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Sample records for cam kinase ii

  1. Developmental distribution of CaM kinase II in the antennal lobe of the sphinx moth Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Christian; Bergstein, Sandra; Hirnet, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    The antennal lobe (primary olfactory center of insects) is completely reorganized during metamorphosis. This reorganization is accompanied by changing patterns of calcium signaling in neurons and glial cells. In the present study, we investigated the developmental distribution of a major calcium-dependent protein, viz., calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II), in the antennal lobe of the sphinx moth Manduca sexta by using a monoclonal antibody. During synaptogenesis (developmental stages 6-10), we found a redistribution of CaM kinase II immunoreactivity, from a homogeneous distribution in the immature neuropil to an accumulation in the neuropil of the glomeruli. CaM kinase II immunoreactivity was less intense in olfactory receptor axons of the antennal nerve and antennal lobe glial cells. Western blot analysis revealed a growing content of CaM kinase II in antennal lobe tissue throughout metamorphosis. Injection of the CaM kinase inhibitor KN-93 into pupae resulted in a reduced number of antennal lobe glial cells migrating into the neuropil to form borders around glomeruli. The results suggest that CaM kinase II is involved in glial cell migration.

  2. Heme-induced Trypanosoma cruzi proliferation is mediated by CaM kinase II

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    Souza, C.F. [Laboratorio de Imunomodulacao e Protozoologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz (Brazil); Carneiro, A.B.; Silveira, A.B. [Laboratorio de Sinalizacao Celular, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, UFRJ (Brazil); Laranja, G.A.T. [Laboratorio de Interacao Tripanosomatideos e Vetores, Departamento de Bioquimica, IBRAG, UERJ, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva-Neto, M.A.C. [Laboratorio de Sinalizacao Celular, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, UFRJ (Brazil); INCT, Entomologia Molecular (Brazil); Costa, S.C. Goncalves da [Laboratorio de Imunomodulacao e Protozoologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz (Brazil); Paes, M.C., E-mail: mcpaes@uerj.br [Laboratorio de Interacao Tripanosomatideos e Vetores, Departamento de Bioquimica, IBRAG, UERJ, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); INCT, Entomologia Molecular (Brazil)

    2009-12-18

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted through triatomine vectors during their blood-meal on vertebrate hosts. These hematophagous insects usually ingest approximately 10 mM of heme bound to hemoglobin in a single meal. Blood forms of the parasite are transformed into epimastigotes in the crop which initiates a few hours after parasite ingestion. In a previous work, we investigated the role of heme in parasite cell proliferation and showed that the addition of heme significantly increased parasite proliferation in a dose-dependent manner . To investigate whether the heme effect is mediated by protein kinase signalling pathways, parasite proliferation was evaluated in the presence of several protein kinase (PK) inhibitors. We found that only KN-93, a classical inhibitor of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs), blocked heme-induced cell proliferation. KN-92, an inactive analogue of KN-93, was not able to block this effect. A T. cruzi CaMKII homologue is most likely the main enzyme involved in this process since parasite proliferation was also blocked when Myr-AIP, an inhibitory peptide for mammalian CaMKII, was included in the cell proliferation assay. Moreover, CaMK activity increased in parasite cells with the addition of heme as shown by immunological and biochemical assays. In conclusion, the present results are the first strong indications that CaMKII is involved in the heme-induced cell signalling pathway that mediates parasite proliferation.

  3. The γ isoform of CaM kinase II controls mouse egg activation by regulating cell cycle resumption

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    Backs, Johannes; Stein, Paula; Backs, Thea; Duncan, Francesca E.; Grueter, Chad E.; McAnally, John; Qi, Xiaoxia; Schultz, Richard M.; Olson, Eric N.

    2009-01-01

    Fertilization triggers a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the egg that initiates a series of events known as egg activation. These events include cortical granule exocytosis that establishes a block to polyspermy, resumption of meiosis, and recruitment of maternal mRNAs into polysomes for translation. Several calcium-dependent proteins, including calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), have been implicated in egg activation. However, the precise role of CaMKII in mediating specific events of egg activation and the identity of the isoform(s) present in mouse eggs have not been unequivocally established. Through targeted deletion of the γ isoform of CaMKII, we find that CaMKIIγ is the predominant CaMKII isoform in mouse eggs and that it is essential for egg activation. Although CaMKIIγ−/− eggs exhibit a normal pattern of Ca2+ oscillations after insemination and undergo cortical granule exocytosis, they fail to resume meiosis or to recruit maternal mRNAs. Surprisingly, we find that the recruitment of maternal mRNAs does not directly depend on CaMKII, but requires elevated [Ca2+]i and metaphase II exit. We conclude that CaMKIIγ specifically controls mouse egg activation by regulating cell cycle resumption. PMID:19966304

  4. Cardiac CaM Kinase II Genes δ and γ Contribute to Adverse Remodeling but Redundantly Inhibit Calcineurin-Induced Myocardial Hypertrophy

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    Kreusser, Michael M.; Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Keranov, Stanislav; Hoting, Marc-Oscar; Oehl, Ulrike; Kohlhaas, Michael; Reil, Jan-Christian; Neumann, Kay; Schneider, Michael D.; Hill, Joseph A.; Dobrev, Dobromir; Maack, Christoph; Maier, Lars S.; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Katus, Hugo A.; Olson, Eric N.; Backs, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Background Ca2+-dependent signaling through CaM Kinase II (CaMKII) and calcineurin was suggested to contribute to adverse cardiac remodeling. However, the relative importance of CaMKII versus calcineurin for adverse cardiac remodeling remained unclear. Methods and Results We generated double-knockout mice (DKO) lacking the 2 cardiac CaMKII genes δ and γ specifically in cardiomyocytes. We show that both CaMKII isoforms contribute redundantly to phosphorylation not only of phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2, and histone deacetylase 4, but also calcineurin. Under baseline conditions, DKO mice are viable and display neither abnormal Ca2+ handling nor functional and structural changes. On pathological pressure overload and β-adrenergic stimulation, DKO mice are protected against cardiac dysfunction and interstitial fibrosis. But surprisingly and paradoxically, DKO mice develop cardiac hypertrophy driven by excessive activation of endogenous calcineurin, which is associated with a lack of phosphorylation at the auto-inhibitory calcineurin A site Ser411. Likewise, calcineurin inhibition prevents cardiac hypertrophy in DKO. On exercise performance, DKO mice show an exaggeration of cardiac hypertrophy with increased expression of the calcineurin target gene RCAN1-4 but no signs of adverse cardiac remodeling. Conclusions We established a mouse model in which CaMKII’s activity is specifically and completely abolished. By the use of this model we show that CaMKII induces maladaptive cardiac remodeling while it inhibits calcineurin-dependent hypertrophy. These data suggest inhibition of CaMKII but not calcineurin as a promising approach to attenuate the progression of heart failure. PMID:25124496

  5. Muscarinic stimulation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in isolated rat pancreatic acini.

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    Cui, Z J

    1997-05-01

    To study whether M3 receptor occupation would lead to activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II). In this study, we isolated rat pancreatic acini by collagenase digestion; measured the Ca2+/calmodulin-independent activity of autophosphorylated form of the CaM kinase II both before and after stimulation of the acini with muscarinic secretagogue bethanechol (Bet). Bet stimulated the activation of, or generation of Ca(2+)-independent activity of, this kinase, in a concentration (0.0001-1 mmol.L-1) and time (5-300 s)-dependent manner; with Bet of 100 mumol.L-1, Ca(2+)-independent activity increased from an unstimulated level of 4.5 +/- 0.3 (n = 4) to 8.9 +/- 1.3 (n = 4, P Ca2+ mobilizing secretagogue cholecystokinin (CCK) also activated the kinase; at 1 mumol.L-1, CCK increased Ca(2+)-independent kinase activity to 12.9 +/- 0.5 (n = 6, P -independent kinase activity (from control 3.90 +/- 0.28 to 4.53 +/- 0.47, n = 6, P > 0.05). Atropine completely blocked Bet activation of the kinase. CaM kinase II plays a pivotal role in digestive enzyme secretion, especially during the initial phase of amylase secretion.

  6. Autonomous and nonautonomous regulation of Wnt-mediated neuronal polarity by the C. elegans Ror kinase CAM-1.

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    Chien, Shih-Chieh Jason; Gurling, Mark; Kim, Changsung; Craft, Teresa; Forrester, Wayne; Garriga, Gian

    2015-08-01

    Wnts are a conserved family of secreted glycoproteins that regulate various developmental processes in metazoans. Three of the five Caenorhabditis elegans Wnts, CWN-1, CWN-2 and EGL-20, and the sole Wnt receptor of the Ror kinase family, CAM-1, are known to regulate the anterior polarization of the mechanosensory neuron ALM. Here we show that CAM-1 and the Frizzled receptor MOM-5 act in parallel pathways to control ALM polarity. We also show that CAM-1 has two functions in this process: an autonomous signaling function that promotes anterior polarization and a nonautonomous Wnt-antagonistic function that inhibits anterior polarization. These antagonistic activities can account for the weak ALM phenotypes displayed by cam-1 mutants. Our observations suggest that CAM-1 could function as a Wnt receptor in many developmental processes, but the analysis of cam-1 mutants may fail to reveal CAM-1's role as a receptor in these processes because of its Wnt-antagonistic activity. In this model, loss of CAM-1 results in increased levels of Wnts that act through other Wnt receptors, masking CAM-1's autonomous role as a Wnt receptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MAP Kinase Pathway–dependent Phosphorylation of the L1-CAM Ankyrin Binding Site Regulates Neuronal Growth

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    Whittard, John D.; Sakurai, Takeshi; Cassella, Melanie R.; Gazdoiu, Mihaela; Felsenfeld, Dan P.

    2006-01-01

    The growth of neuronal processes depends critically on the function of adhesion proteins that link extracellular ligands to the cytoskeleton. The neuronal adhesion protein L1-CAM serves as a receptor for nerve growth–promoting proteins, a process that is inhibited by the interaction between L1-CAM and the cytoskeleton adaptor ankyrin. Using a novel reporter based on intramolecular bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we have determined that the MAP kinase pathway regulates the phosphory...

  8. Evolutionary divergence in the catalytic activity of the CAM-1, ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains.

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    Travis W Bainbridge

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors (ROR 1 and 2 are atypical members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family and have been associated with several human diseases. The vertebrate RORs contain an ATP binding domain that deviates from the consensus amino acid sequence, although the impact of this deviation on catalytic activity is not known and the kinase function of these receptors remains controversial. Recently, ROR2 was shown to signal through a Wnt responsive, β-catenin independent pathway and suppress a canonical Wnt/β-catenin signal. In this work we demonstrate that both ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains are catalytically deficient while CAM-1, the C. elegans homolog of ROR, has an active tyrosine kinase domain, suggesting a divergence in the signaling processes of the ROR family during evolution. In addition, we show that substitution of the non-consensus residues from ROR1 or ROR2 into CAM-1 and MuSK markedly reduce kinase activity, while restoration of the consensus residues in ROR does not restore robust kinase function. We further demonstrate that the membrane-bound extracellular domain alone of either ROR1 or ROR2 is sufficient for suppression of canonical Wnt3a signaling, and that this domain can also enhance Wnt5a suppression of Wnt3a signaling. Based on these data, we conclude that human ROR1 and ROR2 are RTK-like pseudokinases.

  9. Role of calmodulin-calmodulin kinase II, cAMP/protein kinase A and ERK 1/2 on Aeromonas hydrophila-induced apoptosis of head kidney macrophages.

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    Chaitali Banerjee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of calcium (Ca2+ and its dependent protease calpain in Aeromonas hydrophila-induced head kidney macrophage (HKM apoptosis has been reported. Here, we report the pro-apoptotic involvement of calmodulin (CaM and calmodulin kinase II gamma (CaMKIIg in the process. We observed significant increase in CaM levels in A. hydrophila-infected HKM and the inhibitory role of BAPTA/AM, EGTA, nifedipine and verapamil suggested CaM elevation to be Ca2+-dependent. Our studies with CaM-specific siRNA and the CaM inhibitor calmidazolium chloride demonstrated CaM to be pro-apoptotic that initiated the downstream expression of CaMKIIg. Using the CaMKIIg-targeted siRNA, specific inhibitor KN-93 and its inactive structural analogue KN-92 we report CaM-CaMKIIg signalling to be critical for apoptosis of A. hydrophila-infected HKM. Inhibitor studies further suggested the role of calpain-2 in CaMKIIg expression. CaMK Kinase (CaMKK, the other CaM dependent kinase exhibited no role in A. hydrophila-induced HKM apoptosis. We report increased production of intracellular cAMP in infected HKM and our results with KN-93 or KN-92 implicate the role of CaMKIIg in cAMP production. Using siRNA to PKACA, the catalytic subunit of PKA, anti-PKACA antibody and H-89, the specific inhibitor for PKA we prove the pro-apoptotic involvement of cAMP/PKA pathway in the pathogenicity of A. hydrophila. Our inhibitor studies coupled with siRNA approach further implicated the role of cAMP/PKA in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK 1/2. We conclude that the alteration in intracellular Ca2+ levels initiated by A. hydrophila activates CaM and calpain-2; both pathways converge on CaMKIIg which in turn induces cAMP/PKA mediated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation leading to caspase-3 mediated apoptosis of infected HKM.

  10. Nucleolin (C23), a physiological substrate for casein kinase II

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    Schneider, H R; Issinger, O G

    1988-01-01

    Nucleolin (C23), a 110 kDa phosphoprotein, which is mainly found in the nucleolus has been shown to be a physiological substrate for casein kinase II (CKII). Nucleolin was identified and characterized by immunodetection using an anti-nucleolin antibody. Phosphopeptide patterns from nucleolin...... phosphorylated by purified casein kinase II and of phosphorylated nucleolin which had been isolated from tumor cells grown in the presence of [32P]-o-phosphate, were identical. The partial tryptic digest revealed nine phosphopeptides. Nucleolin isolated from Krebs II mouse ascites cells was phosphorylated...... by purified casein kinase II with about two moles phosphate per one mole of nucleolin....

  11. Biophysical analysis of the dynamics of calmodulin interactions with neurogranin and Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II.

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    Seeger, Christian; Talibov, Vladimir O; Danielson, U Helena

    2017-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) functions depend on interactions with CaM-binding proteins, regulated by Ca2+. Induced structural changes influence the affinity, kinetics, and specificities of the interactions. The dynamics of CaM interactions with neurogranin (Ng) and the CaM-binding region of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII290-309 ) have been studied using biophysical methods. These proteins have opposite Ca2+ dependencies for CaM binding. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor analysis confirmed that Ca2+ and CaM interact very rapidly, and with moderate affinity ( KDSPR=3μM). Calmodulin-CaMKII290-309 interactions were only detected in the presence of Ca2+, exhibiting fast kinetics and nanomolar affinity ( KDSPR=7.1nM). The CaM-Ng interaction had higher affinity under Ca2+-depleted ( KDSPR=480nM,k1=3.4×105M-1s-1 and k-1 = 1.6 × 10(-1) s(-1) ) than Ca2+-saturated conditions ( KDSPR=19μM). The IQ motif of Ng (Ng27-50 ) had similar affinity for CaM as Ng under Ca2+-saturated conditions ( KDSPR=14μM), but no interaction was seen under Ca2+-depleted conditions. Microscale thermophoresis using fluorescently labeled CaM confirmed the surface plasmon resonance results qualitatively, but estimated lower affinities for the Ng ( KDMST=890nM) and CaMKII290-309 ( KDMST=190nM) interactions. Although CaMKII290-309 showed expected interaction characteristics, they may be different for full-length CaMKII. The data for full-length Ng, but not Ng27-50 , agree with the current model on Ng regulation of Ca2+/CaM signaling. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Molecular Recognition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Rho kinases I and II regulate different aspects of myosin II activity

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    Yoneda, Atsuko; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    The homologous mammalian rho kinases (ROCK I and II) are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on kinase construct overexpression. As downstream effectors of Rho GTPases, their major substrates are myosin light chain and myosin phosphatase. Both kinases are implicated in microfilament...

  13. Enhanced casein kinase II activity in human tumour cell cultures

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    Prowald, K; Fischer, H; Issinger, O G

    1984-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity is enhanced as much as 2-3 fold in established and 4-5-fold in transformed human cell lines when compared to that of fibroblasts and primary human tumour cell cultures where CKII activity never exceeded a basic level. The high activity of CKII in transformed cells...

  14. Depolarization and CaM kinase IV modulate NMDA receptor splicing through two essential RNA elements.

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    Ji-Ann Lee

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing controls the activity of many proteins important for neuronal excitation, but the signal-transduction pathways that affect spliced isoform expression are not well understood. One particularly interesting system of alternative splicing is exon 21 (E21 of the NMDA receptor 1 (NMDAR1 E21, which controls the trafficking of NMDA receptors to the plasma membrane and is repressed by Ca(++/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK IV signaling. Here, we characterize the splicing of NMDAR1 E21. We find that E21 splicing is reversibly repressed by neuronal depolarization, and we identify two RNA elements within the exon that function together to mediate the inducible repression. One of these exonic elements is similar to an intronic CaMK IV-responsive RNA element (CaRRE originally identified in the 3' splice site of the BK channel STREX exon, but not previously observed within an exon. The other element is a new RNA motif. Introduction of either of these two motifs, called CaRRE type 1 and CaRRE type 2, into a heterologous constitutive exon can confer CaMK IV-dependent repression on the new exon. Thus, either exonic CaRRE can be sufficient for CaMK IV-induced repression. Single nucleotide scanning mutagenesis defined consensus sequences for these two CaRRE motifs. A genome-wide motif search and subsequent RT-PCR validation identified a group of depolarization-regulated alternative exons carrying CaRRE consensus sequences. Many of these exons are likely to alter neuronal function. Thus, these two RNA elements define a group of co-regulated splicing events that respond to a common stimulus in neurons to alter their activity.

  15. Depolarization and CaM Kinase IV Modulate NMDA Receptor Splicing through Two Essential RNA Elements

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    Lee, Ji-Ann; Xing, Yi; Nguyen, David; Xie, Jiuyong; Lee, Christopher J; Black, Douglas L

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing controls the activity of many proteins important for neuronal excitation, but the signal-transduction pathways that affect spliced isoform expression are not well understood. One particularly interesting system of alternative splicing is exon 21 (E21) of the NMDA receptor 1 (NMDAR1 E21), which controls the trafficking of NMDA receptors to the plasma membrane and is repressed by Ca++/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) IV signaling. Here, we characterize the splicing of NMDAR1 E21. We find that E21 splicing is reversibly repressed by neuronal depolarization, and we identify two RNA elements within the exon that function together to mediate the inducible repression. One of these exonic elements is similar to an intronic CaMK IV–responsive RNA element (CaRRE) originally identified in the 3′ splice site of the BK channel STREX exon, but not previously observed within an exon. The other element is a new RNA motif. Introduction of either of these two motifs, called CaRRE type 1 and CaRRE type 2, into a heterologous constitutive exon can confer CaMK IV–dependent repression on the new exon. Thus, either exonic CaRRE can be sufficient for CaMK IV–induced repression. Single nucleotide scanning mutagenesis defined consensus sequences for these two CaRRE motifs. A genome-wide motif search and subsequent RT-PCR validation identified a group of depolarization-regulated alternative exons carrying CaRRE consensus sequences. Many of these exons are likely to alter neuronal function. Thus, these two RNA elements define a group of co-regulated splicing events that respond to a common stimulus in neurons to alter their activity. PMID:17298178

  16. AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated feedback phosphorylation controls the Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) dependence of Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase kinase β.

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    Nakanishi, Akihiro; Hatano, Naoya; Fujiwara, Yuya; Bin Shari, Arian; Takabatake, Shota; Akano, Hiroki; Kanayama, Naoki; Magari, Masaki; Nozaki, Naohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2017-10-03

    The Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β(CaMKKβ)/5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation cascade affects various Ca(2+)-dependent metabolic pathways and cancer growth. Unlike recombinant CaMKKβ that exhibits higher basal activity (autonomous activity), activation of the CaMKKβ/AMPK signaling pathway requires increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. Moreover, the Ca(2+)/CaM dependence of CaMKKβ appears to arise from multiple phosphorylation events, including autophosphorylation and activities furnished by other protein kinases. However, the effects of proximal downstream kinases on CaMKKβ activity have not yet been evaluated. Here, we demonstrate feedback phosphorylation of CaMKKβ at multiple residues by CaMKKβ-activated AMPK in addition to autophosphorylation in vitro, leading to reduced autonomous, but not Ca(2+)/CaM-activated, CaMKKβ activity. MS analysis and site-directed mutagenesis of AMPK phosphorylation sites in CaMKKβ indicated that Thr144 phosphorylation by activated AMPK converts CaMKKβ into a Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent enzyme, as shown by completely Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent CaMKK activity of a phosphomimetic Thr144Glu CaMKKβ mutant. CaMKKβ mutant analysis indicated that the C-terminal domain (residues 471-587) including the autoinhibitory region plays an important role in stabilizing an inactive conformation in a Thr144 phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, immunoblot analysis with antiphospho-Thr144 antibody revealed phosphorylation of Thr144 in CaMKKβ in transfected COS-7 cells that was further enhanced by exogenous expression of AMPKα. These results indicate that AMPK-mediated feedback phosphorylation of CaMKKβ regulates the CaMKKβ/AMPK signaling cascade and may be physiologically important for intracellular maintenance of Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK activation by CaMKKβ. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Deconstructing dwarf galaxies: a Suprime-Cam survey of Andromeda II

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    McConnachie, Alan W.; Arimoto, Nobuo; Irwin, Mike

    2007-07-01

    We present deep, subhorizontal-branch, multicolour photometry of the Andromeda II dwarf spheroidal (And II dSph) taken with the Subaru Suprime-Cam wide-field camera. We identify a red clump population in this galaxy, the first time this feature has been detected in an M31 dSph, which are normally characterized as having no significant intermediate-age populations. We construct radial profiles for the various stellar populations and show that the horizontal branch (HB) has a nearly constant density spatial distribution out to large radius, whereas the reddest red giant branch stars are centrally concentrated in an exponential profile. We argue that these populations trace two distinct structural components in And II, and show that this assumption provides a good match to the overall radial profile of this galaxy. The extended component dominates the stellar populations at large radius, whereas the exponential component dominates the inner few arcminutes. By examining colour-magnitude diagrams in these regions, we show that the two components have very different stellar populations; the exponential component has an average age of ~7-10 Gyr, is relatively metal-rich ([Fe/H] ~ -1) but with a significant tail to low metallicities, and possesses a red clump. The extended component, on the other hand, is ancient (~13 Gyr), metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -1.5) with a narrower dispersion σ[Fe/H] ~= 0.28, and has a well-developed blue HB. The extended component contains approximately three-quarters of the light of And II and its unusual density profile is unique in Local Group dwarf galaxies. This suggests that its formation and/or evolution may have been quite different from other dwarf galaxies. The obvious chemodynamical complexity of And II lends further support to the accumulating body of evidence which shows that the evolutionary histories of faint dSph galaxies can be every bit as complicated as their brighter and more massive counterparts. Based on data collected at Subaru

  18. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF A CRIMPING DEVICE WITH MULTIPLE CAMS USING MSC ADAMS II

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    Gheorghe Popescu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the present paper, the author presents the results of the dynamic analysis with MSC ADAMS of the mechanism with a crimping device with 12 tightening cams, designed and used in the technological process of assembly of the indigenous electrical detonators. In this sense, the mechanism with multiple cams is considered a mechanical system and is treated as an assembly of rigid bodies connected by mechanical connections and elastic elements. For shaping and simulation of the mechanism with multiple cams using ADAMS program, the author got through the following stages: construction of the pattern, its testing and simulation, validation, finishing, parametrization, optimization of the pattern.

  19. Identification of peptides in wheat germ hydrolysate that demonstrate calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitory activity.

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    Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Akiyama, Sayaka; Guo, Jian; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-12-15

    Hydrolysis of wheat germ by proteases resulted in bioactive peptides that demonstrated an inhibitory effect against the vasoconstrictive Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). The hydrolysate by thermolysin (1.0wt%, 5h) showed a particularly potent CaMK II inhibition. As a result of mixed mode high-performance liquid chromatography of thermolysin hydrolysate with pH elution gradient ranging between 4.8 and 8.9, the fraction eluted at pH 8.9 was the most potent CaMK II inhibitor. From this fraction, Trp-Val and Trp-Ile were identified as CaMK II inhibitors. In Sprague-Dawley rats, an enhanced aortic CaMK II activity by 1μM phenylephrine was significantly (pCaMK II activity assays, it was concluded that Trp-Val and Trp-Ile competed with Ca(2+)-CaM complex to bind to CaMK II with Ki values of 5.4 and 3.6μM, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cloning and quantitative determination of the human Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) isoforms in human beta cells.

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    Rochlitz, H; Voigt, A; Lankat-Buttgereit, B; Göke, B; Heimberg, H; Nauck, M A; Schiemann, U; Schatz, H; Pfeiffer, A F

    2000-04-01

    The Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) is highly expressed in pancreatic islets and associated with insulin secretion vesicles. The suppression of CaMK II disturbs insulin secretion and insulin gene expression. There are four isoforms of CaMK II, alpha to delta, that are expressed from different genes in mammals. Our aim was to identify the isoforms of CaMK II expressed in human beta cells by molecular cloning from a human insulinoma cDNA library and to assess its distribution in humans. The previously unknown complete coding sequences of human CaMK IIbeta and the kinase domain of CaMK IIdelta were cloned from a human insulinoma cDNA library. Quantitative determination of CaMK II isoform mRNA was carried out in several tissues and beta cells purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting and compared to the housekeeping enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase. We found CaMK IIbeta occurred in three splice variants and was highly expressed in endocrine tissues such as adrenals, pituitary and beta cells. Liver showed moderate expression but adipose tissue or lymphocytes had very low levels of CaMK IIbeta-mRNA. In human beta cells CaMK IIbeta and delta were expressed equally with pyruvate dehydrogenase whereas tenfold lower expression of CaMK IIgamma and no expression of CaMK IIalpha were found. Although CaMK IIdelta is ubiquitously expressed, CaMK IIbeta shows preferential expression in neuroendocrine tissues. In comparison with the expression of a key regulatory enzyme in glucose oxidation, pyruvate dehydrogenase, two of the four CaM kinases investigated are expressed at equally high levels, which supports an important role in beta-cell physiology. These results provide the basis for exploring the pathophysiological relevance of CaMK IIbeta in human diabetes.

  1. A Review of CAM for Procedural Pain in Infancy: Part II. Other Interventions

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    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the second in a two-part series reviewing the empirical evidence for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches for the management of pain related to medical procedures in infants up to 6 weeks of age. Part I of this series investigated the effects of sucrose with or without non-nutritive sucking (NNS. The present article examines other CAM interventions for procedural pain including music-based interventions, olfactory stimulation, kangaroo care and swaddling. Computerized databases were searched for relevant studies including prior reviews and primary trials. Preliminary support was revealed for the analgesic effects of the CAM modalities reviewed. However, the overall quality of the evidence for these approaches remains relatively weak. Additional well-designed trials incorporating rigorous methodology are required. Such investigations will assist in the development of evidence-based guidelines on the use of CAM interventions either alone or in concert with conventional approaches to provide safe, reliable analgesia for infant procedural pain.

  2. Angiotensin II Facilitates Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-Mediated Myosin Light Chain Kinase Degradation in Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy

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    Shun Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Angiotensin II (Ang II has been shown to promote cardiac remodeling during the process of hypertrophy. Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, a specific kinase for the phosphorylation of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2, plays an important role in regulating cardiac muscle contraction and hypertrophy. However, whether Ang II could facilitate cardiac hypertrophy by altering the expression of MLCK remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate this effect and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Cardiac hypertrophy was induced via pressure overload in rats, which were then evaluated via histological and biochemical measurements and echocardiography. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI was used to inhibit Ang II. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were stimulated with Ang II to induce hypertrophy and were treated with a matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9 inhibitor. Myocyte hypertrophy was evaluated using immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Degradation of recombinant human MLCK by recombinant human MMP9 was tested using a cleavage assay. The expression levels of MLCK, MLC2, phospho-myosin light chain 2 (p-MLC2, myosin phosphatase 2 (MYPT2, and calmodulin (CaM were measured using western blotting. Results: ACEI improved cardiac function and remodeling and increased the levels of MLCK and p-MLC2 as well as reduced the expression of MMP9 in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Moreover, the MMP9 inhibitor alleviated myocyte hypertrophy and upregulated the levels of MLCK and p-MLC2 in Ang II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Recombinant human MLCK was concentration- and time-dependently degraded by recombinant human MMP9 in vitro, and this process was prevented by the MMP9 inhibitor. Conclusion: Our results suggest that Ang II is involved in the degradation of MLCK in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and that this process was mediated by MMP9.

  3. The Caenorhabditis elegans matrix non-peptidase MNP-1 is required for neuronal cell migration and interacts with the Ror receptor tyrosine kinase CAM-1.

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    Craft, Teresa R; Forrester, Wayne C

    2017-04-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for metazoan development. During Caenorhabditis elegans development many neuronal, muscle and other cell types migrate. Multiple classes of proteins have been implicated in cell migration including secreted guidance cues, receptors for guidance cues and intracellular proteins that respond to cues to polarize cells and produce the forces that move them. In addition, cell surface and secreted proteases have been identified that may clear the migratory route and process guidance cues. We report here that mnp-1 is required for neuronal cell and growth cone migrations. MNP-1 is expressed by migrating cells and functions cell autonomously for cell migrations. We also find a genetic interaction between mnp-1 and cam-1, which encodes a Ror receptor tyrosine kinase required for some of the same cell migrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Rat vas deferens SERCA2 is modulated by Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation

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    Rodriguez, J.B.R.; Muzi-Filho, H. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Valverde, R.H.F. [Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Quintas, L.E.M. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Noel, F. [Programa de Desenvolvimento de Fármacos, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Einicker-Lamas, M. [Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Biologia Estrutural e Bioimagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cunha, V.M.N. [Programa de Farmacologia e Inflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-03-19

    Ca{sup 2+} pumps are important players in smooth muscle contraction. Nevertheless, little information is available about these pumps in the vas deferens. We have determined which subtype of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase isoform (SERCA) is expressed in rat vas deferens (RVD) and its modulation by calmodulin (CaM)-dependent mechanisms. The thapsigargin-sensitive Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase from a membrane fraction containing the highest SERCA levels in the RVD homogenate has the same molecular mass (∼115 kDa) as that of SERCA2 from the rat cerebellum. It has a very high affinity for Ca{sup 2+} (Ca{sub 0.5} = 780 nM) and a low sensitivity to vanadate (IC{sub 50} = 41 µM). These facts indicate that SERCA2 is present in the RVD. Immunoblotting for CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) showed the expression of these two regulatory proteins. Ca{sup 2+} and CaM increased serine-phosphorylated residues of the 115-kDa protein, indicating the involvement of CaMKII in the regulatory phosphorylation of SERCA2. Phosphorylation is accompanied by an 8-fold increase of thapsigargin-sensitive Ca{sup 2+} accumulation in the lumen of vesicles derived from these membranes. These data establish that SERCA2 in the RVD is modulated by Ca{sup 2+} and CaM, possibly via CaMKII, in a process that results in stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} pumping activity.

  5. The Role of Th17 in Neuroimmune Disorders: Target for CAM Therapy. Part II

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    Aristo Vojdani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Decades of research went into understanding the role that Th1 autoreactive T-cells play in neuroinflammation. Here we describe another effector population, the IL-17-producing T-helper lineage (Th17, which drives the inflammatory process. Through the recruitment of inflammatory infiltration neutrophils and the activation of matrix metalloproteinases, IL-17, a cytokine secreted by Th17 cells, contributes to blood-brain barrier breakdown and the subsequent attraction of macrophages and monocytes into the nervous system. The entry of cells along with the local production of inflammatory cytokines leads to myelin and axonal damage. This activation of the inflammatory response system is induced by different pathogenic factors, such as gut bacterial endotoxins resulting in progressive neurodegeneration by Th17 cells. Through the understanding of the role of bacterial endotoxins and other pathogenic factors in the induction of autoimmune diseases by Th17 cells, CAM practitioners will be able to design CAM therapies targeting IL-17 activity. Targeted therapy can restore the integrity of the intestinal and blood-brain barriers using probiotics, N-acetyl-cysteine, α-lipoic acid, resveratrol and others for their patients with autoimmunities, in particular those with neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

  6. A mechanism for regulation of chloroplast LHC II kinase by plastoquinol and thioredoxin.

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    Puthiyaveetil, Sujith

    2011-06-23

    State transitions are acclimatory responses to changes in light quality in photosynthesis. They involve the redistribution of absorbed excitation energy between photosystems I and II. In plants and green algae, this redistribution is produced by reversible phosphorylation of the chloroplast light harvesting complex II (LHC II). The LHC II kinase is activated by reduced plastoquinone (PQ) in photosystem II-specific low light. In high light, when PQ is also reduced, LHC II kinase becomes inactivated by thioredoxin. Based on newly identified amino acid sequence features of LHC II kinase and other considerations, a mechanism is suggested for its redox regulation. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Casein kinase II is elevated in solid human tumours and rapidly proliferating non-neoplastic tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münstermann, U; Fritz, G; Seitz, G

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase CKII (i.e. casein kinase II, CKII, NII) is expressed at a higher level in rapidly proliferating tissues and in solid human tumours (e.g. colorectal carcinomas) when compared to the corresponding non-neoplastic colorectal mucosa. This could be shown by (a) Western blotting of cellular...

