal matter (11 llamas and 17 alpacas) confirmed that most of these animals were infested with both Dicrocoelium dendriticum and other gastrointestinal parasites. In most cases (10/12 llamas, 4/6 alpacas), liver enzyme activity in serum was elevated. Histologically, arteries in the lungs of 9 of 20 llamas (45%) and 3 of 20 alpacas (15%) showed severe intimal and adventitial and slight to moderate medial thickening, which was confirmed with α-SMA and VG-elastica staining. All animals exhibited typical liver changes, such as fibrosis and biliary hyperplasia, in association with the presence of liver flukes. This study shows that liver flukes can induce proliferative changes in lung arteries in NWCs that resemble those seen with pulmonary arterial hypertension due to liver parasites in humans. However, the degree of liver fluke infestation was not correlated with the extent of liver damage, or with the amount of thoracic or abdominal effusion or pulmonary arterial changes. PMID:25637085

  4. The history of Old World camelids in the light of molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Pamela Anna

    2016-06-01

    Old World camels have come into the focus as sustainable livestock species, unique in their morphological and physiological characteristics and capable of providing vital products even under extreme environmental conditions. The evolutionary history of dromedary and Bactrian camels traces back to the middle Eocene (around 40 million years ago, mya), when the ancestors of Camelus emerged on the North American continent. While the genetic status of the two domestic species has long been established, the wild two-humped camel has only recently been recognized as a separate species, Camelus ferus, based on molecular genetic data. The demographic history established from genome drafts of Old World camels shows the independent development of the three species over the last 100,000 years with severe bottlenecks occurring during the last glacial period and in the recent past. Ongoing studies involve the immune system, relevant production traits, and the global population structure and domestication of Old World camels. Based on the now available whole genome drafts, specific metabolic pathways have been described shedding new light on the camels' ability to adapt to desert environments. These new data will also be at the origin for genome-wide association studies to link economically relevant phenotypes to genotypes and to conserve the diverse genetic resources in Old World camelids. PMID:27048619

  5. Proteomics of old world camelid (Camelus dromedarius: Better understanding the interplay between homeostasis and desert environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Warda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Life is the interplay between structural–functional integrity of biological systems and the influence of the external environment. To understand this interplay, it is useful to examine an animal model that competes with harsh environment. The dromedary camel is the best model that thrives under severe environment with considerable durability. The current proteomic study on dromedary organs explains a number of cellular mysteries providing functional correlates to arid living. Proteome profiling of camel organs suggests a marked increased expression of various cytoskeleton proteins that promote intracellular trafficking and communication. The comparative overexpression of α-actinin of dromedary heart when compared with rat heart suggests an adaptive peculiarity to sustain hemoconcentration–hemodilution episodes associated with alternative drought-rehydration periods. Moreover, increased expression of the small heat shock protein, α B-crystallin facilitates protein folding and cellular regenerative capacity in dromedary heart. The observed unbalanced expression of different energy related dependent mitochondrial enzymes suggests the possibility of mitochondrial uncoupling in the heart in this species. The evidence of increased expression of H+-ATPase subunit in camel brain guarantees a rapidly usable energy supply. Interestingly, the guanidinoacetate methyltransferase in camel liver has a renovation effect on high energy phosphate with possible concomitant intercession of ion homeostasis. Surprisingly, both hump fat tissue and kidney proteomes share the altered physical distribution of proteins that favor cellular acidosis. Furthermore, the study suggests a vibrant nature for adipose tissue of camel hump by the up-regulation of vimentin in adipocytes, augmenting lipoprotein translocation, blood glucose trapping, and challenging external physical extra-stress. The results obtained provide new evidence of homeostasis in the arid habitat

  6. Methane emission by camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Methane emissions from ruminant livestock have been intensively studied in order to reduce contribution to the greenhouse effect. Ruminants were found to produce more enteric methane than other mammalian herbivores. As camelids share some features of their digestive anatomy and physiology with ruminants, it has been proposed that they produce similar amounts of methane per unit of body mass. This is of special relevance for countrywide greenhouse gas budgets of countries that harbor large populations of camelids like Australia. However, hardly any quantitative methane emission measurements have been performed in camelids. In order to fill this gap, we carried out respiration chamber measurements with three camelid species (Vicugna pacos, Lama glama, Camelus bactrianus; n = 16 in total), all kept on a diet consisting of food produced from alfalfa only. The camelids produced less methane expressed on the basis of body mass (0.32±0.11 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹) when compared to literature data on domestic ruminants fed on roughage diets (0.58±0.16 L kg⁻¹ d⁻¹). However, there was no significant difference between the two suborders when methane emission was expressed on the basis of digestible neutral detergent fiber intake (92.7±33.9 L kg⁻¹ in camelids vs. 86.2±12.1 L kg⁻¹ in ruminants). This implies that the pathways of methanogenesis forming part of the microbial digestion of fiber in the foregut are similar between the groups, and that the lower methane emission of camelids can be explained by their generally lower relative food intake. Our results suggest that the methane emission of Australia's feral camels corresponds only to 1 to 2% of the methane amount produced by the countries' domestic ruminants and that calculations of greenhouse gas budgets of countries with large camelid populations based on equations developed for ruminants are generally overestimating the actual levels. PMID:24718604

  7. An introduction to South American camelids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The South American camelids - the domesticated alpaca and llama, and the wild vicuna and guanaco - which belong to the Camelidae family of the Artiodactyla order are of considerable sociological, economic and ecological importance to the native populations living in the high plateau (altiplano) of the central Andes. Owing to their biological characteristics they are able to provide meat, wool, hides and transportation without disrupting the fragile ecosystem. Increasing interest is being taken in these animals, both in their native lands of Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and Peru and in other parts of the world. (author). 55 refs, 5 figs

  8. The new world disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Nicolas; Maguire, John; Barney, Jonathan

    2003-08-01

    On January 1, 1995, representatives from 76 countries signed the World Trade Organization charter, which for years had been part of a temporary trade agreement. The WTO's emergence as a fully empowered supranational body seemed to reflect the triumph of what the first President Bush had described as the "new world order." That order was based on two assumptions: that a healthy economy and a sound financial system make for political stability, and that countries in business together do not fight each other. The number one priority of U.S. foreign policy was thus to encourage the former Communist countries of Europe and the developing nations in Latin America, Asia, and Africa to adopt business-friendly policies. Private capital would flow from the developed world into these countries, creating economic growth. It sounded too good to be true, and so it proved. The new world order of Bush père and his successor, Bill Clinton, has been replaced by the new world disorder of Bush fils. Under the second Bush's administration, the economic and political rationale-behind the Washington consensus of the 1990s has unraveled, forcing a radical change in our perceptions of which countries are safe for business. Negotiating this new environment will require companies to more rigorously evaluate political events and more carefully assess the links between political, economic, and financial risk factors. They'll need to be more selective about which markets to enter, and they'll need to think differently about how to position themselves in those markets. The geopolitical events of the past year, the Bush administration's global war on terror, as well as ongoing convulsions in traditional political and economic relationships must be understood and managed by corporate leaders worldwide. With careful analysis, business leaders can increase their companies' visibility and better respond to the uncertainties of the new world disorder. PMID:12884669

  9. New Wonders of the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    New Seven Wonders of the World is a contemporary attempt to create analternative to historical lists of the Seven Wonders of the World.The result of a worldwide popularity poll was organized by the private,non-profit New Open World Corporation(NOWC).Its final list was announced on

  10. New Worlds Airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harness, Anthony; Cash, Webster; Shipley, Ann; Glassman, Tiffany; Warwick, Steve

    2013-09-01

    We review the progress on the New Worlds Airship project, which has the eventual goal of suborbitally mapping the Alpha Centauri planetary system into the Habitable Zone. This project consists of a telescope viewing a star that is occulted by a starshade suspended from an airship. The starshade suppresses the starlight such that fainter planetary objects near the star are revealed. A visual sensor is used to determine the position of the starshade and keep the telescope within the starshade's shadow. In the first attempt to demonstrate starshades through astronomical observations, we have built a precision line of sight position indicator and flew it on a Zeppelin in October (2012). Since the airship provider went out of business we have been redesigning the project to use Vertical Takeoff Vertical Landing rockets instead. These Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicles will serve as a starshade platform and test bed for further development of the visual sensor. We have completed ground tests of starshades on dry lakebeds and have shown excellent contrast. We are now attempting to use starshades on hilltops to occult stars and perform high contrast imaging of outer planetary systems such as the debris disk around Fomalhaut.

  11. Wanted: New Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughtrey, Taz

    1980-01-01

    Described is a high school astronomy course developed by gifted students. Students are asked to apply contemporary astronomical principles in designing a consistent and scientifically plausible world in orbit around a nearby star. The course can be used in traditional high school settings and with students not initially favorably inclined toward…

  12. Our Brave New World Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Aldous Huxley is perhaps the only author to have written a work of science fiction and a work of nonfiction to ascertain whether fiction had become reality. Both "Brave New World" and "Brave New World Revisited" are discussed and compared with Jacques Ellul's work on technology.

  13. New frontiers for tomorrow's world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference paper deals with new frontiers and barricades in the global economic development and their influence on fuel consumption and energy source development. Topics discussed are incremental energy supply - new frontiers, world car population - new frontiers, OPEC crude production capacity vs call on OPEC, incremental world oil demand by region 1992-2000, oil resource cost curve, progress in seismic 1983-1991, Troll picture, cost reduction in renewables, sustained growth scenario, nuclear electricity capacity - France, OECD road transport fuels - barricades, and energy taxation. 18 figs

  14. Nutrition: the new world map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Geoffrey

    2002-01-01

    The map of nutrition, evident in the structure of any course or textbook, derives from theses that framed a science begun in the 1840s, developed until the 1940s, and consolidated until now. Nutritionists now are as perplexed as the explorers of half a millennium ago, who continued to use maps that did not fit the wider world they found. Until the 1600s, alternatives to Ptolemaic cosmology remained unthinkable despite its obvious inadequacy, because it was of a universe with the earth, and man made in the divine image, at its centre. Nutritionists now are inhibited for similar reasons. Two determining principles of nutrition science, the identification of health with growth and the belief that animal food is superior to plant food, have a deep origin; they derive from the materialist ideology that asserts a manifest destiny of humans to exploit and consume the living and natural world. In response, a new nutrition is emerging, with a global perspective, whose ideology places humans within nature, and whose theses make a wider frame, able to fit the world as we can discern it now. The new nutrition gives equal value to personal, population and planetary health, with all that implies, including the concept that the world is best perceived as a whole. The Copernican revolution changed the meaning of movement on earth. The new nutrition can change the meaning of life on earth. Now is the time to draw its map. PMID:12492639

  15. Webster's new world telecom dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Horak, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Webster's New World Telecom Dictionary, by Ray Horak, is a comprehensive telecommunications dictionary of more than 7,500 terms critical to understanding voice, data, video, and multimedia communications system and network technologies, applications, and regulation. Given the convergence of computing and communications, the book also effectively is a computer dictionary with a telecom focus. It is thoroughly researched, highly objective, absolutely accurate, and includes just about every essential term, abbreviation, acronym, contraction, initialism, and portmanteau you might encounter in the

  16. New Threat to World Economy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The aggregate amount of money and credit in the global economy has risen sharply over the past 30 years,with its growth rate and stock far exceeding that of the real economy or real assets of the world.This is the view of Xiang Songzuo,professor at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology,whose opinion was first published in a recent article in China Business News.Xiang said this situation is a real threat to the world economy.Excerpts of his article are reprinted below:

  17. Seminal plasma components in camelids and comparisons with other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw-Young, C M; Maxwell, W M C

    2012-08-01

    Camelid semen is characterized by a highly viscous, low-volume ejaculate with a low concentration of spermatozoa that exhibit low progressive motility. The viscous seminal plasma is currently the major impediment to the development of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) in camelids. To advance ARTs such as sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination in camelids, it is necessary to identify the cause of the viscosity and gain an understanding of the role of seminal plasma components on sperm function and fertility. Numerous compounds and proteins have been identified as mediators of sperm function and predictors of fertility in other livestock species, and understanding the importance of specific proteins has progressed the success of ARTs in these species. Current knowledge on the components of camelid seminal plasma is outlined, together with the implications of these components for the development of ARTs in camelids. The cause of semen viscosity, as well as proteins that are present in camelid seminal plasma, is described for the first time. Seminal plasma components are compared with those of other species to hypothesize their role in sperm function and fertility. PMID:22827394

  18. Global Systems Science: A New World View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneider, Cary; Golden, Richard; Barrett, Katharine

    1999-01-01

    Global systems science is a new field of study about the interactions between Earth's natural systems and human activities. The people who study global systems science draw on methods and theories of many different fields from chemistry and biology to economics and politics-in order to predict how today's actions are likely to affect the world of tomorrow - our world and our children's world.

  19. A Harmonious world and China's New Diplomacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Peng

    2007-01-01

    The concept of"a harmonious world,"a phrase used by the incumbent leadership of China to encapsulate China's diplomatic goals,has become a new guideline for China's diplomatic activities.By applying this concept, Chinese diplomacy has taken a new turn,pushing China into a new and powerful role in world affairs.China's diplomatic effort,however still faces numerous problems,challenges and risks,requiring the Chinese leadership to refine the concept of"harmonious world"through creative thinking and application.

  20. China: New Engine of World Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Garnaut, Ross; SONG, LIGANG

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-five years of reform have transformed China from a centrally planned and closed system to a predominantly market-driven and open economy. As a consequence, China is emerging as the new powerhouse for the world economy. China: new engine for world growth discusses the impact and significance of this transformation. It points out risks to the growth process and unfinished tasks of reform. It presents conclusions from recent research on growth, trade and investment, the financial sector, ...

  1. Iberian origins of New World horse breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, Cristina; Bastos-Silveira, Cristiane; Cothran, E Gus; Oom, Maria do Mar

    2006-01-01

    Fossil records, archaeological proofs, and historical documents report that horses persisted continuously in the Iberian Peninsula since the Pleistocene and were taken to the American continent (New World) in the 15th century. To investigate the variation within the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region of Iberian and New World horse breeds, to analyze their relationships, and to test the historical origin of New World horses, a total of 153 samples, representing 30 Iberian and New World breeds, were analyzed by sequencing mtDNA control region fragments. Fifty-four haplotypes were found and assigned to seven haplogroups. Reduced levels of variation found for the Menorquina, Sorraia, and Sulphur Mustang breeds are consistent with experienced bottlenecks or limited number of founders. For all diversity indices, Iberian breeds showed higher diversity values than South American and North American breeds. Although, the results show that the Iberian and New World breeds stem from multiple origins, we present a set of genetic data revealing a high frequency of Iberian haplotypes in New World breeds, which is consistent with historical documentation. PMID:16489143

  2. On the way to Brane New World

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, S; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.

    2001-01-01

    In this report we consider brane-world universe (New Brane World) where an arbitrary large $N$ quantum CFT exists on the domain wall. This corresponds to implementing of Randall-Sundrum compactification within the context of AdS/CFT correspondence. Using anomaly induced effective action for domain wall CFT, the possibility of self-consistent quantum creation of 4d de Sitter wall universe (inflation) is demonstrated. In case of maximally SUSY Yang-Mills theory the exact correspondence with radius and effective tension found by Hawking-Hertog-Reall is obtained. We also discuss the bosonic sector of 5d gauged supergravity with single scalar and taking the boundary action as predicted by supersymmetry and discuss the possibility to supersymmetrize dilatonic New Brane World. It is demonstrated that for a number of superpotentials the flat SUSY dilatonic brane-world (with dynamically induced brane dilaton) or quantum-induced de Sitter dilatonic brane-world (not Anti-de Sitter one) where SUSY is broken by the quantu...

  3. Geopolitics of petroleum. A new market. New risks. New worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this book is to shade light on a complex world in complete evolution, the stakes of which for today's societies being proportional to the energy and economical importance of petroleum. The big petroleum fear of consuming countries and the reactions linked with oil shocks are now old stories. The producing countries are today at least as vulnerable to price variations and fluxes restrictions as the consumers of developed countries. Two countries, USA and Saudi Arabia, and one organisation, the OPEC, play a key role in the regulation of this system, the equilibrium of which is now threatened by the reinforcement of preoccupations like environment and human rights protection. New challenges occur: the increase of demand, the concentration of offer, some technological changes that would limit the petroleum needs in the future, and the increasing insecurity of key oil-producing regions. At a shorter term, the geopolitical context of Middle-East is the most worrying. (J.S.)

  4. Energy and the New World Order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two major trends determine energy demand and supply; population growth and economic growth. This type of analysis very often forgets political and military events, both global and regional. This paper presents the major events influencing energy during the cold war and after the break-up of the USSR in so called ''New World Order'' which have politically and military determined energy supply and demand or, better to say, its price. The main accent is on oil and such events as the OPEC oil embargo in 1973 and the Gulf War in 1991. The relationship between oil and the other forms of primary energy production (coal, nuclear energy) as well as with energy in traffic and transportation are presented. All options in the period that we like to designate with the expression ''New World Order'' one discussed. (author)

  5. South Africa: the new world of disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzer, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, unique business imperatives in South Africa have led to innovative risk product design, some of which are still unfamiliar to the rest of the world. The main drivers are: the unique mix of first- and third-world societies in our country, and an energetic marketing force operating in an already highly saturated insurance market. As a result, new product design has become one of the most effective ways to grow new business volumes in this competitive environment. This article reviews some of the unique products available and their advantages, target markets and disadvantages. The products that are discussed include lump sum total and permanent disability benefits, extended critical illness products, cover for impairment of function as well as risk products for people living with HIV/AIDS. PMID:19119593

  6. Modern Exploration of Galileo's New Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Torrence V.

    2010-01-01

    Four hundred years ago Galileo turned his telescope to the heavens and changed the way we view the cosmos forever. Among his discoveries in January of 1610 were four new 'stars', following Jupiter in the sky but changing their positions with respect to the giant planet every night. Galileo showed that these 'Medicean stars', as he named them, were moons orbiting Jupiter in the same manner that the Earth and planets revolve about the Sun in the Copernican theory of the solar system. Over the next three centuries these moons, now collectively named the Galilean satellites after their discoverer, remained tiny dots of light in astronomers' telescopes. In the latter portion of the twentieth century Galileo's new worlds became important targets of exploration by robotic spacecraft. This paper reviews the history of this exploration through the discoveries made by the Galileo mission from 1995 to 2003, setting the stage for on-going exploration in the new century.

  7. Biochemical adaptation of camelids during periods where feed is withheld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wensvoort

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical changes during fasting or the withholding of feed for 5 day were studied in serum of camelids (dromedary camel, llama and ruminants (sheep, steers. Camels maintained low levels of 13-hydroxybutyrate (BHB and high levels of glucose but showed some increased levels of non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA and urea when fasting. Sheep and steers showed a rise in serum BHB and much higher increases of NEFA than camels and llamas. Sheep showed decreased serum glucose. The llama showed some increase in BHB but NEFA was lower than the other three species. The results indicate that camelids have a unique ability to control lipolytic and gluconeogenic activity to prevent or postpone the state of ketosis. Understanding and manipulation of these metabolic mechanisms in cattle and sheep could have great benefit to the livestock industry.

  8. Eradication of New World Screwworm from Jamaica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New World Screwworm (NWS) is an insect pest affecting warm-blooded animals and also humans. It causes widespread economic losses in livestock production as well as pain and suffering to animals and to those people unfortunate enough to become infected. Although it is endemic in Jamaica, the screwworm can be eradicated from the island using the well proven and successful Sterile Insect Technique. In collaboration with the Jamaican authorities, the Department of Technical Co-operation of the IAEA is planning to sponsor a Model Project to eradicate screwworm from Jamaica. (IAEA)

  9. A NEW THINKING FOR A NEW WORLD. REPRESENTATIONS FROM ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negucioiu Aurel

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An incursion, even a succinct one, incomplete, in the universal history, in the world economic history and not in the least in the real world gives more and more credit to the idea according to which the movement is the main form of existence- working and evolution- of the society, economy, and of all the structures they are made of. Its "force motrice", its internal cause is represented, in our opinion, the unity and interaction of opposites. The changes, the transformations taking place in society and in its economy have direct or indirect authors the human beings who, using their minds, "leaven bread" and express at the beginning through thinking, the objectives that are going to complete or lessen reality. The positive changes and transformations that the people operate renew the world. For more than half of a century, the humankind has been in a vast and very complex process of transformation, changes with innovative character. In other words, a process of building a new world. Hence, the need to create a new thinking. "A new thinking for a new world" Making a halt in the field of economy -theory, science and practice - we are trying to bring to attention to those interested a few considerations concerning the truth value of some paradigms in the theoretical circuit, including their degree of rationality or irrationality.

  10. Generation and characterization of heavy chain antibodies derived from Camelids

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidthals, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies and antibody fragments are essential tools in basic research, diagnostics and therapy. Conventional antibodies consist of two heavy and two light chains with both chains contributing to the antigen-binding site. In addition to these conventional antibodies, camelids (llamas, alpacas, dromedaries and camels) possess so-called heavy chain antibodies (hcAbs) that lack the light chains. The antigen binding site of these unusual antibodies is formed by one single domain only, the so cal...

  11. Get Involved in Planetary Discoveries through New Worlds, New Discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, Christine; Shipp, S. S.; Halligan, E.; Dalton, H.; Boonstra, D.; Buxner, S.; SMD Planetary Forum, NASA

    2013-01-01

    "New Worlds, New Discoveries" is a synthesis of NASA’s 50-year exploration history which provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of our solar system. As NASA spacecraft head to and arrive at key locations in our solar system, "New Worlds, New Discoveries" provides an integrated picture of our new understanding of the solar system to educators and the general public! The site combines the amazing discoveries of past NASA planetary missions with the most recent findings of ongoing missions, and connects them to the related planetary science topics. "New Worlds, New Discoveries," which includes the "Year of the Solar System" and the ongoing celebration of the "50 Years of Exploration," includes 20 topics that share thematic solar system educational resources and activities, tied to the national science standards. This online site and ongoing event offers numerous opportunities for the science community - including researchers and education and public outreach professionals - to raise awareness, build excitement, and make connections with educators, students, and the public about planetary science. Visitors to the site will find valuable hands-on science activities, resources and educational materials, as well as the latest news, to engage audiences in planetary science topics and their related mission discoveries. The topics are tied to the big questions of planetary science: how did the Sun’s family of planets and bodies originate and how have they evolved? How did life begin and evolve on Earth, and has it evolved elsewhere in our solar system? Scientists and educators are encouraged to get involved either directly or by sharing "New Worlds, New Discoveries" and its resources with educators, by conducting presentations and events, sharing their resources and events to add to the site, and adding their own public events to the site’s event calendar! Visit to find quality resources and ideas. Connect with educators, students and the public to

  12. Maxwell: A new vision of the world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maystre, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The paper outlines the crucial contributions of James Clerk Maxwell to Physics and more generally to our vision of the world. He achieved 150 years ago a synthesis of the pioneering works in magnetostatics, electrostatics, induction and, by introducing the notion of displacement current, gave birth to Electromagnetics. Then, he deduced the existence of electromagnetic waves and identified light as one of them. Maxwell equations deeply changed a Newtonian conception of the world based on particle interactions by pointing out the vital role of waves in physics. This new conception had a strong influence on the development of quantum physics. Finally, the invariance of light velocity in Galilean frames led to Lorentz transformations, a key step toward the theory of relativity. Par ailleurs, les équations de Maxwell ont profondément changé une conception du monde newtonienne basée sur l'interaction entre particules en révélant le rôle essentiel des ondes en physique, ce qui eut une influence déterminante sur le développement de la physique quantique. Enfin, l'invariance de la vitesse de la lumière dans les repères galiléens a entraîné la découverte des transformations de Lorentz, une étape capitale vers la théorie de la relativité.

  13. Mummification in the Ancient and New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the Ancient and New World there was a custom to preserve the corpse in a natural and artificial way. Since Paleolithic man believed in an afterlife and even in Mesoamerica and the Andes cultures, care and ceremony were practiced to the burial of the dead in an ancestral cult. Mortuary rituals were developed in Pre-dynastic Egypt (4500-3100 BC) but apparently they had begun before in America, c. 5000 BC. Mummies served for assisting the soul to survive and for preventing the dead from frightening the livings. Incas arrived at a point of perfection in these practices after other Andean cultures but we should not forget their older predecessors, the Chinchorro culture on the arid coast of the Atacama Desert. Different steps in the technique can be distinguished in both worlds: natural desiccation covered by animal skins, methods to protect the body skin and flesh removal, replacement with clay; black, red or mud-coated corpses, evisceration, body cavity treatment, cleansing and anointing the interior, brain removal, mummified bodies, corpses covered with natron, before being washed and bandaged or wrapped. It will be necessary to carefully check dates, techniques and periods in the two zones to establish exactly the evolution of the methods applied. PMID:25811691

  14. New Challenges in the Narcotics World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta-Elena Buzatu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of narcotics is one of the problems the international world is confronted withnowadays; its direct or indirect effects lead to the conclusion that it represents a worrying phenomenon meantto be taken into account by the international programs of co-operation. In contrast with the mature population,the younger population is much more receptive to the new, much more attracted by new experiments and,consequently, by risks. The narcotics flagellum is one of the most complex, profound and dramaticphenomena met with in the contemporary world. Narcotization is the morbid habit of repeatedly taking andusing ever higher doses of more or less toxic substances able to generate a psychological and physicaladdiction to them. Unhappily due to the lack of information, people think that the illegal substances only –heroine, marijuana, cocaine, etc. – are considered drugs. Not long ago there appeared the so-called “mixes ofethno-botanical plants” that are perfectly legal, and many consumers have replaced narcotics - as marijuana,for example - with plant mixes. According to explanations given by the Ethno-botanical ExplanatoryDictionary, ethno-biology is a branch that studies the mutual relationship between man and plant. InRomania, ethno-botanical plants are sold under the generic names of “aroma therapeutic” or “ethnobotanical”plants. The numerous researches meant to decode the molecular and biochemical structure of theseherbs, the researchers found that consumers are described as facing hallucinogenic effects caused by somesynthetic substances - cannabinoids - added by manufacturers.

  15. World new facilities for radioactive isotope beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of unstable nuclei in the form of energetic beams for nuclear physics studies is now entering into a new era. 'New-generation' facilities are either in operation, under construction or being planned. They are designed to provide radioactive isotope (RI) beams with very high intensities over a wide range of nuclides. These facilities are expected to provide opportunities to study nuclear structure, astrophysical nuclear processes and nuclear matter with large proton-neutron imbalance in grate detail. This article reports on the current status of such new-generation RI-beam facilities around the world. In order to cover different energy domains and to meet various scientific demands, the designs of RI-beam facilities are of a wide variety. For example, RIBF in Japan, FAIR in Germany and FRIB in US are based on the fragmentation scheme for beams with energies of a few hundred MeV/nucleon to GeV/nucleon, whereas Spiral2 in France, SPES in Italy, HIE-ISOLDE in Switzerland/France, and the future facility EURISOL in Europe are based on the ISOL method, and aim at providing lower-energy RI beams. There are a many other projects including upgrades of existing facilities in the three continents, America, Asia and Europe

  16. Biomechanical analysis of the camelid cervical intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean K. Stolworthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic low back pain (LBP is a prevalent global problem, which is often correlated with degenerative disc disease. The development and use of good, relevant animal models of the spine may improve treatment options for this condition. While no animal model is capable of reproducing the exact biology, anatomy, and biomechanics of the human spine, the quality of a particular animal model increases with the number of shared characteristics that are relevant to the human condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the camelid (specifically, alpaca and llama cervical spine as a model of the human lumbar spine. Cervical spines were obtained from four alpacas and four llamas and individual segments were used for segmental flexibility/biomechanics and/or morphology/anatomy studies. Qualitative and quantitative data were compared for the alpaca and llama cervical spines, and human lumbar specimens in addition to other published large animal data. Results indicate that a camelid cervical intervertebral disc (IVD closely approximates the human lumbar disc with regard to size, spinal posture, and biomechanical flexibility. Specifically, compared with the human lumbar disc, the alpaca and llama cervical disc size are approximately 62%, 83%, and 75% with regard to area, depth, and width, respectively, and the disc flexibility is approximately 133%, 173%, and 254%, with regard to range of motion (ROM in axial-rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral-bending, respectively. These results, combined with the clinical report of disc degeneration in the llama lower cervical spine, suggest that the camelid cervical spine is potentially well suited for use as an animal model in biomechanical studies of the human lumbar spine.

  17. New Vaccines for the World's Poorest People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Strych, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The 2000 Millennium Development Goals helped stimulate the development of life-saving childhood vaccines for pneumococcal and rotavirus infections while greatly expanding coverage of existing vaccines. However, there remains an urgent need to develop new vaccines for HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, as well as for respiratory syncytial virus and those chronic and debilitating (mostly parasitic) infections known as neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The NTDs represent the most common diseases of people living in extreme poverty and are the subject of this review. The development of NTD vaccines, including those for hookworm infection, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease, is being led by nonprofit product development partnerships (PDPs) working in consortia of academic and industrial partners, including vaccine manufacturers in developing countries. NTD vaccines face unique challenges with respect to their product development and manufacture, as well as their preclinical and clinical testing. We emphasize global efforts to accelerate the development of NTD vaccines and some of the hurdles to ensuring their availability to the world's poorest people. PMID:26356803

  18. Advances in sarcocystiosis diagnosis in South American camelids in Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Sarcocystiosis in south-American camelids has a high prevalence, about 94% and affects alpacas and llamas by producing cysts either in skeletal muscle or heart muscle and is caused aucheniae and S. lamacanis. The approach of this investigation was to identify the species involves their pathogenicity, protein structure and the antibody kinetics of animals raised under field conditions, in isolation and under experimental infection and immunization by ELISA and Western blot analysis. Also a PCR assay was developed for diagnosis of the disease in live animals, because so far this parasitic disease is diagnosed at the post mortem examination in the slaughterhouse. PCR product was sequenced and registered in the GeneBank for S. lamacanis. To learn about antibody kinetics under field conditions a group of 30 alpacas and their offspring raised in the Andean region of Huancavelica was sampled. Blood samples were collected and assayed by ELISA for 6 months after lambing. Similarly, a group of alpaca crias kept in isolation in Lima was monitored for antibodies. A group of 20 pregnant alpacas raised in the Andean region of Puno was transferred to our station in Lima and raised in sarcocystis-free pens. These alpacas were monitored for antibody to sarcocystis by ELISA and blood parasitemia by PCR for 2 years. A group of alpaca crias was immunized using a bradyzoite protein suspension, and blood samples were collected for monitoring antibody by ELISA and western blot. In order to identify genes coding surface antigens, bradkyzoites of S. aucheniae were collected for total RNA and mRNA isolation. From this mRNA a cDNA library will be constructed, using ligation, transformation and sequencing. Alpacas from Huancavelica assayed by ELISA showed antibody (93.3%) up to 4 months after parturition, and then 100% of them were positive. This result indicates the high rate of the infection in field conditions. A 30% of their offspring showed antibody up to 2 months of age being

  19. A New World of Mathematics Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, James E.

    2010-01-01

    The "flat" world described by Friedman (2006) is one of global supply chains and economic networks, outsourcing, international personal entrepreneurial opportunities, and nearly unlimited, universal information availability. American children will inherit a world in which their competition and opportunities are international. In light of these…

  20. The World Needs a New Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensky, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The author proposes that today's existing, world-wide curriculum--based on offering roughly the same math, language arts, science, and social studies to all--is not what is required for the future, and is hurting rather than helping the world's students. Math, language arts, science, and social studies, he argues, are really "proxies"…

  1. The World Bank’s New Contributor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    At the end of 2007,China announced for the first time that it would contrib- ute to the International Development Association(IDA),the part of the World Bank Group that provides grants and no-interest credit to the world’s poorest countries.As Robert Zoellick,President of the World Bank,said at the time, China had moved within less than a decade from being a successful IDA recipi- ent to being a global partner. In an exclusive interview with Beifing Review reporter Yu Shujun,David Dollar,the World Bank’s Country Director for China and Mongolia,discusses China’s cooperation with the international bank,the areas of future coopera- tion,the economic development of China and its role in the world economy.

  2. Electromagnetic perturbations in new brane world scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, C.; Pavan, A. B.; Torrejon, T. E. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we consider electromagnetic dynamics in Randall-Sundrum branes. It is derived a family of four-dimensional spacetimes compatible with Randall-Sundrum brane worlds, focusing on asymptotic flat backgrounds. Maximal extensions of the solutions are constructed and their causal structures are discussed. These spacetimes include singular, non-singular and extreme black holes. Maxwell's electromagnetic field is introduced and its evolution is studied in an extensive numerical survey. El...

  3. Electromagnetic perturbations in new brane world scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Molina, C; Torrejon, T E M

    2016-01-01

    In this work we consider electromagnetic dynamics in Randall-Sundrum branes. It is derived a family of four-dimensional spacetimes compatible with Randall-Sundrum brane worlds, focusing on asymptotic flat backgrounds. Maximal extensions of the solutions are constructed and their causal structures are discussed. These spacetimes include singular, non-singular and extreme black holes. Maxwell's electromagnetic field is introduced and its evolution is studied in an extensive numerical survey. Electromagnetic quasinormal mode spectra are derived and analyzed with time-dependent and high order WKB methods. Our results indicate that the black holes in the brane are electromagnetically stable.

  4. Electromagnetic perturbations in new brane world scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, C.; Pavan, A. B.; Medina Torrejón, T. E.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we consider electromagnetic dynamics in Randall-Sundrum branes. It is derived from a family of four-dimensional spacetimes compatible with Randall-Sundrum brane worlds, focusing on asymptotic flat backgrounds. Maximal extensions of the solutions are constructed, and their causal structures are discussed. These spacetimes include singular, nonsingular, and extreme black holes. Maxwell's electromagnetic field is introduced, and its evolution is studied in an extensive numerical survey. Electromagnetic quasinormal mode spectra are derived and analyzed with time-dependent and high-order WKB methods. Our results indicate that the black holes in the brane are electromagnetically stable.

  5. Corporate planning in the new world order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The planning process at IPL Energy Inc. was discussed. IPL Energy is the largest natural gas distribution company which has the world's longest and most complex liquid pipeline. The three business units at IPL Energy are: gas distribution, pipelines, and international investment. Each uses different strategies for growth opportunities. The process wherein the plans from the various business units are formulated, leavened with corporate level vision, enriched by the addition of an international dimension, and merged into a complex strategic plan for the company as a whole has been described. The need for flexibility, and the importance of constant attention to the three Cs -competencies, culture and communications - were emphasized

  6. The elliptocyte: a study of the relationship between cell shape and membrane structure using the camelid erythrocyte as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omorphos, S A; Hawkey, C M; Rice-Evans, C

    1989-01-01

    1. The elliptocytic shape of the camelid erythrocyte is very stable and has a high resistance to modification by drugs and treatment which alter the shape of the discocytic erythrocytes of scimitar-horned oryx and man. 2. Differences in the erythrocyte membrane proteins have been found which indicate that proteins play an important role in stabilisation of the camelid elliptocyte. 3. The organisation of the cytoskeletal network in camelid elliptocytes differs from that established for human discocytes. PMID:2605918

  7. The new world of gas marketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that present gas supplies are adequate but tightening. An overall supply tightening means that the 1990s will be an exciting and challenging time for the gas business. The author of this paper foresees gas becoming the fuel of the future because of its environmental benefits and its increasing share of the power generation market. New supplies must come from new development, discoveries, or long-haul new sources such as Canadian imports, underutilized Rocky Mountain gas, gas from frontier areas, or LNG. However, the development of these new supplies will depend on gas prices, transportation availability, and access to new exploration areas. Moreover, the author believes something must happen to gas prices to encourage future development; gas burner-tip sales cannot continue below parity with liquid fuels

  8. NATO strategy in a new world order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the most immediate threat to Western Europe during the cold ware was the specter of Soviet military superiority looming from the East, proscribing Western political and economic freedom. NATO and the link to U.S. military power deterred political intimidation as well as a less probable military thrust into Central Europe. But these threat have faded under Mikhail Gorbachev, replaced by revolutions in Eastern Europe, the dissolution of the Warsaw Pact, receding Soviet military power, German unification, and the stirring of political and economic freedom nurtured by the West. These events are linked directly to the Gorbachev domestic revolution, a revolution that depends not only on domestic change, but also on political-economic integration with the West and dramatic shifts from defense to domestic investment. New Soviet military thinking, arms control, and unilateral cuts in conventional force structure and dramatic in themselves. But when projected on a new map of Europe, these events call for a major reexamination of NATO military strategy and the future role of the U.S. armed forces in a revised organization. A new strategy for NATO has been quietly taking shape since 1989, the debate often muffled by more dramatic events in the Soviet Union and more recently by war in the Persian Gulf. By the spring of 1991, the broad outlines of a new NATO within a radically new European security regime began to emerge. This chapter assesses both the emerging new strategy and the larger European security environment in which it will evolve

  9. Astrobiology: Discovering New Worlds of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Charles C.; Van Dover, Cindy Lee

    2001-01-01

    Emphasizes discoveries at the frontiers of science. Includes an instructional poster illustrating the hydrothermal vent communities on the deep ocean floor. Describes research activities related to the new discipline of astrobiology, a multidisciplinary approach to studying the emergence of life in the universe. Research activities include the…

  10. Positive psychology: New worlds for old

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Alan.

    2004-01-01

    Clinical Psychology has traditionally focused on psychological de ficits and disability. It has rarely privileged clients’ resilience, resourcefulness and capacity for renewal. In the USA Professor Martin Seligman and his colleagues have begun laying the foundations for a positive psychology to complement deficit - based a pproaches (Seligman & Peterson 2004; Snyder & Lopez, 2002). This new branch of psychology is primarily concerned with the scientific study of human strengths and happiness.

  11. The world food situation: New driving forces and required actions

    OpenAIRE

    von Braun, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    "The world food situation is currently being rapidly redefined by new driving forces. Income growth, climate change, high energy prices, globalization, and urbanization are transforming food consumption, production, and markets. The influence of the private sector in the world food system, especially the leverage of food retailers, is also rapidly increasing. Changes in food availability, rising commodity prices, and new producer–consumer linkages have crucial implications for the livelihoods...

  12. [Johannes de Laet and his vision of the New World].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannini de Gerulewicz, M

    1992-06-01

    Highlighting the contribution of Johannes De Laet (1582-1649), naturalist, historian, researcher, to the knowledge of the New World history and geography, as well as its inhabitants, flora and fauna. Laet published his huge New World or Description of the Occidental Indies in Dutch (1625), Latin (1633) and French (1640). The first Spanish edition appeared in 1988 in Venezuela, edited by the author of this work. PMID:11636366

  13. A NEW THINKING FOR A NEW WORLD. REPRESENTATIONS FROM ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    Negucioiu Aurel

    2011-01-01

    An incursion, even a succinct one, incomplete, in the universal history, in the world economic history and not in the least in the real world gives more and more "credit" to the idea according to which the movement is the main form of existence - working and evolution - of the society, economy, and of all the structures they are made of. Its "force motrice", its internal cause is represented, in our opinion, the unity and interaction of opposites. The changes, the transformations taking place...

  14. The Venus-new-world project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, C.

    The search for life is one of the major domains of space research, but it is also the most disappointing. There remains a small hope of success near the southern tropic of Mars. The installation of large human communities is possible on some planets and satellites. For Venus the major problem is to cool down that very hot planet (460°C); it can be done through the interposition of a dust cloud between the Sun and Venus. An efficient dust cloud must be very heavy (billions of tons) and it can be obtained through the pulverization of a well chosen asteroid at a proper place. Thousands of asteroids cross the Venus orbit; it is possible to move some of them with atom bombs and to lead them to the desired place. When Venus will be cold its gaseous CO 2 will disappear into the rocks, the corresponding "greenhouse effect" will be destroyed and we will thus reach a new stable equilibrium. The most pleasant Venusian regions will certainly be the polar regions without night; the Venusian equator is indeed almost exactly in the orbital plane of the planet.

  15. Can world answer the new nuclear necessity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanks to climatic change policies and to the prospective studies about the depletion of oil and gas reserves, a new chance will be given to nuclear energy. However, even if the nuclear industry has become more transparent, more attentive to the public preoccupations, and permanently looking for a demonstration of its safety, the institutional bases of its re-start up (the participating decision processes and the competing framework of electric markets) are much less favourable than those of its initial technological development. The future of nuclear energy is not warranted except if a strong consensus happens in dominating countries about the real or assumed catastrophic consequences of the greenhouse effect and if this sudden awareness changes the public opinion about the specific risks of nuclear energy and radioactive wastes. The uncertainty which will remain during, at least, the next 15 years will greatly complicate the choices of the nuclear industry and of the governments. For this reason, a paradoxical effort has to be made for the promotion of energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. (J.S.)

  16. Exploration: New Treasures in the Old World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, C. M.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Dhingra, D.; Cheek, L.; Prissel, T. C.; Jackson, C.; Parman, S. W.; Taylor, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The last decade has seen a renewed effort in the exploration of the Moon by modern spacecraft sent from Japan, China, India, and the US. These missions have resulted in remarkable discoveries and have inspired a new understanding of the early solar system shared by the Earth and the Moon. Although invaluable samples were brought to Earth from the Apollo and Luna landing sites more than four decades ago, the modern orbital measurements have demonstrated that key components of crustal compositions were missed. Small exposures of one lithology in particular, a Mg-rich 'pink' spinel anorthosite (PSA) has been confirmed at several sites around the globe, implying that its origin is linked to wide-spread crustal-evolution processes. We now believe this new lithology is deep-seated in origin [1] and possibly associated with early (Mg-suite) magma interactions with the primordial anorthositic crust [2]. In addition to the higher water (and sulfur) contents now recognized for the lunar interior [3], the recognition of PSA reopens a question as to whether ancient lunar processes may have concentrated valuable minerals/resources in small zones of the crust, as often occurs for layered magmatic complexes on Earth. We ask the question 'Where on the Moon should humans/robots go to obtain samples to address such wide-ranging science/exploration issues?' We focus on four areas with discrete outcrops of Mg-spinel lithology exposed from depth, and rank them in terms of science/exploration potential (1 - 4), and in terms of ease of access (A - D). THOMSON CRATER in SPA (1D): Multiple Mg-spinel exposures are found around Thomson (diameter 117 km); pure crystalline plagioclase and norite occur nearby. Thomson is within Ingenii (diameter 318 km), both of which are mare filled, facilitating access to the crater walls. Ingenii also contains enigmatic ';swirls' and magnetic anomalies, as well as a small mascon. Stratigraphic relations imply deep crust from the inner ring of SPA basin at

  17. New World cattle show ancestry from multiple independent domestication events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Decker, Jared E; Schnabel, Robert D; Taylor, Jeremy F; Hillis, David M

    2013-04-01

    Previous archeological and genetic research has shown that modern cattle breeds are descended from multiple independent domestication events of the wild aurochs (Bos primigenius) ∼10,000 y ago. Two primary areas of domestication in the Middle East/Europe and the Indian subcontinent resulted in taurine and indicine lines of cattle, respectively. American descendants of cattle brought by European explorers to the New World beginning in 1493 generally have been considered to belong to the taurine lineage. Our analyses of 47,506 single nucleotide polymorphisms show that these New World cattle breeds, as well as many related breeds of cattle in southern Europe, actually exhibit ancestry from both the taurine and indicine lineages. In this study, we show that, although European cattle are largely descended from the taurine lineage, gene flow from African cattle (partially of indicine origin) contributed substantial genomic components to both southern European cattle breeds and their New World descendants. New World cattle breeds, such as Texas Longhorns, provide an opportunity to study global population structure and domestication in cattle. Following their introduction into the Americas in the late 1400s, semiferal herds of cattle underwent between 80 and 200 generations of predominantly natural selection, as opposed to the human-mediated artificial selection of Old World breeding programs. Our analyses of global cattle breed population history show that the hybrid ancestry of New World breeds contributed genetic variation that likely facilitated the adaptation of these breeds to a novel environment. PMID:23530234

  18. The retinal ganglion cell classes of New World primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, E S; Silveira, L C; Gomes, F L; Lee, B B

    1996-12-01

    In the primate retina there are distinct ganglion cell classes, exhibiting particular morphologies and central projections, each responsible for conveying particular types of visual information to the brain. The chief retinal inputs to the cortex arise from specific ganglion cell classes, M-ganglion cells, responsible for carrying the luminance signal, and P-ganglion cells, that convey the red-green color opponent signal, as well as high contrast luminance signal. There are other ganglion cell classes, such as small-field bistratified cells, exhibiting dendrites that stratify at two different levels in the inner plexiform layer, which convey the blue-yellow color opponent signal. Most published data concerning primate retinal ganglion cell anatomy and physiology have been obtained from Old World species. Studies on New World monkeys have recently become of interest since they differ from the Old World monkeys with respect to the color vision inheritance pattern. On reviewing retinal ganglion cell layer organization in New World monkeys, it seems that there are more similarities than differences in relation to the Old World monkeys. Diurnal genera of New World monkeys exhibit a well-developed fovea centralis and ganglion cell density peak, as well as peripheral density values which are in the range reported for Old World monkeys and human. Moreover, all the major ganglion cell classes identified in Old World monkeys are also present in New World primates. Up to now, no obvious anatomical differences between dichromats and trichromats have been reported. The only genus that is significantly different from the others is the Aotus. It exhibits lower ganglion cell density in the central retina, and apparently lacks the small-field bistratified cells. PMID:9394516

  19. Semen preservation and artificial insemination in domesticated South American camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, P Walter; Alarcon, V; Baca, L; Cuba, Y; Ordoñez, C; Salinas, J; Tito, F

    2013-01-10

    Semen preservation and artificial insemination in South American camelids are reviewed giving emphasis to work done in Peru and by the authors. Reports on semen evaluation and the preservation process indicate that semen of alpacas and llamas can be manipulated by making it liquid first. Collagenase appears to be the best enzyme to eliminate viscosity. Tris buffer solution maintains a higher motility than egg-yolk citrate, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), Triladyl, and Merck-I extenders. Cooling of semen took 1h after collected, and equilibrated with 7% glycerol presented a better motility and spermatozoa survival at 1, 7, 15 and 30days after being slowly frozen in 0.25mL plastic straws. Trials of artificial insemination with freshly diluted semen and frozen-thawed semen are encouraging and needs to be tested extensively under field conditions. Recently, fertility rates varied from 3 to 67%. Semen preservation and most important, artificial insemination appear to be a reality, and could be used to improve the genetic quality of alpacas and llamas. PMID:23153624

  20. The Creative Industries and New Trends in the Economic World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena MARINOVA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the re-branding of ‘cultural industries’ as ‘creative industries’ and new trends in economic world. The paper focuses on three central claims – first, the culture and the creative industry, second- the innovation and sustainability entrepreneurship and third represents the concept of creative industries cluster and new economy.

  1. Kaleidoscope: Admitting and Developing "New Leaders for a Changing World"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Coffin, Lee A.

    2010-01-01

    In the fall of 2005, the Academic Council of Tufts University proposed a new slogan to characterize its mission in educating students: "New Leaders for a Changing World." Many colleges, of course, have slogans of various kinds. The challenge is how each translates its words into action in an authentic manner. Sternberg's theory of…

  2. Novel Camelid Antibody Fragments Targeting Recombinant Nucleoprotein of Araucaria hantavirus: A Prototype for an Early Diagnosis of Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Soraya S.; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S.; Morais, Michelle S. S.; Prado, Nidiane D. R.; Barros, Marcos L.; Koishi, Andrea C.; Mazarrotto, Giovanny A. C. A.; Gonçalves, Giselle M.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Soares, Andreimar M.; Pereira da Silva, Luiz H.; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N.; Fernandes, Carla F. C.; Stabeli, Rodrigo G.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to conventional antibodies, camelids produce immunoglobulins G composed exclusively of heavy chains in which the antigen binding site is formed only by single domains called VHH. Their particular characteristics make VHHs interesting tools for drug-delivery, passive immunotherapy and high-throughput diagnosis. Hantaviruses are rodent-borne viruses of the Bunyaviridae family. Two clinical forms of the infection are known. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS) is present in the Old World, while Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is found on the American continent. There is no specific treatment for HPS and its diagnosis is carried out by molecular or serological techniques, using mainly monoclonal antibodies or hantavirus nucleoprotein (N) to detect IgM and IgG in patient serum. This study proposes the use of camelid VHHs to develop alternative methods for diagnosing and confirming HPS. Phage display technology was employed to obtain VHHs. After immunizing one Lama glama against the recombinant N protein (prNΔ85) of a Brazilian hantavirus strain, VHH regions were isolated to construct an immune library. VHHs were displayed fused to the M13KO7 phage coat protein III and the selection steps were performed on immobilized prNΔ85. After selection, eighty clones recognized specifically the N protein. These were sequenced, grouped based mainly on the CDRs, and five clones were analyzed by western blot (WB), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) device, and ELISA. Besides the ability to recognize prNΔ85 by WB, all selected clones showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range. Additionaly, the clone KC329705 is able to detect prNΔ85 in solution, as well as the native viral antigen. Findings support the hypothesis that selected VHHs could be a powerful tool in the development of rapid and accurate HPS diagnostic assays, which are essential to provide supportive care to patients and reduce the high mortality rate associated with hantavirus infections. PMID

  3. Incompatibility of Happiness and Truth in Brave New World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波; 张敏; 夏梅花

    2014-01-01

    Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is called one of the“Anti-Utopian Trilogy”because of its obvious political empha-sis. Yet the following analysis about its theme shows that it is more than a science fiction or political fable. It was given more phil-osophical significance. The fact that happiness and truth cannot be compatible in the World Stare actually gives a warning to the modern society which depends too much on technical development and material prosperity.

  4. Transition to a New World Economic Order Part II: Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Calkins, Peter H.

    1995-01-01

    Research on the transition to a new world economic order has already produced rich empirical results which help to validate sixteen specific research hypotheses for socialist and capitalist, underdeveloped and developed contexts, as well as the world economy as a whole. This multi-disciplinary literature on the NWO also maps out appropriate strategies that nations could follow to reach the goals of international efficiency, equity, equilibrium and positive evolution. Because of remaining lacu...

  5. New Particles” of the Changing World Situation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuSui; WangWei

    2004-01-01

    The world situation, as always complicated and volatile, has seen some “new particles” after the war on Iraq. This is a special war that has affected the whole world. The course and consequences of the war have exemplified the fever pitch of the U.S. unilateralism and the heavy cost thus paid by the U.S. They have also resulted in the changes of relations between major powers,

  6. Mechanisms of Ricin Toxin Neutralization Revealed through Engineered Homodimeric and Heterodimeric Camelid Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristina; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2015-11-13

    Novel antibody constructs consisting of two or more different camelid heavy-chain only antibodies (VHHs) joined via peptide linkers have proven to have potent toxin-neutralizing activity in vivo against Shiga, botulinum, Clostridium difficile, anthrax, and ricin toxins. However, the mechanisms by which these so-called bispecific VHH heterodimers promote toxin neutralization remain poorly understood. In the current study we produced a new collection of ricin-specific VHH heterodimers, as well as VHH homodimers, and characterized them for their ability neutralize ricin in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrate that the VHH heterodimers, but not homodimers were able to completely protect mice against ricin challenge, even though the two classes of antibodies (heterodimers and homodimers) had virtually identical affinities for ricin holotoxin and similar IC50 values in a Vero cell cytotoxicity assay. The VHH heterodimers did differ from the homodimers in their ability to promote toxin aggregation in solution, as revealed through analytical ultracentrifugation. Moreover, the VHH heterodimers that were most effective at promoting ricin aggregation in solution were also the most effective at blocking ricin attachment to cell surfaces. Collectively, these data suggest that heterodimeric VHH-based neutralizing agents may function through the formation of antibody-toxin complexes that are impaired in their ability to access host cell receptors. PMID:26396190

  7. Construction of naïve camelids VHH repertoire in phage display-based library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Jamal S M; Atef, Ahmed; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Edris, Sherif; Hajrah, Nahid; Alzohairy, Ahmed M; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Camelids have unique antibodies, namely HCAbs (VHH) or commercially named Nanobodies(®) (Nb) that are composed only of a heavy-chain homodimer. As libraries based on immunized camelids are time-consuming, costly and likely redundant for certain antigens, we describe the construction of a naïve camelid VHHs library from blood serum of non-immunized camelids with affinity in the subnanomolar range and suitable for standard immune applications. This approach is rapid and recovers VHH repertoire with the advantages of being more diverse, non-specific and devoid of subpopulations of specific antibodies, which allows the identification of binders for any potential antigen (or pathogen). RNAs from a number of camelids from Saudi Arabia were isolated and cDNAs of the diverse vhh gene were amplified; the resulting amplicons were cloned in the phage display pSEX81 vector. The size of the library was found to be within the required range (10(7)) suitable for subsequent applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. Two hundred clones were randomly selected and the inserted gene library was either estimated for redundancy or sequenced and aligned to the reference camelid vhh gene (acc. No. ADE99145). Results indicated complete non-specificity of this small library in which no single event of redundancy was detected. These results indicate the efficacy of following this approach in order to yield a large and diverse enough gene library to secure the presence of the required version encoding the required antibodies for any target antigen. This work is a first step towards the construction of phage display-based biosensors useful in disease (e.g., TB or tuberculosis) diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24702893

  8. Brave new world revisited revisited: Huxley's evolving view of behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, B

    1992-01-01

    Aldous Huxley's Brave New World has served as a popular and powerful source of antibehavioral sentiment. Several of Huxley's works are examined in order to ascertain his true thoughts regarding behaviorism. Early in his career Huxley failed to appreciate aspects of behavioral theory (e.g., an appreciation of heredity) or the good ends to which it could be employed. Huxley's later works portrayed behaviorism in a much more positive light, and he believed that behavioral science, along with spiritual enlightenment, might help save humanity from the Brave New World he predicted. PMID:22478115

  9. Designing a brave new world: eugenics, politics, and fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woiak, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    Aldous Huxley composed Brave New World in the context of the Depression and the eugenics movement in Britain. Today his novel is best known as satirical and predictive, but an additional interpretation emerges from Huxley's nonfiction writings in which the liberal hurmanist expressed some surprising opinions about eugenics, citizenship, and meritocracy. He felt that his role as an artist and public intellectual was to formulate an evolving outlook on urgent social, scientific, and moral issues. His brave new world can therefore be understood as a serious design for social reform, as well as a commentary about the social uses of scientific knowledge. PMID:18175454

  10. Brave new world? Political participation and new media

    OpenAIRE

    Simões, Maria João; Barriga, Antónia do Carmo; Jerónimo, Nuno Amaral

    2011-01-01

    This paper intends to highlight the role played by new social media upon citizens’ political participation, their challenges and inequalities, like what has been thoroughly studied for traditional media. New media, also called social networks, like Twitter or Facebook, have been glorified as the universal public sphere, a promising new "café". This paper intends to discuss, in a more realistic and reflexive way, the use of some internet platforms, contradicting the excess...