  8. A deep, wide-field study of Holmberg II with Suprime-Cam: evidence for ram pressure stripping

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    Bernard, Edouard J.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Barker, Michael K.; Irwin, Michael J.; Jablonka, Pascale; Arimoto, Nobuo

    2012-11-01

    We present a deep, wide-field optical study of the M81 group dwarf galaxy Holmberg II (HoII) based on Subaru/Suprime-Cam imaging. Individual stars are resolved down to I ˜ 25.2, that is, about 1.5 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (RGB). We use resolved star counts in the outskirts of the galaxy to measure the radial surface brightness profile down to μV ˜ 32 mag arcsec-2, from which we determine a projected exponential scalelength of 0.70 ± 0.01 arcmin (i.e. 0.69 ± 0.01 kpc). The composite profile, ranging from the cored centre out to R = 7 arcmin, is best fitted by an Elson-Fall-Freeman profile which gives a half-light radius of 1.41 ± 0.04 arcmin (i.e. 1.39 ± 0.04 kpc), and an absolute magnitude MV = -16.3. The low surface brightness stellar component of HoII is regular and symmetric and has an extent much smaller than the vast H I cloud in which it is embedded. We compare the spatial distribution of the young, intermediate-age and old stellar populations, and find that the old RGB stars are significantly more centrally concentrated than the young stellar populations, contrary to what is observed in most dwarf galaxies of the local Universe. We discuss these properties in the context of the comet-like distribution of H I gas around HoII, and argue for the presence of a hot intragroup medium in the vicinity of HoII to explain the contrasting morphologies of gas and stars. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  9. Activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II following bovine rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavinikoo, Hadi; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Bamdad, Taravat; Teimoori, Ali; Goodarzi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is responsible for the increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration through a phospholipase C-dependent and phospholipase C-independent pathways in infected cells. It is shown that increasing of intracellular calcium concentration in rotavirus infected cells is associated with the activation of some members of protein kinases family such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, which plays a crucial role in replication and pathogenesis of the virus. The aim of this study was to expression bovine rotavirus NSP4 gene in HEK293 cell and evaluation of its biological effect related to activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in cell culture. Materials and Methods: MA104 cells was used as a sensitive cell for propagation of virus and defined as a positive control. The NSP4 gene was amplified and inserted into an expression vector, and introduced as a recombinant plasmid into HEK293T cells. Western blot analysis was performed as a confirmation test for both expression of NSP4 protein and activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Results: Expression of NSP4 and activated form of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II were demonstrated by western blotting. Conclusion: It was shown that the expression of biologically active full- length NSP4 protein in HEK293T cells may be associated with some biological properties such as calcium calmodulin kinase II activation, which was indicator of rotaviruses replication and pathogenesis. PMID:26019803

  10. Activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II following bovine rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Razavinikoo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4 is responsible for the increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration through a phospholipase C-dependent and phospholipase C-independent pathways in infected cells. It is shown that increasing of intracellular calcium concentration in rotavirus infected cells is associated with the activation of some members of protein kinases family such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, which plays a crucial role in replication and pathogenesis of the virus. The aim of this study was to expression bovine rotavirus NSP4 gene in HEK293 cell and evaluation of its biological effect related to activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in cell culture. Materials and Methods: MA104 cells was used as a sensitive cell for propagation of virus and defined as a positive control. The NSP4 gene was amplified and inserted into an expression vector, and introduced as a recombinant plasmid into HEK293T cells. Western blot analysis was performed as a confirmation test for both expression of NSP4 protein and activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Results:Expression of NSP4 and activated form of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II were demonstrated by western blotting. Conclusion: It was shown that the expression of biologically active full- length NSP4 protein in HEK293T cells may be associated with some biological properties such as calcium calmodulin kinase II activation, which was indicator of rotaviruses replication and pathogenesis

  11. Casein kinase II activity in the brain of an insect, Acheta domesticus: characterization and hormonal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degrelle, F; Renucci, M; Charpin, P; Tirard, A

    1997-01-01

    This study documented casein kinase II (CK II) activity in Acheta domesticus brain using specific antibodies and its regulation by polyamines. In control animals a transient decrease in CK II activity at day 3 after imaginal moult was observed in the brain but not in the fat body. If deprived of ecdysone by ovariectomy a different pattern was observed, with CK II activity being significantly higher on days 3 and 4 after emergence. After ecdysone injection in ovariectomized females, CK II activity decreased to levels similar to those in controls. The implications of ecdysone regulation of brain CK II activity are discussed.

  12. Zn(II)-Coordinated Quantum Dot-FRET Nanosensors for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Butaek; Park, Ji-In; Lee, Kyung Jin; Lee, Jin-Won; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-07-23

    We report a simple detection of protein kinase activity using Zn(II)-mediated fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots (QDs) and dye-tethered peptides. With neither complex chemical ligands nor surface modification of QDs, Zn(II) was the only metal ion that enabled the phosphorylated peptides to be strongly attached on the carboxyl groups of the QD surface via metal coordination, thus leading to a significant FRET efficiency. As a result, protein kinase activity in intermixed solution was efficiently detected by QD-FRET via Zn(II) coordination, especially when the peptide substrate was combined with affinity-based purification. We also found that mono- and di-phosphorylation in the peptide substrate could be discriminated by the Zn(II)-mediated QD-FRET. Our approach is expected to find applications for studying physiological function and signal transduction with respect to protein kinase activity.

  13. Roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in long-term memory formation in crickets.

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    Makoto Mizunami

    Full Text Available Ca(2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII is a key molecule in many systems of learning and memory in vertebrates, but roles of CaMKII in invertebrates have not been characterized in detail. We have suggested that serial activation of NO/cGMP signaling, cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, Ca(2+/CaM and cAMP signaling participates in long-term memory (LTM formation in olfactory conditioning in crickets, and here we show participation of CaMKII in LTM formation and propose its site of action in the biochemical cascades. Crickets subjected to 3-trial conditioning to associate an odor with reward exhibited memory that lasts for a few days, which is characterized as protein synthesis-dependent LTM. In contrast, animals subjected to 1-trial conditioning exhibited memory that lasts for only several hours (mid-term memory, MTM. Injection of a CaMKII inhibitor prior to 3-trial conditioning impaired 1-day memory retention but not 1-hour memory retention, suggesting that CaMKII participates in LTM formation but not in MTM formation. Animals injected with a cGMP analogue, calcium ionophore or cAMP analogue prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention, and co-injection of a CaMKII inhibitor impaired induction of LTM by the cGMP analogue or that by the calcium ionophore but not that by the cAMP analogue, suggesting that CaMKII is downstream of cGMP production and Ca(2+ influx and upstream of cAMP production in biochemical cascades for LTM formation. Animals injected with an adenylyl cyclase (AC activator prior to 1-trial conditioning exhibited 1-day retention. Interestingly, a CaMKII inhibitor impaired LTM induction by the AC activator, although AC is expected to be a downstream target of CaMKII. The results suggest that CaMKII interacts with AC to facilitate cAMP production for LTM formation. We propose that CaMKII serves as a key molecule for interplay between Ca(2+ signaling and cAMP signaling for LTM formation, a new role of Ca

  14. The CaM Kinase CMK-1 Mediates a Negative Feedback Mechanism Coupling the C. elegans Glutamate Receptor GLR-1 with Its Own Transcription.

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    Benjamin J Moss

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of synaptic AMPA receptor levels is a major mechanism underlying homeostatic synaptic scaling. While in vitro studies have implicated several molecules in synaptic scaling, the in vivo mechanisms linking chronic changes in synaptic activity to alterations in AMPA receptor expression are not well understood. Here we use a genetic approach in C. elegans to dissect a negative feedback pathway coupling levels of the AMPA receptor GLR-1 with its own transcription. GLR-1 trafficking mutants with decreased synaptic receptors in the ventral nerve cord (VNC exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 mRNA, which can be attributed to increased glr-1 transcription. Glutamatergic transmission mutants lacking presynaptic eat-4/VGLUT or postsynaptic glr-1, exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 transcription, suggesting that loss of GLR-1 activity is sufficient to trigger the feedback pathway. Direct and specific inhibition of GLR-1-expressing neurons using a chemical genetic silencing approach also results in increased glr-1 transcription. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active version of GLR-1 results in decreased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that bidirectional changes in GLR-1 signaling results in reciprocal alterations in glr-1 transcription. We identify the CMK-1/CaMK signaling axis as a mediator of the glr-1 transcriptional feedback mechanism. Loss-of-function mutations in the upstream kinase ckk-1/CaMKK, the CaM kinase cmk-1/CaMK, or a downstream transcription factor crh-1/CREB, result in increased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that the CMK-1 signaling pathway functions to repress glr-1 transcription. Genetic double mutant analyses suggest that CMK-1 signaling is required for the glr-1 transcriptional feedback pathway. Furthermore, alterations in GLR-1 signaling that trigger the feedback mechanism also regulate the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of CMK-1, and activated, nuclear-localized CMK-1 blocks the feedback pathway. We

  15. The CaM Kinase CMK-1 Mediates a Negative Feedback Mechanism Coupling the C. elegans Glutamate Receptor GLR-1 with Its Own Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Benjamin J.; Park, Lidia; Dahlberg, Caroline L.; Juo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of synaptic AMPA receptor levels is a major mechanism underlying homeostatic synaptic scaling. While in vitro studies have implicated several molecules in synaptic scaling, the in vivo mechanisms linking chronic changes in synaptic activity to alterations in AMPA receptor expression are not well understood. Here we use a genetic approach in C. elegans to dissect a negative feedback pathway coupling levels of the AMPA receptor GLR-1 with its own transcription. GLR-1 trafficking mutants with decreased synaptic receptors in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 mRNA, which can be attributed to increased glr-1 transcription. Glutamatergic transmission mutants lacking presynaptic eat-4/VGLUT or postsynaptic glr-1, exhibit compensatory increases in glr-1 transcription, suggesting that loss of GLR-1 activity is sufficient to trigger the feedback pathway. Direct and specific inhibition of GLR-1-expressing neurons using a chemical genetic silencing approach also results in increased glr-1 transcription. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active version of GLR-1 results in decreased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that bidirectional changes in GLR-1 signaling results in reciprocal alterations in glr-1 transcription. We identify the CMK-1/CaMK signaling axis as a mediator of the glr-1 transcriptional feedback mechanism. Loss-of-function mutations in the upstream kinase ckk-1/CaMKK, the CaM kinase cmk-1/CaMK, or a downstream transcription factor crh-1/CREB, result in increased glr-1 transcription, suggesting that the CMK-1 signaling pathway functions to repress glr-1 transcription. Genetic double mutant analyses suggest that CMK-1 signaling is required for the glr-1 transcriptional feedback pathway. Furthermore, alterations in GLR-1 signaling that trigger the feedback mechanism also regulate the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of CMK-1, and activated, nuclear-localized CMK-1 blocks the feedback pathway. We propose a model in

  16. Intracellular translocation of calmodulin and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II during the development of hypertrophy in neonatal cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangopadhyay, Jaya Pal, E-mail: jaya@bbri.org [Boston Biomedical Research Institute, Watertown, MA 02472 (United States); Ikemoto, Noriaki [Boston Biomedical Research Institute, Watertown, MA 02472 (United States); Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-05-28

    We have recently shown that stimulation of cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes with endothelin-1 (ET-1) first produces conformational disorder within the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) and diastolic Ca{sup 2+} leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), then develops hypertrophy (HT) in the cardiomyocytes (Hamada et al., 2009 ). The present paper addresses the following question. By what mechanism does crosstalk between defective operation of RyR2 and activation of the HT gene program occur? Here we show that the immuno-stain of calmodulin (CaM) is localized chiefly in the cytoplasmic area in the control cells; whereas, in the ET-1-treated/hypertrophied cells, major immuno-staining is localized in the nuclear region. In addition, fluorescently labeled CaM that has been introduced into the cardiomyocytes using the BioPORTER system moves from the cytoplasm to the nucleus with the development of HT. The immuno-confocal imaging of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) also shows cytoplasm-to-nucleus shift of the immuno-staining pattern in the hypertrophied cells. In an early phase of hypertrophic growth, the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients increases, which accompanies with cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation of CaM. In a later phase of hypertrophic growth, further increase in the frequency of spontaneous Ca{sup 2+} transients results in the appearance of trains of Ca{sup 2+} spikes, which accompanies with nuclear translocation of CaMKII. The cardio-protective reagent dantrolene (the reagent that corrects the de-stabilized inter-domain interaction within the RyR2 to a normal mode) ameliorates aberrant intracellular Ca{sup 2+} events and prevents nuclear translocation of both CaM and CaMKII, then prevents the development of HT. These results suggest that translocation of CaM and CaMKII from the cytoplasm to the nucleus serves as messengers to transmit the pathogenic signal elicited in the surface membrane and in the RyR2 to the nuclear transcriptional

  17. Slit and Netrin-1 guide cranial motor axon pathfinding via Rho-kinase, myosin light chain kinase and myosin II

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    Drescher Uwe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing hindbrain, cranial motor axon guidance depends on diffusible repellent factors produced by the floor plate. Our previous studies have suggested that candidate molecules for mediating this effect are Slits, Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A (Sema3A. It is unknown to what extent these factors contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of motor axons, and the downstream signalling pathways are largely unclear. Results In this study, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the components of floor plate chemorepulsion and their downstream signalling pathways. Using in vitro motor axon deflection assays, we demonstrate that Slits and Netrin-1, but not Sema3A, contribute to floor plate repulsion. We also find that the axon pathways of dorsally projecting branchiomotor neurons are disrupted in Netrin-1 mutant mice and in chick embryos expressing dominant-negative Unc5a receptors, indicating an in vivo role for Netrin-1. We further demonstrate that Slit and Netrin-1 signalling are mediated by Rho-kinase (ROCK and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, which regulate myosin II activity, controlling actin retrograde flow in the growth cone. We show that MLCK, ROCK and myosin II are required for Slit and Netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse of cranial motor axons. Inhibition of these molecules in explant cultures, or genetic manipulation of RhoA or myosin II function in vivo causes characteristic cranial motor axon pathfinding errors, including the inability to exit the midline, and loss of turning towards exit points. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both Slits and Netrin-1 contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of cranial motor axons. They further indicate that RhoA/ROCK, MLCK and myosin II are components of Slit and Netrin-1 signalling pathways, and suggest that these pathways are of key importance in cranial motor axon navigation.

  18. Characterization of casein kinase II in human colonic carcinomas after heterotransplantation into nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitz, G; Münstermann, U; Schneider, H R

    1989-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) activity in colorectal tumours was compared before and after heterotransplantation onto nude mice. The test revealed that the enzyme activity was about two-fold enhanced in the tumours isolated from the nude mice when compared to the respective primary tumours from which...

  19. Isolation and characterization of recombinant human casein kinase II subunits alpha and beta from bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grankowski, N; Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1991-01-01

    cDNA encoding the casein kinase II (CKII) subunits alpha and beta of human origin were expressed in Escherichia coli using expression vector pT7-7. Significant expression was obtained with E. coli BL21(DE3). The CKII subunits accounted for approximately 30% of the bacterial protein; however, most...

  20. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Protein kinase C contributes to desensitization of ANG II signaling in adult rat cardiac fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, J G; Raphael, R; Lio, F M; Brunton, L L

    2000-12-01

    We have studied G(q)-linked ANG II signaling [inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation, Ca(2+) mobilization] in primary cultures of rat cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) and have found that ANG II initiates a protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated negative feedback loop that rapidly terminates the ANG II response. Pharmacological inhibition of PKC by staurosporine and GF-109203X doubled IP production over that achieved in response to ANG II alone. Inhibition of PKC also led to larger Ca(2+) transients in response to ANG II, suggesting that Ca(2+) mobilization was proportional to G(q)-phospholipase C-IP(3) activity under the conditions studied. Depletion of cellular PKC by overnight treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) similarly augmented ANG II-induced IP production. Acute activation of PKC by PMA halved IP formation, with an EC(50) approximately 1 nM; 4alpha-PMA was inactive. Time course data demonstrated that ANG II-mediated IP production fully desensitized within 30 s; PKC inhibition reduced the rate and extent of this desensitization. In cells desensitized to ANG II, a purinergic agonist still mobilized intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that desensitization was homologous. The ANG II-induced Ca(2+) signal was fully resensitized within 30 min. The data demonstrate that a large portion of the IP-Ca(2+) responses of rat CFs to ANG II are short-lived because of rapid, PKC-mediated desensitization.

  2. A Single Protein Kinase A or Calmodulin Kinase II Site Does Not Control the Cardiac Pacemaker Ca2+ Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Valdivia, Héctor H.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Anderson, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Fight or flight heart rate (HR) increases depend on protein kinase A (PKA) and calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) mediated enhancement of Ca2+ uptake and release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in sinoatrial nodal cells (SANC). However, the impact of specific PKA and CaMKII phosphorylation sites on HR is unknown. Methods and Results We systematically evaluated validated PKA and CaMKII target sites on phospholamban (PLN) and the ryanodine receptor (RyR2) using genetically modified mice. We found that knockin alanine replacement of RyR2 PKA (S2808) or CaMKII (S2814) target sites failed to affect HR responses to isoproterenol or spontaneous activity in vivo or in SANC. Similarly, selective mutation of PLN amino acids critical for enhancing SR Ca2+ uptake by PKA (S16) or CaMKII (T17) to alanines did not affect HR in vivo or in SANC. In contrast, CaMKII inhibition by expression of AC3-I has been shown to slow SANC rate responses to isoproterenol and decrease SR Ca2+ content. PLN deficiency rescued SR Ca2+ content and SANC rate responses to isoproterenol in mice with AC3-I expression, suggesting CaMKII affects HR by modulation of SR Ca2+ content. Consistent with this, mice expressing a superinhibitory PLN mutant had low SR Ca2+ content and slow HR in vivo and in SANC. Conclusions SR Ca2+ depletion reduces HR and SR Ca2+ repletion restores physiological SANC rate responses despite CaMKII inhibition. PKA and CaMKII do not affect HR by a unique target site governing SR Ca2+ uptake or release. HR acceleration may require an SR Ca2+ content threshold. PMID:26857906

  3. Cdk-related kinase 9 regulates RNA polymerase II mediated transcription in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Abhijit S; Mitra, Pallabi; Kolagani, Ashok; Gurupwar, Rajkumar

    2018-02-18

    Cyclin-dependent kinases are an essential part of eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. In Apicomplexan parasites, the role and relevance of the kinases in the multistep process of transcription seeks more attention given the absence of full repertoire of canonical Cdks and cognate cyclin partners. In this study, we functionally characterize T. gondii Cdk-related kinase 9 (TgCrk9) showing maximal homology to eukaryotic Cdk9. An uncanonical cyclin, TgCyclin L, colocalizes with TgCrk9 in the parasite nucleus and co-immunoprecipitate, could activate the kinase in-vitro. We identify two threonines in conserved T-loop domain of TgCrk9 that are important for its activity. The activated TgCrk9 phosphorylates C-terminal domain (CTD) of TgRpb1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II highlighting its role in transcription. Selective chemical inhibition of TgCrk9 affected serine 2 phosphorylation in the heptapeptide repeats of TgRpb1-CTD towards 3' end of genes consistent with a role in transcription elongation. Interestingly, TgCrk9 kinase activity is regulated by the upstream TgCrk7 based CAK complex. TgCrk9 was found to functionally complement the role of its yeast counterpart Bur1 establishing its role as an important transcriptional kinase. In this study, we provide robust evidence that TgCrk9 is an important part of transcription machinery regulating gene expression in T. gondii. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIβ and IIδ mediate TGFβ-induced transduction of fibronectin and collagen in human pulmonary fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Subhendu; Sheng, Wei; Sun, Rui; Janssen, Luke J

    2017-04-01

    It is now clear that in addition to activating several complex kinase pathways (Smad, MAP kinase, PI3 kinase), TGFβ also acts by elevating cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration within human pulmonary fibroblasts. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamK II) is also known to regulate gene expression in fibroblasts. In this study, we examined the interactions between calcium signaling, activation of CamK and other kinases, and extracellular matrix (ECM) gene expression. Human pulmonary fibroblasts were cultured and stimulated with artificially generated Ca(2+) pulses in the absence of TGFβ, or with TGFβ (1 nM) or vehicle in the presence of various blockers of Ca(2+) signaling. PCR and Western blotting were used to measure gene expression and protein levels, respectively. We found that Ca(2+) pulses in the absence of TGFβ increased ECM gene expression in a pulse frequency-dependent manner, and that blocking Ca(2+) signaling and the CamK II pathway significantly reduced TGFβ-mediated ECM gene expression, without having any effects on other kinase pathways (Smad, PI3 kinase, or MAP kinase). We also found that TGFβ elevated the expression of CamK IIβ and CamK IIδ, while siRNA silencing of those two subtypes significantly reduced TGFβ-mediated expression of collagen A1 and fibronectin 1. Our data suggest that TGFβ induces the expression of CamK IIβ and CamK IIδ, which in turn are activated by TGFβ-evoked Ca(2+) waves in a frequency-dependent manner, leading to increased expression of ECM proteins. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Casein Kinase 1 Coordinates Cohesin Cleavage, Gametogenesis, and Exit from M Phase in Meiosis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello-Miranda, Orlando; Zagoriy, Ievgeniia; Mengoli, Valentina; Rojas, Julie; Jonak, Katarzyna; Oz, Tugce; Graf, Peter; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2017-01-09

    Meiosis consists of DNA replication followed by two consecutive nuclear divisions and gametogenesis or spore formation. While meiosis I has been studied extensively, less is known about the regulation of meiosis II. Here we show that Hrr25, the conserved casein kinase 1δ of budding yeast, links three mutually independent key processes of meiosis II. First, Hrr25 induces nuclear division by priming centromeric cohesin for cleavage by separase. Hrr25 simultaneously phosphorylates Rec8, the cleavable subunit of cohesin, and removes from centromeres the cohesin protector composed of shugoshin and the phosphatase PP2A. Second, Hrr25 initiates the sporulation program by inducing the synthesis of membranes that engulf the emerging nuclei at anaphase II. Third, Hrr25 mediates exit from meiosis II by activating pathways that trigger the destruction of M-phase-promoting kinases. Thus, Hrr25 synchronizes formation of the single-copy genome with gamete differentiation and termination of meiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fibronectin matrix assembly requires distinct contributions from Rho kinases I and -II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Ushakov, Dmitriy; Multhaupt, Hinke A B

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular matrix is integral to tissue architecture and regulates many aspects of cell behavior. Fibronectin matrix assembly involves the actin cytoskeleton and the small GTPase RhoA, but downstream signaling is not understood. Here, down-regulation of either rho kinase isoform (ROCK I or -II......) by small interfering RNA treatment blocked fibronectin matrix assembly, although the phenotypes were distinct and despite persistence of the alternate kinase. Remnant fibronectin on ROCK-deficient fibroblasts was mostly punctate and more deoxycholate soluble compared with controls. Fibronectin matrix...... assembly defects in ROCK-deficient cells did not result from decreased synthesis/secretion, altered fibronectin mRNA splicing, metalloproteinase activity, or alpha5beta1 integrin dysfunction. Rescue could be effected by ROCK protein restoration or phosphomimetic myosin light chain expression. However...

  7. Reaction-driven de novo design, synthesis and testing of potential type II kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Gisbert; Geppert, Tim; Hartenfeller, Markus; Reisen, Felix; Klenner, Alexander; Reutlinger, Michael; Hähnke, Volker; Hiss, Jan A; Zettl, Heiko; Keppner, Sarah; Spänkuch, Birgit; Schneider, Petra

    2011-03-01

    De novo design of drug-like compounds with a desired pharmacological activity profile has become feasible through innovative computer algorithms. Fragment-based design and simulated chemical reactions allow for the rapid generation of candidate compounds as blueprints for organic synthesis. We used a combination of complementary virtual-screening tools for the analysis of de novo designed compounds that were generated with the aim to inhibit inactive polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), a target for the development of cancer therapeutics. A homology model of the inactive state of Plk1 was constructed and the nucleotide binding pocket conformations in the DFG-in and DFG-out state were compared. The de novo-designed compounds were analyzed using pharmacophore matching, structure-activity landscape analysis, and automated ligand docking. One compound was synthesized and tested in vitro. The majority of the designed compounds possess a generic architecture present in known kinase inhibitors. Predictions favor kinases as targets of these compounds but also suggest potential off-target effects. Several bioisosteric replacements were suggested, and de novo designed compounds were assessed by automated docking for potential binding preference toward the inactive (type II inhibitors) over the active conformation (type I inhibitors) of the kinase ATP binding site. One selected compound was successfully synthesized as suggested by the software. The de novo-designed compound exhibited inhibitory activity against inactive Plk1 in vitro, but did not show significant inhibition of active Plk1 and 38 other kinases tested. Computer-based de novo design of screening candidates in combination with ligand- and receptor-based virtual screening generates motivated suggestions for focused library design in hit and lead discovery. Attractive, synthetically accessible compounds can be obtained together with predicted on- and off-target profiles and desired activities.

  8. In vitro evaluation of marginal and internal adaptation of class II CAD/CAM ceramic restorations with different resinous bases and interface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, María José; Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso; Krejci, Ivo; Mandikos, Michael; Dietschi, Didier

    2015-12-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of different composite bases and surface treatments on marginal and internal adaptation of class II CEREC CAD/CAM ceramic inlays, before and after simulated occlusal loading. Thirty-two IPS Empress CAD class II inlays (MO or OD) (n = 8/group) were placed on third molars, with margins 1 mm below the cementum-enamel junction (CEJ), following different cavity treatments. These treatments were non-liner (control group), a flowable composite liner (Premise flow) sandblasted or treated with soft air abrasion and a restorative composite liner (Premise) sandblasted. The restorations were then luted with Premise. All specimens were submitted to 1,000,000 cycles with a 100-N eccentric load. The tooth restoration margins were analysed semi-quantitatively by SEM pre- and post-loading. The internal adaptation was also evaluated after test completion. The percentage of satisfactory marginal adaptation varied from 75 to 87 % pre-loading and 62 to 72 % post-loading in occlusal enamel, from 71 to 83 % pre-loading and 52 to 63 % post-loading in proximal enamel, and from 68 to 88 % pre-loading and 43 to 66 % post-loading in cervical dentin. There were no significant differences among groups. The percentages of satisfactory tooth-composite internal adaptation varied from 81 to 98 % in occlusal dentin, from 63 to 90 % in axial dentin, and from 71 to 84 % in cervical dentin without any statistical difference. The results of the present study support the use of flowable or restorative composites as a liner underneath ceramic CAD/CAM inlays, producing marginal and internal adaptation which is not different from restorations placed directly on dentin. Soft air abrasion proved not to be different from sandblasting for treating cavities before cementation. The results of this in vitro test validate the increasing use of a flowable base/liner underneath CAD/CAM ceramic inlays to optimise tissue conservation and clinical procedures; in this case

  9. Excitation-transcription coupling in parvalbumin-positive interneurons employs a novel CaM Kinase-dependent pathway distinct from excitatory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Samuel M.; Ma, Huan; Kuchibhotla, Kishore V.; Watson, Brendon O.; Buzsáki, György; Froemke, Robert C.; Tsien, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Properly functional CNS circuits depend on inhibitory interneurons that in turn rely upon activity-dependent gene expression for morphological development, connectivity and excitatory-inhibitory coordination. Despite its importance, excitation-transcription coupling in inhibitory interneurons is poorly understood. Here, we report that PV+ interneurons employ a novel CaMK-dependent pathway to trigger CREB phosphorylation and gene expression. As in excitatory neurons, voltage-gated Ca2+ influx through CaV1 channels triggers CaM nuclear translocation via local Ca2+ signaling. However, PV+ interneurons are distinct in that nuclear signaling is mediated by γCaMKI, not γCaMKII. CREB phosphorylation also proceeds with slow, sigmoid kinetics, rate-limited by paucity of CaMKIV, protecting against saturation of phospho-CREB in the face of higher firing rates and bigger Ca2+ transients. Our findings support the generality of CaM shuttling to drive nuclear CaMK activity, and are relevant to disease pathophysiology, insofar as dysfunction of PV+ interneurons and molecules underpinning their excitation-transcription coupling both relate to neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:27041500

  10. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase activity in the somatic cells of the seminiferous tubules. II. Effect of retinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, M; Pezzotti, R; Nisticò, L

    1991-01-01

    The effect of retinol on cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase activity of Sertoli cells and peritubular cells isolated from prepubertal rats has been investigated. Treatments longer than six hours induced a significant inhibition of type I protein kinase activity of Sertoli cells without appreciable variation of type II protein kinase. Short time treatments with the vitamin did not affect the Sertoli cell protein kinase activity. The vitamin A addition did not induce any appreciable variation of peritubular cell protein kinase activity.

  11. Salt induction and the partial purification/characterization of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein-serine kinase from an inducible crassulacean-acid-metabolism (CAM) plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B; Chollet, R

    1994-10-01

    Treatment of the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum) with high salinity caused the well-documented increase in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) protein and a concomitant rise in the activity of a Ca(2+)-independent PEPC-kinase (PEPC-PK). When the plants were irrigated with 0.5 M NaCl, PEPC protein level and PEPC-PK activity started to increase after 2 days of treatment and continued to rise for the next 8 days, attaining about a 14- and 8-fold total increase, respectively. This salt-induced PEPC-kinase activity was detected only in leaves harvested from the stressed plants at night. This highly regulated protein kinase was partially purified about 3500-fold from these darkened, salt-stressed plants by sequential fast-protein liquid chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, blue dextran-agarose, and Superdex 75. The gel-filtration data indicated that the native PEPC-kinase has a molecular weight around 33,000. Complementary analysis by denaturing electrophoresis and subsequent in situ renaturation and assay of PEPC-kinase activity revealed two major PEPC-PK polypeptides with approximate molecular masses of 39 and 32 kDa. The partially purified M. crystallinum PEPC-kinase readily phosphorylated PEPCs purified from maize, M. crystallinum, and tobacco leaves and a recombinant sorghum enzyme. In contrast, this Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase phosphorylated neither a recombinant sorghum mutant PEPC in which the target residue (Ser-8) was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Asp nor histone III-S, casein, and bovine serum albumin. The optimal pH for PEPC-PK activity was pH 8.0 and this activity was affected by both the substrate (phosphoenolpyruvate) and the negative allosteric effector (L-malate) of PEPC in a pH-dependent manner. Overall, the molecular properties of this highly regulated PEPC-kinase from M. crystallinum are strikingly similar to those reported recently by this laboratory for the reversibly light-activated C4 enzyme from maize (Arch

  12. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity regulates the proliferative potential of growth plate chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwei; Ahrens, Molly J; Wu, Amy; Liu, Jennifer; Dudley, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    For tissues that develop throughout embryogenesis and into postnatal life, the generation of differentiated cells to promote tissue growth is at odds with the requirement to maintain the stem cell/progenitor cell population to preserve future growth potential. In the growth plate cartilage, this balance is achieved in part by establishing a proliferative phase that amplifies the number of progenitor cells prior to terminal differentiation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Here, we show that endogenous calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamkII, also known as Camk2) activity is upregulated prior to hypertrophy and that loss of CamkII function substantially blocks the transition from proliferation to hypertrophy. Wnt signaling and Pthrp-induced phosphatase activity negatively regulate CamkII activity. Release of this repression results in activation of multiple effector pathways, including Runx2- and β-catenin-dependent pathways. We present an integrated model for the regulation of proliferation potential by CamkII activity that has important implications for studies of growth control and adult progenitor/stem cell populations.

  13. Expression, purification, and initial characterization of a recombinant form of plant PEP-carboxylase kinase from CAM-induced Mesembryanthemum crystallinum with enhanced solubility in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolova, Natalia V; Ann Cushman, Mary; Taybi, Tahar; Condon, Shirley A; Cushman, John C; Chollet, Raymond

    2003-05-01

    Plant phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxylase kinase (PEPC-kinase [PpcK]) is the smallest Ser/Thr kinase identified to date, having a molecular mass of approximately 32,000. This novel, monomeric kinase is dedicated to the phosphorylation of plant PEPC, thereby regulating this target enzyme's activity and allosteric properties. Although several recombinant, non-fusion PpcK proteins have been produced recently in Escherichia coli, these are plagued by their high degree of insolubility. Here, we report the use of the native, E. coli NusA protein and a related E. coli expression vector (pET-43a(+) [Novagen]) for enhancing the solubility of this recalcitrant Ser/Thr kinase at least 10-fold by its production as a dual 6xHis-tagged NusA/McPpcK1 fusion protein, which accounts for approximately 10% of the soluble protein fraction from induced cells. Capture of this fusion protein from the centrifuged cell extract by immobilized metal (Ni(2+)) affinity-chromatography, its "on-bead" cleavage by thrombin, and subsequent elution yielded milligram quantities of a "free," approximately 36-kDa form of PpcK for further purification by fast-protein liquid chromatography on blue dextran-agarose or preparative SDS-PAGE. Steady-state kinetic analysis of the former, active preparation revealed that this dedicated kinase discriminates against neither various isoforms of plant PEPC nor certain mutant forms of recombinant C(4) PEPC. Alternatively, the latter, electrophoretically homogeneous sample of the approximately 36-kDa polypeptide was used as antigen for polyclonal-antibody production in rabbits. The antibodies against the recombinant McPpcK1 from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum cross-reacted on Western blots with an enriched preparation of the maize-leaf kinase, but not with the parent crude extract, thus directly documenting this protein's extremely low abundance in vivo. However, these antibodies were effective in immunoprecipitating 32P-based PpcK activity from crude, desalted extracts of

  14. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddouk, F Z; Ginnan, R; Singer, H A

    2017-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways are central regulators of differentiated vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contractile function. In addition, Ca2+ signals regulate VSM gene transcription, proliferation, and migration of dedifferentiated or "synthetic" phenotype VSM cells. Synthetic phenotype VSM growth and hyperplasia are hallmarks of pervasive vascular diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, postangioplasty/in-stent restenosis, and vein graft failure. The serine/threonine protein kinase Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of intracellular Ca2+ signals. Its multifunctional nature, structural complexity, diversity of isoforms, and splice variants all characterize this protein kinase and make study of its activity and function challenging. The kinase has unique autoregulatory mechanisms, and emerging studies suggest that it can function to integrate Ca2+ and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species signaling. Differentiated VSM expresses primarily CaMKIIγ and -δ isoforms. CaMKIIγ isoform expression correlates closely with the differentiated phenotype, and some studies link its function to regulation of contractile activity and Ca2+ homeostasis. Conversely, synthetic phenotype VSM cells primarily express CaMKIIδ and substantial evidence links it to regulation of gene transcription, proliferation, and migration of VSM in vitro, and vascular hypertrophic and hyperplastic remodeling in vivo. CaMKIIδ and -γ isoforms have opposing functions at the level of cell cycle regulation, proliferation, and VSM hyperplasia in vivo. Isoform switching following vascular injury is a key step in promoting vascular remodeling. Recent availability of genetically engineered mice with smooth muscle deletion of specific isoforms and transgenics expressing an endogenous inhibitor protein (CAMK2N) has enabled a better understanding of CaMKII function in VSM and should facilitate future studies. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F. [University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD (United Kingdom); Lau, Peter C. [National Research Council Canada, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montreal, QC H4P 2R2 (Canada); Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki [Kansai University (Japan); Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T. [Greifswald University, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 4, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Bourenkov, Gleb [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Hamburg Outstation, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Littlechild, Jennifer A., E-mail: j.a.littlechild@exeter.ac.uk [University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  16. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  17. Novel nootropic drug sunifiram improves cognitive deficits via CaM kinase II and protein kinase C activation in olfactory bulbectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Tanaka, Tomoya; Tagashira, Hideaki; Narahashi, Toshio; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) shows degeneration of the cholinergic system in the medial septum, thereby eliciting down-regulation of the olfactory function in patients. We have previously reported that olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice show hippocampus-dependent memory impairment as assessed by memory-related behavioral tasks and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). In the present study, we focused whether novel pyrrolidone nootropic drug sunifiram improves both memory impairment and depression observed in OBX mice. OBX mice were administered once a day for 7-12 days with sunifiram (0.01-1.0mg/kg p.o.) from 10 days after operation with or without gavestinel (10mg/kg i.p.), which is glycine-binding site inhibitor of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The spatial reference memory assessed by Y-maze and short-term memory assessed by novel object recognition task were significantly improved by sunifiram treatment in OBX mice. Sunifiram also restored hippocampal LTP injured in OBX mice without treatment with gavestinel. By contrast, sunifiram treatment did not ameliorate the depressive behaviors assessed by tail suspension task in OBX mice. Notably, sunifiram treatment restored CaMKIIα (Thr-286) autophosphorylation and GluR1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation in the hippocampal CA1 region from OBX mice to the levels of control mice. Likewise, sunifiram treatment improved PKCα (Ser-657) autophosphorylation and NR1 (Ser-896) phosphorylation to the control levels. Stimulation of CaMKII and PKC autophosphorylation by sunifiram was significantly inhibited by pre-treatment with gavestinel. However, sunifiram treatment did not affect the phosphorylation of CaMKIV (Thr-196) and ERK. Taken together, sunifiram ameliorates OBX-induced deficits of memory-related behaviors and impaired LTP in the hippocampal CA1 region via stimulation of glycine-binding site of NMDAR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Is prayer CAM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, Kim; Marsman, Kevin; Zwickey, Heather

    2009-04-01

    Alternative medicine researchers and policy makers have classified prayer as a mind-body intervention, and thus, a modality of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). As such, numerous epidemiological surveys of CAM utilization-which have included prayer-depict increasing CAM use, particularly in specific racial and ethnic groups. This paper discusses the implications of conflating prayer and CAM, especially regarding the definitions of both concepts and the resulting statistics of CAM utilization.

  19. Type II cGMP‑dependent protein kinase inhibits EGF‑induced JAK/STAT signaling in gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Wu, Yan; Lan, Ting; Jiang, Lu; Qian, Hai; Chen, Yongchang

    2016-08-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)‑initiated signal transduction of MAPK‑mediated, PI3K/Akt‑mediated and PLCγ1‑mediated pathways through blocking EGF‑induced phosphorylation/activation of EGF receptor (EGFR). As EGF/EGFR signaling also initiated signal transduction of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)‑mediated pathway, the present study was performed to investigate whether PKG II exerts an inhibitory effect this pathway. AGS human gastric cancer cell line was infected with adenoviral constructs encoding the cDNA of PKG II (Ad‑PKG II), to increase the expression of PKG II, and treated with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP to activate the kinase. Western blotting was performed to detect the phosphorylation/activation of EGFR, JAK1, JAK2, STAT1 and STAT3 and the expression of cell cycle‑associated proteins, including cyclin D1 and cyclin E. EGF‑induced cell cycle changes were detected by flow cytometry. Transcriptional activity was determined by a reporter gene assay. The results demonstrated that EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, JAK1, JAK2, STAT1 and STAT3, increased the expression levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, promoted the cells to enter S phase, and stimulated transcriptional activity in the cells. Increased PKG II activity through infecting the cells with Ad‑PKG II and activating the kinase with 8‑pCPT‑cGMP efficiently reversed the changes caused by EGF. The results suggest that PKG II inhibits EGF‑induced signal transduction of the JAK/STAT‑mediated pathway and further confirms that PKG II may be a cancer inhibitor.

  20. α-Calcium calmodulin kinase II modulates the temporal structure of hippocampal bursting patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeiwon Cho

    Full Text Available The alpha calcium calmodulin kinase II (α-CaMKII is known to play a key role in CA1/CA3 synaptic plasticity, hippocampal place cell stability and spatial learning. Additionally, there is evidence from hippocampal electrophysiological slice studies that this kinase has a role in regulating ion channels that control neuronal excitability. Here, we report in vivo single unit studies, with α-CaMKII mutant mice, in which threonine 305 was replaced with an aspartate (α-CaMKII(T305D mutants, that indicate that this kinase modulates spike patterns in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Previous studies showed that α-CaMKII(T305D mutants have abnormalities in both hippocampal LTP and hippocampal-dependent learning. We found that besides decreased place cell stability, which could be caused by their LTP impairments, the hippocampal CA1 spike patterns of α-CaMKII(T305D mutants were profoundly abnormal. Although overall firing rate, and overall burst frequency were not significantly altered in these mutants, inter-burst intervals, mean number of intra-burst spikes, ratio of intra-burst spikes to total spikes, and mean intra-burst intervals were significantly altered. In particular, the intra burst intervals of place cells in α-CaMKII(T305D mutants showed higher variability than controls. These results provide in vivo evidence that besides its well-known function in synaptic plasticity, α-CaMKII, and in particular its inhibitory phosphorylation at threonine 305, also have a role in shaping the temporal structure of hippocampal burst patterns. These results suggest that some of the molecular processes involved in acquiring information may also shape the patterns used to encode this information.

  1. Ablation of phosphoinositide-3-kinase class II alpha suppresses hepatoma cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Stanley K.L. [Singapore Immunology Network A-STAR (Singapore); Neo, Soek-Ying, E-mail: neo_soek_ying@sics.a-star.edu.sg [Singapore Immunology Network A-STAR (Singapore); Yap, Yann-Wan [Singapore Immunology Network A-STAR (Singapore); Karuturi, R. Krishna Murthy; Loh, Evelyn S.L. [Genome Institute of Singapore A-STAR (Singapore); Liau, Kui-Hin [Department of General Surgery, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Ren, Ee-Chee, E-mail: ren_ee_chee@immunol.a-star.edu.sg [Singapore Immunology Network A-STAR (Singapore); Department of Microbiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-09-18

    Cancer such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is characterized by complex perturbations in multiple signaling pathways, including the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K/AKT) pathways. Herein we investigated the role of PI3K catalytic isoforms, particularly class II isoforms in HCC proliferation. Among the siRNAs tested against the eight known catalytic PI3K isoforms, specific ablation of class II PI3K alpha (PIK3C2{alpha}) was the most effective in impairing cell growth and this was accompanied by concomitant decrease in PIK3C2{alpha} mRNA and protein levels. Colony formation ability of cells deficient for PIK3C2{alpha} was markedly reduced and growth arrest was associated with increased caspase 3 levels. A small but significant difference in gene dosage and expression levels was detected between tumor and non-tumor tissues in a cohort of 19 HCC patients. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time that in addition to class I PI3Ks in cancer, class II PIK3C2{alpha} can modulate HCC cell growth.

  2. Nonclassical Mechanisms of Progesterone Action in the Brain: II. Role of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in Progesterone-Mediated Signaling in the Hypothalamus of Female Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Bhuvana; Portillo, Wendy; Reyna, Andrea; Chen, Jian Zhong; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.; Mani, Shaila K.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the activation of classical progestin receptor-dependent genomic pathway, progesterone (P) can activate nonclassical, membrane-initiated signaling pathways in the brain. We recently demonstrated rapid P activation of second-messenger kinases, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C in the ventromedial nucleus (VMN) and preoptic area (POA) of rat brain. To determine whether P can activate yet another Ca+2dependent kinase, we examined the rapid P modulation of calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in the VMN and POA in female rats. A rapid P-initiated activation of CaMKII basal activity was observed in the VMN but not the POA at 30 min. Estradiol benzoate (EB) priming enhanced this CaMKII basal activity in both the VMN and POA. CaMKII protein levels and phosphorylation of Thr-286 moiety on CaMKII, however, remained unchanged with EB and/or P treatments, suggesting that the changes in the CaMKII kinase activity are due to rapid P modulation of the kinase activity and not its synthesis or autoactivation. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of a CaMKII-specific inhibitor, KN-93, 30 min prior to the P infusion, in EB-primed, ovariectomized female rats inhibited CaMKII activation but not protein kinase A and protein kinase C activities. Interestingly, icv administration of KN-93 30 min prior to P infusion (icv) resulted in a reduction but not total inhibition of P-facilitated lordosis response in EB-primed female rats. These observations suggest a redundancy or, alternately, a hierarchy in the P-regulated activation of kinase signaling cascades in female reproductive behavior. PMID:18617607

  3. Molecular determinants for cardiovascular TRPC6 channel regulation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Juan; Geshi, Naomi; Takahashi, Shinichi

    2013-01-01

    and distribution of TRPC6 channels did not significantly change with these mutations. Electrophysiological and immunocytochemical data with the Myc-tagged TRPC6 channel indicated that Thr487 is most likely located at the intracellular side of the cell membrane. Overexpression of T487A caused significant reduction......The molecular mechanism underlying Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated regulation of the mouse transient receptor potential channel TRPC6 was explored by chimera, deletion and site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Induction of currents (ICCh) in TRPC6-expressing HEK293 cells...... of the TRPC6 channel by receptor stimulation. The abrogating effect of the alanine mutation of Thr487 (T487A) was reproduced with other non-polar amino acids, namely glutamine or asparagine, while being partially rescued by phosphomimetic mutations with glutamate or aspartate. The cellular expression...

  4. Serotonin regulates 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase activity in a PLC-PKC-CaMK II- and Janus kinase-dependent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Wagner Santos; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a hormone that has been implicated in the regulation of many physiological and pathological events. One of the most intriguing properties of this hormone is its ability to up-regulate mitosis. Moreover, 5-HT stimulates glucose uptake and up-regulates PFK activity through the 5-HT(2A) receptor, resulting in the phosphorylation of a tyrosine residue of PFK and the intracellular redistribution of PFK within skeletal muscle. The present study investigated some of the signaling intermediates involved in the effects of 5-HT on 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) regulation from skeletal muscle using kinetic assessments, immunoprecipitation, and western blotting assays. Our results demonstrate that 5-HT stimulates PFK from skeletal muscle via phospholipase C (PLC). The activation of PLC in skeletal muscle leads to the recruitment of protein kinase C (PKC) and calmodulin and the stimulation of calmodulin kinase II, which associates with PFK upon 5-HT action. Alternatively, 5-HT loses its ability to up-regulate PFK activity when Janus kinase is inhibited, suggesting that 5-HT is able to control glycolytic flux in the skeletal muscle of mice by recruiting different pathways and controlling PFK activity.

  5. Identification of type I and type II inhibitors of c-Yes kinase using in silico and experimental techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Chandrasekaran; Mary Thangakani, Anthony; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Anantha Krishnan, Dhanabalan; Sekijima, Masakazu; Akiyama, Yutaka; Gromiha, M Michael

    2017-06-07

    c-Yes kinase is considered as one of the attractive targets for anti-cancer drug design. The DFG (Asp-Phe-Gly) motif present in most of the kinases will adopt active and inactive conformations, known as DFG-in and DFG-out and their inhibitors are classified into type I and type II, respectively. In the present study, two screening protocols were followed for identification of c-Yes kinase inhibitors. (i) Structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) and (ii) Structure-based (SB) and Pharmacophore-based (PB) tandem screening. In SBVS, the c-Yes kinase structure was obtained from homology modeling and seven ensembles with different active site scaffolds through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. For SB-PB tandem screening, we modeled ligand bound active and inactive conformations. Physicochemical properties of inhibitors of Src kinase family and c-Yes kinase were used to prepare target focused libraries for screenings. Our screening procedure along with docking showed 520 probable hits in SBVS and tandem screening (120 and 400, respectively). Out of 5000 compounds identified from different computational methods, 2410 were examined using kinase inhibition assays. It includes 266 compounds (5.32%) identified from our method. We observed that 14 compounds (12%) are identified by the present method out of 168 that showed > 30% inhibition. Among them, three compounds are novel, unique, and showed good inhibition. Further, we have studied the binding of these compounds at the DFG-in and DFG-out conformations and reported the probable class (type I or type II). Hence, we suggest that these compounds could be novel drug leads for regulation of colorectal cancer.

  6. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  7. N-terminal myristoylation is required for membrane localization of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); T. Jarchau; S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells harbors a unique isozyme of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK type II) which acts as a key regulator of ion transport systems, including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

  8. Involvement of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) in genistein-induced potentiation of leucine/glutamine-stimulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hyo-Eun; Choi, Sung-E; Shin, Ha-Chul; Kwag, Won-Jae; Lee, Byung-Kyu; Cho, Ki-Woong; Kang, Yup

    2009-09-01

    Genistein has been reported to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Inhibitory activity on tyrosine kinase or activation of protein kinase A (PKA) was shown to play a role in the genistein-induced potentiation effect on GSIS. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism of genistein-induced potentiation of insulin secretion. Genistein augmented insulin secretion in INS-1 cells stimulated by various energy-generating nutrients such as glucose, pyruvate, or leucine/glutamine (Leu/Gln), but not the secretion stimulated by depolarizing agents such as KCl and tolbutamide, or Ca(2+) channel opener Bay K8644. Genistein at a concentration of 50 μM showed a maximum potentiation effect on Leu/Gln-stimulated insulin secretion, but this was not sufficient to inhibit the activity of tyrosine kinase. Inhibitor studies as well as immunoblotting analysis demonstrated that activation of PKA was little involved in genistein-induced potentiation of Leu/Gln-stimulated insulin secretion. On the other hand, all the inhibitors of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II tested, significantly diminished genistein-induced potentiation. Genistein also elevated the levels of [Ca(2+)]i and phospho-CaMK II. Furthermore, genistein augmented Leu/Gln-stimulated insulin secretion in CaMK II-overexpressing INS-1 cells. These data suggest that the activation of CaMK II played a role in genistein-induced potentiation of insulin secretion.

  9. Calcium/calmodulin and calmodulin kinase II stimulate hyperactivation in demembranated bovine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignotz, George G; Suarez, Susan S

    2005-09-01

    Hyperactivated motility is observed among sperm in the mammalian oviduct near the time of ovulation. It is characterized by high-amplitude, asymmetrical flagellar beating and assists sperm in penetrating the cumulus oophorus and zona pellucida. Elevated intracellular Ca2+ is required for the initiation of hyperactivated motility, suggesting that calmodulin (CALM) and Ca2+/CALM-stimulated pathways are involved. A demembranated sperm model was used to investigate the role of CALM in promoting hyperactivation. Ejaculated bovine sperm were demembranated and immobilized by brief exposure to Triton X-100. Motility was restored by addition of reactivation medium containing MgATP and Ca2+, and hyperactivation was observed as free Ca2+ was increased from 50 nM to 1 microM. However, when 2.5 mM Ca2+ was added to the demembranation medium to extract flagellar CALM, motility was not reactivated unless exogenous CALM was readded. The inclusion of anti-CALM IgG in the reactivation medium reduced the proportion hyperactivated in 1 microM Ca2+ to 5%. Neither control IgG, the CALM antagonist W-7, nor a peptide directed against the CALM-binding domain of myosin light chain kinase (MYLK2) inhibited hyperactivation. However, when sperm were reactivated in the presence of CALM kinase II (CAMK2) inhibiting peptides, hyperactivation was reduced by 75%. Furthermore, an inhibitor of CAMK2, KN-93, inhibited hyperactivation without impairing normal motility of intact sperm. CALM and CAMK2 were immunolocalized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. These results indicate that hyperactivation is stimulated by a Ca2+/CALM pathway involving CAMK2.

  10. Mechanical stress triggers cardiomyocyte autophagy through angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated p38MAP kinase independently of angiotensin II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor is known to mediate a variety of physiological actions of Ang II including autophagy. However, the role of AT1 receptor in cardiomyocyte autophagy triggered by mechanical stress still remains elusive. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether and how AT1 receptor participates in cardiomyocyte autophagy induced by mechanical stresses. A 48-hour mechanical stretch and a 4-week transverse aorta constriction (TAC were imposed to cultured cardiomyocytes of neonatal rats and adult male C57B/L6 mice, respectively, to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy prior to the assessment of cardiomyocyte autophagy using LC3b-II. Losartan, an AT1 receptor blocker, but not PD123319, the AT2 inhibitor, was found to significantly reduce mechanical stretch-induced LC3b-II upregulation. Moreover, inhibition of p38MAP kinase attenuated not only mechanical stretch-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy but also autophagy. To the contrary, inhibition of ERK and JNK suppressed cardiac hypertrophy but not autophagy. Intriguingly, mechanical stretch-induced autophagy was significantly inhibited by Losartan in the absence of Ang II. Taken together, our results indicate that mechanical stress triggers cardiomyocyte autophagy through AT1 receptor-mediated activation of p38MAP kinase independently of Ang II.

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 links RNA polymerase II transcription to processing of ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Rohrmoser, Michaela; Coordes, Britta; Heidemann, Martin; Kellner, Markus; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Strässer, Katja; Eick, Dirk

    2013-07-19

    Ribosome biogenesis is a process required for cellular growth and proliferation. Processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is highly sensitive to flavopiridol, a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9). Cdk9 has been characterized as the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we studied the connection between RNAPII transcription and rRNA processing. We show that inhibition of RNAPII activity by α-amanitin specifically blocks processing of rRNA. The block is characterized by accumulation of 3' extended unprocessed 47 S rRNAs and the entire inhibition of other 47 S rRNA-specific processing steps. The transcription rate of rRNA is moderately reduced after inhibition of Cdk9, suggesting that defective 3' processing of rRNA negatively feeds back on RNAPI transcription. Knockdown of Cdk9 caused a strong reduction of the levels of RNAPII-transcribed U8 small nucleolar RNA, which is essential for 3' rRNA processing in mammalian cells. Our data demonstrate a pivotal role of Cdk9 activity for coupling of RNAPII transcription with small nucleolar RNA production and rRNA processing.

  12. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

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    Grant S. Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX, the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults.

  13. Role of EGFR transactivation in angiotensin II signaling to extracellular regulated kinase in preglomerular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Bradley T; Linnoila, Jenny J; Jackson, Edwin K; Romero, Guillermo G

    2003-03-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II promotes the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK); however, the mechanisms leading to Ang II-induced ERK phosphorylation are debated. The currently accepted theory involves transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We have shown that generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) is required for the recruitment of Raf to membranes and the activation of ERK by multiple agonists, including Ang II. In the present report, we confirm that phospholipase D-dependent generation of PA is required for Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK in Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rat preglomerular smooth muscle cells (PGSMCs). However, EGF stimulation does not activate phospholipase D or generate PA. These observations indicate that EGF recruits Raf to membranes via a mechanism that does not involve PA, and thus, Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK is partially independent of EGFR-mediated signaling cascades. We hypothesized that phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) can also act to recruit Raf to membranes; therefore, inhibition of PI3K should inhibit EGF signaling to ERK. Wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, inhibited EGF-mediated phosphorylation of ERK (IC50, approximately 14 nmol/L). To examine the role of the EGFR in Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK we utilized 100 nmol/L wortmannin to inhibit EGFR signaling to ERK and T19N RhoA to block Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation. Wortmannin treatment inhibited EGF-mediated but not Ang II-mediated phosphorylation of ERK. Furthermore, T19N RhoA inhibited Ang II-mediated ERK phosphorylation, whereas T19N RhoA had significantly less effect on EGF-mediated ERK phosphorylation. We conclude that transactivation of the EGFR is not primarily responsible for Ang II-mediated activation of ERK in PGSMCs.

  14. Template-Based de Novo Design for Type II Kinase Inhibitors and Its Extented Application to Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Han Su

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a compelling need to discover type II inhibitors targeting the unique DFG-out inactive kinase conformation since they are likely to possess greater potency and selectivity relative to traditional type I inhibitors. Using a known inhibitor, such as a currently available and approved drug or inhibitor, as a template to design new drugs via computational de novo design is helpful when working with known ligand-receptor interactions. This study proposes a new template-based de novo design protocol to discover new inhibitors that preserve and also optimize the binding interactions of the type II kinase template. First, sorafenib (Nexavar® and nilotinib (Tasigna®, two type II inhibitors with different ligand-receptor interactions, were selected as the template compounds. The five-step protocol can reassemble each drug from a large fragment library. Our procedure demonstrates that the selected template compounds can be successfully reassembled while the key ligand-receptor interactions are preserved. Furthermore, to demonstrate that the algorithm is able to construct more potent compounds, we considered kinase inhibitors and other protein dataset, acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitors. The de novo optimization was initiated using a template compound possessing a less than optimal activity from a series of aminoisoquinoline and TAK-285 inhibiting type II kinases, and E2020 derivatives inhibiting AChE respectively. Three compounds with greater potency than the template compound were discovered that were also included in the original congeneric series. This template-based lead optimization protocol with the fragment library can help to design compounds with preferred binding interactions of known inhibitors automatically and further optimize the compounds in the binding pockets.

  15. C-terminal Src Kinase Gates Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Regulates Fasciclin II Expression at the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlyn M Spring

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Forms of homeostatic plasticity stabilize neuronal outputs and promote physiologically favorable synapse function. A well-studied homeostatic system operates at the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ. At the NMJ, impairment of postsynaptic glutamate receptor activity is offset by a compensatory increase in presynaptic neurotransmitter release. We aim to elucidate how this process operates on a molecular level and is preserved throughout development. In this study, we identified a tyrosine kinase-driven signaling system that sustains homeostatic control of NMJ function. We identified C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk as a potential regulator of synaptic homeostasis through an RNAi- and electrophysiology-based genetic screen. We found that Csk loss-of-function mutations impaired the sustained expression of homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ, without drastically altering synapse growth or baseline neurotransmission. Muscle-specific overexpression of Src Family Kinase (SFK substrates that are negatively regulated by Csk also impaired NMJ homeostasis. Surprisingly, we found that transgenic Csk-YFP can support homeostatic plasticity at the NMJ when expressed either in the muscle or in the nerve. However, only muscle-expressed Csk-YFP was able to localize to NMJ structures. By immunostaining, we found that Csk mutant NMJs had dysregulated expression of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule homolog Fasciclin II (FasII. By immunoblotting, we found that levels of a specific isoform of FasII were decreased in homeostatically challenged GluRIIA mutant animals-but markedly increased in Csk mutant animals. Additionally, we found that postsynaptic overexpression of FasII from its endogenous locus was sufficient to impair synaptic homeostasis, and genetically reducing FasII levels in Csk mutants fully restored synaptic homeostasis. Based on these data, we propose that Csk and its SFK substrates impinge upon homeostatic control of NMJ function by

  16. Tyrosine kinase is involved in angiotensin II-stimulated phospholipase D activation in aortic smooth muscle cells: function of Ca2+ influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Shinoda, J; Oiso, Y; Kozawa, O

    1996-03-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of angiotensin II (Ang II) on phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D activity in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC). Ang II dose-dependently stimulated the formation of choline and inositol phosphates. The effect of Ang II on the formation of inositol phosphates (EC50 was 0.249 +/- 0.091 nM) was more potent than that on the formation of choline (EC50 was 2.39 +/- 1.29 nM). A combination of Ang II and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C, additively stimulated the formation of choline. Staurosporine, an inhibitor of protein kinases, inhibited the TPA-induced formation of choline, but had little effect on the Ang II-induced choline formation. Ang II stimulated Ca2+ influx from extracellular space time- and dose-dependently. The depletion of extracellular Ca2+ by (ethylenebis(oxyethylenenitrilo)) tetraacetic acid (EGTA) significantly reduced the Ang II-induced formation of choline. Genistein and tyrphostin, protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors, significantly suppressed the Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx. Genistein and tyrphostin also suppressed the Ang II-induced formation of choline. These results suggest that Ang II stimulates phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D due to Ca2+ influx from the extracellular space in rat aortic SMC, and that protein tyrosine kinase is involved in the Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx, resulting in the promotion of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis.

  17. Cadmium affects focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in mesangial cells: involvement of CaMK-II and the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Templeton, Douglas M

    2013-08-01

    The toxic metal ion cadmium (Cd(2+)) induces pleiotropic effects on cell death and survival, in part through effects on cell signaling mechanisms and cytoskeletal dynamics. Linking these phenomena appears to be calmodulin-dependent activation of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II). Here we show that interference with the dynamics of the filamentous actin cytoskeleton, either by stabilization or destabilization, results in disruption of focal adhesions at the ends of organized actin structures, and in particular the loss of vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) from the contacts is a result. Low-level exposure of renal mesangial cells to CdCl2 disrupts the actin cytoskeleton and recapitulates the effects of manipulation of cytoskeletal dynamics with biological agents. Specifically, Cd(2+) treatment causes loss of vinculin and FAK from focal contacts, concomitant with cytoskeletal disruption, and preservation of cytoskeletal integrity with either a calmodulin antagonist or a CaMK-II inhibitor abrogates these effects of Cd(2+). Notably, inhibition of CaMK-II decreases the migration of FAK-phosphoTyr925 to a membrane-associated compartment where it is otherwise sequestered from focal adhesions in a Cd(2+)-dependent manner. These results add further insight into the mechanism of the CaMK-II-dependent effects of Cd(2+) on cellular function. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Calmodulin kinase II is required for fight or flight sinoatrial node physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Gao, Zhan; Chen, Biyi; Koval, Olha M; Singh, Madhu V; Guan, Xiaoqun; Hund, Thomas J; Kutschke, William; Sarma, Satyam; Grumbach, Isabella M; Wehrens, Xander H T; Mohler, Peter J; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2009-04-07

    The best understood "fight or flight" mechanism for increasing heart rate (HR) involves activation of a cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel (HCN4) by beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) agonist stimulation. HCN4 conducts an inward "pacemaker" current (I(f)) that increases the sinoatrial nodal (SAN) cell membrane diastolic depolarization rate (DDR), leading to faster SAN action potential generation. Surprisingly, HCN4 knockout mice were recently shown to retain physiological HR increases with isoproterenol (ISO), suggesting that other I(f)-independent pathways are critical to SAN fight or flight responses. The multifunctional Ca(2+) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a downstream signal in the betaAR pathway that activates Ca(2+) homeostatic proteins in ventricular myocardium. Mice with genetic, myocardial and SAN cell CaMKII inhibition have significantly slower HRs than controls during stress, leading us to hypothesize that CaMKII actions on SAN Ca(2+) homeostasis are critical for betaAR agonist responses in SAN. Here we show that CaMKII mediates ISO HR increases by targeting SAN cell Ca(2+) homeostasis. CaMKII inhibition prevents ISO effects on SAN Ca(2+) uptake and release from intracellular sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores that are necessary for increasing DDR. CaMKII inhibition has no effect on the ISO response in SAN cells when SR Ca(2+) release is disabled and CaMKII inhibition is only effective at slowing HRs during betaAR stimulation. These studies show the tightly coupled, but previously unanticipated, relationship of CaMKII to the betaAR pathway in fight or flight physiology and establish CaMKII as a critical signaling molecule for physiological HR responses to catecholamines.

  19. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague-Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0±14.0 to 142.1±18.4ms (p=0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200μg/ml for 30min, n=5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p=0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5mmol/L, n=3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5μg/ml for 20min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5mmol/L, n=5), nifedipine (10μmol/L, n=5), and active Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1μmol/L, n=5), but not by thapsigargin (200nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10μmol/L, n=5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1μmol/L, n=5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidized calmodulin kinase II regulates conduction following myocardial infarction: a computational analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Christensen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII mediates critical signaling pathways responsible for divergent functions in the heart including calcium cycling, hypertrophy and apoptosis. Dysfunction in the CaMKII signaling pathway occurs in heart disease and is associated with increased susceptibility to life-threatening arrhythmia. Furthermore, CaMKII inhibition prevents cardiac arrhythmia and improves heart function following myocardial infarction. Recently, a novel mechanism for oxidative CaMKII activation was discovered in the heart. Here, we provide the first report of CaMKII oxidation state in a well-validated, large-animal model of heart disease. Specifically, we observe increased levels of oxidized CaMKII in the infarct border zone (BZ. These unexpected new data identify an alternative activation pathway for CaMKII in common cardiovascular disease. To study the role of oxidation-dependent CaMKII activation in creating a pro-arrhythmia substrate following myocardial infarction, we developed a new mathematical model of CaMKII activity including both oxidative and autophosphorylation activation pathways. Computer simulations using a multicellular mathematical model of the cardiac fiber demonstrate that enhanced CaMKII activity in the infarct BZ, due primarily to increased oxidation, is associated with reduced conduction velocity, increased effective refractory period, and increased susceptibility to formation of conduction block at the BZ margin, a prerequisite for reentry. Furthermore, our model predicts that CaMKII inhibition improves conduction and reduces refractoriness in the BZ, thereby reducing vulnerability to conduction block and reentry. These results identify a novel oxidation-dependent pathway for CaMKII activation in the infarct BZ that may be an effective therapeutic target for improving conduction and reducing heterogeneity in the infarcted heart.

  1. Biodentine induces human dental pulp stem cell differentiation through mitogen-activated protein kinase and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhirong; Kohli, Meetu R; Yu, Qing; Kim, Syngcuk; Qu, Tiejun; He, Wen-xi

    2014-07-01

    Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossès, France), a new tricalcium silicate cement formulation, has been introduced as a bioactive dentine substitute to be used in direct contact with pulp tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to the material and whether mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signal pathways played a regulatory role in Biodentine-induced odontoblast differentiation. hDPCs obtained from impacted third molars were incubated with Biodentine. Odontoblastic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for the analysis of messenger RNA expression of the following differentiation gene markers: osteocalcin (OCN), dentin sialophosprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), and bone sialoprotein (BSP). Cell cultures in the presence of Biodentine were exposed to specific inhibitors of MAPK (U0126, SB203580, and SP600125), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), and CaMKII (KN-93) pathways to evaluate the regulatory effect on the expression of these markers and mineralization assay. Biodentine significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation and the expression of OCN, DSPP, DMP1, and BSP. The MAPK inhibitor for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (U0126) and Jun N-terminal kinase (SP600125) significantly decreased the Biodentine-induced mineralized differentiation of hDPSCs and OCN, DSPP, DMP1, and BSP messenger RNA expression, whereas p38 MAPK inhibitors (SB203580) had no effect. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 significantly attenuated and the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate further enhanced the up-regulation of Biodentine-induced gene expression and mineralization. Biodentine is a bioactive and biocompatible material capable

  2. BRD4 is an atypical kinase that phosphorylates Serine2 of the RNA Polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaiah, Ballachanda N.; Lewis, Brian A.; Cherman, Natasha; Hewitt, Michael C.; Albrecht, Brian K.; Robey, Pamela G.; Ozato, Keiko; Sims, Robert J.; Singer, Dinah S.

    2012-01-01

    The bromodomain protein, BRD4, has been identified recently as a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia, multiple myeloma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, NUT midline carcinoma, colon cancer, and inflammatory disease; its loss is a prognostic signature for metastatic breast cancer. BRD4 also contributes to regulation of both cell cycle and transcription of oncogenes, HIV, and human papilloma virus (HPV). Despite its role in a broad range of biological processes, the precise molecular mechanism of BRD4 function remains unknown. We report that BRD4 is an atypical kinase that binds to the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II and directly phosphorylates its serine 2 (Ser2) sites both in vitro and in vivo under conditions where other CTD kinases are inactive. Phosphorylation of the CTD Ser2 is inhibited in vivo by a BRD4 inhibitor that blocks its binding to chromatin. Our finding that BRD4 is an RNA polymerase II CTD Ser2 kinase implicates it as a regulator of eukaryotic transcription. PMID:22509028

  3. Angiotensin II activates MAP kinase and NF-kappaB through angiotensin II type I receptor in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Koji; Ohta, Tetsuo; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Kayahara, Masato; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Takashi; Nishimura, Gen-Ichi; Shimizu, Koichi; Miwa, Koichi

    2004-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal cancer has higher angiotensin II concentrations compared with normal pancreas or other solid tumors. This study examined angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor expression and the role of angiotensin II in proliferation and survival of human pancreatic cancer cells. All three pancreatic cancer cell lines studied, from well to poorly-differentiated types, HPAF-II, AsPC-1, and Panc-1, showed strong expression of AT1 receptor. In contrast, HT-29 human colon cancer cells showed extremely weak expression. Angiotensin II stimulated the growth of pancreatic cancer cells through MAP kinase activation but had no significant effect on proliferation of HT-29 colon cancer cells. In addition, angiotensin II significantly prevented cisplatin (CDDP)-induced apoptosis through NF-kappaB activation and the subsequent production of anti-apoptotic molecules, including survivin and Bcl-XL, in pancreatic cancer cells. These findings suggest that angiotensin II plays a role in the growth and chemoresistance of AT1-positive pancreatic cancer cells through its action as a potent mitogen and anti-apoptotic molecule.

  4. Investigation of Neuronal Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mima Kazuko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The promoter activity of the rat Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gene was analyzed using the luciferase reporter gene in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. Neuronal cell type-specific promoter activity was found in the 5'-flanking region of &agr; and &bgr; isoform genes of the kinase. Silencer elements were also found further upstream of promoter regions. A brain-specific protein bound to the DNA sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the gene was found by gel mobility shift analysis in the nuclear extract of the rat brain, including the cerebellum, forebrain, and brainstem, but not in that of non-neuronal tissues, including liver, kidney and spleen. The luciferase expression system and gel shift analysis can be used as an additional and better index by which to monitor gene expression in most cell types.