  11. Development and utilization of transgenic New World screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    The New World Screwworm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, was the first insect to be effectively controlled using the sterile insect technique (SIT). Recent efforts to improve NWS SIT biological control have centered on the development of genetically transformed strains using the piggyBac transposon...

  12. The genetic prehistory of the New World Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raghavan, Maanasa; DeGiorgio, Michael; Albrechtsen, Anders;

    2014-01-01

    The New World Arctic, the last region of the Americas to be populated by humans, has a relatively well-researched archaeology, but an understanding of its genetic history is lacking. We present genome-wide sequence data from ancient and present-day humans from Greenland, Arctic Canada, Alaska...

  13. Toxoplasmosis in a colony of New World monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietz, H.H.; Henriksen, P.; Bille-Hansen, Vivi;

    1997-01-01

    In a colony of New World monkeys five tamarins (Saguinus oedipus, Saguinus labiatus and Leontopithecus rosal. rosal.), three marmosets (Callithrix jacchus and Callithrix pygmaea) and one saki (Pithecia pithecia) died suddenly. The colony comprised 16 marmosets, 10 tamarins and three sakis. The ma...

  14. A "New Silk Road" Between China and the Arab World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zank, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The chapter reconstructs the development of new links between China and the Arab World. The links have been created from "above" and from "below", by private initiatives. This process has been facilitated by a turn to more open economic systems on both sides. The relations are closest between Chi...

  15. Global work force 2000: the new world labor market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, W B

    1991-01-01

    Just as there are global markets for products, technology, and capital, managers must now think of one for labor. Over the next 15 years, human capital, once the most stationary factor in production, will cross national borders with greater and greater ease. Driving the globalization of labor is a growing imbalance between the world's labor supply and demand. While the developed world accounts for most of the world's gross domestic product, its share of the world work force is shrinking. Meanwhile, in the developing countries, the work force is quickly expanding as many young people approach working age and as women join the paid work force in great numbers. The quality of that work force is also rising as developing countries like Brazil and China generate growing proportions of the world's college graduates. Developing nations that combine their young, educated workers with investor-friendly policies could leapfrog into new industries. South Korea, Taiwan, Poland, and Hungary are particularly well positioned for such growth. And industrialized countries that keep barriers to immigration low will be able to tap world labor resources to sustain their economic growth. The United States and some European nations have the best chance of encouraging immigration, while Japan will have trouble overcoming its cultural and language barriers. PMID:10110172

  16. Paridris Kieffer of the New World (Hymenoptera, Platygastroidea, Platygastridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Elijah Talamas; Lubomir Masner; Norman Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Paridris in the New World is revised (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae). Fifteen species are described, of which 13 are new. Paridris aenea (Ashmead)(Mexico (Tamaulipas) and West Indies south to Bolivia and southern Brazil (Rio de Janeiro state)), Paridris armata Talamas, sp. n. (Venezuela), Paridris convexa Talamas, sp. n. (Costa Rica, Panama), Paridris dnophos Talamas, sp. n. (Mexico (Vera Cruz) south to Bolivia and central Brazil (Goiás)), Paridris gongylos Talamas & Masner, sp. n. (Un...

  17. OSTEOMETRÍA Y GENÉTICA DE LOS CAMÉLIDOS MOCHICA, COSTA NORTE DEL PERÚ / Mochica camelids osteometry and genetics, north coast of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Félix Vásquez Sánchez

    2009-12-01

    of Peru during Moche times. This model takes into account that in this environment currently camelids are not breed, as well as genetics and evolutionary factors in the new domestic form, the effect of Bergmann’s Rule, and new grasses in the morphology of this new form of domestic camelid, ,which lived in the region at the time of Moche.Keywords: osteometry, genetic, camelids, speciation, Mochica 

  18. Digesta retention patterns of solute and different-sized particles in camelids compared with ruminants and other foregut fermenters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Marie T; Runge, Ullrich; Ortmann, Sylvia; Lang, Richard A; Moser, Dario; Galeffi, Cordula; Schwarm, Angela; Kreuzer, Michael; Clauss, Marcus

    2015-07-01

    The mean retention times (MRT) of solute or particles in the gastrointestinal tract and the forestomach (FS) are crucial determinants of digestive physiology in herbivores. Besides ruminants, camelids are the only herbivores that have evolved rumination as an obligatory physiological process consisting of repeated mastication of large food particles, which requires a particle sorting mechanism in the FS. Differences between camelids and ruminants have hardly been investigated so far. In this study we measured MRTs of solute and differently sized particles (2, 10, and 20 mm) and the ratio of large-to-small particle MRT, i.e. the selectivity factors (SF(10/2mm), SF(20/2mm), SF(20/10mm)), in three camelid species: alpacas (Vicugna pacos), llamas (Llama glama), and Bactrian camels (Camelus bactrianus). The camelid data were compared with literature data from ruminants and non-ruminant foregut fermenters (NRFF). Camelids and ruminants both had higher SF(10/2mm)FS than NRFF, suggesting convergence in the function of the FS sorting mechanism in contrast to NRFF, in which such a sorting mechanism is absent. The SF(20/10mm)FS did not differ between ruminants and camelids, indicating that there is a particle size threshold of about 1 cm in both suborders above which particle retention is not increased. Camelids did not differ from ruminants in MRT(2mm)FS, MRTsoluteFS, and the ratio MRT(2mm)FS/MRTsoluteFS, but they were more similar to 'cattle-' than to 'moose-type' ruminants. Camelids had higher SF(10/2mm)FS and higher SF(20/2mm)FS than ruminants, indicating a potentially slower particle sorting in camelids than in ruminants, with larger particles being retained longer in relation to small particles. PMID:25921796

  19. The new competition in the world market for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current revival in the world market for nuclear reactors, notwithstanding Fukushima, completes the re-composition of the world's nuclear industry that started in the early 1990's and which has displaced nuclear power's centre of gravity towards Asia. In this new context, the capability to provide full-fledged financing for the buyers and to set up consortia that may include the operator have become major advantages at this stage, relegating to a lower order the ability to supply reactors with a high level of safety. (author)

  20. ELT in a changing world innovative approaches to new challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Azra; Saleem, Faiza; Cane, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    A novel ELT resource for language specialists and teachers across the world, this selection of papers is a collection of the most compelling and innovative ideas presented at a seminar hosted by the Centre of English Language, Aga Khan University, Pakistan, in January 2011, entitled 'ELT in a Changing World: Innovative Approaches to New Challenges'.The book is divided into three sections, the first of which is 'Global change and language learning'. This section offers a guided tour of language teaching evolution, highlighting the merits of enhanced language awareness, self-immersive and input/

  1. '(World) risk society’ or ‘new rationalities of risk’?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasborg, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    ’s at the same time ‘social constructivist’ and ‘realist’ notion of risk; ambiguities that seem to be repeated on the one hand in Beck’s view on the relation between knowledge and unawareness in reflexive modernity and on the other hand in his view on the role of the mass media in the ‘(world) risk...... elaborate on the problem of risk. Thus, rather than a mainly technology-driven new type of social reality, the ‘(world) risk society’ could perhaps better be seen as indicating a changing cultural self-understanding of late modern society, a new ‘semantics of crisis’, or the emergence of new forms of...

  2. TOURISM AS AN ENABLER INTO THE NEW GLOBAL WORLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROTARIU ILIE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades a new world has been developed, characterized not only by huge technical discoveries but also by tremendous social changes, because of the transformation of the human been philosophy and way of living. We have assisted in the developed countries to the issue, expansion and now transformation of the classical economy into leisure, experiences and now transformation. In the emerging countries the influence is high, stressing for the population which has to face the abundance of the markets, the new “brain cleaning” by mass media and the compulsory need to integrate into the new world. Philosophy, science, tradition, national behaviors and science have generated a melting pot where the common people has to swim to reach the feeling of happiness. Even the classical PIB is replaced by the Index of Happiness. Tourism is in the middle and seems to be a perfect tool to find a theoretical, but manly a practical issue. New forms of tourism have led to the need of reconsideration even of the definition of the tourism. The paper wants to be an opening for a broader discussion of the role and future of tourism as an enabler into the global leisure world.

  3. Secret science: Spanish cosmography and the New World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portuondo, Maria M.

    This study explores the efforts of sixteenth-century Spanish cosmographers to create a scientific framework to explain the New World. Cosmography is defined broadly to encompass the modern disciplines of geography, cartography, ethnography, natural history, and certain elements of astronomy and history. By the mid sixteenth century humanistic modes of representation and epistemological methods associated with Renaissance cosmography proved incapable of effectively describing the reality of the New World. The onus on Spanish royal cosmographers working in state-run institutions to describe their nation's vast empire resulted in a series of ambitious large-scale scientific projects aimed at addressing this problem. Spanish cosmographers turned to voyages of scientific exploration, new cartographic methods and an unrelenting questioning of those living in the new lands to formulate an accurate and useful description of the world. During most of the sixteenth century, the Spanish monarchy considered cosmographical information about the New World a valuable strategic and utilitarian asset and thus treated such information as a state secret. Legal measures taken to safeguard this information also increasingly regulated cosmographical practice, forcing royal cosmographers to compromise between the intellectual demands of science and the bureaucratic demands of an expanding empire. For the most part, historians have treated the scientific enterprises that resulted form the work of royal cosmographers as independent projects, springing loosely from administrative needs or the monarch's curiosity. This study forms a more cohesive picture of these scientific enterprises by reconstructing the intellectual heritage of Spanish cosmographers, defining the cosmographical methodology they ascribed to and studying the cosmographer as one of the key agents in a vigorous trans-Atlantic exchange of information. The work of two royal cosmographers of the Council of Indies, Juan L

  4. Paleobiolinguistics of New World Crops and the Otomanguean Language Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecil H. Brown

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Several studies recently published in Ethnobiology Letters treat respectively the paleobiolinguistics of chili pepper, manioc, maize, and the common bean in New World language families. This includes the Otomanguean family of Mexico, one of the oldest language groups of the hemisphere, whose parent language may have been spoken at the latest around 6500 years ago. This communication addresses the possibility that Otomanguean paleobiolinguistics should be considered tentative since languages of the grouping are not yet conclusively demonstrated to be descended from a common ancestor. This challenges the proposal that words for chili pepper, manioc, and maize were in vocabularies of languages spoken two thousand or more years before development of a village-farming way of life in the New World.

  5. The new worlds observer: The astrophysics strategic mission concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cash W.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We present some results of the Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study for the New Worlds Observer (NWO. We show that the use of starshades is the most effective and affordable path to mapping and understanding our neighboring planetary systems, to opening the search for life outside our solar system, while serving the needs of the greater astronomy community. A starshade-based mission can be implemented immediately with a near term program of technology demonstration.

  6. The new worlds observer: The astrophysics strategic mission concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, W.

    2011-07-01

    We present some results of the Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Study for the New Worlds Observer (NWO). We show that the use of starshades is the most effective and affordable path to mapping and understanding our neighboring planetary systems, to opening the search for life outside our solar system, while serving the needs of the greater astronomy community. A starshade-based mission can be implemented immediately with a near term program of technology demonstration.

  7. Hybridization in Large-Bodied New World Primates

    OpenAIRE

    Cortés-Ortiz, Liliana; Duda, Thomas F.; Canales-Espinosa, Domingo; García-Orduña, Francisco; Rodríguez-Luna, Ernesto; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2007-01-01

    Well-documented cases of natural hybridization among primates are not common. In New World primates, natural hybridization has been reported only for small-bodied species, but no genotypic data have ever been gathered that confirm these reports. Here we present genetic evidence of hybridization of two large-bodied species of neotropical primates that diverged ∼3 MYA. We used species-diagnostic mitochondrial and microsatellite loci and the Y chromosome Sry gene to determine the hybrid status o...

  8. Paleobiolinguistics of New World Crops and the Otomanguean Language Family

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Cecil H.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies recently published in Ethnobiology Letters treat respectively the paleobiolinguistics of chili pepper, manioc, maize, and the common bean in New World language families. This includes the Otomanguean family of Mexico, one of the oldest language groups of the hemisphere, whose parent language may have been spoken at the latest around 6500 years ago. This communication addresses the possibility that Otomanguean paleobiolinguistics should be considered tentative since languages o...

  9. New World and Mediterranean wine tourism: A comparative analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Charters, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This is a theoretical paper providing a comparative overview of wine tourism in the New World and Europe – particularly the Mediterranean region. The review is timely because while there has been substantial wine tourism research in Anglophone countries, less has occurred in Europe, despite the fact that it has such a long history of wine production. The paper suggests a series of differences between the two areas based on both structural factors affecting the context in which wine is produce...

  10. Brave new world revisited revisited: Huxley's evolving view of behaviorism

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Bobby

    1992-01-01

    Aldous Huxley's Brave New World has served as a popular and powerful source of antibehavioral sentiment. Several of Huxley's works are examined in order to ascertain his true thoughts regarding behaviorism. Early in his career Huxley failed to appreciate aspects of behavioral theory (e.g., an appreciation of heredity) or the good ends to which it could be employed. Huxley's later works portrayed behaviorism in a much more positive light, and he believed that behavioral science, along with spi...

  11. TOURISM AS AN ENABLER INTO THE NEW GLOBAL WORLD

    OpenAIRE

    ROTARIU ILIE

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades a new world has been developed, characterized not only by huge technical discoveries but also by tremendous social changes, because of the transformation of the human been philosophy and way of living. We have assisted in the developed countries to the issue, expansion and now transformation of the classical economy into leisure, experiences and now transformation. In the emerging countries the influence is high, stressing for the population which has to fa...

  12. A brave new world for an old world pest: Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wee Tek Tay

    Full Text Available The highly polyphagous Old World cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera is a quarantine agricultural pest for the American continents. Historically H. armigera is thought to have colonised the American continents around 1.5 to 2 million years ago, leading to the current H. zea populations on the American continents. The relatively recent species divergence history is evident in mating compatibility between H. zea and H. armigera under laboratory conditions. Despite periodic interceptions of H. armigera into North America, this pest species is not believed to have successfully established significant populations on either continent. In this study, we provide molecular evidence via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA cytochrome oxidase I (COI and cytochrome b (Cyt b partial gene sequences for the successful recent incursion of H. armigera into the New World, with individuals being detected at two sites (Primavera do Leste, Pedra Preta within the State of Mato Grosso in Brazil. The mtDNA COI and Cyt b haplotypes detected in the Brazilian H. armigera individuals are common throughout the Old World, thus precluding identification of the founder populations. Combining the two partial mtDNA gene sequences showed that at least two matrilines are present in Brazil, while the inclusion of three nuclear DNA Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC markers identified a further two possible matrilines in our samples. The economic, biosecurity, resistance management, ecological and evolutionary implications of this incursion are discussed in relation to the current agricultural practices in the Americas.

  13. A brave new world for an old world pest: Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Wee Tek; Soria, Miguel F; Walsh, Thomas; Thomazoni, Danielle; Silvie, Pierre; Behere, Gajanan T; Anderson, Craig; Downes, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    The highly polyphagous Old World cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera is a quarantine agricultural pest for the American continents. Historically H. armigera is thought to have colonised the American continents around 1.5 to 2 million years ago, leading to the current H. zea populations on the American continents. The relatively recent species divergence history is evident in mating compatibility between H. zea and H. armigera under laboratory conditions. Despite periodic interceptions of H. armigera into North America, this pest species is not believed to have successfully established significant populations on either continent. In this study, we provide molecular evidence via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and cytochrome b (Cyt b) partial gene sequences for the successful recent incursion of H. armigera into the New World, with individuals being detected at two sites (Primavera do Leste, Pedra Preta) within the State of Mato Grosso in Brazil. The mtDNA COI and Cyt b haplotypes detected in the Brazilian H. armigera individuals are common throughout the Old World, thus precluding identification of the founder populations. Combining the two partial mtDNA gene sequences showed that at least two matrilines are present in Brazil, while the inclusion of three nuclear DNA Exon-Primed Intron-Crossing (EPIC) markers identified a further two possible matrilines in our samples. The economic, biosecurity, resistance management, ecological and evolutionary implications of this incursion are discussed in relation to the current agricultural practices in the Americas. PMID:24260345

  14. [The social status of women. For a new world order].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauffenic, A

    1985-01-01

    Curiosity about the place of women in development and solidarity with women's organizations in different economies prompt consideration of the individual and collective possibilities for women in public life and of the social status of women. Recent histories of Third World countries as reported in UN conferences held in Tunisia, Portugal, and New Delhi in 1982-83 and Western experience are the basis for identification of constraints in the development of women's movements and alternatives for participation of women in a new world order. Women have always contributed to the life and economic development of their countries, often in activities not recognized as economic, but they are excluded from processes of institutionalization and their presence is very rare at the highest levels of the social hierarchy. Women organized themselves and participated in the liberation movements of India, Malaysia, Libya, and Egypt, but were later relegated to their customary low status. Among the structural and ideological factors impeding access of women to political power and a true social status are cultural nationalism and religious ideology. Socialization is 1 of the processes by which members of a society acquire a common fund of knowledge, but norms produced by the dominant ideology, in this case male, pose a problem to dominated groups concerning the nature of their particularity. Such groups can strive for integration at the price of risking loss of identity, or they can contest the rules, situating themselves at the margin of the "laws" or rules. The essential question concerns the possibility of women rethinking the process and contents of socialization. A new system is required of perceptions, evaluations, and actions founded on new human values. In this perspective the women's movement would contribute to the realization of a new world order. Theories of equality, to comprehend reality in its entirety, must include equality while developing the concept of differences

  15. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C M; Elvidge, Christopher D; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A; Rybnikova, Nataliya A; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-06-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution-artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world's land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights. PMID:27386582

  16. The World Nuclear University: New partnership in nuclear education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The important role which the IAEA plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. A continued focus of IAEA activities in managing nuclear knowledge is to support Member States to secure and sustain human resources for the nuclear sector, comprising both the replacement of retiring staff and building of new capacity. The IAEA assists Member States, particularly developing ones, in their efforts to sustain nuclear education and training in all areas of nuclear technology for peaceful purposes, which is a necessary prerequisite for succession planning, in particular through the networking of nuclear education and training, including activities of the World Nuclear University (WNU) and the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT). The report on the attached CD-ROM, The World Nuclear University: New Partnership in Nuclear Education, gives an overview of the history of the development of the World Nuclear University and related IAEA activities and contains an analysis and recommendations from the first WNU Summer Institute, held in 2005 in the USA

  17. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness

    CERN Document Server

    Falchi, Fabio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C M; Elvidge, Christopher D; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A; Rybnikova, Nataliya A; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution-artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world's land surfaces between 75{\\deg}N and 60{\\deg}S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.

  18. A New Globalization Paradigm: World Unity or Alternatives for Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Shvydanenko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the conceptual foundations of the modern global economic system of development. It reflects the cyclical nature of changes to and the details of global integration processes. The creation of a global economy from a multi-paradigmatic angle is briefly outlined, taking into account the modern paradigms of globalization and the predominance of alternatives to the future development of a global economic space. The article investigates the development of a new type of world economy, a multi-system with a proven role for linkages and a more consolidated world economy. The article reveals the initial conditions for and main qualitative changes related to the integrated development of a complex network of interdependent national societies and macro-regional geo-economic structures. The article also reveals changes in the configuration of those factors that provide competitiveness for these societies and geo-economic formations.

  19. New world bats harbor diverse influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suxiang Tong

    Full Text Available Aquatic birds harbor diverse influenza A viruses and are a major viral reservoir in nature. The recent discovery of influenza viruses of a new H17N10 subtype in Central American fruit bats suggests that other New World species may similarly carry divergent influenza viruses. Using consensus degenerate RT-PCR, we identified a novel influenza A virus, designated as H18N11, in a flat-faced fruit bat (Artibeus planirostris from Peru. Serologic studies with the recombinant H18 protein indicated that several Peruvian bat species were infected by this virus. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that, in some gene segments, New World bats harbor more influenza virus genetic diversity than all other mammalian and avian species combined, indicative of a long-standing host-virus association. Structural and functional analyses of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase indicate that sialic acid is not a ligand for virus attachment nor a substrate for release, suggesting a unique mode of influenza A virus attachment and activation of membrane fusion for entry into host cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that bats constitute a potentially important and likely ancient reservoir for a diverse pool of influenza viruses.

  20. Latitude, elevational climatic zonation and speciation in New World vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Kozak, Kenneth H.; Gomez, Juan Pablo;

    2012-01-01

    in tropical versus temperate areas. Here, we quantify overlap in the climatic distributions of 93 pairs of sister species of mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles restricted to either the New World tropics or to the Northern temperate zone. We show that elevational ranges of tropical- and temperate......-zone species do not differ from one another, yet the temperature range experienced by species in the temperate zone is greater than for those in the tropics. Moreover, tropical sister species tend to exhibit greater similarity in their climatic distributions than temperate sister species. This pattern suggests...

  1. A Brave New World of Open Access Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Eve, Martin Paul

    2016-01-01

    As the Institute of Development Studies enters its fiftieth year, it is fitting that its flagship publication, the IDS Bulletin, should turn to an open-access mode of publication. For IDS has always aimed to understand the world in order to better it. By allowing anyone access to read the work, for free, online, the latest iteration of IDS Bulletin will be able to reach new audiences both inside and outside of academia and to thereby achieve the greatest impact from its publications.

  2. Therapeutic options for old world cutaneous leishmaniasis and new world cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Maillo, Begoña; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2013-11-01

    Estimated worldwide incidence of tegumentary leishmaniasis (cutaneous leishmaniasis [CL] and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis [MCL]) is over 1.5 million cases per year in 82 countries, with 90 % of cases occurring in Afghanistan, Brazil, Iran, Peru, Saudi Arabia and Syria. Current treatments of CL are poorly justified and have sub-optimal effectiveness. Treatment can be based on topical or systemic regimens. These different options must be based on Leishmania species, geographic regions, and clinical presentations. In certain cases of Old World CL (OWCL), lesions can spontaneously heal without any need for therapeutic intervention. Local therapies (thermotherapy, cryotherapy, paromomycin ointment, local infiltration with antimonials) are good options with less systemic toxicity, reserving systemic treatments (azole drugs, miltefosine, antimonials, amphotericin B formulations) mainly for complex cases. The majority of New World CL (NWCL) types require systemic treatment (mainly with pentavalent antimonials), either to speed the healing or to prevent dissemination to oral-nasal mucosa as MCL (NWMCL). These types of lesions are potentially serious and always require systemic-based regimens, mainly antimonials and pentamidine; however, the associated immunotherapy is promising. This paper is an exhaustive review of the published literature on the treatment of OWCL, NWCL and NWMCL, and provides treatment recommendations stratified according to their level of evidence regarding the species of Leishmania implicated and the geographical location of the infection. PMID:24170665

  3. The new world of medicine: prospecting for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Vay Liang W; Champaneria, Manish C

    2002-09-20

    Throughout past millennia, human beings have shared the common goal of improving health for longevity. However, different cultures around the world have developed their own approaches to achieve this goal. Various traditions have emerged, rendering distinct medical systems such as Ayurveda, Yoga, Chinese-Japanese medicine, shamanism, and Native American healing. Traditional medicine involves a holistic approach to the human body to integrate healing with culture, environment, and tradition. Modern allopathic medicine originated from Greco-Roman Medicine and Northern European traditions and is built on the science of anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry and the structure-function relationship between cells, tissues, and organs. This foundation focuses on diagnosis, treatment, and cure for acute illnesses via potent pharmaceutical drugs, surgery, radiation, and other treatment modalities. Within this past century, we have doubled the life-span of human beings. Genomic medicine, including stem cell research, cloning, and gene therapy, will increase our capability to treat even more diseases. In the new millennium, we face more chronic illnesses related to aging, environment, and lifestyle, such as cancer, diabetes. osteoporosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Thus, health care providers face the challenge of prospecting for health and disease prevention. Modern science and medical advancements provide the rationale for the integration of various traditional healing techniques, which have been termed Alternative and Complementary Medicine, to promote healing, health, and longevity. Advances in medicine must include the holistic approach of traditional medicine to face the current challenges in health care. Therefore, the New World of Medicine must fuse the antiquity of ancient healing with the innovations of modern medicine to increase life-expectancy and improve quality of life throughout the world. PMID:12426761

  4. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C. M.; Elvidge, Christopher D.; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A.; Rybnikova, Nataliya A.; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution—artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world’s land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights. PMID:27386582

  5. A new local-world evolving network model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Sen; Dai Guan-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    In some real complex networks, only a few nodes can obtain the global information about the entire networks, but most of the nodes own only local connections therefore own only local information of the networks. A new local-world evolving network model is proposed in this paper. In the model, not all the nodes obtain local network information, which is different from the local world network model proposed by Li and Chen (LC model). In the LC model, each node has only the local connections therefore owns only local information about the entire networks. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that adjusting the ratio of the number of nodes obtaining the global information of the network to the total number of nodes can effectively control the valuing range for the power-law exponent of the new network. Therefore, if the topological structure of a complex network, especially its exponent of power-law degree distribution, needs controlling, we just add or take away a few nodes which own the global information of the network.

  6. Mirror neurons in a New World monkey, common marmoset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eSuzuki

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mirror neurons respond when executing a motor act and when observing others’ similar act. So far, mirror neurons have been found only in macaques, humans and songbirds. To investigate the degree of phylogenetic specialization of mirror neurons during the course of their evolution, we determined whether mirror neurons with similar properties to macaques occur in a New World monkey, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus. The ventral premotor cortex (PMv, where mirror neurons have been reported in macaques, is difficult to identify in marmosets, since no sulcal landmarks exist in the frontal cortex. We addressed this problem using in vivo connection imaging methods. That is, we first identified cells responsive to others’ grasping action in a clear landmark, the superior temporal sulcus (STS, under anesthesia, and injected fluorescent tracers into the region. By fluorescence stereomicroscopy, we identified clusters of labelled cells in the ventrolateral frontal cortex, which were confirmed to be within the ventrolateral frontal cortex including PMv after sacrifice. We next implanted electrodes into the ventrolateral frontal cortex and STS and recorded single/multi-units under an awake condition. As a result, we found neurons in the ventrolateral frontal cortex with characteristic mirror properties quite similar to those in macaques. This finding suggests that mirror neurons occur in a common ancestor of New and Old World monkeys and its common properties are preserved during the course of primate evolution.

  7. Innervation and immunohistochemical characteristics of epididymis in Alpaca camelid (Vicugna pacos)

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanna Liguori; Salvatore Paino; Caterina Squillacioti; Adriana De Luca; Sabrina Alì; Emilia Langella; Nicola Mirabella

    2013-01-01

    Alpacas (Vicugna pacos) are domesticated camelids indigenous to south America and recently also bred in Europe and Italy for their high quality wool. There is little data available regarding the innervation of the male reproductive tract of this species. In the present study, the distribution of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), neuropeptide Y (NPY), tyrosine hydroxilase (TH), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP) was analyzed in the epididymis by using immunohistochem...

  8. Computed tomographic and radiographic examination of dental structures in South American camelid specimen of different ages

    OpenAIRE

    Rostami, Abdolrazagh; Geissbühler, Urs; Schellenberger, Frank; Zanolari, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Background Tooth root problems and periodontal diseases are common in South American camelids (SAC). The objective was to evaluate and optimize the imaging technique for dental radiography in SAC and to describe the radiographic and computed tomographic (CT) anatomy of normal teeth at different ages. In this study, the heads of 20 healthy SAC slaughtered for meat production or euthanized for reasons not related to dental problems included 7 female and 10 male llamas and 3 male alpacas. Using ...

  9. A cytogenetic and comparative map of camelid chromosome 36 and the minute in alpacas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Felipe; Baily, Malorie P; Merriwether, David A; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Rubes, Jiři; Kutzler, Michelle A; Chowdhary, Renuka; Janečka, Jan; Raudsepp, Terje

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in camelid genomics have provided draft sequence assemblies and the first comparative and gene maps for the dromedary (CDR) and the alpaca (LPA). However, no map information is currently available for the smallest camelid autosome-chr36. The chromosome is also of clinical interest because of its involvement in the minute chromosome syndrome (MCS) in infertile alpacas. Here, we developed molecular markers for camelid chr36 by direct sequencing CDR36 and LPA minute and by bioinformatics analysis of alpaca unplaced sequence scaffolds. We constructed a cytogenetic map for chr36 in the alpaca, llama, and dromedary and showed its homology to human chromosome 7 (HSA7) at 49.8-55.5 Mb. The chr36 map comprised seven markers, including two genes-ZPBP and WVC2. Comparative status of HSA7 was further refined by cytogenetic mapping of 16 HSA7 orthologs in camelid chromosomes 7 and 18 and by the analysis of HSA7-conserved synteny blocks across 11 vertebrate species. Finally, mapping chr36 markers in infertile alpacas confirmed that the minute chromosome was a derivative of chr36, but the small size was not a result of a large deletion or a translocation. Instead, cytogenetic mapping of 5.8S, 18S, and 28S rRNA genes (nucleolus organizer region (NOR)) revealed that the size difference between chr36 homologs in infertile alpacas was due to a heterozygous presence of NOR, whereas chr36 in fertile alpacas had no NOR. We theorized that the heterozygous NOR might affect chr36 pairing, recombination, and segregation in meiosis and, thus fertility. PMID:25634498

  10. Computed tomographic and radiographic examination of dental structures in South American camelid specimen of different ages.

    OpenAIRE

    Rostami, Abdolrazagh; Geissbühler, Urs; Schellenberger, Frank; Zanolari, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Tooth root problems and periodontal diseases are common in South American camelids (SAC). The objective was to evaluate and optimize the imaging technique for dental radiography in SAC and to describe the radiographic and computed tomographic (CT) anatomy of normal teeth at different ages. In this study, the heads of 20 healthy SAC slaughtered for meat production or euthanized for reasons not related to dental problems included 7 female and 10 male llamas and 3 male alpacas. Us...

  11. Culicoides fauna and bluetongue virus serotype 8 infection in South American camelid herds in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a Culicoides-born infectious disease caused by bluetongue virus (BTV). From 2006 to 2010, BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) spread throughout Europe, causing severe disease in domestic and some wild ruminant species and in an alpaca. Compulsory vaccination of susceptible animals was the most effective strategy to control and eradicate the BTV-8 epizootic in Europe. However, South American camelids (SAC) were not included in the BTV-8 vaccination programmes in Europe. The presented...

  12. Magnetosome Expression of Functional Camelid Antibody Fragments (Nanobodies) in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Pollithy, Anna; Romer, Tina; Lang, Claus; Müller, Frank D.; Helma, Jonas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Schüler, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Numerous applications of conventional and biogenic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), such as in diagnostics, immunomagnetic separations, and magnetic cell labeling, require the immobilization of antibodies. This is usually accomplished by chemical conjugation, which, however, has several disadvantages, such as poor efficiency and the need for coupling chemistry. Here, we describe a novel strategy to display a functional camelid antibody fragment (nanobody) from an alpaca (Lama pacos) on the surf...

  13. Alpaca (Lama pacos) as a convenient source of recombinant camelid heavy chain antibodies (VHHs)

    OpenAIRE

    Maass, David R.; Sepulveda, Jorge; Pernthaner, Anton; Shoemaker, Charles B.

    2007-01-01

    Recombinant single domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that derive from the unusual camelid heavy chain only IgG class (HCAbs) have many favourable properties compared with single-chain antibodies prepared from conventional IgG. As a result, VHHs have become widely used as binding reagents and are beginning to show potential as therapeutic agents. To date, the source of VHH genetic material has been camels and llamas despite their large size and limited availability. Here we demonstrate that the...

  14. Algal chloroplast produced camelid VHH antitoxins are capable of neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel J Barrera; Rosenberg, Julian N.; Chiu, Joanna G.; Chang, Yung-Nien; Debatis, Michelle; Ngoi, Soo-Mun; Chang, John T.; Shoemaker, Charles B.; George A Oyler; Mayfield, Stephen P

    2014-01-01

    We have produced three antitoxins consisting of the variable domains of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies (VHH) by expressing the genes in the chloroplast of green algae. These antitoxins accumulate as soluble proteins capable of binding and neutralizing botulinum neurotoxin. Furthermore, they accumulate at up to 5% total soluble protein, sufficient expression to easily produce these antitoxins at scale from algae. The genes for the three different antitoxins were transformed into Chlamydom...

  15. Fully Human VH Single Domains That Rival the Stability and Cleft Recognition of Camelid Antibodies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, Romain; Dudgeon, Kip; Christie, Mary; Langley, David; Christ, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Human VH single domains represent a promising class of antibody fragments with applications as therapeutic modalities. Unfortunately, isolated human VH domains also generally display poor biophysical properties and a propensity to aggregate. This has encouraged the development of non-human antibody domains as alternative means of antigen recognition and, in particular, camelid (VHH) domains. Naturally devoid of light chain partners, these domains are characterized by favorable biophysical properties and propensity for cleft binding, a highly desirable characteristic, allowing the targeting of cryptic epitopes. In contrast, previously reported structures of human VH single domains had failed to recapitulate this property. Here we report the engineering and characterization of phage display libraries of stable human VH domains and the selection of binders against a diverse set of antigens. Unlike “camelized” human domains, the domains do not rely on potentially immunogenic framework mutations and maintain the structure of the VH/VL interface. Structure determination in complex with hen egg white lysozyme revealed an extended VH binding interface, with complementarity-determining region 3 deeply penetrating into the active site cleft, highly reminiscent of what has been observed for camelid domains. Taken together, our results demonstrate that fully human VH domains can be constructed that are not only stable and well expressed but also rival the cleft binding properties of camelid antibodies. PMID:25737448

  16. When China rules the world: the end of the Western world and the birth of a new global order

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Ting

    2012-01-01

    When China Rules the World considers how China has become a challenge to the West and is reshaping the global economy, but may not replace the US if it cannot make further cultural and institutional breakthrough. Ting Xu recommends this book to anyone interested in not only China and its future, but also the future of the West and the global world. When China Rules the World: The End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order. Martin Jacques. 2nd Edition. Penguin Books. 2012...

  17. New world balance and emerging countries - democracy, energy, technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serious economic crisis which rages since 2008 has been the result of a troubled era which started years before and contributed to aggravate the phenomenon. Energy crisis, biodiversity loss, global warming and its effects, markets deregulation have added up to economic recession. We are today the witnesses of a new deal of the cards illustrated by the social revolts of several Arab countries around the Mediterranean Sea. In this changing world, the declining occident cannot impose its economical or political leadership and the main emerging countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa: BRICS) play a more and more important role. With 30% of population increase expected in 2050, the emerging countries represent the driver of the world growth and have become the keys of development questions. In front of this irreversible movement, urgent and worldwide changes have to be done. First of all, huge technological efforts and changes of the existing international institutions (IMF, UNO, WTO) and of their governance are necessary to build up a sustainable economy and energy policy with emerging countries. Such a transformation will be painful for the Occident as it will change its vision of growth based on political domination and search of financial wealth, energy and resources. It is this effort that the author aims to present in this book in a practical and visionary way, where technological progress occupies an important place

  18. Book review: The world of wolves: New perspectives on ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David

    2011-01-01

    Wolf populations have proliferated in several areas and so have wolf books. The latest book is a good one. This compendium, The World of Wolves, covers a variety of fast-moving and controversial areas such as canid genetics, effects of wolves on ecosystems, climate change, hunting of wolves by snowmobile and non-lethal methods of minimizing livestock depredation. A great deal of new and interesting information resides in this book, far more than this review can cover. Several of the article authors are well experienced in their specialties: Luigi Boitani, Robert Wayne, Doug Smith, Rolf Peterson, Paul Paquet, Dean Cluff, and Olof Liberg along with numerous associates. The material reflects that. 

  19. Healthy by law: heading towards a brave new world?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gignon, Maxime; Ganry, Olivier; Manaouil, Cécile

    2012-12-01

    The law is a tool used by Government to protect public health. Health is an omnipresent preoccupation, inviting each one of us to protect ourselves against potential risks at all times and in all places. The right to health protection is a source of benefit entitlements and rights-obligations that render it effective. However, believing that the law can and should regulate all sectors of human life, still a utopian belief. International law suffers from intrinsic weaknesses that limit its effectiveness. The current economic context has lead to stricter controls over healthcare expenditure faced with the ever-growing demand for treatment, limiting the right to healthcare protection. Through health law, the State has developed controls over individuals. Individual liberties tend to be limited to the cause of the public health policy. Healthy by law, raises a question: are we heading towards a brave new world as described by Aldous Huxley? PMID:23447901

  20. Invisible woman: female slavery in the New World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Rust

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Slave women in Caribbean society, 1650-1838, by BARBARA BUSH. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990. xiii + 190 pp. (Cloth US$ 29.95, Paper US$ 12.50 [Published simultaneously by: James Curry, London, & Heinemann Publishers (Caribbean, Kingston.] Within the plantation household: Black and White women of the Old South, by ELIZABETH FOX-GENOVESE. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1988. xvii + 544 pp. (Cloth US$ 34.95, Paper US$ 12.95 Slave women in the New World: gender stratiftcation in the Caribbean, by MARIETTA MORRISSEY. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1989. xiv + 202 pp. (Cloth US$ 29.95 In a letter to his son in 1760, Chesapeake slaveowner Charles Carrol employed a curious euphemism for woman: "fair sex." Obviously, he wasn't thinking of his slaves. An attempt to remedy his negligence by considering this popular definition of eighteenth-century womanhood in relation to the females he forgot reveals this highly restrictive code to be exclusionary as well, for the difficulty of figuring out how brown or black skin can be "fair" suggests that a bondwoman in the New World was not, according to dominant ideology, a woman. Slavery made nonsense of female gender in the case of those whose labor allo wed white society its definition. A contemporary observer reveals just how thorough was the distinction between white womanly passivity and whatever unnamed oblivion was left to black females: "The labor of the slave thus becomes the substitute for that of the woman" (Smith 1980:70; Dew 1970 [1832]:36.

  1. Referential alarm calling behaviour in New World primates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristiane C(A)SAR; Klaus ZUBERB(U)HLER

    2012-01-01

    There is relatively good evidence that non-human primates can communicate about objects and events in their environment in ways that allow recipients to draw inferences about the nature of the event experienced by the signaller.In some species,there is also evidence that the basic semantic units are not individual calls,but call sequences and the combinations generated by them.These two findings are relevant to theories pertaining to the origins of human language because of the resemblances of these phenomena with linguistic reference and syntactic organisation.Until recently,however,most research efforts on the primate origins of human language have involved Old Word species with comparatively few systematic studies on New World monkeys,which has prevented insights into the deeper phylogenetic roots and evolutionary origins of language-relevant capacities.To address this,we review the older primate literature and very recent evidence for functionally referential communication and call combinations in New World primates.Within the existing literature there is ample evidence in both Callitrichids and Cebids for acoustically distinct call variants given to external disturbances that are accompanied by distinct behavioural responses.A general pattern is that one call type is typically produced in response to a wide range of general disturbances,often on the ground but also including inter-group encounters,while another call type is produced in response to a much narrower range of aerial threats.This pattern is already described for Old World monkeys and Prosimians,suggesting an early evolutionary origin.Second,recent work with black-fronted titi monkeys has produced evidence for different alarm call sequences consisting of acoustically distinct call types.These sequences appear to encode several aspects of the predation event simultaneously,notably predator type and location.Since meaningful call sequences have already been described in Old Word primates,we suggest

  2. Paridris Kieffer of the New World (Hymenoptera, Platygastroidea, Platygastridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Talamas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Paridris in the New World is revised (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae. Fifteen species are described, of which 13 are new. Paridris aenea (Ashmead (Mexico (Tamaulipas and West Indies south to Bolivia and southern Brazil (Rio de Janeiro state, P. armata Talamas, sp. n. (Venezuela, P. convexa Talamas, sp. n. (Costa Rica, Panama, P. dnophos Talamas, sp. n. (Mexico (Vera Cruz south to Bolivia and central Brazil (Goiás, P. gongylos Talamas & Masner, sp. n. (United States: Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, P. gorn Talamas & Masner, sp. n. (United States: Ohio south to Alabama, Georgia, P. invicta Talamas & Masner, sp. n. (Brazil: São Paulo, P. isabelicae Talamas & Masner, sp. n. (Cuba, Dominican Republic, P. lemete Talamas & Masner, sp. n. (Puerto Rico, P. minor Talamas, sp. n. (Cuba, P. nayakorum Talamas, sp. n. (Costa Rica, P. pallipes (Ashmead (southeastern Canada, United States south to Costa Rica, also Brazil (São Paulo, P. psydrax Talamas & Masner, sp. n. (Argentina, Mexico, Paraguay, United States, Venezuela, P. saurotos Talamas, sp. n. (Jamaica, P. soucouyant Talamas & Masner, sp. n. (Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela. Paridris brevipennis Fouts, P. laeviceps (Ashmead, and P. nigricornis (Fouts are treated as junior synonyms of P. pallipes; Paridris opaca is transferred to Probaryconus. Lectotypes are designated for Idris aenea Ashmead and Caloteleia aenea Ashmead.

  3. Infectious diseases -- new and ancient threats to world health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshansky, S J; Carnes, B; Rogers, R G; Smith, L

    1997-07-01

    Infectious and parasitic diseases remain a leading cause of death and disability in developing countries and are re-emerging as a serious health problem in developed countries. Outbreaks of Ebola, dengue hemorrhagic fever, cholera, and bubonic plague have occurred in low-income countries and multidrug-resistant organisms have surfaced throughout the world. Since 1973, over 28 new disease-causing microbes have been identified. This issue of "Population Bulletin" analyzes the impact of factors such as population growth, urbanization, migration, poverty, travel, agricultural practices, climate changes, natural disasters, and medical technology on the resurgence of infectious and parasitic diseases as well as the influence of diseases such as AIDS on population dynamics and socioeconomic development. Most of these diseases could be prevented, cured, or eradicated with known public health measures. National governments can help reduce poverty, step up immunization programs, and lessen the chances of introducing new diseases. Nongovernmental organizations can disseminate preventive knowledge and monitor disease outbreaks. The medical profession can strengthen infection control precautions and institute surveillance of the use of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents. Since the geographic isolation that used to contain disease outbreaks has been replaced by permeable international borders, the campaign against infectious and parasitic diseases must be global. PMID:12292663

  4. The new World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Kyba, Christopher C. M.; Portnov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    I present the main steps toward the completion of the new World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness (WA II) and some results. The computational technique has been updated, in comparison to the first World Atlas, to take into account both sources and sites elevation. The elevation data are from USGS GTOPO30 global digital elevation model, with the same pixel size as the WA II maps. The upward emission function used to compute the Atlas is a three parameters function. The parameters can be constrained to the database of Earth based night sky brightness measurements. In this way we can use the better fitting upward function for the final map’s calibration. We maintained constant atmosphere parameters over the entire Earth, identical to those used for the first Atlas (Garstang atmospheric clarity coefficient k=1, equivalent to a vertical extinction at sea level of 0.33 magnitude in the V band). This was done in order to avoid introducing a local bias due to different conditions that may confound the light pollution propagation effects. The radiance data used are those from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day-Night Band (DNB) on board the Suomi NPP satellite. The use of this newly available radiance data allows for an increased real resolution, even while maintaining the same 30"x30" lat-lon pixel size. Anyway, a higher resolution is really appreciable only in the immediate proximity of sources of light pollution (e.g. inside a big city). The VIIRS DNB data used for the input data were chosen from the months ranging from May to September in order to avoid introducing bias from the variable snow coverage in mid to high northern latitudes. In the southern hemisphere this problem is far less pronounced. The WA II takes advantage of the now enormous database of Earth based sky brightness measurements obtained mainly with Sky Quality Meters, but also with CCD measurements.

  5. Inhibition of the Myotoxicity Induced by Bothrops jararacussu Venom and Isolated Phospholipases A2 by Specific Camelid Single-Domain Antibody Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Nidiane D. R.; Pereira, Soraya S.; da Silva, Michele P.; Morais, Michelle S. S.; Kayano, Anderson M.; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S.; Luiz, Marcos B.; Zanchi, Fernando B.; Fuly, André L.; E. F. Huacca, Maribel; Fernandes, Cleberson F.; Calderon, Leonardo A.; Zuliani, Juliana P.; Soares, Andreimar M.; Stabeli, Rodrigo G.; F. C. Fernandes, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Antivenoms, produced using animal hyperimmune plasma, remains the standard therapy for snakebites. Although effective against systemic damages, conventional antivenoms have limited efficacy against local tissue damage. Additionally, the hypersensitivity reactions, often elicited by antivenoms, the high costs for animal maintenance, the difficulty of producing homogeneous lots, and the instability of biological products instigate the search for innovative products for antivenom therapy. In this study, camelid antibody fragments (VHH) with specificity to Bothropstoxin I and II (BthTX-I and BthTX-II), two myotoxic phospholipases from Bothrops jararacussu venom, were selected from an immune VHH phage display library. After biopanning, 28 and 6 clones recognized BthTX-I and BthTX-II by ELISA, respectively. Complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and immunoglobulin frameworks (FRs) of 13 VHH-deduced amino acid sequences were identified, as well as the camelid hallmark amino acid substitutions in FR2. Three VHH clones (KF498607, KF498608, and KC329718) were capable of recognizing BthTX-I by Western blot and showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range against both toxins. VHHs inhibited the BthTX-II phospholipase A2 activity, and when tested for cross-reactivity, presented specificity to the Bothrops genus in ELISA. Furthermore, two clones (KC329718 and KF498607) neutralized the myotoxic effects induced by B. jararacussu venom, BthTX-I, BthTX-II, and by a myotoxin from Bothrops brazili venom (MTX-I) in mice. Molecular docking revealed that VHH CDRs are expected to bind the C-terminal of both toxins, essential for myotoxic activity, and to epitopes in the BthTX-II enzymatic cleft. Identified VHHs could be a biotechnological tool to improve the treatment for snake envenomation, an important and neglected world public health problem. PMID:27028872

  6. Inhibition of the Myotoxicity Induced by Bothrops jararacussu Venom and Isolated Phospholipases A2 by Specific Camelid Single-Domain Antibody Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Nidiane D R; Pereira, Soraya S; da Silva, Michele P; Morais, Michelle S S; Kayano, Anderson M; Moreira-Dill, Leandro S; Luiz, Marcos B; Zanchi, Fernando B; Fuly, André L; E F Huacca, Maribel; Fernandes, Cleberson F; Calderon, Leonardo A; Zuliani, Juliana P; Pereira da Silva, Luiz H; Soares, Andreimar M; Stabeli, Rodrigo G; F C Fernandes, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Antivenoms, produced using animal hyperimmune plasma, remains the standard therapy for snakebites. Although effective against systemic damages, conventional antivenoms have limited efficacy against local tissue damage. Additionally, the hypersensitivity reactions, often elicited by antivenoms, the high costs for animal maintenance, the difficulty of producing homogeneous lots, and the instability of biological products instigate the search for innovative products for antivenom therapy. In this study, camelid antibody fragments (VHH) with specificity to Bothropstoxin I and II (BthTX-I and BthTX-II), two myotoxic phospholipases from Bothrops jararacussu venom, were selected from an immune VHH phage display library. After biopanning, 28 and 6 clones recognized BthTX-I and BthTX-II by ELISA, respectively. Complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and immunoglobulin frameworks (FRs) of 13 VHH-deduced amino acid sequences were identified, as well as the camelid hallmark amino acid substitutions in FR2. Three VHH clones (KF498607, KF498608, and KC329718) were capable of recognizing BthTX-I by Western blot and showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range against both toxins. VHHs inhibited the BthTX-II phospholipase A2 activity, and when tested for cross-reactivity, presented specificity to the Bothrops genus in ELISA. Furthermore, two clones (KC329718 and KF498607) neutralized the myotoxic effects induced by B. jararacussu venom, BthTX-I, BthTX-II, and by a myotoxin from Bothrops brazili venom (MTX-I) in mice. Molecular docking revealed that VHH CDRs are expected to bind the C-terminal of both toxins, essential for myotoxic activity, and to epitopes in the BthTX-II enzymatic cleft. Identified VHHs could be a biotechnological tool to improve the treatment for snake envenomation, an important and neglected world public health problem. PMID:27028872

  7. Inhibition of the Myotoxicity Induced by Bothrops jararacussu Venom and Isolated Phospholipases A2 by Specific Camelid Single-Domain Antibody Fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidiane D R Prado

    Full Text Available Antivenoms, produced using animal hyperimmune plasma, remains the standard therapy for snakebites. Although effective against systemic damages, conventional antivenoms have limited efficacy against local tissue damage. Additionally, the hypersensitivity reactions, often elicited by antivenoms, the high costs for animal maintenance, the difficulty of producing homogeneous lots, and the instability of biological products instigate the search for innovative products for antivenom therapy. In this study, camelid antibody fragments (VHH with specificity to Bothropstoxin I and II (BthTX-I and BthTX-II, two myotoxic phospholipases from Bothrops jararacussu venom, were selected from an immune VHH phage display library. After biopanning, 28 and 6 clones recognized BthTX-I and BthTX-II by ELISA, respectively. Complementarity determining regions (CDRs and immunoglobulin frameworks (FRs of 13 VHH-deduced amino acid sequences were identified, as well as the camelid hallmark amino acid substitutions in FR2. Three VHH clones (KF498607, KF498608, and KC329718 were capable of recognizing BthTX-I by Western blot and showed affinity constants in the nanomolar range against both toxins. VHHs inhibited the BthTX-II phospholipase A2 activity, and when tested for cross-reactivity, presented specificity to the Bothrops genus in ELISA. Furthermore, two clones (KC329718 and KF498607 neutralized the myotoxic effects induced by B. jararacussu venom, BthTX-I, BthTX-II, and by a myotoxin from Bothrops brazili venom (MTX-I in mice. Molecular docking revealed that VHH CDRs are expected to bind the C-terminal of both toxins, essential for myotoxic activity, and to epitopes in the BthTX-II enzymatic cleft. Identified VHHs could be a biotechnological tool to improve the treatment for snake envenomation, an important and neglected world public health problem.

  8. A new world malaria map: Plasmodium falciparum endemicity in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gething Peter W

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transmission intensity affects almost all aspects of malaria epidemiology and the impact of malaria on human populations. Maps of transmission intensity are necessary to identify populations at different levels of risk and to evaluate objectively options for disease control. To remain relevant operationally, such maps must be updated frequently. Following the first global effort to map Plasmodium falciparum malaria endemicity in 2007, this paper describes the generation of a new world map for the year 2010. This analysis is extended to provide the first global estimates of two other metrics of transmission intensity for P. falciparum that underpin contemporary questions in malaria control: the entomological inoculation rate (PfEIR and the basic reproductive number (PfR. Methods Annual parasite incidence data for 13,449 administrative units in 43 endemic countries were sourced to define the spatial limits of P. falciparum transmission in 2010 and 22,212 P. falciparum parasite rate (PfPR surveys were used in a model-based geostatistical (MBG prediction to create a continuous contemporary surface of malaria endemicity within these limits. A suite of transmission models were developed that link PfPR to PfEIR and PfR and these were fitted to field data. These models were combined with the PfPR map to create new global predictions of PfEIR and PfR. All output maps included measured uncertainty. Results An estimated 1.13 and 1.44 billion people worldwide were at risk of unstable and stable P. falciparum malaria, respectively. The majority of the endemic world was predicted with a median PfEIR of less than one and a median PfRc of less than two. Values of either metric exceeding 10 were almost exclusive to Africa. The uncertainty described in both PfEIR and PfR was substantial in regions of intense transmission. Conclusions The year 2010 has a particular significance as an evaluation milestone for malaria global health policy. The

  9. WORLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    1. THE UNITED STATES U.S. President Barack Obama, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President of the Palestinian National Authority Mahmoud Abbas confer during trilateral negotiations on Middle East peace on September 22 in New York

  10. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 gene (Pck1) displays parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Yin, Qiuyuan; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2015-01-01

    Bats are an ideal mammalian group for exploring adaptations to fasting due to their large variety of diets and because fasting is a regular part of their life cycle. Mammals fed on a carbohydrate-rich diet experience a rapid decrease in blood glucose levels during a fast, thus, the development of mechanisms to resist the consequences of regular fasts, experienced on a daily basis, must have been crucial in the evolution of frugivorous bats. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1, encoded by the Pck1 gene) is the rate-limiting enzyme in gluconeogenesis and is largely responsible for the maintenance of glucose homeostasis during fasting in fruit-eating bats. To test whether Pck1 has experienced adaptive evolution in frugivorous bats, we obtained Pck1 coding sequence from 20 species of bats, including five Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our molecular evolutionary analyses of these sequences revealed that Pck1 was under purifying selection in both Old World and New World fruit bats with no evidence of positive selection detected in either ancestral branch leading to fruit bats. Interestingly, however, six specific amino acid substitutions were detected on the ancestral lineage of OWFBs. In addition, we found considerable evidence for parallel evolution, at the amino acid level, between the PEPCK1 sequences of Old World fruit bats and New World fruit bats. Test for parallel evolution showed that four parallel substitutions (Q276R, R503H, I558V and Q593R) were driven by natural selection. Our study provides evidence that Pck1 underwent parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats, two lineages of mammals that feed on a carbohydrate-rich diet and experience regular periods of fasting as part of their life cycle. PMID:25807515

  11. The New World Screwworm eradication programme in North Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The screwworm is thought to have reached North Africa with a shipment of contaminated livestock imported from Central or South America. The parasite's presence in Libya poses a great threat to livestock, wildlife, and the environment in Africa, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean Basin. The parasite's present restricted distribution in Africa - confined to an area of approximately 20,000 square kilometers, 30 kilometers south of Tripoli and 60 kilometers east of the border with Tunisia - offers the possibility for eradication, if an international emergency action programme can be fully instituted. The programme is a collaborative effort of the Government of Libya and international agencies including FAO, IAEA, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). If eradication is achieved before much additional spread occurs, savings will be very great indeed. The sterile insect technique, in conjunction with surveillance, preventive, and curative treatment of animal wounds, is the only available technique for eradicating the New World Screwworm. The sterile insect technique requires the releases of huge numbers of factory-reared, sexually sterile insects. Sexual sterility is induced by exposing the late pupal stage to gamma rays. When these sterile insects mate with native females, the eggs laid on open wounds fail to hatch and no progeny are produced. By sustained releases and maintaining a ratio of 10 or more sterile insects to each native insect over several generations, eradication is achieved in a relatively short period of time

  12. The new world of retirement income security in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Joseph F; Cahill, Kevin E

    2016-01-01

    We have entered a new world of retirement income security in America, with older individuals more exposed to market risk and more vulnerable to financial insecurity than prior generations. This reflects an evolution that has altered the historical vision of a financially secure retirement supported by Social Security, a defined-benefit pension plan, and individual savings. Today, 2 of these 3 retirement income sources-pensions and savings-are absent or of modest importance for many older Americans. Retirement income security now often requires earnings from continued work later in life, which exacerbates the economic vulnerability of certain segments of the population, including persons with disabilities, the oldest-old, single women, and individuals with intermittent work histories. Because of the unprecedented aging of our society, further changes to the retirement income landscape are inevitable, but policymakers do have options to help protect the financial stability of older Americans. We can begin by promoting savings at all (especially younger) ages and by removing barriers that discourage work later in life. For individuals already on the cusp of retirement, more needs to be done to educate the public about the value of delaying the receipt of Social Security benefits. Inaction now could mean a return to the days when old age and poverty were closely linked. The negative repercussions of this would extend well beyond traditional economic measures, as physical and mental health outcomes are closely tied to financial security. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27159439

  13. Geophagy in new world monkeys (Platyrrhini): ecological and geographic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Stephen F; Veiga, Liza M; Urbani, Bernardo

    2008-01-01

    Geophagy has been recorded in an increasing number of New World monkeys (Platyrrhini) over recent years, permitting a tentative analysis of ecological patterns. While geophagy has now been recorded in species representing all 4 platyrrhine families and a majority of genera, there is a marked tendency for it to occur in the larger-bodied Pitheciidae and Atelidae. Howlers (Alouatta) are responsible for almost a third of reports, which are concentrated in the more frugivorous species, Alouatta belzebul and Alouatta seniculus. Geophagy may also be relatively common in the spider monkeys (Ateles) and the pitheciids, which are specialised frugivores and seed predators, respectively. An overview of the available data points to a marked Amazonian bias, allowing for geographical differences in the number of species and field studies. This pattern is demonstrated most emphatically by Alouatta, for which there are almost as many reports as field studies in the Amazon basin, in stark contrast with Central American sites, which have a long tradition of fieldwork, but no published records of geophagy. There are also relatively few reports from the Brazilian Atlantic forest. Despite the growth in reports, and the patterns identified here, the functional aspects of geophagy in the platyrrhines still remain unclear. PMID:18587239

  14. Two novel parvoviruses in frugivorous New and Old World bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Canuti

    Full Text Available Bats, a globally distributed group of mammals with high ecological importance, are increasingly recognized as natural reservoir hosts for viral agents of significance to human and animal health. In the present study, we evaluated pools of blood samples obtained from two phylogenetically distant bat families, in particular from flying foxes (Pteropodidae, Eidolon helvum in West Africa, and from two species of New World leaf-nosed fruit bats (Phyllostomidae, Artibeus jamaicensis and Artibeus lituratus in Central America. A sequence-independent virus discovery technique (VIDISCA was used in combination with high throughput sequencing to detect two novel parvoviruses: a PARV4-like virus named Eh-BtPV-1 in Eidolon helvum from Ghana and the first member of a putative new genus in Artibeus jamaicensis from Panama (Aj-BtPV-1. Those viruses were circulating in the corresponding bat colony at rates of 7-8%. Aj-BtPV-1 was also found in Artibeus lituratus (5.5%. Both viruses were detected in the blood of infected animals at high concentrations: up to 10E8 and to 10E10 copies/ml for Aj-BtPV-1 and Eh-BtPV-1 respectively. Eh-BtPV-1 was additionally detected in all organs collected from bats (brain, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys and intestine and spleen and kidneys were identified as the most likely sites where viral replication takes place. Our study shows that bat parvoviruses share common ancestors with known parvoviruses of humans and livestock. We also provide evidence that a variety of Parvovirinae are able to cause active infection in bats and that they are widely distributed in these animals with different geographic origin, ecologies and climatic ranges.