  5. Conditioned taste aversion and Ca/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in the parabrachial nucleus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, J

    2001-07-01

    Bielavska and colleagues (Bielavska, Sacchetti, Baldi, & Tassoni, 1999) have recently shown that KN-62, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaCMK), induces conditioned taste aversion (CTA) when introduced into the parabrachial nucleus (PBN) of rats. The aim of the present report was to assess whether activity of CaCMK in the PBN is changed during CTA. We induced CTA in one group of rats by pairing saccharin consumption with an ip injection of lithium chloride. Another group of rats received lithium alone (without being paired with saccharin consumption) to test whether lithium has an effect on CaCMK in the PBN, independent of those effects due to training. In animals receiving CTA training, CaCMK activity in extracts of PBN was reduced by approximately 30% at the postacquisition intervals of 12, 24, and 48 h, compared to control animals receiving saccharin with saline injection. By 120 h after CTA training, no effect on CaCMK was present. At those postacquisition intervals showing CaCMK activity effects due to CTA, there were no effects attributable to lithium alone. Lithium alone produced only a short-lasting reduction in CaCMK activity (at 20 min a 30% decrease, at 60 min a 23% decrease; and at 6, 12, and 24 h no decrease). The time course of lithium-induced effects differed markedly from that of CTA training. All changes were Ca2+/- -dependent; we did not observe any changes in Ca-independent activity. CTA effects on CaCMK were selective for PBN, insofar as we did not observe any CTA effects on CaCMK in the visual cortex, a brain region unrelated to taste pathways. Since CTA produces a relatively long-lasting reduction in CaCMK activity (lasting 2 days or more) specifically in the PBN, which is critical a relay for taste information, the reduction of CaCMK activity may enable the consolidation of taste memory in an aversive situation.

  6. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin-Bae [The Division of Cardiology, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, 1 Hoegi-dong, Dongdaemun-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changsoo [The Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eunmi [Cardiovascular Research Institute and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung [The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Dong Chun [The Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ki-Chul [Cardiovascular Research Institute and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Joung, Boyoung, E-mail: cby6908@yuhs.ac [The Division of Cardiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seungsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  7. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mediates hippocampal glutamatergic plasticity during benzodiazepine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guofu; Van Sickle, Bradley J; Tietz, Elizabeth I

    2010-08-01

    Benzodiazepine withdrawal anxiety is associated with potentiation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) currents in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons attributable to increased synaptic incorporation of GluA1-containing AMPARs. The contribution of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) to enhanced glutamatergic synaptic strength during withdrawal from 1-week oral flurazepam (FZP) administration was further examined in hippocampal slices. As earlier reported, AMPAR-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) amplitude increased in CA1 neurons from 1- and 2-day FZP-withdrawn rats, along with increased single-channel conductance in neurons from 2-day rats, estimated by non-stationary noise analysis. Input-output curve slope was increased without a change in paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting increased AMPAR postsynaptic efficacy rather than altered glutamate release. The increased mEPSC amplitude and AMPAR conductance were related to CaMKII activity, as intracellular inclusion of CaMKIINtide or autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide, but not scrambled peptide, prevented both AMPAR amplitude and conductance changes. mEPSC inhibition by 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine and the negative shift in rectification index at both withdrawal time points were consistent with functional incorporation of GluA2-lacking AMPARs. GluA1 but not GluA2 or GluA3 levels were increased in immunoblots of postsynaptic density (PSD)-enriched subcellular fractions of CA1 minislices from 1-day FZP-withdrawn rats, when mEPSC amplitude, but not conductance, was increased. Both GluA1 expression levels and CaMKII alpha-mediated GluA1 Ser(831) phosphorylation were increased in PSD-subfractions from 2-day FZP-withdrawn rats. As phospho-Thr(286)CaMKII alpha was unchanged, CaMKII alpha may be activated through an alternative signaling pathway. Synaptic insertion and subsequent CaMKII alpha-mediated Ser(831) phosphorylation of GluA1 homomers

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibition and angiotensin II converting inhibition in mice with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchir, Antoine, E-mail: a.muchir@institut-myologie.org [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wu, Wei [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Sera, Fusako; Homma, Shunichi [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Worman, Howard J., E-mail: hjw14@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • Both ACE and MEK1/2 inhibition are beneficial on cardiac function in Lmna cardiomyopathy. • MEK1/2 inhibitor has beneficial effects beyond ACE inhibition for Lmna cardiomyopathy. • These results provide further preclinical rationale for a clinical trial of a MEK1/2 inhibitor. - Abstract: Background: Mutations in the LMNA gene encoding A-type nuclear lamins can cause dilated cardiomyopathy with or without skeletal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have shown abnormally increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activity in hearts of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice, a small animal model. Inhibition of this abnormal signaling activity with a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2) inhibitor has beneficial effects on heart function and survival in these mice. However, such treatment has not been examined relative to any standard of care intervention for dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. We therefore examined the effects of an angiotensin II converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor on left ventricular function in Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice and assessed if adding a MEK1/2 inhibitor would provide added benefit. Methods: Male Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice were treated with the ACE inhibitor benazepril, the MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib or both. Transthoracic echocardiography was used to measure left ventricular diameters and fractional shortening was calculated. Results: Treatment of Lmna{sup H222P/H222P} mice with either benazepril or selumetinib started at 8 weeks of age, before the onset of detectable left ventricular dysfunction, lead to statistically significantly increased fractional shortening compared to placebo at 16 weeks of age. There was a trend towards a great value for fractional shortening in the selumetinib-treated mice. When treatment was started at 16 weeks of age, after the onset of left ventricular dysfunction, the addition of selumetinib treatment to benazepril lead to a statistically significant increase in left

  9. Ca(2+ permeable AMPA receptor induced long-term potentiation requires PI3/MAP kinases but not Ca/CaM-dependent kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Asrar

    Full Text Available Ca(2+ influx via GluR2-lacking Ca(2+-permeable AMPA glutamate receptors (CP-AMPARs can trigger changes in synaptic efficacy in both interneurons and principle neurons, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We took advantage of genetically altered mice with no or reduced GluR2, thus allowing the expression of synaptic CP-AMPARs, to investigate the molecular signaling process during CP-AMPAR-induced synaptic plasticity at CA1 synapses in the hippocampus. Utilizing electrophysiological techniques, we demonstrated that these receptors were capable of inducing numerous forms of long-term potentiation (referred to as CP-AMPAR dependent LTP through a number of different induction protocols, including high-frequency stimulation (HFS and theta-burst stimulation (TBS. This included a previously undemonstrated form of protein-synthesis dependent late-LTP (L-LTP at CA1 synapses that is NMDA-receptor independent. This form of plasticity was completely blocked by the selective CP-AMPAR inhibitor IEM-1460, and found to be dependent on postsynaptic Ca(2+ ions through calcium chelator (BAPTA studies. Surprisingly, Ca/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII, the key protein kinase that is indispensable for NMDA-receptor dependent LTP at CA1 synapses appeared to be not required for the induction of CP-AMPAR dependent LTP due to the lack of effect of two separate pharmacological inhibitors (KN-62 and staurosporine on this form of potentiation. Both KN-62 and staurosporine strongly inhibited NMDA-receptor dependent LTP in control studies. In contrast, inhibitors for PI3-kinase (LY294002 and wortmannin or the MAPK cascade (PD98059 and U0126 significantly attenuated this CP-AMPAR-dependent LTP. Similarly, postsynaptic infusion of tetanus toxin (TeTx light chain, an inhibitor of exocytosis, also had a significant inhibitory effect on this form of LTP. These results suggest that distinct synaptic signaling underlies GluR2-lacking CP-AMPAR-dependent LTP, and reinforces

  10. Endogenous type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase exists as a dimer in membranes and can Be functionally distinguished from the type I isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); A.G. Bot (Alice); M.A. Kroos (Marian); T. Jarchau; S. Lohmann; H.G. Genieser; H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn mammalian tissues two types of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) have been identified. In contrast to the dimeric cGK I, cGK II purified from pig intestine was shown previously to behave as a monomer. However, recombinant rat cGK II was found to have

  11. A dynamic model of interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and catalytic subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Pepke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During the acquisition of memories, influx of Ca2+ into the postsynaptic spine through the pores of activated N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors triggers processes that change the strength of excitatory synapses. The pattern of Ca2+influx during the first few seconds of activity is interpreted within the Ca2+-dependent signaling network such that synaptic strength is eventually either potentiated or depressed. Many of the critical signaling enzymes that control synaptic plasticity,including Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, are regulated by calmodulin, a small protein that can bindup to 4 Ca2+ ions. As a first step toward clarifying how the Ca2+-signaling network decides between potentiation or depression, we have created a kinetic model of the interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and CaMKII that represents our best understanding of the dynamics of these interactions under conditions that resemble those in a postsynaptic spine. We constrained parameters of the model from data in the literature, or from our own measurements, and then predicted time courses of activation and autophosphorylation of CaMKII under a variety of conditions. Simulations showed that species of calmodulin with fewer than four bound Ca2+ play a significant role in activation of CaMKII in the physiological regime,supporting the notion that processing of Ca2+ signals in a spine involves competition among target enzymes for binding to unsaturated species of CaM in an environment in which the concentration of Ca2+ is fluctuating rapidly. Indeed, we showed that dependence of activation on the frequency of Ca2+ transients arises from the kinetics of interaction of fluctuating Ca2+with calmodulin/CaMKII complexes. We used parameter sensitivity analysis to identify which parameters will be most beneficial to measure more carefully to improve the accuracy of predictions. This model provides a quantitative base from which to build more complex dynamic

  12. Signal transduction underlying carbachol-induced contraction of rat urinary bladder. II. Protein kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleichman, Marina; Schneider, Tim; Fetscher, Charlotte; Michel, Martin C.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated the role of several protein kinases in carbachol-stimulated, M-3 muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction of rat urinary bladder. Concentration-response curves for the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol were generated in the presence of multiple concentrations of inhibitors

  13. CAM and NK Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Takeda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that tumor development, outgrowth and metastasis are under the surveillance of the immune system. Although both innate and acquired immune systems play roles, innate immunity is the spearhead against tumors. Recent studies have revealed the critical role of natural killer (NK cells in immune surveillance and that NK cell activity is considerably influenced by various agents, such as environmental factors, stress, foods and drugs. Some of these NK cell stimulants have been used in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM since ancient times. Therefore, the value of CAM should be re-evaluated from this point of view. In this review, we overview the intimate correlation between NK cell functions and CAM agents, and discuss possible underlying mechanisms mediating this. In particular, neuro-immune crosstalk and receptors for CAM agents are the most important and interesting candidates for such mechanisms.

  14. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Gwan Lee

    Full Text Available Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine, is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3 with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg

  15. Calmodulin Kinase II Interacts with the Dopamine Transporter C Terminus to Regulate Amphetamine-Induced Reverse Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob U; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Holy, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound to the d......Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound...... to the distal C terminus of DAT and colocalized with DAT in dopaminergic neurons. CaMKIIalpha stimulated dopamine efflux via DAT in response to amphetamine in heterologous cells and in dopaminergic neurons. CaMKIIalpha phosphorylated serines in the distal N terminus of DAT in vitro, and mutation...... of these serines eliminated the stimulatory effects of CaMKIIalpha. A mutation of the DAT C terminus impairing CaMKIIalpha binding also impaired amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux. An in vivo role for CaMKII was supported by chronoamperometry measurements showing reduced amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux...

  16. Calmodulin kinase II interacts with the dopamine transporter C terminus to regulate amphetamine-induced reverse transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Jacob U; Khoshbouei, Habibeh; Holy, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound to the d......Efflux of dopamine through the dopamine transporter (DAT) is critical for the psychostimulatory properties of amphetamines, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we show that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a key role in this efflux. CaMKIIalpha bound...... to the distal C terminus of DAT and colocalized with DAT in dopaminergic neurons. CaMKIIalpha stimulated dopamine efflux via DAT in response to amphetamine in heterologous cells and in dopaminergic neurons. CaMKIIalpha phosphorylated serines in the distal N terminus of DAT in vitro, and mutation...... of these serines eliminated the stimulatory effects of CaMKIIalpha. A mutation of the DAT C terminus impairing CaMKIIalpha binding also impaired amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux. An in vivo role for CaMKII was supported by chronoamperometry measurements showing reduced amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux...

  17. Cloning and characterization of PAK5, a novel member of mammalian p21-activated kinase-II subfamily that is predominantly expressed in brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A.; Dan, I.; Kristiansen, T.Z.

    2002-01-01

    cloned a novel human PAK family kinase that has been designated as PAK5. PAK5 contains a CDC42/Rac1 interactive binding (CRIB) motif at the N-terminus and a Ste20-like kinase domain at the C-terminus. PAK5 is structurally most related to PAK4 and PAK6 to make up the PAK-II subfamily. We have shown...

  18. Heterobiaryl purine derivatives as potent antiproliferative agents: inhibitors of cyclin dependent kinases. Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trova, Michael P; Barnes, Keith D; Alicea, Luis; Benanti, Travis; Bielaska, Mark; Bilotta, Joseph; Bliss, Brian; Duong, Thuy Nguyen; Haydar, Simon; Herr, R Jason; Hui, Yu; Johnson, Matthew; Lehman, John M; Peace, Denise; Rainka, Matthew; Snider, Patricia; Salamone, Susan; Tregay, Steven; Zheng, Xiaozhang; Friedrich, Thomas D

    2009-12-01

    C-6 Biarylmethylamino purine derivatives of roscovitine (1) inhibit cyclin dependent kinases and demonstrate potent antiproliferative activity. Replacement of the aryl rings of the C-6 biarylmethylamino group with heterobiaryl rings has provided compounds with significantly improved activity. In particular, derivatives 18 g and 9 c demonstrated 1000-fold and 1250-fold improvements, respectively, in the growth inhibition of HeLa cells compared to roscovitine (1).

  19. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulation of gonadotropin subunit transcription: evidence for the involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (Ca/CAMK II) activation in rat pituitaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisenleder, D J; Burger, L L; Aylor, K W; Dalkin, A C; Marshall, J C

    2003-07-01

    The intracellular pathways mediating GnRH regulation of gonadotropin subunit transcription remain to be fully characterized, and the present study examined whether calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (Ca/CAMK II) plays a role in the rat pituitary. Preliminary studies demonstrated that a single pulse of GnRH given to adult rats stimulated a transient 2.5-fold rise in Ca/CAMK II activity (as determined by an increase in Ca/CAMK II phosphorylation), with peak values at 5 min, returning to basal 45 min after the pulse. Further studies examined the alpha, LHbeta, and FSHbeta transcriptional responses to GnRH or Bay K 8644+KCl (BK+KCl) pulses in vitro in the absence or presence of the Ca/CAMK II-specific inhibitor, KN-93. Gonadotropin subunit transcription was assessed by measuring primary transcripts (PTs) by quantitative RT-PCR. In time-course studies, both GnRH and BK+KCl pulses given alone increased all three subunit PTs after 6 h (2- to 4-fold). PT responses to GnRH increased over time (3- to 8-fold over basal at 24 h), although BK+KCl was ineffective after 24 h. KN-93 reduced the LHbeta and FSHbeta transcriptional responses to GnRH by 50-60% and completely suppressed the alphaPT response. In contrast, KN-93 showed no inhibitory effects on basal transcriptional activity or LH or FSH secretion. In fact, KN-93 tended to increase basal alpha, LHbeta, and FSHbeta PT levels and enhance LH secretory responses to GnRH. These results reveal that Ca/CAMK II plays a central role in the transmission of pulsatile GnRH signals from the plasma membrane to the rat alpha, LHbeta, and FSHbeta subunit genes.

  20. PreCam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allam, Sahar S. [Fermilab; Tucker, Douglas L. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) will be taking the next step in probing the properties of Dark Energy and in understanding the physics of cosmic acceleration. A step towards the photometric calibration of DES is to have a quick, bright survey in the DES footprint (PreCam), using a pre-production set of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) CCDs and a set of 100 mm×100 mm DES filters. The objective of the PreCam Survey is to create a network of calibrated DES grizY standard stars that will be used for DES nightly calibrations and to improve the DES global relative calibrations. Here, we describe the first year of PreCam observation, results, and photometric calibrations.

  1. Antiproliferative effect of complexes of platinum (II) with plasmanyl-(N-acyl)-ethanolamine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaevich, I S; Vlasenkova, N K; Gerasimova, G K

    1992-10-01

    Antiproliferative activities of combinations of semisynthetic plasmanyl-(N-acyl)-ethanolamine [PNAE(s)], an inhibitor of protein kinase C, with two antitumor complexes of platinum (II) [cisplatin and ammine(cyclopentylamine)-S-(-)-malatoplatinum (cycloplatam)] were investigated. The exposure of human melanoma BRO cells in culture simultaneously with cisplatin (1-10 microM) and PNAE(s) (100 microM-1 mM) in a molar ratio of 1/100 for 24 h induced a considerable decrease in the ability of these cells to incorporate [3H]thymidine into DNA. A considerable antiproliferative synergism of these agents was observed. The effect of cycloplatam/PNAE(s) combination in similar experiments was significantly different from cisplatin/PNAE(s), i.e. interaction of these agents was complex and synergism was not found.

  2. Inhibitory effects of KN-93, an inhibitor of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, on light-regulated root gravitropism in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, L. J.; Hidaka, H.

    1993-01-01

    Light is essential for root gravitropism in Zea mays L., cultivar Merit. It is hypothesized that calcium mediates this light-regulated response. KN-93, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II), inhibits light-regulated root gravitropism but does not affect light perception. We hypothesize that CaMK II, or a homologue, operates late in the light/gravity signal transduction chain. Here we provide evidence suggesting a possible physiological involvement of CaMK II in root gravitropism in plants.

  3. Functional Role of RNA Polymerase II and P70 S6 Kinase in KCl Withdrawal-induced Cerebellar Granule Neuron Apoptosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Jaya; Brown, Kristy R.; Padilla, Amelia; Shelanski, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    KCl withdrawal-induced apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons is associated with aberrant cell cycle activation, and treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitors protects cells from undergoing apoptosis. Because the Cdk inhibitor flavopiridol is known to inhibit RNA polymerase II (Pol II)-dependent transcription elongation by inhibiting the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb, a complex of CDK9 and cyclin T), we examined whether inhibition of RNA Pol II protects neurons from apoptosis. Treatment of neurons with 5, 6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribobenzimidazole (DRB), an RNA Pol II-dependent transcription elongation inhibitor, and flavopiridol inhibited phosphorylation and activation of Pol II and protected neurons from undergoing apoptosis. In addition to Pol II, neurons subjected to KCl withdrawal showed increased phosphorylation and activation of p70 S6 kinase, which was inhibited by both DRB and flavopiridol. Immunostaining analysis of the neurons deprived of KCl showed increased nuclear levels of phospho-p70 S6 kinase, and neurons protected with DRB and flavopiridol showed accumulation of the kinase into large spliceosome assembly factor-positive speckle domains within the nuclei. The formation of these foci corresponded with cell survival, and removal of the inhibitors resulted in dispersal of the speckles into smaller foci with subsequent apoptosis induction. Because p70 S6 kinase is known to induce translation of mRNAs containing a 5′-terminal oligopyrimidine tract, our data suggest that transcription and translation of this subset of mRNAs may contribute to KCl withdrawal-induced apoptosis in neurons. PMID:25568312

  4. Growth-dependent modulation of casein kinase II and its substrate nucleolin in primary human cell cultures and HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, H R; Issinger, O G

    1989-01-01

    We have previously provided evidence that casein kinase II (CKII) and its substrate nucleolin increase concomitantly during certain development stages during embryogenesis (Schneider et al., Eur. J. Biochem. 161, 733-738). We now show that during normal growth of primary cell cultures and He...

  5. Extracellular signal regulated kinase and SMAD signaling both mediate the angiotensin II driven progression towards overt heart failure in homozygous TGR(mRen2)27

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, RA; Pokharel, S; Flesch, M; van Kampen, DA; Suurmeijer, AJH; Boomsma, F; van Gilst, WH; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Pinto, YM

    2004-01-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II is a key player in left ventricular (LV) remodeling and cardiac fibrosis. Its effects are thought to be transferred at least in part by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), transforming growth factor (TGF) beta(1), and the Smad pathway. In this study we sought to elucidate

  6. Dual Inhibition of Topoisomerase II and Tyrosine Kinases by the Novel Bis-Fluoroquinolone Chalcone-Like Derivative HMNE3 in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Chao Ma

    Full Text Available Both tyrosine kinase and topoisomerase II (TopII are important anticancer targets, and their respective inhibitors are widely used in cancer therapy. However, some combinations of anticancer drugs could exhibit mutually antagonistic actions and drug resistance, which further limit their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we report that HMNE3, a novel bis-fluoroquinolone chalcone-like derivative that targets both tyrosine kinase and TopII, induces tumor cell proliferation and growth inhibition. The viabilities of 6 different cancer cell lines treated with a range of HMNE3 doses were detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was determined using Hoechst 33258 fluorescence staining and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay. The expression of activated Caspase-3 was examined by immunocytochemistry. The tyrosine kinase activity was measured with a human receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK detection kit using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP-conjugated phosphotyrosine (pY20 antibody as the substrate. The topoisomerase II activity was measured using agarose gel electrophoresis with the DNA plasmid pBR322 as the substrate. The expression levels of the P53, Bax, Bcl-2, Caspase-3, -8, -9, p-cSrc, c-Src and topoisomerase II proteins were detected by western blot analysis. The proliferation of five of the six cancer cell lines was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 at 0.312 to 10 μmol/L in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of the Capan-1 and Panc-1 cells with 1.6 to 3.2 μM HMNE3 for 48 h significantly increased the percentage of apoptotic cells (P<0.05, and this effect was accompanied by a decrease in tyrosine kinase activity. HMNE3 potentially inhibited tyrosine kinase activity in vitro with an IC50 value of 0.64±0.34 μmol/L in Capan-1 cells and 3.1±0.86 μmol/L in Panc-1 cells. The activity of c-Src was significantly inhibited by HMNE3 in a dose

  7. Functional involvement of protein kinase C-betaII and its substrate, myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), in insulin-stimulated glucose transport in L6 rat skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, D S; Patel, N A; Jiang, K; Li, P; Watson, J E; Byers, D M; Cooper, D R

    2009-05-01

    Insulin stimulates phosphorylation cascades, including phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase (PDK1), Akt, and protein kinase C (PKC). Myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), a PKCbetaII substrate, could link the effects of insulin to insulin-stimulated glucose transport (ISGT) via phosphorylation of its effector domain since MARCKS has a role in cytoskeletal rearrangements. We examined phosphoPKCbetaII after insulin treatment of L6 myocytes, and cytosolic and membrane phosphoMARCKS, MARCKS and phospholipase D1 in cells pretreated with LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), CG53353 (PKCbetaII inhibitor) or W13 (calmodulin inhibitor), PI3K, PKCbetaII and calmodulin inhibitors, respectively, before insulin treatment, using western blots. ISGT was examined after cells had been treated with inhibitors, small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) for MARCKS, or transfection with MARCKS mutated at a PKC site. MARCKS, PKCbetaII, GLUT4 and insulin receptor were immunoblotted in subcellular fractions with F-actin antibody immunoprecipitates to demonstrate changes following insulin treatment. GLUT4 membrane insertion was followed after insulin with or without CG53353. Insulin increased phosphoPKCbetaII(Ser660 and Thr641); LY294002 blocked this, indicating its activation by PI3K. Insulin treatment increased cytosolic phosphoMARCKS, decreased membrane MARCKS and increased membrane phospholipase D1 (PLD1), a protein regulating glucose transporter vesicle fusion resulted. PhosphoMARCKS was attenuated by CG53353 or MARCKS siRNA. MARCKS siRNA blocked ISGT. Association of PKCbetaII and GLUT4 with membrane F-actin was enhanced by insulin, as was that of cytosolic and membrane MARCKS. ISGT was attenuated in myocytes transfected with mutated MARCKS (Ser152Ala), whereas overproduction of wild-type MARCKS enhanced ISGT. CG53353 blocked insertion of GLUT4 into membranes of insulin treated cells. The results suggest that PKCbetaII is involved in mediating

  8. Enhanced casein kinase II activity during mouse embryogenesis. Identification of a 110-kDa phosphoprotein as the major phosphorylation product in mouse embryos and Krebs II mouse ascites tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, H R; Reichert, G H; Issinger, O G

    1986-01-01

    Mouse embryos at various stages of development were used to study the relationship of protein kinase activities with normal embryogenesis. Casein kinase II (CKII) activity in developing mouse embryos shows a 3-4-fold activity increase at day 12 of gestation. Together with the CKII activity...... mouse tumour cells also show an enhanced CKII activity. Here too, a 110-kDa phosphoprotein was the major phosphoryl acceptor. Partial proteolytic digestion shows that both proteins are identical. Other protein kinases tested (cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinases) only show a basal level of enzyme......, increased phosphorylation of a 110-kDa protein is observed. Treatment of the embryo extracts with heparin, a highly specific inhibitor of CKII activity, results in a drastic reduction of the 110-kDa protein phosphorylation indicating that the protein might be a CKII-specific substrate. Rapidly proliferating...

  9. Expression of calmodulin and myosin light chain kinase during larval settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Fan Chen

    Full Text Available Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus ( = Amphibalanus amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM, encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca(2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite.

  10. Expression of Calmodulin and Myosin Light Chain Kinase during Larval Settlement of the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhang-Fan

    2012-02-13

    Barnacles are one of the most common organisms in intertidal areas. Their life cycle includes seven free-swimming larval stages and sessile juvenile and adult stages. The transition from the swimming to the sessile stages, referred to as larval settlement, is crucial for their survivor success and subsequent population distribution. In this study, we focused on the involvement of calmodulin (CaM) and its binding proteins in the larval settlement of the barnacle, Balanus (= Amphibalanus) amphitrite. The full length of CaM gene was cloned from stage II nauplii of B. amphitrite (referred to as Ba-CaM), encoding 149 amino acid residues that share a high similarity with published CaMs in other organisms. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ba-CaM was highly expressed in cyprids, the stage at which swimming larvae are competent to attach and undergo metamorphosis. In situ hybridization revealed that the expressed Ba-CaM gene was localized in compound eyes, posterior ganglion and cement glands, all of which may have essential functions during larval settlement. Larval settlement assays showed that both the CaM inhibitor compound 48/80 and the CaM-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7 effectively blocked barnacle larval settlement, whereas Ca 2+/CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors did not show any clear effects. The subsequent real-time PCR assay showed a higher expression level of Ba-MLCK gene in larval stages than in adults, suggesting an important role of Ba-MLCK gene in larval development and competency. Overall, the results suggest that CaM and CaM-dependent MLCK function during larval settlement of B. amphitrite. © 2012 Chen et al.

  11. Camønoen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Widtfeld Meged, Jane

    2016-01-01

    communitarian business models, such as car-sharing, social dining and peer rental of property. These sharing models thrive primarily in urban settings with a high density of assets, triggering the question: how can sparse and loosely connected coastal resources be mobilized to create value for tourists...... is augmented by a digital platform on which hikers may directly connect with local citizens and book experiences ranging from private dinners to bird-watching and berry-picking. The platform Camønoen.org is hosted by the regional museum, which neither charges for intermediation, nor is responsible for vetting...... and control procedures. Our paper will follow the consolidation of Camønoen by analyzing its business model, the institutionalization of brokers and coordination roles as well as the emerging relationships, trust and exchange mechanisms between small, local providers and visitors. By doing so, we will be able...

  12. MAP kinase-signaling controls nuclear translocation of tripeptidyl-peptidase II in response to DNA damage and oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preta, Giulio; Klark, Rainier de; Chakraborti, Shankhamala [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Glas, Rickard, E-mail: rickard.glas@ki.se [Center for Molecular Medicine (CMM), Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, 171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of TPPII occurs in response to different DNA damage inducers. {yields} Nuclear accumulation of TPPII is linked to ROS and anti-oxidant enzyme levels. {yields} MAPKs control nuclear accumulation of TPPII. {yields} Inhibited nuclear accumulation of TPPII decreases DNA damage-induced {gamma}-H2AX expression. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a continuous hazard in eukaroytic cells by their ability to cause damage to biomolecules, in particular to DNA. Previous data indicated that the cytosolic serine peptidase tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPPII) translocates into the nucleus of most tumor cell lines in response to {gamma}-irradiation and ROS production; an event that promoted p53 expression as well as caspase-activation. We here observed that nuclear translocation of TPPII was dependent on signaling by MAP kinases, including p38MAPK. Further, this was caused by several types of DNA-damaging drugs, a DNA cross-linker (cisplatinum), an inhibitor of topoisomerase II (etoposide), and to some extent also by nucleoside-analogues (5-fluorouracil, hydroxyurea). In the minority of tumor cell lines where TPPII was not translocated into the nucleus in response to DNA damage we observed reduced intracellular ROS levels, and the expression levels of redox defense systems were increased. Further, treatment with the ROS-inducer {gamma}-hexa-chloro-cyclohexane ({gamma}-HCH, lindane), an inhibitor of GAP junctions, restored nuclear translocation of TPPII in these cell lines upon {gamma}-irradiation. Moreover, blocking nuclear translocation of TPPII in etoposide-treated cells, by using a peptide-derived inhibitor (Z-Gly-Leu-Ala-OH), attenuated expression of {gamma}-H2AX in {gamma}-irradiated melanoma cells. Our results indicated a role for TPPII in MAPK-dependent DNA damage signaling.

  13. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  14. Regulation of Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Signaling within Hippocampal Glutamatergic Postsynapses during Flurazepam Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien E. Earl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cessation of one-week oral administration of the benzodiazepine flurazepam (FZP to rats results in withdrawal anxiety after 1 day of withdrawal. FZP withdrawal is correlated with synaptic incorporation of homomeric GluA1-containing α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptors (AMPARs in the proximal stratum radiatum of CA1 neurons. After 2 days of withdrawal, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII phosphorylates GluA1 subunits at Ser831, increasing channel conductance. Secondary to AMPAR potentiation, GluN2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs, known binding partners of CaMKII, are selectively removed from the postsynaptic density (PSD. While activation of synaptic CaMKII is known to involve translocation to the PSD, CaMKII bound to NMDARs may be removed from the PSD. To distinguish these possibilities, the current studies used postembedding immunogold electron microscopy to investigate alterations in CaMKII signaling at CA1 stratum radiatum synapses after 2 days of FZP withdrawal. These studies revealed decreased total, but not autophosphorylated (Thr286 CaMKIIα expression in CA1 PSDs. The removal of CaMKII-GluN2B complexes from the PSD during drug withdrawal may serve as a homeostatic mechanism to limit AMPAR-mediated CA1 neuron hyperexcitability and benzodiazepine withdrawal anxiety.

  15. The arrhythmogenic calmodulin mutation D129G dysregulates cell growth, calmodulin-dependent kinase II activity, and cardiac function in zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, Martin Werner; Zacharias, Triantafyllos; Kulej, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    viability, as well as heart rhythm, remains unknown, and only a few targets with relevance for heart physiology have been analyzed for their response to mutant CaM. We show that the arrhythmia-associated CaM mutants support growth and viability of DT40 cells in the absence of WT CaM except for the long QT...

  16. Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II/cAMP Response Element-binding Protein/Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Cascade Regulates Angiotensin II-induced Podocyte Injury and Albuminuria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Xu, Lingling; Song, Yuxian; Li, Jianzhong; Mao, Junhua; Zhao, Allan Zijian; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) plays a pivotal role in promoting podocyte dysfunction and albuminuria, however, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully delineated. In this study, we found that Ang II induced Wnt1 expression and β-catenin nuclear translocation in cultured mouse podocytes. Blocking Wnt signaling with Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) or β-catenin siRNA attenuated Ang II-induced podocyte injury. Ang II could also induce the phosphorylation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) II and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in cultured podocytes. Blockade of this pathway with CK59 or CREB siRNA could significantly inhibit Ang II-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling and podocyte injury. In in vivo studies, administration of Ang II promoted Wnt/β-catenin signaling, aggregated podocyte damage, and albuminuria in mice. CK59 could remarkably ameliorate Ang II-induced podocyte injury and albuminuria. Furthermore, ectopic expression of exogenous Dkk1 also attenuated Ang II-induced podocytopathy in mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that the CaMK II/CREB/Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade plays an important role in regulating Ang II-induced podocytopathy. Targeting this signaling pathway may offer renal protection against the development of proteinuric kidney diseases. PMID:23803607

  17. Berbamine inhibits the growth of liver cancer cells and cancer initiating cells by targeting Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Zhipeng; Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Van Ness, Carl; Gan, Yichao; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Jinfen; Lou, Guiyu; Wang, Yafan; Wu, Jun; Yen, Yun; Xu, Rongzhen; Huang, Wendong

    2013-01-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide but no effective treatment toward liver cancer is available so far. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need to identify novel therapies to efficiently treat liver cancer and improve the prognosis of this disease. Here we report that berbamine (BBM) and one of its derivatives, bbd24, potently suppressed liver cancer cell proliferation and induced cancer cell death by targeting Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMK...

  18. Intraterminal injection of synapsin I or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alters neurotransmitter release at the squid giant synapse.

    OpenAIRE

    Llinás, R.; McGuinness, T L; Leonard, C S; Sugimori, M; Greengard, P.

    1985-01-01

    Synapsin I and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II were pressure-injected into the preterminal digit of the squid giant synapse to test directly the possible regulation of neurotransmitter release by these substances. Neurotransmitter release was determined by measuring the amplitude, rate of rise, and latency of the postsynaptic potential generated in response to presynaptic depolarizing steps under voltage clamp conditions. Injection of dephosphosynapsin I decreased the amplitude...

  19. Composite hybrid cam carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madin, Mark Michael; Wicks, Christopher Donald

    2017-11-21

    A cam carrier assembly includes a body made of a material lighter than aluminum. The body has a first side operably coupled with a cylinder head and a second side having bearing surfaces with bearing inserts. The bearing inserts support the camshaft. A series of apertures extend between the first and second sides of the body. Lobes of the camshaft operably couple with the valves of the cylinder head through the series of apertures extending between the first and second sides of the body.