  15. New possibilities for a secure and just world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagotta, W.E. [ed.

    1994-02-28

    More than a decade ago individuals from three significant institutions in East Bay Area began discussions in response to the apprehensions that were so deep in the early 1980s. These apprehensions were a result of the intense rhetoric between the two superpowers and the casual commentary about ``limited nuclear war.`` The discussions spoke to the mortal danger as well as to the profound moral question revolving around nuclear arms. The issuance of the US Bishops` Pastoral on War and Peace in 1983 gave the group focus and momentum. The Chancellor at the University of California at Berkeley, the President of the Graduate Theological Union (the consortium of theological schools in Berkeley), and the Director of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (one of the chief designers of American nuclear arms) encouraged us to complete plans for a symposium. It was an era of activism. We chose, however, to serve the theme expressed by Albert Einstein, ``Peace cannot be kept by force, it can only be achieved by understanding.`` After a decade, all of us can commend the leadership of the three institutions and the individuals involved for their perseverance. Their commitments to the pursuit of peace and to the development of an approach to manage the weapons of our time remain a concern of this group even though the great anxiety of a decade ago has subsided. We are now in a time different from that in which the Bishops` Pastoral was written. The talks of Fr. J. Bryan Hehir, Dr. Michael M. May, and Prof. Robert N. Bellah move into new areas of exploration; thus, our theme for this colloquium is ``New Possibilities for a Secure and Just World.`` During our early encounters, one member of our founding group stated that: ``This project will be a work of thirty years.`` Such a profound change in attitude may well be the work of an entire generation.

  16. World Energy Prospects and Stakes. A New Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To pursue the present path in the development of energy systems would lead to growing insecurity of supply and an unacceptable increase in greenhouse gas emissions. Both climate change (and other environmental hazards) and security of supply would rapidly become formidable obstacles for peace and development if energy consumption follows such an 'impossible path'. Energy security and environmental constraints converge to offer mankind both a challenge and opportunity: to invent a new model compatible with sustainable development, in order to 'meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs'. Energy efficiency comes first, because it presents the largest potential, it is applicable to all sectors of activities in all countries and because it is a pre-requisite to slow down the depletion rate of fossil fuel resources and to ensure a rational and significant increase of the share of renewable energy sources in total energy requirements. An energy efficiency strategy is not a slight adjustment to an energy supply policy but a new concept of economic policy which takes into account the costs of environmental degradation, growing energy insecurity and the medium and long term trend of increasing energy costs. Industrialized countries can and must reduce their total energy consumption. Most developing countries must increase their energy consumption for their economic development, but they can reach this objective with much lower growth than industrialized countries in the past by applying energy efficiency strategies. At world level, priority should be given to energy efficiency in the Transport sector, literally tied to oil products, and to electricity consumption in the household and service sectors since electricity production is a voracious and expensive consumer of natural resources. (authors)

  17. Virtual Worlds: A New Opportunity for People with Lifelong Disability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stendal, Karen; Balandin, Susan; Molka-Danielsen, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Virtual worlds, such as Second Life[R], are the latest star in the online communication sky. Created by Linden Lab, Second Life is a three-dimensional environment that provides a context for avatars to communicate and socialise with other avatars in a variety of settings (Bell, 2009). Virtual worlds have been used to train people with intellectual…

  18. A new small-world network created by Cellular Automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yuhong; Li, Anwei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we generate small-world networks by the Cellular Automaton based on starting with one-dimensional regular networks. Besides the common properties of small-world networks with small average shortest path length and large clustering coefficient, the small-world networks generated in this way have other properties: (i) The edges which are cut in the regular network can be controlled that whether the edges are reconnected or not, and (ii) the number of the edges of the small-world network model equals the number of the edges of the original regular network. In other words, the average degree of the small-world network model equals to the average degree of the original regular network.

  19. Virtual worlds: a new frontier for nurse education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

    2014-01-01

    Virtual worlds have the potential to offer nursing students social networking and, learning, opportunities through the use of collaborative and immersive learning. If nursing educators, are to stay, abreast of contemporary learning opportunities an exploration of the potential benefits of, virtual, worlds and their possibilities is needed. Literature was sourced that explored virtual worlds, and their, use in education, but nursing education specifically. It is clear that immersive learning has, positive, benefits for nursing, however the best way to approach virtual reality in nursing education, has yet to, be ascertained. PMID:25109212

  20. NEW DEVELOPMENT BANK IN A WORLD FINANCIAL SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    MIKHAYLYUK A.G.

    2015-01-01

    After collapse of the USSR and the world system of socialism in 1991 in-fluence of the USA became much stronger. The USA with its political and ideological allies such as western countries, Japan, Australia conduct a course in line with the American economic policy, they together control the voting rights of the Bretton Woods institutions and furiously oppose their reforming. The four largest emerging and developing economies by nominal GDP, according to the most recent World Economic Outlook...

  1. A Brave New World for an Old World Pest: Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Tay, Wee Tek; MIGUEL F SORIA; Walsh, Thomas; Thomazoni, Danielle; Silvie, Pierre; Behere, Gajanan T.; Anderson, Craig; Downes, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    The highly polyphagous Old World cotton bollworm Helicoverpa armigera is a quarantine agricultural pest for the American continents. Historically H. armigera is thought to have colonised the American continents around 1.5 to 2 million years ago, leading to the current H. zea populations on the American continents. The relatively recent species divergence history is evident in mating compatibility between H. zea and H. armigera under laboratory conditions. Despite periodic interceptions of H. ...

  2. Camelid antivenom development and potential in vivo neutralization of Hottentotta saulcyi scorpion venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvish, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Soltan Ahmad; Shahbazzadeh, Delavar; Bagheri, Kamran-Pooshang; Behdani, Mahdi; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2016-04-01

    Scorpion envenoming is a serious health problem which can cause a variety of clinical toxic effects. Of the many scorpion species native to Iran, Hottentotta saulcyi is important because its venom can produce toxic effects in man. Nowadays, antivenom derived from hyper immune horses is the only effective treatment for sever scorpion stings. Current limitations of immunotherapy urgently require an efficient alternative with high safety, target affinity and more promising venom neutralizing capability. Recently, heavy chain-only antibodies (HC-Abs) found naturally in camelid serum met the above mentioned advantages. In this study, immuno-reactivities of polyclonal antibodies were tested after successful immunization of camel using H. saulcyi scorpion crude venom. The lethal potency of scorpion venom in C57BL/6 mice injected intraperitoneally was determined to be 2.7 mg/kg. These results were followed by the efficient neutralization of lethal activity of H. saulcyi scorpion venom by injection of antivenom and purified IgG fractions into mice intraperitonelly or intravenously, respectively. HC-Ab camelid antivenom could be considered as a useful serotherapeutics instead of present treatment for scorpion envenomation. PMID:26809016

  3. Virtual Worlds: New Directions for HRD Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Diane D.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual environments, once used strictly for gaming and military training, have developed into spaces for community building and collaboration rather than competition. This literature review explores virtual worlds and underlying theories of interest to Human Resource Development (HRD). Findings suggest application opportunities for HRD in five…

  4. To understand the new world of energy - Energy saving and energy efficiency: the world of energy 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliographical note contains the table of contents and a brief presentation of a book which proposes a general overview of the world of modern energy, focuses on the main associated political and climatic stakes and challenges. It also addresses the crucial issue of energy efficiency and energy savings which are the pillars of the current energy transition. The chapters address the world energy stakes and challenges, the emergence of a new energetic paradigm, the issues of energy efficiency and energy savings, the main sources of energy savings to be exploited and valorised, the situation in Europe and in the World regarding energy efficiency, the relationship between energy transition and local territories, the necessary continuous innovation

  5. Galaxy Collisions Forging New Worlds from Cosmic Crashes

    CERN Document Server

    Struck, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Galaxy collisions are the key process in building galaxies, triggering the formation of stars and the build-up of heavy elements that allow the formation of planets and solar systems. This book presents the revolutionary research advances achieved in the last decade and lucidly explains the underlying dynamical processes. Galaxy Collisions takes a comprehensive trip through the visually spectacular world of galaxy collisions; investigates the interactions of stars, gas clouds, and dark matter in galaxy collisions; uses analogies and metaphors to help comprehend the bizarre world of galaxies; presents recent research results to enhance the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution; includes discoveries of minor collisions within our own group of galaxies; shows how a galaxy collision might affect a solar system, or a planet like ours.

  6. Earthworm's immunity in the nanomaterial world: new room, future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Engelmann, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of the nanotechnology era, the environmental sink has been continuously receiving engineered nanomaterials as well as their derivatives. Our current understanding of the potential impact of nanomaterials on invertebrate immunity is limited to only a handful of initial studies...... researches in vertebrate models tell us that study of the nanoparticle recognition involved in cellular uptake as well as sub- and inter-cellular events may uncover further intriguing insights into earthworm’s immunity in the nanomaterial world....

  7. What Change Can The New Developments In Energy Sector Bring Into the World`s Energypolitical and Geopolitical Order?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur TUTULMAZ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments bring US to a leading natural gas and oil producer position. The attempts in last 20 years to bring new horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies together have developed a success in shale gas and oil production in US; the production volumes has reached to a position to redefine the market. Last estimations are bringing more information about the shale capacities of the major basins of the world. However, the estimates are based on a wide range of assumptions and consequently their results vary in a large scale. In any case, these developments have crucial economic, political and geopolitical consequences on the energy market, petroleum producer and consumer countries and regions. Despite the wide range of ambiguity of the estimated size of the resources, the estimations show US and North America has one of the biggest potential, already turning technology into the giant production numbers. Some of the estimations allege so big numbers can even mean to a new world order. The asymmetric nature of the potential, can also be said, increases some of the expected impacts too. In this study, basically, we want to supply an initial solid and economical evaluation to this ambiguity. We are trying to shape a frame for the new energy potential and to put it in a place in the current practice of the world. Secondly, in this context, we are underlying here some of the possible economic and geopolitical consequences each of which can constitute a subject of deeper study.

  8. World's particle physics laboratories join to create new communication resource

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The worldwide particle physics community today (August 12) launched Interactions.org, a new global, Web-based resource developed to provide news, high-quality imagery, video and other tools for communicating the science of particle physics" (1 page).

  9. THE NEW WORLD SPECIES OF CINNAMOMUM TREW (LAURACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJGH Kostermans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The American species of Phoebe Nees are relegated to Cinnamomum Trew; the reasons for this transfer are discussed. To retain nomenclatural stability the new combinations which have become necessary are presented, in anticipation of a general revision of  the   genus   Cinnamomum;   68   new   combinations   and   names   are presented.

  10. THE NEW WORLD SPECIES OF CINNAMOMUM TREW (LAURACEAE)

    OpenAIRE

    AJGH Kostermans

    2014-01-01

    The American species of Phoebe Nees are relegated to Cinnamomum Trew; the reasons for this transfer are discussed. To retain nomenclatural stability the new combinations which have become necessary are presented, in anticipation of a general revision of  the   genus   Cinnamomum;   68   new   combinations   and   names   are presented.

  11. Quantifying sustainability: A new approach and world ranking

    OpenAIRE

    Carraro, Carlo; Campagnolo, Lorenza; Eboli, Fabio; Lanzi, Elisa; Parrado, Ramiro; Portale, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new tool to assess sustainability and make the concept of sustainable development operational. It considers its multi-dimensional structure combining the information deriving from a selection of relevant sustainability indicators belonging to economic, social and environmental pillars. It reproduces the dynamics of these indicators over time and countries. Then, it aggregates these indicators using a new approach based on Choquet’s integrals. The main novelties of this a...

  12. Assessing genetic variation in natural populations of the New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Through participation in the FAO/IAEA coordinated research project 'Enabling Technologies for the Expansion of SIT for Old and New World Screwworm Fly', we have been able to analyse samples of New World screwworm fly from across the range of this insect pest. This presentation will bring together data from a range of genetic markers that have been used to assess levels of genetic variation within populations of the New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax. The markers used include: rRNA gene sequences, together with sequence information from protein coding genes, and microsatellites, allowing variation to be assessed at a range of levels from species to population. (author)

  13. The New World of Interaction Recording for Medical Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Today's medical practice staff communicates remotely with patients, pharmacies, and other medical providers in new ways that go far beyond telephone calls. Patient care and communication are now being provided via telecommunications technologies, including chat/IM, screen, Skype, and other video applications. This new paradigm in patient care, known as "telehealth" or "telemedicine," could put medical practices at risk for noncompliance with strict HIPAA and other regulations. Interaction recording encompasses these new means of communication and can help medical practice staff achieve compliance and reduce financial and liability risks while improving operations and patient care. This article explores what medical practices need to know about interaction recording, what to look for in an interaction recording solution, and how to best utilize that solution to meet compliance, manage liability, and improve patient care. PMID:27039643

  14. New competition in the world market of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As nuclear orders are picking up a little, there are strengths competing against one another in the world industry of reactors, an industry that has been deeply affected for twenty years, by the smallness of the market and the reorganization of the electromechanical industry. Competition remains particularly difficult, even though, in terms of exports, national markets in industrialized countries such as the American market and European market are now open to foreign newcomers. One of the reasons of the difficulty is the increased commercial competition based on advanced reactor techniques untested due to strong faith in technology leading to forget the learning difficulties of older reactor types. On a narrow market, demanding and with very specific political interference, the reasoning is not like on an ordinary capital equipment market. Each builder tries to sell by relying on the assets it has in addition to the offered price and related services: industrial reputation and experience that play confusedly when untested advanced reactors are competing with one another, credit terms offered by the State and the government's influence on the market of emerging economies, the backing o the State's financial insurance in the event of risks taken in the sale of turnkey untested reactors. In the competition of the five manufacturers in the export market, American builders do not seem to have the best place, though even the leading position of Framatome ANP shows some limits. (author)

  15. New optical, acoustic, and electrical diagnostics for the developing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, S. L.; Witte, C.; Bourquin, Y.; Kremer, C.; Menachery, A.; Zhang, Y.; Wilson, R.; Reboud, J.; Cooper, J. M.

    2012-03-01

    Infectious diseases cause 10 million deaths each year worldwide, accounting for ~60% of all deaths of children aged 5- 14. Although these deaths arise primarily through pneumonia, TB, malaria and HIV, there are also the so called "neglected diseases" such as sleeping sickness and bilharzia, which have a devastating impact on rural communities, in sub-Sahara Africa. There, the demands for a successful Developing World diagnostic are particularly rigorous, requiring low cost instrumentation with low power consumption (there is often no fixed power infrastructure). In many cases, the levels of infection within individuals are also sufficiently low that instruments must show extraordinary sensitivity, with measurements being made in blood or saliva. In this talk, a description of these demands will be given, together with a review of some of the solutions that have been developed, which include using acoustics, optics and electrotechnologies, and their combinations to manipulate the fluid samples. In one example, we show how to find a single trypanosome, as the causative agent of sleeping sickness.

  16. The Civilizational Orientation in the Making of the New World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouar Abdel-Malek

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The historical moment of the position of the problem, from the onset, leads to the heart of the sudden perplexity about the nature, rôle and prospect of “the civilizational question” in our times. While the very category of “civilization” was avoided until recently, a ?urry of amazement-cum-disquiet has been pervading the public mind, more speci?cally the intellectual circles used to the long-prevailing dichotomies of social thought (“left” and “right”; “developed” and “under-developed”; “center” and “periphery”; “conservative” and “radical”; “reactionary” and “progressive”; “religious” and “secular”. All of a sudden, as it were, on the morrow of the implosion of the former U.S.S.R., the end of the bi-polar system, the advent of unipolar world hegemonism in 1989-1991, a resounding essay in 1993 came as a shock. “Civilizations,” ?nally in the limelight, were deemed to “clash.”

  17. Children's Virtual Play Worlds Culture, Learning, and Participation. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies. Volume 58

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Anne, Ed.; Marsh, Jackie, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    As children's digital lives become more relevant to schools and educators, the question of play and learning is being revisited in new and interesting ways. "Children's Virtual Play Worlds: Culture, Learning, and Participation" provides a more reasoned account of children's play engagements in virtual worlds through a number of scholarly…

  18. Copyright in the Networked World: New Rules for Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seadle, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Reviews two recent court cases that have redefined how images may be used on the Internet without copyright infringement. Discusses the former presumption of copyright protection for photographs and the new fair use guidelines that allow some images to be considered in the public domain. (Author/LRW)

  19. Supramolecular science: A new way to understand the matter world

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xi; SHEN Jiacong

    2003-01-01

    @@ After over 20 years' rapid development, supramolecular chemistry has exceeded the original realm of organic host-guest chemistry, and formed its own unique concepts and systems, such as molecular recognition, molecular self-assembly, supramolecular devices and materials[1,2]. These branches have organized into a charming new subject in the whole family of chemistry.

  20. Literacy Instruction in the Brave New World of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Technology integration into language arts instruction has been slow and tentative, even as information technologies have evolved with frightening speed. Today's teachers need to be aware of several extant and unchanging realities: Technology is now indispensable to literacy development; reading with technology requires new skills and…

  1. Navigating the new world of private equity - a conference summary

    OpenAIRE

    William Mark; Steven VanBever

    2008-01-01

    The Federal Reserve System's Private Equity Merchant Banking Knowledge Center, formed at the Chicago Fed in 2000 shortly after the passage of the Gramm–Leach–Bliley Act, sponsors an annual conference on new industry developments. This article summarizes the 2008 conference held on July 9 - 10.

  2. Elkon - A new world class Russian uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The uranium deposits of Elkon district are located in the south of Republic of Sakha Yakutia. Deposits contain about 6% of the world known uranium resources: 342 409 tonnes of in situ or 288 768 tonnes of recoverable RAR + Inferred resources. Most significant uranium resources of Elkon district (261 768 tonnes) were identified within five deposits of Yuzhnaya zone. The uranium grade averages 0.15%. Gold, silver and molybdenum are by-products. Principal resources are proposed to be mined by conventional underground method. Location, shape and dimensions of uranium ore bodies are primarily controlled by NW-SE oriented and steeply SW dipping faults of Mesozoic age and surrounding pyrite-carbonate-potassium feldspar alteration zones. Country rocks are Archean gneisses. Deposits are of metasomatic geological type. Principal mineralization is represented by brannerite. The Yuzhnaya zone is about 20 km long. It was explored by underground workings and drill holes. Upper limit of ore bodies is at a depth of between 200 m and 500 m. Depth persistence exceeds 2 000 m. Uranium mining enterprise Elkon was established in November 2007. It is a 100% Atomredmetzoloto subsidiary. The planned producing capacity is 5 000 m tU/year. It will perform the entire works related to uranium mining, milling, ore sorting, processing and uranium dioxide production. Technology of ore processing assumes primary radiometric sorting, thickening, sulphide flotation for gold concentrate extraction, subsequent autoclave sulphuric-acid uranium leaching from flotation tails and uranium adsorption onto resin, roasting and heap leaching for uranium from low grade ores, cyanide leaching of gold. Due to a considerable abundance of brannerite ore is classified as refractory. Elkon development include 4 main stages: feasibility study and infrastructure development (2008- 2010), mine and mill construction (2010-2015), pilot production (2013-2015), mine development and achieving full capacity

  3. Cooperative Communications: A New Trend in the Wireless World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordhan Das Menghwar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This Wireless channel while offering independence of movement also introduces un-reliability in the messages received at the destination. Various strategies have been introduced so far to mitigate the effects of the channel on the message received. In this paper, we give an introductory overview of cooperative communications, a new trend in this field of wireless Communications where the transmitting users help each other to overcome the Effects of wireless channel on the message received at the destination. We compare the new idea of cooperative communications with traditional direct or noncooperative communications. In particular, we discuss the achievable rates and simulate the system to get the probability of outage performance of cooperative communications and compare it with direct or noncooperative communications.

  4. A Changed World: A Plea for New Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Ramaswamy R. Iyer

    2006-01-01

    This paper queries the rightness of the current mainstream thinking on development and technological change; expresses the apprehension that the much-feared climate change seems to have begun, and concludes with a fervent plea to all to undertake some radically new thinking. It is a concerned citizen’s plea to other concerned citizens, experts, decision-makers, social activists, opinion-makers, and people in general.

  5. Eating and Obesity—The New World Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Neville Rigby

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is not a new phenomenon. Paleolithic artefacts, some almost 35,000 years old, depict obesity in its classical gynoid form, suggesting that early hunter-gathers were not entirely safeguarded by the assumed Stone Age diet [1]. Nevertheless it has been convincingly argued by Boyd Eaton and others that the 21st century epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including obesity, is attributable to mankind no longer enjoying the diet of our ancestors for which we remain genetically and...

  6. The Developing World in The New England Journal of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee Amitava; Lown Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Rampant disease in poor countries impedes development and contributes to growing North-South disparities; however, leading international medical journals underreport on health research priorities for developing countries. Methods We examined 416 weekly issues of the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) over an eight-year period, January 1997 to December 2004. A total of 8857 articles were reviewed by both authors. The content of each issue was evaluated in six categories...

  7. A New World for Museum Marketing? Facing the Old Dilemmas while Challenging New Market Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Komarac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Museums are part of a wider cultural and entertainment environment, which is ruled by highly demanding visitors who seek immersive experiences (edutainment and time-saving arrangement. This has encouraged and, in some opinions, forced museums to turn their focus from collections to visitors. In addition, museums have faced competition and new technologies in the form of virtual museums and virtual reality. This has emphasized the need to accept marketing as a survival tool and to make it into a link between museums and visitors. This article attempts to give current insights into museum marketing as part of the arts marketing field. Its aim is also to identify and explain some of the major challenges and opportunities facing everyday museum business, in order to provide insight into the complex world of museum marketing. Former findings about the development of museum marketing and its biggest changes and challenges are presented, summarized and analyzed.

  8. Elena Paruolo (dir., Brave New Worlds. Old and New Classics of Children’s Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Lévêque

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Le volume rassemble les communications du colloque international « Brave New Worlds », organisé par l’Université de Salerne et l’Université de Venise Ca’ Foscari les 11 et 12 juin 2009. Le titre du colloque, devenu celui du présent ouvrage, est une référence au livre d’Aldous Huxley (1932, qui s’inspirait lui-même d’une œuvre classique. Le titre du roman d’Huxley est en effet emprunté à une citation de The Tempest de Shakespeare, quand Miranda, isolée sur son île, découvre enfin le monde des...

  9. Green-Color World Creates for You a New Living Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Shenzhen Green-Color World LandscapeHorticultural Research and DevelopmentCo., Ltd., is a high and new technologyenterprise. Its operations include cross-breeding grouped flowers, the design and imple-mentation of horticultural projects, ag-biological

  10. New Transnational Literary Histories on the World Scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remo Ceserani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Il saggio discute il rapporto sempre più problematico fra storia della letteratura e identità nazionale. Dopo aver esaminato alcune storie recenti che continuano a privilegiare la dimensione nazionale ed esclusivamente letteraria della materia trattata, si sofferma su alcune interessanti esperienze di storie che trattano la produzione culturale e letteraria di intere zone geografiche, a prescindere dalle identità statali, culturali e linguistiche di singoli Paesi e nazioni (per esempio: l’Europa centro-orientale, la penisola iberica, l’intero continente sudamericano. Fra i testi presi in esame: la Storia della letteratura ungherese, a cura di B. Ventavoli (2002-2004, la Storia della letteratura polacca, a cura di L. Marinelli (2004, la Geografia e storia della civiltà letteraria rumena nel contesto europeo, a cura di B. Mazzoni e A. Tarantino (2010, la History of the Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe, a cura di M. Cornis-Pope e J. Neubauer (2004-2010, la New History of German Literature, a cura di D. E. Wellbery e J. Ryan (2004, la New History of French Literature, a cura di D. Hollier (1998, la Comparative History of Literatures in the Iberian Peninsula, a cura di F. Cabo Aseguinolaza, A. Abuín Gonzales e C. Domínguez (2010, la New Literary History of America, a cura di G. Marcus e W. Sollors (2009 e le Literary Cultures of Latin America, a cura di M. Valdés e D. Kadir (2004.  

  11. A new form of collaboration in cultural anthropology: Matsutake worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. K, Choy,; Tsing, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Experiments in collaboration open new investigative possibilities for cultural anthropologists. In this report, we use our research on matsutake mushrooms to show the promise of collaborative experiments for ethnographers of scale making, global connection, and human–nonhuman relations. Anna Tsing...... introduces. Mogu Mogu (Timothy Choy and Shiho Satsuka) argue that the mushroomic figure of mycorrhizal life illuminates workings of capital and power, nature and culture. Lieba Faier examines contingency—through the effect of weather and bugs on matsutake production—as a form of self-positioning that emerges...

  12. The world food situation: New driving forces and required actions [In Chinese

    OpenAIRE

    von Braun, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    "The world food situation is currently being rapidly redefined by new driving forces. Income growth, climate change, high energy prices, globalization, and urbanization are transforming food consumption, production, and markets. The influence of the private sector in the world food system, especially the leverage of food retailers, is also rapidly increasing. Changes in food availability, rising commodity prices, and new producer–consumer linkages have crucial implications for the livelihoods...

  13. The new world screwworm eradication programme, North Africa 1988-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet provides a complete account of the FAO campaign to eradicate the New World screwworm from North Africa, from the discovery of the possible in Libya in 1988 to the close of the project in 1992, ten months after the last case of screwworm myiasis had been found. The parts played by the international organizations involved are described, and introductory chapters provide background information about the New World screwworm and about the sterile insect technique. Figs and tabs

  14. [Competition among gas utilities]. It's a brave new world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional wisdom about competition among public utilities sates that once any rival offers the commodity at a 5 percent price advantage customers will begin to switch in droves. Whether or not that was ever true for natural gas in the past, many believe it will not be true for residential and small commercial customers in the environment unfolding after Order 636, the Federal Energy Regulatory commission directive that took gas pipelines out of the merchant function and vastly increased competition in the gas market. Why won't price drive the market? A look at lessons learned from deregulation in the telecommunications industry leads to a few reasons why: (1) Although it may be unbundled from related transportation, storage and billing services, natural gas will no longer be sold independent of the other products. It may not even be the focus of the sales transaction. Therefore,the price of gas will no longer drive the purchase decision. (2) Gaining, retaining or losing customers will be simulated only through complete understanding and fulfillment of the needs of each of the most valuable customer segments. (3) Similarly, brand loyalty will be built only if the marketer stays in touch with customers' evolving needs and continues to respond with new products. Gas utilities will need to set their strategy, identify customer needs, develop plans to meet these needs, and evaluate new products. These factors are discussed

  15. Eating and obesity--the new world disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Neville

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is not a new phenomenon. Paleolithic artefacts, some almost 35,000 years old, depict obesity in its classical gynoid form, suggesting that early hunter-gathers were not entirely safeguarded by the assumed Stone Age diet. Nevertheless it has been convincingly argued by Boyd Eaton and others that the 21st century epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including obesity, is attributable to mankind no longer enjoying the diet of our ancestors for which we remain genetically and metabolically programmed. Even if our forebears seemed to revere obesity sufficiently to carve out stone "venuses", it is still unclear if they were documenting a commonplace feature, although the frequency with which these venuses appear across thousands of years and even thousands of miles apart might suggest that obesity, in women at least, was not a complete rarity. PMID:24152752

  16. Eating and Obesity—The New World Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville Rigby

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is not a new phenomenon. Paleolithic artefacts, some almost 35,000 years old, depict obesity in its classical gynoid form, suggesting that early hunter-gathers were not entirely safeguarded by the assumed Stone Age diet [1]. Nevertheless it has been convincingly argued by Boyd Eaton and others that the 21st century epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs, including obesity, is attributable to mankind no longer enjoying the diet of our ancestors for which we remain genetically and metabolically programmed [2]. Even if our forebears seemed to revere obesity sufficiently to carve out stone “venuses”, it is still unclear if they were documenting a commonplace feature, although the frequency with which these venuses appear across thousands of years and even thousands of miles apart might suggest that obesity, in women at least, was not a complete rarity [3].

  17. Cereus peruvianus (Koubo new cactus fruit for the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Mizrahi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Several different species of the columnar cacti of the genera Stenocereus and Pachycereus, were introduced into different semi-arid ecozones in Israel and most of these efforts were of disappointing outcomes, the only exception being the Cereus peruvianus (L. Miller,which bore plenty of fruits, some of them of good taste. The original seeds of this plant were obtained from the late Mr. Amram (Ron Kodish, who collected seeds from various private gardens in Southern California which bore fruits of reasonable qualities. The initial success of this species led us to initiate an intensive research study, and today it is already fruit-crop, marketed mainly in Israel under the name " Koubo" . This paper will describe our work of domestication of this new cactus fruit crop in Israel.

  18. Social movements in a globalized world: something new?

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador MARTÍ I PUIG

    2004-01-01

    New Roman;">En el texto que sigue se aportan algunos apuntes sobre el impacto que ha teni­do la globalización en los actores políticos colectivos que convenimos en llamar movimientos sociales o «redes de movimientos» haciendo un especial énfasis –aunque no ex...

  19. Assessing olfactory performance in a New World primate, Saimiri sciureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laska, M; Hudson, R

    1993-01-01

    Using a task designed to simulate olfactory-guided foraging behavior, this study demonstrates for the first time that olfactory performance can be reliably assessed in squirrel monkeys. Small flip-top vials were fixed in random order to the arms of a climbing frame and equipped with odorized strips signalling either that they contained a peanut food reward (S+) or that they did not (S-), and three adult female monkeys were allowed 1 min to harvest as many baited nuts from this tree as possible. Given five 1-min trials per day, animals took between 15 and 25 days to reach the criterion of 80% correct choices, could readily transfer to new S+ or S- stimuli, and could remember the task even after a 1-month break. The precision and consistency of the monkeys' performance in tests of discrimination ability and sensitivity demonstrate the suitability of this paradigm for assessing olfactory function, and a first test of human subjects using the same cups and odorants showed that it may also be used to directly compare olfactory performance in human and nonhuman primates. PMID:8434074

  20. INIS: new world-wide nuclear information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new search system utilizing Atomindex is expounded. The nuclear information system of United States of America will be shifted to the larger scale system, Atomindex, at the moment of discontinuing the publication of Nuclear Science Abstract (NSA). This shifting exerts large or small influence upon the information systems of the other countries. The Atomindex is a publication of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), and it includes most market unavailable reports. It is delivered through the clearing house to the users. Main differences between INIS and NSA are illustrated. Each piece of literature is listed under one or more descriptor pairs. Each pair is composed of the main heading and its qualifier, both of which are descriptors. Atomindex employs four working languages, namely English, French, Russian and Spanish. However, a version in the original language, even when this is not a working language can be recorded on magnetic tapes. Many special characters (suffixes, Greek, etc.) as well as alphabet are used, and italic type or boldface can be designated, so that the quality of Atomindex is better than that of NSA. The tapes for SDI and RS will be utilized as on-line real time systems. The second generation that utilizes the computer seems to be superseding the first generation that turns over the abstracts page by page. (Iwakiri, K.)

  1. Parallel evolution of the glycogen synthase 1 (muscle) gene Gys1 between Old World and New World fruit bats (Order: Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lu; Shen, Bin; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-10-01

    Glycogen synthase, which catalyzes the synthesis of glycogen, is especially important for Old World (Pteropodidae) and New World (Phyllostomidae) fruit bats that ingest high-carbohydrate diets. Glycogen synthase 1, encoded by the Gys1 gene, is the glycogen synthase isozyme that functions in muscles. To determine whether Gys1 has undergone adaptive evolution in bats with carbohydrate-rich diets, in comparison to insect-eating sister bat taxa, we sequenced the coding region of the Gys1 gene from 10 species of bats, including two Old World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) and a New World fruit bat (Phyllostomidae). Our results show no evidence for positive selection in the Gys1 coding sequence on the ancestral Old World and the New World Artibeus lituratus branches. Tests for convergent evolution indicated convergence of the sequences and one parallel amino acid substitution (T395A) was detected on these branches, which was likely driven by natural selection. PMID:25001420

  2. A revision of the new world species of Polytrichophora Cresson and Facitrichophora, new genus (Diptera, Ephydridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Mathis

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The New World species of Polytrichophora Cresson and Fascitrichophora new genus, are revised. Fifteen new species are described (type locality in parenthesis: Fascitrishophora atrella sp. n. (Costa Rica. Guanacaste: Murciélago [10°56.9’N, 85°42.5’W; sandy mud flats around mangrove inlet], F. carvalhorum sp.n. (Brazil. São Paulo: Praia Puruba [23°21’S, 44°55.6’W; beach], F. manza sp. n. (Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad. St. Andrew: Lower Manzanilla (12 km S; 10°24.5’N, 61°01.5’W, bridge over Nariva River, F. panama sp. n. (Panama. Darien: Garachine [8°04’N, 78°22’W], Polytrichophora adarca sp. n. (Barbados. Christ Church: Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary [13°04.2’N, 59°34.7’W; swamp], P. arnaudorum sp. n. (Mexico. Baja California. San Felipe [31°01.5’N, 114°50.4’W], P. barba sp. n. (Cuba. Sancti Spiritus: Topes de Collantes [21°54.4’N, 80°01.4’W, 670 m], P. flavella sp. n. (Peru. Madre de Dios: Rio Manu, Pakitza [11°56.6’S, 71°16.9’W; 250 m], P. marinoniorum sp. n. (Brazil. Paraná: Antonina [25°28.4’S, 48°40.9’W; mangal], P. rostra sp. n. (Peru. Madre de Dios: Rio Manu, Pakitza [11°56.6’S, 71°16.9’W; 250 m], P. sinuosa sp. n. (Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad. St. Andrew: Lower Manzanilla [12 km S; 10°24’N, 61°02’W], P. mimbres sp. n. (United States. New Mexico. Grant: Mimbres River [New Mexico Highway 61 & Royal John Mine Road; 32°43.8’N, 107°52’W; 1665 m], P. salix sp. n. (United States. Alaska. Matanuska-Susitna: Willow Creek [61°46.1’N, 150°04.2’W; 50 m], P. sturtevantorum sp. n. (United States. Tennessee. Shelby: Meeman Shelby State Park [Mississippi River; 35°20.4’N, 90°2.1’W; 98 m], P. prolata sp. n. (Belize. Stann Creek: Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary [16°45’N, 88°30’W]. All known New World species of both genera are described with an emphasis on structures of the male terminalia, which are fully illustrated. Detailed locality data and distribution

  3. History of the World Allergy Organization: 1989 to 2006, the XVIII World Allergy Congress, Journal Development, Reorganization, and New Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Allen P.

    2011-01-01

    History of the World Allergy Organization: In 1951, the leaders in allergy from all over the world came together to form the International Association of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (IAACI). For the next 60 years, the allergy world converged at the IAACI triennial meetings, which became biennial in 2003. The international meetings, originally named the International Congress of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (ICACI), are now the World Allergy Congress (WAC) hosted by the World Al...

  4. Analysis of camelid antibodies for antivenom development: Neutralisation of venom-induced pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Darren A N; Owen, Timothy; Wagstaff, Simon C; Kinne, Joerg; Wernery, Ulrich; Harrison, Robert A

    2010-09-01

    Camelid IgG has been reported to be less immunogenic, less able to activate the complement cascade and more thermostable than IgG from other mammals, and has the ability to bind antigens that are unreactive with other mammalian IgGs. We are investigating whether these attributes of camelid IgG translate into antivenom with immunological and venom-neutralising efficacy advantages over conventional equine and ovine antivenoms. The objective of this study was to determine the preclinical venom-neutralising effectiveness of IgG from camels immunised with venoms, individually or in combination, of the saw-scaled viper, Echis ocellatus, the puff adder, Bitis arietans and the spitting cobra, Naja nigricollis - the most medically-important snake species in West Africa. Neutralisation of the pathological effects of venoms from E. ocellatus, B. arietans and N. nigricollis by IgG from the venom-immunised camels, or commercial antivenom, was compared using assays of venom lethality (ED(50)), haemorrhage (MHD) and coagulopathy (MCD). The E. ocellatus venom ED(50), MHD and MCD results of the E. ocellatus monospecific camel IgG antivenom were broadly equivalent to comparable ovine (EchiTAbG, MicroPharm Ltd, Wales) and equine (SAIMR Echis, South African Vaccine Producer, South Africa) antivenoms, although the equine antivenom required half the amount of IgG. The B. arietans monospecific camel IgG neutralised the lethal effects of B. arietans venom at one fourth the concentration of the SAIMR polyspecific antivenom (a monospecific B. arietans antivenom is not available). The N. nigricollis camel IgG antivenom was ineffective (at the maximum permitted dose, 100 mul) against the lethal effects of N. nigricollis venom. All the equine polyspecific antivenoms required more than 100 microl to be effective against this venom. The polyspecific camel IgG antivenom, prepared from five camels, was effective against the venom-induced effects of E. ocellatus but not against that of B. arietans

  5. The glycogen synthase 2 gene (Gys2) displays parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yamin; Fang, Tao; Shen, Bin; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-01-01

    Frugivorous and nectarivorous bats rely largely on hepatic glycogenesis and glycogenolysis for postprandial blood glucose disposal and maintenance of glucose homeostasis during short time starvation, respectively. The glycogen synthase 2 encoded by the Gys2 gene plays a critical role in liver glycogen synthesis. To test whether the Gys2 gene has undergone adaptive evolution in bats with carbohydrate-rich diets in relation to their insect-eating sister taxa, we sequenced the coding region of the Gys2 gene in a number of bat species, including three Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our results showed that the Gys2 coding sequences are highly conserved across all bat species we examined, and no evidence of positive selection was detected in the ancestral branches leading to OWFBs and NWFBs. Our explicit convergence test showed that posterior probabilities of convergence between several branches of OWFBs, and the NWFBs were markedly higher than that of divergence. Three parallel amino acid substitutions (Q72H, K371Q, and E666D) were detected among branches of OWFBs and NWFBs. Tests for parallel evolution showed that two parallel substitutions (Q72H and E666D) were driven by natural selection, while the K371Q was more likely to be fixed randomly. Thus, our results suggested that the Gys2 gene has undergone parallel evolution on amino acid level between OWFBs and NWFBs in relation to their carbohydrate metabolism. PMID:24258790

  6. The New Rules: How To Succeed in Today's Post-Corporate World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotter, John P.

    The new realities of today's postcorporate world and the new rules for achieving success were examined through a study of the career progress of a sample of 115 individuals who graduated from Harvard in 1974 with a Master's of Business Administration. The members of the study sample completed yearly questionnaires between January 1975 and 1992.…

  7. New Worlds / New Horizons Science with an X-ray Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall K.; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Bandler, Simon; Brandt, W. N.; Hughes, John P.; McCammon, Dan; Matsumoto, Hironori; Mushotzky, Richard; Osten, Rachel A.; Petre, Robert; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Ptak, Andrew; Ramsey, Brian; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Schattenburg, Mark

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 NASA commenced a design study for an X-ray Astrophysics Probe to address the X-ray science goals and program prioritizations of the Decadal Survey New World New Horizons (NWNH) with a cost cap of approximately $1B. Both the NWNH report and 2011 NASA X-ray mission concept study found that high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy performed with an X-ray microcalorimeter would enable the most highly rated NWNH X-ray science. Here we highlight some potential science topics, namely: 1) a direct, strong-field test of General Relativity via the study of accretion onto black holes through relativistic broadened Fe lines and their reverberation in response to changing hard X-ray continuum, 2) understanding the evolution of galaxies and clusters by mapping temperatures, abundances and dynamics in hot gas, 3) revealing the physics of accretion onto stellar-mass black holes from companion stars and the equation of state of neutron stars through timing studies and time-resolved spectroscopy of X-ray binaries and 4) feedback from AGN and star formation shown in galaxy-scale winds and jets. In addition to these high-priority goals, an X-ray astrophysics probe would be a general-purpose observatory that will result in invaluable data for other NWNH topics such as stellar astrophysics, protostars and their impact on protoplanetary systems, X-ray spectroscopy of transient phenomena such as high-z gamma-ray bursts and tidal capture of stars by massive black holes, and searches for dark matter decay.

  8. World Sheet Superstring and Superstring Field Theory: a new solution using Ultradistributions of Exponential Type

    CERN Document Server

    Bollini, C G; Rocca, M C

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we show that Ultradistributions of Exponential Type (UET) are appropriate for the description in a consistent way world sheet superstring and superstring field theories. A new Lagrangian for the closed world sheet superstring is obtained. We also show that the superstring field is a linear superposition of UET of compact support (CUET), and give the notion of anti-superstring. We evaluate the propagator for the string field, and calculate the convolution of two of them.

  9. Skill requirements of LIS professionals in the new e-world

    OpenAIRE

    Sridhar, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    All pervasive information technology (e-world) has affected significantly the rendering of library and information services, but adoption of IT to library services has not been smooth. In addition to professional knowledge, librarianship is expected to have some knowledge in the areas of management, foreign languages, statistics, computers, etc. New professionals of e-world of 21st century need to have not only kowledge and skill in the areas of information technology but also matching "will"...

  10. New worlds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woof, M.

    2003-11-01

    Robot loading and haulage are coming to material moving. The article reports latest developments in automated systems in the surface and underground mining sectors including GPS-based navigation, wireless telecommunications infrastructure and remote monitoring. It mentions key companies developing GPS software and designing robot-trucks and computer-controlled load-haul-dumpers (LHDs). 3 photos.

  11. Bluetongue disease and seroprevalence in South American camelids from the northwestern region of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew J; Stanton, James B; Evermann, James F; Fry, Lindsay M; Ackerman, Melissa G; Barrington, George M

    2015-03-01

    In late summer/early fall of 2013, 2 South American camelids from central Washington were diagnosed with fatal bluetongue viral disease, an event which is rarely reported. A 9-year-old intact male llama (Lama glama), with a 1-day history of anorexia, recumbency, and dyspnea before death. Abundant foam discharged from the mouth and nostrils, and the lungs were severely edematous on postmortem examination. Histologically, there was abundant intra-alveolar edema with fibrin. Hemorrhage and edema disrupted several other organs. Bluetongue viral RNA was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and serotype 11 was identified by sequencing a segment of the VP2 outer capsid gene. Approximately 1 month later, at a site 150 miles north of the index case, a 2-year-old female alpaca with similar, acutely progressive clinical signs was reported. A postmortem examination was performed, and histologic lesions from the alpaca were similar to those of the llama, and again serotype 11 was detected by PCR. The occurrence of bluetongue viral infection and disease is described in the context of seasonal Bluetongue virus activity within the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada. PMID:25680921

  12. Innervation and immunohistochemical characteristics of epididymis in Alpaca camelid (Vicugna pacos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Liguori

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Alpacas (Vicugna pacos are domesticated camelids indigenous to south America and recently also bred in Europe and Italy for their high quality wool. There is little data available regarding the innervation of the male reproductive tract of this species. In the present study, the distribution of protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5, neuropeptide Y (NPY, tyrosine hydroxilase (TH, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP and substance P (SP was analyzed in the epididymis by using immunohistochemical methods. Specimens of the caput, corpus and cauda epididymis were fixed in Bouin’s fluid and processed for immunohistochemistry analysis with primary antibodies against PGP 9.5, NPY, TH, CGRP and SP. Immunopositivity to PGP 9.5 and TH and NPY was observed in nerve fibre bundles and in single nerve fibres contained into the peritubular connective tissue. Many TH and NPY immunopositive cells were found to innervate blood vessels. Rare CGRP and SP immunopositive nerves were observed. Several PGP 9,5 and NPY immunopositive epithelial cells were observed in the caput epididymis. The results of the present study suggest a role for the innervations in modulate reproductive functions in the alpaca epididymis.

  13. Isolation and optimization of camelid single-domain antibodies:Dirk Saerens’work on nanobodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dirk; Saerens

    2010-01-01

    It is well established that all camelids have unique antibodies circulating in their blood.Unlike antibodies from all other species,these special antibodies are devoid of light chains,and are composed of a heavy chain homodimer.These so-called heavy-chain antibodies(HCAbs)are expressed after a V-D-J rearrangement and require dedicated constant gamma genes. An immune response is raised in these HCAbs following a classical immunization protocol.These HCAbs are easily purified from serum,and their antigen-binding fragment interacts with parts of the target that are less antigenic to conventional antibodies.The antigen binding site of the dromedary HCAb comprises one single domain,referred to as VHH or nanobody(Nb),therefore,a strategy was designed to clone the Nb repertoire of an immunized dromedary and to select the Nb with specificity for our target antigens.The monoclonal Nb is produced well in bacteria,is very stable and highly soluble,and it binds the antigen with high affinity and specificity.Currently,the recombinant Nb has been developed successfully for research purposes, as a probe in biosensors,to diagnose infections,or to treat diseases such as cancer or trypanosomiasis.

  14. Alpaca (Lama pacos) as a convenient source of recombinant camelid heavy chain antibodies (VHHs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, David R; Sepulveda, Jorge; Pernthaner, Anton; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2007-07-31

    Recombinant single domain antibody fragments (VHHs) that derive from the unusual camelid heavy chain only IgG class (HCAbs) have many favourable properties compared with single-chain antibodies prepared from conventional IgG. As a result, VHHs have become widely used as binding reagents and are beginning to show potential as therapeutic agents. To date, the source of VHH genetic material has been camels and llamas despite their large size and limited availability. Here we demonstrate that the smaller, more tractable and widely available alpaca is an excellent source of VHH coding DNA. Alpaca sera IgG consists of about 50% HCAbs, mostly of the short-hinge variety. Sequencing of DNA encoding more than 50 random VHH and hinge domains permitted the design of PCR primers that will amplify virtually all alpaca VHH coding DNAs for phage display library construction. Alpacas were immunized with ovine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and a VHH phage display library was prepared from a lymph node that drains the sites of immunizations and successfully employed in the isolation of VHHs that bind and neutralize ovine TNFalpha. PMID:17568607

  15. Camelid-derived heavy-chain nanobody against Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin E in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghban, Roghayyeh; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Nazarian, Shahram; Bakherad, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) result in severe and often fatal disease, botulism. Common remedial measures such as equine antitoxin and human botulism immunoglobulin in turn are problematic and time-consuming. Therefore, diagnosis and therapy of BoNTs are vital. The variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) has unique features, such as the ability to identify and bind specifically to target epitopes and ease of production in bacteria and yeast. The Pichia pastoris is suitable for expression of recombinant antibody fragments. Disulfide bond formation and correct folds of protein with a high yield are some of the advantages of this eukaryotic host. In this study, we have expressed and purified the camelid VHH against BoNT/E in P. pastoris. The final yield of P. pastoris-expressed antibody was estimated to be 16 mg/l, which is higher than that expressed by Escherichia coli. The nanobody expressed in P. pastoris neutralized 4LD50 of the BoNT/E upon i.p. injection in 25% of mice. The nanobody expressed in E. coli extended the mice's survival to 1.5-fold compared to the control. This experiment indicated that the quality of expressed protein in the yeast is superior to that of the bacterial expression. Favorable protein folding by P. pastoris seems to play a role in its better toxin-binding property. PMID:24673401

  16. Polymorphic New World monkeys with more than three M/L cone types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Gerald H.; Deegan, Jess F.

    2005-10-01

    Most New World (platyrrhine) monkeys have M/L cone photopigment polymorphisms that map directly into individual variations in visual sensitivity and color vision. We used electroretinogram flicker photometry to examine M/L cone photopigments in the New World monkey Callicebus moloch (the dusky Titi). Like other New World monkeys, this species has an M/L cone photopigment polymorphism that reflects the presence of X-chromosome opsin gene alleles. However, unlike other platyrrhines in which three M/L photopigments are typical, Callicebus has a total of five M/L cone photopigments. The peak sensitivity values for these pigments extend across the range from 530 to 562 nm. The result is an enhanced array of potential color vision phenotypes in this species.

  17. Historical evidence for a pre-Columbian presence of Datura in the Old World and implications for a first millennium transfer from the New World

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Geeta; Waleed Gharaibeh

    2007-12-01

    Datura (Solanaceae) is a small genus of plants that, for long, was thought to occur naturally in both the New and Old Worlds. However, recent studies indicate that all species in the genus originated in the Americas. This finding has prompted the conclusion that no species of Datura could have been present in the Old World prior to its introduction there by Europeans in the early 16th century CE. Further, the textual evidence traditionally cited in support of a pre-Columbian Old World presence of Datura species is suggested to be due to the misreading of classical Greek and Arabic sources. As a result, botanists generally accept the opinion that Datura species were transferred into the Old World in the post-Columbian period. While the taxonomic and geographic evidence for a New World origin for all the Datura species appears to be well supported, the assertion that Datura species were not known in the Old World prior to the 16th century is based on a limited examination of the pre-Columbian non-Anglo sources. We draw on old Arabic and Indic1 texts and southern Indian iconographic representations to show that there is conclusive evidence for the pre-Columbian presence of at least one species of Datura in the Old World. Given the systematic evidence for a New World origin of the genus, the most plausible explanation for this presence is a relatively recent but pre-Columbian (probably first millennium CE) transfer of at least one Datura species, D. metel, into the Old World. Because D. metel is a domesticated species with a disjunct distribution, this might represent an instance of human-mediated transport from the New World to the Old World, as in the case of the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas).

  18. Brave New World versus Island — Utopian and Dystopian Views on Psychopharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Schermer, M. H. N.

    2007-01-01

    Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World is a famous dystopia, frequently called upon in public discussions about new biotechnology. It is less well known that 30 years later Huxley also wrote a utopian novel, called Island. This paper will discuss both novels focussing especially on the role of psychopharmacological substances. If we see fiction as a way of imagining what the world could look like, then what can we learn from Huxley’s novels about psychopharmacology and how does that relate to the di...

  19. A New Miocene-Divergent Lineage of Old World Racer Snake from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan A Mirza

    Full Text Available A distinctive early Miocene-divergent lineage of Old world racer snakes is described as a new genus and species based on three specimens collected from the western Indian state of Gujarat. Wallaceophis gen. et. gujaratenesis sp. nov. is a members of a clade of old world racers. The monotypic genus represents a distinct lineage among old world racers is recovered as a sister taxa to Lytorhynchus based on ~3047bp of combined nuclear (cmos and mitochondrial molecular data (cytb, ND4, 12s, 16s. The snake is distinct morphologically in having a unique dorsal scale reduction formula not reported from any known colubrid snake genus. Uncorrected pairwise sequence divergence for nuclear gene cmos between Wallaceophis gen. et. gujaratenesis sp. nov. other members of the clade containing old world racers and whip snake is 21-36%.

  20. Artificial diets used in mass production of the New World Screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    The New World screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), has been eradicated from North and Central America using the sterile insect technique. This success has been based on mass production of high quality screwworms using artificial diets since 1958. Many diet formulat...

  1. Feasibility of Using a Caribbean Strain of the New World Screwworm for SIT Campaigns in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The New World Screwworm (NWS) is one of the most damaging parasites of livestock in South America with annual losses of millions of dollars. Recently, Mercado Común del Sur countries demonstrated interest for the control of this pest by the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). A pilot-project was conduct...

  2. First New World Primate Papillomavirus Identification in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil: Alouatta guariba papillomavirus 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Rodrigo Vellasco Duarte; de Souza, Alex Junior Souza; Silva, Allan Kaio; de Mello, Wyller Alencar; Nunes, Marcio Roberto T.; Júnior, João Lídio S. G. V.; Cardoso, Jedson Ferreira; de Vasconcelos, Janaina Mota; de Oliveira, Layanna Freitas; da Silva, Sandro Patroca; da Silva, Adriana Marques J.; Fries, Brigida Gomes; Summa, Maria Eugênia L.; de Sá, Lilian Rose M.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the first papillomavirus detected in a New World primate, howler monkey, Alouatta guariba clamitans papillomavirus 1 (AgPV1), from the Atlantic Forest in São Paulo State, Brazil. PMID:27540053

  3. WWW.Cell Biology Education: Using the World Wide Web to Develop a New Teaching Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blystone, Robert V.; MacAlpine, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    "Cell Biology Education" calls attention each quarter to several Web sites of educational interest to the biology community. The Internet provides access to an enormous array of potential teaching materials. In this article, the authors describe one approach for using the World Wide Web to develop a new college biology laboratory exercise. As a…

  4. These Aren't Your Father's Funny Papers: The New World of Digital Graphic Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorefield-Lang, Heather; Gavigan, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Due to the development of new 21st-century technologies, the world of children's and young adult literature is continually changing. For example, one of the fastest-growing multimodal formats that today's visually literate youth embrace is the digital graphic novel. Digital graphic novels are graphic novels produced on and/or accessed on some form…

  5. Beyond the Green Revolution: New Approaches for Third World Agriculture. Worldwatch Paper 73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Edward C.

    After 20 years, the "green revolution" is generally referred to as a milestone in the international agricultural movement. The introduction of new varieties of wheat and rice, along with fertilizers, pesticides, and mechanized farm equipment has produced a dramatic increase in world food production. This paper assesses the successes of the green…

  6. Book Review: Screen Distribution and the New King Kongs of the Online World

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley Decker

    2014-01-01

    A short review of the 2013 book, Screen Distribution and the New King Kongs of the Online World, a succinct publication which explores the impact of new methods of media distribution, from their inception in the 1990’s, to the current climate of both legitimate and illegitimate streaming sources, and offers a framework within which to research future developments in the industry of online distribution. The review concludes with a brief critique and recommendations for those who may intend to ...

  7. Schmallenberg virus infection in South American camelids: Field and experimental investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Claudia; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2015-11-18

    During the first epizootic wave of the novel, teratogenic Schmallenberg virus (SBV, Orthobunyavirus) in ruminants in Northern Europe, serological evidence of a previous SBV-infection demonstrated that South American camelids (SAC) are also susceptible to SBV. However, their potential role in SBV spread remains unknown. To investigate the prevalence and course of SBV-infection in SAC, a German field study and an animal trial with three llamas and three alpacas were conducted. From September 2012 to December 2013, 313 of 502 SAC (62.35%) were found SBV seropositive, but negative for SBV-RNA. The estimated between-district (94.23% of 52) and median within-district (71.43%) and herd (73.13%) SBV seroprevalence in German SAC was similar to the seroprevalence reported in cattle herds and sheep flocks at the time. An age of >1 year was found a statistically significant risk factor for SBV-infection, which could be explained by the spatio-temporal spread of SBV in Germany during the study period. No clinical signs or an increase of abortion and congenital malformation associated with SBV-infection in SAC were reported by the study participants. Similar to SBV-infected ruminants, SBV-RNAemia in experimentally SBV-infected SAC was detected for a short time between days 3 and 7 after infection (dpi), and seroconversion occurred between 9 and 21 dpi. Despite the similar virological and serological results, the lack of clinical signs and congenital malformation associated with SBV-infection suggests that SBV causes subclinical infection in SAC. However, their role as reservoirs in the spread of SBV has to be further investigated. PMID:26361966

  8. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus species from gut microbiota of Chilean Altiplano camelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katheryne Guerrero-Olmos

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus is one of the major human pathogens able to acquire multiple antibiotic-resistant markers as well as virulence factors which also colonize remote ecosystems, including wild animals. In this work, we characterized the Enterococcus population colonizing the gut of Chilean Altiplano camelids without foreign human contact. Material and methods: Rectal swabs from 40 llamas and 10 alpacas were seeded in M-Enterococcus agar, and we selected a total of 57 isolates. Species identification was performed by biochemical classical tests, semi-automated WIDER system, mass spectrometry analysis by MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and, finally, nucleotide sequence of internal fragments of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, pheS, and aac(6-I genes. Genetic diversity was measured by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE-SmaI, whereas the antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the WIDER system. Carriage of virulence factors was explored by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: Our results demonstrated that the most prevalent specie was Enterococcus hirae (82%, followed by other non–Enterococcus faecalis and non–Enterococcus faecium species. Some discrepancies were detected among the identification methods used, and the most reliable were the rpoB, pheS, and aac(6-I nucleotide sequencing. Selected isolates exhibited susceptibility to almost all studied antibiotics, and virulence factors were not detected by PCR. Finally, some predominant clones were characterized by PFGE into a diverse genetic background. Conclusion: Enterococcus species from the Chilean camelids’ gut microbiota were different from those adapted to humans, and they remained free of antibiotic resistance mechanisms as well as virulence factors.

  9. A NEW STAGE OF THE WORLD FINANCIAL CRISIS. SOVEREIGN DEBT CRISIS

    OpenAIRE

    Marius GUST; Parpandel, Denisa Elena; Sorin GRIGORESCU

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to emphasize the effects of the world financial crisis upon the European Union countries? economies and finances. From its beginning in 2007, the world financial crisis was felt in the countries of the European Union in less than a year and during the next two years, 2008 and 2009, it strongly impacted the economies and finances in these countries. The research goals reside in analyzing the implications of the new crisis wave which was felt again all throughout...

  10. Charting the new world order: proceedings of the 15. CERI international oil and gas markets conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15th International Oil and Gas Markets Conference, organized by the Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) and held in Calgary, AB, provided a wide variety of opportunities for discussion of the global oil and gas market outlook, international oil and gas market strategies and corporate planning in the new world order, competition for investments, the re-emergence of the geopolitics of energy, energy in the Americas, international gas market strategies, and the financing of Canadian international operations. More than 100 delegates from around the world attended the conference to hear some 20 presentations. refs., tabs., figs

  11. The Problem with Violence: Exceptionality and Sovereignty in the New World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A. Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For many observers, the violent and often spectacular crime that takes place in particular Caribbean areas is evidence of a failure to create a growth-oriented economy and morally progressive ethos. It is a problem of culture, a mark of backwardness, an unsuccessful movement from savagery, or a failure to take advantage of post-World War II opportunities for development in political, economic, and socio-cultural fields. At the very least, it is something that marks the Caribbean—as well as some spaces within Latin America—as seeming to have taken a different path in relation to other New World trajectories. This article uses the case of Jamaica—itself often portrayed as exceptional within the region—to think through how, when, and why the US is, on one hand and from one perspective, written out of these narratives and, on the other and from alternative vantage points, central to them. In doing so, Thomas emphasizes the long-standing transnational dimension of violence in the postcolonial Americas, situating the New World as a single sphere of experience, in order to say something about the relationships among violence, the exploitation and settlement of the New World, sovereignty, and the various phases of modern capitalism.

  12. Brave New World versus Island--utopian and dystopian views on psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, M H N

    2007-06-01

    Aldous Huxley's Brave New World is a famous dystopia, frequently called upon in public discussions about new biotechnology. It is less well known that 30 years later Huxley also wrote a utopian novel, called Island. This paper will discuss both novels focussing especially on the role of psychopharmacological substances. If we see fiction as a way of imagining what the world could look like, then what can we learn from Huxley's novels about psychopharmacology and how does that relate to the discussion in the ethical and philosophical literature on this subject? The paper argues that in the current ethical discussion the dystopian vision on psychopharmacology is dominant, but that a comparison between Brave New World and Island shows that a more utopian view is possible as well. This is illustrated by a discussion of the issue of psychopharmacology and authenticity. The second part of the paper draws some further conclusions for the ethical debate on psychopharmacology and human enhancement, by comparing the novels not only with each other, but also with our present reality. It is claimed that the debate should not get stuck in an opposition of dystopian and utopian views, but should address important issues that demand attention in our real world: those of evaluation and governance of enhancing psychopharmacological substances in democratic, pluralistic societies. PMID:17486431

  13. 75 FR 25794 - Regulated Navigation Area: Red Bull Air Race World Championship, Upper New York Bay, Lower Hudson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA08 Regulated Navigation Area: Red Bull Air Race World... State Park, New Jersey and Ellis Island, New Jersey and New York for the Red Bull Air Race World..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a...

  14. The Intersecting Worlds of Sustainability and Cyberspace: Old or/and New Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunn, S. D.

    2013-11-01

    The world is replete with boundaries at all scales, personal, community, disciplinary, national and global. Some of these are open and permeable; others are closed and difficult to cross. The fields, concepts and models associated with studying global sustainability call for an examination of both old boundaries and new boundaries, especially those that intersect different disciplines, scales and technologies. In this presentation I want to focus on new transdisciplinary boundaries that are essential for us to study sustainability at local and global levels and also cyberspace worlds where there is much fluidity, speed, networking that relate to issues of identity and territoriality. I discuss both what is similar to "old" or "traditional boundary thinking" and what is "new." I conclude by suggesting some challenges facing transitional boundary research and policy.

  15. Palynological analysis of camelid coprolites: seasonality in the use of the site Cerro Casa de Piedra 7 (Santa Cruz, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Nadia Jimena; Burry, Lidia Susana; Fugassa, Martín Horacio; Civalero, María Teresa; Aschero, Carlos Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Palynological, palaeoparasitological and paleobotanical studies of coprolites found in archaeological sites from Perito Moreno National Park (47°57‧S72°05‧W) yielded information on diet, palaeoenvironment and health. These studies allowed adding evidence to the reconstruction of life history of the hunter-gatherers that inhabited Patagonia during the Holocene. We examined the season of the year when camelid Lama guanicoe coprolites (5400 ± 64 yr 14C BP to 9640 ± 190 yr 14C BP) were deposited at Cerro Casa de Piedra 7 (site CCP7). The study used palynological evidence and comparison with pollen spectra of modern feces collected during summer, fall, winter and spring of 2010. The dominant types were: pollen of Nothofagus, Empetrum rubrum, Asteraceae subfam. Asteroideae, Nassauvia, Caryophyllaceae and Poaceae; fern spores; remains of Eimeria macusaniensis; and plant remains of Poaceae, Festuca pallescens, Stipa speciosa, Armeria maritima, Gaultheria mucronata and E. rubrum. Pollen spectra of modern and fossil feces were used for multivariate analysis. Coprolites associated to fall and winter modern feces. These results and those obtained from pollen concentration values and the presence of pollen types indicators of seasonality, allowed the determination of summer, fall and winter coprolites. However, caution must be taken with the seasonality results of coprolites dated earlier than 9000 years BP since the environmental conditions differed from now. The site was probably a camelid shelter during the unfavorable seasons.

  16. Old World and Clade C New World Arenaviruses Mimic the Molecular Mechanism of Receptor Recognition Used by α-Dystroglycan's Host-Derived Ligands▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rojek, Jillian M.; Spiropoulou, Christina F.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Kunz, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    α-Dystroglycan (DG) is an important cellular receptor for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and also serves as the receptor for Old World arenaviruses Lassa fever virus (LFV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and clade C New World arenaviruses. In the host cell, α-DG is subject to a remarkably complex pattern of O glycosylation that is crucial for its interactions with ECM proteins. Two of these unusual sugar modifications, protein O mannosylation and glycan modifications involv...

  17. World-Economy Centrality and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: A New Look at the Position in the Capitalist World-System and Environmental Pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the ever-growing concern of climate change, much attention has been paid to the factors driving carbon dioxide emissions. Previous research in the World-Systems perspective has identified a relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy. This study intends to build on the previous research by developing a new, more parsimonious indicator of World-System position based on Immanuel Wallerstein’s theoretical concepts of incorporation and core-periphery processes. The new World-System indicator is derived from the centrality measure in network analysis based on import data from the International Monetary Fund’s Direction of Trade Statistics. Based on the theoretical concepts of core-periphery processes, carbon dioxide emissions are predicted to rise based on the predominance of energy-intensive, high-technology, core processes within the nation. The results tend to demonstrate a strong relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and position in the world-economy, and the new World-System position indicator is more strongly related with carbon dioxide emissions than Gross Domestic Product per capita.

  18. China's new oil import status underpins world's most dynamic petroleum scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China is poised to become a net importer of oil in 1994--95. That sets the stage for China importing more than 1 million b/d of crude oil and refined products on a net basis by the turn of the century. That development underpins a bigger story -- arguably the biggest story on the petroleum scene today. The turnabout that is seeing the world's fifth biggest oil producer go from significant oil exporter in recent years to major oil importer by the turn of the century points to several other truisms in the petroleum industry: That an oil demand surge in the Asia-Pacific region led by China will fuel overall world oil demand growth for years to come; that a refining and petrochemical boom in a country that accounts for about one fifth of the world's population has dramatic implications for those two industries; that privatization has gathered so much momentum in the global petroleum industry that even Communist China has embraced some form of it; that China's domestic crude supply shortfall is creating unprecedented opportunities for foreign upstream investors in one of the world's most prospective yet underexplored and underexploited regions; and that the same new openness that is distinguishing China's petroleum industry today is turning some of its state owned companies into major competitors to be reckoned with on the international scene, upstream and downstream. The paper discusses China's oil export/import balance, supply/demand outlook, policy changes, and new regulations governing export of crude oil and products

  19. Widespread adaptive evolution during repeated evolutionary radiations in New World lupins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevado, Bruno; Atchison, Guy W.; Hughes, Colin E.; Filatov, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary processes that drive rapid species diversification are poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear whether Darwinian adaptation or non-adaptive processes are the primary drivers of explosive species diversifications. Here we show that repeated rapid radiations within New World lupins (Lupinus, Leguminosae) were underpinned by a major increase in the frequency of adaptation acting on coding and regulatory changes genome-wide. This contrasts with far less frequent adaptation in genomes of slowly diversifying lupins and all other plant genera analysed. Furthermore, widespread shifts in optimal gene expression coincided with shifts to high rates of diversification and evolution of perenniality, a putative key adaptation trait thought to have triggered the evolutionary radiations in New World lupins. Our results reconcile long-standing debate about the relative importance of protein-coding and regulatory evolution, and represent the first unambiguous evidence for the rapid onset of lineage- and genome-wide accelerated Darwinian evolution during rapid species diversification. PMID:27498896

  20. The remarkable journey of adaptation of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite to New World anopheline mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Molina-Cruz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum originated in Africa, dispersed around the world as a result of human migration and had to adapt to several different indigenous anopheline mosquitoes. Anophelines from the New World are evolutionary distant form African ones and this probably resulted in a more stringent selection of Plasmodium as it adapted to these vectors. It is thought that Plasmodium has been genetically selected by some anopheline species through unknown mechanisms. The mosquito immune system can greatly limit infection and P. falciparum evolved a strategy to evade these responses, at least in part mediated by Pfs47, a highly polymorphic gene. We propose that adaptation of P. falciparum to new vectors may require evasion of their immune system. Parasites with a Pfs47 haplotype compatible with the indigenous mosquito vector would be able to survive and be transmitted. The mosquito antiplasmodial response could be an important determinant of P. falciparum population structure and could affect malaria transmission in the Americas.

  1. The remarkable journey of adaptation of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite to New World anopheline mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2014-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum originated in Africa, dispersed around the world as a result of human migration and had to adapt to several different indigenous anopheline mosquitoes. Anophelines from the New World are evolutionary distant form African ones and this probably resulted in a more stringent selection of Plasmodium as it adapted to these vectors. It is thought that Plasmodium has been genetically selected by some anopheline species through unknown mechanisms. The mosquito immune system can greatly limit infection and P. falciparum evolved a strategy to evade these responses, at least in part mediated by Pfs47, a highly polymorphic gene. We propose that adaptation of P. falciparum to new vectors may require evasion of their immune system. Parasites with a Pfs47 haplotype compatible with the indigenous mosquito vector would be able to survive and be transmitted. The mosquito antiplasmodial response could be an important determinant of P. falciparum population structure and could affect malaria transmission in the Americas. PMID:25185006

  2. The remarkable journey of adaptation of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite to New World anopheline mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum originated in Africa, dispersed around the world as a result of human migration and had to adapt to several different indigenous anopheline mosquitoes. Anophelines from the New World are evolutionary distant form African ones and this probably resulted in a more stringent selection of Plasmodium as it adapted to these vectors. It is thought that Plasmodium has been genetically selected by some anopheline species through unknown mechanisms. The mosquito immune system can greatly limit infection and P. falciparum evolved a strategy to evade these responses, at least in part mediated by Pfs47, a highly polymorphic gene. We propose that adaptation of P. falciparum to new vectors may require evasion of their immune system. Parasites with a Pfs47 haplotype compatible with the indigenous mosquito vector would be able to survive and be transmitted. The mosquito antiplasmodial response could be an important determinant of P. falciparum population structure and could affect malaria transmission in the Americas. PMID:25185006

  3. Burnout: relationships between emotional exhaustion, labour market position and the New World of Work

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia van Echtelt

    2014-01-01

    Burnout (or emotional exhaustion) is relatively common: roughly one in eight employees in the Netherlands suffers from it. It is accordingly regarded as a serious societal problem which warrants attention in policy. This report presents the results of two specific analyses in relation to burnout. First, we look at the impact of emotional exhaustion on employees’ careers. Second, we explore the relationship between The New World of Work and burnout. The final section of the report was compiled...

  4. Towards new maps of global human values, based on World Values Survey (6) data

    OpenAIRE

    Tausch, Arno

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a new approach to the study of global values, based on a statistical analysis of the freely available data from the World Values Survey, 6th wave of global opinion surveys, which has now been made public. In accordance with economic approaches, we contradict the mainstream of the hitherto published global value analyses in sociology (Ronald F. Inglehart) and we think that family values (Schumpeter) and religious values (Barro) can be an important positive asset for socie...

  5. Venomics of New World pit vipers: Genus-wide comparisons of venom proteomes across Agkistrodon

    OpenAIRE

    Lomonte, Bruno; Tsai, Wan-Chih; Ureña-Diaz, Juan Manuel; Sanz, Libia; Mora-Obando, Diana; Sánchez, Elda E.; Fry, Bryan G.; Gutiérrez, José María; Gibbs, H. Lisle; Sovic, Michael G.; Calvete, Juan J

    2013-01-01

    We report a genus-wide comparison of venom proteome variation across New World pit vipers in the genus Agkistrodon. Despite the wide variety of habitats occupied by this genus and that all its taxa feed on diverse species of vertebrates and invertebrate prey, the venom proteomes of copperheads, cottonmouths, and cantils are remarkably similar, both in the type and relative abundance of their different toxin families. The venoms from all the eleven species and subspecies sampled showed relativ...

  6. Latitudinal Diversity Gradients in New World Bats: Are They a Consequence of Niche Conservatism?

    OpenAIRE

    Maria João Ramos Pereira; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

    2013-01-01

    The increase in species diversity from the Poles to the Equator is a major biogeographic pattern, but the mechanisms underlying it remain obscure. Our aim is to contribute to their clarification by describing the latitudinal gradients in species richness and in evolutionary age of species of New World bats, and testing if those patterns may be explained by the niche conservatism hypothesis. Maps of species ranges were used to estimate species richness in a 100 x 100 km grid. Root distances in...

  7. The influence of new world species on the botany of the 16th century

    OpenAIRE

    Ubrizsy Savoia, Andrea

    1996-01-01

    This paper is about how some New World species, not as widespread as tomato, tobacco, etc. were introduced in the botanical European knowledge, with special reference to Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522-1605). His herbal, his inconographic collections and manuscripts containing lists of seeds, woods and other matrials, are conserved in his Museum and grown in the Botanical Garden of Bologna.

    El presente trabajo analiza cómo algunas especies botánicas del Nuevo mundo, no tan difundid...

  8. Land use explains the distribution of threatened New World amphibians better than climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Thiesen Brum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We evaluated the direct and indirect influence of climate, land use, phylogenetic structure, species richness and endemism on the distribution of New World threatened amphibians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the WWF's New World ecoregions, the WWFs amphibian distributional data and the IUCN Red List Categories to obtain the number of threatened species per ecoregion. We analyzed three different scenarios urgent, moderate, and the most inclusive scenario. Using path analysis we evaluated the direct and indirect effects of climate, type of land use, phylogenetic structure, richness and endemism on the number of threatened amphibians in New World ecoregions. In all scenarios we found strong support for direct influences of endemism, the cover of villages and species richness on the number of threatened species in each ecoregion. The proportion of wild area had indirect effects in the moderate and the most inclusive scenario. Phylogenetic composition was important in determining the species richness and endemism in each ecoregion. Climate variables had complex and indirect effects on the number of threatened species. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Land use has a more direct influence than climate in determining the distribution of New World threatened amphibians. Independently of the scenario analyzed, the main variables influencing the distribution of threatened amphibians were consistent, with endemism having the largest magnitude path coefficient. The importance of phylogenetic composition could indicate that some clades may be more threatened than others, and their presence increases the number of threatened species. Our results highlight the importance of man-made land transformation, which is a local variable, as a critical factor underlying the distribution of threatened amphibians at a biogeographic scale.

  9. The World Trade Center Residents’ Respiratory Health Study: New-Onset Respiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Function

    OpenAIRE

    Reibman, Joan; Lin, Shao; Hwang, Syni-An A.; Gulati, Mridu; Bowers, James A.; Rogers, Linda; Berger, Kenneth I.; Hoerning, Anne; Gomez, Marta; Fitzgerald, Edward F.

    2004-01-01

    The destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) on 11 September 2001 in New York City resulted in the massive release of pulverized dust and combustion products. The dust and smoke settled in the surrounding area, which encompassed a large residential community. We hypothesized that previously normal residents in the community surrounding the former WTC would have an increased incidence of persistent respiratory symptoms and abnormalities in screening spirometry. A hybrid cross-sectional and ...

  10. Review of the world species of Exoryza (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae), with description of five new species

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez-Triana, Jose L.; Whitfield, James B.; Smith, M. Alex; Dapkey, Tanya; Hallwachs, Winnie; Janzen, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    The world species of the genus Exoryza (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Microgastrinae) are revised. Ten species are recognized, including five new, authored by Fernandez-Triana: mariabustosae, richardashleyi, ritaashleyae, rosamatarritae and yeimycedenoae. The species Dolichogenidea oryzae Walker, 1994 is considered as related to Exoryza – although is not formally transferred to that genus. A dichotomous key to all species, descriptions and illustrations are provided. The only region where the genu...

  11. Building a New World: An Ecosystemic Approach for Global Change & Development Design

    OpenAIRE

    Pilon, André Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Problems of difficult settlement or solution in the world cannot be solved by segmented academic formats, market-place interests or mass-media headlines; instead of dealing with taken for granted issues (the apparent “bubbles” in the surface), public policies, research and teaching programmes should detect the issues and deal with them deep inside the boiling pot. Policy discussions and policy making require new paradigms of growth, power, wealth, work and freedom embedded into the cultural, ...

  12. Changing Opinions in a Changing World: a New Perspective in Sociophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Pluchino, A.; Latora, V.; Rapisarda, A.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new model of opinion formation, the Opinion Changing Rate (OCR) model. Instead of investigating the conditions that allow consensus in a world of agents with different opinions, we study under which conditions a group of agents with a different natural tendency (rate) to change opinion can find agreement. The OCR is a modified version of the Kuramoto model, one of the simplest models for synchronization in biological systems, here adapted to a social context. By means of several ...

  13. Voices: World Forum for Music Therapy - A new avenue for communication among music therapy communities

    OpenAIRE

    Carolyn Kenny; Brynjulf Stige

    2001-01-01

    Welcome to the inaugural issue of a new international music therapy journal, electronically published and with free access. We're sure you have noticed the growing interest in the field of music therapy. The number of music therapists around the world is increasing every year. Diverse contexts for music therapy work grow too. Though music has been practiced as a healing art in Indigenous societies for hundreds of years, contemporary professional music therapy has grown from a Western enterpri...

  14. Host switching of human lice to new world monkeys in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drali, Rezak; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Boutellis, Amina; Djossou, Félix; Barker, Stephen C; Raoult, Didier

    2016-04-01

    The coevolution between a host and its obligate parasite is exemplified in the sucking lice that infest primates. In the context of close lice-host partnerships and cospeciation, Pediculus mjobergi, the louse of New World primates, has long been puzzling because its morphology resembles that of human lice. To investigate the possibility that P. mjobergi was transmitted to monkeys from the first humans who set foot on the American continent thousands of years ago, we obtained and compared P. mjobergi lice collected from howler monkeys from Argentina to human lice gathered from a remote and isolated village in Amazonia that has escaped globalization. Morphological examinations were first conducted and verified the similarity between the monkey and human lice. The molecular characterization of several nuclear and mitochondrial genetic markers in the two types of lice revealed that one of the P. mjobergi specimens had a unique haplotype that clustered with the haplotypes of Amazonian head lice that are prevalent in tropical regions in the Americas, a natural habitat of New World monkeys. Because this phylogenetic group forms a separate branch within the clade of lice from humans that were of American origin, this finding indicates that human lice have transferred to New World monkeys. PMID:26867815

  15. "The New World". Musica e narratività nel cinema di Terrence Malick

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Finocchiaro

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The New World (USA, 2005 is the fourth full-length film’s title of the American director Terrence Malick. The movie tells the legendary love story between Princess Pocahontas (Q’orianka Kilcher of the Powathan tribe and the English soldier and explorer John Smith (Colin Farrell. The background of the historical events concerns the foundation of one of the first European settlements in the New World, at the close beginning of 17th Century. The specific topic of the proposed didactical unit, which is addressed to a 2nd or 3rd class of the Secondary School, consists in the analysis of some film sequences, that all employ the main theme of the second movement (Adagio from the Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Piano Concerto K 488. The didactic unit is based on an audiovisual analysis, that focuses on developing some categories, concepts and tools, which can enrich the reading strategies of a kind of text – the syncretic cinematographic one – with a central role in the contemporary music production and consumption. Malick’s work not only represents a polished example of music employment in a movie, but also deals with a topic of a relevant historical importance, that is the encounter between the Old and New World; indeed this topic is particularly suitable for encouraging a reflection upon cultural diversity and interethnic communication.

  16. Mother of a New World? Stereotypical Representations of Black Women in Three Postapocalyptic Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima K. Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores three cinematic representations of Black matriarchs who play prophetic roles in redeeming humanity in the midst of apocalyptic change: Ika (Quest for Fire, Kee (Children of Men, and The Oracle (The Matrix trilogy. Not only do these courageous women resist the politics of domination, rebelling against a dying status quo, but they "give birth" to the leaders needed to rebuild a world in chaos and decay. One film ends with a pregnant woman rubbing her belly as she stands on the precipice of evolutionary change; another positions a mother and newborn adrift, waiting to be found by leaders of a new world order; in the third, a character sacrifices herself to empower resistance fighters with ideas and the means to choose their survival in a postapocalyptic world. Defying the politics of an annihilating patriarchy, these women portend a return to a naturally evolving world. However, despite their powerful influence, they can be understood, problematically, as modern-day reinventions of Black female stereotypes—Ika as Jezebel, Kee as Hagar, the Oracle as Mammy—because they, and the indices for understanding their roles in the community, are wedded to White patriarchs and to their own gendered functions as nurturing or sexual(ized beings.

  17. World Literature - World Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Offering their own twenty-first-century perspectives - across generations, nationalities and disciplines -, the contributors to this anthology explore the idea of world literature for what it may add of new connections and itineraries to the study of literature and culture today. Covering a vast ...... historical material these essays, by a diverse group of scholars, examine the pioneers of world literature and the roles played by translation, migration and literary institutions in the circulation and reception of both national and cosmopolitan literatures....

  18. Economic impact of eradicating the New World screw-worm (Cochliomyia hominivorax) from Jamaica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study is to assess the economic feasibility of eradicating the New World screw-worm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel, from Jamaica. The endemic presence of the NWS in Jamaica has caused the livestock sector to incur recurrent economic costs and losses. Eradication of the pest utilising the environmentally-benign sterile insect technique (SIT) has proved technologically feasible on other islands and other parts of the world. Based on these successful experiences, the proposed project to eradicate the NWS from Jamaica is expected to be similarly effective in eliminating the pest from Jamaica in a relatively short period of time. The elimination of the pest from the Caribbean would lessen the significant risk of re-infestation of eradicated areas and pest-free countries in the region

  19. Thematic Plan for the Sterile Insect Technique for Old and New World Screwworm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To support livestock development programmes aiming at controlling or eradicating key insect pests. This involves the application of the sterile insect technique (SIT) into area wide integrated pest management and eradication systems. The sustainability of eradication activities has been demonstrated for a number of insect pests under various national settings where the application of SIT has produced significant impact on socio-economic development, in terms of both cost-savings and environmental quality. In line with the TC strategy, this thematic plan reviews best practices and experience gained in field operations, identifies stakeholders and common objectives in New World Screwworm, Cochliomya hominivorax (NWS) and Old World Screwworm, Chrysomya bezziana (OWS), control and outlines a strategy for implementing integrated pest control programmes at the regional, sub-regional and national level. Synergies are sought with partner organisations to expand the knowledge base and capabilities for SIT based pest control activities and to strengthen TCDC.

  20. A New World for Museum Marketing? Facing the Old Dilemmas while Challenging New Market Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Tanja Komarac

    2014-01-01

    Museums are part of a wider cultural and entertainment environment, which is ruled by highly demanding visitors who seek immersive experiences (edutainment) and time-saving arrangement. This has encouraged and, in some opinions, forced museums to turn their focus from collections to visitors. In addition, museums have faced competition and new technologies in the form of virtual museums and virtual reality. This has emphasized the need to accept marketing as a survival tool and to make it int...

  1. Existing Estimates, New Estimates, and New Interpretations of World War I and its Aftermath

    OpenAIRE

    Romer, Christina D.

    1987-01-01

    The paper examines the official Commerce Department estimates of gross national product for 1909-1928 and finds that they are far inferior to the less commonly used Kendrick GNP estimates. The paper then derives a revised version of the Kendrick series that alters significantly the representation of annual movements in the Kendrick series before 1919. This endorsement of a revised Kendrick GNP series in place of the official Commerce Department estimates before 1929 suggests new interpretatio...

  2. New challenging issues for world trade and the world economy Strategies for the EC-Turkey Custom Union

    OpenAIRE

    Messerlin, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The recent crisis has deeply changed the environment in which the EC-Turkey Custom Union (ECT) will develop. The world trade in goods was experiencing its worst collapse in almost a century (a fall of 20 percent in volume in one year, twice more than in 1929-30 for the same time lapse) but it looks also faster back on track. Meanwhile, trade in some services (telecoms, insurance, etc.) has been resilient to the crisis, even during its peak, while trade in the other services (transportati...

  3. Extending the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal - New Capabilities and New Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Brian; Law, Emily

    2015-11-01

    NASA’s Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP) provides a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, lunar scientists, and engineers to access mapped lunar data products from past and current lunar missions (http://lmmp.nasa.gov). During the past year, the capabilities and data served by LMMP have been significantly expanded. New interfaces are providing improved ways to access and visualize data. Many of the recent enhancements to LMMP have been specifically in response to the requirements of NASA's proposed Resource Prospector lunar rover, and as such, provide an excellent example of the application of LMMP to mission planning.At the request of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, LMMP’s technology and capabilities are now being extended to additional planetary bodies. New portals for Vesta and Mars are the first of these new products to be released.On March 31, 2015, the LMMP team released Vesta Trek (http://vestatrek.jpl.nasa.gov), a web-based application applying LMMP technology to visualize the asteroid Vesta. Data gathered from multiple instruments aboard Dawn have been compiled into Vesta Trek’s user-friendly set of tools, enabling users to study the asteroid’s features.Released on July 1, 2015, Mars Trek replicates the functionality of Vesta Trek for the surface of Mars. While the entire surface of Mars is covered, higher levels of resolution and greater numbers of data products are provided for special areas of interest. Early releases focus on past, current, and future robotic sites of operation. Future releases will add many new data products and analysis tools as Mars Trek has been selected for use in site selection for the Mars 2020 rover and in identifying potential human landing sites on Mars.Other destinations will follow soon. The Solar Sytem Exploration Research Virtual Institute, which manages the project, invites the user community to provide suggestions and requests as the

  4. Extending the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal - New Capabilities and New Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, B. H.; Law, E.; Arevalo, E.; Bui, B.; Chang, G.; Dodge, K.; Kim, R. M.; Malhotra, S.; Sadaqathullah, S.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP) provides a web-based Portal and a suite of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, lunar scientists, and engineers to access mapped lunar data products from past and current lunar missions (http://lmmp.nasa.gov). During the past year, the capabilities and data served by LMMP have been significantly expanded. New interfaces are providing improved ways to access and visualize data. Many of the recent enhancements to LMMP have been specifically in response to the requirements of NASA's proposed Resource Prospector lunar rover, and as such, provide an excellent example of the application of LMMP to mission planning. At the request of NASA's Science Mission Directorate, LMMP's technology and capabilities are now being extended to additional planetary bodies. New portals for Vesta and Mars are the first of these new products to be released. On March 31, 2015, the LMMP team released Vesta Trek (http://vestatrek.jpl.nasa.gov), a web-based application applying LMMP technology to visualizations of the asteroid Vesta. Data gathered from multiple instruments aboard Dawn have been compiled into Vesta Trek's user-friendly set of tools, enabling users to study the asteroid's features. With an initial release on July 1, 2015, Mars Trek replicates the functionality of Vesta Trek for the surface of Mars. While the entire surface of Mars is covered, higher levels of resolution and greater numbers of data products are provided for special areas of interest. Early releases focus on past, current, and future robotic sites of operation. Future releases will add many new data products and analysis tools as Mars Trek has been selected for use in site selection for the Mars 2020 rover and in identifying potential human landing sites on Mars. Other destinations will follow soon. The user community is invited to provide suggestions and requests as the development team continues to expand the capabilities of LMMP

  5. Persistent Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Infection in Domestic and Wild Small Ruminants and Camelids Including the Mountain Goat (Oreamnos americanus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Danielle D.; Duprau, Jennifer L.; Wolff, Peregrine L.; Evermann, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a pestivirus best known for causing a variety of disease syndromes in cattle, including gastrointestinal disease, reproductive insufficiency, immunosuppression, mucosal disease, and hemorrhagic syndrome. The virus can be spread by transiently infected individuals and by persistently infected animals that may be asymptomatic while shedding large amounts of virus throughout their lifetime. BVDV has been reported in over 40 domestic and free-ranging species, and persistent infection has been described in eight of those species: white-tailed deer, mule deer, eland, mousedeer, mountain goats, alpacas, sheep, and domestic swine. This paper reviews the various aspects of BVDV transmission, disease syndromes, diagnosis, control, and prevention, as well as examines BVDV infection in domestic and wild small ruminants and camelids including mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus). PMID:26779126

  6. Livestock systems and rangeland degradation in the new World Atlas of Desertification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Claudio; Reynolds, James F.; Cherlet, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Livestock systems and rangeland degradation in the new World Atlas of Desertification Land degradation and desertification (LDD), which are widespread in global rangelands, are complex processes. They are caused by multiple (but limited) number of biophysical and socioeconomic drivers that lead to an unbalance in the capacity of the land to sustainably produce ecosystem services and economic value. Converging evidence indicates that the key biophysical and socioeconomic drivers include agricultural or pastoral land use and management practices, population growth, societal demands (e.g., urbanization), and climate change (e.g., increasing aridity and drought). The new World Atlas of Desertification (WAD) describes these global issues, documents their spatial change, and highlights the importance of these drivers in relation to land degradation processes. The impacts of LDD on the atmosphere, on water and on biodiversity are also covered. The WAD spatially illustrates relevant types of livestock and rangeland management systems, related (over-under) use of resources, various management activities, and some of the common features and transitions that contribute to LDD. For example, livestock grazing in marginal areas is increasing due to competition with agricultural encroachment and, hence, vulnerable lands are under threat. The integration of stratified global data layers facilitates identifying areas where stress on the land system can be linked to underlying causal issues. One of the objectives of the new WAD is to provide synthesis and tools for scientists and stakeholders to design sustainable solutions for efficient land use in global rangelands.

  7. Wiki management a revolutionary new model for a rapidly changing and collaborative world

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Rod

    2013-01-01

    We now live in a "wiki" world where mass collaboration is not only possible-it's often the best solution. Conventional management thought assumes that command-and-control is the most effective way to organize the efforts of large numbers of people, but rapid change and increasing complexity have rendered that model obsolete. As a result, most managers today lack the skills and knowledge needed to succeed in an age when networks are proving smarter and faster than hierarchies. Designing organizations for mass collaboration demands a new and very different model-wiki management.

  8. “The New World Order”: An Outline of the Post-Cold War Era

    OpenAIRE

    YlLMAZ, Muzaffer Ercan

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an analytical discussion on post-Cold War developments and the emerging world order in that era. In this regard, some of the main characteristics of the international system, basic trends, and new threats in international relations are addressed, in that order. It is argued that while classical inter-state wars tend to decrease in the post-Cold War era, there are many other serious threats to international peace beyond the full control of nation-states, most notably ethn...

  9. Trypanosoma (Duttonella vivax: its biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, and introduction in the New World - a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Alves Rosa Osório

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The biology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic techniques, and history of the introduction of Trypanosoma (Duttonella vivax in the New World are reviewed. The two main immunological responses of trypanosome-infected animals - antibody production and immunodepression - are discussed in the context of how these responses play a role in disease tolerance or susceptibility. Isolation and purification of T. vivax are briefly discussed. The recent reports of bovine trypanosomiasis diagnosed in cattle on farms located in the Pantanal region of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul and Mato Grosso, Brazil, are also discussed.

  10. New competition pattern of world nuclear power market and its inspirations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The renaissance of nuclear power has aroused a severe competition in the world. In the new pattern of present nuclear power market, the alliance relationship between the American and Japanese enterprises has been strengthened, with the leading power transferred to the Japanese enterprises. In order to improve the international competition capability, Russia and France are intensifying the union of their own nuclear industries. We should keep farsighted to protect and develop the national benefits and give impetus to the development of national nuclear power utilization by means of effective measures. (authors)

  11. The World At Night: A New International Year of Astronomy 2009 Project

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, M.; Tafreshi, B. A.

    2008-01-01

    The World At Night (TWAN) is a new programme founded in 2007 with the goal of creating a collection of stunning photographs of the world’s most beautiful and historic sites against the night-time backdrop of stars, planets, and celestial events. The eternally peaceful sky looks the same above all the symbols of different nations and regions, a testament to the truly unified nature of Earth as a planet rather than an amalgam of human-designated territories. Those involved in global programmes ...

  12. Education of librarians and the challenges of the new library world

    OpenAIRE

    Kempf, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    During the recent years a variety of terms have emerged in the library world about what librarians will be in future and about the skills that they will need: digital librarian, data librarian, infobroker, cybrarian? This is certainly an answer to the „ brave new library world“ (to quote the title of the well-known book by Aldous Huxley), which we are confronted by and which is frequently described – mostly by individuals that deal with libraries in their everyday life seldom or not at all. I...

  13. [Science fiction and the Brave New World: predictions fulfilled in our century and bioethical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Carolina Clemente Dos; Amorim Neto, Thomaz Pereira de; Goes, Andrea Carla de Souza

    2013-06-01

    The speed with which science generates results in modern society requires reflection on the limits of scientific progress. This is the foundation of Brave New World, a book published by Aldous Huxley in 1932 that portrays a future technological society along the lines of Fordism. This article establishes a relationship between our current technocratic society and that described by Huxley, discussing the viability of the technical and biological aspects of the manipulations narrated in the book in light of current knowledge. Some bioethical considerations with respect to the procedures 'invented' by the author - and which are already or could be developed in modern society - will also be addressed. PMID:23739805

  14. YottaYotta announces new world record set for TCP disk-to-disk bulk transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Yottabyte NetStorage(TM) Company, today announced a new world record for TCP disk-to-disk data transfer using the company's NetStorager(R) System. The record-breaking demonstration transferred 5 terabytes of data between Chicago, Il. to Vancouver, BC and Ottawa, ON, at a sustained average throughput of 11.1 gigabits per second. Peak throughput exceeded 11.6 gigabits per second, more than 15-times faster than previous records for TCP transfer from disk-to-disk (1 page).

  15. Observations from Ground Zero at the World Trade Center in New York City, Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, R L; Acosta, J K

    2001-01-01

    The authors are mental health clinicians with the Police Organization Providing Peer Assistance (POPPA), an affiliate organization of the Patrolman's Benevolent Association of the New York Police Department (NYPD). Beginning on September 11, 2001 we were at Ground Zero of the World Trade Center (WTC) to assist in the all phases of crisis intervention and Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM), as indicated. Our observations and anecdoctal reports, as we worked on teams with NYPD Peer Support Officers (PSOs), are the subject of this paper. PMID:12025483

  16. Voices: World Forum for Music Therapy - A new avenue for communication among music therapy communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Kenny

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to the inaugural issue of a new international music therapy journal, electronically published and with free access. We're sure you have noticed the growing interest in the field of music therapy. The number of music therapists around the world is increasing every year. Diverse contexts for music therapy work grow too. Though music has been practiced as a healing art in Indigenous societies for hundreds of years, contemporary professional music therapy has grown from a Western enterprise to one with a very broad foundation of approaches internationally.

  17. The New World Order and the Unmasking of the Neo-Colonial Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilijana Burcar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In his dramatic sketch The New World Order Pinter exposes practices of psychological and physical abuse targeted at local people who resist neo-colonial advancements in territories directly occupied or indirectly controlled by Western hegemonic powers. Through the deployment of Pinteresque double-layered meanings conveyed through seemingly ordinary, everyday language, the drama unveils the ideological premises and operating principles of neo-colonial discourse. The paper discusses the way Pinter blasts apart a seemingly neutral Western rhetoric of humanitarian militarism, focusing on the discursive strategies by means of which neo-imperial violence, torture and massive dispossession of local populations are justified and naturalized.

  18. New Lens Scenarios. A Shift in Perspective for a World in Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    With the world's population headed toward 9 billion at mid-century and millions of people climbing out of poverty, global energy demand could increase by as much as 80% by 2050. That's according to Shell's latest scenarios, which look at trends in the economy, politics and energy in considering developments over the next half a century. The first scenario (Mountains) sees a strong role for government and the introduction of firm and far-reaching policy measures. These help to develop more compact cities and transform the global transport network. New policies unlock plentiful natural gas resources - making it the largest global energy source by the 2030s - and accelerate carbon capture and storage technology, supporting a cleaner energy system. The second scenario (Oceans) describes a more prosperous and volatile world. Energy demand surges, due to strong economic growth. Power is more widely distributed and governments take longer to agree major decisions. Market forces rather than policies shape the energy system: oil and coal remain part of the energy mix but renewable energy also grows. By the 2070s solar becomes the world's largest energy source.

  19. Globalization and new world order are we ready for "Scientists without Borders"?

    CERN Document Server

    Kouchner, B

    2005-01-01

    Since the end of the cold war and the fall of the Berlin wall, large scientific projects, such as the LHC and ITER, are now based on international collaborations involving most world powers. These collaborations cover not only the design, but also run the construction and operation phases. Scientists, like other cultural and economical actors, have to adapt and organize their work in this new world environment. They also need to learn how to convince public opinion, offering information and transparency. There is no good model yet on how to do that in the most efficient way and a great deal might be learned by looking at experiences outside the scientific field. Relying on my experience as founder of "Doctors Without Borders" and "Doctors of the World", as well as holder of several ministerial positions in different French governments and as former Head of the UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo, I share with you my view on globalization and on how to initiate and carry out large international, nonpro...

  20. Revision of the New World genus Glyphidops Enderlein (Diptera: Neriidae) .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Tatiana A; Wolff, Marta I; De Carvalho, Claudio J B

    2014-01-01

    The genus Glyphidops Enderlein, 1922, the most widespread and speciose of the New World genera of Neriidae (Diptera), is revised herein. Glyphidops (Glyphidops) ruselatus, new species, G. (G.) steyskali, new species and G. (G.) coracinus, new species are described. Of the 16 previously described species, which were last treated by Aczél (1961), the following synonyms are proposed: Chaetomeristes peruanus Enderlein is treated as a junior synonym of G. (G.) bullatus (Enderlein); Nerius dispar Cresson, Oncopsia neutra Hennig and Oncopsia dubia Hennig are treated as junior synonyms of G.(O.) durus (Cresson) and Oncopsia seductrix Hennig, is treated as a junior synonym of G. (O.) flavifrons (Bigot). The species Telostylus vittatus Cresson, is removed from synonymy with G. (G.) filosus (Fabricius) and revalidated as senior synonym of G. ochreus Hennig. A new diagnosis for the genus and all species are provided, as is an identification key to species. New locality records are provided for Costa Rica, Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, Ecuador and Brazil. PMID:24872176

  1. Developing as new search engine and browser for libraries to search and organize the World Wide Web library resources

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasulu, V.

    2000-01-01

    Internet Granthalaya urges world wide advocates and targets at the task of creating a new search engine and dedicated browseer. Internet Granthalaya may be the ultimate search engine exclusively dedicated for every library use to search and organize the world wide web libary resources

  2. Genetic analysis of ancestry, admixture and selection in Bolivian and Totonac populations of the New World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins W

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Populations of the Americas were founded by early migrants from Asia, and some have experienced recent genetic admixture. To better characterize the native and non-native ancestry components in populations from the Americas, we analyzed 815,377 autosomal SNPs, mitochondrial hypervariable segments I and II, and 36 Y-chromosome STRs from 24 Mesoamerican Totonacs and 23 South American Bolivians. Results and Conclusions We analyzed common genomic regions from native Bolivian and Totonac populations to identify 324 highly predictive Native American ancestry informative markers (AIMs. As few as 40–50 of these AIMs perform nearly as well as large panels of random genome-wide SNPs for predicting and estimating Native American ancestry and admixture levels. These AIMs have greater New World vs. Old World specificity than previous AIMs sets. We identify highly-divergent New World SNPs that coincide with high-frequency haplotypes found at similar frequencies in all populations examined, including the HGDP Pima, Maya, Colombian, Karitiana, and Surui American populations. Some of these regions are potential candidates for positive selection. European admixture in the Bolivian sample is approximately 12%, though individual estimates range from 0–48%. We estimate that the admixture occurred ~360–384 years ago. Little evidence of European or African admixture was found in Totonac individuals. Bolivians with pre-Columbian mtDNA and Y-chromosome haplogroups had 5–30% autosomal European ancestry, demonstrating the limitations of Y-chromosome and mtDNA haplogroups and the need for autosomal ancestry informative markers for assessing ancestry in admixed populations.

  3. ASPM and the evolution of cerebral cortical size in a community of New World monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando A Villanea

    Full Text Available The ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated gene has been proposed as a major determinant of cerebral cortical size among primates, including humans. Yet the specific functions of ASPM and its connection to human intelligence remain controversial. This debate is limited in part by a taxonomic focus on Old World monkeys and apes. Here we expand the comparative context of ASPM sequence analyses with a study of New World monkeys, a radiation of primates in which enlarged brain size has evolved in parallel in spider monkeys (genus Ateles and capuchins (genus Cebus. The primate community of Costa Rica is perhaps a model system because it allows for independent pairwise comparisons of smaller- and larger-brained species within two taxonomic families. Accordingly, we analyzed the complete sequence of exon 18 of ASPM in Ateles geoffroyi, Alouatta palliata, Cebus capucinus, and Saimiri oerstedii. As the analysis of multiple species in a genus improves phylogenetic reconstruction, we also analyzed eleven published sequences from other New World monkeys. Our exon-wide, lineage-specific analysis of eleven genera and the ratio of rates of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions (d(N/d(S on ASPM revealed no detectable evidence for positive selection in the lineages leading to Ateles or Cebus, as indicated by d(N/d(S ratios of <1.0 (0.6502 and 0.4268, respectively. Our results suggest that a multitude of interacting genes have driven the evolution of larger brains among primates, with different genes involved in this process in different encephalized lineages, or at least with evidence for positive selection not readily apparent for the same genes in all lineages. The primate community of Costa Rica may serve as a model system for future studies that aim to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive capacity and cortical size.

  4. The Food Crisis and Food Security: Towards a New World Food Order?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Golay

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The worst food crisis since 1974 broke out in 2007-08. Higher world market prices of food commodities (especially wheat, rice, soya and maize sparked an unprecedented increase in the number of hungry people. Despite moderately lower prices since the summer of 2008, the number of the hungry continued to rise in 2009. This food crisis has placed the fight against hunger on the international agenda. Since March 2008 governments UN agencies and many social movements have adopted positions on the causes of the crisis and the means to address it. Unfortunately, while these parties are trying to coordinate their activities and suggest new approaches, the old recipes for producing more food are often brought up. Contradictory proposals are made and the thought given to the causes underlying hunger and the food crisis (social, economic and political discrimination and exclusion has gone largely unheeded. The first Millennium Development Goal, which calls for cutting the percentage of hungry people by half by 2015, is clearly out of reach. But the food crisis might lead to a new world food order based on the three pillars of food assistance, food security and the right to food.

  5. The World At Night: A New International Year of Astronomy 2009 Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons, M.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The World At Night (TWAN is a new programme founded in 2007 with the goal of creating a collection of stunning photographs of the world’s most beautiful and historic sites against the night-time backdrop of stars, planets, and celestial events. The eternally peaceful sky looks the same above all the symbols of different nations and regions, a testament to the truly unified nature of Earth as a planet rather than an amalgam of human-designated territories. Those involved in global programmes learn to see humanity as a family living together on a single planet amidst the vast ocean of our Universe. This global perspective motivates us to work for a better, more peaceful planet for all the world’s inhabitants. TWAN is an innovative approach to expanding this global perspective. TWAN’s primary goal is to present the public with a new and enlightening view of the wonders of our planet by revealing the unified nature of Earth’s people as one family and our world as a living planet that we must all care for together.

  6. Leptospirosis en camélidos sudamericanos. Estudio de prevalencia serológica en distintas regiones de la Argentina Leptospirosis in south-american camelids. A study on the serological prevalence in different regions of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. LLORENTE

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la seroprevalencia en Camélidos Sudamericanos de Leptospirosis, zoonosis de distribución mundial, producida por espiroquetas patógenas del género Leptospira. Se examinaron 494 animales (llamas, guanacos y vicuñas, clínicamente sanos sin vacunar, de diferentes regiones geográficas de la República Argentina. Se utilizó la técnica, serovar específica, de microaglutinación (MAT. El estudio reveló prevalencias entre 47.3 y 96.2% en llamas, entre 0 y 13% en guanacos y entre 9 y 62.8% en vicuñas. De los serovares que se usaron como antígeno en las determinaciones, los que más frecuentemente reaccionaron con los anticuerpos séricos de los camélidos, fueron copenhageni y castellonisLeptospirosis is a zoonotic infectious disease, affecting wild and domestic animals and human beings, caused by pathogenic spirochetes, spread world wide, belonging to the genus Leptospira. It is transmited by direct contact with infected animal urine or tissues, and indirectly through contaminated water and soil. Leptospirosis has a negative economic impact on porcine and bovine productions. It causes abortions, stillbirths, placental retention, infertility and chronical renal deficiency, causing disturbance of flow milk and quality in dairy cattle. Studies on south-american camelids productive aspects, have increased during the last decades, in order to promote alternative regional economies. There exist three species in Argentina, llama (Lama glama, guanaco (Lama guanicoe and vicuña (Vicugna vicugna. The knowledge of physiological parameters and susceptibility and immune response to infectious agents of these animals, are required to improve their breeding efficiency. Leptospirosis is an infectious disease, which may affect reproduction efficiency. Leptospira antibody prevalence in 494 sera obtained from healthy non vaccinated llamas, vicuñas and guanacos from different geographic zones in Argentina, was evaluated. The serovar specific

  7. A new species of Scelidopetalon Delkeskamp (Coleoptera, Erotylidae from China with a key to world species of the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-Chao Dai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new species Scelidopetalon biwenxuani sp. n. is described from China, representing the first occurrence of the genus in Hainan province. A key to the world species of this genus is provided.

  8. Invasion of Old World Phragmites australis in the New World: precipitation and temperature patterns combined with human influences redesign the invasive niche

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Wen-Yong; Lambertini, Carla; Li, Xiu-Zhen;

    2013-01-01

    millions of hectares of native plants in inland and tidal wetlands. Another P. australis invasion from the Mediterranean region is simultaneously occurring in the Gulf region of the USA and some countries in South America. Here, we analysed the occurrence records of the two Old World invasive lineages of P....... australis (Haplotype M and Med) in both their native and introduced ranges using environmental niche models (ENMs) to assess (i) whether a niche shift accompanied the invasions in the New World; (ii) the role of biologically relevant climatic variables and human influence in the process of invasion......; and (iii) the current potential distribution of these two lineages. We detected local niche shifts along the East Coast of North America and the Gulf Coast of the USA for Haplotype M and around the Mississippi Delta and Florida of the USA for Med. The new niche of introduced Haplotype M accounts...