  20. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-dependent remodeling of Ca2+ current in pressure overload heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanggan; Tandan, Samvit; Cheng, Jun; Yang, Chunmei; Nguyen, Lan; Sugianto, Jessica; Johnstone, Janet L; Sun, Yuyang; Hill, Joseph A

    2008-09-12

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity is increased in heart failure (HF), a syndrome characterized by markedly increased risk of arrhythmia. Activation of CaMKII increases peak L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) and slows I(Ca) inactivation. Whether these events are linked mechanistically is unknown. I(Ca) was recorded in acutely dissociated subepicardial and subendocardial murine left ventricular (LV) myocytes using the whole cell patch clamp method. Pressure overload heart failure was induced by surgical constriction of the thoracic aorta. I(Ca) density was significantly larger in subepicardial myocytes than in subendocardial/myocytes. Similar patterns were observed in the cell surface expression of alpha1c, the channel pore-forming subunit. In failing LV, I(Ca) density was increased proportionately in both cell types, and the time course of I(Ca) inactivation was slowed. This typical pattern of changes suggested a role of CaMKII. Consistent with this, measurements of CaMKII activity revealed a 2-3-fold increase (p process could not be induced, suggesting already maximal activation. Internal application of active CaMKII in failing myocytes did not elicit changes in I(Ca). Finally, CaMKII inhibition by internal diffusion of a specific peptide inhibitor reduced I(Ca) density and inactivation time course to similar levels in control and HF myocytes. I(Ca) density manifests a significant transmural gradient, and this gradient is preserved in heart failure. Activation of CaMKII, a known pro-arrhythmic molecule, is a major contributor to I(Ca) remodeling in load-induced heart failure.

  1. Casein kinase II induced polymerization of soluble TDP-43 into filaments is inhibited by heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlomagno, Yari; Zhang, Yongjie; Davis, Mary; Lin, Wen-Lang; Cook, Casey; Dunmore, Judy; Tay, William; Menkosky, Kyle; Cao, Xiangkun; Petrucelli, Leonard; Deture, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Trans-activation Response DNA-binding Protein-43 (TDP-43) lesions are observed in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration with ubiquitin inclusions (FTLD-TDP) and 25-50% of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) cases. These abnormal protein inclusions are composed of either amorphous TDP-43 aggregates or highly ordered filaments. The filamentous TDP-43 accumulations typically contain clean 10-12 nm filaments though wider 18-20 nm coated filaments may be observed. The TDP-43 present within these lesions is phosphorylated, truncated and ubiquitinated, and these modifications appear to be abnormal as they are linked to both a cellular heat shock response and microglial activation. The mechanisms associated with this abnormal TDP-43 accumulation are believed to result in a loss of TDP-43 function, perhaps due to the post-translational modifications or resulting from physical sequestration of the TDP-43. The formation of TDP-43 inclusions involves cellular translocation and conversion of TDP-43 into fibrillogenic forms, but the ability of these accumulations to sequester normal TDP-43 and propagate this behavior between neurons pathologically is mostly inferred. The lack of methodology to produce soluble full length TDP-43 and recapitulate this polymerization into filaments as observed in disease has limited our understanding of these pathogenic cascades. The protocols described here generate soluble, full-length and untagged TDP-43 allowing for a direct assessment of the impact of various posttranslational modifications on TDP-43 function. We demonstrate that Casein Kinase II (CKII) promotes the polymerization of this soluble TDP-43 into 10 nm diameter filaments that resemble the most common TDP-43 structures observed in disease. Furthermore, these filaments are recognized as abnormal by Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) which can inhibit TDP-43 polymerization or directly promote TDP-43 filament depolymerization. These findings demonstrate CKII induces

  2. Immunohistochemical study of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila brain using a specific monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yoshiki; Kishimoto, Yasuko; Ohsako, Shunji

    2003-06-06

    To analyze the distribution of Drosophila calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (dCaMKII) in the adult brain, we generated monoclonal antibodies against the bacterially expressed 490-amino acid (a.a.) form of dCaMKII. One of those, named #18 antibody, was used for this study. Western blot analysis of the adult head extracts showed that the antibody specifically detects multiple bands between 55 and 60 kDa corresponding to the molecular weights of the splicing isoforms of dCaMKII. Epitope mapping revealed that it was in the region between 199 and 283 a.a. of dCaMKII. Preferential dCaMKII immunoreactivity in the embryonic nervous system, adult thoracic ganglion and gut, and larval neuro-muscular junction (NMJ) was consistent with previous observations by in situ hybridization and immunostaining with a polyclonal antibody at the NMJ, indicating that the antibody is applicable to immunohistochemistry. Although dCaMKII immunoreactive signal was low in the retina, it was found at regular intervals in the outer margin of the compound eye. These signals were most likely to be interommatidial bristle mechanosensory neurons. dCaMKII immunoreactivity in the brain was observed in almost all regions and relatively higher staining was found in the neuropilar region than in the cortex. Higher dCaMKII immunoreactivity in the mushroom body (MB) was found in the entire gamma lobe including the heel, and dorsal tips of the alpha and alpha' lobes, while cores of alpha and beta lobes were stained light. Finding abundant dCaMKII accumulation in the gamma lobe suggested that this lobe might especially require high levels of dCaMKII expression to function properly among MB lobes.

  3. Diabetes mellitus affects activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha in rat trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerić, Milka; Vuica, Ana; Borić, Matija; Puljak, Livia; Jeličić Kadić, Antonia; Grković, Ivica; Filipović, Natalija

    2015-01-01

    The activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CaMKIIα) may play a critical role in the modulation of nociceptor activity and plasticity of primary sensory trigeminal neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated CaMKIIα (pCaMKIIα) in subpopulations of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons in rat models of early diabetes type 1 (dm1) and 2 (dm2). DM1 model was induced with intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected streptozotocin (STZ) (55mg/kg). DM2 rats were fed with the high fat diet (HFD) for 2 weeks and then received 35mg/kg of STZ i.p. Two weeks and 2 months after the STZ-diabetes induction, rats were sacrificed and immunohistochemical analysis for detection of pCaMKIIα immunoreactivity and double immunofluorescence labelling with isolectin (IB4) was performed. Increased intensity of pCaMKIIα immunofluorescence, restricted to IB4-negative small-diameter neurons, was seen in TG neurons two months after STZ-DM1 induction. DM1 model, as well as the obesity (control dm2 groups) resulted in neuronal impaired growth while dm2 model led to neuron hypertrophy in TG. Observed changes may play a critical role in the modulation of nociceptor activity and plasticity of primary sensory trigeminal neurons. In future, innovative strategies for modulation of CaMKIIα activity in specific subpopulations of neurons could be a novel approach in therapy of diabetic trigeminal neuropathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. EpCAM in morphogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trzpis, Monika; Bremer, Edwin; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.; de Leij, Lou F. M. H.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    Embryonic development is one of the most complex biological phenomena that involves the appropriate expression and synchronized interactions of a plethora of proteins, including cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Many members of the diverse family of CAMs have been shown to be critically involved in

  5. CAM and Pediatric Oncology: Where Are All the Best Cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Denise; Spelliscy, Courtney; Sivakumar, Leka; Grundy, Paul; Leis, Anne; Sencer, Susan; Vohra, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Background. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by children with cancer is high; however, pediatric best cases are rare. Objectives. To investigate whether best cases exist in pediatric oncology using a three-phase approach and to compare our methods with other such programs. Methods. In phase I, Children's Oncology Group (COG) oncologists were approached via email and asked to recall patients who were (i) under 18 when diagnosed with cancer, (ii) diagnosed between 1990 and 2006, (iii) had unexpectedly positive clinical outcome, and (iv) reported using CAM during or after cancer treatment. Phase II involved partnering with CAM research networks; patients who were self-identified as best cases were asked to submit reports completed in conjunction with their oncologists. Phase III extended this partnership to 200 CAM associations and training organizations. Results. In phase I, ten cases from three COG sites were submitted, and most involved use of traditional Chinese medicine to improve quality of life. Phases II and III did not yield further cases. Conclusion. Identification of best cases has been suggested as an important step in guiding CAM research. The CARE Best Case Series Program had limited success in identifying pediatric cases despite the three approaches we used.

  6. Optimisation Methods for Cam Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia–Mari Popa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the criteria which represent the base of optimizing the cam mechanisms and also we perform the calculations for several types of mechanisms. We study the influence of the constructive parameters in case of the simple machines with rotation cam and follower (flat or curve of translation on the curvature radius and that of the transmission angle. As it follows, we present the optimization calculations of the cam and flat rotation follower mechanisms, as well as the calculations for optimizing the cam mechanisms by circular groove followers’ help. For an easier interpretation of the results, we have visualized the obtained cam in AutoCAD according to the script files generated by a calculation program.

  7. Activation of Transcription Factor Nrf2 Signalling by the Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor SKI-II Is Mediated by the Formation of Keap1 Dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Nicolas; Kizawa, Yasuo; Ueda, Keitaro; Xiong, Yeping; Kimura, Genki; Moses, Audric; Curtis, Jonathan M.; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anti-oxidant capacity is crucial defence against environmental or endogenous oxidative stress. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that plays a key defensive role against oxidative and cytotoxic stress and cellular senescence. However, Nrf2 signalling is impaired in several aging-related diseases, such as chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD), cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, novel therapeutics that enhance Nrf2 signalling are an attractive approach to treat these diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Nrf2 was stabilized by SKI-II (2-(p-hydroxyanilino)-4-(p-chlorophenyl) thiazole), which is a known sphingosine kinase inhibitor, in human bronchial epithelial cell line, BEAS2B, and in primary human bronchial epithelial cells, leading to enhancement of anti-oxidant proteins, such as HO-1, NQO1 and GCLM. The activation of Nrf2 was achieved by the generation of inactive dimerized form of Keap1, a negative regulator of Nrf2 expression, which was independent of sphingosine kinase inhibition. Using mice that were exposed to cigarette smoke, SKI-II induced Nrf2 expression together with HO-1 in their lungs. In addition, SKI-II reduced cigarette smoke mediated oxidative stress, macrophages and neutrophil infiltration and markers of inflammation in mice. Conclusions/Significance SKI-II appears to be a novel activator of Nrf2 signalling via the inactivation of Keap1. PMID:24505412

  8. Rad Pole Cam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckendorn, F. M.; Odell, D. M. C; Harpring, L. J.; Peterson, K. D.

    2005-10-05

    The RadPoleCam was developed to provide Department Of Energy (DOE) first responders the capability to assess the radiological and visual condition of remote or inaccessible locations. Real time gamma isotopic identification is provided to the first responder in the form of audio feedback (i.e. spoken through head phones) from a gamma detector mounted on a collapsible pole that can extend from 1 to 9 meters (6 to 29 feet). Simultaneously, selectable direct and side looking visual images are provided from the 5cm (2in) diameter, waterproof probe tip. The lightweight, self contained, ruggedized, system will provide a rapidly deployable field system for visual and radiological search and assessment of confined spaces and extended reach locations.

  9. Casein kinase 1α mediates degradation of receptors for type I and type II interferons caused by hemagglutinin of influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Chuan; Wolf, Jennifer J; Vijayan, Madhuvanthi; Studstill, Caleb J; Ma, Wenjun; Hahm, Bumsuk

    2018-01-17

    Although influenza A virus (IAV) evades cellular defense systems to effectively propagate in the host, the viral immune evasive mechanisms are incompletely understood. Our recent data showed that hemagglutinin (HA) of IAV induces degradation of type I IFN receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Here, we demonstrate that IAV HA induces degradation of type II IFN (IFN-γ) receptor 1 (IFNGR1) as well as IFNAR1 via casein kinase 1α (CK1α), resulting in the impairment of cellular responsiveness to both type I and II IFNs. IAV infection or transient HA expression induced degradation of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1, whereas HA gene-deficient IAV failed to downregulate the receptors. IAV HA caused the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of IFNGR1, leading to the lysosome-dependent degradation of IFNGR1. Influenza viral HA strongly decreased cellular sensitivity to type II IFNs, as it suppressed the activation of STAT1 and the induction of IFN-γ-stimulated genes in response to exogenously supplied recombinant IFN-γ. Importantly, CK1α, but not p38 MAP kinase or protein kinase D2, was proven to be critical for HA-induced degradation of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1. Pharmacologic inhibition of CK1α or siRNA-based knockdown of CK1α repressed the degradation process of both IFNGR1 and IFNAR1 triggered by IAV infection. Further, CK1α was shown to be pivotal for proficient replication of IAV. Collectively, the results suggest that IAV HA induces degradation of IFN receptors via CK1α, creating a condition favorable for viral propagation. Therefore, the study uncovers a new immune evasive pathway of influenza virus.IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) remains a grave threat to humans by causing seasonal and pandemic influenza. Upon infection, the innate and adaptive immunity such as the interferon (IFN) response is induced to protect hosts against IAV infection. However, IAV seems to be equipped with tactics to evade the IFN-mediated antiviral responses. Yet, the detailed mechanisms need to be elucidated

  10. Initiation of caspase-independent death in mouse mesangial cells by Cd2+: involvement of p38 kinase and CaMK-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Templeton, Douglas M

    2008-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal with multiple effects on cell signaling and cell death. We studied the effects of Cd(2+) on quiescent mouse mesangial cells in serum-free conditions. Cadmium induces cell death over 6 h through annexin V+ states without or with causing uptake of propidium iodide, termed apoptotic and apoptosis-like death, respectively. Little or no necrosis is observed, and cell death is caspase-independent and associated with nuclear translocation of the apoptosis-inducing factor, AIF. We previously showed that Cd(2+) increased phosphorylation of Erk and CaMK-II, and CaMK-II activation increased cell death in an Erk-independent manner. Here we demonstrate that Cd(2+) increases Jnk and p38 kinase phosphorylation, and inhibition of p38-but not of Jnk-increases cell viability by suppressing apoptosis in preference to apoptosis-like death. Neither p38 kinase nor CaMK-II inhibition protects against a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, psi, indicating that kinase-mediated death is either independent of, or involves events downstream of a mitochondrial pathway. However, both the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and the mitochondrial membrane-stabilizing agent cyclosporine A (CsA) partially preserve psi, suppress activation of p38 kinase, and partially protect the cells from Cd(2+)-induced death. Whereas the effect of CsA is on apoptosis, NAC acts on apoptosis-like death. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis exacerbates a Cd(2+)-dependent increase in cellular peroxides and favors apoptosis-like death over apoptosis. The caspase-independence of these modes of cell death is not due to an absence of this machinery in the mesangial cells: when they are exposed to Cd(2+) for longer periods in the presence of serum, procaspase-3 and PARP are cleaved and caspase inhibition is protective. We conclude that Cd(2+) can kill mesangial cells by multiple pathways, including caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic and apoptosis-like death. Necrosis is not

  11. Heparin inhibits Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II activation and c-fos induction in mesangial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Miralem, T; Templeton, D M

    1998-01-01

    Like vascular smooth-muscle cells, rat mesangial cells (RMCs) display an anti-mitogenic response to heparin. In particular, heparin partially suppresses the ability of quiescent RMCs to enter the cell cycle and induce c-fos expression. When the mitogenic stimulus is serum, phorbol ester or platelet-derived growth factor, this response appears to result from the ability of heparin to suppress activation of the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase family of mitogen-activated protein kinases. H...

  12. Crystallization method providing composition autocontrol in situ (CAM-S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkrbec, J.J. (Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, 16627 Prague 6 (Czechoslovakia)); Rosick, V.; Kohout, J. (Institute of Radioelectronics, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czechoslovakia))

    1993-01-14

    A novel approach to crystal growth from a molten solution zone (MSZ) is presented. There are five variants of CAM-S, which is a modification of the travelling heater method (THM), which can solve crystal growth problems as THM does, especially synthesis, repeated creation of the MSZ, zoning operations with vibrational stirring, and perform all these operations in situ. The combination of CAM-S with calculation method of optimal molten-solution composition (COM-S) has been applied to the growth of bulk crystals of the ternary solid solutions Ga[sub x]In[sub 1-x]Sb. Extreme constancy of the lattice parameter throughout the crystalline length has been achieved. Both methods are based on the knowledge of phase diagrams.

  13. Casein kinase II induced polymerization of soluble TDP-43 into filaments is inhibited by heat shock proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yari Carlomagno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trans-activation Response DNA-binding Protein-43 (TDP-43 lesions are observed in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration with ubiquitin inclusions (FTLD-TDP and 25-50% of Alzheimer's Disease (AD cases. These abnormal protein inclusions are composed of either amorphous TDP-43 aggregates or highly ordered filaments. The filamentous TDP-43 accumulations typically contain clean 10-12 nm filaments though wider 18-20 nm coated filaments may be observed. The TDP-43 present within these lesions is phosphorylated, truncated and ubiquitinated, and these modifications appear to be abnormal as they are linked to both a cellular heat shock response and microglial activation. The mechanisms associated with this abnormal TDP-43 accumulation are believed to result in a loss of TDP-43 function, perhaps due to the post-translational modifications or resulting from physical sequestration of the TDP-43. The formation of TDP-43 inclusions involves cellular translocation and conversion of TDP-43 into fibrillogenic forms, but the ability of these accumulations to sequester normal TDP-43 and propagate this behavior between neurons pathologically is mostly inferred. The lack of methodology to produce soluble full length TDP-43 and recapitulate this polymerization into filaments as observed in disease has limited our understanding of these pathogenic cascades. RESULTS: The protocols described here generate soluble, full-length and untagged TDP-43 allowing for a direct assessment of the impact of various posttranslational modifications on TDP-43 function. We demonstrate that Casein Kinase II (CKII promotes the polymerization of this soluble TDP-43 into 10 nm diameter filaments that resemble the most common TDP-43 structures observed in disease. Furthermore, these filaments are recognized as abnormal by Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs which can inhibit TDP-43 polymerization or directly promote TDP-43 filament depolymerization. CONCLUSION

  14. Kainic acid (KA)-induced Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) expression in the neurons, astrocytes and microglia of the mouse hippocampal CA3 region, and the phosphorylated CaMK II only in the hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Hong-Won; Lee, Han-Kyu; Seo, Young-Jun; Kwon, Min-Soo; Shim, Eon-Jeong; Lee, Jin-Young; Choi, Seong-Soo; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2005-06-24

    In the present study, we investigated the role of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) and which types of neuronal cells contain CaMK II and phosphorylated CaMK II (p-CaMK II) in the CA3 hippocampal region of mice using confocal immunofluorescence study. KA increased the CaMK II, p-CaMK II, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and complement receptor type 3 (OX-42) immunoreactivities (IR) at 30 min after KA treatment in mouse hippocampal area. In studies, nevertheless KA-induced CaMK II is expressed in neurons or astrocytes or microglia, p-CaMK II is expressed only in neurons. Thus, our results suggest that the activated CaMK II in early time may be performed important roles only in neurons but not in the astrocytes and microglia.

  15. Effects of Wenxin Keli on Cardiac Hypertrophy and Arrhythmia via Regulation of the Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyu; Chen, Yu; Li, Yanda; Ren, Xiaomeng

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL) on the Calcium/Calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMK II) signal transduction pathway with transverse aortic constriction (TAC) rats. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained 3 and 9 weeks after the surgery. Meanwhile, the action potentials (APDs) were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and western blotting was used to assess components of the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. At both 3 and 9 weeks after treatment, the fractional shortening (FS%) increased in the WXKL group compared with the TAC group. The APD90 of the TAC group was longer than that of the Sham group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment. Western blotting results showed that the protein expressions of CaMK II, phospholamban (PLB), and ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2) were not statistically significant among the different groups at both treatment time points. However, WXKL treatment decreased the protein level and phosphorylation of CaMK II (Thr-286) and increased the protein level and phosphorylation of PLB (Thr-17) and the phosphorylation of RYR2 (Ser-2814). WXKL also decreased the accumulation of type III collagen fibers. In conclusion, WXKL may improve cardiac function and inhibit the arrhythmia by regulating the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. PMID:28573136

  16. Effects of Wenxin Keli on Cardiac Hypertrophy and Arrhythmia via Regulation of the Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of Wenxin Keli (WXKL on the Calcium/Calmodulin dependent kinase II (CaMK II signal transduction pathway with transverse aortic constriction (TAC rats. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained 3 and 9 weeks after the surgery. Meanwhile, the action potentials (APDs were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique, and western blotting was used to assess components of the CaMK II signal transduction pathway. At both 3 and 9 weeks after treatment, the fractional shortening (FS% increased in the WXKL group compared with the TAC group. The APD90 of the TAC group was longer than that of the Sham group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment. Western blotting results showed that the protein expressions of CaMK II, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine receptor 2 (RYR2 were not statistically significant among the different groups at both treatment time points. However, WXKL treatment decreased the protein level and phosphorylation of CaMK II (Thr-286 and increased the protein level and phosphorylation of PLB (Thr-17 and the phosphorylation of RYR2 (Ser-2814. WXKL also decreased the accumulation of type III collagen fibers. In conclusion, WXKL may improve cardiac function and inhibit the arrhythmia by regulating the CaMK II signal transduction pathway.

  17. Phosphorylation of the PCNA binding domain of the large subunit of replication factor C by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibits DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maga, G; Mossi, R; Fischer, R

    1997-01-01

    delta and epsilon. The DNA and PCNA binding domains of the large 140 kDa subunit of human RF-C have been recently cloned [Fotedar, R., Mossi, R., Fitzgerald, P., Rousselle, T., Maga, G., Brickner, H., Messier, H., Khastilba. S., Hübscher, U., & Fotedar, A. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 4423-4433]. Here we show...... that the PCNA binding domain is phosphorylated by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an enzyme required for cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The DNA binding domain, on the other hand, is not phosphorylated. Phosphorylation by CaMKII reduces the binding of PCNA to RF...

  18. H-ras deletion protects against angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension and cardiac remodeling through protein kinase G-Iβ pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, Paloma; Luengo, Alicia; Griera, Mercedes; Orea, María Jesús; López-Olañeta, Marina; Chiloeches, Antonio; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; Calleros, Laura; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2017-10-20

    Ras proteins regulate cell survival, growth, differentiation, blood pressure, and fibrosis in some organs. We have demonstrated that H-ras gene deletion produces mice hypotension via a soluble guanylate cyclase-protein kinase G (PKG)-dependent mechanism. In this study, we analyzed the consequences of H-ras deletion on cardiac remodeling induced by continuous angiotensin II (AngII) infusion and the molecular mechanisms implied. Left ventricular posterior wall thickness and mass and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area were similar between AngII-treated H-Ras knockout (H-ras(-/-) ) and control wild-type (H-ras(+/+) ) mice, as were extracellular matrix protein expression. Increased cardiac PKG-Iβ protein expression in H-ras(-/-) mice suggests the involvement of this protein in heart protection. Ex vivo experiments on cardiac explants could support this mechanism, as PKG blockade blunted protection against AngII-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis markers in H-ras(-/-) mice. Genetic modulation studies in cardiomyocytes and cardiac and embryonic fibroblasts revealed that the lack of H-Ras down-regulates the B-RAF/MEK/ERK pathway, which induces the glycogen synthase kinase-3β-dependent activation of the transcription factor, cAMP response element-binding protein, which is responsible for PKG-Iβ overexpression in H-ras(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This study demonstrates that H-ras deletion protects against AngII-induced cardiac remodeling, possibly via a mechanism in which PKG-Iβ overexpression could play a partial role, and points to H-Ras and/or downstream proteins as potential therapeutic targets in cardiovascular disease.-Martín-Sánchez, P., Luengo, A., Griera, M., Orea, M. J., López-Olañeta, M., Chiloeches, A., Lara-Pezzi, E., de Frutos, S., Rodríguez-Puyol, M., Calleros, L., Rodríguez-Puyol, D. H-ras deletion protects against angiotensin II-induced arterial hypertension and cardiac remodeling through protein kinase G-Iβ pathway activation.

  19. Extracellular Protein Kinase A Modulates Intracellular Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II, Nitric Oxide Synthase, and the Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway in Cerebellum. Differential Effects in Hyperammonemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente

    2016-12-21

    Extracellular protein kinases, including cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), modulate neuronal functions including N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term potentiation. NMDA receptor activation increases calcium, which binds to calmodulin and activates nitric oxide synthase (NOS), increasing nitric oxide (NO), which activates guanylate cyclase, increasing cGMP, which is released to the extracellular fluid, allowing analysis of this glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in vivo by microdialysis. The function of this pathway is impaired in hyperammonemic rats. The aims of this work were to assess (1) whether the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway is modulated in cerebellum in vivo by an extracellular PKA, (2) the role of phosphorylation and activity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and NOS in the pathway modulation by extracellular PKA, and (3) whether the effects are different in hyperammonemic and control rats. The pathway was analyzed by in vivo microdialysis. The role of extracellular PKA was analyzed by inhibiting it with a membrane-impermeable inhibitor. The mechanisms involved were analyzed in freshly isolated cerebellar slices from control and hyperammonemic rats. In control rats, inhibiting extracellular PKA reduces the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway function in vivo. This is due to reduction of CaMKII phosphorylation and activity, which reduces NOS phosphorylation at Ser1417 and NOS activity, resulting in reduced guanylate cyclase activation and cGMP formation. In hyperammonemic rats, under basal conditions, CaMKII phosphorylation and activity are increased, increasing NOS phosphorylation at Ser847, which reduces NOS activity, guanylate cyclase activation, and cGMP. Inhibiting extracellular PKA in hyperammonemic rats normalizes CaMKII phosphorylation and activity, NOS phosphorylation, NOS activity, and cGMP, restoring normal function of the pathway.

  20. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Low Back Pain and CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section CAM Low Back Pain and CAM Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of ... benefit from CAM treatment for conditions such as low back pain. Photo courtesy of Glenn Scimonelli "Oh, my aching ...

  1. Casein kinase II is required for proper cell division and acts as a negative regulator of centrosome duplication in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C. Medley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes are the primary microtubule-organizing centers that orchestrate microtubule dynamics during the cell cycle. The correct number of centrosomes is pivotal for establishing bipolar mitotic spindles that ensure accurate segregation of chromosomes. Thus, centrioles must duplicate once per cell cycle, one daughter per mother centriole, the process of which requires highly coordinated actions among core factors and modulators. Protein phosphorylation is shown to regulate the stability, localization and activity of centrosome proteins. Here, we report the function of Casein kinase II (CK2 in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The catalytic subunit (KIN-3/CK2α of CK2 localizes to nuclei, centrosomes and midbodies. Inactivating CK2 leads to cell division defects, including chromosome missegregation, cytokinesis failure and aberrant centrosome behavior. Furthermore, depletion or inhibiting kinase activity of CK2 results in elevated ZYG-1 levels at centrosomes, restoring centrosome duplication and embryonic viability to zyg-1 mutants. Our data suggest that CK2 functions in cell division and negatively regulates centrosome duplication in a kinase-dependent manner.

  2. Mechanical stretch stimulates protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation in epidermal cells via angiotensin II type 1 receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenberger, Stefan; Loitsch, Stefan; Guschel, Maike; Müller, Jutta; Knies, Yvonne; Kaufmann, Roland; Bernd, August

    2005-01-28

    Mechanical stress is known to modulate fundamental events such as cell life and death. Mechanical stretch in particular has been identified as a positive regulator of proliferation in skin keratinocytes and other cell systems. In the present study it was investigated whether antiapoptotic signaling is also stimulated by mechanical stretch. It was demonstrated that mechanical stretch rapidly induced the phosphorylation of the proto-oncogene protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt at both phosphorylation sites (serine 473/threonine 308) in different epithelial cells (HaCaT, A-431, and human embryonic kidney-293). Blocking of phosphoinositide 3-OH kinase by selective inhibitors (LY-294002 and wortmannin) abrogated the stretch-induced PKB/Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore mechanical stretch stimulated phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the formation of EGFR membrane clusters. Functional blocking of EGFR phosphorylation by either selective inhibitors (AG1478 and PD168393) or dominant-negative expression suppressed stretch-induced PKB/Akt phosphorylation. Finally, the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) was shown to induce positive transactivation of EGFR in response to cell stretch. These findings define a novel signaling pathway of mechanical stretch, namely the activation of PKB/Akt by transactivation of EGFR via angiotensin II type 1 receptor. Evidence is provided that stretch-induced activation of PKB/Akt protects cells against induced apoptosis.

  3. Natural variation in phosphorylation of photosystem II proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana: is it caused by genetic variation in the STN kinases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Pádraic J.; Yin, Lan; Herdean, Andrei; Harbinson, Jeremy; Aarts, Mark G. M.; Spetea, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of photosystem II (PSII) proteins is an important regulatory mechanism that can protect plants from changes in ambient light intensity and quality. We hypothesized that there is natural variation in this process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and that this results from genetic variation in the STN7 and STN8 kinase genes. To test this, Arabidopsis accessions of diverse geographical origins were exposed to two light regimes, and the levels of phospho-D1 and phospho-light harvesting complex II (LHCII) proteins were quantified by western blotting with anti-phosphothreonine antibodies. Accessions were classified as having high, moderate or low phosphorylation relative to Col-0. This variation could not be explained by the abundance of the substrates in thylakoid membranes. In genotypes with atrazine-resistant forms of the D1 protein, low D1 and LHCII protein phosphorylation was observed, which may be due to low PSII efficiency, resulting in reduced activation of the STN kinases. In the remaining genotypes, phospho-D1 levels correlated with STN8 protein abundance in high-light conditions. In growth light, D1 and LHCII phosphorylation correlated with longitude and in the case of LHCII phosphorylation also with temperature variability. This suggests a possible role of natural variation in PSII protein phosphorylation in the adaptation of Arabidopsis to diverse environments. PMID:24591726

  4. THE CAM DESIGN FOR A BETTER EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETRESCU Ion Florian

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an original method to determine the efficiency of a mechanism with cam and follower. The originality of this method consists in eliminate of the friction modulus. In this paper on analyze three types of cam mechanisms: 1.The mechanism with rotary cam and plate translated follower; 2.The mechanism with rotary cam and translated follower with roll; 3.The mechanism with rotary cam and rocking-follower with roll. In every kind of cam and follower mechanism on utilize a different method for the best efficiency design.

  5. Optical integration of CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Jan-Frederik; Magne, Pascal

    The optical integration (OI) of monolithic CAD/CAM materials under 4 illuminations was evaluated using a standardized and clinically relevant method. Eighteen inlays were manufactured and placed (glycerin gel). Standardized photos were taken under 4 illuminations (neutral white light direct and indirect illumination, cross-polarized light, fluorescent light). Six evaluators defined the optical integration score (OIS) as the "visibility" of the restoration (0 = worst OI, 4 = optimal OI). The intact tooth served as control. The null hypothesis was that different illuminations did not influence the OI of CAD/CAM inlays. One-way ANOVA, followed by Scheffe's post hoc, was applied (P = 0.05). Neutral light direct illumination: OIS between 2.67 (IPS e.max CAD LT A1, ENAMIC A1) and 3.83 (IPS e.max CAD HT A1) with a mean of 3.28 (± 0.339). Indirect illumination: OIS from 1.00 (Paradigm MZ100 A1) to 2.41 (ENAMIC A1) with a mean of 1.88 (± 0.598). Fluorescent light: OIS between 0.75 and 3.25 with a mean of 1.67 (± 1.025). ENAMIC and VITA BLOCS Mark II showed the best optical integration in fluorescence. IPS e.max CAD, Paradigm MZ 100 demonstrated low fluorescence; Lava Ultimate high fluorescence. OI was influenced by different illumination. A simple method accessible to clinicians for additional evaluation of CAD/CAM materials in daily practice is presented. All materials showed excellent OI under direct illumination with neutral white light. The most pronounced differences in optical integration between tooth and evaluated materials were observed under fluorescent light.

  6. Enterovirus 71 VP1 activates calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and results in the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocyte cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Haolong

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is one of the main causative agents of foot, hand and mouth disease. Its infection usually causes severe central nervous system diseases and complications in infected infants and young children. In the present study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection caused the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocytoma cells. The rearranged vimentin, together with various EV71 components, formed aggresomes-like structures in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy and viral RNA labeling indicated that the aggresomes were virus replication sites since most of the EV71 particles and the newly synthesized viral RNA were concentrated here. Further analysis revealed that the vimentin in the virus factories was serine-82 phosphorylated. More importantly, EV71 VP1 protein is responsible for the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II which phosphorylated the N-terminal domain of vimentin on serine 82. Phosphorylation of vimentin and the formation of aggresomes were required for the replication of EV71 since the latter was decreased markedly after phosphorylation was blocked by KN93, a CaMK-II inhibitor. Thus, as one of the consequences of CaMK-II activation, vimentin phosphorylation and rearrangement may support virus replication by playing a structural role for the formation of the replication factories. Collectively, this study identified the replication centers of EV71 in human astrocyte cells. This may help us understand the replication mechanism and pathogenesis of EV71 in human.