  9. Development of new substances and materials in the world and in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.O. Sichkarenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The purpose of article is to show the position of Ukraine’s research in the sphere of new substances and materials in world context, and what types of new materials are the most perspective in that moment. The results of the analysis. The article includes the results of the analysis in the field of new substances and materials in the world and particularly in Ukraine. The author says that there are a lot of definitions of the term “advanced materials”, and there are some points of view what advanced materials are and how it makes influences to economic development. The author allows that the sphere of researching in the field of advanced materials and substances is actual and it is in the focus of the scientific community. The author has analyzed what countries are leaders in this direction and why they got their positions. The most important idea in the article is how low-income countries can take part in this direction of scientific researches. Ukraine is one of the examples which show how a low-income country can develop its own research in the field of advanced materials and substances. In addition the author has researched European Union’s experience in innovation policy and innovation sphere and particularly in the field of advanced materials. The scientific importance of the article is demonstration, how low-income countries like Ukraine can develop scientific research in the field of new substances and materials with poor funding and weak government institutions. If to talk briefly about the research results, we should mention the following. Scientific research in the field of new substances and materials is the significant part of the research activities in general. It is quite difficult to appreciate the importance of this area, but it is possible to say clearly, that development of new compounds and materials is at least one fifth of all physical and chemical researches. The most important scientific

  10. A revision of the new world species of Polytrichophora Cresson and Facitrichophora, new genus (Diptera, Ephydridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Wayne N; Zatwarnicki, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    The New World species of Polytrichophora Cresson and Facitrichophora new genus, are revised. Fifteen new species are described (type locality in parenthesis): Facitrichophora atrellasp. n. (Costa Rica. Guanacaste: Murciélago [10°56.9'N, 85°42.5'W; sandy mud flats around mangrove inlet]), Facitrichophora carvalhorumsp. n. (Brazil. São Paulo: Praia Puruba [23°21'S, 44°55.6'W; beach]), Facitrichophora manzasp. n. (Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad. St. Andrew: Lower Manzanilla (12 km S; 10°24.5'N, 61°01.5'W), bridge over Nariva River), Facitrichophora panamasp. n. (Panama. Darien: Garachine [8°04'N, 78°22'W]), Polytrichophora adarcasp. n. (Barbados. Christ Church: Graeme Hall Nature Sanctuary [13°04.2'N, 59°34.7'W; swamp]), Polytrichophora arnaudorumsp. n. (Mexico. Baja California. San Felipe [31°01.5'N, 114°50.4'W]), Polytrichophora barbasp. n. (Cuba. Sancti Spiritus: Topes de Collantes [21°54.4'N, 80°01.4'W, 670 m]), Polytrichophora flavellasp. n. (Peru. Madre de Dios: Rio Manu, Pakitza [11°56.6'S, 71°16.9'W; 250 m]), Polytrichophora marinoniorumsp. n. (Brazil. Paraná: Antonina [25°28.4'S, 48°40.9'W; mangal]), Polytrichophora rostrasp. n. (Peru. Madre de Dios: Rio Manu, Pakitza [11°56.6'S, 71°16.9'W; 250 m]), Polytrichophora sinuosasp. n. (Trinidad and Tobago. Trinidad. St. Andrew: Lower Manzanilla [12 km S; 10°24'N, 61°02'W]), Polytrichophora mimbressp. n. (United States. New Mexico. Grant: Mimbres River [New Mexico Highway 61 & Royal John Mine Road; 32°43.8'N, 107°52'W; 1665 m]), Polytrichophora salixsp. n. (United States. Alaska. Matanuska-Susitna: Willow Creek [61°46.1'N, 150°04.2'W; 50 m]), Polytrichophora sturtevantorumsp. n. (United States. Tennessee. Shelby: Meeman Shelby State Park [Mississippi River; 35°20.4'N, 90°2.1'W; 98 m]), Polytrichophora prolatasp. n. (Belize. Stann Creek: Cockscomb Basin Wildlife Sanctuary [16°45'N, 88°30'W]). All known New World species of both genera are described with an emphasis on structures of

  11. An annotated catalogue of the New World Therevidae (Insecta: Diptera: Asiloidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Donald W; Gaimari, Stephen D; Hauser, Martin; Holston, Kevin C; Metz, Mark A; Irwin, Michael E; Kampmeier, Gail E; Algmin, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    The genera and species of New World stiletto flies (Diptera: Therevidae) are listed, with annotated references to nomenclature, synonymies and generic combinations, type localities, the primary type depositories, distribution, and citations for the most recent revisions. The genus Cyclotelus Walker, 1850 (along with its synonyms Furcifera Kröber, 1911, and Epomyia Cole, 1923a) is synonymized under Cerocatus Rondani, 1848. Ectinorhynchus fascipennis Kröber, 1911 is given the new name Cerocatus rondanii Gaimari, and Phycus rufiventris Kröber, 1911 is given the new name Cerocatus raspii Hauser. Phycus analis Kröber, 1911 and Phycus bicolor Kröber, 1911, are placed as new combinations in Cerocatus Rondani, as are the following species that were previously in combination with Cyclotelus: Furcifera achaeta Malloch, 1932, Cyclotelus badicrusus Irwin and Webb, 1992, Phycus beckeri Kröber, 1911, Epomyia bella Cole, 1923a, Furcifera braziliana Cole, 1960a, Cyclotelus colei Irwin and Lyneborg, 1981a, Thereva diversipes Kröber, 1911, Thereva fascipennis Macquart, 1846a, Psilocephala femorata Kröber, 1911, Furcifera flavipes Kröber, 1928b, Furcifera hardyi Cole, 1960a, Furcifera kroeberi Cole, 1960a, Cyclotelus laetus Walker, 1850, Furcifera longicornis Kröber, 1911, Cyclotelus nigroflammus Walker, 1850, Psilocephala nigrifrons Kröber, 1914a, Thereva pictipennis Wiedemann, 1821, Furcifera polita Kröber, 1911, Cyclotelus pruinosus Walker, 1850, Thereva ruficornis Macquart, 1841a, Psilocephala rufiventris Loew, 1869, Thereva scutellaris Walker, 1857, Cyclotelus silacrusus Irwin and Webb, 1992, Cyclotelus socius Walker, 1850 and Psilocephala sumichrasti Bellardi, 1861. Dialineura pallidiventris Malloch, 1932, Melanothereva blackmani Oldroyd, 1968, Thereva maculicornis Jaennicke, 1867 and Thereva notabilis Macquart, 1841a are placed as new combinations in Entesia Oldroyd. Henicomyia amazonica Irwin and Webb, 1992 is a new synonym of Henicomyia flava Lyneborg, 1972

  12. The Hunt for Planet X New Worlds and the Fate of Pluto

    CERN Document Server

    Schilling, Govert

    2009-01-01

    "The Hunt for Planet X is a fascinating tale by one of the world's premier astronomy writers. Govert Schilling is not only scrupulously accurate, he writes beautifully as well." Stephen P. Maran, Author of "Astronomy for Dummies" and Press Officer, American Astronomical Society "The Hunt for Planet X is an adventure story or, more accurately, a series of adventure stories. Schilling tells them well, capturing both the science and the people involved. It starts with the classics: Uranus, Neptune and Pluto; and moves all over the solar system as ground-based astronomers and space scientists pour over measurements and observations to try to understand the worlds around us. Current debates about the Pioneer Anomaly and the definition of what is a planet make the book current as well as a good history." Dr. Louis Friedman, Executive Director, The Planetary Society "This exciting tale of the centuries-old search for new planets in the solar system reads like a thriller. It is an adventure packed with fierce competi...

  13. Oil palm genome sequence reveals divergence of interfertile species in Old and New worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajinder; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie; Manaf, Mohamad Arif Abdul; Rosli, Rozana; Nookiah, Rajanaidu; Ooi, Leslie Cheng-Li; Ooi, Siew-Eng; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Halim, Mohd Amin; Azizi, Norazah; Nagappan, Jayanthi; Bacher, Blaire; Lakey, Nathan; Smith, Steven W; He, Dong; Hogan, Michael; Budiman, Muhammad A; Lee, Ernest K; DeSalle, Rob; Kudrna, David; Goicoechea, Jose Luis; Wing, Rod A; Wilson, Richard K; Fulton, Robert S; Ordway, Jared M; Martienssen, Robert A; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi

    2013-08-15

    Oil palm is the most productive oil-bearing crop. Although it is planted on only 5% of the total world vegetable oil acreage, palm oil accounts for 33% of vegetable oil and 45% of edible oil worldwide, but increased cultivation competes with dwindling rainforest reserves. We report the 1.8-gigabase (Gb) genome sequence of the African oil palm Elaeis guineensis, the predominant source of worldwide oil production. A total of 1.535 Gb of assembled sequence and transcriptome data from 30 tissue types were used to predict at least 34,802 genes, including oil biosynthesis genes and homologues of WRINKLED1 (WRI1), and other transcriptional regulators, which are highly expressed in the kernel. We also report the draft sequence of the South American oil palm Elaeis oleifera, which has the same number of chromosomes (2n = 32) and produces fertile interspecific hybrids with E. guineensis but seems to have diverged in the New World. Segmental duplications of chromosome arms define the palaeotetraploid origin of palm trees. The oil palm sequence enables the discovery of genes for important traits as well as somaclonal epigenetic alterations that restrict the use of clones in commercial plantings, and should therefore help to achieve sustainability for biofuels and edible oils, reducing the rainforest footprint of this tropical plantation crop. PMID:23883927

  14. A Psicologia no novo contexto mundial Psychology in the new world context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Faria Leitão

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Profundas alterações no mundo contemporâneo criaram um novo contexto de produção científica, caracterizado pela desconstrução de antigas teorias e pela construção de uma nova rede de conhecimentos. Neste artigo, analisamos algumas teorias recentemente desenvolvidas nas ciências sociais e na filosofia que compõem esta rede: as teorias pós-modernas, as teorias da modernização reflexiva e a teoria da Revolução da Tecnologia da Informação. Visamos com isto munir os psicólogos de conhecimentos advindos de outros campos disciplinares que sirvam como ponto de partida para a análise das mudanças subjetivas introduzidas pelo novo cenário mundial. Argumentamos que a psicologia ainda observa o homem contemporâneo a partir de categorias tradicionais, desconsiderando que transformações sociais profundas geram impactos psicológicos não menos profundos e dificilmente captáveis a partir de antigos referenciais. Concluímos que um conhecimento mais aprofundado das transformações radicais em curso no mundo atual pode ajudar os psicólogos a rever suas antigas certezas a respeito do homem e a aventurar novos olhares sobre os também novos fenômenos humanos.Profound changes in the contemporary world have created a new context for scientific work, characterised by the deconstruction of old theories and the construction of a new network of knowledge. In this article, we analyse a few theories recently developed in the social sciences and in philosophy that make up this network: post-modernist theories, reflexive modernisation theories and Information Technology Revolution theory. In this way, we aim to provide psychologists with insights produced in other fields of knowledge that can serve as a starting point for the analysis of the subjective changes introduced by the new global scenario. We argue that psychology still observes contemporary man on the basis of traditional categories, ignoring the fact that profound social changes

  15. A Programme for the Eradication of the New World Screwworm from North Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent establishment of the New World Screwworm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, in North Africa poses an enormous threat to that continent, as well as the Mediterranean Basin and the Middle East. Because of the urgent need to initiate an eradication programme as soon as possible, three consultants met in Vienna from 8 to 19 January 1990 to prepare a programme outlining the eradication of the NWS from North Africa. Emphasis was placed on the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) portion of an eradication programme. At the time the report was prepared the NWS had been reported only from Libya, therefore the report deals with eradication from that country. The document will be used by the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture as a guide to assist FAO in NWS eradication from North Africa.

  16. Eradication of the new world screwworm from the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New World screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel), invaded North Africa in the late 1980s. It became established in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, where it was first detected in 1988 and confirmed in 1989. This devastating pest of livestock became the target of a major eradication programme costing approximately US $80 million. The basis of the eradication programme was the sterile insect technique. A total of 1400 million sterile screwworm flies from Mexico were released over a 40,000 km2 area between December 1990 and October 1991. Total eradication was achieved. The eradication programme included a very strong quarantine effort to prevent expansion of the infested area in the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya. Animals in the infested area were inspected and wounds treated about every three or four weeks. Trapping of adults determined the presence or absence of adult screwworm flies. A major information programme supported the eradication effort. (author). 11 refs, 12 figs

  17. Comparison of eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of new world vultures (Aves: Cathartidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisney, Thomas J.; Stecyk, Karyn; Kolominsky, Jeffrey;

    2013-01-01

    Vultures are highly reliant on their sensory systems for the rapid detection and localization of carrion before other scavengers can exploit the resource. In this study, we compared eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Cathartidae), turkey vultures (Cathartes...... aura), with a highly developed olfactory sense, and black vultures (Coragyps atratus), with a less developed sense of olfaction. We found that eye size relative to body mass was the same in both species, but that black vultures have larger corneas relative to eye size than turkey vultures. However, the...... species are similar and that vision plays an equally important role in the biology of both species, despite the apparently greater reliance on olfaction for finding carrion in turkey vultures. Anat Rec, 296:1954-1970, 2013. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  18. Action of New World scorpion venom and its neurotoxins in secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, P L; Fletcher, M; Fainter, L K; Terrian, D M

    1996-01-01

    New World scorpion venom contains protein toxins specific for ion channels in the plasmalemma of excitable cells. The effects were examined of whole venoms from Tityus serrulatus, T. bahiensis and T. stigmurus, and some purified toxins in isolated nerve endings (synaptosomes) and pancreatic acinar cells. Both systems initiated exocytosis in a dose-dependent response to the venom or its bioactive protein toxins. Actions differed, however, such that pancreatic acinar cells required Ca2+ while cerebrocortical synaptosomes responded by a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, except in the case of one toxin, IV-5, that elicited a Ca(2+)-independent response. Membrane depolarization caused by scorpion venom toxins was measured via radioisotopic discharge of tetra[3H]phenylphosphonium bromide. The role of protein kinase C in second-messenger coupling in pancreatic acinar cells is favored over ion-exclusive routes characteristic of synaptosomes. PMID:9027997

  19. The influence of new world species on the botany of the 16th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubrizsy Savoia, Andrea

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about how some New World species, not as widespread as tomato, tobacco, etc. were introduced in the botanical European knowledge, with special reference to Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522-1605. His herbal, his inconographic collections and manuscripts containing lists of seeds, woods and other matrials, are conserved in his Museum and grown in the Botanical Garden of Bologna.

    El presente trabajo analiza cómo algunas especies botánicas del Nuevo mundo, no tan difundidas como el tomate, el tabaco, etc., formaron parte del conocimiento botánico europeo, haciendo especial referencia a la de obra de Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522-1605. Su herbario, sus colecciones iconográficas y manuscritos que contienen listas de semillas, maderas y otros materiales, se conservan en su Museo y algunas de las especies crecen en el Jardín Botánico de Bolonia.

  20. High tropical net diversification drives the New World latitudinal gradient in palm (Arecaceae) species richness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenning, J.-C.; Borchsenius, Finn; Bjorholm, Stine Wendelboe;

    2008-01-01

    Aim Species richness exhibits striking geographical variation, but the processes that drive this variation are unresolved. We investigated the relative importance of two hypothesized evolutionary causes for the variation in palm species richness across the New World: time for diversification and...... evolutionary (net diversification) rate. Palms have a long history in the region, with the major clades diversifying during the Tertiary (65-2 Ma). Location Tropical and subtropical America (34° N-34° S; 33-120° W). Methods Using range maps, palm species richness was estimated in a 1° × 1° grid. Mean lineage...

  1. Estructura temática en Brave New World de Aldous Huxley

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Betancor, Yazmina

    2004-01-01

    [ES] El propósito del presente estudio es establecer una aproximación a la estructura temática dominante en Brave New World, la obra más polémica de un escritor controvertido. Nuestro análisis se centra en el primer y en el último capítulo de la novela, de modo que podamos establecer una comparación entre los elementos destacables en la presentación de este nuevo mundo y su evolución hasta el ambiente pesimista que domina el último capítulo. Por medio del análisis de estos dos capítulos, se h...

  2. John’s Apocalypse: Dynamic word-images for a new world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rosell

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to investigate the function of the symbols and images in the Apocalypse of John. Its aim is to focus on the ‘mental scenarios’ readers are bringing to the text, rather than on John’s supposed lack of ability to convey his message. The article discusses both the symbolic or iconographic and the evocative power within the historical situation which the author of the Apocalypse addresses. The article’s intention is to show how John reveals an alternative way of understanding history through the use of his particular imagery, aided by film theory tools and based on previous work that had perceived the Apocalypse’s ‘theatrical’ nature, in order to discover John’s use of images, their function and the new world he aims to portray.

  3. A Changing Child in Changing World: Psychological and Educational Problems of the New School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I.Feldstein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to a number of urgent problems of mental and physical health of people who live in the global community. How we understand what is the world around us, what kind of society we live in and what are behavioural patterns and developmental features in the contemporary situation, and what the requirements of this society are. Changes in the modern child are influenced by an intense evolutionary self-development of modern man. Special attention should be paid to the development of science on the whole and psychological, psychophysiological, psychological and didactic branches in particular whose ba¬sis are stipulated in the textbooks and manuals of a qualitatively new generation.

  4. Coral snakes predict the evolution of mimicry across New World snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis Rabosky, Alison R; Cox, Christian L; Rabosky, Daniel L; Title, Pascal O; Holmes, Iris A; Feldman, Anat; McGuire, Jimmy A

    2016-01-01

    Batesian mimicry, in which harmless species (mimics) deter predators by deceitfully imitating the warning signals of noxious species (models), generates striking cases of phenotypic convergence that are classic examples of evolution by natural selection. However, mimicry of venomous coral snakes has remained controversial because of unresolved conflict between the predictions of mimicry theory and empirical patterns in the distribution and abundance of snakes. Here we integrate distributional, phenotypic and phylogenetic data across all New World snake species to demonstrate that shifts to mimetic coloration in nonvenomous snakes are highly correlated with coral snakes in both space and time, providing overwhelming support for Batesian mimicry. We also find that bidirectional transitions between mimetic and cryptic coloration are unexpectedly frequent over both long- and short-time scales, challenging traditional views of mimicry as a stable evolutionary 'end point' and suggesting that insect and snake mimicry may have different evolutionary dynamics. PMID:27146100

  5. Characterization and utilization of microsatellite loci in the New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, A M; Evans, L M; Stevens, J R

    2009-06-01

    New World screwworm populations in North and Central America have been the targets of virtually continuous eradication attempts by sterile insect technique (SIT) since the 1950s. Nevertheless, in some areas, such as Jamaica, SIT control programmes have failed. Reasons for the failure of SIT-based control programmes in some locations are unknown, but it has been hypothesized that failure may be related to mating incompatibility between sterile and wild fly populations or to the existence of sexually incompatible cryptic species. This paper outlines the development of a suite of four new microsatellite loci which can be used to study intra-specific relationships between populations of Cochliomyia hominivorax from the Caribbean and South America, which represent those populations involved in, or earmarked for, forthcoming SIT control. Cross-amplification with the secondary screwworm, Cochliomyia macellaria, was also successful with three of the new loci. We present results which suggest that populations from Trinidad and Jamaica form distinct groupings of flies and that C. hominivorax from Trinidad appears particularly distinct. PMID:19335825

  6. Major changes in the world's nuclear power at the beginning of the new century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last decade of the 20th century the world nuclear power recorded some characteristic trends among which one can mention the following: - Almost total absence of investments in new NPPs in the industrialized countries except Japan and South Korea; - Policy of some governments to decrease the nuclear power sector in their countries up to a complete stop of electricity production in a foreseeable future (as in case of Sweden, Germany, Nederland and Belgium); - Projections indicating a steady decline of nuclear share in the national power production as for instance in USA, Germany, Great Britain, and other industrialized countries; - pressures upon countries late owners of soviet type NPPs in order to shut down completely the RBMK and WWER reactors; - a drastic reduction of the funds afforded for research dedicated to fission reactors of new concept, except Japan and South Korea; - almost negligible effects of the Kyoto protocol upon nuclear power, hopes being directed towards renewable energy sources. After second half of the year 1998 modest signals of future changes in the energy policy occurred. The US government admitted on basis of performance assessments and projections that the important role of nuclear power in US will be extended still for long after the years 2020-2030. Consequently, research concerning the future demand for fission based power began be financed. Gradually the countries of EU and Canada modified also their official position towards the role of nuclear fission in ensuring the electric energy needs of the future. The beginning of the new century was marked by a significant acceleration of changes of opinions in favor of nuclear power. Japan and South Korea stated that at least in the first half of the 21th century the fission NPP's will play a major role. Russia promoted new WWER reactor types of safety standards equivalent or higher than the western ones. Also China and India launched ambitious plans for building new NPPs. These new

  7. Biology and systematics of the New World Phyllocnistis Zeller leafminers of the avocado genus Persea (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Donald Davis; David Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Four New World species of Phyllocnistis Zeller are described from serpentine mines in Persea (Family Lauraceae). Phyllocnistis hyperpersea ,new species, mines the upper leaf surfaces of avocado, Persea americana Mill., and red bay, Persea borbonia (L.) Spreng. and ranges over much of the southeastern United States into Central America. Phyllocnistis subpersea ,new species, mines the underside and occasionally upper sides of new leaves of Persea borbonia in southeastern United States....

  8. Revision of the new world genus Crassomicrodus Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Agathidinae, with an identification key to species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Figueroa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A key to species and descriptions are presented for 14 species of the New World genus Crassomicrodus Ashmead. Seven new species, C. azteca, C. clypealis, C. costaricensis, C. jalisciensis, C. mariae, C. oaxaquensis, and C. olgae are described. C. fenestratus (Viereck is synonymized with C. nigriceps (Cresson. C. melanopleurus (Ashmead is recognized as a valid species.

  9. Feministas en el Foro Feminists at the World Social Forum: challenges for a new political culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Celiberti

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available El articulo trata sobre la forma de incursión de expresiones significativas de la pluralidad feminista en el Foro Social Mundial expresa. Estas incursiones expresan los cambios en las subjetividades y en las estrategias de lucha que comienzan a desarrollar los movimientos feministas en particular y los movimientos sociales en general, en el marco de un mundo globalizado y en el nuevo milenio. Es un proceso inédito, que esta impulsando el desarrollo de nuevos paradigmas para la acción colectiva, que combina lo local y lo global, la interconexión de múltiples agendas y la recuperación de una dimensión mas profunda de la justicia económica, social, cultural y simbólica, ampliando, en este proceso, el concepto de la política, lo político y el poder. El articulo coloca en debate las formas de hacer política de los movimientos sociales que confluyen en el Foro - que arrastran viejas dinámicas y al mismo tiempo recrean los nuevos paradigmas - y que abren la posibilidad de reinventar un mapa emancipatorio y un imaginario social, capaz de competir con el consenso neoliberal y el pensamiento único, recuperando la diversidad y la pluralidad de sujet@s y actor@s sociales.The article deals with the ways of incursion of the feminist plurality's significant expressions in the World Social Forum. These incursions express the changes in the subjectivities and in strategies of struggle that feminist movements in particular and social movements in general begin to develop, in the frame of a globalised world and in the new millennium. It's an unprecedented process, that is promoting the development of new paradigms for collective action, that combines local and global issues, the interconnection of multiple agendas and the recovery of a more profound dimension of economic, social, cultural and symbolic justice, broadening, in this process, the concept of politics, the political and the power. The article sets discussion around the ways in which social

  10. Eschewing New World Order Tensions: Interpretations and Metaphors for Colombian Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Aceros Gualdrón

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available This article exemplifies a kind of tension that has been caused by the emergent world order; specifically, the one that has been established between the economic and social rationalities. In order to do so, it portrays the description that the ?Asociación Nacional Pro-Referendo Ley 100? (ANPR made of the Colombia?s Health System in an article called: ?Documento Parcial Preparatorio?. From this article we can highlight some metaphores that exemplify the before metioned tension, the actors involve in it and the proposed political action. In addition to that, there is a use of the cyborg image (Haraway,1991, the idea of the symbiotic contract (Serres, 1990, and the concept of the organizational government (Schvarstein, 2003 to translate the ANPR`s discourse and seek new ways of thinking. This article should not be taken as a reflection of the Health System?s reality. Instead, it should be taken as a possible reading to be given a second thought in order to produce a broader vision of the situation and a new point of view.

  11. Beyond aridification: multiple explanations for the elevated diversification of cacti in the New World Succulent Biome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Hernández, Tania; Brown, Joseph W; Schlumpberger, Boris O; Eguiarte, Luis E; Magallón, Susana

    2014-06-01

    Succulent plants are widely distributed, reaching their highest diversity in arid and semi-arid regions. Their origin and diversification is thought to be associated with a global expansion of aridity. We test this hypothesis by investigating the tempo and pattern of Cactaceae diversification. Our results contribute to the understanding of the evolution of New World Succulent Biomes. We use the most taxonomically complete dataset currently available for Cactaceae. We estimate divergence times and utilize Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods that account for nonrandom taxonomic sampling, possible extinction scenarios and phylogenetic uncertainty to analyze diversification rates, and evolution of growth form and pollination syndrome. Cactaceae originated shortly after the Eocene-Oligocene global drop in CO2 , and radiation of its richest genera coincided with the expansion of aridity in North America during the late Miocene. A significant correlation between growth form and pollination syndrome was found, as well as a clear state dependence between diversification rate, and pollination and growth-form evolution. This study suggests a complex picture underlying the diversification of Cactaceae. It not only responded to the availability of new niches resulting from aridification, but also to the correlated evolution of novel growth forms and reproductive strategies. PMID:24611540

  12. Phylogeny and temporal diversification of the New World pond turtles (Emydidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, Phillip Q; Thomson, Robert C; McCartney-Melstad, Evan; Shaffer, H Bradley

    2016-10-01

    We present a comprehensive multigene phylogeny and time tree for the turtle family Emydidae. Our phylogenetic analysis, based on 30 nuclear and four mitochondrial genes (23,330 total base pairs) sequenced for two individuals for each of the currently recognized species of the subfamily Emydinae and two species from each of the more species-rich Deirochelyinae genera, yielded a well-supported tree that provides an evolutionary framework for this well-studied clade and a basis for a stable taxonomy. We calibrated an emydid time tree using three well-vetted fossils, modeled uncertainty in fossil ages to reflect their accuracy in node dating, and extracted stem/crown ages of a number of key diversification events. We date the age of crown emydids at a relatively young 44Ma, and the crown age of both contained subfamilies at roughly 30Ma. One deirochelyine clade, which includes the genera Graptemys, Malaclemys, Pseudemys, and Trachemys and contains 11% of all turtle species, dates to 21Ma just prior to the mid-Miocene climatic optimum, suggesting a potential causal link between warm, moist conditions and rapid species accumulation of these highly aquatic turtles. Both nuclear DNA data alone and in combination with mitochondrial DNA support the monophyly of an inclusive genus Emys containing the old world species orbicularis and trinacris and the New World blandingii, marmorata and pallida. Given that all members of this group were originally aligned in the genus Emys and that the age of the clade is roughly equal to other emydine genera, we strongly support a classification that places these five species in a single genus rather than the alternative three-genus scheme (Emys (orbicularis, trinacris), Actinemys (marmorata, pallida), Emydoidea (blandingii)). The phylogeny and resulting time tree presented here provides a comprehensive foundation for future comparative analyses of the Emydidae that will shed light on the historical ecology and conservation prioritization of

  13. Visualization of Vgi Data Through the New NASA Web World Wind Virtual Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovelli, M. A.; Kilsedar, C. E.; Zamboni, G.

    2016-06-01

    GeoWeb 2.0, laying the foundations of Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) systems, has led to platforms where users can contribute to the geographic knowledge that is open to access. Moreover, as a result of the advancements in 3D visualization, virtual globes able to visualize geographic data even on browsers emerged. However the integration of VGI systems and virtual globes has not been fully realized. The study presented aims to visualize volunteered data in 3D, considering also the ease of use aspects for general public, using Free and Open Source Software (FOSS). The new Application Programming Interface (API) of NASA, Web World Wind, written in JavaScript and based on Web Graphics Library (WebGL) is cross-platform and cross-browser, so that the virtual globe created using this API can be accessible through any WebGL supported browser on different operating systems and devices, as a result not requiring any installation or configuration on the client-side, making the collected data more usable to users, which is not the case with the World Wind for Java as installation and configuration of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) is required. Furthermore, the data collected through various VGI platforms might be in different formats, stored in a traditional relational database or in a NoSQL database. The project developed aims to visualize and query data collected through Open Data Kit (ODK) platform and a cross-platform application, where data is stored in a relational PostgreSQL and NoSQL CouchDB databases respectively.

  14. The future of global health cooperation: designing a new World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forss, K; Stenson, B; Sterky, G

    1996-06-01

    This article discusses some needed changes to the functioning and management of the World Health Organization (WHO). WHO is unable to meet new challenges and needs reform. The Executive Board of WHO initiated an internal review in 1992 that led to a management-related focus, while informal groups within the agency tackled funding constraints. Some governments and nongovernmental groups have proposed reorganization of international health assistance. The authors urge that the public health sector and researchers join the reform effort. WHO was established in 1948 and was the sole global health agency. The demand for greater international health cooperation has increased over time. WHO is an association of sovereign states. WHO demonstrated success in eliminating smallpox, promotion of health policy, collection and dissemination of epidemiologic information, and establishment of standards in health care and medical ethics. WHO staff comprises about 5000 persons. The annual budget is too small at about US$900 million. In 1995 only 56% of receipts were collected. WHO's constitution mandates complete health for all, but there has been a widening gap between rich and poor and those with access to health services and those without. Absolute and relative poverty are the main determinants of premature mortality and ill health. The major challenge for health policy is this disparity; the focus of international collaboration should be on this issue. The machine metaphor of organizational structure no longer works in today's world. The authors propose that WHO limit functions in health development and create a full mandate for dealing with determinants of health. WHO should be participatory, open to constituents, autonomous, and flexible. Member states must be more powerful in policy formulation. Program implementation should occur in independent programs in a decentralized system. PMID:12291612

  15. Inhibition of host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation decreases new world alphavirus multiplication in infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Kelsey; Amaya, Moushimi [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Mueller, Claudius [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Roberts, Brian [Leidos Health Life Sciences, 5202 Presidents Court, Suite 110, Frederick, MD (United States); Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Bailey, Charles [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States); Petricoin, Emanuel [Center for Applied Proteomics and Personalized Medicine, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, Manassas, VA (United States); Narayanan, Aarthi, E-mail: anaraya1@gmu.edu [National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, 10650 Pyramid Place, Manassas, VA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    New World alphaviruses belonging to the family Togaviridae are classified as emerging infectious agents and Category B select agents. Our study is focused on the role of the host extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the infectious process of New World alphaviruses. Infection of human cells by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) results in the activation of the ERK-signaling cascade. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by the small molecule inhibitor Ag-126 results in inhibition of viral multiplication. Ag-126-mediated inhibition of VEEV was due to potential effects on early and late stages of the infectious process. While expression of viral proteins was down-regulated in Ag-126 treated cells, we did not observe any influence of Ag-126 on the nuclear distribution of capsid. Finally, Ag-126 exerted a broad-spectrum inhibitory effect on New World alphavirus multiplication, thus indicating that the host kinase, ERK, is a broad-spectrum candidate for development of novel therapeutics against New World alphaviruses. - Highlights: • VEEV infection activated multiple components of the ERK signaling cascade. • Inhibition of ERK activation using Ag-126 inhibited VEEV multiplication. • Activation of ERK by Ceramide C6 increased infectious titers of TC-83. • Ag-126 inhibited virulent strains of all New World alphaviruses. • Ag-126 treatment increased percent survival of infected cells.

  16. Invasion of Old World Phragmites australis in the New World: precipitation and temperature patterns combined with human influences redesign the invasive niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Yong; Lambertini, Carla; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Meyerson, Laura A; Brix, Hans

    2013-11-01

    After its introduction into North America, Euro-Asian Phragmites australis became an aggressive invasive wetland grass along the Atlantic coast of North America. Its distribution range has since expanded to the middle, south and southwest of North America, where invasive P. australis has replaced millions of hectares of native plants in inland and tidal wetlands. Another P. australis invasion from the Mediterranean region is simultaneously occurring in the Gulf region of the United States and some countries in South America. Here, we analysed the occurrence records of the two Old World invasive lineages of P. australis (Haplotype M and Med) in both their native and introduced ranges using environmental niche models (ENMs) to assess (i) whether a niche shift accompanied the invasions in the New World; (ii) the role of biologically relevant climatic variables and human influence in the process of invasion; and (iii) the current potential distribution of these two lineages. We detected local niche shifts along the East Coast of North America and the Gulf Coast of the United States for Haplotype M and around the Mississippi Delta and Florida of the United States for Med. The new niche of the introduced Haplotype M accounts for temperature fluctuations and increased precipitation. The introduced Med lineage has enlarged its original subtropical niche to the tropics-subtropics, invading regions with a high annual mean temperature (> ca. 10 °C) and high precipitation in the driest period. Human influence is an important factor for both niches. We suggest that an increase in precipitation in the 20th century, global warming and human-made habitats have shaped the invasive niches of the two lineages in the New World. However, as the invasions are ongoing and human and natural disturbances occur concomitantly, the future distribution ranges of the two lineages may diverge from the potential distribution ranges detected in this study. PMID:23765641

  17. The new world of discovery, invention, and innovation: convergence of knowledge, technology, and society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roco, Mihail C., E-mail: mroco@nsf.gov; Bainbridge, William S. [National Science Foundation (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Convergence of knowledge and technology for the benefit of society (CKTS) is the core opportunity for progress in the twenty-first century. CKTS is defined as the escalating and transformative interactions among seemingly different disciplines, technologies, communities, and domains of human activity to achieve mutual compatibility, synergism, and integration, and through this process to create added value and branch out to meet shared goals. Convergence has been progressing by stages over the past several decades, beginning with nanotechnology for the material world, followed by convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information, and cognitive science (NBIC) for emerging technologies. CKTS is the third level of convergence. It suggests a general process to advance creativity, innovation, and societal progress based on five general purpose principles: (1) the interdependence of all components of nature and society, (2) decision analysis for research, development, and applications based on dynamic system-logic deduction, (3) enhancement of creativity and innovation through evolutionary processes of convergence that combines existing principles and divergence that generates new ones, (4) the utility of higher-level cross-domain languages to generate new solutions and support transfer of new knowledge, and (5) the value of vision-inspired basic research embodied in grand challenges. CKTS is a general purpose approach in knowledge society. It allows society to answer questions and resolve problems that isolated capabilities cannot, as well as to create new competencies, knowledge, and technologies on this basis. Possible solutions are outlined for key societal challenges in the next decade, including support for foundational emerging technologies NBIC to penetrate essential platforms of human activity and create new industries and jobs, improve lifelong wellness and human potential, achieve personalized and integrated healthcare and education, and secure a

  18. The new world of discovery, invention, and innovation: convergence of knowledge, technology, and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Convergence of knowledge and technology for the benefit of society (CKTS) is the core opportunity for progress in the twenty-first century. CKTS is defined as the escalating and transformative interactions among seemingly different disciplines, technologies, communities, and domains of human activity to achieve mutual compatibility, synergism, and integration, and through this process to create added value and branch out to meet shared goals. Convergence has been progressing by stages over the past several decades, beginning with nanotechnology for the material world, followed by convergence of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information, and cognitive science (NBIC) for emerging technologies. CKTS is the third level of convergence. It suggests a general process to advance creativity, innovation, and societal progress based on five general purpose principles: (1) the interdependence of all components of nature and society, (2) decision analysis for research, development, and applications based on dynamic system-logic deduction, (3) enhancement of creativity and innovation through evolutionary processes of convergence that combines existing principles and divergence that generates new ones, (4) the utility of higher-level cross-domain languages to generate new solutions and support transfer of new knowledge, and (5) the value of vision-inspired basic research embodied in grand challenges. CKTS is a general purpose approach in knowledge society. It allows society to answer questions and resolve problems that isolated capabilities cannot, as well as to create new competencies, knowledge, and technologies on this basis. Possible solutions are outlined for key societal challenges in the next decade, including support for foundational emerging technologies NBIC to penetrate essential platforms of human activity and create new industries and jobs, improve lifelong wellness and human potential, achieve personalized and integrated healthcare and education, and secure a

  19. Development and utilization of camelid VHH antibodies from alpaca for 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bever, Candace R S; Majkova, Zuzana; Radhakrishnan, Rajeswaran; Suni, Ian; McCoy, Mark; Wang, Yanru; Dechant, Julie; Gee, Shirley; Hammock, Bruce D

    2014-08-01

    An antibody-based analytical method for the detection of a chemical flame retardant using antibody fragments isolated from an alpaca has been developed. One specific chemical flame retardant congener, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47), is often the major poly-BDE (PBDE) congener present in human and environmental samples and that which is the most frequently detected. An alpaca was immunized with a surrogate of BDE-47 covalently attached to a carrier protein. The resulting mRNA coding for the variable domain of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH) were isolated, transcribed to cDNA, and cloned into a phagemid vector for phage display library construction. Selection of VHHs recognizing BDE-47 was achieved by panning under carefully modified conditions. The assay sensitivity for detecting BDE-47 was down to the part-per-billion (microgram per liter) level. Cross-reactivity analyses confirmed that this method was highly selective for BDE-47 and selected hydroxylated metabolites. When exposed to elevated temperatures, the camelid VHH antibodies retained more reactivity than a polyclonal antibody developed to the same target analyte. The use of this VHH antibody reagent immobilized onto a Au electrode for impedance biosensing demonstrates the increased versatility of VHH antibodies. PMID:25005746

  20. Construct new world history system——the enlightenment of China and Japan and Korea S. editing historical textbook of east Asia jointly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang JunKai

    2012-01-01

    To constructs the new world history system, should function as the system to understand to intension and epitaxy of the world history, and also define the standard of establishing the system of new world history, on the basis of the existing

  1. Special event launches new partnership. IAEA and NFCR join forces to fight cancer in developing world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: IAEA Director General and Nobel Laureate Mohamed ElBaradei will join more than 100 leading public figures, philanthropists and cancer experts at the United Nations Headquarters in New York on 29 October to mark the launch of a new partnership between the IAEA and the US based National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR). Through this partnership, and the endowment fund called the PACT Fund at NFCR, Americans can support the IAEA and its partners in helping poor countries to combat the looming cancer epidemic. 'The IAEA has long provided radiotherapy machines and expertise to developing countries, but the growing cancer crisis cannot be fought with radiotherapy alone,' says Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Our Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT), which draws on the Agency's long experience in radiation therapy, is building international partnerships to assist in cancer prevention, early detection, treatment and palliative care. Now, through the PACT Fund at NFCR, Americans have the opportunity to support these efforts and bring hope to millions of cancer patients in developing nations.' According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the world is on the brink of a cancer crisis. New cases are expected to double to more than 16 million a year by 2020, unless action is taken now. Hardest hit will be low-income countries, whose health systems are already overburdened by infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. PACT, which was created within the IAEA in 2004, is forging international partnerships with other cancer organizations in both the public and private sectors. Together with partners such as WHO, the American Cancer Society (ACS), the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), it has established pilot projects called Model Demonstration Sites (PMDS) in six countries (Albania, Nicaragua, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Vietnam and Yemen) to develop and implement comprehensive, integrated

  2. China and her Influence on the New World Order in the Context of the Nuclear Threats of North Coreea

    OpenAIRE

    Culi?ã Gica Gherghina

    2013-01-01

    The end of the Cold War has put the world in a new stage of reevaluation. A new world order is needed, mostly because everyone wants to identify on which side he is going to be. The main actors of this are United States of America and China. But European Union, Japan and Rusia have their own part of the deal, not to mention many other Arabic countries like Iran or Soudit Arabia. In this paper we want to analyze China`s main reasons to ask for such a position, to see what can sustain that and ...

  3. Odour-baited targets to control New World screwworm: A preliminary field study in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biconical, F3 and Wind Oriented (WOT) traps and black cloth targets, baited with swormlure-4, were assessed as catching and killing devices for the New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, in Mexico. The WOT was significantly better than the other trap designs, with a mean catch 2.7 and 86.4 times better than those of the Biconical and F3, respectively. It was demonstrated that the release of swormlure-4 could be reduced from the standard 10 ml/day to 2 ml/day without a reduction in the numbers of screwworm caught in a WOT. Use of electric nets demonstrated that a visual target was not necessary for the precise location of a swormlure-4 source by screwworm. Target colour was important with respect to the landing response of screwworms on targets: in a two-choice situation, flies landed much more frequently on black than on blue or yellow, and more on these two colours than they did on white. Screwworm tend not to circle a target before landing on it: about 75% of the flies caught on a combination of electrified black target plus electric flanking net were caught on the target. 6 tabs

  4. Laboratory investigations of insecticide impregnated materials for the control of New World screwworm flies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In laboratory tests, New World screwworm flies were found to be at least three orders of magnitude less susceptible to the insecticides deltamethrin, alphacypermethrin and cyfluthrin than are tsetse flies. Deltamethrin was the most toxic of the three insecticides to screwworm flies. For topical application, the LD50s for deltamethrin 20% suspension concentrate were 33 ng and 25 ng for male and female screwworm flies respectively, compared with 0.04 ng for tsetse, G.m. morsitans. In various tests simulating contact of screwworm flies with cloth or netting targets impregnated with insecticide, 100% kill was only achieved with 3.2% deltamethrin and contact times of at least 10 sec, although 100% knockdown for up to 24 hours was obtained with lower concentrations. No repellent effect was observed at the higher concentrations. Cloth targets impregnated with a high dose of insecticide and baited with an attractant could be effective against NWS flies, especially if after ''knockdown'' flies are removed by predators. 1 fig., 9 tabs

  5. New Worlds Observer Formation Control Design Based on the Dynamics of Relative Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquette, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    The New Worlds Observer (NWO) mission is designed for the direct detection and characterization of extrasolar planets. The NWO mission concept employs a two spacecraft leader-follower formation on a trajectory around the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2) Libration Point. The leader spacecraft is baselined as a 4 meter optical telescope. The follower, Starshade spacecraft, is designed to suppress light from a central body star permitting direct detection of a surrounding exoplanetary system. The current design requires a nominal leader-follower separation range of 72 Megameters. NWO poses many challenges including formation control. NWO cycles between three principal control modes during the nominal mission timeline: science (fine pointing), realignment and transition. This paper examines formation control strategies in the context of dynamics of relative motion for two spacecraft operating in the vicinity of the Earth/Moon-Sun L(sub 2)libration point. The paper presents an overview of the equations of relative motion followed by a discussion of each of the control modes. Discussion and analysis characterize control strategies for each of the mission control modes, including requirements, implementation challenges and project fuel budgets.

  6. Sequence of a New World primate insulin having low biological potency and immunoreactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of the insulin gene of the owl or night monkey (Aotus trivirgatus), a New World primate, is similar to that of the human gene. The sequences of these two genes and flanking regions possess 84.3% homology. An unusual feature of the owl monkey gene is the partial duplication and insertion of a portion of the A-chain coding sequence into the 3' untranslated region. The insulin gene of this primate also lacks a region of tandem repeats that is present in the 5' flanking region of the human and chimpanzee genes. Owl monkey preproinsulin has 85.5% identity with the human insulin precursor and is the most divergent of the primate insulins/preproinsulins yet described. The differences between owl monkey and human preproinsulin include three substitutions in the signal peptide, two in the B chain, seven in the C peptide, and three in the A chain. One of these replacements is the conservative substitution of valine for isoleucine a position A2, an invariant site in all other vertebrate insulins and insulin-like growth factors. The substitutions in owl monkey insulin at B9, B27, A2, A4, and A17 alter its structure so that it has only 20% of the receptor-binding activity and 1% of the affinity with guinea pig anti-porcine insulin antibodies as compared to human insulin

  7. Sequence of a New World primate insulin having low biological potency and immunoreactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seino, S.; Steiner, D.F.; Bell, G.I.

    1987-11-01

    The organization of the insulin gene of the owl or night monkey (Aotus trivirgatus), a New World primate, is similar to that of the human gene. The sequences of these two genes and flanking regions possess 84.3% homology. An unusual feature of the owl monkey gene is the partial duplication and insertion of a portion of the A-chain coding sequence into the 3' untranslated region. The insulin gene of this primate also lacks a region of tandem repeats that is present in the 5' flanking region of the human and chimpanzee genes. Owl monkey preproinsulin has 85.5% identity with the human insulin precursor and is the most divergent of the primate insulins/preproinsulins yet described. The differences between owl monkey and human preproinsulin include three substitutions in the signal peptide, two in the B chain, seven in the C peptide, and three in the A chain. One of these replacements is the conservative substitution of valine for isoleucine a position A2, an invariant site in all other vertebrate insulins and insulin-like growth factors. The substitutions in owl monkey insulin at B9, B27, A2, A4, and A17 alter its structure so that it has only 20% of the receptor-binding activity and 1% of the affinity with guinea pig anti-porcine insulin antibodies as compared to human insulin.

  8. Field assessment of two synthetic attractants for the New World Screwworm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrangelo, Thiago, E-mail: mastrang@unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CBMEG/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genetica; Neto, Paulo C.; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: pcassier@cena.usp.br, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The New World Screwworm fly (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, causes millions of dollars in annual losses to farmers. The collection of adult flies with trapping systems is essential in surveillance for NWS populations and for monitoring the progress of eradication programs against this pest. Chemical baits can be used to attract adult flies, such as the Swormlure-4. In ports of Australia, the attractant Bezzilure-2 B is part of a quarantine surveillance program for another screwworm fly, Chrysomya bezziana. Comparative trials with these attractants have never been done in Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance between the attractants Swormlure-4 and Bezzilure-2 B for NWS. Field trials were carried out on a vegetated area of UNICAMP campus. For each trial, 12 Delta sticky traps were set up, with traps positioned 100 to 200 m apart. The attractants were dispensed in 30 mL bottles containing a dental roll. Three independent trials were performed: one applying Swormlure-4 alone (Trial A), the second with only Bezzilure-2 B (Trial B), and the third with both attractants (6 traps for each attractant) (Trial C). Between 800 and 1120 sterile adult flies were released 1 h after the installation of the traps. The trapped flies were collected on the 10{sup th} day after the release. In all trials, the Swormlure-4 proved to be much more efficient and its use should be encouraged for future collections and surveillance of NWS populations in Brazil. (author)

  9. Trematode diversity in freshwater fishes of the Globe II: 'New World'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Anindo; Aguirre-Macedo, M Leopoldina; Curran, Stephen S; de Núñez, Margarita Ostrowski; Overstreet, Robin M; de León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce; Santos, Cláudia Portes

    2016-03-01

    We provide a summary overview of the diversity of trematode parasites in freshwater fishes of the 'New World', i.e. the Americas, with emphasis on adult forms. The trematode fauna of three regions, South America, Middle America, and USA and Canada (North America north of Mexico), are considered separately. In total, 462 trematode species have been reported as adults from the Americas. The proportion of host species examined for parasites varies widely across the Americas, from a high of 45% in the Mexican region of Middle America to less than 5% in South America. North and South America share no adult species, and one exclusively freshwater genus, Creptotrema Travassos, Artigas & Pereira, 1928 in the Allocreadiidae Looss, 1902 is the most widely distributed. Metacercariae of strigeiforms maturing in fish-eating birds (e.g. species of the Diplostomidae Poirier, 1886) are common and widely distributed. The review also highlights the paucity of known life-cycles. The foreseeable future of diversity studies belongs to integrative approaches and the application of molecular ecological methods. While opportunistic sampling will remain important in describing and cataloguing the trematode fauna, a better understanding of trematode diversity and biology will also depend on strategic sampling throughout the Americas. PMID:26898590

  10. Comparative and functional myology of the prehensile tail in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemelin, P

    1995-06-01

    The caudal myology of prehensile-tailed monkeys (Cebus apella, Alouatta palliata, Alouatta seniculus, Lagothrix lagotricha, and Ateles paniscus) and nonprehensile-tailed primates (Eulemur fulvus, Aotus trivirgatus, Callithrix jacchus, Pithecia pithecia, Saimiri sciureus, Macaca fascicularis, and Cercopithecus aethiops) was examined and compared in order to identify muscular differences that correlate with osteological features diagnostic of tail prehensility. In addition, electrophysiological stimulation was carried out on different segments of the intertransversarii caudae muscle of an adult spider monkey (Ateles geoffroyi) to assess their action on the prehensile tail. Several important muscular differences characterize the prehensile tail of New World monkeys compared to the nonprehensile tail of other primates. In atelines and Cebus, the mass of extensor caudae lateralis and flexor caudae longus muscles is more uniform along the tail, and their long tendons cross a small number of vertebrae before insertion. Also, prehensile-tailed monkeys, especially atelines, are characterized by well-developed flexor and intertransversarii caudae muscles compared to nonprehensile-tailed primates. Finally, Ateles possesses a bulkier abductor caudae medialis and a more cranial origin for the first segment of intertransversarii caudae than do other prehensile-tailed platyrrhines. These myological differences between nonprehensile-tailed and prehensile-tailed primates, and among prehensile-tailed monkeys, agree with published osteological and behavioral data. Caudal myological similarities and differences found in Cebus and atelines, combined with tail-use data from the literature, support the hypothesis that prehensile tails evolved in parallel in Cebus and atelines. PMID:7595958

  11. Field assessment of two synthetic attractants for the New World Screwworm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New World Screwworm fly (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, causes millions of dollars in annual losses to farmers. The collection of adult flies with trapping systems is essential in surveillance for NWS populations and for monitoring the progress of eradication programs against this pest. Chemical baits can be used to attract adult flies, such as the Swormlure-4. In ports of Australia, the attractant Bezzilure-2 B is part of a quarantine surveillance program for another screwworm fly, Chrysomya bezziana. Comparative trials with these attractants have never been done in Brazil. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance between the attractants Swormlure-4 and Bezzilure-2 B for NWS. Field trials were carried out on a vegetated area of UNICAMP campus. For each trial, 12 Delta sticky traps were set up, with traps positioned 100 to 200 m apart. The attractants were dispensed in 30 mL bottles containing a dental roll. Three independent trials were performed: one applying Swormlure-4 alone (Trial A), the second with only Bezzilure-2 B (Trial B), and the third with both attractants (6 traps for each attractant) (Trial C). Between 800 and 1120 sterile adult flies were released 1 h after the installation of the traps. The trapped flies were collected on the 10th day after the release. In all trials, the Swormlure-4 proved to be much more efficient and its use should be encouraged for future collections and surveillance of NWS populations in Brazil. (author)

  12. Extraordinary resistance to insecticides reveals exotic Q biotype of Bemisia tabaci in the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, Timothy J; Degain, Benjamin A; Harpold, Virginia S; Zaborac, Marni; Morin, Shai; Fabrick, Jeffrey A; Nichols, Robert L; Brown, Judith K; Byrne, Frank J; Li, Xianchun

    2010-12-01

    A strain of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) possessing unusually high levels of resistance to a wide range of insecticides was discovered in 2004 in the course of routine resistance monitoring in Arizona. The multiply resistant insects, collected from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd. ex Klotzsch) plants purchased at a retail store in Tucson, were subjected to biotype analysis in three laboratories. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of naphthyl esterases and sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene (780 bp) confirmed the first detection of the Q biotype of B. tabaci in the New World. This U.S. Q biotype strain, referred to as Poinsettia'04, was highly resistant to two selective insect growth regulators, pyriproxyfen and buprofezin, and to mixtures of fenpropathrin and acephate. It was also unusually low in susceptibility to the neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid, acetamiprid, and thiamethoxam, relative to B biotype whiteflies. In 100 collections of whiteflies made in Arizona cotton (Gossypium spp.), vegetable, and melon (Cucumis melo L.) fields from 2001 to 2005, no Q biotypes were detected. Regions of the United States that were severely impacted by the introduction of the B biotype of B. tabaci in the 1980s would be well advised to promote measures that limit movement of the Q biotype from controlled environments into field systems and to formulate alternatives for managing this multiply-resistant biotype, in the event that it becomes more widely distributed. PMID:21309242

  13. Brave new world: Myth and migration in recent Asian-Australian picture books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenche Ommundsen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available From Exodus to the American Dream, from Terra Nullius to the Yellow Peril to multicultural harmony, migration has provided a rich source of myth throughout human history. It engenders dreams, fears and memories in both migrant and resident populations; giving rise to hope for a new start and a bright future, feelings of exile and alienation, nostalgia for lost homelands, dreams of belonging and entitlement, fears of invasion, dispossession and cultural extinction. It has inspired artists and writers from the time of the Ancient Testament to the contemporary age of globalisation and mass migration and it has exercised the minds of politicians from Greek and Roman times to our era of detention centres and temporary visas. This reading of Asian-Australian picture books will focus on immigrants’ perception of the ‘new worlds’ of America and Australia. The Peasant Prince, a picture-book version of Li Cunxin’s best-selling autobiography Mao’s Last Dancer, sets up tensions between individual ambition and belonging, illustrated by contrasts between the Chinese story ‘The Frog in the Well’ and the Western fairy-tale of Cinderella, to which Li Cunxin’s own trajectory from poor peasant boy in a Chinese village to international ballet star is explicitly related. Shaun Tan’s The Lost Thing and The Arrival trace the journey from alienation to belonging by means of fantasy worlds encompassing both utopic and dystopic visions. By way of a conclusion, the paper considers the nature of myth as evoked and dramatised in these texts, contrasting the idea of myth as eternal truth with Roland Barthes’ insistence that myth is a mechanism which transforms history into nature.

  14. Volcanoes of the World: Reconfiguring a scientific database to meet new goals and expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzke, Edward; Andrews, Ben; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    The Smithsonian Global Volcanism Program's (GVP) database of Holocene volcanoes and eruptions, Volcanoes of the World (VOTW), originated in 1971, and was largely populated with content from the IAVCEI Catalog of Volcanoes of Active Volcanoes and some independent datasets. Volcanic activity reported by Smithsonian's Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network and USGS/SI Weekly Activity Reports (and their predecessors), published research, and other varied sources has expanded the database significantly over the years. Three editions of the VOTW were published in book form, creating a catalog with new ways to display data that included regional directories, a gazetteer, and a 10,000-year chronology of eruptions. The widespread dissemination of the data in electronic media since the first GVP website in 1995 has created new challenges and opportunities for this unique collection of information. To better meet current and future goals and expectations, we have recently transitioned VOTW into a SQL Server database. This process included significant schema changes to the previous relational database, data auditing, and content review. We replaced a disparate, confusing, and changeable volcano numbering system with unique and permanent volcano numbers. We reconfigured structures for recording eruption data to allow greater flexibility in describing the complexity of observed activity, adding in the ability to distinguish episodes within eruptions (in time and space) and events (including dates) rather than characteristics that take place during an episode. We have added a reference link field in multiple tables to enable attribution of sources at finer levels of detail. We now store and connect synonyms and feature names in a more consistent manner, which will allow for morphological features to be given unique numbers and linked to specific eruptions or samples; if the designated overall volcano name is also a morphological feature, it is then also listed and described as

  15. The Changing Strategic Context of Nuclear Weapons and Its Implications for the New Nuclear World Order

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Ever since the nuclear bombing at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945, nuclear weapons have become one of the defining elements in shaping the world strategic situation for better or worse. The end of the Cold War has led to dramatic changes in the world security landscape. The international

  16. WorldView-2遥感图像融合新方法%New Pansharpening Method for WorldView-2 Satellite Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭; 何明一; 张雷

    2015-01-01

    New-style high resolution WorldView-2 satellite images pose challenges to the image fusion techniques. A new pansharpening method is proposed in this paper. First, 8-band multispectral imagery is resampled by nearest neighbor interpolation. According to the relative spectral responses between the multispectral band and the panchromatic band, a low spatial resolution panchromatic image is evaluated through multivariate linear regression. The spatial details are extracted from the original panchromatic image, and then injected into the component space of multispectral imagery. Finally, the pansharpened results are produced by employing inverse correspondence analysis transform. The experimental results show that the proposed method can obtain a better trade-off between the spatial resolution enhancement and the spectral information preservation compared to some existing methods.%新型高分辨率WorldView-2星载图像的出现给现有的图像融合技术带来了更大的挑战,该文提出了一种全色光和多光谱图像融合新方法。首先采用最近邻插值对多光谱图像重采样放大;然后结合WorldView-2各波段光谱响应特点利用多元线性回归构造出低分辨率全色光图像,通过对原始高分辨率全色光图像空间细节信息的提取并将其注入至多光谱图像的成分空间中;最后经对应分析反变换得到融合结果。实验结果表明,该方法在融合WorldView-2遥感图像时能够在提高空间分辨率和保持光谱信息两方面达到较好的平衡,优于现有的几种融合方法。

  17. Forest cover type analysis of New England forests using innovative WorldView-2 imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Jenna M.

    For many years, remote sensing has been used to generate land cover type maps to create a visual representation of what is occurring on the ground. One significant use of remote sensing is the identification of forest cover types. New England forests are notorious for their especially complex forest structure and as a result have been, and continue to be, a challenge when classifying forest cover types. To most accurately depict forest cover types occurring on the ground, it is essential to utilize image data that have a suitable combination of both spectral and spatial resolution. The WorldView-2 (WV2) commercial satellite, launched in 2009, is the first of its kind, having both high spectral and spatial resolutions. WV2 records eight bands of multispectral imagery, four more than the usual high spatial resolution sensors, and has a pixel size of 1.85 meters at the nadir. These additional bands have the potential to improve classification detail and classification accuracy of forest cover type maps. For this reason, WV2 imagery was utilized on its own, and in combination with Landsat 5 TM (LS5) multispectral imagery, to evaluate whether these image data could more accurately classify forest cover types. In keeping with recent developments in image analysis, an Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) approach was used to segment images of Pawtuckaway State Park and nearby private lands, an area representative of the typical complex forest structure found in the New England region. A Classification and Regression Tree (CART) analysis was then used to classify image segments at two levels of classification detail. Accuracies for each forest cover type map produced were generated using traditional and area-based error matrices, and additional standard accuracy measures (i.e., KAPPA) were generated. The results from this study show that there is value in analyzing imagery with both high spectral and spatial resolutions, and that WV2's new and innovative bands can be useful

  18. Prof. dr. Vesna Vucinic Neškovic - A New President of the World Council of Anthropological Association (WCAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Velimirović

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vesna Vučinić Nešković PhD, professor at Department of Ethnology and Anthropology,Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade, became in the year 2014 a new President of the World Council of Anthropological Association (WCAA

  19. Video News release: LHC sets new world record at 3.48 TeV energy - CERN, 19 march 2010

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions

    2010-01-01

    This morning, Friday 19 March at 5:23 AM, the beam energy of the LHCwas ramped to 3.5 TeV, a new world record and the highest energy for this year’s run. Now operators will prepare the machine to make high-energy collisions later this month.

  20. An Australian and New Zealand Scoping Study on the Use of 3D Immersive Virtual Worlds in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalgarno, Barney; Lee, Mark J. W.; Carlson, Lauren; Gregory, Sue; Tynan, Belinda

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the research design of, and reports selected findings from, a scoping study aimed at examining current and planned applications of 3D immersive virtual worlds at higher education institutions across Australia and New Zealand. The scoping study is the first of its kind in the region, intended to parallel and complement a…

  1. Current status of the New World screwworm Cochliomyia hominivorax in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, A; Kowalski, A

    2009-06-01

    The geographical distribution and seasonality of the New World screwworm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax Coquerel (Diptera: Calliphoridae), were monitored through the use of sentinel animals as part of a co-ordinated programme involving veterinarians and farmers, as well as undergraduate students and teachers from veterinary colleges in Venezuela. This surveillance activity made it possible to collect NWS egg masses or larvae from all 23 states in the country and to determine that the rainy season has a strong positive influence on the number of cases of myiasis caused by C. hominivorax in dogs. In addition, efforts were made to obtain the co-operation of the public health service in order to document the extent of human myiasis in the western-central region of Venezuela. Preliminary results revealed 241 cases over a 7-year period, with cases reported in infants as well as in elderly people. Larvae causing myiasis, other than C. hominivorax, were collected from primary myiasis in rabbit (Lucilia eximia [Wiedemann]), dog (an unidentified sarcophagid species), birds (Philornis sp.) and wild mice (Cuterebra sp.). The economic impact of NWS in Venezuela has not been calculated in terms of loss of milk and meat production, damage to hides or death of animals. Control costs (e.g. cost of larvicides) have been estimated at US$ 2 m per year. Control of myiasis in animals is achieved through the use of chemical compounds, mainly organophosphorus (OP) compounds, macrocyclic lactones and, more recently, a foamy spray based on spinosad. Concerns about insecticide resistance to OP compounds have been raised. PMID:19335837

  2. Detecting Exoplanets with the New Worlds Observer: The Problem of Exozodiacal Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, A.; Noecker, M. C.; Glassman, T. M.; Oakley, P.; Turnbull, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    Dust coming from asteroids and comets will strongly affect direct imaging and characterization of terrestrial planets in the Habitable Zones of nearby stars. Such dust in the Solar System is called the zodiacal dust (or 'zodi' for short). Higher levels of similar dust are seen around many nearby stars, confined in disks called debris disks. Future high-contrast images of an Earth-like exoplanet will very likely be background-limited by light scattered of both the local Solar System zodi and the circumstellar dust in the extrasolar system (the exozodiacal dust). Clumps in the exozodiacal dust, which are expected in planet-hosting systems, may also be a source of confusion. Here we discuss the problems associated with imaging an Earth-like planet in the presence of unknown levels of exozodiacal dust. Basic formulae for the exoplanet imaging exposure time as function of star, exoplanet, zodi, exozodi, and telescope parameters will be presented. To examine the behavior of these formulae, we apply them to the New Worlds Observer (NWO) mission. NWO is a proposed 4-meter UV/optical/near-IR telescope, with a free flying starshade to suppress the light from a nearby star and achieve the high contrast needed for detection and characterization of a terrestrial planet in the star's Habitable Zone. We find that NWO can accomplish its science goals even if exozodiacal dust levels are typically much higher than the Solar System zodi level. Finally, we highlight a few additional problems relating to exozodiacal dust that have yet to be solved.

  3. Settlement-Size Scaling among Prehistoric Hunter-Gatherer Settlement Systems in the New World.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Randall Haas

    Full Text Available Settlement size predicts extreme variation in the rates and magnitudes of many social and ecological processes in human societies. Yet, the factors that drive human settlement-size variation remain poorly understood. Size variation among economically integrated settlements tends to be heavy tailed such that the smallest settlements are extremely common and the largest settlements extremely large and rare. The upper tail of this size distribution is often formalized mathematically as a power-law function. Explanations for this scaling structure in human settlement systems tend to emphasize complex socioeconomic processes including agriculture, manufacturing, and warfare-behaviors that tend to differentially nucleate and disperse populations hierarchically among settlements. But, the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size variation requires such complex behaviors remains unclear. By examining the settlement patterns of eight prehistoric New World hunter-gatherer settlement systems spanning three distinct environmental contexts, this analysis explores the degree to which heavy-tailed settlement-size scaling depends on the aforementioned socioeconomic complexities. Surprisingly, the analysis finds that power-law models offer plausible and parsimonious statistical descriptions of prehistoric hunter-gatherer settlement-size variation. This finding reveals that incipient forms of hierarchical settlement structure may have preceded socioeconomic complexity in human societies and points to a need for additional research to explicate how mobile foragers came to exhibit settlement patterns that are more commonly associated with hierarchical organization. We propose that hunter-gatherer mobility with preferential attachment to previously occupied locations may account for the observed structure in site-size variation.

  4. Patterns of MHC-G-Like and MHC-B Diversification in New World Monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan S Lugo

    Full Text Available The MHC class I (MHC-I region in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini has remained relatively understudied. To evaluate the diversification patterns and transcription behavior of MHC-I in Platyrrhini, we first analyzed public genomic sequences from the MHC-G-like subregion in Saimiri boliviensis, Ateles geoffroyi and Callicebus moloch, and from the MHC-B subregion in Saimiri boliviensis. While S. boliviensis showed multiple copies of both MHC-G-like (10 and -B (15 loci, A. geoffroyi and C. moloch had only three and four MHC-G-like genes, respectively, indicating that not all Platyrrhini species have expanded their MHC-I loci. We then sequenced MHC-G-like and -B cDNAs from nine Platyrrhini species, recovering two to five unique cDNAs per individual for both loci classes. In two Saguinus species, however, no MHC-B cDNAs were found. In phylogenetic trees, MHC-G-like cDNAs formed genus-specific clusters whereas the MHC-B cDNAs grouped by Platyrrhini families, suggesting a more rapid diversification of the former. Furthermore, cDNA sequencing in 12 capuchin monkeys showed that they transcribe at least four MHC-G-like and five MHC-B polymorphic genes, showing haplotypic diversity for gene copy number and signatures of positive natural selection at the peptide binding region. Finally, a quantitative index for MHC:KIR affinity was proposed and tested to predict putative interacting pairs. Altogether, our data indicate that i MHC-I genes has expanded differentially among Platyrrhini species, ii Callitrichinae (tamarins and marmosets MHC-B loci have limited or tissue-specific expression, iii MHC-G-like genes have diversified more rapidly than MHC-B genes, and iv the MHC-I diversity is generated mainly by genetic polymorphism and gene copy number variation, likely promoted by natural selection for ligand binding.

  5. Molecular systematics of the new world screech-owls (Megascops: Aves, Strigidae): biogeographic and taxonomic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Sidnei M; Weckstein, Jason D; Bates, John M; Krabbe, Niels K; Cadena, Carlos Daniel; Robbins, Mark B; Valderrama, Eugenio; Aleixo, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Megascops screech-owls are endemic to the New World and range from southern Canada to the southern cone of South America. The 22 currently recognized Megascops species occupy a wide range of habitats and elevations, from desert to humid montane forest, and from sea level to the Andean tree line. Species and subspecies diagnoses of Megascops are notoriously difficult due to subtle plumage differences among taxa with frequent plumage polymorphism. Using three mitochondrial and three nuclear genes we estimated a phylogeny for all but one Megascops species. Phylogenies were estimated with Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference, and a Bayesian chronogram was reconstructed to assess the spatio-temporal context of Megascops diversification. Megascops was paraphyletic in the recovered tree topologies if the Puerto Rican endemic M. nudipes is included in the genus. However, the remaining taxa are monophyletic and form three major clades: (1) M. choliba, M. koepckeae, M. albogularis, M. clarkii, and M. trichopsis; (2) M. petersoni, M. marshalli, M. hoyi, M. ingens, and M. colombianus; and (3) M. asio, M. kennicottii, M. cooperi, M. barbarus, M. sanctaecatarinae, M. roboratus, M. watsonii, M. atricapilla, M. guatemalae, and M. vermiculatus. Megascops watsonii is paraphyletic with some individuals more closely related to M. atricapilla than to other members in that polytypic species. Also, allopatric populations of some other Megascops species were highly divergent, with levels of genetic differentiation greater than between some recognized species-pairs. Diversification within the genus is hypothesized to have taken place during the last 8 million years, with a likely origin in Central America. The genus later expanded over much of the Americas and then diversified via multiple dispersal events from the Andes into the Neotropical lowlands. PMID:26456003

  6. Untangling reticulate evolutionary relationships among New World and Hawaiian mints (Stachydeae, Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tilottama; Cole, Logan W; Chang, Tien-Hao; Lindqvist, Charlotte

    2015-08-01

    The phenomenon of polyploidy and hybridization usually results in novel genetic combinations, leading to complex, reticulate evolution and incongruence among gene trees, which in turn may show different phylogenetic histories than the inherent species tree. The largest tribe within the subfamily Lamioideae (Lamiaceae), Stachydeae, which includes the globally distributed Stachys, and one of the largest Hawaiian angiosperm radiations, the endemic mints, is a widespread and taxonomically challenging lineage displaying a wide spectrum of morphological and chromosomal diversity. Previous molecular phylogenetic studies have showed that while the Hawaiian mints group with Mexican-South American Stachys based on chloroplast DNA sequence data, nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) sequences suggest that they are most closely related to temperate North American Stachys. Here, we have utilized five independently inherited, low-copy nuclear loci, and a variety of phylogenetic methods, including multi-locus coalescence-based tree reconstructions, to provide insight into the complex origins and evolutionary relationships between the New World Stachys and the Hawaiian mints. Our results demonstrate incongruence between individual gene trees, grouping the Hawaiian mints with both temperate North American and Meso-South American Stachys clades. However, our multi-locus coalescence tree is concurrent with previous nrDNA results placing them within the temperate North American Stachys clade. Our results point toward a possible allopolyploid hybrid origin of the Hawaiian mints arising from temperate North American and Meso-South American ancestors, as well as a reticulate origin for South American Stachys. As such, our study is another significant step toward further understanding the putative parentage and the potential influence of hybridization and incomplete lineage sorting in giving rise to this insular plant lineage, which following colonization underwent rapid morphological and

  7. The eNutrition Academy: Supporting a New Generation of Nutritional Scientists around the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Catherine; Amuna, Paul; Kattelmann, Kendra K; Zotor, Francis B; Donovan, Sharon M

    2016-01-01

    Nutrition training and building capacity to provide a competent workforce to support national and regional efforts to combat malnutrition remain a major challenge in Africa and other developing regions of the world. The capacity to provide the necessary intellectual drive for nutrition research, policy, and practice in countries lacking in readiness for nutrition actions is imperative to improve the health of their people. To help address this need, the eNutrition Academy (eNA) was formed as a global partnership organization by the African Nutrition Society, the Federation of African Nutrition Societies, the Nutrition Society of the United Kingdom and Ireland, the ASN, and the International Union of Nutritional Sciences, supported by Cambridge University Press. The primary objective of this partnership is to provide an online learning platform that is free to access, enabling users to benefit from a wide range of learning materials from basic tools to more-advanced learning materials for teachers and researchers in developing countries. The goal of this article was to summarize the findings of a symposium held at the ASN Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology 2015, which explored the themes of international capacity development, with a particular focus on the African continent, online learning, and the eNA e-learning platform. Given the vast human capacity present in Africa that is poised to create new solutions to address the public health needs of the continent, now is an opportune time to establish South-North and South-South partnerships to develop the next generation of African nutritional scientists. PMID:27180382

  8. Quasinormal modes and a new instability of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes in the de Sitter world

    OpenAIRE

    Cuyubamba, M. A.; Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of time-domain profiles for gravitational perturbations shows that the Gauss-Bonnet black holes in de Sitter world posses a new kind of dynamical instability which does not take place for asymptotically flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes. The new instability is in the gravitational perturbations of scalar type and is due to the nonvanishing cosmological constant. Analysis of the quasinormal spectrum in the stability sector shows that although the scalar type of gravitational pert...

  9. Business Information and the Internet in the Developing World: A New Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Kargbo, John Abdul

    1997-01-01

    The Internet, modern society's cheapest and most effective means of global communication, is gradually spreading to the developing world. In this article the application of the Internet in business information and its implications is examined.

  10. World financial system in the conditions of crisis and prospects of creation the new reserve currencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pavlova

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Credit crunch started with US subprime mortgage crisis spread to other parts of the world. Countries across the world call for reforms in international financial system. The author considers that financial crises catalyzes international tendencies to create regional currencies. Also, paper concludes that for Russian Ruble to become a regional currency much efforts need to be done in terms of increasing country’s attractiveness for foreign investors.

  11. MAPPING THE WORLD – A NEW APPROACH FOR VOLUNTEERED GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION IN THE CLOUD

    OpenAIRE

    M. S. Moeller; Furhmann, S.

    2015-01-01

    The OSM project provides a geodata basis for the entire world under the CC-SA licence agreement. But some parts of the world are mapped more densely compared to other regions. However, many less developed countries show a lack of valid geo-information. Africa for example is a sparsely mapped continent. During a huge Ebola outbreak in 2014 the lack of data became apparent. Help organization like the American Red Cross and the Humanitarian Openstreetmap Team organized mappings campaign...

  12. The World Bank and Municipal Adjustments in Senegal: Towards a New Institutional Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Mebometa Ndongo; Juan-Luis Klein

    2014-01-01

    This paper adresses the impact of the World Bank¡¯s urban development projects on territorial governance in Africa. From the analysis of eight projects completed in Senegal between the 1960s and beyond 2006, the paper identifies the process through which the World Bank adapts systems of actors and local institutional environments to its philosophy of governance. The paper shows that this territorial strategy constitutes a process of municipal adjustment where the local actor contributes to a ...

  13. A new mealybug in the genus Pseudococcus Westwood (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Pseudococcidae) from North America, with a key to species of Pseudococcus from the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenrieder, Natalia Von; Watson, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    A mealybug species that feeds on Agave spp., Pseudococcus variabilis sp. n. (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha: Pseudococcidae), is described from North America. Its entry into the United States was likely via the horticultural trade on its host plants in the genus Agave (Liliales: Agavaceae). Descriptions and illustrations of the adult female and male, diagnosis from congeners in the New World, and a molecular characterization based on COI are provided, as well as a key to adult females of all Pseudococcus species recorded from the New World. PMID:27394765

  14. An anti-hapten camelid antibody reveals a cryptic binding site with significant energetic contributions from a nonhypervariable loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanning, Sean W.; Horn, James R. (NIU)

    2014-03-05

    Conventional anti-hapten antibodies typically bind low-molecular weight compounds (haptens) in the crevice between the variable heavy and light chains. Conversely, heavy chain-only camelid antibodies, which lack a light chain, must rely entirely on a single variable domain to recognize haptens. While several anti-hapten VHHs have been generated, little is known regarding the underlying structural and thermodynamic basis for hapten recognition. Here, an anti-methotrexate VHH (anti-MTX VHH) was generated using grafting methods whereby the three complementarity determining regions (CDRs) were inserted onto an existing VHH framework. Thermodynamic analysis of the anti-MTX VHH CDR1-3 Graft revealed a micromolar binding affinity, while the crystal structure of the complex revealed a somewhat surprising noncanonical binding site which involved MTX tunneling under the CDR1 loop. Due to the close proximity of MTX to CDR4, a nonhypervariable loop, the CDR4 loop sequence was subsequently introduced into the CDR1-3 graft, which resulted in a dramatic 1000-fold increase in the binding affinity. Crystal structure analysis of both the free and complex anti-MTX CDR1-4 graft revealed CDR4 plays a significant role in both intermolecular contacts and binding site conformation that appear to contribute toward high affinity binding. Additionally, the anti-MTX VHH possessed relatively high specificity for MTX over closely related compounds aminopterin and folate, demonstrating that VHH domains are capable of binding low-molecular weight ligands with high affinity and specificity, despite their reduced interface.

  15. Preparation and characterization of novel IgG affinity resin coupling anti-Fc camelid single-domain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhui; Xu, Yang; Fu, Jinheng; Huang, Zhibing; Wang, Yao; Liu, Bin; Tao, Yong

    2015-03-01

    This work aimed to evaluate novel affinity resin used to purify immunoglobulin G (IgG) with a variable domain of the heavy chain of the heavy-chain antibody (VHH) as an affinity ligand. The VHH, isolated from a naïve camelid single-domain phage display library, exhibits not only affinity to the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of IgG but also high thermal stability. This anti-Fc VHH (AFV) was expressed as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli and purified using a simple heat treatment procedure. The effects of pH and NaCl concentrations on the capacity of AFV resin were also investigated. Results showed a robust property of the AFV resin. It could bind IgGs at various pH conditions (from 6.0 to 9.0) and NaCl concentrations. The static binding capacities of AFV resin ranged from 3.40±0.53mg/ml to 15.04±0.37mg/ml measured using rabbit, mouse, and human IgGs. The bound IgGs can be efficiently eluted at pH 5.0, which is conducive to acid-sensitive IgGs and prevents the aggregation of IgGs. After 10 purification cycles or a 7-day period of storage at 37°C, recovery did not decrease. These findings suggested that VHHs from non-immunized library could also be robust and functional reagent as an affinity purification ligand. PMID:25614967

  16. The geopolitics in the spheres of influence, domination, and overrule: towards a new world order or disorder?

    OpenAIRE

    Mulaj, Isa

    2012-01-01

    The term New World Order (NWO) appears to get a more comprehensive meaning from the most recent evolution of dramatic events in various parts of the world. Officially, there is still no any unified approach how it may look like, upon which pillars it will be built, and how it would operate. More assumptions can be heard by ordinary people than by those who are believed to have considerable impact on the flows of this outspoken order. Unlike great revolutionary changes of the past, e.g. the be...

  17. The New Geographical Structures of the Capitalist World-Economy and the Role of the BRICS: a View from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre de Freitas Barbosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an alternative theoretical framework in order to understand the new nature of the capitalist world-economy and its corresponding international division of labor. It studies the meaning of BRICS by examining the once-held belief that the world was divided by a center, semi-periphery and periphery; it analyses the newly established divisions of intra-South and intra-North. These countries operate under various forms of capitalism, thus creating new power relations that work collectively from a geopolitical standpoint. Despite weak economic ties, with the exception of China, leaders of the BRICS are attempting to promote a reform within multilateral organizations and the G-20. The objective of this paper is to shed light on such challenges to this new strategy facing these countries, particularly from the perspective of Brazil’s foreign policy.

  18. Climate change, economics and Buddhism. Part 2. New views and practices for sustainable world economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, Peter L. [Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University, Brisbane, 4111 (Australia)

    2010-03-15

    The evidence of impending and serious climate and other consequences of an expanding world economy based on fossil carbon energy continues to accumulate. This two-part paper examines the potential contribution of the world view and insights of Buddhism to this search. It presents both a conceptual and practical case that Buddhism can help shape and move towards an alternative and effective paradigmatic basis for sustainable economies - one capable of bringing about and maintaining genuine, high welfare levels across the world's societies. The first paper outlined a comprehensive analytical framework to identify the fundamental nature of anthropogenic climate change. Based on the integration of two of the most influential environmental analysis tools of recent decades (the DPSIR model and IPAT equation), the framework was then broadened to facilitate ideas from the Buddhist world view by injecting two key missing aspects - the interrelated role of (1) beliefs and values (on goals and behavior) and (2) the nature of well-being or human happiness. Finally, the principal linkages between this climate change analysis framework and Buddhism were explored. In this concluding paper, the systems framework is used to demonstrate how Buddhist and related world views can feed into appropriate and effective responses to the impending challenges of climate change. This is undertaken by systematically presenting a specific, if indicative, list of relevant strategies informed by the understanding of interconnectedness and other basic principles about the nature of reality and human well-being as proposed in Buddhism. (author)

  19. Climate change, economics and Buddhism. Part 2. New views and practices for sustainable world economies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evidence of impending and serious climate and other consequences of an expanding world economy based on fossil carbon energy continues to accumulate. This two-part paper examines the potential contribution of the world view and insights of Buddhism to this search. It presents both a conceptual and practical case that Buddhism can help shape and move towards an alternative and effective paradigmatic basis for sustainable economies - one capable of bringing about and maintaining genuine, high welfare levels across the world's societies. The first paper outlined a comprehensive analytical framework to identify the fundamental nature of anthropogenic climate change. Based on the integration of two of the most influential environmental analysis tools of recent decades (the DPSIR model and IPAT equation), the framework was then broadened to facilitate ideas from the Buddhist world view by injecting two key missing aspects - the interrelated role of (1) beliefs and values (on goals and behavior) and (2) the nature of well-being or human happiness. Finally, the principal linkages between this climate change analysis framework and Buddhism were explored. In this concluding paper, the systems framework is used to demonstrate how Buddhist and related world views can feed into appropriate and effective responses to the impending challenges of climate change. This is undertaken by systematically presenting a specific, if indicative, list of relevant strategies informed by the understanding of interconnectedness and other basic principles about the nature of reality and human well-being as proposed in Buddhism. (author)

  20. Promote Sound, Sustainable and Quality Development Speech at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting of New Champions 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Professor Klaus Schwab,Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum,Ladies and Gentleman,I wish to extend warm congratulations on the opening of the Fifth Annual Meeting of the New Champions,or the Summer Davos,and a sincere welcome to you all.The Summer Davos has undergone five years of growth and established its principle of being oriented to the whole world,to the future,to innovation and to youths.Participants have had lively and dynamic exchanges at various forms of discussions,delivering to the world messages of hope,confidence and courage,particularly at the difficult times of the global financial crisis.The theme of this year's meeting-Mastering Quality Growth-represents people's shared desire for robust,sustainable and balanced economic growth,and I wish the meeting a great success.

  1. Deep sequencing of New World screw-worm transcripts to discover genes involved in insecticide resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azeredo-Espin Ana Maria L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The New World screw-worm (NWS, Cochliomyia hominivorax, is one of the most important myiasis-causing flies, causing severe losses to the livestock industry. In its current geographical distribution, this species has been controlled by the application of insecticides, mainly organophosphate (OP compounds, but a number of lineages have been identified that are resistant to such chemicals. Despite its economic importance, only limited genetic information is available for the NWS. Here, as a part of an effort to characterize the C. hominivorax genome and identify putative genes involved in insecticide resistance, we sampled its transcriptome by deep sequencing of polyadenylated transcripts using the 454 sequencing technology. Results Deep sequencing on the 454 platform of three normalized libraries (larval, adult male and adult female generated a total of 548,940 reads. Eighteen candidate genes coding for three metabolic detoxification enzyme families, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and carboxyl/cholinesterases were selected and gene expression levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Of the investigated candidates, only one gene was expressed differently between control and resistant larvae with, at least, a 10-fold down-regulation in the resistant larvae. The presence of mutations in the acetylcholinesterase (target site and carboxylesterase E3 genes was investigated and all of the resistant flies presented E3 mutations previously associated with insecticide resistance. Conclusions Here, we provided the largest database of NWS expressed sequence tags that is an important resource, not only for further studies on the molecular basis of the OP resistance in NWS fly, but also for functional and comparative studies among Calliphoridae flies. Among our candidates, only one gene was found differentially expressed in resistant individuals, and its role on

  2. Mapping the World - a New Approach for Volunteered Geographic Information in the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, M. S.; Furhmann, S.

    2015-05-01

    The OSM project provides a geodata basis for the entire world under the CC-SA licence agreement. But some parts of the world are mapped more densely compared to other regions. However, many less developed countries show a lack of valid geo-information. Africa for example is a sparsely mapped continent. During a huge Ebola outbreak in 2014 the lack of data became apparent. Help organization like the American Red Cross and the Humanitarian Openstreetmap Team organized mappings campaign to fill the gaps with valid OSM geodata. This paper gives a short introduction into this mapping activity.

  3. Chromosome size-correlated and chromosome size-uncorrelated homogenization of centromeric repetitive sequences in New World quails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishishita, Satoshi; Tsuruta, Yuri; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nishida, Chizuko; Griffin, Darren K; Tsudzuki, Masaoki; Ono, Tamao; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-04-01

    Many families of centromeric repetitive DNA sequences isolated from Struthioniformes, Galliformes, Falconiformes, and Passeriformes are localized primarily to microchromosomes. However, it is unclear whether chromosome size-correlated homogenization is a common characteristic of centromeric repetitive sequences in Aves. New World and Old World quails have the typical avian karyotype comprising chromosomes of two distinct sizes, and C-positive heterochromatin is distributed in centromeric regions of most autosomes and the whole W chromosome. We isolated six types of centromeric repetitive sequences from three New World quail species (Colinus virginianus, CVI; Callipepla californica, CCA; and Callipepla squamata, CSQ; Odontophoridae) and one Old World quail species (Alectoris chukar, ACH; Phasianidae), and characterized the sequences by nucleotide sequencing, chromosome in situ hybridization, and filter hybridization. The 385-bp CVI-MspI, 591-bp CCA-BamHI, 582-bp CSQ-BamHI, and 366-bp ACH-Sau3AI fragments exhibited tandem arrays of the monomer unit, and the 224-bp CVI-HaeIII and 135-bp CCA-HaeIII fragments were composed of minisatellite-like and microsatellite-like repeats, respectively. ACH-Sau3AI was a homolog of the chicken nuclear membrane repeat sequence, whose homologs are common in Phasianidae. CVI-MspI, CCA-BamHI, and CSQ-BamHI showed high homology and were specific to the Odontophoridae. CVI-MspI was localized to microchromosomes, whereas CVI-HaeIII, CCA-BamHI, and CSQ-BamHI were mapped to almost all chromosomes. CCA-HaeIII was localized to five pairs of macrochromosomes and most microchromosomes. ACH-Sau3AI was distributed in three pairs of macrochromosomes and all microchromosomes. Centromeric repetitive sequences may be homogenized in chromosome size-correlated and -uncorrelated manners in New World quails, although there may be a mechanism that causes homogenization of centromeric repetitive sequences primarily between microchromosomes, which is commonly

  4. Martinez Arranz, Alfonso / Doyle, Natalie J. / Winand, Pascaline (eds.), New Europe, New World? The European Union, Europe and the Challenges of the 21 st Century,

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian IVAN

    2010-01-01

    New Europe, New World? The European Union, Europe, and the Challenges of the 21 st Century is a collective work that emerged from such an academic engagement generated by the Monash European and EU Center (at Monash University, Australia) in collaboration with the Austral-Asian Center for Italian Studies. The editors, Alfonso Martinez Arranz, Natalie J. Doyle and Pascaline Winand, succeeded in turning the conference debates into a coherent volume that will certainly contribute to the academic...

  5. New global realities for mining and exploration companies in today's world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presented brief comments on the stock market, the economy and the business of mining industry consolidation. It also described the rapidly changing environment within the mining industry and the realities facing mineral resource exploration and development. The mining industry is market-driven. Mining stocks have done well recently, with most movement occurring with major mining companies, particularly gold. However, it was noted that current economic projects have wide ranges of possible errors because the world has become a riskier place in recent months. In 2001, world trade growth slowed to just under 1 per cent, the lowest level since 1982, and global GDP growth fell to 2.4 per cent, a recessionary rate. The GDP grew strongly in China, the world's second largest consumer of mineral-based products. The author suggested that the state of economic recovery in 2002 will depend on how the major industrial economies respond to monetary easing and on how financial and currency markets manage stresses arising from increased levels of indebtedness. It is likely that demand for mineral commodities will be slow and keeping a close control on supply will determine how soon producers will benefit from world economic recovery

  6. The Digital Divide across All Citizens of the World: A New Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the requirements for and implications of, moving from the confines of the conventional concept of the digital divide to one that reflects a world distribution of Internet users with different income levels, with particular reference to those users living in poverty. The first part of the note provides a simple,…

  7. New global realities for mining and exploration companies in today's world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingner, G.D. [Rio Tinto, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    This paper presented brief comments on the stock market, the economy and the business of mining industry consolidation. It also described the rapidly changing environment within the mining industry and the realities facing mineral resource exploration and development. The mining industry is market-driven. Mining stocks have done well recently, with most movement occurring with major mining companies, particularly gold. However, it was noted that current economic projects have wide ranges of possible errors because the world has become a riskier place in recent months. In 2001, world trade growth slowed to just under 1 per cent, the lowest level since 1982, and global GDP growth fell to 2.4 per cent, a recessionary rate. The GDP grew strongly in China, the world's second largest consumer of mineral-based products. The author suggested that the state of economic recovery in 2002 will depend on how the major industrial economies respond to monetary easing and on how financial and currency markets manage stresses arising from increased levels of indebtedness. It is likely that demand for mineral commodities will be slow and keeping a close control on supply will determine how soon producers will benefit from world economic recovery.

  8. Physics technology - cost of the new facilities - a world-wide round-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account of the status of 18 of the electron accelerator projects around the world is presented. The survey is restricted to those projects which are aimed mainly at studies of nuclear physics and which aspire to the development of CW beams

  9. Relationships of new world Phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae based on fossil evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Dilermando Andrade Filho

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The fossil record and systematics of phlebotomid sand flies, vectors of leishmaniasis and arbovirus in several regions of the world, strongly support that living genera existed long before the Oligocene (38 million years, myr. A common Phlebotominae ancestor was present in the Triassic period before the separations of continents (248 myr.

  10. From theater to the world wide web--a new online era for surgical education.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, D Peter

    2012-07-01

    Traditionally, surgical education has been confined to operating and lecture theaters. Access to the World Wide Web and services, such as YouTube and iTunes has expanded enormously. Each week throughout Ireland, nonconsultant hospital doctors work hard to create presentations for surgical teaching. Once presented, these valuable presentations are often never used again.

  11. The Development of Rocketry Capability in New Zealand—World Record Rocket and First of Its Kind Rocketry Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Buchanan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The University of Canterbury has developed a rocket research group, UC Rocketry, which recently broke the world altitude record for an I-class motor (impulse of 320–640 Ns and has run a rocketry course for the first time in New Zealand. This paper discusses the development and results of the world record rocket “Milly” and details all the fundamental elements of the rocketry final year engineering course, including the manufacturing processes, wind tunnel testing, avionics, control and the final rocket launch of “Smokey”. The rockets Milly and Smokey are an example of the design, implementation and testing methodologies that have significantly contributed to research and graduates for New Zealand’s space program.

  12. The Evolving Ecological Universe: a Study in the Science and Human Implications of a New World Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerner, Sally Jo.

    1992-01-01

    This study describes a broad cultural shift and a parallel scientific shift. Scientifically and culturally, Western civilization is moving toward a vision of a living, evolving, ecological universe and away from the Newtonian clockwork-machine universe. In Stephen Pepper's (1946) terms, the shift represents a change in dominant world hypothesis--that is, the dominant metaphor of how the world works. The bulk of the dissertation is a detailed exploration of the scientific shift because science's understanding of how the world works profoundly shapes beliefs in general. The exploration shows how a number of minirevolutions in physics and biology are related and how each supports an evolving ecological vision. The work in these different fields combines to produce a particularly important change in understanding--a vision of evolution as a single overall physical process from molecules to humankind. Ecological science (physics to biology) and the new view of evolution become possible because of a major conceptual shift in physics, the nonlinear revolution. The nonlinear revolution includes three major elements: chaos (modern nonlinear dynamics); self-organization theory (far -from-equilibrium thermodynamics); and the thermodynamics of evolution. Together these elements produce a physical understanding of an evolving, order-producing, universe --that is, a universe that evolves toward higher and higher levels of ordered complexity through interactive ecological dynamics. This very different physical picture of how the world works has important implications for human beliefs in general. A final section of the study explores the ecological shift's implications for humankind. It looks at ecological changes occurring outside the physical sciences (for example, in economics) and at how the radically changed physical sense of how the world works might affect other beliefs. For instance, the new physical view shows a remarkable ability to support and connect many

  13. A new family of bizarre durophagous carnivorous marsupials from Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, M.; S. J. Hand; K. H. Black; Beck, R. M. D.; Arena, D.A.; Wilson, L. A. B.; Kealy, S.; T.-t. Hung

    2016-01-01

    A new specimen of the bizarrely specialised Malleodectes mirabilis from middle Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area provides the first and only information about the molar dentition of this strange group of extinct marsupials. Apart from striking autapomorphies such as the enormous P3, other dental features such as stylar cusp D being larger than B suggest it belongs in the Order Dasyuromorphia. Phylogenetic analysis of 62 craniodental characters places Malleodectes within ...

  14. What Change Can The New Developments In Energy Sector Bring Into the World's Energy political and Geopolitical Order?

    OpenAIRE

    Onur TUTULMAZ

    2014-01-01

    The recent developments bring US to a leading natural gas and oil producer position. The attempts in last 20 years to bring new horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies together have developed a success in shale gas and oil production in US; the production volumes has reached to a position to redefine the market. Last estimations are bringing more information about the shale capacities of the major basins of the world. However, the estimates are based on a wide range of assum...

  15. Finanční analýza společnosti New World Resources Plc

    OpenAIRE

    Valík, Lukáš

    2013-01-01

    This diploma thesis titled "Financial analysis of the company New World Resources Plc" is structured into three main parts. The first chapter lays down the theoretical framework of the financial analysis including the definitions of the fundamental terms, introduces the main groups of users and presents mostly applied tools. The second part aims to present relevant information about the NWR group, i.e. among others the major shareholders and controlled subsidiaries. Moreover, the substantial ...

  16. A PERSONAL, DEBATABLE AND TIMELY VIEW ON WORLD ORDER: HENRY KISSINGER – HENRY KISSINGER – WORLD ORDER, PENGUIN PRESS, NEW YORK, 2014 - Book review

    OpenAIRE

    FLORIN BONCIU

    2014-01-01

    The concept of World Order had been much more present in the scientific debates and mass-media before 1990 when the world economy were more or less bipolar and the ideas of a dynamic balance of power and of spheres of influence were logically justified. After 1990 at the end of the Cold War a rather false perception became prevalent, particularly in the Western countries, projecting a unipolar world gradually witnessing a universalization of the Western style liberal democracy. Th...

  17. Connecting the New World. Nets, mobility and progress in the Age of Alexander von Humboldt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz von Brescius

    2012-12-01

    Beschleunigung“ analytisch verbunden werden, da diese Faktoren eine zentrale Rolle für die „Verwandlung der Welt“ im 19. Jahrhundert spielten. Abstract This article explores the link between the profound technological transformations of the nineteenth century and the life and work of the Prussian scholar Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859. It analyses how Humboldt sought to appropriate the revolutionary new communication and transportation technologies of the time in order to integrate the American continent into global networks of commercial, intellectual and material exchange. Recent scholarship on Humboldt’s expedition to the New World (1799-1804 has claimed that his descriptions of tropical landscapes opened up South America to a range of „transformative interventions“ (Pratt by European capitalists and investors. These studies, however, have not analysed the motivations underlying Humboldt’s support for such intrusions into nature. Furthermore, they have not explored the role that such projects played in shaping Humboldt’s understanding of the forces behind the progress of societies. To comprehend Humboldt’s approval for human interventions in America’s natural world, this study first explores the role that eighteenth-century theories of progress and the notion of geographical determinism played in shaping his conception of civilisational development. It will look at concrete examples of transformative interventions in the American hemisphere that were actively proposed by Humboldt and intended to overcome natural obstacles to human interaction. These were the use of steamships, electric telegraphy, railroads and large-scale canals that together enabled global trade and communication to occur at an unprecedented pace. All these contemporary innovations will be linked to the four motifs of nets, mobility, progress and acceleration, which were driving forces behind the „transformation of the world“ that took place in the course of the nineteenth century. Resumen

  18. Systemic Therapy of New World Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: A Case Report and Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abadir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis is a disease endemic to Central and South America, Mexico and the Caribbean, and affects millions of people. As travel to these regions becomes more common, cutaneous leishmaniasis is becoming a disease of increasing importance in the developed world. However, disease recognition and access to appropriate therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis remains a challenge in North America. The present article reports a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis in a Canadian man following a trip to Costa Rica. Species-specific diagnosis was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis of a skin biopsy, which was positive for Leishmania panamensis. After failing a course of itraconazole, the patient was successfully treated with sodium stibogluconate, despite significant barriers to administering this therapy, and the paucity of data regarding its efficacy and tolerability. The pathophysiology, diagnosis and systemic treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis, as well as its emerging presence in the developed world, are reviewed.

  19. Mini-ribozymes and freezing environment: a new scenario for the early RNA world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vlassov

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The RNA World hypothesis states that the present-day life, which is based on DNA genomes and protein enzymes, was preceded by a simpler life form based primarily on RNA. During this era, the genetic information resided in the sequence of RNA molecules and the phenotype derived from the catalytic properties of RNA. Though it is a widely accepted scenario, a number of problems remain unsolved. One of the biggest questions is how complex RNAs could evolve, survive and replicate under typically assumed ''warm and wet'' conditions, taking into account that the RNA phosphodiester backbone is chemically unstable under these conditions. We suggest that prebiotic conditions associated with freezing could have been of key importance in the early RNA World, and discuss the role of primitive catalytic RNA in the evolution of RNA size and complexity.

  20. A new data service from the World Data Centre for Geomagnetism, Edinburgh

    OpenAIRE

    Reay, Sarah; Dawson, Ewan; Flower, Simon; Kerridge, David; Matzka, Jürgen; MacMillan, Susan; Shanahan, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The British Geological Survey operates the World Data Centre (WDC) for Geomagnetism, Edinburgh providing access to observatory annual mean values, magnetic survey data and real-time magnetic activity indices online. In 2007 we took over responsibility for further geomagnetic datasets with the transfer of minute and hourly mean data for over 100 observatories from WDC Copenhagen to WDC Edinburgh. We present a summary of our current data service, data holdings and quality control procedur...

  1. Evolution, Systematics, and Phylogeography of Pleistocene Horses in the New World: A Molecular Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinstock, Jaco; Willerslev, Eske; Sher, A.;

    2005-01-01

    . Furthermore, we show that stilt-legged horses, commonly regarded as Old World migrants related to the hemionid asses of Asia, were in fact an endemic North American lineage. Finally, our data suggest that there were fewer horse species in late Pleistocene North America than have been named on morphological...... grounds. Both caballine and stilt-legged lineages may each have comprised a single, wide-ranging species....

  2. Africa and the New World Order-The Role of China in Africa's Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gina Caballero

    2008-01-01

    Sino-African relations, economic relation in particular, are developing steadily when the continent is trying to rejuvenate. During this process, China is not trying to overthrow the western order. It is more about how to reconcile China's scientific pragmatic foreign policy with western humanitarian interventionism. An inclusive world system will be better managed by striking a balance between Chinese pragmatism and U.S. idealism.

  3. New Teaching Environments Near Real-World-Like Laboratories for Power Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Holbøll, Joachim; Østergaard, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    The Technical University of Denmark offers educations within power engineering at all levels: bachelor, master and PhD. Relevant bachelor programs use the CDIO educational framework, which allows the students to learn engineering fundaments in a context of conceiving, designing, implementing, and operating real-world systems. The tool to be presented here is mainly establishment of teaching facilities at the Technical University of Denmark adjacent to the research facilities and where nearnes...

  4. The World Well Lost, Found: Reality and Authenticity in Green's "New Classroom Pedagogy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakeva, Lauri

    2009-01-01

    In her recent work, Green (2001; 2008) builds on the idea that there is a gulf between "real-world music" and classroom music (Ibid., p. 2). One of her main goals seems to be to pave the way for the former in the latter: to make the music in schools more in touch with reality. The learning practices of popular music are taken to bring the needed…

  5. Financial Stability, World Financial Crisis and Financial Markets´ Regulation: Some New Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Vladislav Pavlat

    2009-01-01

    This article confronts selected theoretical concepts of financial crisis, financial stability and financial regulation with the real situation at the world economic scene. The author´s views are mainly based on the results of a research group at the Institute of Administration and Finance in Prague (IAF), headed by Antonin Kubicek. This group has been analysing selected partial problems connected with the phenomena of financial markets´ regulation since 2002 in the framework of two grants (20...

  6. Poland - Christopher Columbus (Columbus and the "Discovery of the New World")

    OpenAIRE

    Czekaj, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    The topic of the module concerns various methods of presenting the historic figure of Christopher Columbus in literature, popular culture and school textbooks. The choice of articles from popular science magazines used in the module allows the students to familiarize themselves with various theories concerning the life of that great explorer, as well as various points of view regarding his role in the world's history. The main part of the module is based on a Polish article presenting a criti...

  7. New Media Art Projects, Panoramic Images and Live Video as Interface between Real and Virtual Worlds

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This paper starts with the concept of a virtual gallery where art works, mainly pictures, are presented on the world wide web. One of the first such galleries, the Slovenian Virtual Gallery existing from 1995 is being considered. Today, such galleries are conceptually not much different, however, they typically contain much more material of higher resolution in 2D and 3D. Several open source tools are available for development of such virtual galleries. To gain some notion of immediacy, effor...

  8. Petroleum and international relations: Saudi Arabia, victim of the new world energy deal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US-Saudi Arabia partnership is, on the aspect of international relations, the main victim of September 11, 2001 terror events. If it is excessive today to claim that the President Bush government wishes to weaken the Saudi state, the 2002 trends of the US foreign policy have deeply modify the world energy deal to the detriment of OPEC and its main producing country

  9. A word from the DG: A new opening to the world

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Having just returned from a visit to India and China I'm conscious of something that has changed greatly in the way CERN works over recent years, and is continuing rapidly to evolve. Today, CERN provides for collaboration not only among European states, but among states the world over. Joining CERN's 20 European member states are six observers and a further 35 countries that have signed cooperation agreements with us. Furthermore we have a number of memoranda of understanding with scientific agencies around the world. And among our user community, you will find representatives of 111 nationalities. There is no other organization in the world quite like it, where people of so many different cultures and backgrounds work harmoniously towards common goals. The LHC project has allowed CERN to take international collaboration in science beyond the regional model that it pioneered in the 1950s, blazing the trail for future global projects in science. Although over 90% funded by our Member States, the LHC is the f...

  10. Quasinormal modes and a new instability of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes in the de Sitter world

    CERN Document Server

    Cuyubamba, M A; Zhidenko, A

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of time-domain profiles for gravitational perturbations shows that the Gauss-Bonnet black holes in de Sitter world posses a new kind of dynamical instability which does not take place for asymptotically flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes. The new instability is in the gravitational perturbations of scalar type and is due to the nonvanishing cosmological constant. Analysis of the quasinormal spectrum in the stability sector shows that although the scalar type of gravitational perturbations does not obey the Hod's conjectural bound connecting the damping rate and the Hawking temperature, the vector and tensor types do not violate it.

  11. Quasinormal modes and a new instability of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes in the de Sitter world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyubamba, M. A.; Konoplya, R. A.; Zhidenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Analysis of time-domain profiles for gravitational perturbations shows that Gauss-Bonnet black holes in a de Sitter world possess a new kind of dynamical instability which does not take place for asymptotically flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet black holes. The new instability is in the gravitational perturbations of the scalar type and is due to the nonvanishing cosmological constant. Analysis of the quasinormal spectrum in the stability sector shows that although the scalar type of gravitational perturbations alone does not obey Hod's conjectural bound, connecting the damping rate and the Hawking temperature, the vector and tensor types (and thereby the gravitational spectrum as a whole) do obey it.

  12. From new to the firm to new to the world. Effect of geographical proximity and technological capabilities on the degree of novelty in emerging economies

    OpenAIRE

    Plechero , Monica; Chaminade , Cristina

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates empirically what it takes for a firm to move from new to the firm to new to the domestic market and new to the world innovations. More specifically, the paper analyses the relationship between, on the one hand, the degree of novelty of product innovation and on the other hand the accumulation of technological capabilities at firm level as well as the geographical spread of the innovation activities of the firm. The analysis is based on a unique firm level data collecte...

  13. Amphibious shelter-builder Oniscidea species from the New World with description of a new subfamily, a new genus and a new species from Brazilian cave (Isopoda, Synocheta, Styloniscidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila A Souza

    Full Text Available The new subfamily Iuiuniscinae, Styloniscidae, is erected for the new genus Iuiuniscus and the new species I. iuiuensis, which is described from cave of the State of Bahia, Northeastern Brazil. A special ecological character is shown here for the first time for a New World Oniscidea: the construction of mud shelters. An introduction addressing the systematics of Synocheta with emphasis on Styloniscidae Vandel, 1952 is provided, as well as general comments about the dependence of water in some Oniscidea and ecological traits of amphibious Synocheta. The problems referring to nomenclature, taxonomy and the interrelationships in Styloniscidae are discussed.

  14. The Problem with Violence: Exceptionality and Sovereignty in the New World

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    For many observers, the violent and often spectacular crime that takes place in particular Caribbean areas is evidence of a failure to create a growth-oriented economy and morally progressive ethos. It is a problem of culture, a mark of backwardness, an unsuccessful movement from savagery, or a failure to take advantage of post-World War II opportunities for development in political, economic, and socio-cultural fields. At the very least, it is something that marks the Caribbean—as well as so...

  15. Energy/oil/1980's: the world faces a critical new balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A worldwide supply-limited balance is projected for oil and natural gas as supplies become restricted and vulnerable to disruption, although a trend toward slower energy-consumption growth is developing. Politics is seen as a more-decisive factor than the world market economy. Socal's economists predict that the trend toward using less energy per gross national product level will continue and accelerate as energy costs increase if these costs are passed through to the consumer. There is a need for more-realistic energy policies that promote energy efficiency by making the user aware of the real cost of energy. 5 Graphs. (DCK)

  16. The Real (Porn) World: The Politics and Aesthetics of the New Reality Porn

    OpenAIRE

    Moorman, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    It may at first seem perfectly selfevident that a porn filmmaker would want to borrow from the conventions of reality TV. Cinematic pornography has, as Linda Williams suggests, concerned itself with proving its own authenticity since its inception.1 And reality TV attempts to depict “the real world,” right? In fact, generally speaking, it doesn’t. A closer look at reality TV reveals its patently “false settings [and] contrived situations,” and we should not make the mistake of assuming that i...

  17. A Changing Child in Changing World: Psychological and Educational Problems of the New School

    OpenAIRE

    David I.Feldstein

    2011-01-01

    The article is devoted to a number of urgent problems of mental and physical health of people who live in the global community. How we understand what is the world around us, what kind of society we live in and what are behavioural patterns and developmental features in the contemporary situation, and what the requirements of this society are. Changes in the modern child are influenced by an intense evolutionary self-development of modern man. Special attention should be paid to the developme...

  18. The New Internationalists: World Vision and the Revival of American Evangelical Humanitarianism, 1950–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David King

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available International relief and development agencies consistently rank among the largest evangelical organizations, and in recent decades, they have gained increased exposure and influence within the greater humanitarian community. World Vision, the largest evangelical agency, is also the largest Christian humanitarian organization in the world. Themes of politics and culture wars have led many to scholars to categorize American evangelicals into distinct conservative and liberal parties. Yet the history of American evangelicals’ humanitarianism demonstrates how they often resisted such dichotomies. As evangelical humanitarian agencies expanded exponentially over the past five decades, they came to embrace a “holistic gospel” that helped shape evangelical mission debates concerning the relationship between evangelism and social action; they engaged international evangelicals that forced Americans to reconsider their own categories; and many modeled a practical ecumenism that allowed evangelicals to expand beyond a limited subculture to work alongside other religious and even secular NGOs. While other evangelical progressives fragmented over identity politics or remained tethered to small alterative communities, the leading aid agencies have achieved broad support across evangelicalism, making them some of the most influential voices.

  19. Animals in a bacterial world, a new imperative for the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Hadfield, Michael G; Bosch, Thomas C G; Carey, Hannah V; Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Douglas, Angela E; Dubilier, Nicole; Eberl, Gerard; Fukami, Tadashi; Gilbert, Scott F; Hentschel, Ute; King, Nicole; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Knoll, Andrew H; Kremer, Natacha; Mazmanian, Sarkis K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Nealson, Kenneth; Pierce, Naomi E; Rawls, John F; Reid, Ann; Ruby, Edward G; Rumpho, Mary; Sanders, Jon G; Tautz, Diethard; Wernegreen, Jennifer J

    2013-02-26

    In the last two decades, the widespread application of genetic and genomic approaches has revealed a bacterial world astonishing in its ubiquity and diversity. This review examines how a growing knowledge of the vast range of animal-bacterial interactions, whether in shared ecosystems or intimate symbioses, is fundamentally altering our understanding of animal biology. Specifically, we highlight recent technological and intellectual advances that have changed our thinking about five questions: how have bacteria facilitated the origin and evolution of animals; how do animals and bacteria affect each other's genomes; how does normal animal development depend on bacterial partners; how is homeostasis maintained between animals and their symbionts; and how can ecological approaches deepen our understanding of the multiple levels of animal-bacterial interaction. As answers to these fundamental questions emerge, all biologists will be challenged to broaden their appreciation of these interactions and to include investigations of the relationships between and among bacteria and their animal partners as we seek a better understanding of the natural world. PMID:23391737

  20. Net clinical benefit of new oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban) versus no treatment in a 'real world' atrial fibrillation population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, A; Lane, D A; Torp-Pedersen, C;

    2012-01-01

    patients with non-valvular AF between 1997-2008, for dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban on the basis of recent clinical trial outcome data for these new OACs. In patients with CHADS2=0 but at high bleeding risk, apixaban and dabigatran 110 mg bid had a positive net clinical benefit. At CHA2DS2-VASc=1......, apixaban and both doses of dabigatran (110 mg and 150 mg bid) had a positive net clinical benefit. In patients with CHADS2 score=1 or CHA2DS2-VASc=2, the three new OACs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) appear superior to warfarin for net clinical benefit, regardless of risk of bleeding. When risk of...... in AF. Using 'real world' data, our modelling analysis has shown that when the risk of bleeding and stroke are both high, all three new drugs appear to have a greater net clinical benefit compared to warfarin....

  1. Impact of New Technology on Reading Habits: A Glimpse on the World Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Loan, Fayaz Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Reading helps in all-round development of a person from his birth to death. It adds new sight to eyes and new wisdom to mind. A dump person becomes a communicator and a lame climbs mountains of knowledge through reading. However, in the modern multimedia society, the radio, television, cell phone, computer and the Internet have captured a big slice of time and reading has taken a back seat. These new gadgets of technology have become the “Time Eating Machine” and reading has almost become a ...

  2. Biology and systematics of the New World Phyllocnistis Zeller leafminers of the avocado genus Persea (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Davis

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Four New World species of Phyllocnistis Zeller are described from serpentine mines in Persea (Family Lauraceae. Phyllocnistis hyperpersea, new species, mines the upper leaf surfaces of avocado, Persea americana Mill., and red bay, Persea borbonia (L. Spreng. and ranges over much of the southeastern United States into Central America. Phyllocnistis subpersea, new species, mines the underside and occasionally upper sides of new leaves of Persea borbonia in southeastern United States. Phyllocnistis longipalpa, new species, known only from southern Florida also mines the undersides of new leaves of Persea borbonia. Phyllocnistis perseafolia, new species, mines both leaf surfaces and possibly fruits of Persea americana in Colombia, South America. As in all known species of Phyllocnistis, the early instars are subepidermal sapfeeders in young (not fully hardened foliage, and the final instar is an extremely specialized, nonfeeding larval form, whose primary function is to spin the silken cocoon, at the mine terminus, prior to pupation. Early stages are illustrated and described for three of the species. The unusual morphology of the pupae, particularly the frontal process of the head, is shown to be one of the most useful morphological sources of diagnostic characters for species identification of Phyllocnistis. COI barcode sequence distances are provided for the four proposed species and a fifth, undescribed species from Costa Rica.