  7. Enterovirus 71 VP1 Activates Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II and Results in the Rearrangement of Vimentin in Human Astrocyte Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haolong, Cong; Du, Ning; Hongchao, Tian; Yang, Yang; Wei, Zhang; Hua, Zhang; Wenliang, Zhang; Lei, Song; Po, Tien

    2013-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the main causative agents of foot, hand and mouth disease. Its infection usually causes severe central nervous system diseases and complications in infected infants and young children. In the present study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection caused the rearrangement of vimentin in human astrocytoma cells. The rearranged vimentin, together with various EV71 components, formed aggresomes-like structures in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy and viral RNA labeling indicated that the aggresomes were virus replication sites since most of the EV71 particles and the newly synthesized viral RNA were concentrated here. Further analysis revealed that the vimentin in the virus factories was serine-82 phosphorylated. More importantly, EV71 VP1 protein is responsible for the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK-II) which phosphorylated the N-terminal domain of vimentin on serine 82. Phosphorylation of vimentin and the formation of aggresomes were required for the replication of EV71 since the latter was decreased markedly after phosphorylation was blocked by KN93, a CaMK-II inhibitor. Thus, as one of the consequences of CaMK-II activation, vimentin phosphorylation and rearrangement may support virus replication by playing a structural role for the formation of the replication factories. Collectively, this study identified the replication centers of EV71 in human astrocyte cells. This may help us understand the replication mechanism and pathogenesis of EV71 in human. PMID:24073199

  8. Randomized controlled within-subject evaluation of digital and conventional workflows for the fabrication of lithium disilicate single crowns. Part II: CAD-CAM versus conventional laboratory procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Irena; Benic, Goran I; Fehmer, Vincent; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Mühlemann, Sven

    2017-07-01

    Clinical studies are needed to evaluate the entire digital and conventional workflows in prosthetic dentistry. The purpose of the second part of this clinical study was to compare the laboratory production time for tooth-supported single crowns made with 4 different digital workflows and 1 conventional workflow and to compare these crowns clinically. For each of 10 participants, a monolithic crown was fabricated in lithium disilicate-reinforced glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD). The computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) systems were Lava C.O.S. CAD software and centralized CAM (group L), Cares CAD software and centralized CAM (group iT), Cerec Connect CAD software and lab side CAM (group CiL), and Cerec Connect CAD software with centralized CAM (group CiD). The conventional fabrication (group K) included a wax pattern of the crown and heat pressing according to the lost-wax technique (IPS e.max Press). The time for the fabrication of the casts and the crowns was recorded. Subsequently, the crowns were clinically evaluated and the corresponding treatment times were recorded. The Paired Wilcoxon test with the Bonferroni correction was applied to detect differences among treatment groups (α=.05). The total mean (±standard deviation) active working time for the dental technician was 88 ±6 minutes in group L, 74 ±12 minutes in group iT, 74 ±5 minutes in group CiL, 92 ±8 minutes in group CiD, and 148 ±11 minutes in group K. The dental technician spent significantly more working time for the conventional workflow than for the digital workflows (P.05). Irrespective of the CAD-CAM system, the overall laboratory working time for a digital workflow was significantly shorter than for the conventional workflow, since the dental technician needed less active working time. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Scleroderma, Stress and CAM Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kit Hui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease influenced by interplay among genetic and environmental factors, of which one is stress. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is frequently used to treat stress and those diseases in which stress has been implicated. Results are presented from a survey of patients with scleroderma. Respondents were a convenient sample of those attending a national conference in Las Vegas in 2002. Findings implicate stress in the onset, continuation and exacerbation of scleroderma. The implication is that CAM providers may be filling an important patient need in their provision of services that identify and treat stress and its related disorders.

  10. Dendritic spine changes in the development of alcohol addiction regulated by α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Mijakowska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Alcohol has many adverse effects on the brain. Among them are dendritic spine morphology alterations, which are believed to be the basis of alcohol addiction. Autophosphorylation of α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (αCaMKII has been shown to regulate spine morphology in vitro. Here we show that αCaMKII can also regulate addiction related behaviour and dendritic spine morphology changes caused by alcohol consumption in vivo. Method 12 αCaMKII-autophosphorylation deficient female mice (T286A and 12 wild type littermates were used in the study. T286A strain was created by Giese et al. (1998. Mice were housed and tested in two IntelliCages from NewBehavior (www.newbehavior.com. IntelliCage is an automated learning system. After 95 days of alcohol drinking interrupted by tests for motivation, persistence in alcohol seeking and probability of relapse, mice were ascribed to ‘high’ or ‘low’ drinkers group according to their performance in the tests. Additional criterion was the amount of alcohol consumed during the whole experiment. Result of each test was evaluated separately. 1/3 of the mice that scored highest in each criterion were considered ‘positive’ for this trait. ‘Positive’ animals were given 1 point, negative 0 points. Mice that were positive in at least 2 criteria were ascribed to ‘high’ drinkers (‘+’ group. Remaining mice – to ‘low’ drinkers (‘–‘. This method of behavioral phenotyping, developed by Radwanska and Kaczmarek (2012, is inspired by DSM-IV. Since the results of this evaluation are discrete (i.e. by definition all the animals score between 0 to +4, we developed also a continuous method of addiction rating, which we call ‘addiction index’. The result of the second method is a sum of the standardized (z-score results of the above mentioned tests. We use it to examine the correlations between addiction-like behavior and spine parameters. Control group (12 WT, 8

  11. IBD and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine (CAM) Go Back Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Email Print + Share Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ... Energy Medicine, and Biologically-Based Practices. Mind-Body Medicine Mind-body medicine is a set of interventions ...

  12. Phosphorylation at Ser²⁶ in the ATP-binding site of Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II as a mechanism for switching off the kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mehtap; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Leavis, Paul; Grabarek, Zenon; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2013-02-07

    CaMKII (Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent kinase II) is a serine/threonine phosphotransferase that is capable of long-term retention of activity due to autophosphorylation at a specific threonine residue within each subunit of its oligomeric structure. The γ isoform of CaMKII is a significant regulator of vascular contractility. Here, we show that phosphorylation of CaMKII γ at Ser²⁶, a residue located within the ATP-binding site, terminates the sustained activity of the enzyme. To test the physiological importance of phosphorylation at Ser²⁶, we generated a phosphospecific Ser²⁶ antibody and demonstrated an increase in Ser²⁶ phosphorylation upon depolarization and contraction of blood vessels. To determine if the phosphorylation of Ser²⁶ affects the kinase activity, we mutated Ser²⁶ to alanine or aspartic acid. The S26D mutation mimicking the phosphorylated state of CaMKII causes a dramatic decrease in Thr²⁸⁷ autophosphorylation levels and greatly reduces the catalytic activity towards an exogenous substrate (autocamtide-3), whereas the S26A mutation has no effect. These data combined with molecular modelling indicate that a negative charge at Ser²⁶ of CaMKII γ inhibits the catalytic activity of the enzyme towards its autophosphorylation site at Thr²⁸⁷ most probably by blocking ATP binding. We propose that Ser²⁶ phosphorylation constitutes an important mechanism for switching off CaMKII activity.

  13. Type III Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor Drives Cardiac Hypertrophy Through β-Arrestin2-Dependent Activation of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Song, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan-Chao; Sun, Fei; Ding, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Mei-Tong; Dong, Chang-Jiang; Ji, Yong; Li, Hongliang; Chu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-09-01

    The role of type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII) in the pathogenesis of heart diseases remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated the functional role and molecular mechanisms of TβRIII in the development of myocardial hypertrophy. Western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of TβRIII was significantly elevated in human cardiac hypertrophic samples. Consistently, TβRIII expression was substantially increased in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)- and isoproterenol-induced mouse cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Overexpression of TβRIII resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was greatly attenuated by knockdown of TβRIII in vitro. Cardiac-specific transgenic expression of TβRIII independently led to cardiac hypertrophy in mice, which was further aggravated by isoproterenol and TAC treatment. Cardiac contractile function of the mice was not altered in TβRIII transgenic mice; however, TAC led to significantly decreased cardiac contractile function in TβRIII transgenic mice compared with control mice. Conversely, isoproterenol- and TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and TAC-induced cardiac contractile function impairment were partially reversed by suppression of TβRIII in vivo. Our data suggest that TβRIII mediates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which requires a physical interaction of β-arrestin2 with both TβRIII and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our findings indicate that stress-induced increase in TβRIII expression results in cardiac hypertrophy through β-arrestin2-dependent activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and that transforming growth factor-β and β-adrenergic receptor signaling are not involved in spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy in cardiac

  14. The Z CamPaign: Year Five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Entering into the fifth year of the Z CamPaign, the author has developed a website summarizing our findings which will also act as a living catalog of bona fide Z Cam stars, suspected Z Cams, and Z Cam impostors. In this paper we summarize the findings of the first four years of research, introduce the website and its contents to the public, and discuss the way forward into year five and beyond.

  15. Point mutations at the thymidine kinase locus in L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells. II. Test validation and interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, D E; Paillet, S C; Turner, G N; Ray, V A; Salsburg, D S

    1980-08-01

    The L5178Y Mouse Lymphoma TK assay was studied extensively to determine if this mammalian cell assay for gene mutations at the thymidine kinase (TK) locus could provide valid, interpretable determinations of mutagenic potential, and whether this information is of value in the safety evaluation of chemicals. We first determined that test-derived TFTR mutants were phenotypically stable, possessing little or no thymidine kinase activity as measured by labeled thymidine uptake, but demonstrating 100% cross resistance to bromodeoxyuridine. Common solvent vehicles such as acetone, dimethylsulfoxide and ethanol were shown to produce little cytotoxicity and no mutagenic activity when present at 1% levels. Out of a total of 10 noncarcinogens tested, all were negative when results were analyzed by a 2-sample loge t test on control and treated mutant count means. Of the 13 putative animal carcinogens tested, 10 were positive, 2 were negative (auramine O and sodium phenobarbital), and 1 showed sporadic activity (hydrazine sulfate) in the TK assay on the basis of test-derived t statistics. 2 compounds, 1,2-epoxybutane and ICR 191, which have been described as Ames positive non-carcinogens, were also positive in the TK assay. Although this sampling of a total of 29 compounds is insufficient for precise estimations of expected false-positive or false-negative frequencies, these data indicate the TK assay can be expected to detect a majority of carcinogens as mutagens including some missed by more established point-mutation assays.

  16. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-09-08

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis.

  17. Testosterone downregulates angiotensin II type-2 receptor via androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway in rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jay S; Hankins, Gary D; Kumar, Sathish

    2016-10-01

    Blood pressure is lower in females than males. Angiotensin II type-2 receptor (AT2R) induces vasodilation. This study determined whether sex differences in vascular AT2R expression occur and if androgens exert control on AT2R expression in the vasculature. AT2Rs in the aorta of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were examined following alteration in androgen levels by gonadectomy or hormone supplementation. AT2R mRNA and protein expression levels were lower in the aortas of males than females. In males, testosterone withdrawal by castration significantly elevated AT2R mRNA and protein levels and testosterone replacement restored them. In females, increasing androgen levels decreased AT2R mRNA and protein expression and this was attenuated by androgen receptor blocker flutamide. Ex vivo, dihydrotestosterone downregulated AT2R in endothelium-intact but not endothelium-denuded aorta. Dihydrotestosterone-induced AT2R downregulation in isolated aorta was blocked by an androgen receptor antagonist. Furthermore, blockade of ERK1/2 but not p38 MAP kinase or TGFβ signaling with specific inhibitors abolished dihydrotestosterone-induced AT2R downregulation. Androgens downregulate AT2R expression levels in aorta, in vivo and ex vivo. The androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase-signaling pathway may be a key mechanism by which testosterone downregulates AT2R expression, implicating androgens' contributing role to gender differences in vascular AT2R expression. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. A Casein Kinase II Phosphorylation Site in AtYY1 Affects Its Activity, Stability, and Function in the ABA Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiu-Yun; Li, Tian

    2017-01-01

    The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins are crucial in the regulation of protein activity and stability in various signaling pathways. In this study, we identified an ABA repressor, Arabidopsis Ying Yang 1 (AtYY1) as a potential target of casein kinase II (CKII). AtYY1 physically interacts with two regulatory subunits of CKII, CKB3, and CKB4. Moreover, AtYY1 can be phosphorylated by CKII in vitro, and the S284 site is the major CKII phosphorylation site. Further analyses indicated that S284 phosphorylation can enhance the transcriptional activity and protein stability of AtYY1 and hence strengthen the effect of AtYY1 as a negative regulator in the ABA response. Our study provides novel insights into the regulatory mechanism of AtYY1 mediated by CKII phosphorylation.

  19. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-γ (CaMKIIγ) negatively regulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and vascular remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddouk, Fatima Z.; Sun, Li-Yan; Liu, Yong Feng; Jiang, Miao; Singer, Diane V.; Backs, Johannes; Van Riper, Dee; Ginnan, Roman; Schwarz, John J.; Singer, Harold A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM) expresses calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-δ and -γ isoforms. CaMKIIδ promotes VSM proliferation and vascular remodeling. We tested CaMKIIγ function in vascular remodeling after injury. CaMKIIγ protein decreased 90% 14 d after balloon injury in rat carotid artery. Intraluminal transduction of adenovirus encoding CaMKIIγC rescued expression to 35% of uninjured controls, inhibited neointima formation (>70%), inhibited VSM proliferation (>60%), and increased expression of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21 (>2-fold). Comparable doses of CaMKIIδ2 adenovirus had no effect. Similar dynamics in CaMKIIγ mRNA and protein expression were observed in ligated mouse carotid arteries, correlating closely with expression of VSM differentiation markers. Targeted deletion of CaMKIIγ in smooth muscle resulted in a 20-fold increase in neointimal area, with a 3-fold increase in the cell proliferation index, no change in apoptosis, and a 60% decrease in p21 expression. In cultured VSM, CaMKIIγ overexpression induced p53 mRNA (1.7 fold) and protein (1.8-fold) expression; induced the p53 target gene p21 (3-fold); decreased VSM cell proliferation (>50%); and had no effect on expression of apoptosis markers. We conclude that regulated CaMKII isoform composition is an important determinant of the injury-induced vasculoproliferative response and that CaMKIIγ and -δ isoforms have nonequivalent, opposing functions.—Saddouk, F. Z., Sun, L.-Y., Liu, Y. F., Jiang, M., Singer, D. V., Backs, J., Van Riper, D., Ginnan, R., Schwarz, J. J., Singer, H. A. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-γ (CaMKIIγ) negatively regulates vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and vascular remodeling. PMID:26567004

  20. Dual sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI-II enhances sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil in hepatocellular carcinoma cells via suppression of osteopontin and FAK/IGF-1R signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbčić, Petra; Tomljanović, Ivana; Klobučar, Marko; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra; Lučin, Ksenija; Sedić, Mirela

    2017-06-10

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally. Although 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is used as the first choice treatment for advanced HCC, it exerts poor efficacy and is associated with acquired and intrinsic resistance. Sphingosine kinases (Sphk) 1 and 2 play tumour-promoting roles in different cancer types including HCC and thus represent promising pharmacological targets. In the present study, we have investigated for the first time the anticancer efficacy and underlying molecular mechanisms of combined administration of 5-FU and dual Sphk1/Sphk2 inhibitor SKI-II (4-[[4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]amino]phenol) in HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Here, we report that co-administration of 5-FU and SKI-II at low sub-toxic concentrations of 20 μM and 5 μM, respectively, synergistically inhibit cell proliferation, markedly reduce cell migration and the clonogenic survival, and increase apoptosis induction in HepG2 cells. Additional Western blot analyses have shown that possible mechanisms underlying enhanced sensitivity to 5-FU induced by dual Sphk 1/2 inhibition could include abrogation of FAK-regulated IGF-1R activity and down-regulation of osteopontin expression culminating in the inhibition of NF-κB activity and its downstream signalling mediated by sirtuin 1 and p38 MAPK. Our results clearly show that pharmacological blockade of both Sphk isoforms represents a promising strategy to boost the anti-tumour efficacy of 5-FU and provide a rationale for further in vivo studies into the possible use of SKI-II inhibitor as an adjunct to 5-FU treatment in HCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of electroacupuncture on the mRNA and protein expression of Rho-A and Rho-associated kinase II in spinal cord injury rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-jiang Min

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroacupuncture is beneficial for the recovery of spinal cord injury, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. The Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK signaling pathway regulates the actin cytoskeleton by controlling the adhesive and migratory behaviors of cells that could inhibit neurite regrowth after neural injury and consequently hinder the recovery from spinal cord injury. Therefore, we hypothesized electroacupuncture could affect the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway to promote the recovery of spinal cord injury. In our experiments, the spinal cord injury in adult Sprague-Dawley rats was caused by an impact device. Those rats were subjected to electroacupuncture at Yaoyangguan (GV3, Dazhui (GV14, Zusanli (ST36 and Ciliao (BL32 and/or monosialoganglioside treatment. Behavioral scores revealed that the hindlimb motor functions improved with those treatments. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence in situ hybridization and western blot assay showed that electroacupuncture suppressed the mRNA and protein expression of Rho-A and Rho-associated kinase II (ROCKII of injured spinal cord. Although monosialoganglioside promoted the recovery of hindlimb motor function, monosialoganglioside did not affect the expression of Rho-A and ROCKII. However, electroacupuncture combined with monosialoganglioside did not further improve the motor function or suppress the expression of Rho-A and ROCKII. Our data suggested that the electroacupuncture could specifically inhibit the activation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway thus partially contributing to the repair of injured spinal cord. Monosialoganglioside could promote the motor function but did not suppress expression of RhoA and ROCKII. There was no synergistic effect of electroacupuncture combined with monosialoganglioside.

  2. Testosterone downregulates angiotensin II type-2 receptor via androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway in rat aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S Mishra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood pressure is lower in females than males. Angiotensin II type-2 receptor (AT2R induces vasodilation. This study determined whether sex differences in vascular AT2R expression occur and if androgens exert control on AT2R expression in the vasculature. Methods: AT2Rs in the aorta of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were examined following alteration in androgen levels by gonadectomy or hormone supplementation. Results: AT2R mRNA and protein expression levels were lower in the aortas of males than females. In males, testosterone withdrawal by castration significantly elevated AT2R mRNA and protein levels and testosterone replacement restored them. In females, increasing androgen levels decreased AT2R mRNA and protein expression and this was attenuated by androgen receptor blocker flutamide. Ex vivo, dihydrotestosterone downregulated AT2R in endothelium-intact but not endothelium-denuded aorta. Dihydrotestosterone-induced AT2R downregulation in isolated aorta was blocked by an androgen receptor antagonist. Furthermore, blockade of ERK1/2 but not p38 MAP kinase or TGFβ signaling with specific inhibitors abolished dihydrotestosterone-induced AT2R downregulation. Conclusion: Androgens downregulate AT2R expression levels in aorta, in vivo and ex vivo. The androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase-signaling pathway may be a key mechanism by which testosterone downregulates AT2R expression, implicating androgens’ contributing role to gender differences in vascular AT2R expression.

  3. Involvement of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in endothelin receptor expression in rat cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldsee, Roya; Ahnstedt, Hilda; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Experimental cerebral ischemia and organ culture of cerebral arteries result in the enhanced expression of endothelin ET(B) receptors in smooth muscle cells via increased transcription. The present study was designed to evaluate the involvement of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAMK) in the transcriptional expression of endothelin receptors after organ culture. Rat basilar arteries were incubated for 24 h with or without the CAMK inhibitor KN93 or ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126. The contractile responses to endothelin-1 (ET-1; ET(A) and ET(B) receptor agonist) and sarafotoxin 6c (S6c; ET(B) receptor agonist) were studied using a sensitive myograph. The mRNA levels of the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors and CAMKII were determined by real-time PCR, and their protein levels were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The mRNA levels of CAMKII and the ET(B) receptor increased during organ culture, but there was no change in the expression of the ET(A) receptor. This effect was abolished by coincubation with KN93 or U0126. In functional studies, both inhibitors attenuated the S6c-induced contraction. Incubating the arteries with KN93, but not U0126, decreased the amount of phosphorylated CAMKII. The inhibitors had no effect on the levels of myosin light chain during organ culture, as measured by Western blot. CAMKII is involved in the upregulation of the endothelin ET(B) receptor and interacts with the ERK1/2 pathway to enhance receptor expression. CAMKII has no effect on the contractile apparatus in rat cerebral arteries.

  4. Calmodulin kinase II inhibition limits the pro-arrhythmic Ca2+ waves induced by cAMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Pierre; Varin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Florence; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire; Leroy, Jérôme

    2016-05-01

    A major concern of using phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors in heart failure is their potential to increase mortality by inducing arrhythmias. By diminishing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) hydrolysis, they promote protein kinase A (PKA) activity under β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation, hence enhancing Ca(2+) cycling and contraction. Yet, cAMP also activates CaMKII via PKA or the exchange protein Epac, but it remains unknown whether these pathways are involved in the pro-arrhythmic effect of PDE inhibitors. Excitation-contraction coupling was investigated in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes loaded with Fura-2 and paced at 1 Hz allowing coincident measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) and sarcomere shortening. The PDE4 inhibitor Ro 20-1724 (Ro) promoted the inotropic effects of the non-selective β-AR agonist isoprenaline (Iso) and also spontaneous diastolic Ca(2+) waves (SCWs). PDE4 inhibition potentiated RyR2 and PLB phosphorylation at specific PKA and CaMKII sites increasing sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) load and SR Ca(2+) leak measured in a 0Na(+)/0Ca(2+) solution ± tetracaine. PKA inhibition suppressed all the effects of Iso ± Ro, whereas CaMKII inhibition prevented SR Ca(2+) leak and diminished SCW incidence without affecting the inotropic effects of Ro. Inhibition of Epac2 but not Epac1 diminished the occurrence of SCWs. PDE3 inhibition with cilostamide induced an SR Ca(2+) leak, which was also blocked by CaMKII inhibition. Our results show that PDE inhibitors exert inotropic effects via PKA but lead to SCWs via both PKA and CaMKII activation partly via Epac2, suggesting the potential use of CaMKII inhibitors as adjuncts to PDE inhibition to limit their pro-arrhythmic effects. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Phosphorylation and mRNA Splicing of Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 Determine Inhibition of Rho-associated Protein Kinase (ROCK) II Function in Carcinoma Cell Migration and Invasion*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Couchman, John R.; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    The Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II) are central regulators of important cellular processes such as migration and invasion downstream of the GTP-Rho. Recently, we reported collapsin response mediator protein (CRMP)-2 as an endogenous ROCK II inhibitor. To reveal how the CRMP-2-ROCK II interaction is controlled, we further mapped the ROCK II interaction site of CRMP-2 and examined whether phosphorylation states of CRMP-2 affected the interaction. Here, we show that an N-terminal fragment of the long CRMP-2 splice variant (CRMP-2L) alone binds ROCK II and inhibits colon carcinoma cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, the interaction of CRMP-2 and ROCK II is partially regulated by glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 phosphorylation of CRMP-2, downstream of PI3K. Inhibition of PI3K reduced interaction of CRMP-2 with ROCK II, an effect rescued by simultaneous inhibition of GSK3. Inhibition of PI3K also reduced colocalization of ROCK II and CRMP-2 at the cell periphery in human breast carcinoma cells. Mimicking GSK3 phosphorylation of CRMP-2 significantly reduced CRMP-2 binding of recombinant full-length and catalytic domain of ROCK II. These data implicate GSK3 in the regulation of ROCK II-CRMP-2 interactions. Using phosphorylation-mimetic and -resistant CRMP-2L constructs, it was revealed that phosphorylation of CRMP-2L negatively regulates its inhibitory function in ROCK-dependent haptotactic cell migration, as well as invasion of human colon carcinoma cells. Collectively, the presented data show that CRMP-2-dependent regulation of ROCK II activity is mediated through interaction of the CRMP-2L N terminus with the ROCK II catalytic domain as well as by GSK3-dependent phosphorylation of CRMP-2. PMID:24036111

  6. [Effect of curcumin on the learning, memory and hippocampal Ca+/CaMK II level in senescence-accelerated mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen-you; Qi, Shuang-shuang; Sun, Shu-hong

    2011-03-01

    To explore effect of curcumin in different concentrations on learning and memory of senescence-accelerated mice (SAM) and their possible mechanisms. Mice were randomly divided into six groups: the SAMR1 normal control group, the SAMP8 model control group, the SAMP8 + solvent (the peanut oil) control group, SAMP8 + low, middle and high dose curcumin groups. Mice were gastrogavage for 25 successive days. On the next day of ending the experiment, changes of learning and memory in mice of each group were observed by Morris water maze. The hippocampal [Ca2+] was determined. Expressions of hippocampal calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II) and Calmodulin (CaM) mRNA were detected using Western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) respectively. The latency to find the hidden platform was remarkably prolonged, the hippocampal [Ca2+]i was markedly increased, the expression of CaMK II in the hippocampal membrane and the level of hippocampal CaM mRNA were significantly reduced in the SAMP8-model control group (P CaMK II in the hippocampal membrane and the level of hippocampal CaM mRNA obviously increased in the SAMP8 + low, middle and high dose curcumin groups (P CaMK II expression in the hippocampal dose-dependently.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta is required for vitamin D receptor-dependent E-cadherin expression in SW480 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouchi, Zen, E-mail: zkouchi@toyaku.ac.jp [Laboratory of Genome and Biosignals, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-city, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Fujiwara, Yuki [Laboratory of Genome and Biosignals, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-city, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hideki [Division of Metastasis and Invasion Signaling, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi-city, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Fukami, Kiyoko [Laboratory of Genome and Biosignals, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-city, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} We analyzed Phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate kinase II{beta} (PIPKII{beta}) function in cancer. {yields} PIPKII{beta} is required for vitamin D receptor-mediated E-cadherin upregulation in SW480. {yields} PIPKII{beta} suppresses cellular motility through E-cadherin induction in SW480 cells. {yields} Nuclear PIP{sub 2} but not plasma membrane-localized PIP{sub 2} mediates E-cadherin upregulation. -- Abstract: Numerous epidemiological data indicate that vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling induced by its ligand or active metabolite 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) has anti-cancer activity in several colon cancers. 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces the epithelial differentiation of SW480 colon cancer cells expressing VDR (SW480-ADH) by upregulating E-cadherin expression; however, its precise mechanism remains unknown. We found that phosphatidylinositol-5-phosphate 4-kinase type II beta (PIPKII{beta}) but not PIPKII{alpha} is required for VDR-mediated E-cadherin induction in SW480-ADH cells. The syntenin-2 postsynaptic density protein/disc large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain and pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC{delta}1 PHD) possess high affinity for phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}) mainly localized to the nucleus and plasma membrane, respectively. The expression of syntenin-2 PDZ but not PLC{delta}1 PHD inhibited 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-induced E-cadherin upregulation, suggesting that nuclear PI(4,5)P{sub 2} production mediates E-cadherin expression through PIPKII{beta} in a VDR-dependent manner. PIPKII{beta} is also involved in the suppression of the cell motility induced by 1{alpha},25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}. These results indicate that PIPKII{beta}-mediated PI(4,5)P{sub 2} signaling is important for E-cadherin upregulation and inhibition of cellular motility induced by VDR activation.

  8. The path to CAM6: coupled simulations with CAM5.4 and CAM5.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Bogenschutz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents coupled simulations of two developmental versions of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM towards CAM6. The configuration called CAM5.4 introduces new microphysics, aerosol, and ice nucleation changes, among others to CAM. The CAM5.5 configuration represents a more radical departure, as it uses an assumed probability density function (PDF-based unified cloud parameterization to replace the turbulence, shallow convection, and warm cloud macrophysics in CAM. This assumed PDF method has been widely used in the last decade in atmosphere-only climate simulations but has never been documented in coupled mode. Here, we compare the simulated coupled climates of CAM5.4 and CAM5.5 and compare them to the control coupled simulation produced by CAM5.3. We find that CAM5.5 has lower cloud forcing biases when compared to the control simulations. Improvements are also seen in the simulated amplitude of the Niño-3.4 index, an improved representation of the diurnal cycle of precipitation, subtropical surface wind stresses, and double Intertropical Convergence Zone biases. Degradations are seen in Amazon precipitation as well as slightly colder sea surface temperatures and thinner Arctic sea ice. Simulation of the 20th century results in a credible simulation that ends slightly colder than the control coupled simulation. The authors find this is due to aerosol indirect effects that are slightly stronger in the new version of the model and propose a solution to ameliorate this. Overall, in these early coupled simulations, CAM5.5 produces a credible climate that is appropriate for science applications and is ready for integration into the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR's next-generation climate model.

  9. The path to CAM6: coupled simulations with CAM5.4 and CAM5.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Peter A.; Gettelman, Andrew; Hannay, Cecile; Larson, Vincent E.; Neale, Richard B.; Craig, Cheryl; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents coupled simulations of two developmental versions of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) towards CAM6. The configuration called CAM5.4 introduces new microphysics, aerosol, and ice nucleation changes, among others to CAM. The CAM5.5 configuration represents a more radical departure, as it uses an assumed probability density function (PDF)-based unified cloud parameterization to replace the turbulence, shallow convection, and warm cloud macrophysics in CAM. This assumed PDF method has been widely used in the last decade in atmosphere-only climate simulations but has never been documented in coupled mode. Here, we compare the simulated coupled climates of CAM5.4 and CAM5.5 and compare them to the control coupled simulation produced by CAM5.3. We find that CAM5.5 has lower cloud forcing biases when compared to the control simulations. Improvements are also seen in the simulated amplitude of the Niño-3.4 index, an improved representation of the diurnal cycle of precipitation, subtropical surface wind stresses, and double Intertropical Convergence Zone biases. Degradations are seen in Amazon precipitation as well as slightly colder sea surface temperatures and thinner Arctic sea ice. Simulation of the 20th century results in a credible simulation that ends slightly colder than the control coupled simulation. The authors find this is due to aerosol indirect effects that are slightly stronger in the new version of the model and propose a solution to ameliorate this. Overall, in these early coupled simulations, CAM5.5 produces a credible climate that is appropriate for science applications and is ready for integration into the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR's) next-generation climate model.

  10. Restricted growth of U-type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout cells may be linked to casein kinase II activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.-W.; Moon, C.H.; Harmache, A.; Wargo, A.R.; Purcell, M.K.; Bremont, M.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    casein kinase II (CKII) inhibitor, 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), reduced the titre of the U type 8.3-fold at 24 h post-infection. In contrast, 100 μm of the CKII inhibitor reduced the titre of the M type only 1.3-fold at 48 h post-infection. Our data suggest that the different growth of U- and M-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells may be linked to a differential requirement for cellular protein kinases such as CKII for their growth.

  11. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 2: Flexural strength testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Mevec, Daniel; Harrer, Walter; Lube, Tanja; Danzer, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Strength is one of the preferred parameters used in dentistry for determining clinical indication of dental restoratives. However, small dimensions of CAD/CAM blocks limit reliable measurements with standardized uniaxial bending tests. The objective of this study was to introduce the ball-on-three-ball (B3B) biaxial strength test for dental for small CAD/CAM block in the context of the size effect on strength predicted by the Weibull theory. Eight representative chairside CAD/CAM materials ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Specimens were prepared with highly polished surfaces in rectangular plate (12×12×1.2mm 3 ) or round disc (Ø=12mm, thickness=1.2mm) geometries. Specimens were tested using the B3B assembly and the biaxial strength was determined using calculations derived from finite element analyses of the respective stress fields. Size effects on strength were determined based on results from 4-point-bending specimens. A good agreement was found between the biaxial strength results for the different geometries (plates vs. discs) using the B3B test. Strength values ranged from 110.9MPa (Vitablocs Mark II) to 1303.21MPa (e.max ZirCAD). The strength dependency on specimen size was demonstrated through the calculated effective volume/surface. The B3B test has shown to be a reliable and simple method for determining the biaxial strength restorative materials supplied as small CAD/CAM blocks. A flexible solution was made available for the B3B test in the rectangular plate geometry. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A universal RNA polymerase II CTD cycle is orchestrated by complex interplays between kinase, phosphatase, and isomerase enzymes along genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Alain R; Jeronimo, Célia; Jacques, Pierre-Étienne; Laramée, Louise; Fortin, Marie-Ève; Forest, Audrey; Bergeron, Maxime; Hanes, Steven D; Robert, François

    2012-01-27

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is coupled to mRNA processing and chromatin modifications via the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit, consisting of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide YSPTSPS. Pioneering studies showed that CTD serines are differentially phosphorylated along genes in a prescribed pattern during the transcription cycle. Genome-wide analyses challenged this idea, suggesting that this cycle is not uniform among different genes. Moreover, the respective role of enzymes responsible for CTD modifications remains controversial. Here, we systematically profiled the location of the RNAPII phosphoisoforms in wild-type cells and mutants for most CTD modifying enzymes. Together with results of in vitro assays, these data reveal a complex interplay between the modifying enzymes, and provide evidence that the CTD cycle is uniform across genes. We also identify Ssu72 as the Ser7 phosphatase and show that proline isomerization is a key regulator of CTD dephosphorylation at the end of genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Involvement of class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase α-isoform in antigen-induced degranulation in RBL-2H3 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyomi Nigorikawa

    Full Text Available In this study, we present findings that suggest that PI3K-C2α, a member of the class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K subfamily, regulates the process of FcεRI-triggered degranulation. RBL-2H3 cells were transfected with shRNA targeting PI3K-C2α. The knockdown impaired the FcεRI-induced release of a lysosome enzyme, β-hexosaminidase, without affecting the intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. The release of mRFP-tagged neuropeptide-Y, a reporter for the regulated exocytosis, was also decreased in the PI3K-C2α-deficient cells. The release was increased significantly by the expression of the siRNA-resistant version of PI3K-C2α. In wild-type cells, FcεRI stimulation induced the formation of large vesicles, which were associated with CD63, a marker protein of secretory granules. On the vesicles, the existence of PI3K-C2α and PtdIns(3,4P2 was observed. These results indicated that PI3K-C2α and its product PtdIns(3,4P2 may play roles in the secretory process.

  14. Phase II study of single-agent bosutinib, a Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer pretreated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campone, M; Bondarenko, I; Brincat, S; Hotko, Y; Munster, P N; Chmielowska, E; Fumoleau, P; Ward, R; Bardy-Bouxin, N; Leip, E; Turnbull, K; Zacharchuk, C; Epstein, R J

    2012-03-01

    This phase II study evaluated single-agent bosutinib in pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Patients received oral bosutinib 400 mg/day. The primary end point was the progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate, clinical benefit rate, 2-year overall survival rate, safety, and changes in levels of bone resorption/formation biomarkers. Seventy-three patients were enrolled and treated. Median time from diagnosis of metastatic disease to initiation of bosutinib treatment was 24.5 months. For the intent-to-treat population, the PFS rate at 16 weeks was 39.6%. Unexpectedly, all responding patients (n = 4) were hormone receptor positive. The clinical benefit rate was 27.4%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 26.4%. The main toxic effects were diarrhea (66%), nausea (55%), and vomiting (47%). Grade 3-4 laboratory aminotransferase elevations occurred in 14 (19%) patients. Myelosuppression was minimal. No consistent changes in the levels of bone resorption/formation biomarkers were seen. Bosutinib showed promising efficacy in prolonging time to progression in chemotherapy-pretreated patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer. Bosutinib was generally well tolerated, with a safety profile different from that of the Src/Abl tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib in a similar patient population.

  15. Role of exercise-induced calmodulin protein kinase (CAMK)II activation in the regulation of omega-6 fatty acids and lipid metabolism genes in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, J S; Ayeleso, A O; Mukwevho, E

    2017-09-22

    Activation of calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CaMK)II by exercise is beneficial in controlling membrane lipids associated with type 2 diabetes and obesity. Regulation of lipid metabolism is crucial in the improvement of type 2 diabetes and obesity associated symptoms. The role of CaMKII in membrane associated lipid metabolism was the focus of this study. Five to six weeks old male Wistar rats were used in this study. GC×GC-TOFMS technique was used to determine the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and 11,14-eicosadienoic acid). Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (Cpt-1) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (Acc-1) genes expression were assessed using quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). From the results, CaMKII activation by exercise increased the levels of arachidonic acid and 11, 14-eicosadienoic acid while a decrease in the level of linolenic acid was observed in the skeletal muscle. The results indicated that exercise-induced CaMKII activation increased CPT-1 expression and decreased ACC-1 expression in rat skeletal muscle. All the observed increases with activation of CaMKII by exercise were aborted when KN93, an inhibitor of CaMKII was injected in exercising rats. This study demonstrated that CaMKII activation by exercise regulated lipid metabolism. This study suggests that CaMKII can be a vital target of therapeutic approach in the management of diseases such as type 2 diabetes and obesity that have increased to epidemic proportions recently.

  16. Berbamine inhibits the growth of liver cancer cells and cancer-initiating cells by targeting Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhipeng; Li, Tao; Ma, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Xiaoqiong; Van Ness, Carl; Gan, Yichao; Zhou, Hong; Tang, Jinfen; Lou, Guiyu; Wang, Yafan; Wu, Jun; Yen, Yun; Xu, Rongzhen; Huang, Wendong

    2013-10-01

    Liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide but no effective treatment toward liver cancer is available so far. Therefore, there is an unmet medical need to identify novel therapies to efficiently treat liver cancer and improve the prognosis of this disease. Here, we report that berbamine and one of its derivatives, bbd24, potently suppressed liver cancer cell proliferation and induced cancer cell death by targeting Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII). Furthermore, berbamine inhibited the in vivo tumorigenicity of liver cancer cells in NOD/SCID mice and downregulated the self-renewal abilities of liver cancer-initiating cells. Chemical inhibition or short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of CAMKII recapitulated the effects of berbamine, whereas overexpression of CAMKII promoted cancer cell proliferation and increased the resistance of liver cancer cells to berbamine treatments. Western blot analyses of human liver cancer specimens showed that CAMKII was hyperphosphorylated in liver tumors compared with the paired peritumor tissues, which supports a role of CAMKII in promoting human liver cancer progression and the potential clinical use of berbamine for liver cancer therapies. Our data suggest that berbamine and its derivatives are promising agents to suppress liver cancer growth by targeting CAMKII. Mol Cancer Ther; 12(10); 2067-77. ©2013 AACR.

  17. Pharmacological and safety evaluation of CIGB-300, a casein kinase 2 inhibitor peptide, administered intralesionally to patients with cervical cancer stage IB2/II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soriano-García JL

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available CIGB-300 is a pro-apoptotic casein kinase 2 inhibitor peptide with potential anticancer action. An open-label and dose scaling Phase I trial was carried out to investigate the peptide tumor uptake, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and levels of a CIGB-300 response biomarker in patients with cervical cancer stage IB2/II. Fourteen patients were included; six of them received 35 mg, 6 received 70 mg and the two remaining patients received 245 mg of CIGB-300 prior chemoradiotherapy. CIGB-300 was applied by intratumor injections during 5-consecutive days. For pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies, the peptide was radiolabeled with 99mTc in the first administration and whole body gammagraphy and plasma testing were done during 48 h. Data showed that the maximum tolerated dose was 70 mg for CIGB-300 in this clinical setting. Furthermore, an allergic-like syndrome was identified as the dose limiting toxicity, which was well-correlated with plasmatic histamine levels. Importantly, the mean tumor uptake was 14.9 mg and 10.4 mg for CIGB-300 doses of 35 and 70 mg, respectively. Also, the kidneys were the main target organ for drug elimination. Finally, treatment with CIGB-300 significantly reduced the B23/nucleophosmin levels in tumor specimens. CIGB-300 meets potentialities to be tested in future trials in a neoadjuvant setting prior to chemoradiotherapy in cervical cancer.

  18. IMC & CAMS meeting in Egmond, the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roggemans, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The 35th IMC broke a few records: the largest total number of participants, the largest number of presentations, both talks and posters and the thickest IMC Proceedings ever. After the IMC the Benelux CAMS group had its meeting in Egmond. A summary is presented of the highlights of this IMC and CAMS day.

  19. Casein kinase II phosphorylation of cyclin F at serine 621 regulates the Lys48-ubiquitylation E3 ligase activity of the SCF((cyclin F)) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert; Rayner, Stephanie L; De Luca, Alana; Gwee, Serene S L; Morsch, Marco; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Shahheydari, Hamideh; Ragagnin, Audrey; Shi, Bingyang; Yang, Shu; Williams, Kelly L; Don, Emily K; Walker, Adam K; Zhang, Katharine Y; Yerbury, Justin J; Cole, Nicholas J; Atkin, Julie D; Blair, Ian P; Molloy, Mark P; Chung, Roger S

    2017-10-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by progressive weakness, paralysis and muscle loss often resulting in patient death within 3-5 years of diagnosis. Recently, we identified disease-linked mutations in the CCNF gene, which encodes the cyclin F protein, in cohorts of patients with familial and sporadic ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) (Williams KL et al 2016 Nat. Commun.7, 11253. (doi:10.1038/ncomms11253)). Cyclin F is a part of a Skp1-Cul-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex and is responsible for ubiquitylating proteins for degradation by the proteasome. In this study, we investigated the phosphorylation status of cyclin F and the effect of the serine to glycine substitution at site 621 (S621G) on E3 ligase activity. This specific mutation (S621G) was found in a multi-generational Australian family with ALS/FTD. We identified seven phosphorylation sites on cyclin F, of which five are newly reported including Ser621. These phosphorylation sites were mostly identified within the PEST (proline, glutamic acid, serine and threonine) sequence located at the C-terminus of cyclin F. Additionally, we determined that casein kinase II (CK2) can phosphorylate Ser621 and thereby regulate the E3 ligase activity of the SCF((cyclin F)) complex. Furthermore, the S621G mutation in cyclin F prevents phosphorylation by CK2 and confers elevated Lys48-ubiquitylation activity, a hallmark of ALS/FTD pathology. These findings highlight the importance of phosphorylation in regulating the activity of the SCF((cyclin F)) E3 ligase complex that can affect downstream processes and may lead to defective motor neuron development, neuron degeneration and ultimately ALS and FTD. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. The Anthocyanin Delphinidin 3-Rutinoside Stimulates Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in Murine GLUTag Cell Line via the Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase II Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kato

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 is an incretin hormone secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells. Although several nutrients induce GLP-1 secretion, there is little evidence to suggest that non-nutritive compounds directly increase GLP-1 secretion. Here, we hypothesized that anthocyanins induce GLP-1 secretion and thereby significantly contribute to the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Delphinidin 3-rutinoside (D3R was shown to increase GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag L cells. The results suggested that three hydroxyl or two methoxyl moieties on the aromatic ring are essential for the stimulation of GLP-1 secretion. Notably, the rutinose moiety was shown to be a potent enhancer of GLP-1 secretion, but only in conjunction with three hydroxyl moieties on the aromatic ring (D3R. Receptor antagonist studies revealed that D3R-stimulates GLP-1 secretion involving inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Treatment of GLUTag cells with a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinaseII (CaMKII inhibitor (KN-93 abolished D3R-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. In addition, treatment of GLUTag cells with D3R resulted in activation of CaMKII. Pre-treatment of cells with a G protein-coupled receptor (GPR 40/120 antagonist (GW1100 also significantly decreased D3R-stimulated GLP-1 secretion. These observations suggest that D3R stimulates GLP-1 secretion in GLUTag cells, and that stimulation of GLP-1 secretion by D3R is mediated via Ca2+-CaMKII pathway, which may possibly be mediated by GPR40/120. These findings provide a possible molecular mechanism of GLP-1 secretion in intestinal L-cells mediated by foods or drugs and demonstrate a novel biological function of anthocyanins in regards to GLP-1 secretion.

  1. VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) induced vascular insufficiency in zebrafish as a model for studying vascular toxicity and vascular preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shang; Dang, Yuan Ye; Oi Lam Che, Ginny [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine and Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macao (China); Kwan, Yiu Wa [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong (China); Chan, Shun Wan [State Key Laboratory of Chinese Medicine and Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Leung, George Pak Heng [Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Lee, Simon Ming Yuen, E-mail: simonlee@umac.mo [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine and Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macao (China); Hoi, Maggie Pui Man, E-mail: maghoi@umac.mo [State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine and Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences, University of Macau, Avenida da Universidade, Taipa, Macao (China)

    2014-11-01

    In ischemic disorders such as chronic wounds and myocardial ischemia, there is inadequate tissue perfusion due to vascular insufficiency. Besides, it has been observed that prolonged use of anti-angiogenic agents in cancer therapy produces cardiovascular toxicity caused by impaired vessel integrity and regeneration. In the present study, we used VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor II (VRI) to chemically induce vascular insufficiency in zebrafish in vivo and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro to further study the mechanisms of vascular morphogenesis in these pathological conditions. We also explored the possibility of treating vascular insufficiency by enhancing vascular regeneration and repair with pharmacological intervention. We observed that pretreatment of VRI induced blood vessel loss in developing zebrafish by inhibiting angiogenesis and increasing endothelial cell apoptosis, accompanied by down-regulation of kdr, kdrl and flt-1 genes expression. The VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish could be restored by post-treatment of calycosin, a cardiovascular protective isoflavone. Similarly, VRI induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HUVEC which could be rescued by calycosin post-treatment. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms showed that the PI3K/AKT/Bad cell survival pathway was a main contributor of the vascular regenerative effect of calycosin. These findings indicated that the cardiovascular toxicity in anti-angiogenic therapy was mainly caused by insufficient endothelial cell survival, suggesting its essential role in vascular integrity, repair and regeneration. In addition, we showed that VRI-induced blood vessel loss in zebrafish represented a simple and effective in vivo model for studying vascular insufficiency and evaluating cancer drug vascular toxicities. - Highlights: • In vivo VRI model • Rescue effects of calycosin • Calycosin EC survival pathways.

  2. Synergistic antiproliferative effect of cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II) and a new anticancer agent, plasmanyl-(N-acyl)-ethanolamine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaevich, I S; Vlasenkova, N K; Gerasimova, G K

    1991-01-01

    The action of a new anticancer agent, the semisynthetic alkyl-phospholipid plasmanyl-(N-acyl)-ethanolamine (sPNAE), namely 1-O-octadecyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(N-palmitoyl)-ethanolamine, on protein kinase C (PKC) was investigated, and it was found to inhibit in a dose-dependent manner PKC isolated from mouse brain. The inhibition was competitive with respect to phosphatidylserine (K(i) = 20 microM). Lyso-PNAE, a possible cell metabolite of sPNAE, also inhibited PKC. A two-site model was used to calculate the binding affinity and the number of binding sites for phorbol ester in a culture of human melanoma BRO cells. The values of Kd, the dissociation constant, were K'd = 0.5 nM and K"d = 72 nM, whereas the values of Bmax, the number of binding sites, were B'max = 4.6 x 10(4) sites cell-1, and B"max = 2.9 x 10(5) sites cell-1. sPNAE was able to reduce the affinity of BRO cells for phorbol ester with almost no changes in the number of binding sites: K'd = 1.6 nM, K"d = 557 nM, and B'max = 4 x 10(4), B"max = 1.9 x 10(5). These data suggest that sPNAE may inhibit PKC in intact cells. Since various inhibitors of PKC may enhance the antiproliferative activity of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP), we investigated the effect of the combination of sPNAE and cis-DDP on the proliferation of BRO cells. sPNAE synergistically enhanced the antiproliferative activity of cis-DDP.

  3. Antipsychotic drugs up-regulate tryptophan hydroxylase in ADF neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans: role of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and transient receptor potential vanilloid channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Dallas R; Phan, Thang; Weeks, Kathrine; Aamodt, Eric J; Dwyer, Donard S

    2008-08-15

    Antipsychotic drugs produce acute behavioral effects through antagonism of dopamine and serotonin receptors, and long-term adaptive responses that are not well understood. The goal of the study presented here was to use Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the molecular mechanism or mechanisms that contribute to adaptive responses produced by antipsychotic drugs. First-generation antipsychotics, trifluoperazine and fluphenazine, and second-generation drugs, clozapine and olanzapine, increased the expression of tryptophan hydroxylase-1::green fluorescent protein (TPH-1::GFP) and serotonin in the ADF neurons of C. elegans. This response was absent or diminished in mutant strains lacking the transient receptor potential vanilloid channel (TRPV; osm-9) or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII; unc-43). The role of calcium signaling was further implicated by the finding that a selective antagonist of calmodulin and a calcineurin inhibitor also enhanced TPH-1::GFP expression. The ADF neurons modulate foraging behavior (turns/reversals off food) through serotonin production. We found that short-term exposure to the antipsychotic drugs altered the frequency of turns/reversals off food. This response was mediated through dopamine and serotonin receptors and was abolished in serotonin-deficient mutants (tph-1) and strains lacking the SER-1 and MOD-1 serotonin receptors. Consistent with the increase in serotonin in the ADF neurons induced by the drugs, drug withdrawal after 24-hr treatment was accompanied by a rebound in the number of turns/reversals, which demonstrates behavioral adaptation in serotonergic systems. Characterization of the cellular, molecular, and behavioral adaptations to continuous exposure to antipsychotic drugs may provide insight into the long-term clinical effects of these medications.

  4. Age-dependent targeting of protein phosphatase 1 to Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by spinophilin in mouse striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Baucum

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying age-dependent changes of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons are poorly understood. Spinophilin is an F-actin- and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1-binding protein that targets PP1 to multiple downstream effectors to modulate dendritic spine morphology and function. We found that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII directly and indirectly associates with N- and C-terminal domains of spinophilin, but F-actin can displace CaMKII from the N-terminal domain. Spinophilin co-localizes PP1 with CaMKII on the F-actin cytoskeleton in heterologous cells, and spinophilin co-localizes with synaptic CaMKII in neuronal cultures. Thr286 autophosphorylation enhances the binding of CaMKII to spinophilin in vitro and in vivo. Although there is no change in total levels of Thr286 autophosphorylation, maturation from postnatal day 21 into adulthood robustly enhances the levels of CaMKII that co-immunoprecipitate with spinophilin from mouse striatal extracts. Moreover, N- and C-terminal domain fragments of spinophilin bind more CaMKII from adult vs. postnatal day 21 striatal lysates. Total levels of other proteins that interact with C-terminal domains of spinophilin decrease during maturation, perhaps reducing competition for CaMKII binding to the C-terminal domain. In contrast, total levels of α-internexin and binding of α-internexin to the spinophilin N-terminal domain increases with maturation, perhaps bridging an indirect interaction with CaMKII. Moreover, there is an increase in the levels of myosin Va, α-internexin, spinophilin, and PP1 in striatal CaMKII immune complexes isolated from adult and aged mice compared to those from postnatal day 21. These changes in spinophilin/CaMKII interactomes may contribute to changes in striatal dendritic spine density, morphology, and function during normal postnatal maturation and aging.

  5. CAM Photosynthesis in Submerged Aquatic Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a CO2-concentrating mechanism selected in response to aridity in terrestrial habitats, and, in aquatic environments, to ambient limitations of carbon. Evidence is reviewed for its presence in five genera of aquatic vascular plants, including Isoe??tes, Sagittaria, Vallisneria, Crassula, and Littorella. Initially, aquatic CAM was considered by some to be an oxymoron, but some aquatic species have been studied in sufficient detail to say definitively that they possess CAM photosynthesis. CO2-concentrating mechanisms in photosynthetic organs require a barrier to leakage; e.g., terrestrial C4 plants have suberized bundle sheath cells and terrestrial CAM plants high stomatal resistance. In aquatic CAM plants the primary barrier to CO2 leakage is the extremely high diffusional resistance of water. This, coupled with the sink provided by extensive intercellular gas space, generates daytime CO2(Pi) comparable to terrestrial CAM plants. CAM contributes to the carbon budget by both net carbon gain and carbon recycling, and the magnitude of each is environmentally influenced. Aquatic CAM plants inhabit sites where photosynthesis is potentially limited by carbon. Many occupy moderately fertile shallow temporary pools that experience extreme diel fluctuations in carbon availability. CAM plants are able to take advantage of elevated nighttime CO2 levels in these habitats. This gives them a competitive advantage over non-CAM species that are carbon starved during the day and an advantage over species that expend energy in membrane transport of bicarbonate. Some aquatic CAM plants are distributed in highly infertile lakes, where extreme carbon limitation and light are important selective factors. Compilation of reports on diel changes in titratable acidity and malate show 69 out of 180 species have significant overnight accumulation, although evidence is presented discounting CAM in some. It is concluded that similar proportions of the aquatic

  6. CAM Stochastic Volatility Model for Option Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coupled additive and multiplicative (CAM noises model is a stochastic volatility model for derivative pricing. Unlike the other stochastic volatility models in the literature, the CAM model uses two Brownian motions, one multiplicative and one additive, to model the volatility process. We provide empirical evidence that suggests a nontrivial relationship between the kurtosis and skewness of asset prices and that the CAM model is able to capture this relationship, whereas the traditional stochastic volatility models cannot. We introduce a control variate method and Monte Carlo estimators for some of the sensitivities (Greeks of the model. We also derive an approximation for the characteristic function of the model.

  7. An 8-year evaluation of sintered ceramic and glass ceramic inlays processed by the Cerec CAD/CAM system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Dijken van, J.W.V.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cerec CAD/CAM inlays processed of two industrially made machinable ceramics during an 8-yr follow-up period. Each of 16 patients received two similar ceramic inlays. Half the number of the inlays were made of a feldspathic (Vita Mark II) and the other...... be concluded that the CAD/CAM inlays processed of the two ceramics functioned well during the 8-yr follow-up period....

  8. Hypothyroidism following developmental iodine deficiency reduces hippocampal neurogranin, CaMK II and calmodulin and elevates calcineurin in lactational rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Liu, Wanyang; Wang, Yi; Xi, Qi; Chen, Jie

    2010-11-01

    Developmental iodine deficiency (ID) leads to inadequate thyroid hormone that impairs learning and memory with an unclear mechanism. Here, we show that hippocampal neurogranin, calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), calmodulin (CaM) and calcineurin (CaN) are implicated in the brain impairment in lactational rat hippocampus following developmental ID and hypothyroidism. Three developmental rat models were created by administrating dam rats with either iodine-deficient diet or propylthiouracil (PTU, 5 ppm or 15 ppm)-added drinking water from gestational day (GD) 6 till postnatal day (PN) 21. Then, the neurogranin, CaMKII, CaM and CaN in the hippocampus were detected with immunohistochemistry and western blotting on PN14 and PN21. The iodine-deficient and hypothyroid pups showed significantly lower level of neurogranin, CaMKII and CaM and significantly increased CaN in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions than the controls on PN14 and PN21 (P<0.05, respectively). Data indicate that, in lactational rats, hippocampal neurogranin, CaMKII, CaM and CaN are involved in the brain impairment by developmental ID and hypothyroidism. Copyright © 2010 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Model Documentation for the MiniCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenkert, Antoinette L.; Smith, Steven J.; Kim, Son H.; Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2003-07-17

    The MiniCAM, short for the Mini-Climate Assessment Model, is an integrated assessment model of moderate complexity focused on energy and agriculture sectors. The model produces emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide) and other radiatively important substances such as sulfur dioxide. Through incorporation of the simple climate model MAGICC, the consequences of these emissions for climate change and sea-level rise can be examined. The MiniCAM is designed to be fast and flexible.

  10. Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeker William C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions Data Sources A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. Data Selection A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Data Synthesis Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Results Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Conclusion Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine.

  11. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II and Androgen Signaling Pathways Modulate MEF2 Activity in Testosterone-Induced Cardiac Myocyte Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Duran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone is known to induce cardiac hypertrophy through androgen receptor (AR-dependent and -independent pathways, but the molecular underpinnings of the androgen action remain poorly understood. Previous work has shown that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII and myocyte-enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 play key roles in promoting cardiac myocyte growth. In order to gain mechanistic insights into the action of androgens on the heart, we investigated how testosterone affects CaMKII and MEF2 in cardiac myocyte hypertrophy by performing studies on cultured rat cardiac myocytes and hearts obtained from adult male orchiectomized (ORX rats. In cardiac myocytes, MEF2 activity was monitored using a luciferase reporter plasmid, and the effects of CaMKII and AR signaling pathways on MEF2C were examined by using siRNAs and pharmacological inhibitors targeting these two pathways. In the in vivo studies, ORX rats were randomly assigned to groups that were administered vehicle or testosterone (125 mg⋅kg-1⋅week-1 for 5 weeks, and plasma testosterone concentrations were determined using ELISA. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by measuring well-characterized hypertrophy markers. Moreover, western blotting was used to assess CaMKII and phospholamban (PLN phosphorylation, and MEF2C and AR protein levels in extracts of left-ventricle tissue from control and testosterone-treated ORX rats. Whereas testosterone treatment increased the phosphorylation levels of CaMKII (Thr286 and phospholambam (PLN (Thr17 in cardiac myocytes in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, testosterone-induced MEF2 activity and cardiac myocyte hypertrophy were prevented upon inhibition of CaMKII, MEF2C, and AR signaling pathways. Notably, in the hypertrophied hearts obtained from testosterone-administered ORX rats, both CaMKII and PLN phosphorylation levels and AR and MEF2 protein levels were increased. Thus, this study presents the first evidence indicating that

  12. The role of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and calcineurin in TNF-α-induced myocardial hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gui-Jun [Department of Infectious Diseases, First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang Liaoning Province (China); Liaoning Medical College, Jinzhou (China); Wang, Hong-Xin; Yao, Yu-Sheng; Guo, Lian-Yi [Liaoning Medical College, Jinzhou (China); Liu, Pei [Department of Infectious Diseases, First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang Liaoning Province (China)

    2012-07-27

    We investigated whether Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) and calcineurin (CaN) are involved in myocardial hypertrophy induced by tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). The cardiomyocytes of neonatal Wistar rats (1-2 days old) were cultured and stimulated by TNF-α (100 µg/L), and Ca{sup 2+} signal transduction was blocked by several antagonists, including BAPTA (4 µM), KN-93 (0.2 µM) and cyclosporin A (CsA, 0.2 µM). Protein content, protein synthesis, cardiomyocyte volumes, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transients, CaMKIIδ{sub B} and CaN were evaluated by the Lowry method, [{sup 3}H]-leucine incorporation, a computerized image analysis system, a Till imaging system, and Western blot analysis, respectively. TNF-α induced a significant increase in protein content in a dose-dependent manner from 10 µg/L (53.56 µg protein/well) to 100 µg/L (72.18 µg protein/well), and in a time-dependent manner from 12 h (37.42 µg protein/well) to 72 h (42.81 µg protein/well). TNF-α (100 µg/L) significantly increased the amplitude of spontaneous [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transients, the total protein content, cell size, and [{sup 3}H]-leucine incorporation in cultured cardiomyocytes, which was abolished by 4 µM BAPTA, an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator. The increases in protein content, cell size and [{sup 3}H]-leucine incorporation were abolished by 0.2 µM KN-93 or 0.2 µM CsA. TNF-α increased the expression of CaMKIIδ{sub B} by 35.21% and that of CaN by 22.22% compared to control. These effects were abolished by 4 µM BAPTA, which itself had no effect. These results suggest that TNF-α induces increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}, CaMKIIδ{sub B} and CaN and promotes cardiac hypertrophy. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Ca{sup 2+}/CaMKII- and CaN-dependent signaling pathways are involved in myocardial hypertrophy induced by TNF-α.

  13. Transparency in Dutch CAM practices: a comparison between CAM and GP physicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.; Dulmen, S. van

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine) is increasing worldwide because the demand is growing. Transparency is needed to provide more objective information about CAM services, to date largely unknown by a majority of care users and mainstream care providers. Despite the fact that

  14. CAM-related changes in chloroplastic metabolism of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomska, Ewa; Bilger, Wolfgang; Gruca, Magdalena; Mulisch, Maria; Miszalski, Zbigniew; Krupinska, Karin

    2011-02-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is an intriguing metabolic strategy to maintain photosynthesis under conditions of closed stomata. A shift from C(3) photosynthesis to CAM in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum plants was induced by high salinity (0.4 M NaCl). In CAM-performing plants, the quantum efficiencies of photosystem II and I were observed to undergo distinct diurnal fluctuations that were characterized by a strong decline at the onset of the day, midday recovery, and an evening drop. The temporal recovery of both photosystems' efficiency at midday was associated with a more rapid induction of the electron transport rate at PSII. This recovery of the photosynthetic apparatus at midday was observed to be accompanied by extreme swelling of thylakoids. Despite these fluctuations, a persistent effect of CAM was the acceptor side limitation of PSI during the day, which was accompanied by a strongly decreased level of Rubisco protein. Diurnal changes in the efficiency of photosystems were parallel to corresponding changes in the levels of mRNAs for proteins of PSII and PSI reaction centers and for rbcL, reaching a maximum in CAM plants at midday. This might reflect a high demand for new protein synthesis at this time of the day. Hybridization of run-on transcripts with specific probes for plastid genes of M. crystallinum revealed that the changes in plastidic mRNA levels were regulated at the level of transcription.

  15. Beliefs, decision-making, and dialogue about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) within families using CAM: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, James; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Shaw, Alison

    2011-02-01

    The rise in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is well documented. Surveys provide varying estimates of the prevalence of CAM use. Qualitative research has explored individuals' decision-making regarding CAM. This study aimed to examine the family as a context for beliefs, decision-making, and dialogue about CAM. Families were recruited via the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. A subsample of CAM users was targeted using purposeful sampling. Focus groups and interviews were conducted with 15 families and the data were analyzed thematically. Family understandings and beliefs about CAM: CAM was understood as treatments provided outside mainstream care, offering a more "natural" and "holistic" approach, tailored to individual needs and overlapping with wider healthy lifestyle practices. Hierarchies of acceptability of CAM: Physical and "mainstream" therapies were widely supported, with "fringe" therapies producing the most polarized views. There was a belief particularly among fathers and young people that certain therapies rely on "placebo" effects and their value was contested. Types of CAM users within families: Family members were predominantly "pragmatic" CAM users, with "committed" users (all mothers) characterized by deeper philosophical commitment to CAM and skepticism toward conventional medicine. Family dynamics of CAM decision-making: Mothers tended to "champion" CAM within families, while not determining family CAM use. Fathers largely positioned themselves as lacking expertise or skeptical of CAM. Young people were beginning to articulate independent and more critical views of CAM, some directly challenging their mother's perspective. However, all families shared openness to CAM as part of broader beliefs in proactive healthy lifestyles. Family focus groups and interviews allow a window on beliefs, decision-making, and dialogue about CAM within families, illuminating the CAM "champion" role held by mothers, and young people

  16. Inhibition of protein kinase CbetaII increases glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through elevated expression of glucose transporter 1 at the plasma membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, R.R.; Bazuine, M.; Wake, M.M.; Span, P.N.; Olthaar, A.J.; Schurmann, A.; Maassen, J.A.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism via which diacylglycerol-sensitive protein kinase Cs (PKCs) stimulate glucose transport in insulin-sensitive tissues is poorly defined. Phorbol esters, such as phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), are potent activators of conventional and novel PKCs. Addition of PMA increases the

  17. Inhibition of protein kinase CbetaII increases glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes through elevated expression of glucose transporter 1 at the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Remko R.; Bazuine, Merlijn; Wake, Michelle M.; Span, Paul N.; Olthaar, André J.; Schürmann, Annette; Maassen, J. Antonie; Hermus, Ad R. M. M.; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Sweep, C. G. J.

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism via which diacylglycerol-sensitive protein kinase Cs (PKCs) stimulate glucose transport in insulin-sensitive tissues is poorly defined. Phorbol esters, such as phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), are potent activators of conventional and novel PKCs. Addition of PMA increases the

  18. From Sphingosine Kinase to Dihydroceramide Desaturase: A Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) Study of the Enzyme Inhibitory and Anticancer Activity of 4-((4-(4-Chlorophenyl)thiazol-2-yl)amino)phenol (SKI-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurelio, Luigi; Scullino, Carmen V; Pitman, Melissa R; Sexton, Anna; Oliver, Victoria; Davies, Lorena; Rebello, Richard J; Furic, Luc; Creek, Darren J; Pitson, Stuart M; Flynn, Bernard L

    2016-02-11

    The sphingosine kinase (SK) inhibitor, SKI-II, has been employed extensively in biological investigations of the role of SK1 and SK2 in disease and has demonstrated impressive anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo. However, interpretations of results using this pharmacological agent are complicated by several factors: poor SK1/2 selectivity, additional activity as an inducer of SK1-degradation, and off-target effects, including its recently identified capacity to inhibit dihydroceramide desaturase-1 (Des1). In this study, we have delineated the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for these different targets and correlated them to that required for anticancer activity and determined that Des1 inhibition is primarily responsible for the antiproliferative effects of SKI-II and its analogues. In the course of these efforts, a series of novel SK1, SK2, and Des1 inhibitors have been generated, including compounds with significantly greater anticancer activity.

  19. Casein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    The present review on casein kinases focuses mainly on the possible metabolic role of CK-2, with special emphasis on its behavior in pathological tissues. From these data at least three ways to regulate CK-2 activity emerge: (i) CK-2 activity changes during embryogenesis, being high at certain...

  20. CAM practitioners in the Australian health workforce: an underutilized resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background CAM practitioners are a valuable but underutilizes resource in Australian health care. Despite increasing public support for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) little is known about the CAM workforce. Apart from the registered professions of chiropractic, osteopathy and Chinese medicine, accurate information about the number of CAM practitioners in the workforce has been difficult to obtain. It appears that many non-registered CAM practitioners, although highly qualified, are not working to their full capacity. Discussion Increasing public endorsement of CAM stands in contrast to the negative attitude toward the CAM workforce by some members of the medical and other health professions and by government policy makers. The marginalisation of the CAM workforce is evident in prejudicial attitudes held by some members of the medical and other health professions and its exclusion from government policy making. Inconsistent educational standards has meant that non-registered CAM practitioners, including highly qualified and competent ones, are frequently overlooked. Legitimising their contribution to the health workforce could alleviate workforce shortages and provide opportunities for redesigned job roles and new multidisciplinary teams. Priorities for better utilisation of the CAM workforce include establishing a guaranteed minimum education standard for more CAM occupation groups through national registration, providing interprofessional education that includes CAM practitioners, developing courses to upgrade CAM practitioners' professional skills in areas of indentified need, and increasing support for CAM research. Summary Marginalisation of the CAM workforce has disadvantaged those qualified and competent CAM practitioners who practise evidence-informed medicine on the basis of many years of university training. Legitimising and expanding the important contribution of CAM practitioners could alleviate projected health workforce shortages

  1. Web-based CAD and CAM for optomechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Min; Zhou, Hai-Guang

    2001-10-01

    CAD & CAM technologies are being used in design and manufacturing process, and are receiving increasing attention from industries and education. We have been researching to develop a new kind of software that is for web-course CAD & CAM. It can be used either in industries or in training, it is supported by IE. Firstly, we aim at CAD/CAM for optomechatronics. We have developed a kind of CAD/CAM, which is not only for mechanics but also for optics and electronic. That is a new kind of software in China. Secondly, we have developed a kind of software for web-course CAD & CAM, we introduce the basis of CAD, the commands of CAD, the programming, CAD/CAM for optomechatronics, the joint application of CAD & CAM. We introduce the functions of MasterCAM, show the whole processes of CAD/CAM/CNC by examples. Following the steps showed on the web, the trainer can not miss. CAD & CAM are widely used in many areas, development of web-course CAD & CAM is necessary for long- distance education and public education. In 1992, China raised: CAD technique, as an important part of electronic technology, is a new key technique to improve the national economic and the modernization of national defence. As so for, the education. Of CAD & CAM is mainly involved in manufacturing industry in China. But with the rapidly development of new technology, especially the development of optics and electronics, CAD & CAM will receive more attention from those areas.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Dynamic Protein Interactions during Transcription Reveals a Role for Casein Kinase II in Polymerase-associated Factor (PAF) Complex Phosphorylation and Regulation of Histone H2B Monoubiquitylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Lynn Glowczewski; Dronamraju, Raghuvar; Kerschner, Jenny L; Hunter, Gerald O; Axley, Elizabeth DeVlieger; Boyd, Asha K; Strahl, Brian D; Mosley, Amber L

    2016-06-24

    Using affinity purification MS approaches, we have identified a novel role for casein kinase II (CKII) in the modification of the polymerase associated factor complex (PAF-C). Our data indicate that the facilitates chromatin transcription complex (FACT) interacts with CKII and may facilitate PAF complex phosphorylation. Posttranslational modification analysis of affinity-isolated PAF-C shows extensive CKII phosphorylation of all five subunits of PAF-C, although CKII subunits were not detected as interacting partners. Consistent with this, recombinant CKII or FACT-associated CKII isolated from cells can phosphorylate PAF-C in vitro, whereas no intrinsic kinase activity was detected in PAF-C samples. Significantly, PAF-C purifications combined with stable isotope labeling in cells (SILAC) quantitation for PAF-C phosphorylation from wild-type and CKII temperature-sensitive strains (cka1Δ cka2-8) showed that PAF-C phosphorylation at consensus CKII sites is significantly reduced in cka1Δ cka2-8 strains. Consistent with a role of CKII in FACT and PAF-C function, we show that decreased CKII function in vivo results in decreased levels of histone H2B lysine 123 monoubiquitylation, a modification dependent on FACT and PAF-C. Taken together, our results define a coordinated role of CKII and FACT in the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription through chromatin via phosphorylation of PAF-C. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  4. Patients’ views of CAM as spiritual practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Anita; Evron, Lotte; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This paper explores Danish cancer patients’ narratives on spiritual beliefs, practices and the relationship these practices may have to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Design: Narrative inquiry was used to understand how spiritual beliefs and practices might be related...... significantly elaborated upon in narratives by four female participants to warrant more detailed consideration and analysis. Conclusion: It is suggested that for some cancer patients CAM may function, not just as a treatment for cancer related symptoms and side effects, but also as a form of spiritual practice...