  3. Phylogeny of the Ampelocissus-Vitis clade in Vitaceae supports the New World origin of the grape genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu-Qun; Ickert-Bond, Stefanie M; Nie, Ze-Long; Zhou, Zhuo; Chen, Long-Qing; Wen, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The grapes and the close allies in Vitaceae are of great agronomic and economic importance. Our previous studies showed that the grape genus Vitis was closely related to three tropical genera, which formed the Ampelocissus-Vitis clade (including Vitis, Ampelocissus, Nothocissus and Pterisanthes). Yet the phylogenetic relationships of the four genera within this clade remain poorly resolved. Furthermore, the geographic origin of Vitis is still controversial, because the sampling of the close relatives of Vitis was too limited in the previous studies. This study reconstructs the phylogenetic relationships within the clade, and hypothesizes the origin of Vitis in a broader phylogenetic framework, using five plastid and two nuclear markers. The Ampelocissus-Vitis clade is supported to be composed of five main lineages. Vitis includes two described subgenera each as a monophyletic group. Ampelocissus is paraphyletic. The New World Ampelocissus does not form a clade and shows a complex phylogenetic relationship, with A. acapulcensis and A. javalensis forming a clade, and A. erdvendbergiana sister to Vitis. The majority of the Asian Ampelocissus species form a clade, within which Pterisanthes is nested. Pterisanthes is polyphyletic, suggesting that the lamellate inflorescence characteristic of the genus represents convergence. Nothocissus is sister to the clade of Asian Ampelocissus and Pterisanthes. The African Ampelocissus forms a clade with several Asian species. Based on the Bayesian dating and both the RASP and Lagrange analyses, Vitis is inferred to have originated in the New World during the late Eocene (39.4Ma, 95% HPD: 32.6-48.6Ma), then migrated to Eurasia in the late Eocene (37.3Ma, 95% HPD: 30.9-45.1Ma). The North Atlantic land bridges (NALB) are hypothesized to be the most plausible route for the Vitis migration from the New World to Eurasia, while intercontinental long distance dispersal (LDD) cannot be eliminated as a likely mechanism. PMID:26545592

  4. New Media in IYA2009: Communicating with the world via the web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Pamela L.; Koppelman, M.; IYA New Media Task Group

    2009-01-01

    In the 2009 International Year of Astronomy, new media will play a prominent role in engaging people in the universe that is theirs to discover. New online projects will take advantage of a diversity of technologies, allowing us to bring content to people through a variety of devices in places they work, play and learn. In this session we will give an overview of our programs, high-lighting: "AstroTwitter," an interface that asks 'What are you looking at?' and allows you to see how observers around the globe (professional and amateur) answer that same question; "Portal to the Universe," your one stop shop for all things new in astronomy; the "365 Days of Astronomy" podcast, which brings you an 8-minute podcast on the people, places, things, thoughts and discoveries in astronomy each day of 2009; new projects to extend Galaxy Zoo to new areas of science both in our solar system and at the edge of the cosmos; our social networking initiatives in Facebook, Flickr and YouTube; and the IYA Second Life® Island, which will be unveiled during this session. In addition to showing you how to access each of these new projects, we will also tell you how you can become a part of the projects in the coming months.

  5. Exploring the image of new world wine producers: website texts for wineries in Australia and New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Poncini, Gina

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a study investigating websites and brochures for wineries and wine regions in Australia and New Zealand. It is part of a wider study1 investigating written texts and intercultural interactions, mainly in English, with data originating in the food and wine industry in different countries, including Italy, the U.S., Australia, and New Zealand. The present article focuses on evaluative language in website texts, exploring two interrelated issues. One issue concerns the ki...

  6. A revision of the New World genus Lepidophora Westwood, 1835 (Diptera, Bombyliidae, Ecliminae) with a key to the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paula Fernanda Motta; Lamas, Carlos José Einicker

    2013-01-01

    The bombyliid genus Lepidophora has a distribution restricted to the New World. The genus is composed by eight species, which are revised and redescribed herein: five restricted to the Neotropical region (L. acroleuca Painter, 1930, L. culiciformis Walker, 1850, L. cuneata Painter, 1939, L. secutor Walker, 1857 and L. trypoxylona Hall, 1981), two restricted to the Nearctic region (L. lepidocera (Wiedemann, 1828) and L. lutea Painter, 1962) and one species occurring in Nearctic and Neotropical regions (L. vetusta Walker, 1857). The main characters of the external morphology of adults and male and female terminalia are illustrated. An key to species is presented. PMID:25243274

  7. Online learning: the brave new world of massive open online courses and the role of the health librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Hannah

    2016-03-01

    In a wired, virtual and information rich society, MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) are leading us into a brave new world in which their key role is to support lifelong networked learning. This feature looks at the broad role of MOOCs and considers them within the context of health, and health librarianship. In particular, it provides examples of where health librarians have developed MOOCs and what opportunities there are in the future for health librarians to collaborate in the development and delivery of health MOOCs. H.S. PMID:26995753

  8. Chloroplast capture and intra- and inter-continental biogeographic diversification in the Asian - New World disjunct plant genus Osmorhiza (Apiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ting-Shuang; Jin, Gui-Hua; Wen, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Osmorhiza Raf. (Apiaceae) contains about 12 species disjunctly distributed in temperate Asia, and North, Central to South America. Phylogenetic and biogeographic analyses were carried out applying sequences of two nuclear and nine plastid loci from eleven recognized Osmorhiza species. The nuclear ITS and ETS and the plastid data fully resolved the infrageneric relationships, yet the two phylogenies were largely incongruent. Comparisons of nuclear and plastid phylogenies revealed several interspecific chloroplast transfer events in Osmorhiza, one of which involved an extinct or an unsampled lineage. This genus was inferred to have originated in the Old World during the late Miocene (11.02mya, 95% HPD: 9.13-12.93mya), and the crown of the genus was dated to be in the late Miocene (5.51mya, 95% HPD: 2.81-8.37mya). Species of Osmorhiza were inferred to have migrated from the Old World into North America across the Bering land bridge during the late Miocene, and they then diversified in the New World through multiple dispersal and divergence events. The intraspecific amphitropical disjunctions between North and South America, and the eastern and western North American disjunctions within O. berteroi and O. depauperata were hypothesized to be via recent long-distance dispersals most likely facilitated by birds. PMID:25585153

  9. Towards a new world: The contributions of nuclear energy to a sustainable future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last few years, the world has seen growing concern about the sustainability of the Planet when supplying increasing energy use. The major issues are: increased energy prices in the world markets; growing energy demand in emerging economies; security and stability of oil and gas supply; potentially adverse climate change due to carbon-based emissions; and the need to deploy economic, sustainable and reliable alternates. Large undefined 'wedges' of alternate energy technologies are needed. In light of these major difficulties, there is renewed interest and need for a greater role for nuclear energy as a safe, sustainable and economic energy contributor. The shift has been, from being viewed by some as politically discounted, to being accepted as absolutely globally essential. We have carefully considered, and systematically, extensively and technically analyzed the contributions that nuclear energy can and should make to a globally sustainable energy future. These include restraining emissions, providing safe and secure power, operating synergistically with other sources, and being both socially and fiscally attractive. Therefore, we quantify in this paper the major contributions: a) The reduction in climate change potential and the global impact of future nuclear energy deployment through emissions reduction, using established analysis tools which varying the plausible future penetration and scale of nuclear energy. b) The minimization of economic costs and the maximization of global benefits, including investment requirements, carbon price implications, competitive market penetration, and effect of variable daily pricing. c) The introduction of fuel switching, including base-load nuclear energy synergistically enabling both hydrogen production and the introduction of significant wind power. d) The management and reduction of waste streams, utilizing intelligent designs and fuel cycles that optimize fuel resource use and minimize emissions, waste disposal

  10. Creativity and Quantum Physics: a New World View Unifying Current Theories of Creativity and Pointing Toward New Research Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kimberly Ann

    1990-01-01

    Divisions in definitions of creativity have centered primarily on the working definition of discontinuity and the inclusion of intrinsic features such as unconscious processing and intrinsic motivation and reinforcement. These differences generally result from Cohen's two world views underlying theories of creativity: Organismic, oriented toward holism; or mechanistic, oriented toward cause-effect reductionism. The quantum world view is proposed which theoretically and empirically unifies organismic and mechanistic elements of creativity. Based on Goswami's Idealistic Interpretation of quantum physics, the quantum view postulates the mind -brain as consisting of both classical and quantum structures and functions. The quantum domain accesses the transcendent order through coherent superpositions (a state of potentialities), while the classical domain performs the function of measuring apparatus through amplifying and recording the result of the collapse of the pure mental state. A theoretical experiment, based on the 1980 Marcel study of conscious and unconscious word-sense disambiguation, is conducted which compares the predictions of the quantum model with those of the 1975 Posner and Snyder Facilitation and Inhibition model. Each model agrees that while conscious access to information is limited, unconscious access is unlimited. However, each model differently defines the connection between these states: The Posner model postulates a central processing mechanism while the quantum model postulates a self-referential consciousness. Consequently, the two models predict differently. The strength of the quantum model lies in its ability to distinguish between classical and quantum definitions of discontinuity, as well as clarifying the function of consciousness, without added assumptions or ad-hoc analysis: Consciousness is an essential, valid feature of quantum mechanisms independent of the field of cognitive psychology. According to the quantum model, through a

  11. Between Two Worlds : The Evolution of the New Woman in American Fiction

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the evolution of the New Woman in American literature around 1900, who was the first example of a modern woman. The characters studied are Edna Pontellier in Kate Chopin s The Awakening (1899) and Carrie Meeber in Theodore Dreiser s Sister Carrie (1900), as representatives for the white New Woman. Amy Boldin in the novella When the Sleeper Wakes (1920) by Jessie Redmond Fauset and Rachel Loving in the play Rachel (1916) by Anglina Weld Grimké serve as examples of Afric...

  12. New Geopolitical Role of Central Asia within Foreign Policy Interests of World Powers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustem Kulnazarov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the fall of the Soviet Union, the leading global and regional players have started their occupation of the geopolitical and geo-economical vacuum in Central Asia. This article is targeted to trace the competition growth with regard to establishment of control over the Central Asian region by global players, in particular, by Russia, seeking to return Central Asia, and China, striving to entangle the region into its orbit of influence. Within two post-Soviet decades, the world players still have not managed to develop a general cooperation scheme against each other in Central Asia. Although, at the beginning of the XXI century, Russia and China attempted to build up a scheme of the Russian-Chinese-Central Asian cooperation within the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, however this scheme cannot be called effective due to the absence of common vision of long-term interests in Russia, China and Central Asian countries. As it seems, even at very short by historical standards period of time, after the fall of the Soviet Union we observe clear interests in the Central Asian’s policies of Russia and China.  

  13. New observational limits on dark radiation in brane-world cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Sasankan, Nishanth; Mathews, Grant J; Kusakabe, Motohiko

    2016-01-01

    A dark radiation term arises as a correction to the energy momentum tensor in the simplest five-dimensional RS-II brane-world cosmology. In this paper we revisit the constraints on dark radiation based upon the newest results for light-element nuclear reaction rates, observed light-element abundances and the power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Adding the effect of dark radiation during big bang nucleosynthesis alters the Friedmann expansion rate causing the nuclear reactions to freeze out at a different temperature. This changes the final light element abundances at the end of BBN. Its influence on the CMB is to change the effective expansion rate at the surface of last scattering. We find that the BBN constraint reduces the the allowed range for dark radiation to between -12.1% and +6.2% of the photon background. Combining this result with fits to the CMB power spectrum constraint, the range decreases to -6.0% to +6.2%. Thus, we find, that the ratio of dark radiation to the background to...

  14. Evolution, systematics, and phylogeography of pleistocene horses in the new world: a molecular perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The rich fossil record of horses has made them a classic example of evolutionary processes. However, while the overall picture of equid evolution is well known, the details are surprisingly poorly understood, especially for the later Pliocene and Pleistocene, c. 3 million to 0.01 million years (Ma ago, and nowhere more so than in the Americas. There is no consensus on the number of equid species or even the number of lineages that existed in these continents. Likewise, the origin of the endemic South American genus Hippidion is unresolved, as is the phylogenetic position of the "stilt-legged" horses of North America. Using ancient DNA sequences, we show that, in contrast to current models based on morphology and a recent genetic study, Hippidion was phylogenetically close to the caballine (true horses, with origins considerably more recent than the currently accepted date of c. 10 Ma. Furthermore, we show that stilt-legged horses, commonly regarded as Old World migrants related to the hemionid asses of Asia, were in fact an endemic North American lineage. Finally, our data suggest that there were fewer horse species in late Pleistocene North America than have been named on morphological grounds. Both caballine and stilt-legged lineages may each have comprised a single, wide-ranging species.

  15. Highlights : LHC sets new world record CERN Control Centre, 30 November 2009

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Productions; Marion Viguier

    2009-01-01

    Geneva, 30 November 2009. CERN1’s Large Hadron Collider has today become the world’s highest energy particle accelerator, having accelerated its twin beams of protons to an energy of 1.18 TeV in the early hours of the morning. This exceeds the previous world record of 0.98 TeV, which had been held by the US Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory’s Tevatron collider since 2001. It marks another important milestone on the road to first physics at the LHC in 2010. “We are still coming to terms with just how smoothly the LHC commissioning is going,” said CERN Director General Rolf Heuer. “It is fantastic. However, we are continuing to take it step by step, and there is still a lot to do before we start physics in 2010. I’m keeping my champagne on ice until then.” These developments come just 10 days after the LHC restart, demonstrating the excellent performance of the machine. First beams were injected into the LHC on Friday 20 November. Over the following days, the machine’s operators circulated...

  16. Alison Gill – "To See a World", an exhibition of new sculpture and works on paper

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Wednesday, 11 December 2013 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Library, bldg. 52 1-052 "Sculpture stories and invisible things" How might the presence of an artist influence the CMS experiment? And how does the LHC change the artist and the work they make? Over the last two decades, I have worked with a wide range of media to create both sculpture and drawing. The interdisciplinary approach that I have taken has often involved engagement and dialogues with scientists. Through my art, I explore the stories we tell to make sense of things that seem beyond our conscious grasp, taking familiar objects and materials and re-purposing, casting or altering the meaning. Underlying themes have included folklore, beliefs and methods used in the pursuit of transcendence. Knots, Klein bottles and Möbius strips have also been used for their topological, emotive and metaphysical associations. I try to scrutinise the world around me to find hidden meanings and use humour to provoke thought, elicit c...

  17. Corporate Governance and Social Media : A Brave New World for Board Directors

    OpenAIRE

    Chaher, Santiago; Spellman, James David

    2012-01-01

    Publication of secret diplomatic cables through Wikileaks shocked governments and provided a sudden wake-up call to all who thought they were safe from the new power of social media. Consequences went well beyond mere embarrassment; they helped spark the first 'Arab spring' uprising in Tunisia, and other forms of social media helped sustain popular dissent elsewhere in the Middle East and ...

  18. Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 New Features The Real-world Tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jim

    2011-01-01

    This book is packed with practical steps and screenshots to make learning fun and addictive. You will learn to build a complete Airline Compensation Management system using Dynamics CRM 2011. If you want a focused book that gets you up-to-speed with the new features of Microsft Dynamics CRM 2011 then this is the perfect book for you.

  19. A Vice-President from the Business World Brings a New Bottom Line to Penn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Werf, Martin

    1999-01-01

    The executive vice-president of the University of Pennsylvania is credited with making significant changes in both the administration and the campus, using cost-cutting and change strategies from his business experience. Outsourcing, training for employees who might be terminated, substantial savings and new revenue, and gentrification of…

  20. Fine Motor Skills and Early Comprehension of the World: Two New School Readiness Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissmer, David; Grimm, Kevin J.; Aiyer, Sophie M.; Murrah, William M.; Steele, Joel S.

    2010-01-01

    Duncan et al. (2007) presented a new methodology for identifying kindergarten readiness factors and quantifying their importance by determining which of children's developing skills measured around kindergarten entrance would predict later reading and math achievement. This article extends Duncan et al.'s work to identify kindergarten readiness…

  1. Public Health Threat of New, Reemerging, and Neglected Zoonoses in the Industrialized World

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cutler, S.J.; Fooks, A.R.; Poel, van der W.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Microbiologic infections acquired from animals, known as zoonoses, pose a risk to public health. An estimated 60% of emerging human pathogens are zoonotic. Of these pathogens, >71% have wildlife origins. These pathogens can switch hosts by acquiring new genetic combinations that have altered path

  2. Cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage: time for a new world of thought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pluta, Ryszard M; Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Dreier, Jens;

    2009-01-01

    this review are highlights of research from North America, Europe and Asia reflecting recent advances in the understanding of delayed ischemic deficit. RESULT: It will focus on current accepted mechanisms and on new frontiers in vasospasm research. CONCLUSION: A key issue is the recognition of events...

  3. Alphacoronaviruses in New World Bats: Prevalence, Persistence, Phylogeny, and Potential for Interaction with Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Christina; Cryan, Paul M.; O'Shea, Thomas J.; Oko, Lauren M.; Ndaluka, Christina; Calisher, Charles H.; Berglund, Andrew D.; Klavetter, Mead L.; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Dominguez, Samuel R.

    2011-01-01

    Bats are reservoirs for many different coronaviruses (CoVs) as well as many other important zoonotic viruses. We sampled feces and/or anal swabs of 1,044 insectivorous bats of 2 families and 17 species from 21 different locations within Colorado from 2007 to 2009. We detected alphacoronavirus RNA in bats of 4 species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), 10% prevalence; long-legged bats (Myotis volans), 8% prevalence; little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), 3% prevalence; and western long-eared bats (Myotis evotis), 2% prevalence. Overall, juvenile bats were twice as likely to be positive for CoV RNA as adult bats. At two of the rural sampling sites, CoV RNAs were detected in big brown and long-legged bats during the three sequential summers of this study. CoV RNA was detected in big brown bats in all five of the urban maternity roosts sampled throughout each of the periods tested. Individually tagged big brown bats that were positive for CoV RNA and later sampled again all became CoV RNA negative. Nucleotide sequences in the RdRp gene fell into 3 main clusters, all distinct from those of Old World bats. Similar nucleotide sequences were found in amplicons from gene 1b and the spike gene in both a big-brown and a long-legged bat, indicating that a CoV may be capable of infecting bats of different genera. These data suggest that ongoing evolution of CoVs in bats creates the possibility of a continued threat for emergence into hosts of other species. Alphacoronavirus RNA was detected at a high prevalence in big brown bats in roosts in close proximity to human habitations (10%) and known to have direct contact with people (19%), suggesting that significant potential opportunities exist for cross-species transmission of these viruses. Further CoV surveillance studies in bats throughout the Americas are warranted.

  4. Alphacoronaviruses in New World bats: prevalence, persistence, phylogeny, and potential for interaction with humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Osborne

    Full Text Available Bats are reservoirs for many different coronaviruses (CoVs as well as many other important zoonotic viruses. We sampled feces and/or anal swabs of 1,044 insectivorous bats of 2 families and 17 species from 21 different locations within Colorado from 2007 to 2009. We detected alphacoronavirus RNA in bats of 4 species: big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus, 10% prevalence; long-legged bats (Myotis volans, 8% prevalence; little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus, 3% prevalence; and western long-eared bats (Myotis evotis, 2% prevalence. Overall, juvenile bats were twice as likely to be positive for CoV RNA as adult bats. At two of the rural sampling sites, CoV RNAs were detected in big brown and long-legged bats during the three sequential summers of this study. CoV RNA was detected in big brown bats in all five of the urban maternity roosts sampled throughout each of the periods tested. Individually tagged big brown bats that were positive for CoV RNA and later sampled again all became CoV RNA negative. Nucleotide sequences in the RdRp gene fell into 3 main clusters, all distinct from those of Old World bats. Similar nucleotide sequences were found in amplicons from gene 1b and the spike gene in both a big-brown and a long-legged bat, indicating that a CoV may be capable of infecting bats of different genera. These data suggest that ongoing evolution of CoVs in bats creates the possibility of a continued threat for emergence into hosts of other species. Alphacoronavirus RNA was detected at a high prevalence in big brown bats in roosts in close proximity to human habitations (10% and known to have direct contact with people (19%, suggesting that significant potential opportunities exist for cross-species transmission of these viruses. Further CoV surveillance studies in bats throughout the Americas are warranted.

  5. A new family of bizarre durophagous carnivorous marsupials from Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, M.; Hand, S. J.; Black, K. H.; Beck, R. M. D.; Arena, D. A.; Wilson, L. A. B.; Kealy, S.; Hung, T.-T.

    2016-05-01

    A new specimen of the bizarrely specialised Malleodectes mirabilis from middle Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area provides the first and only information about the molar dentition of this strange group of extinct marsupials. Apart from striking autapomorphies such as the enormous P3, other dental features such as stylar cusp D being larger than B suggest it belongs in the Order Dasyuromorphia. Phylogenetic analysis of 62 craniodental characters places Malleodectes within Dasyuromorphia albeit with weak support and without indication of specific relationships to any of the three established families (Dasyuridae, Myrmecobiidae and Thylacinidae). Accordingly we have allocated Malleodectes to the new family, Malleodectidae. Some features suggest potential links to previously named dasyuromorphians from Riversleigh (e.g., Ganbulanyi) but these are too poorly known to test this possibility. Although the original interpretation of a steeply declining molar row in Malleodectes can be rejected, it continues to seem likely that malleodectids specialised on snails but probably also consumed a wider range of prey items including small vertebrates. Whatever their actual diet, malleodectids appear to have filled a niche in Australia’s rainforests that has not been occupied by any other mammal group anywhere in the world from the Miocene onwards.

  6. The corbiculate bees arose from New World oil-collecting bees: implications for the origin of pollen baskets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Aline C; Melo, Gabriel A R; Renner, Susanne S

    2014-11-01

    The economically most important group of bees is the "corbiculates", or pollen basket bees, some 890 species of honeybees (Apis), bumblebees (Bombus), stingless bees (Meliponini), and orchid bees (Euglossini). Molecular studies have indicated that the corbiculates are closest to the New World genera Centris, with 230 species, and Epicharis, with 35, albeit without resolving the precise relationships. Instead of concave baskets, these bees have hairy hind legs on which they transport pollen mixed with floral oil, collected with setae on the anterior and middle legs. We sampled two-thirds of all Epicharis, a third of all Centris, and representatives of the four lineages of corbiculates for four nuclear gene regions, obtaining a well-supported phylogeny that has the corbiculate bees nested inside the Centris/Epicharis clade. Fossil-calibrated molecular clocks, combined with a biogeographic reconstruction incorporating insights from the fossil record, indicate that the corbiculate clade arose in the New World and diverged from Centris 84 (72-95)mya. The ancestral state preceding corbiculae thus was a hairy hind leg, perhaps adapted for oil transport as in Epicharis and Centris bees. Its replacement by glabrous, concave baskets represents a key innovation, allowing efficient transport of plant resins and large pollen/nectar loads and freeing the corbiculate clade from dependence on oil-offering flowers. The transformation could have involved a novel function of Ubx, the gene known to change hairy into smooth pollen baskets in Apis and Bombus. PMID:25034728

  7. Migratory New World Blackbirds (Icterids) Are More Neophobic than Closely Related Resident Icterids

    OpenAIRE

    Mettke-Hofmann, Claudia; Winkler, Hans; Hamel, Paul B.; Greenberg, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Environments undergo short-term and long-term changes due to natural or human-induced events. Animals differ in their ability to cope with such changes which can be related to their ecology. Changes in the environment often elicit avoidance reactions (neophobia) which protect animals from dangerous situations but can also inhibit exploration and familiarization with novel situations and thus, learning about new resources. Studies investigating the relationship between a species’ ecology and i...

  8. Public Debt around the World: A New Dataset of Central Government Debt

    OpenAIRE

    Jaimovich, Dany; Panizza, Ugo

    2006-01-01

    Commonly used datasets on the level of public debt provide incomplete country and period coverage. This paper presents a new dataset that includes complete series of central government debt for 89 countries over the 1991-2005 period and for seven other countries for the 1993-2005 period. The data set can be found at: http://www. iadb. org/res/pub_desc. cfm?pub_id=DBA-005

  9. Pioneering mobilities: new patterns of movement and motility in a mobile world

    OpenAIRE

    Sven Kesselring

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents empirical data from a research project on mobility pioneers. It shows new mobility patterns and constellations of mobility and immobility, movement and motility (mobility potential). The author raises the question as to whether the reported subject-oriented strategies for coping with the modern ‘mobility imperative’ open up a perspective on a structural change in the modern concept of mobility and mobility practice. The theory of reflexive modernization is used to discuss t...

  10. New Worlds on the Horizon: Earth-Sized Planets Close to Other Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Gaidos, Eric; Haghighipour, Nader; Agol, Eric; Latham, David; Raymond, Sean; Rayner, John

    2007-01-01

    The search for habitable planets like Earth around other stars fulfils an ancient imperative to understand our origins and place in the cosmos. The past decade has seen the discovery of hundreds of planets, but nearly all are gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn. Recent advances in instrumentation and new missions are extending searches to planets the size of the Earth, but closer to their host stars. There are several possible ways such planets could form, and future observations will soon tes...

  11. CoS: a new perspective of operating systems design for the cyber-physical world

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Vikram; Tovar, Eduardo; Pereira, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Our day-to-day life is dependent on several embedded devices, and in the near future, many more objects will have computation and communication capabilities enabling an Internet of Things. Correspondingly, with an increase in the interaction of these devices around us, developing novel applications is set to become challenging with current software infrastructures. In this paper, we argue that a new paradigm for operating systems needs to be conceptualized to provide aconducive ba...

  12. NEW RELATIONS BETWEEN NATURAL RESOURCES AND INDUSTRY IN A GLOBALIZED WORLD ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    CRISTIAN SIMA; CĂTĂLINA BONCIU; MARIUS BULEARCA; GHEORGHE MARINESCU

    2012-01-01

    Natural resources are not homogeneous in nature, having certain features in the productive process that require grouping them into different categories by different criteria. Consequently, natural resources cannot be addressed all at once, but only distinctly, according to relevant criteria selected based on the proposed goals. Changing approaches based resources (materials) to the knowledge, from quantity to quality, from mass products to new concepts of higher added value, follows a develop...

  13. A Key to New World Distatrix Mason (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), with Descriptions of Six New Reared Neotropical Species

    OpenAIRE

    Grinter, Christopher C.; Whitfield, James B; Connahs, Heidi; Dyer, Lee A.; Hallwachs, Winifred; Janzen, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    Six new species of the genus Distatrix Mason from Central and South America, D. loretta, D. xanadon, D. vigilis, D. pitillaensis, D. pandora Grinter, n. sp., and D. antirrheae Whitfield & Grinter, n. sp., are described from large-scale caterpillar inventory endeavors, mostly from the larvae of geometrid moths. Biological information and diagnostic features that distinguish these species from other previously described Distatrix, especially those from the Neotropical region, are provided; and ...

  14. GENETICS OF THE RABBIT FOR MEAT PRODUCTION : WHAT'S NEW SINCE THE WORLD RABBIT CONGRESS HELD IN BUDAPEST IN 1988? l A REVIEW.

    OpenAIRE

    De Rochambeau, H

    1997-01-01

    Abstract not available. Rochambeau, HD. (1997). GENETICS OF THE RABBIT FOR MEAT PRODUCTION : WHAT'S NEW SINCE THE WORLD RABBIT CONGRESS HELD IN BUDAPEST IN 1988? l A REVIEW. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/10427.

  15. Michele Renee Salzman, Marvina A. Sweeney & William Adler (eds., The Cambridge History of Religions in the Ancient World (2 vols. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Baruchello

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Michele Renee Salzman, Marvina A. Sweeney & William Adler (eds., The Cambridge History of Religions in the Ancient World (2 vols. (New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013

  16. UP KEEPING WITH THE NEW ERA OF DIGITAL WORLD: DIGITAL MARKETING & PROSPECTS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Bhargava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available -Digital Marketing is relatively new term in marketing. It has become more enlightened with the rise of E-commerce. According to a survey by Assocham, India's e- commerce market, which stood at $2.5 billion in 2009, reached $8.5 billion in 2012 and rose 88 per cent to touch $16 billion in 2013. The survey estimates the country's e-commerce market to reach $56 billion by 2023, driven by rising online retail. India's e-commerce market grew at a staggering 88 per cent in 2013 to $ 16 billion, riding on booming online retail trends and defying slower economic growth and spiraling inflation

  17. Ethical challenges in the new world of maternal-fetal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiel, Ryan M

    2016-06-01

    This article explores some of the complex ethical challenges that exist in the field of fetal diagnosis and treatment, especially surrounding maternal-fetal surgery. The rise of these new treatments force us to reconsider who or what is the fetus, what are our obligations to the fetus, and what are the limits to those obligations. In addition, we will consider provider and professional biases, disability issues, and how maternal-fetal surgery has, for a select group of women, changed the very experience of motherhood. PMID:26804036

  18. The end of the 'new world order'?: Security governance and US imperialism after 9/11

    OpenAIRE

    KRAHMANN, Elke

    2006-01-01

    The concept of global governance has emerged as a key theoretical approach since the 1990s. Applied to the transformation of international security, it has suggested a shift from the state-dominated bipolar system of the Cold War era to a new multipolar and multilateral security architecture in which state, non-state and international actors collaborate in the making and implementation of security policies. Then came September 11, 2001 and the war in Iraq. Today we appear to be more likely to...

  19. Docosapentaenoic acid derived metabolites and mediators - The new world of lipid mediator medicine in a nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weylandt, Karsten-H

    2016-08-15

    Recent years have seen the description and elucidation of a new class of anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators. The arachidonic acid (AA)-derived compounds in this class are called lipoxins and have been described in great detail since their discovery thirty years ago. The new players are mediators derived from fish oil omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), called resolvins, protectins and maresins. Taken together, these mediators are also called specialized pro-resolution mediators (SPMs). As compared to the AA/EPA/DHA-derived compounds, research regarding mediators formed from the n-3 and n-6 docosapentaenoic acids (DPAn-3 and DPAn-6) is sparse. However, mono- di- and trihydroxy derivates of the DPAs have anti-inflammatory properties as well, even though mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory action have not been fully elucidated. This review aims to summarize current knowledge regarding the DPA-derived SPMs and their actions. PMID:26546723

  20. The Challenge for Arms Control Verification in the Post-New START World

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuest, C R

    2012-05-24

    Nuclear weapon arms control treaty verification is a key aspect of any agreement between signatories to establish that the terms and conditions spelled out in the treaty are being met. Historically, arms control negotiations have focused more on the rules and protocols for reducing the numbers of warheads and delivery systems - sometimes resorting to complex and arcane procedures for counting forces - in an attempt to address perceived or real imbalances in a nation's strategic posture that could lead to instability. Verification procedures are generally defined in arms control treaties and supporting documents and tend to focus on technical means and measures designed to ensure that a country is following the terms of the treaty and that it is not liable to engage in deception or outright cheating in an attempt to circumvent the spirit and the letter of the agreement. As the Obama Administration implements the articles, terms, and conditions of the recently ratified and entered-into-force New START treaty, there are already efforts within and outside of government to move well below the specified New START levels of 1550 warheads, 700 deployed strategic delivery vehicles, and 800 deployed and nondeployed strategic launchers (Inter-Continental Ballistic Missile (ICBM) silos, Submarine-Launched Ballistic Missile (SLBM) tubes on submarines, and bombers). A number of articles and opinion pieces have appeared that advocate for significantly deeper cuts in the U.S. nuclear stockpile, with some suggesting that unilateral reductions on the part of the U.S. would help coax Russia and others to follow our lead. Papers and studies prepared for the U.S. Department of Defense and at the U.S. Air War College have also been published, suggesting that nuclear forces totaling no more than about 300 warheads would be sufficient to meet U.S. national security and deterrence needs. (Davis 2011, Schaub and Forsyth 2010) Recent articles by James M. Acton and others suggest that

  1. A new appreciation of nuclear energy's value in the United States and round the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US regulatory system for nuclear power facilities (NRC) must undergo reform both from a safety and economic point of view. Given the current state of affairs, reforms will include plant-specific criteria since there is at present a great difference between the best and worst American nuclear power stations. Generally speaking, however, US reactors have become considerably more reliable since 1985. A number of US public service corporations have already announced that they will be applying for permits to extend the service life of plants and to allow their modification. Total liberalization of the electric energy market in the United States is expected to provide an added impetus in favor of nuclear energy. Since the majority of US nuclear power plants are base-load suppliers, they are very competitive. In the USA, however, the construction of new nuclear power stations based on advanced light-water reactor developments is also being considered. The US Regulatory Commission has already certified three new reactor developments of this type and has granted permission for their construction. (orig./GL)

  2. A taxonomic revision of the New World genus Oropodes Casey (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Pselaphinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Chandler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The genus Oropodes is characterized and revised with 18 species being treated. Members of this genus are found in temperate forests to desert brush lands from Oregon to Baja California, but are associated primarily with dry forests and shrub lands of California. Keys to males and Females, where known, are provided. Seven species are redescribed: O. arcaps (California, O. dybasi (Oregon, O. ishii (California, O. nuclere (California, O. orbiceps (California, O. rumseyensis (California, O. yollabolly (California. The name Oropodes raffrayi (California is raised from synonymy and the species is redescribed, stat. n. Ten new species are described: O. aalbui (California, O. bellorum (California, O. casson (California, O. chumash (California, O. esselen (California, O. hardyi (California, O. serrano (California, O. tataviam (California, O. tongva (California, and O. tipai (Baja California, Mexico, stat. n. These species are placed into three species groups: the arcaps-group, the orbiceps-group, and the raffrayi-group. Data for a new record of Euplecterga fideli are given, and a list of the unassociated Oropodes Females with distinctive genitalia is included with their label data.

  3. Military leadership with an operational effect in asymmetric operations - A new military leadership training concept in a new world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Jakob Rømer

    2015-01-01

    cultures and backgrounds who must work together under great pressure: if necessary, they must take the life of others and risk their own lives in order to achieve specific goals. An important part of the preparation is a process of creating a common language and shared concepts between team members....... Suddenly, it was extremely important that the Danish Defence transformed to a more expeditionary force capable of conducting asymmetric operations in different environments far away from Denmark. This is not done overnight but demands a new situational awareness in proportion to the need for leadership...

  4. Immatures of the New World treehopper tribe Amastrini (Hemiptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae) with a key to genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKamey, Stuart H; Wallner, Adam M; Porter, Mitchell J

    2015-01-01

    The immatures stages of 8 of the 11 genera (Amastris Stål, Bajulata Ball, Erosne Stål, Harmonides Kirkaldy, Idioderma Van Duzee, Neotynelia Creão-Duarte & Sakakibara, Tynelia Stål, and Vanduzea Goding) of the tribe Amastrini are described for the first time along with brief diagnoses of Membracidae and the subfamily Smiliinae. A key to genera and notes on biology are provided. Multiple species of most genera are illustrated. Based on its distinct nymphal morphology, Vanduzea laeta nolina Ball is elevated to specific rank as Vanduzea nolina stat. n., and Bajulata, despite the superficial similarity of its adults to those of Vanduzea, is confirmed as warranting generic rank based on its unique nymphal morphology. Colombia is a new country record for Tynelia. PMID:26478706

  5. International oil and gas strategies: corporate planning in the new world order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corporate planning process at Chevron Overseas Petroleum Inc. was totally revamped 5 years ago. The company's international exploration and production activities have forced them to recognize that business objectives and strategic plans must be aligned. The planning process described here involves staff groups from the departmental level up to the top of the organization, each providing input to goals and objectives. New venture planning, project approval, the role of technology transfer, and most importantly, the changing role of managing people resources, were discussed. With regard to 'people management' the need for team players, a variety of technical, linguistic, entrepreneurial, and technology transfer skills, adaptability, cultural awareness, and mobility, have been identified as the key ingredients for all successful players in the international arena

  6. New worlds on the horizon: Earth-sized planets close to other stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaidos, Eric; Haghighipour, Nader; Agol, Eric; Latham, David; Raymond, Sean; Rayner, John

    2007-10-12

    The search for habitable planets like Earth around other stars fulfills an ancient imperative to understand our origins and place in the cosmos. The past decade has seen the discovery of hundreds of planets, but nearly all are gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn. Recent advances in instrumentation and new missions are extending searches to planets the size of Earth but closer to their host stars. There are several possible ways such planets could form, and future observations will soon test those theories. Many of these planets we discover may be quite unlike Earth in their surface temperature and composition, but their study will nonetheless inform us about the process of planet formation and the frequency of Earth-like planets around other stars. PMID:17932279

  7. New Worlds on the Horizon: Earth-Sized Planets Close to Other Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Gaidos, Eric; Agol, Eric; Latham, David; Raymond, Sean; Rayner, John

    2007-01-01

    The search for habitable planets like Earth around other stars fulfils an ancient imperative to understand our origins and place in the cosmos. The past decade has seen the discovery of hundreds of planets, but nearly all are gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn. Recent advances in instrumentation and new missions are extending searches to planets the size of the Earth, but closer to their host stars. There are several possible ways such planets could form, and future observations will soon test those theories. Many of these planets we discover may be quite unlike Earth in their surface temperature and composition, but their study will nonetheless inform us about the process of planet formation and the frequency of Earth-like planets around other stars.

  8. Evolutionary Mechanics: new engineering principles for the emergence of flexibility in a dynamic and uncertain world

    CERN Document Server

    Whitacre, James M; Bender, Axel; Yao, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Engineered systems are designed to deftly operate under predetermined conditions yet are notoriously fragile when unexpected perturbations arise. In contrast, biological systems operate in a highly flexible manner; learn quickly adequate responses to novel conditions, and evolve new routines/traits to remain competitive under persistent environmental change. A recent theory on the origins of biological flexibility has proposed that degeneracy - the existence of multi-functional components with partially overlapping functions - is a primary determinant of the robustness and adaptability found in evolved systems. While degeneracy's contribution to biological flexibility is well documented, there has been little investigation of degeneracy design principles for achieving flexibility in systems engineering. Actually, the conditions that can lead to degeneracy are routinely eliminated in engineering design. With the planning of transportation vehicle fleets taken as a case study, this paper reports evidence that d...

  9. Immatures of the New World treehopper tribe Amastrini (Hemiptera, Membracidae, Smiliinae) with a key to genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKamey, Stuart H.; Wallner, Adam M.; Porter, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The immatures stages of 8 of the 11 genera (Amastris Stål, Bajulata Ball, Erosne Stål, Harmonides Kirkaldy, Idioderma Van Duzee, Neotynelia Creão-Duarte & Sakakibara, Tynelia Stål, and Vanduzea Goding) of the tribe Amastrini are described for the first time along with brief diagnoses of Membracidae and the subfamily Smiliinae. A key to genera and notes on biology are provided. Multiple species of most genera are illustrated. Based on its distinct nymphal morphology, Vanduzea laeta nolina Ball is elevated to specific rank as Vanduzea nolina stat. n., and Bajulata, despite the superficial similarity of its adults to those of Vanduzea, is confirmed as warranting generic rank based on its unique nymphal morphology. Colombia is a new country record for Tynelia. PMID:26478706

  10. A revision of the New World genus Aptilotella Duda (Sphaeroceridae: Limosininae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Stephen P L; Marshall, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    The genus Aptilotella Duda (Diptera: Sphaeroceridae: Limosininae) is redefined and revised. The type species, Aptilotella borgmeieri Duda is redescribed, and twenty-seven species are described as new: Aptilotella andersoni sp. n., A. angela sp. n., A. caerulea sp. n., A. corona sp. n., A. diffisa sp. n., A. ebenea sp. n., A. erinacea sp. n., A. gemmula sp. n., A. germana sp. n., A. gladia sp. n., A. gloriosa sp. n., A. gracilis sp. n., A. hamata sp. n., A. involucris sp. n., A. macta sp. n., A. macula sp. n., A. pennifera sp. n., A. pichin chensis sp. n., A. pyropanda sp. n., A. quadrata sp. n., A. quatuorchela sp. n., A. radians sp. n., A. simplex sp. n., A. solaria sp. n., A. sphyra sp. n., A. umbracatus sp. n., and A. viva sp. n. A phylogenetic analysis and key to species are presented, with illustrations and distributional notes. PMID:24870274

  11. First isolation of tandemly repeated DNA sequences in New World vultures and phylogenetic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, C; Montagnon, D; Schlee, M; Ludes, B; Pfitzinger, H; Mangin, P

    1996-02-01

    A highly repeated DNA sequence composed of closely related subunits that ranged from 171 to 176 base pairs has been cloned and characterized in the king vulture (Sarcoramphus papa). Related sequences were also isolated in the black vulture (Coragyps atratus). This new family of avian repetitive DNA elements is here termed the "HaeIII family." Genomic DNAs from a number of avian species were probed with one of the king vulture restriction fragments. In the cathartids, the hybridization patterns showed no individual or sexual variations. A strong HaeIII ladder was present in the two aforementioned species as well as in the Andean condor (Vultur gryphus), but in the black vulture the bands of the ladder alternated in intensity. Weaker hybridization signals were obtained in two ciconids, the jabiru stork (Jabiru mycteria) and the white stork (Ciconia ciconia). The HaeIII repeat was not detected in accipitrid birds of prey, a Polyborinae falconid, pelecanids, and psittacids. PMID:8851796

  12. Design and Selection of a Camelid Single-Chain Antibody Yeast Two-Hybrid Library Produced De Novo for the Cap Protein of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2)

    OpenAIRE

    Xiangjing Fu; Xiaolong Gao; Shengfang He; Di Huang; Peng Zhang; Xinglong Wang; Shuxia Zhang; Ruyi Dang; Shuanghui Yin; Enqi Du; Zengqi Yang

    2013-01-01

    Nanobodies (or variable domain of the heavy chain of the heavy-chain antibodies, VHHs) are single-domain antigen-binding fragments derived from camelid heavy chain antibodies. Their comparatively small size, monomeric behavior, high stability, high solubility, and ability to bind epitopes inaccessible to conventional antibodies make them especially suitable for many therapeutic and biotechnological applications. In this paper, for the first time, we created the immunized Camelus Bactrianus VH...

  13. Doing it for Real: Designing Experiential Journalism Curricula that Prepare Students for the New and Uncertain World of Journalism Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanti St Clair

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The world of journalism in the digital age is changing faster than university curricula can keep up. News is now produced in forms and on platforms that were nonexistent 10 years ago. Journalists may increasingly generate their own work opportunities in entrepreneurial news outlets and start-ups, rather than as employees in legacy newsprint and broadcast media. Substantial workforce contraction has also occurred since 2012 as revenue in print and other traditional media has found new homes in social media and search engines, and over 1000 journalists (or 15 percent of the journalism workforce were made redundant. Journalism graduates therefore need to be flexible, innovative and enterprising to survive professionally in this evolving setting. Additionally, financial and funding pressures on universities are leading them to reduce course costs and deliver more courses online. Elongated unpaid internships provide real world experience but access to these will likely reduce as workforces continue to contract. This article considers student feedback from three authentic experiential journalism projects in light of these changing times in journalism. It explores how the performative and very practical nature of traditional and digital journalism skills may be developed through a learning-centred curriculum anchored in authentic and experiential activities and settings. The article briefly considers some of the challenges facing journalism educators in delivering such a curriculum in e-learning settings, and sets out a simple framework for supporting the development of digital media workforce readiness.

  14. Doing it for Real: Designing Experiential Journalism Curricula that Prepare Students for the New and Uncertain World of Journalism Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanti St Clair

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The world of journalism in the digital age is changing faster than university curricula can keep up. News is now produced in forms and on platforms that were non - existent 10 years ago. Journalists may increasingly generate their own work opportunities in entrepreneurial news outlets and start - ups, rather than as employees in legacy newsprint and broadcast media. Substantial workforce contraction has also occurred since 2012 as revenue in print and other traditional media has found new homes in social media and search engines, and over 1000 journalists (or 15 percent of the journalism workforce were made redundant. Journalism graduates therefore need to be flexible, innovative and enterpr ising to survive professionally in this evolving setting. Additional ly, financial and funding pressures on universities are leading them to reduce course costs and deliver more courses online. Elongated unpaid internships provide real world experience but access to these will likely reduce as workforces continue to contract. This article considers student feedback from three authentic experiential journalism projects in light of these changing times in journalism. It explores how the performative and very p ractical nature of traditional and digital journalism skills may be developed through a learning - centred curriculum anchored in authentic and experiential activities and settings. The article briefly considers some of the challenges facing journalism educa tors in delivering such a curriculum in e - learning settings, and sets out a simple framework for supporting the development of digital media workforce readiness.

  15. Migratory New World blackbirds (icterids are more neophobic than closely related resident icterids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mettke-Hofmann

    Full Text Available Environments undergo short-term and long-term changes due to natural or human-induced events. Animals differ in their ability to cope with such changes which can be related to their ecology. Changes in the environment often elicit avoidance reactions (neophobia which protect animals from dangerous situations but can also inhibit exploration and familiarization with novel situations and thus, learning about new resources. Studies investigating the relationship between a species' ecology and its neophobia have so far been restricted to comparing only a few species and mainly in captivity. The current study investigated neophobia reactions to experimentally-induced changes in the natural environment of six closely-related blackbird species (Icteridae, including two species represented by two distinct populations. For analyses, neophobic reactions (difference in number of birds feeding and time spent feeding with and without novel objects were related to several measures of ecological plasticity and the migratory strategy (resident or migratory of the population. Phylogenetic relationships were incorporated into the analysis. The degree of neophobia was related to migratory strategy with migrants expressing much higher neophobia (fewer birds feeding and for a shorter time with objects present than residents. Furthermore, neophobia showed a relationship to diet breadth with fewer individuals of diet generalists than specialists returning when objects were present supporting the dangerous niche hypothesis. Residents may have evolved lower neophobia as costs of missing out on opportunities may be higher for residents than migrants as the former are restricted to a smaller area. Lower neophobia allows them approaching changes in the environment (e.g. novel objects quickly, thereby securing access to resources. Additionally, residents have a greater familiarity with similar situations in the area than migrants and the latter may, therefore, initially

  16. Driving factors for the evolution of species-specific echolocation call design in new world free-tailed bats (molossidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kirsten; Molinari, Jesús; Kalko, Elisabeth K V

    2014-01-01

    Phylogeny, ecology, and sensorial constraints are thought to be the most important factors influencing echolocation call design in bats. The Molossidae is a diverse bat family with a majority of species restricted to tropical and subtropical regions. Most molossids are specialized to forage for insects in open space, and thus share similar navigational challenges. We use an unprecedented dataset on the echolocation calls of 8 genera and 18 species of New World molossids to explore how habitat, phylogenetic relatedness, body mass, and prey perception contribute to echolocation call design. Our results confirm that, with the exception of the genus Molossops, echolocation calls of these bats show a typical design for open space foraging. Two lines of evidence point to echolocation call structure of molossids reflecting phylogenetic relatedness. First, such structure is significantly more similar within than among genera. Second, except for allometric scaling, such structure is nearly the same in congeneric species. Despite contrasting body masses, 12 of 18 species call within a relatively narrow frequency range of 20 to 35 kHz, a finding that we explain by using a modeling approach whose results suggest this frequency range to be an adaptation optimizing prey perception in open space. To conclude, we argue that the high variability in echolocation call design of molossids is an advanced evolutionary trait allowing the flexible adjustment of echolocation systems to various sensorial challenges, while conserving sender identity for social communication. Unraveling evolutionary drivers for echolocation call design in bats has so far been hampered by the lack of adequate model organisms sharing a phylogenetic origin and facing similar sensorial challenges. We thus believe that knowledge of the echolocation call diversity of New World molossid bats may prove to be landmark to understand the evolution and functionality of species-specific signal design in bats. PMID

  17. The world goes modern: new globalized framings of the postwar era in the contemporary exhibitions After Year Zero and The World Goes Pop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Handberg

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the contemporary art historical focus on multiple modernities through two significant exhibitions: After Year Zero at Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin 2013/Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw 2015 and The World Goes Pop, Tate Modern, London (2015. These different exhibitions are aimed at re-reading the post-1945 era in a global context, discussing how arts and culture responded to a global modernity. The article emphasizes the overlapping interests in this by academic art history and criticism as well as museal and curatorial efforts and discusses the idea of curatorial research in these different approaches.

  18. A FRET-based real-time PCR assay to identify the main causal agents of New World tegumentary leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Tsukayama

    Full Text Available In South America, various species of Leishmania are endemic and cause New World tegumentary leishmaniasis (NWTL. The correct identification of these species is critical for adequate clinical management and surveillance activities. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay and evaluated its diagnostic performance using 64 archived parasite isolates and 192 prospectively identified samples collected from individuals with suspected leishmaniasis enrolled at two reference clinics in Lima, Peru. The real-time PCR assay was able to detect a single parasite and provided unambiguous melting peaks for five Leishmania species of the Viannia subgenus that are highly prevalent in South America: L. (V. braziliensis, L. (V. panamensis, L. (V. guyanensis, L. (V. peruviana and L. (V. lainsoni. Using kinetoplastid DNA-based PCR as a gold standard, the real-time PCR had sensitivity and specificity values of 92% and 77%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of conventional tests such as microscopy, culture and the leishmanin skin test (LST. In addition, the real-time PCR identified 147 different clinical samples at the species level, providing an overall agreement of 100% when compared to multilocus sequence typing (MLST data performed on a subset of these samples. Furthermore, the real-time PCR was three times faster and five times less expensive when compared to PCR - MLST for species identification from clinical specimens. In summary, this new assay represents a cost-effective and reliable alternative for the identification of the main species causing NWTL in South America.

  19. Phylogeny and biogeography of the New World siskins and goldfinches: rapid, recent diversification in the Central Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, Elizabeth J; Witt, Christopher C

    2015-06-01

    Time-calibrated molecular phylogenies can help us to understand the origins of the diverse and unique Andean avifauna. Previous studies have shown that the tempo of diversification differed between the Andes and adjacent lowland regions of South America. Andean taxa were found to have speciated more recently and to have avoided the decelerated diversification that is typical of Neotropical lowland clades. The South American siskins, a Pleistocene finch radiation, may typify this Andean pattern. We investigated the phylogenetic biogeography of all the New World siskins and goldfinches in new detail. To understand the specific role of the Andes in siskin diversification, we asked: (1) Was diversification faster in Andean siskin lineages relative to non-Andean ones? (2) Did siskin lineages move into and out of the Andes at different rates? We found that siskin lineages in the Andes had higher diversification rates and higher outward dispersal rates than siskin lineages outside the Andes. We conclude that páramo expansion and contraction in response to Pleistocene climatic cycles caused accelerated diversification and outward dispersal in Andean siskins. The younger average age of bird species in the Andes compared to lowland South America may be attributable to bursts of recent diversification in siskins and several other vagile, open-habitat clades. PMID:25796324

  20. Many-particle fragmentation processes in atomic and molecular physics. New insight into the world of correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Correlated many-particle dynamics in Coulombic systems, which is one of the unsolved fundamental problems in AMO-physics, can now be experimentally approached with so far unprecedented completeness and precision. The recent development of the COLTRIMS technique (COLd Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy) provides a coincident multifragment imaging technique for eV and sub-eV fragment detection. In its completeness it is as powerful as the bubble chamber in high energy physics. In recent benchmark experiments quasi snapshots (duration as short an atto-sec) of the correlated dynamics between electrons and nuclei has been made for atomic and molecular objects. This new imaging technique has opened a powerful observation window into the hidden world of many-particle dynamics. The principle of the new reaction microscope (synonym: COLTRIMS) will be presented. If imaging detectors based on fast delay-line position read-out are used multi-hit detection is possible. Even two particles hitting the detector at the 'same' instant (Δt < 1 ns) can simultaneously be detected. The number of detected multi-hits is practically only limited by the electronics needed to store in event mode all information. Several examples for COLTRIMS data will be shown: double excitation and ionization of He as well as complete differential data in momentum space for many particle fragmentation of molecules by ions and photons. The obtained information on e-e correlation is discussed

  1. Diversification and reproductive isolation: cryptic species in the only New World high-duty cycle bat, Pteronotus parnellii

    OpenAIRE

    Clare Elizabeth L; Adams Amanda M; Maya-Simões Aline Z; Eger Judith L; Hebert Paul DN; Fenton M Brock

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular techniques are increasingly employed to recognize the presence of cryptic species, even among commonly observed taxa. Previous studies have demonstrated that bats using high-duty cycle echolocation may be more likely to speciate quickly. Pteronotus parnellii is a widespread Neotropical bat and the only New World species to use high-duty cycle echolocation, a trait otherwise restricted to Old World taxa. Here we analyze morphological and acoustic variation and gen...

  2. Bioinformatic Analysis Reveals Genome Size Reduction and the Emergence of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Site in the Movement Protein of New World Bipartite Begomoviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Eric S; Kuchie, Joan; Duffy, Siobain

    2014-01-01

    Begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) infection is devastating to a wide variety of agricultural crops including tomato, squash, and cassava. Thus, understanding the replication and adaptation of begomoviruses has important translational value in alleviating substantial economic loss, particularly in developing countries. The bipartite genome of begomoviruses prevalent in the New World and their counterparts in the Old World share a high degree of genome homology except for a ...

  3. Diversification and reproductive isolation: cryptic species in the only New World high-duty cycle bat, Pteronotus parnellii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular techniques are increasingly employed to recognize the presence of cryptic species, even among commonly observed taxa. Previous studies have demonstrated that bats using high-duty cycle echolocation may be more likely to speciate quickly. Pteronotus parnellii is a widespread Neotropical bat and the only New World species to use high-duty cycle echolocation, a trait otherwise restricted to Old World taxa. Here we analyze morphological and acoustic variation and genetic divergence at the mitochondrial COI gene, the 7th intron region of the y-linked Dby gene and the nuclear recombination-activating gene 2, and provide extensive evidence that P. parnellii is actually a cryptic species complex. Results Central American populations form a single species while three additional species exist in northern South America: one in Venezuela, Trinidad and western Guyana and two occupying sympatric ranges in Guyana and Suriname. Reproductive isolation appears nearly complete (only one potential hybrid individual found. The complex likely arose within the last ~6 million years with all taxa diverging quickly within the last ~1-2 million years, following a pattern consistent with the geological history of Central and northern South America. Significant variation in cranial measures and forearm length exists between three of the four groups, although no individual morphological character can discriminate these in the field. Acoustic analysis reveals small differences (5–10 kHz in echolocation calls between allopatric cryptic taxa that are unlikely to provide access to different prey resources but are consistent with divergence by drift in allopatric species or through selection for social recognition. Conclusions This unique approach, considering morphological, acoustic and multi-locus genetic information inherited maternally, paternally and bi-parentally, provides strong support to conclusions about the cessation of gene flow and

  4. Identification and characterization of highly divergent simian foamy viruses in a wide range of new world primates from Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia P Muniz

    Full Text Available Foamy viruses naturally infect a wide range of mammals, including Old World (OWP and New World primates (NWP, which are collectively called simian foamy viruses (SFV. While NWP species in Central and South America are highly diverse, only SFV from captive marmoset, spider monkey, and squirrel monkey have been genetically characterized and the molecular epidemiology of SFV infection in NWPs remains unknown. We tested a large collection of genomic DNA (n = 332 comprising 14 genera of NWP species for the presence of SFV polymerase (pol sequences using generic PCR primers. Further molecular characterization of positive samples was carried out by LTR-gag and larger pol sequence analysis. We identified novel SFVs infecting nine NWP genera. Prevalence rates varied between 14-30% in different species for which at least 10 specimens were tested. High SFV genetic diversity among NWP up to 50% in LTR-gag and 40% in pol was revealed by intragenus and intrafamilial comparisons. Two different SFV strains infecting two captive yellow-breasted capuchins did not group in species-specific lineages but rather clustered with SFVs from marmoset and spider monkeys, indicating independent cross-species transmission events. We describe the first SFV epidemiology study of NWP, and the first evidence of SFV infection in wild NWPs. We also document a wide distribution of distinct SFVs in 14 NWP genera, including two novel co-speciating SFVs in capuchins and howler monkeys, suggestive of an ancient evolutionary history in NWPs for at least 28 million years. A high SFV genetic diversity was seen among NWP, yet these viruses seem able to jump between NWP species and even genera. Our results raise concerns for the risk of zoonotic transmission of NWP SFV to humans as these primates are regularly hunted for food or kept as pets in forest regions of South America.

  5. Brane New World

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Stephen William; Reall, H S

    2000-01-01

    We study a Randall-Sundrum cosmological scenario consisting of a domain wallin anti-de Sitter space with a strongly coupled large $N$ conformal fieldtheory living on the wall. The AdS/CFT correspondence allows a fully quantummechanical treatment of this CFT, in contrast with the usual treatment ofmatter fields in inflationary cosmology. The conformal anomaly of the CFTprovides an effective tension which leads to a de Sitter geometry for thedomain wall. This is the analogue of Starobinsky's four dimensional model ofanomaly driven inflation. Studying this model in a Euclidean setting gives anatural choice of boundary conditions at the horizon. We calculate the gravitoncorrelator using the Hartle-Hawking ``No Boundary'' proposal and analyticallycontinue to Lorentzian signature. We find that the CFT strongly suppressesmetric perturbations on all but the largest angular scales. This is trueindependently of how the de Sitter geometry arises, i.e., it is also true forfour dimensional Einstein gravity. Since generic ...

  6. Brane new world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, S. W.; Hertog, T.; Reall, H. S.

    2000-08-01

    We study a Randall-Sundrum cosmological scenario consisting of a domain wall in anti-de Sitter space with a strongly coupled large N conformal field theory living on the wall. The AdS-CFT correspondence allows a fully quantum mechanical treatment of this CFT, in contrast with the usual treatment of matter fields in inflationary cosmology. The conformal anomaly of the CFT provides an effective tension which leads to a de Sitter geometry for the domain wall. This is the analogue of Starobinsky's four dimensional model of anomaly driven inflation. Studying this model in a Euclidean setting gives a natural choice of boundary conditions at the horizon. We calculate the graviton correlator using the Hartle-Hawking ``no boundary'' proposal and analytically continue to Lorentzian signature. We find that the CFT strongly suppresses metric perturbations on all but the largest angular scales. This is true independently of how the de Sitter geometry arises, i.e., it is also true for four dimensional Einstein gravity. Since generic matter would be expected to behave like a CFT on small scales, our results suggest that tensor perturbations on small scales are far smaller than predicted by all previous calculations, which have neglected the effects of matter on tensor perturbations.

  7. New-World Nexus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In a major promotion for Sino-African economic ties, the African Development Bank Group convenes at Shanghai China’s teeming coastal hub of Shanghai has always attracted its share of people from the African continent. However, this May, in an unprecedent

  8. Brave new world

    OpenAIRE

    7

    2008-01-01

    Beginning with the recent history of capitalism and urbanization and moving into a thorough and complex discussion of the modern city, this book outlines the dynamics of what the author calls the third wave of urbanization, characterized by global capitalism’s increasing turn to forms of production revolving around technology-intensive artifacts, financial services, and creative commodities such as film, music, and fashion. The author explores how this shift toward a cognitive and cultural ...

  9. Brave New Mobile World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maya; Reid

    2011-01-01

    An oral history of the mobile app boom in East Africa APPS are taking East Africa by storm.As mobile phone penetration rates increase,technologists and software developers in the region are scrambling to provide bigger and better services for an evergrowing consumer base. At the center of this flurry of activity is Nairobi,Kenya. But Dar Es Salaam in Tanzania and Uganda’s

  10. Brave New Mobile World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maya Reid

    2011-01-01

    APPS are taking East Africa by storm.As mobile phone penetration rates increase,technologisis and software developers in the provide bigger and better services for an evergrowing consumer base.At the center of this flurry of activity is Nairobi,Kenya.But Dar Es Salaam in Tanzania and Uganda's Kampala may not be far behind.

  11. Embracing a New World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KERRY BROWN

    2010-01-01

    @@ People have been talking in Europe of an age of auster-ity since the end of2008. The expectation of large cuts to governments pending has been wide-spread. The question was just when the cuts would start.

  12. Can old-world and new-world monkeys judge spatial above/below relations to be the same or different? Some of them, but not all of them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Roger K R; Flemming, Timothy M; Hagmann, Carl Erick

    2016-02-01

    Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) with the aid of token training can achieve analogical reasoning, or the ability to understand relations-between-relations (e.g., Premack, 1976; Thompson, Oden, & Boysen, 1997). However, extraordinarily few numbers of old- and new-world monkeys have demonstrated this ability in variants of relational matching to sample tasks. Moreover, the rarity of replications leaves open the question of whether the results are normative for other captive colonies of the same species. In experiment one we attempted to replicate whether old world rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) might demonstrate the same level of proficiency on a spatial above/below relational matching task as reported for old world baboons (Papio papio). None of the rhesus monkeys attained above chance performances over 10,000 training trials. In experiment two we attempted to replicate results demonstrating that new-world capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) match above/below relations. The capuchin monkeys performed above chance only in the absence of 'Clever Hans' controls for cuing of the correct choice by the experimenters. These failures to replicate previously reported results demonstrate that some, but definitely not all monkeys can judge the equivalence of abstract 'relations between relations' and warrant further investigations into the behavioral and cognitive characteristics that underlie these similarities and differences within population and between individuals of different primate species. PMID:26581319

  13. Toxoplasmose em primatas neotropicais: estudo retrospectivo de sete casos Toxoplasmosis in New World primates: Retrospective study of seven cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata A. Casagrande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A toxoplasmose é considerada uma doença parasitária fatal em primatas neotropicais. O objetivo deste trabalho foi descrever, através de um estudo retrospectivo, os casos de toxoplasmose em primatas neotropicais. No período de 1999-2009 foram realizados 86 exames anatomopatológicos em primatas e a toxoplasmose foi a enfermidade mais comum (7/86, relatando-se um caso em sagui-do-tufo-preto (Callithrix penicillata e seis em bugio-ruivo (Alouatta guariba. Dois animais foram encontrados mortos e cinco morreram em poucos dias. Os sinais clínicos mais frequentes foram apatia e anorexia (5/7, distensão abdominal (4/7 e febre (3/7. Na necropsia observou-se esplenomegalia (4/7, hemorragia do trato digestório, linfonodos e bexiga (4/7, pulmões avermelhados (3/7 e hepatomegalia (2/7. No exame histopatológico evidenciou-se hepatite (7/7, esplenite (3/7, miocardite (2/7, enterite (2/7, linfadenite (1/7 e sialite (1/7 necróticas e, pneumonia intersticial (4/7. Em fígado, pulmões, baço, coração, linfonodos e glândula salivar havia taquizoítos de Toxoplasma gondii que foram também detectados pelo exame de imuno-histoquímica anti-T. gondii em fígado, baço e pulmões (5/7. A toxoplasmose pode causar alta mortalidade em colônias de primatas neotropicais e representar mais uma ameaça à conversação dessas espécies em cativeiro. Sendo assim, medidas preventivas devem ser tomadas para evitar a contaminação desses animais.Toxoplasmosis is considered to be a fatal parasitic disease in New World primates. The objective of this report was to describe, through a retrospective study, the toxoplasmosis cases in New World primates. From 1999 to 2009 eighty-six anatomopathological exams was performed in primates and toxoplasmosis was the most common disease (7/86. One case occurred in Black-Tufted-Marmoset (Callithrix penicillata and six in Brown-Howler monkeys (Alouatta guariba. Two monkeys were found death and five died within few days. The most

  14. Evolution of an interloop disulfide bond in high-affinity antibody mimics based on fibronectin type III domain and selected by yeast surface display: molecular convergence with single-domain camelid and shark antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsek, Dasa; Lippow, Shaun M; Hackel, Benjamin J; Gregson, Melissa W; Cheng, Paul; Kapila, Atul; Wittrup, K Dane

    2007-05-11

    The 10th human fibronectin type III domain ((10)Fn3) is one of several protein scaffolds used to design and select families of proteins that bind with high affinity and specificity to macromolecular targets. To date, the highest affinity (10)Fn3 variants have been selected by mRNA display of libraries generated by randomizing all three complementarity-determining region -like loops of the (10)Fn3 scaffold. The sub-nanomolar affinities of such antibody mimics have been attributed to the extremely large size of the library accessible by mRNA display (10(12) unique sequences). Here we describe the selection and affinity maturation of (10)Fn3-based antibody mimics with dissociation constants as low as 350 pM selected from significantly smaller libraries (10(7)-10(9) different sequences), which were constructed by randomizing only 14 (10)Fn3 residues. The finding that two adjacent loops in human (10)Fn3 provide a large enough variable surface area to select high-affinity antibody mimics is significant because a smaller deviation from wild-type (10)Fn3 sequence is associated with a higher stability of selected antibody mimics. Our results also demonstrate the utility of an affinity-maturation strategy that led to a 340-fold improvement in affinity by maximizing sampling of sequence space close to the original selected antibody mimic. A striking feature of the highest affinity antibody mimics selected against lysozyme is a pair of cysteines on adjacent loops, in positions 28 and 77, which are critical for the affinity of the (10)Fn3 variant for its target and are close enough to form a disulfide bond. The selection of this cysteine pair is structurally analogous to the natural evolution of disulfide bonds found in new antigen receptors of cartilaginous fish and in camelid heavy-chain variable domains. We propose that future library designs incorporating such an interloop disulfide will further facilitate the selection of high-affinity, highly stable antibody mimics from

  15. World law

    OpenAIRE

    Harold J. Berman; Robert W. Woodruff; James Barr Ames

    1999-01-01

    In the third millennium of the Christian era, which is characterised by the emergence of a world economy and eventually a world society, the concept of world law is needed to embrace not only the traditional disciplines of public international law, and comparative law, but also the common underlying legal principles applicable in world trade, world finance, transnational transfer of technology and other fields of world economic law, as well as in such emerging fields as the protection of the ...

  16. General Theory of Duality. A proposal to unifiy relativity theory, quantum mechanics and string theory - cognition for a new dynamic world view in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chase after a world formula is presently the most iridescent task for natural science. By the development of a radical new scientistic theory, unifying not only relativity and quantum theory as also astrophysics and string theory to a common view, the author lances the first serious candidate for a TOE (Theory of Everything) in the scientific discussion. The General Theory of Duality (GDT) offers not only surprising answers to fundamental questions of physics, but also discovers the smallest component of our universe, which is still known since a longer time, which we ignored: Planck's Constant. May be possible that by this book a new world view in physics can be created. (GL)

  17. Infection pattern and transmission potential of chikungunya virus in two New World laboratory-adapted Aedes aegypti strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengzhang; Kantor, Asher M; Lin, Jingyi; Passarelli, A Lorena; Clem, Rollie J; Franz, Alexander W E

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne virus belonging to the Togaviridae, which is transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus. We describe the infection pattern of CHIKV in two New World Ae. aegypti strains, HWE and ORL. Both mosquito strains were susceptible to the virus but showed different infection patterns in midguts and salivary glands. Even though acquisition of a bloodmeal showed moderate levels of apoptosis in midgut tissue, there was no obvious additional CHIKV-induced apoptosis detectable during midgut infection. Analysis of expression of apoptosis-related genes suggested that CHIKV infection dampens rather than promotes apoptosis in the mosquito midgut. In both mosquito strains, the virus was present in saliva within two days post-oral infection. HWE and ORL mosquitoes exhibited no salivary gland infection barrier; however, only 60% (HWE) to 65% (ORL) of the females had released the virus in their saliva at one week post-oral acquisition, suggesting a salivary gland escape barrier. CHIKV induced an apoptotic response in salivary glands of HWE and ORL mosquitoes, demonstrating that the virus caused pathology in its natural vector. PMID:27102548

  18. Sequence-characterized amplified regions that differentiate New World screwworms from other potential wound-inhabiting flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Joan A; Skoda, Steven R; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M; Lee, Donald J; Foster, John E

    2015-01-01

    New World screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel, 1858), were once devastating pests of warm-blooded animals in the United States before they were successfully eradicated using the sterile insect technique. Guarding against the introduction of screwworms to North America or any other screwworm-free area relies on rapid, reliable identification of suspected cases. In the current study, the DNA from excised markers generated by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction was used as the basis to generate 2 species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region molecular markers. Resulting primer pairs, named CR92A1 and J1A2 (each with forward and reverse components), produced amplicons of 852 and 848 base pairs, respectively. The 2 primer pairs successfully discriminated between C. hominivorax, Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius, 1775), 8 other species of blowflies, 3 noncalliphorid dipterans, and 1 nondipteran outlier. These primers may become important tools for veterinary laboratories and the screwworm eradication and exclusion program for rapid identification or verification of suspicious larval samples in presumed outbreaks. PMID:25387845

  19. Identification and functional analysis of a novel bradykinin inhibitory peptide in the venoms of New World Crotalinae pit vipers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel undecapeptide has been isolated and structurally characterized from the venoms of three species of New World pit vipers from the subfamily, Crotalinae. These include the Mexican moccasin (Agkistrodon bilineatus), the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis), and the South American bushmaster (Lachesis muta). The peptide was purified from all three venoms using a combination of gel permeation chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Automated Edman degradation sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established its peptide primary structure as: Thr-Pro-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-Asp-Val-Gly-Pro-Arg-OH, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1063.18 Da. A synthetic replicate of the peptide was found to be an antagonist of bradykinin action at the rat vascular B2 receptor. This is the first bradykinin inhibitory peptide isolated from snake venom. Database searching revealed the peptide to be highly structurally related (10/11 residues) with a domain residing between the bradykinin-potentiating peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide domains of a recently cloned precursor from tropical rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom gland. BIP thus represents a novel biological entity from snake venom

  20. Identification and functional analysis of a novel bradykinin inhibitory peptide in the venoms of New World Crotalinae pit vipers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Robert Leslie James; Graham, Ciaren; McClean, Stephen; Chen, Tianbao; O'Rourke, Martin; Hirst, David; Theakston, David; Shaw, Chris

    2005-12-23

    A novel undecapeptide has been isolated and structurally characterized from the venoms of three species of New World pit vipers from the subfamily, Crotalinae. These include the Mexican moccasin (Agkistrodon bilineatus), the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus viridis viridis), and the South American bushmaster (Lachesis muta). The peptide was purified from all three venoms using a combination of gel permeation chromatography and reverse-phase HPLC. Automated Edman degradation sequencing and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry established its peptide primary structure as: Thr-Pro-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-Asp-Val-Gly-Pro-Arg-OH, with a non-protonated molecular mass of 1063.18 Da. A synthetic replicate of the peptide was found to be an antagonist of bradykinin action at the rat vascular B2 receptor. This is the first bradykinin inhibitory peptide isolated from snake venom. Database searching revealed the peptide to be highly structurally related (10/11 residues) with a domain residing between the bradykinin-potentiating peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide domains of a recently cloned precursor from tropical rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) venom gland. BIP thus represents a novel biological entity from snake venom. PMID:16277978

  1. CENP-B box, a nucleotide motif involved in centromere formation, occurs in a New World monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntronpong, Aorarat; Kugou, Kazuto; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Ohshima, Kazuhiko; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Centromere protein B (CENP-B) is one of the major proteins involved in centromere formation, binding to centromeric repetitive DNA by recognizing a 17 bp motif called the CENP-B box. Hominids (humans and great apes) carry large numbers of CENP-B boxes in alpha satellite DNA (AS, the major centromeric repetitive DNA of simian primates). Only negative results have been reported regarding the presence of the CENP-B box in other primate taxa. Consequently, it is widely believed that the CENP-B box is confined, within primates, to the hominids. We report here that the common marmoset, a New World monkey, contains an abundance of CENP-B boxes in its AS. First, in a long contig sequence we constructed and analysed, we identified the motif in 17 of the 38 alpha satellite repeat units. We then sequenced terminal regions of additional clones and found the motif in many of them. Immunostaining of marmoset cells demonstrated that CENP-B binds to DNA in the centromeric regions of chromosomes. Therefore, functional CENP-B boxes are not confined to hominids. Our results indicate that the efficiency of identification of the CENP-B box may depend largely on the sequencing methods used, and that the CENP-B box in centromeric repetitive DNA may be more common than researchers previously thought. PMID:27029836

  2. Infection pattern and transmission potential of chikungunya virus in two New World laboratory-adapted Aedes aegypti strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengzhang; Kantor, Asher M.; Lin, Jingyi; Passarelli, A. Lorena; Clem, Rollie J.; Franz, Alexander W. E.

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging mosquito-borne virus belonging to the Togaviridae, which is transmitted to humans by Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus. We describe the infection pattern of CHIKV in two New World Ae. aegypti strains, HWE and ORL. Both mosquito strains were susceptible to the virus but showed different infection patterns in midguts and salivary glands. Even though acquisition of a bloodmeal showed moderate levels of apoptosis in midgut tissue, there was no obvious additional CHIKV-induced apoptosis detectable during midgut infection. Analysis of expression of apoptosis-related genes suggested that CHIKV infection dampens rather than promotes apoptosis in the mosquito midgut. In both mosquito strains, the virus was present in saliva within two days post-oral infection. HWE and ORL mosquitoes exhibited no salivary gland infection barrier; however, only 60% (HWE) to 65% (ORL) of the females had released the virus in their saliva at one week post-oral acquisition, suggesting a salivary gland escape barrier. CHIKV induced an apoptotic response in salivary glands of HWE and ORL mosquitoes, demonstrating that the virus caused pathology in its natural vector. PMID:27102548

  3. 世界地热能发电新进展%New Progress in the World Geothermal Power Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗兰德·洪恩; 李克文

    2012-01-01

    parts of the world, either in the countries, such as New Zealand, Indonesia, and the USA having a traditional interest in conventional geothermal resources, or in die countries having no historical interest in geothermal energy, such as Australia and Germany. The analysis conducted indicates that some new developments have followed well-worn paths using conventional hydrothermal resources in volcanic regions, while others have struck out in new directions involving Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) projects in non-volcanic regions. Technology advance has allowed to developing conventional resources with lower temperature, restricted water access, and constrained surface utilization. ECS projects have launched in a variety of different directions and places, currently the USA keeps six EGS projects in operation. Based on current status, the future for the operation expansion of geothermal developments depends on new fields exploration and technical challenges overcoming in known but not-yet-exploited fields. Two issues are currently being addressed hy the world geothermal community, they are (1) the productivity gap in the exploitation of fields, namely, temperature is too high for down-hole pumps, however it is too low for flash production: (2) the reliable EGS development procedures are able to ensure sustainable Dow rates and assure the public that seismologic disasters will not be induced.

  4. Divergent evolution and purifying selection of the H (FUT1 gene in New World monkeys (Primates, Platyrrhini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara do Nascimento Borges

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the coding region of the H gene was sequenced and analyzed in fourteen genera of New World primates (Alouatta, Aotus, Ateles, Brachyteles, Cacajao, Callicebus, Callithrix, Cebus, Chiropotes, Lagothrix, Leontopithecus, Pithecia, Saguinus, and Saimiri, in order to investigate the evolution of the gene. The analyses revealed that this coding region contains 1,101 nucleotides, with the exception of Brachyteles, the callitrichines (Callithrix, Leontopithecus, and Saguinus and one species of Callicebus (moloch, in which one codon was deleted. In the primates studied, the high GC content (63%, the nonrandom distribution of codons and the low evolution rate of the gene (0.513 substitutions/site/MA in the order Primates suggest the action of a purifying type of selective pressure, confirmed by the Z-test. Our analyses did not identify mutations equivalent to those responsible for the H-deficient phenotypes found in humans, nor any other alteration that might explain the lack of expression of the gene in the erythrocytes of Neotropical monkeys. The phylogenetic trees obtained for the H gene and the distance matrix data suggest the occurrence of divergent evolution in the primates.

  5. Initial investigation of three selective and potent small molecule oxytocin receptor PET ligands in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Aaron L; Freeman, Sara M; Barnhart, Todd E; Abbott, David H; Ahlers, Elizabeth O; Kukis, David L; Bales, Karen L; Goodman, Mark M; Young, Larry J

    2016-07-15

    The neuropeptide oxytocin is part of a neuroendocrine system that has physiological effects ranging from ensuring uterine myometrial contractions at parturition and post-partum mammary gland milk ejection to the modulation of neural control of social relationships. This initial study was performed to investigate the potential use of positron emission tomography (PET) for localizing oxytocin receptors in two New World primates. Three biomarkers for PET (1-3) that are known to have high affinity and selectivity for the human oxytocin receptor were investigated in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) via PET imaging. Brain penetration, and uptake in the salivary gland area were both observed with biomarkers 2 and 3. No brain penetration was observed with 1, but uptake was observed more specifically in several peripheral endocrine glands compared to 2 or 3. Biomarker 2, which displayed the best brain penetration of the three biomarkers in the marmoset, was then investigated in the monogamous coppery titi monkey (Callicebus cupreus) in a brain scan and a limited full body scan. No significant brain penetration of 2 was observed in the titi monkey, but significant uptake was observed in various locations throughout the periphery. Metabolism of 2 was suspected to have been significant based upon HPLC analysis of blood draws, but parent compound was still present near the end of the scan. Follow-up investigations will focus on next generation biomarkers bearing improved binding characteristics and brain penetrability as well as investigating tissue in regions where biomarker uptake was observed. PMID:27209233

  6. The New World challenge: Performance trends in wine production in major wine-exporting countries in the 2000s and their implications for the Australian wine industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euan Fleming

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anderson, K., Nelgen, S., 2011. Global Wine Markets, 1961 to 2009: A Statistical Compendium. University of Adelaide Press, Adelaide publication of an index of revealed comparative advantage suggests that the Australian wine industry had come under increased competition from other “New World” producers in the first decade of this century. We examine this influence by comparing the transformation of winegrapes into wine volume and value in the 11 largest wine-exporting countries during the years, 2000–2009. Our focus is on the challenge issued by other New World producers from the Southern Hemisphere to Australian producers, and the continuing challenge to Old World global supremacy by New World producers and its response. Four performance measures are used this study. Two key trends are evident. First, all countries migrated to higher price points, albeit with differing degrees of success: slightly declining productivity in transforming winegrapes into wine output was overwhelmed by price/quality effects, leading to substantial gains in transforming winegrapes into wine value. Second, New World producers plus Portugal and Spain were much more successful in achieving gains in their export value proposition than they were in extracting value in their domestic markets. Results show that Australian wine producers had lost some of their competitive advantage during the 2000s as their pre-existing strategy dominated by the export of high-volume wines by large companies at low to medium price points, and their reliance on a reputation for reliable good quality for the price point was beginning to fail in the face of competition from both New World and Old World producers. Acknowledgement of this outcome has led to a good deal of introspection, and recognition of the need to promote the wine regions of Australia, based on higher-quality wines, and to select and promote quality indicators.

  7. New NIH-funded Ultrasound Technology is Changing Lives around the World | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to dramatically improve patient care all over the world. With a one-hand user interface, Vscan provides portability along with impressive color Doppler blood flow displays. Photo: GE ... the nation and around the world, health professionals are turning to the Vscan, a ...

  8. An Ethical Reflection on Religion as the Voice of the Voiceless in the emerging New World Order in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Tinkasiimire

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Religion is becoming the voice of the voiceless in Africa today because it talks about human dignity. It says that human beings were created in the image of God, (Gen. 1:27 therefore, they ought to live in accordance with this. Human beings can only do this if they are guided by religious ethics which deals with things Paul says: “What eye has not seen and ear has not heard,” (1 Cor. 2: 9. Religious Ethics interprets the world with the eye of faith, with a spiritual touch, that is beyond the understanding of human beings. The guiding principle of a religious ethicist is: “do good and avoid evil at all times,” that is following in the footsteps of God who is Holy and perfect. Jesus teaches his follows that they should be holy. He tells his followers “Be perfect just as your heavenly Father is perfect” (Mt. 5: 48. As such a person following this tries to live, behave and act like a child of God. Many times human beings find that the voice of religion has been dwarf by different things- which Jesus calls the worries of this world (Mat. 13:22, such as new technologies, multi-national co-operations, greed for riches, corruption, illiteracy and poverty especially in Africa, and sometimes laziness. Contrary to this, Religious Ethics talks about virtuous living which enables a person to behave according to the community of believers. It talks about righteous behavior such as practicing justice, peace and love. Jesus teaches his followers in the Beatitudes that “Blessed are the poor in spirit, the meek, the merciful, the pure in heart and the peace-makers for they shall inherit the Kingdom of God, (Mt. 5: 3-10. In addition to this, Paul in his letter to the Galatians says that, “the fruits of the spirit is, love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control, (Gal. 5: 22-23. Paul also talks about the dictates of the flesh. The works of the flesh are immorality, impurity, hatred, jealousy, (Gal. 5

  9. Conference Papers from the Winter Symposium "Towards a New Ethical Imagination: Political and social values in a cosmopolitan world society", Turku, Finland, 10-12 February 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Dahl Rendtorff

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This collection of papers contains some of the best papers from the winter meeting of the study group “Towards a New Ethical Imagination: Political and social values in a cosmopolitan world society” of the Nordic Summer University.

  10. Delivering Geoscience Knowledge in Federal Systems: What Can the Old and New Worlds Learn from Each Other?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, I.; Broome, H.; Allison, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Across the globe, geological communities are facing the same four challenges: put simply, how do we best make data discoverable, shareable, viewable and downloadable, so that the user also has access to consistent data at a national and continental level? The principle of managing scientific data and knowledge where it is generated and is best understood is well established in the science community. The distributed nature of most data sources means the complementary delivery mechanism of web map services has become equally prevalent in the spatial data community. Together these two factors are driving a world-wide revolution in the way spatial geoscience information is being disseminated to its users. The outcome is that data are being managed and delivered from multiple component sources - a federated system - ie the individual states within a union. These systems exist in the USA, in Canada, in Australia, and progressively, also in Europe, where the European Union can be regarded as a federal analogue, and where new regulation is placing the force of law behind spatial data infrastructures. In these "systems" addressing the four challenges are however, far from simple. To address them means finding solutions to adequate but workable metadata description, data specifications which encompass the richness of the data but deliver continuity, web map interfaces which allow flexible access but are easy to use, and last but not least intellectual property rules that protect the originator but provide the data the users need. The models for collaboration emerging in each of the federated systems are moving towards consensus on a global digital integration framework in the geosciences. We draw draw on the rich experiences in North America and Europe, and explore the way the challenges have been articulated and addressed with a strong emphasis on gaining future benefit by sharing the lessons learned.

  11. A modern regional geological analysis of Venezuela - lessons from a major new world oil province on exploration in mature areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, M. (BP Exploracion de Venezuela, Stockley Park, Middlesex (United Kingdom)); Audemard, F. (Intevep, Miranda (Venezuela)); Valdes, G. (Petroleos de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela))

    1993-09-01

    Venezuela has produced some 44 billion bbl of oil since the early part of the century. As such, it represents one of the world's major oil producers and a mature petroleum province. However, major tracts of Venezuela's sedimentary basins remain underexplored and large discoveries are still being made in new and old reservoir systems. A regional geological analysis of Venezuela, focusing on basin evolution and sequence stratigraphy and incorporating data from the three national oil companies, is presented. The analysis presents a regionally consistent tectonostratigraphic model capable of explaining the evolution of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic basins of Venezuela and placing the major reservoir facies in their regional tectonic and sequence stratigraphic context. Four regional cross sections describe the stratigraphic and structural model. The model recognizes a Jurassic rifting event and inversion, succeeded by an Early Cretaceous passive margin. In western Venezuela, the Early Cretaceous passive subsidence is enhanced locally by extension related to the Colombian active margin. Venezuela experienced a major change in the Campanian with the initial collision of the Caribbean arc, recorded by foreland structuring and widespread stratigraphic changes. From the Campanian onward, the tectonostratigraphic evolution can be modeled in terms of a progressive southeast-directed arc-continent collision and the migration of the associated foredeep and rift basins. Within the tectonic framework, the major sequence stratigraphic units are identified and the reservoir distribution interpreted. This model provides a strong predictive tool to extrapolate reservoir systems into Venezuela's underexplored areas and to readdress its traditional areas.

  12. Preparing the way for coming area wide integrated pest management projects against the new world screwworm, Cochliomyia hominivorax, in MERCOSUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New World Screwworm (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax, was eradicated from the USA, Central America to Panama, but in most tropical regions of Latin America, the NWS is still a serious threat to livestock, provoking estimated annual losses of US$ 1.8 billion in Brazil. Between January and May 2009, a pilot-project was performed at the Brazil-Uruguay border. As the results were positive, novel regional Area-Wide Integrated Pest Management projects are being planned. To set a mass-rearing center based in South America is strategic when considering long-term programs. In partnership with CENA/USP and the Biofactory MOSCAMED Brazil, a project to produce sterile NWS started on 2009. The project aimed to maintain a colony of a regional NWS strain, to develop a mass-rearing system and a sterilization protocol by X rays, and to study the sterility induction in regional strains. A colony was successfully established. The adults were kept in cages and fed on a diet (honey and spray dried egg). The larvae were reared in a medium made of spray dried blood, spray dried egg, milk, water, formalin and Ecogel. Egg hatch has been of 80 ± 10%. From F1 to F22, the total amount of pupae produced was about 38 L (∼ 315,400 pupae). The mean adult emergence and sex ratio were 86.7 ± 3% and 0.59 ± 0.08 respectively. The mean pupal weight was 47.1 ± 1.7 mg. The estimated X ray doses to induce 99% sterility in males and females were 43.7 Gy and 47.5 Gy, respectively. To produce 1.5 L of pupae, the current cost is about US$ 15.00. (author)

  13. Highly polymorphic colour vision in a New World monkey with red facial skin, the bald uakari (Cacajao calvus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Josmael; Bowler, Mark; Heymann, Eckhard W; Roos, Christian; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2016-04-13

    Colour vision is highly variable in New World monkeys (NWMs). Evidence for the adaptive basis of colour vision in this group has largely centred on environmental features such as foraging benefits for differently coloured foods or predator detection, whereas selection on colour vision for sociosexual communication is an alternative hypothesis that has received little attention. The colour vision of uakaris (Cacajao) is of particular interest because these monkeys have the most dramatic red facial skin of any primate, as well as a unique fission/fusion social system and a specialist diet of seeds. Here, we investigate colour vision in a wild population of the bald uakari,C. calvus, by genotyping the X-linked opsin locus. We document the presence of a polymorphic colour vision system with an unprecedented number of functional alleles (six), including a novel allele with a predicted maximum spectral sensitivity of 555 nm. This supports the presence of strong balancing selection on different alleles at this locus. We consider different hypotheses to explain this selection. One possibility is that trichromacy functions in sexual selection, enabling females to choose high-quality males on the basis of red facial coloration. In support of this, there is some evidence that health affects facial coloration in uakaris, as well as a high prevalence of blood-borne parasitism in wild uakari populations. Alternatively, the low proportion of heterozygous female trichromats in the population may indicate selection on different dichromatic phenotypes, which might be related to cryptic food coloration. We have uncovered unexpected diversity in the last major lineage of NWMs to be assayed for colour vision, which will provide an interesting system to dissect adaptation of polymorphic trichromacy. PMID:27053753

  14. Niche-tracking migrants and niche-switching residents: evolution of climatic niches in New World warblers (Parulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Camila; Tenorio, Elkin A; Montoya, Paola; Cadena, Carlos Daniel

    2016-02-10

    Differences in life-history traits between tropical and temperate lineages are often attributed to differences in their climatic niche dynamics. For example, the more frequent appearance of migratory behaviour in temperate-breeding species than in species originally breeding in the tropics is believed to have resulted partly from tropical climatic stability and niche conservatism constraining tropical species from shifting their ranges. However, little is known about the patterns and processes underlying climatic niche evolution in migrant and resident animals. We evaluated the evolution of overlap in climatic niches between seasons and its relationship to migratory behaviour in the Parulidae, a family of New World passerine birds. We used ordination methods to measure seasonal niche overlap and niche breadth of 54 resident and 49 migrant species and used phylogenetic comparative methods to assess patterns of climatic niche evolution. We found that despite travelling thousands of kilometres, migrants tracked climatic conditions across the year to a greater extent than tropical residents. Migrant species had wider niches than resident species, although residents as a group occupied a wider climatic space and niches of migrants and residents overlapped extensively. Neither breeding latitude nor migratory distance explained variation among species in climatic niche overlap between seasons. Our findings support the notion that tropical species have narrower niches than temperate-breeders, but does not necessarily constrain their ability to shift or expand their geographical ranges and become migratory. Overall, the tropics may have been historically less likely to experience the suite of components that generate strong selection pressures for the evolution of migratory behaviour. PMID:26865303

  15. Molecular variation in AVP and AVPR1a in New World monkeys (Primates, Platyrrhini: evolution and implications for social monogamy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongren Ren

    Full Text Available The neurohypophysial hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP plays important roles in fluid regulation and vascular resistance. Differences in AVP receptor expression, particularly mediated through variation in the noncoding promoter region of the primary receptor for AVP (AVPR1a, may play a role in social phenotypes, particularly social monogamy, in rodents and humans. Among primates, social monogamy is rare, but is common among New World monkeys (NWM. AVP is a nonapeptide and generally conserved among eutherian mammals, although a recent paper demonstrated that some NWM species possess a novel form of the related neuropeptide hormone, oxytocin. We therefore characterized variation in the AVP and AVPR1a genes in 22 species representing every genus in the three major platyrrhine families (Cebidae, Atelidae and Pitheciidae. For AVP, a total of 16 synonymous substitutions were detected in 15 NWM species. No non-synonymous substitutions were noted, hence, AVP is conserved in NWM. By contrast, relative to the human AVPR1a, 66 predicted amino acids (AA substitutions were identified in NWM. The AVPR1a N-terminus (ligand binding domain, third intracellular (G-protein binding domain, and C-terminus were variable among species. Complex evolution of AVPR1a is also apparent in NWM. A molecular phylogenetic tree inferred from AVPR1a coding sequences revealed some consensus taxonomic separation by families, but also a mixed group composed of genera from all three families. The overall dN/dS ratio of AVPR1a was 0.11, but signals of positive selection in distinct AVPR1a regions were observed, including the N-terminus, in which we identified six potential positive selection sites. AA substitutions at positions 241, 319, 399 and 409 occurred uniquely in marmosets and tamarins. Our results enhance the appreciation of genetic diversity in the mammalian AVP/AVPR1a system, and set the stage for molecular modeling of the neurohypophyseal hormones and social behavior in

  16. Cophylogenetic analysis of New World ground-doves (Aves: Columbidae) and their parasitic wing lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera: Columbicola).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Andrew D; Johnson, Kevin P

    2016-10-01

    Hosts-parasite interactions are plentiful and diverse, and understanding the patterns of these interactions can provide great insight into the evolutionary history of the organisms involved. Estimating the phylogenetic relationships of a group of parasites and comparing them to that of their hosts can indicate how factors such as host or parasite life history, biogeography, or climate affect evolutionary patterns. In this study we compare the phylogeny generated for a clade of parasitic chewing lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) within the genus Columbicola to that of their hosts, the small New World ground-doves (Aves: Columbidae). We sampled lice from the majority of host species, including samples from multiple geographic locations. From these samples we sequenced mitochondrial and nuclear loci for the lice, and used these data to estimate phylogenetic trees and population networks. After estimating the appropriate number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) for the lice, we used cophylogenetic analyses to compare the louse phylogeny to an existing host phylogeny. Our phylogenetic analysis recovered significant structure within the louse clade, including evidence for potentially cryptic species. All cophylogenetic analyses indicated an overall congruence between the host and parasite trees. However, we only recovered a single cospeciation event. This finding suggests that certain branches in the trees are driving the signal of congruence. In particular, lice with the highest levels of congruence are associated with high Andean species of ground-doves that are well separated altitudinally from other related taxa. Other host-parasite associations are not as congruent, and these often involved widespread louse taxa. These widespread lice did, however, have significant phylogeographic structure, and their phylogenetic relationships are perhaps best explained by biogeographic patterns. Overall these results indicate that both host phylogeny and biogeography can be

  17. Iranotrichia gen. n., a new genus of Scenopinidae (Diptera) from Iran, with a key to window fly genera of the world

    OpenAIRE

    Shaun Winterton; Babak Gharali

    2011-01-01

    Abstract An unusual new genus of Scenopinidae, Iranotrichia gen. n., comprising two newly discovered species ( Iranotrichia insolita sp. n. and Iranotrichia nigra sp. n.), is described from Iran. Iranotrichia gen. n. are scenopinine window flies with a habitus reminiscent of certain bee fly genera (Bombyliidae), based on colouration and elongate mouthparts and antennae. The phylogenetic placement of this distinctive new genus is discussed and a dichotomous key to world genera is presented. Th...

  18. World Economic Outlook Global economy will continue the moderated upward trajectory of 2005 in the new year

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, world economic growth decelerated modestly in contrast to the robust performance of the previous year, due to repeated spikes in oil prices and a battery of interest rate hikes by the U.S. Federal Reserve.

  19. Energy Markets: Challenges of the New Century; Energy for World, Energy for Peace; proposal of Conclusions and Recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    World Energy Council was discussing at 18th World Energy Congress in Buenos Aires (Argentina) about following topics: inconstant prices of the oil and gas; cleaner technologies of burn up of oil, gas and coal; mutual relation between gas and electric energy and complex energy services; gas and drinking water; nuclear energy, hydroelectric power plant and CO2 emission; renewable energy and distributed production based on local resources; competition and efficiency

  20. Bringing the outside world into the mathematics classroom - New approaches to the use of video in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Clark-Wilson, A.; Oldknow, A.

    2009-01-01

    Many countries are exploring different approaches to create a more relevant mathematics curriculum through the use of real world examples in the classroom. In this paper we will share some of the classroom video resources that have been developed since the last ICTMT: the series World of Maths (Teachers TV 2008) and i-Maths (British Broadcasting Corporation 2008). This also complements the UK’s “STEM” (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) agenda (Her Majesty's Trea...

  1. [Spanish version of the new World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO-DAS-II): initial phase of development and pilot study. Cantabria disability work group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Barquero, J L; Vázquez Bourgón, E; Herrera Castanedo, S; Saiz, J; Uriarte, M; Morales, F; Gaite, L; Herrán, A; Ustün, T B

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to present the initial phases of the development of the Spanish version of the "World Health Organization Disablement Assessment Schedule II" WHO-DAS-II and also to describe the quantitative and qualitative methodological strategies used in the elaboration process of an instrument: i) compatible with the new International Classification of Functioning and Disability -ICIDH-2- of the World Health Organisation; ii) with criteria of cross-cultural applicability and; iii) to allow us to assess the disability in all its dimensions. PMID:10937388

  2. New Ways to Promote Sustainability and Social Well-Being in a Complex, Strongly Interdependent World: The FuturICT Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Helbing, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    FuturICT is one of six proposals currently being considered for support within the European Commission's Flagship Initiative (see Box 1). The vision of the FuturICT project is to develop new science and new information and communication systems that will promote social self-organization, self-regulation, well-being, sustainability, and resilience. One of the main aims of the approach is to increase individual opportunities for social, economic and political participation, combined with the creation of collective awareness of the impact that human actions have on our world. This requires us to mine large datasets ("Big Data") and to develop new methods and tools: a Planetary Nervous System (PNS) to answer "What is (the state of the world)..." questions, a Living Earth Simulator (LES) to study "What ... if ..." scenarios, and a Global Participatory Platform (GPP) for social exploration and interaction.

  3. Gas in the new world energy balance in the 21. century; Le gaz dans le nouvel equilibre energetique mondial au 21. siecle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameziane Dahmani, M.

    2000-07-01

    Energy is a field with various sensitivities. They are economic technical political and even geopolitical. These sensitivities strongly marked the evolution of the world energy scene by disturbances, crises and changes. Most of the energy crises the world has experienced most specially during the second half of the 20. century show break of the balance very much detrimental on the relationship and positions between the concerned parties. Therefore the question is whether with the gas development it would be possible to tend during the 21. century to a new world energy balance which would be stable and lasting. That would be legitimate in our opinion. In fact this is what this communication is proposing to deal with. (author)

  4. P53 Overexpression in Bladder Urothelial Neoplasms: New Aspect of World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmadnia

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the probable differences in P53 expression between papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP and varying grades of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder. Materials and Methods: Ten biopsy specimens of the patients with PUNLMP, 20 of the patients with papillary low-grade TCC, 20 of those with invasive high-grade TCC, and 10 of healthy individuals were stained for P53 protein by immunohitochemical methods. Histological grading was performed according to the World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology consensus classification of urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder. Results: Nuclear P53 protein in invasive high-grade TCC was slightly more frequent than that in noninvasive low-grade papillary TCC (P = .35. Ten percent of specimens with PUNLMP had nuclear P53 accumulation, while in low-grade and high-grade TCCs, 75% and 85% of the specimens were positive for P53 protein accumulation (P P53 was nil in all normal transitional epithelium specimens. Conclusion: Overexpression of P53 in papillary low-grade TCC and invasive high-grade TCC, while lacking of expression in PUNLMP indicates that mutations of P53

  5. A phylogenetic hypothesis for Crocodylus (Crocodylia) based on mitochondrial DNA: evidence for a trans-Atlantic voyage from Africa to the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Robert W; Hekkala, Evon R; Amato, George; Gatesy, John

    2011-07-01

    The phylogenetic relationships among extant species of Crocodylus (Crocodylia) have been inconsistently resolved by previous systematic studies. Here we used nearly complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes (∼16,200 base pairs) for all described Crocodylus species, eight of which are new to this study, to derive a generally well-supported phylogenetic hypothesis for the genus. Model-based analyses support monophyly of all Asian+Australian species and paraphyly of Crocodylus niloticus (Nile crocodile) with a monophyletic New World clade nested within this species. Wild-caught Nile crocodiles from eastern populations group robustly with the four New World species to the exclusion of Nile crocodiles from western populations, a result that is also favored by parsimony analyses and by various subpartitions of the overall mt dataset. The fossil record of Crocodylus extends back only to the Late Miocene, while the earliest fossils assigned to C. niloticus and to New World Crocodylus are Pliocene. Therefore, in combination with paleontological evidence, mt DNA trees imply a relatively recent migration of Crocodylus from Africa to the Americas, a voyage that would have covered hundreds of miles at sea. PMID:21459152

  6. Process Drama and Digital Games as Text and Action in Virtual Worlds: Developing New Literacies in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the intersections between drama and digital gaming and the educational possibilities for literacy of both. The article draws on a model for the educational uses of digital gaming and three case studies from the Australian Research Council funded three and a half year project, "Literacy in the digital world of the twenty first…

  7. Assessing genetic variation in natural populations of New World screwworm flies: Evidence from microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The New World screwworm fly (NWS), Cochliomyia hominivorax (Coquerel 1858, Diptera Calliphoridae), is an obligate ectoparasite that causes myiasis in warm-blooded vertebrates throughout the Neotropical region responsible for significant economic losses to livestock rearing. Because of the substantial economic losses caused by this pest, an international effort eradicated the NWS from endemic areas of North and Central America and is preventing invasions into screwworm-free areas. There have been conflicting reports about the existence of non-interbreeding populations and their possible effects on the control programme. The identification of such populations and an understanding of the genetic variability of target populations is necessary in order to maximize the effectiveness of an eradication programme. We have been using different molecular markers to investigate genetic variability and population structure of C. hominivorax throughout its current geographical distribution in South America in order to address these questions. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a marker for studying micro-evolutionary processes in animal populations and can be a suitable marker for estimating the genetic variability within populations. One approach for studying population structure of C. hominivorax population from Uruguay was PCR-RFLP of two specific mitochondrial DNA regions (A+T-rich/12S and cox1/cox 2). The aim of this study was to examine the genetic variability among geographically distinct populations of NWS from Brazil and Uruguay, to have a better scenario of the genetic structure of this species distribution. Nine haplotypes were observed among the populations sampled. The mean nucleotide diversity (π= 2.3%) and the haplotype diversity (Hs= 0.6533) indicated high mtDNA variability in this species. The similarity index (96.7%), the average nucleotide divergence (δ= 0.00055) and the AMOVA results showed no evidence of subpopulation differentiation. In this case

  8. Heat-shock protein 70 PCR-RFLP: a universal simple tool for Leishmania species discrimination in the New and Old World

    OpenAIRE

    Montalvo, A. M.; Fraga, J.; Monzote, L.; Montano, I.; De Doncker, S.; Dujardin, J. C.; Van der Auwera, G.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Introduction. Species typing in leishmaniasis gains importance in diagnostics, epidemiology, and clinical studies. A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay of PCR amplicons from a partial heat-shock protein 70 gene (hsp70) had been described for the New World, allowing identification of some species. Methods. Based on an initial in silico analysis of 51 hsp70 sequences, most of which we recently determined in the frame of a phylogenetic study, species-specific restricti...

  9. New Species in the Old World: Europe as a Frontier in Biodiversity Exploration, a Test Bed for 21st Century Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Fontaine, B; Achterberg, van, C.; Alonso-Zarazaga, M. A.; Araujo, R.; Asche, M.; Aspöck, H; Aspöck, U.; Audisio, P.; Aukema, B.; Bailly, N.; Balsamo, M; Bank, R. A.; Belfiore, C.; Bogdanowicz, W.; Boxshall, G.

    2012-01-01

    The number of described species on the planet is about 1.9 million, with ca. 17,000 new species described annually, mostly from the tropics. However, taxonomy is usually described as a science in crisis, lacking manpower and funding, a politically acknowledged problem known as the Taxonomic Impediment. Using data from the Fauna Europaea database and the Zoological Record, we show that contrary to general belief, developed and heavily-studied parts of the world are important reservoirs of unkn...

  10. Carpal valgus in llamas and alpacas: Retrospective evaluation of patient characteristics, radiographic features and outcomes following surgical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Barbara; Duesterdieck-Zellmer, Katja F.; Huber, Michael J.; Parker, Jill E.; Semevolos, Stacy A.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated outcomes of surgical treatment for carpal valgus in New World camelids and correlated successful outcome (absence of carpal valgus determined by a veterinarian) with patient characteristics and radiographic features. Univariable and multivariable analyses of retrospective case data in 19 camelids (33 limbs) treated for carpal valgus between 1987 and 2010 revealed that procedures incorporating a distal radial transphyseal bridge were more likely (P = 0.03) to result in suc...

  11. The New World economy. Report addressed to Ms Segolene Royal, Minister of Environment, Sustainable Development and Energy, working group led by Corinne Lepage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New World economy is an economy at the service of mankind, free of fossil and fissile energies, connected and relocated. Everywhere in the world, energy transition is taking place. France is no exception. We have in front of us living proof that an efficient, long-term economy serving the common good and creating employment is not only possible, but also capable to generate enthusiasm and confidence. A newer economic model becomes possible. Synergies are developing in France along this direction. Though, unfortunately, the tipping point has not yet been reached. Still, we have the capacity and it is our duty to commit ourselves to this new economy. The levers to be put in place are now clearly known: giving priority to health and well-being, acknowledging external factors, promoting intangible assets, innovating at the local level, and properly taking demand into account. It is also about bolstering the transformation of entrepreneur-ship already under way, introducing fairness in the economy by agreeing to address the question of profit distribution. Such revolutions imply that the rules of the game will change in the taxation, financial, legislative, and normative fields as well as in the area of vocational training. A number of reforms are recommended in the report: creation of certificates relating to systems of externality to finance the transition, a circular VAT as well as an incentive VAT for organic products and products of the circular economy, and massive development of complementary currencies, alternative financing and civic funds. The report also points to the necessary simplification of rules applicable to start-ups and small innovative companies, the promotion of Green Deals and the development of experimentation, the abolition of standards which favor entrenched privileges, as well as the support for state actors making innovative choices in terms of procurement in the public sector. We thus call for a Green Business Act that can put together

  12. Observations from Ground Zero at the World Trade Center in New York City, Part II: Theoretical and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Judith K; Levenson, Richard L

    2002-01-01

    Part I of this series discussed our observations of Ground Zero of the World Trade Center (WTC) immediately after the attack on September 11, 2001, as well as the stress-response of police officers on site. This paper offers a variety of clinical techniques for emergency mental health practitioners and first responders for use with victims of critical incidents. The suggested interventions are based on the theory and clinical practice of Emergency Medical Hypnosis, Neuro-Linguistic Programming, and Ericksonian Psychotherapy. Specific examples of how they were applied with police personnel following the World Trade Center attack are provided along with specific clinical guidelines. These interventions are designed to augment and enhance standard CISM, mental health, and medical practice in the field. PMID:12166017

  13. Meteorological conditions, climate change, new emerging factors, and asthma and related allergic disorders. A statement of the World Allergy Organization

    OpenAIRE

    D’Amato, Gennaro; Holgate, Stephen T; Pawankar, Ruby; Ledford, Dennis K; Cecchi, Lorenzo; Al-Ahmad, Mona; Al-Enezi, Fatma; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Ansotegui, Ignacio; Baena-Cagnani, Carlos E.; Baker, David J.; Bayram, Hasan; Bergmann, Karl Christian; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Buters, Jeroen T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of allergic airway diseases such as asthma and rhinitis has increased dramatically to epidemic proportions worldwide. Besides air pollution from industry derived emissions and motor vehicles, the rising trend can only be explained by gross changes in the environments where we live. The world economy has been transformed over the last 25 years with developing countries being at the core of these changes. Around the planet, in both developed and developing countries, environments...

  14. The social media challenge of Olá : first steps into the new world : cases on Marketing Strategies Seminar

    OpenAIRE

    Beeks, Hilco

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this dissertation is to explore and discuss the (potential) importance, possibilities and threats of social media to the contemporary corporate world. The dissertation is directed at Olá, the market leader of the Portuguese consumption ice cream market. The purpose of the dissertation therefore is to determine how Olá can use social media in the advantage of the company. The findings of the stated research questions are based on primary data, collected through interviews...

  15. More Favorable and Differential Treatment of Developing Countries : Toward a New Approach in the World Trade Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Hoekman, Bernard; Michalopoulos, Constantine; Winters, L. Alan

    2003-01-01

    The authors discuss options that could be considered in the World Trade Organization (WTO) to provide more favorable treatment-so-called special and differential treatment (SDT)-to small and low-income countries. They argue that there is a need both for differentiation across WTO members and for steps that would benefit all developing countries. The authors suggest the following to make th...

  16. THE NEW TENDENCY IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE EUROPEAN UNION COMMON TRADE POLICY DURING THE WORLD ECONOMIC CRISIS

    OpenAIRE

    Zdzisław W. Puślecki

    2013-01-01

    It is emphasized that the trade liberalization has a special positive significance in the global context. Due to technical progress and to the growth of economic ties between particular countries, participants in the world economy, the benefits resulting from liberalized international trade and from the freedom of movement of foreign direct investments become bigger not only for the industrialized countries but also for the so-called “emerging markets”, that is, the countries that find themse...

  17. Demystifying the German "Armament Miracle" During World War II. New Insights from the Annual Audits of German Aircraft Producers

    OpenAIRE

    Budraß, Lutz; Scherner, Jonas; Streb, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    Armament minister Albert Speer is usually credited with causing the boom in German armament production after 1941. This paper uses the annual audit reports of the Deutsche Revisions- und Treuhand AG for seven firms which together represented about 50 % of the German aircraft producers. We question the received view by showing that in the German aircraft industry the crucial changes that triggered the upswing in aircraft production already occurred before World War II. The government decided i...

  18. Iranotrichia gen. n., a new genus of Scenopinidae (Diptera) from Iran, with a key to window fly genera of the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterton, Shaun L; Gharali, Babak

    2011-01-01

    An unusual new genus of Scenopinidae, Iranotrichia gen. n., comprising two newly discovered species (Iranotrichia insolitasp. n. and Iranotrichia nigrasp. n.), is described from Iran. Iranotrichiagen. n. are scenopinine window flies with a habitus reminiscent of certain bee fly genera (Bombyliidae), based on colouration and elongate mouthparts and antennae. The phylogenetic placement of this distinctive new genus is discussed and a dichotomous key to world genera is presented. The genus name Kelseyananom. n. is proposed to replace Caenoneura Kröber, 1924, which was found to be preoccupied by Thomson (1870: 270) (Hymenoptera) and Kirby (1890: 136) (Odonata). PMID:22144855

  19. The genera Cosmopterix Hübner and Pebobs Hodges in the New World with special attention to the Neotropical fauna (Lepidoptera: Cosmopterigidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    The genera Cosmopterix Hübner, [1825] and Pebobs Hodges, 1978 (Cosmopterigidae) of the New World are revised, for the Neotropical fauna for the first time. A total of 102 species is recognized and 49 species are described as new: Cosmopterix adrastea spec. nov., C. amalthea spec. nov., C. ananke spec. nov., C. argentifera spec. nov., C. aurotegulae spec. nov., C. beckeri spec. nov., C. callisto spec. nov., C. carpo spec. nov., C. chaldene spec. nov., C. chalupae spec. nov., C. erinome spec. n...

  20. Iranotrichia gen. n., a new genus of Scenopinidae (Diptera from Iran, with a key to window fly genera of the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Winterton

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available An unusual new genus of Scenopinidae, Iranotrichia gen. n., comprising two newly discovered species (I. insolita sp. n. and I. nigra sp. n., is described from Iran. Iranotrichia gen. n. are scenopinine window flies with a habitus reminiscent of certain bee fly genera (Bombyliidae, based on colouration and elongate mouthparts and antennae. The phylogenetic placement of this distinctive new genus is discussed and a dichotomous key to world genera is presented. The genus name Kelseyana nom. n. is proposed to replace Caenoneura Kröber, 1924, which was found to be preoccupied by Thomson (1870: 270 (Hymenoptera and Kirby (1890: 136 (Odonata.