  5. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Marleen; Valjakova, Emilija Bajraktarova; De Munck, Jan; Mishevska, Cece Bajraktarova; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC paper; 2. sandblasting with 30-μm Al2O3; 3. tribochemical silica coating (CoJet). Subsequent chemical surface treatments involved either no further treatment (control), HF acid etching (HF), silanization (S, or HF acid etching followed by silanization (HF+S). Two specimens with the same surface treatment were bonded together using two dual-curing luting composites: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (self-etching) or Panavia SA Cement (self-adhesive). After 1 week of water storage, the microtensile bond strength of the sectioned microspecimens was measured and the failure mode was evaluated. The bonding performance of the six CAD/CAM materials was significantly influenced by surface treatment (linear mixed models, p CAD (p = 0.0115), and Lava Ultimate (p CAD/CAM materials: Vita Mark II and IPS Empress CAD: S, HF+S; Celtra Duo: HF, HF+S; IPS e.max CAD: HF+S; Vita Enamic: HF+S, S. For Lava Ultimate, the highest bond strengths were obtained with HF, S, HF+S. Failure analysis showed a relation between bond strength and failure type: more mixed failures were observed with higher bond strengths. Mainly adhesive failures were noticed if no further surface treatment was done. The percentage of adhesive failures was higher for CAD/CAM materials with higher flexural strength (Celtra Duo, IPS e.max CAD, and Lava Ultimate). The bond strength of luting composites to novel CAD/CAM materials is influenced by surface treatment. For each luting composite, an adhesive cementation protocol can be specified in order to obtain the highest bond to the

  6. The Z CamPaign: Year Five (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, M.

    2014-12-01

    (Abstract only) Entering into the fifth year of the Z CamPaign, the author has developed a website summarizing our findings which will also act as a living catalogue of bona fide Z Cam stars, suspected Z Cams, and Z Cam impostors. In this paper we summarize the findings of the first four years of research, introduce the website and its contents to the public, and discuss the way forward into year five and beyond.

  7. Impact of future climate policy scenarios on air quality and aerosol-cloud interactions using an advanced version of CESM/CAM5: Part II. Future trend analysis and impacts of projected anthropogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotfelty, Timothy; Zhang, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Following a comprehensive evaluation of the Community Earth System Model modified at the North Carolina State University (CESM-NCSU), Part II describes the projected changes in the future state of the atmosphere under the representative concentration partway scenarios (RCP4.5 and 8.5) by 2100 for the 2050 time frame and examine the impact of climate change on future air quality under both scenarios, and the impact of projected emission changes under the RCP4.5 scenario on future climate through aerosol direct and indirect effects. Both the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 simulations predict similar changes in air quality by the 2050 period due to declining emissions under both scenarios. The largest differences occur in O3, which decreases by global mean of 1.4 ppb under RCP4.5 but increases by global mean of 2.3 ppb under RCP8.5 due to differences in methane levels, and PM10, which decreases by global mean of 1.2 μg m-3 under RCP4.5 and increases by global mean of 0.2 μg m-3 under RCP8.5 due to differences in dust and sea-salt emissions under both scenarios. Enhancements in cloud formation in the Arctic and Southern Ocean and increases of aerosol optical depth (AOD) in central Africa and South Asia dominate the change in surface radiation in both scenarios, leading to global average dimming of 1.1 W m-2 and 2.0 W m-2 in the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 scenarios, respectively. Declines in AOD, cloud formation, and cloud optical thickness from reductions of emissions of primary aerosols and aerosol precursors under RCP4.5 result in near surface warming of 0.2 °C from a global average increase of 0.7 W m-2 in surface downwelling solar radiation. This warming leads to a weakening of the Walker Circulation in the tropics, leading to significant changes in cloud and precipitation that mirror a shift in climate towards the negative phase of the El Nino Southern Oscillation.

  8. Bridging CAM practice and research: teaching CAM practitioners about research methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zick, Suzanna M; Benn, Rita

    2004-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is continuing to provide funds directed to support research in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). CAM providers typically have insufficient knowledge of scientific language or research methodology to develop rigorous proposals. Their ability to contribute meaningfully as advisors, teachers, or research partners in academic settings, is hence limited. To address this issue, we have developed and implemented a 7-week course designed to teach community-based CAM providers: (1) to understand scientific terminology, research design and grantsmanship; (2) to critically evaluate the research literature; and (3) to design pilot studies in areas of their interest. In this article, we describe the recruitment process for selecting course participants, the course design and instructional process and the evaluation results based on qualitative and quantitative methodology. We offer suggestions for developing training opportunities both at the local and national level that would increase the expertise of CAM providers in participating and seeking funded research.

  9. Influence of different surface treatments on bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kömürcüoğlu, Meltem Bektaş; Sağırkaya, Elçin; Tulga, Ayça

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of novel CAD/CAM restorative materials to resin cement by four point bending test. The CAD/CAM materials under investigation were e.max CAD, Mark II, Lava Ultimate, and Enamic. A total of 400 bar specimens (4×1.2×12 mm) (n=10) milled from the CAD/CAM blocks underwent various pretreatments (no pretreatment (C), hydrofluoric acid (A), hydrofluoric acid + universal adhesive (Scotchbond) (AS), sandblasting (Sb), and sandblasting + universal adhesive (SbS)). The bars were luted end-to-end on the prepared surfaces with a dual curing adhesive resin cement (Variolink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) on the custom-made stainless steel mold. Ten test specimens for each treatment and material combination were performed with four point bending test method. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test. The surface treatment and type of CAD/CAM restorative material showed a significant effect on the four point bending strength (FPBS) ( P CAD/CAM restorative materials was modified after treatments. The surface treatment of sandblasting or HF acid etching in combination with a universal adhesive containing MDP can be suggested for the adhesive cementation of the novel CAD/CAM restorative materials.

  10. performance characteristics of a cam turning attachment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    ABSTRACT. A modification of a cylindrical turning unit has been done to give a non- cylindrical turning attachment for production of irregular shapes, like cams on the lathe machine. To assess the performance of the attachment, cutting forces have been measured using a 'Sigma' Cutting Tool. Dynamometer. Furthermore ...

  11. DATA TRANSLATION BETWEEN PADS AND CAM350

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Romanova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of the paper is the process of data translation between computer-aided design system for electronic devices PADS VX and system for technological preparation of production of printed circuit boards CAM350 10. The object of this study is two-way translation of data in these systems. Experimental researches are applied as research methods based on repeated playback of forward and reverse data translation process between PADS and CAM350 systems. The aim is to examine the challenges of data exchange between systems and to find out the ways of their solution. The basis of the work is functionality analysis of PADS and CAM350 systems while data translation, which was carried out in the course of operating experience of these systems. The paper presents advantages and disadvantages of translation methods and their comparison. Errors arising in the process are analyzed. Possible reasons of errors origination are described. The main results are recommendations for data exchange between PADS and CAM350 systems. The proposed recommendations give the possibility to optimize the exchange of data between these systems. Practical significance of the work lies in the implementation of results at LLC «Abeo». Recommendations have been used in the development of dozens of different electronic devices. The use of these results made it possible to reduce the production run-up time, to increase data transmission correctness, thereby improving the quality of products and reduction of their cost.

  12. Faint stars and OmegaCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K; Cristiani, S; Renzini, A; Williams, RE

    2001-01-01

    OmegaCAM will be the wide-field imager on the VLT Survey Telescope. In this contribution I present applications of this instrument to the study of faint stellar populations. Two projects are highlighted: a proper motion study to uncover the galactic halo population, and a microlensing study towards

  13. CAM: A Collaborative Object Memory System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Nijholt, Antinus; Kröner, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Physical design objects such as sketches, drawings, collages, storyboards and models play an important role in supporting communication and coordination in design studios. CAM (Cooperative Artefact Memory) is a mobile-tagging based messaging system that allows designers to collaboratively store

  14. Laser surface hardening for cam shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongyun; Zhang, Hongtao; Wang, Chunshan; Yan, Shi; Lu, Boliang; Xu, Chunying; Zhang, Jibin

    1998-08-01

    The paper introduces the laser surface hardening processing with 5 KW CNC CO2 laser for Cam Shaft made of 45 steel. The results show that spiral scanning matching with adaptable technological parameters and water cooling achieve remarkable hardenability with less deformation, which satisfy the requirements demanded by manufacturer, simplify the manufacturing technology. The advantage of laser surface hardening is very remarkable.

  15. Signal transduction by HLA class II molecules in human T cells: induction of LFA-1-dependent and independent adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Yoshizumi, H; Okamoto, Y

    1992-01-01

    Crosslinking HLA-DR molecules by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation and results in a secondary elevation of free cytoplasmic calcium concentrations in activated human T cells. Binding of bacterial superantigens or moAbs to DR molecules on activated T cells...... was recently reported to induce homotypic aggregation through activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and mediated by CD11a/CD54 (LFA-1/CAM-1) adhesion molecules. Here, we report that moAbs directed against framework DR, but neither DR1, 2- and DRw52- nor DQ- and DP-specific moABs induced homotypic aggregation...... of antigen- and alloantigen-activated T cells, antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell lines, a CD8+ T-cytotoxic cell line, and T-leukemia cells (HUT78). Protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor herbimycin A partly blocked class-II-induced aggregation responses. In contrast, phorbol ester (PMA)-induced aggregation...

  16. Craniofacial arteriovenous metameric syndrome (CAMS) 3 - a transitional pattern between CAM 1 and 2 and spinal arteriovenous metameric syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, I.Y.C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong (China); Batista, L.L.; Alvarez, H.; Lasjaunias, P.L. [Service de Neuroradiologie Diagnostique et Therapeutique, Hopital de Bicetre, 94275, Le Kremlin Bicetre (France)

    2003-09-01

    We report a rare case of craniofacial arteriovenous metameric syndrome (CAMS) 3 arteriovenous malformations of the mandible, left VIII nerve and petrous bone. The patient, a 19-year-old girl, presented with profuse gingival bleeding during a dental procedure and we diagnosed CAMS 3 during a pre-embolisation angiogram. The distribution of the vascular lesions suggests that CAMS 3 is intermediate CAMS 1 and 2 and spinal arteriovenous metameric syndrome (SAMS). (orig.)

  17. Endothelial Microparticles From Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients Induce Premature Coronary Artery Endothelial Cell Aging and Thrombogenicity: Role of the Ang II/AT1 Receptor/NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Activation of MAPKs and PI3-Kinase Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Malak; Jesel, Laurence; Auger, Cyril; Amoura, Lamia; Messas, Nathan; Manin, Guillaume; Rumig, Cordula; León-González, Antonio J; Ribeiro, Thais P; Silva, Grazielle C; Abou-Merhi, Raghida; Hamade, Eva; Hecker, Markus; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Ohlmann, Patrick; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B; Toti, Florence; Morel, Olivier

    2017-01-17

    -converting enzyme in P1 ECs. Losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist, and inhibitors of either mitogen-activated protein kinases or phosphoinositide 3-kinase prevented the MP-induced endothelial senescence. These findings indicate that endothelial-derived MPs from ACS patients induce premature endothelial senescence under atheroprone low shear stress and thrombogenicity through angiotensin II-induced redox-sensitive activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt. They further suggest that targeting endothelial-derived MP shedding and their bioactivity may be a promising therapeutic strategy to limit the development of an endothelial dysfunction post-ACS. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine use of women with breast cancer : Self-help CAM attracts other women than guided CAM therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N. N.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Henselmans, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Examine stability of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) of breast cancer patients, reasons for CAM use, and sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological predictors of CAM use. Methods: CAM use was assessed after adjuvant therapy and six months later. Following the CAM

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine use of women with breast cancer: Self-help CAM attracts other women than guided CAM therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N. N.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Henselmans, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Examine stability of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) of breast cancer patients, reasons for CAM use, and sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological predictors of CAM use. Methods: CAM use was assessed after adjuvant therapy and six months later. Following the CAM

  20. Translucency of ceramic materials for CEREC CAD/CAM system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, Alessandro; Carrabba, Michele; Paravina, Rade; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To compare translucency of the ceramic materials (CEREC CAD/CAM). Fifteen ceramic materials for CEREC CAD/CAM system were evaluated: IPS e.max HT/LT/MO, ZirCAD, Empress HT/LT; VITA Mark II, VITA AL; VITA YZ, VITA In-Ceram Spinell/Alumina/Zirconia; and Sirona InCoris AL; Sirona InCoris ZI/TZI. Specimens (0.5-mm and 1.0-mm thick; n = 10 each material) were cut from commercial blocks using a water-cooled diamond saw. Contrast ratio (CR = YB /YW ) was measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance was performed followed by Dunn's multiple test for post-hoc. CR varied from 0.35 to 1.00 and from 0.48 to 1.00 for 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm thicknesses, respectively. CR increased in the following order: IPS e.max HT (most translucent-least opaque), IPS Empress HT, VITA Mark II, IPS Empress LT, IPS e.max LT, In-Ceram Spinell, IPS e.max MO, VITA YZ, InCoris TZI, IPS e.max ZirCAD, InCoris ZI, In-Ceram Alumina, VITA AL, InCoris AL, and In-Ceram Zirconia (least translucent-most opaque). The null hypothesis has been rejected because tested materials exhibited a wide range of CR. Translucency needs to be taken into account in different clinical situations, including considerations associated with thickness of restoration and/or particular layers. A wide range of translucency was identified for the ceramic materials tested. This variability has to be taken into account for the selection of the materials in different clinical situations also related to the thickness clinically required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Stain susceptibility of composite and ceramic CAD/CAM blocks versus direct resin composites with different resinous matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Amal; Ardu, Stefano; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the stain susceptibility of CAD/CAM blocks and direct composite after long term exposure to various staining agents. 40 disk-shaped samples were fabricated from each of nine materials; six CAD/CAM (Vitablocs Mark II, Paradigm MZ100, Experimental Vita Hybrid Ceramic, Vita Enamic, Experimental Kerr and Lava Ultimate) and three direct composites (Filtek Supreme, Venus Diamond and Filtek Silorane). Samples were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8) according to different staining solutions (distilled water, tea, red wine, coffee and artificial saliva). Initial L*a*b* values were assessed using a calibrated digital spectrophotometer. Specimens were immersed in staining solutions and stored in an incubator at 37 °C for 120 days. L*a*b* values were assessed again and color change (∆E) was calculated as difference between recorded L*a*b* values. ANOVA, and Duncan test were used to identify differences between groups (α = 0.05). Significant differences in ∆E values were detected between materials (p = 0.000). Among all staining solutions, the highest ∆E value was observed with red wine. The new CAD/CAM blocks (Vita Enamic, Vita Hybrid Ceramic and Lava Ultimate) showed the highest resistance to staining compared to the MZ100 composite resin blocks. Filtek Silorane, a direct composite, showed high stain resistance values compared to CAD/CAM materials and other direct composites. Ceramic and composite CAD/CAM blocks had lower staining susceptibility than methacrylate based direct composite. Staining susceptibility of the new resin based CAD/CAM materials Vita Enamic and Lava Ultimate was comparable to feldspathic ceramic blocks (Vitablocs Mark II). Filtek Silorane showed promising results that were comparable to some CAD/CAM blocks.

  2. Efficacy and safety of sequential use of everolimus in Japanese patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma after failure of first-line treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor: a multicenter phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Masafumi; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Nozawa, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Kishida, Takeshi; Kimura, Go; Tokuda, Noriaki; Hinotsu, Shiro; Shimozuma, Kojiro; Akaza, Hideyuki; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2017-06-01

    Many studies have shown the efficacy of everolimus after pretreatment with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We investigated the efficacy and safety of everolimus as a second-line treatment after the failure of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in Japanese patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. This was an open-label, multicenter, phase II trial conducted in Japan through the central registration system. A total of 57  patients were enrolled. Patients were administered 10 mg of everolimus q.d. orally. The primary efficacy endpoint was progression-free survival achieved by administration of everolimus. The median progression-free survival of patients administered everolimus was 5.03 months (95% confidence interval: 3.70-6.20). The median overall survival was not reached. The objective response rate was 9.4% (95% confidence interval: 3.1-20.7). The progression-free survival in the group of <100% relative dose intensity was 6.70 months (95% confidence interval: 4.13-11.60), and that in the group of 100% relative dose intensity was 3.77 months (hazard ratio: 2.79, 95% confidence interval: 2.77-5.63). The commonly observed adverse events and laboratory abnormalities were stomatitis (49.1%), hypertriglyceridemia (26.4%), interstitial lung disease (26.4%), anemia (22.6%) and hypercholesterolemia (22.6%). The median progression-free survival was almost similar to that recorded in the RECORD-1 study, whereas prolongation of overall survival was observed in the present study compared with the RECORD-1 study. The treatment outcomes of first-line vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and second-line everolimus treatment in Japanese patients were successfully established in the present study.

  3. Dihydrolipoic Acid Inhibits Lysosomal Rupture and NLRP3 Through Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein-1/Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II/TAK1 Pathways After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Keren; Enkhjargal, Budbazar; Xie, Zhiyi; Sun, Chengmei; Wu, Lingyun; Malaguit, Jay; Chen, Sheng; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, John H

    2018-01-01

    The NLRP3 (nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome is a crucial component of the inflammatory response in early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this study, we investigated a role of dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) in lysosomal rupture, NLRP3 activation, and determined the underlying pathway. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in male Sprague-Dawley rats. DHLA was administered intraperitoneally 1 hour after SAH. Small interfering RNA for lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 and CaMKIIα (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II α) was administered through intracerebroventricular 48 hours before SAH induction. SAH grade evaluation, short- and long-term neurological function testing, Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining experiments were performed. DHLA treatment increased the expression of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 and decreased phosphorylated CaMKIIα and NLRP3 inflammasome, thereby alleviating neurological deficits after SAH. Lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 small interfering RNA abolished the neuroprotective effects of DHLA and increased the level of phosphorylated CaMKIIα, p-TAK1 (phosphorylated transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase), p-JNK (phosphorylated c-Jun-N-terminal kinase), and NLRP3 inflammasome. CaMKIIα small interfering RNA downregulated the expression of p-TAK1, p-JNK, and NLRP3 and improved the neurobehavior after SAH. DHLA treatment improved neurofunction and alleviated inflammation through the lysosome-associated membrane protein-1/CaMKII/TAK1 pathway in early brain injury after SAH. DHLA may provide a promising treatment to alleviate early brain injury after SAH. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Introduction to Analytical Methods for Internal Combustion Engine Cam Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, J J

    2013-01-01

    Modern design methods of Automotive Cam Design require the computation of a range of parameters. This book provides a logical sequence of steps for the derivation of the relevant equations from first principles, for the more widely used cam mechanisms. Although originally derived for use in high performance engines, this work is equally applicable to the design of mass produced automotive and other internal combustion engines.   Introduction to Analytical Methods for Internal Combustion Engine Cam Mechanisms provides the equations necessary for the design of cam lift curves with an associated smooth acceleration curve. The equations are derived for the kinematics and kinetics of all the mechanisms considered, together with those for cam curvature and oil entrainment velocity. This permits the cam shape, all loads, and contact stresses to be evaluated, and the relevant tribology to be assessed. The effects of asymmetry on the manufacture of cams for finger follower and offset translating curved followers is ...

  5. Phase I/II trial evaluating the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with the HER-1/epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib for patients with recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Roy S; Johnson, David H; Mininberg, Eric; Carbone, David P; Henderson, Ted; Kim, Edward S; Blumenschein, George; Lee, Jack J; Liu, Diane D; Truong, Mylene T; Hong, Waun K; Tran, Hai; Tsao, Anne; Xie, Dong; Ramies, David A; Mass, Robert; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Eberhard, David A; Kelley, Sean K; Sandler, Alan

    2005-04-10

    Bevacizumab (Avastin; Genentech, South San Francisco, CA) is a recombinant, humanized anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody. Erlotinib HCl (Tarceva, OSI-774; OSI Pharmaceuticals, New York, NY) is a potent, reversible, highly selective and orally available HER-1/epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Preclinical data in various xenograft models produced greater growth inhibition than with either agent alone. Additionally, both agents have demonstrated benefit in patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A phase I/II study in two centers examined erlotinib and bevacizumab (A+T) in patients with nonsquamous stage IIIB/IV NSCLC with > or = one prior chemotherapy. In phase I, erlotinib 150 mg/day orally plus bevacizumab 15 mg/kg intravenously every 21 days was established as the phase II dose, although no dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Phase II assessed the efficacy and tolerability of A+T at this dose. Pharmacokinetic parameters were evaluated. ResultsForty patients were enrolled and treated in this study (34 patients at phase II dose); the median age was 59 years (range, 36 to 72 years), 21 were female, 30 had adenocarcinoma histology, nine were never-smokers, and 22 had > or = two prior regimens (three patients had > or = four prior regimens). The most common adverse events were mild to moderate rash, diarrhea, and proteinuria. Preliminary data showed no pharmacokinetic interaction between A + T. Eight patients (20.0%; 95% CI, 7.6% to 32.4%) had partial responses and 26 (65.0%; 95% CI, 50.2% to 79.8%) had stable disease as their best response. The median overall survival for the 34 patients treated at the phase II dose was 12.6 months, with progression-free survival of 6.2 months. Encouraging antitumor activity and safety of A + T support further development of this combination for patients with advanced NSCLC and other solid tumors.

  6. Evaluation of the effectiveness of training on a machine with a variable-cam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanik, Czesław; Staniszewski, Michał; Mastalerz, Andrzej; Karczewska, Magdalena; Lutosławska, Grażyna; Iwańska, Dagmara; Madej, Anna; Ostrowska, Elżbieta; Gwarek, Lucyna; Tkaczyk, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of the training of elbow flexors through the use of 2 machines, one of which was equipped with a disc plate of constant radius, the other one with a variable-cam having a radius adjustable to muscle strength. The experiment included 45 men divided into 3 equal groups: training group A (variable-cam), training group B (circle), and control group C. The training lasted for 8 weeks, 3 times a week. In order to control the effects, the values of peak torque and power of the flexor muscles of the elbow were isokinetically measured for the angular velocities of 30°/s and 60°/s. Also taken were anthropometric measurements of the arm and the creatine kinase (CK) activity in the blood plasma. As a result of the training, significant increases of biomechanical values were noted only in group A: power increased over 20%, the peak torque over 14%. After the training, significant increases of arm circumference in the relaxed position were noted in group A (17 mm), as well as in group B (11 mm). Also, some changes in CK activity were observed between Monday and Friday in a training week. On the basis of the experimental measurements, it may be ascertained that training elbow flexor muscles on a machine with a variable-cam is more efficient for increases in strength and power, as well as for some anthropometric parameters, than training on a machine with a disc plate.

  7. CAM and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Hankey

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the form of the Transcendental Meditation program CAM offers a method of eliminating deep-rooted stress, the efficacy of which has been demonstrated in several related studies. Any discussion of CAM and post-traumatic stress disorder should include a study of its application to Vietnam War Veterans in which improvements were observed on all variables, and several participants were able to return to work after several years of being unable to hold a job. The intervention has been studied for its impact on brain and autonomic nervous system function. It has been found to be highly effective against other stress-related conditions such as hypertension, and to improve brain coherence—a measure of effective brain function. It should be considered a possible ‘new and improved mode of treatment’ for PTSD, and further studies of its application made.

  8. CAM/LIFTER forces and friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbey, D.J.; Lee, J.; Patterson, D.J.

    1992-02-01

    This report details the procedures used to measure the cam/lifter forces and friction. The present effort employed a Cummins LTA-10, and focuses on measurements and dynamic modeling of the injector train. The program was sponsored by the US Department of Energy in support of advanced diesel engine technology. The injector train was instrumented to record the instantaneous roller speed, roller pin friction torque, pushrod force, injector link force and cam speed. These measurements, together with lift profiles for pushrod and injector link displacement, enabled the friction work loss in the injector train to be determined. Other significant design criteria such as camshaft roller follower slippage and maximum loads on components were also determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the dynamic model, with tests run as required for correlation.

  9. CAD/CAM-assisted breast reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melchels, Ferry; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, 60 Musk Avenue, Kelvin Grove, QLD 4059 (Australia); Wiggenhauser, Paul Severin; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten [Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Warne, David; Barry, Mark [High Performance Computing and Research Support, Queensland University of Technology, Gardens Point Road, Brisbane, QLD 4000 (Australia); Ong, Fook Rhu; Chong, Woon Shin, E-mail: Dietmar.Hutmacher@qut.edu.au, E-mail: jtschantz@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Singapore Polytechnic, 500 Dover Road, 139651 Singapore (Singapore)

    2011-09-15

    The application of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques in the clinic is growing slowly but steadily. The ability to build patient-specific models based on medical imaging data offers major potential. In this work we report on the feasibility of employing laser scanning with CAD/CAM techniques to aid in breast reconstruction. A patient was imaged with laser scanning, an economical and facile method for creating an accurate digital representation of the breasts and surrounding tissues. The obtained model was used to fabricate a customized mould that was employed as an intra-operative aid for the surgeon performing autologous tissue reconstruction of the breast removed due to cancer. Furthermore, a solid breast model was derived from the imaged data and digitally processed for the fabrication of customized scaffolds for breast tissue engineering. To this end, a novel generic algorithm for creating porosity within a solid model was developed, using a finite element model as intermediate.

  10. Quality of Life in CAM and Non-CAM Users among Breast Cancer Patients during Chemotherapy in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Lei Chui

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use has become increasingly popular among patients with cancer. The purposes of this study were to compare the QOL in CAM users and non-CAM users and to determine whether CAM use influences QOL among breast cancer patients during chemotherapy.A cross-sectional survey was conducted at two outpatient chemotherapy centers. A total of 546 patients completed the questionnaires on CAM use. QOL was evaluated based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC core quality of life (QLQ-C30 and breast cancer-specific quality of life (QLQ-BR23 questionnaires.A total of 70.7% of patients were identified as CAM users. There was no significant difference in global health status scores and in all five subscales of the QLQ C30 functional scales between CAM users and non-CAM users. On the QLQ-C30 symptom scales, CAM users (44.96±3.89 had significantly (p = 0.01 higher mean scores for financial difficulties than non-CAM users (36.29±4.81. On the QLQ-BR23 functional scales, CAM users reported significantly higher mean scores for sexual enjoyment (6.01±12.84 vs. 4.64±12.76, p = 0.04 than non-CAM users. On the QLQ-BR23 symptom scales, CAM users reported higher systemic therapy side effects (41.34±2.01 vs. 37.22±2.48, p = 0.04 and breast symptoms (15.76±2.13 vs. 11.08±2.62, p = 0.02 than non-CAM users. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that the use of CAM modality was not significantly associated with higher global health status scores (p = 0.71.While the findings indicated that there was no significant difference between users and non-users of CAM in terms of QOL, CAM may be used by health professionals as a surrogate to monitor patients with higher systemic therapy side effects and breast symptoms. Furthermore, given that CAM users reported higher financial burdens (which may have contributed to increased distress, patients should be encouraged to discuss the potential

  11. Initiation of the 3':5'-AMP-induced protein kinase A Iα regulatory subunit conformational transition. Part II. Inhibition by Rp-3':5'-AMPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogacheva, O N; Shchegolev, B F; Stefanov, V E; Savvateeva-Popova, E V

    2012-05-01

    Protein-ligand docking and ab initio calculations have shown that the 3':5'-AMP phosphorothioate analog (Rp-3':5'-AMPS) blocks the A326 amide group displacement typical of transition from the H- to B-conformation within the B-domain of protein kinase A Iα R-subunit. This behavior of Rp-3':5'-AMPS leads to the inhibition of initial stages of hydrophobic relay operation. In accordance with the proposed hypothesis, Rp-3':5'-AMPS similarly to 3':5'-AMP forms a hydrogen bond with the amide group of A326; however, the properties of this bond together with the position of the sulfur atom prevent the movement of A326. Finally, the Rp-3':5'-AMPS-bound domain appears to be locked in the H-conformation, which is in agreement with the X-ray data.

  12. Camões e a cosmogonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J. M.

    2003-08-01

    Os Lusíadas, escrito por Luis de Camões em 1572, é um poema épico renascentista e a visão Cosmogônica do autor é apresentada, principalmente, no último canto do poema, quando Tétis mostra ao Gama a Máquina do Mundo. A Cosmogonia de Camões neste poema reflete uma visão de uma época de transição, que ainda não incorporou os elementos da revolução Copernicana. É uma visão Grego- Ptolomaica e também medieval. O poeta guia-se pela tradução e notas feita por Pedro Nunes, inventor do Nonio, do Tratado da Esfera "De Sphaera" do Astrônomo Inglês John Holywood, mais conhecido pelo nome latinizado de Johannes Sacrobosco. Outra provável fonte de Camões, de acordo com Luciano Antonio Pereira da Silva em Astronomia de os Lusíadas, é o "Theoricae novae Planetarum" (1460) do astrólogo Alemão Jorge Purbáquio (1423 - 1461). A Astronomia de Os Lusíadas representa a ciência do tempo de Camões. Camões nunca emprega a palavra constelação e seu catálogo é bastante completo. A Máquina do Mundo tem a Terra no centro. Em redor, em círculos concêntricos, a lua (Diana), Mercúrio, Vênus, o Sol (Febo), Marte, Júpiter e Saturno. Envolvendo estes astros tem o firmamento seguido pelo "Céu Áqueo" ou cristalino, depois o 1o Móbil, esfera que arrasta todas as outras consigo. Este trabalho, multidisciplinar, serve tanto para ensinar aos alunos da Física como das Ciências Humanas, a concepção de mundo do renascimento de uma forma belamente poética em versos decassílabos Este trabalho também ajuda na apreciação do maior clássico da língua portuguesa e mostra como as Ciências e as artes, em geral, estão correlacionadas e refletem a visão de mundo da época em que foi produzida.

  13. JunoCam's Imaging of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Glenn; Hansen, Candice; Momary, Thomas; Caplinger, Michael; Ravine, Michael; Atreya, Sushil; Ingersoll, Andrew; Bolton, Scott; Rogers, John; Eichstaedt, Gerald

    2017-04-01

    Juno's visible imager, JunoCam, is a wide-angle camera (58° field of view) with 4 color filters: red, green and blue (RGB) and methane at 889 nm, designed for optimal imaging of Jupiter's poles. Juno's elliptical polar orbit offers unique views of Jupiter's polar regions with spatial scales as good as 50 km/pixel. At closest approach ("perijove") the images have spatial scale down to ˜3 km/pixel. As a push-frame imager on a rotating spacecraft, JunoCam uses time-delayed integration to take advantage of the spacecraft spin to extend integration time to increase signal. Images of Jupiter's poles reveal a largely uncharted region of Jupiter, as nearly all earlier spacecraft except Pioneer 11 have orbited or flown by close to the equatorial plane. Poleward of 64-68° planetocentric latitude, Jupiter's familiar east-west banded structure breaks down. Several types of discrete features appear on a darker, bluish-cast background. Clusters of circular cyclonic spirals are found immediately around the north and south poles. Oval-shaped features are also present, ranging in size down to JunoCam's resolution limits. The largest and brightest features usually have chaotic shapes; animations over ˜1 hour can reveal cyclonic motion in them. Narrow linear features traverse tens of degrees of longitude and are not confined in latitude. JunoCam also detected optically thin clouds or hazes that are illuminated beyond the nightside ˜1-bar terminator; one of these detected at Perijove lay some 3 scale heights above the main cloud deck. Tests have been made to detect the aurora and lightning. Most close-up images of Jupiter have been acquired at lower latitudes within 2 hours of closest approach. These images aid in understanding the data collected by other instruments on Juno that probe deeper in the atmosphere. When Jupiter was too close to the sun for ground-based observers to collect data between perijoves 1 and 2, JunoCam took a sequence of routine images to monitor large

  14. Grinding damage assessment for CAD-CAM restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Philippe; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Anselm Wiskott, H W; Durual, Stéphane; Scherrer, Susanne S

    2017-03-01

    To assess surface/subsurface damage after grinding with diamond discs on five CAD-CAM restorative materials and to estimate potential losses in strength based on crack size measurements of the generated damage. The materials tested were: Lithium disilicate (LIT) glass-ceramic (e.max CAD), leucite glass-ceramic (LEU) (Empress CAD), feldspar ceramic (VM2) (Vita Mark II), feldspar ceramic-resin infiltrated (EN) (Enamic) and a composite reinforced with nano ceramics (LU) (Lava Ultimate). Specimens were cut from CAD-CAM blocs and pair-wise mirror polished for the bonded interface technique. Top surfaces were ground with diamond discs of respectively 75, 54 and 18μm. Chip damage was measured on the bonded interface using SEM. Fracture mechanics relationships were used to estimate fracture stresses based on average and maximum chip depths assuming these to represent strength limiting flaws subjected to tension and to calculate potential losses in strength compared to manufacturer's data. Grinding with a 75μm diamond disc induced on a bonded interface critical chips averaging 100μm with a potential strength loss estimated between 33% and 54% for all three glass-ceramics (LIT, LEU, VM2). The softer materials EN and LU were little damage susceptible with chips averaging respectively 26μm and 17μm with no loss in strength. Grinding with 18μm diamond discs was still quite detrimental for LIT with average chip sizes of 43μm and a potential strength loss of 42%. It is essential to understand that when grinding glass-ceramics or feldspar ceramics with diamond discs surface and subsurface damage are induced which have the potential of lowering the strength of the ceramic. Careful polishing steps should be carried out after grinding especially when dealing with glass-ceramics. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fit of CAD/CAM implant frameworks: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abduo, Jaafar

    2014-12-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) is a strongly emerging prosthesis fabrication method for implant dentistry. Currently, CAD/CAM allows the construction of implant frameworks from different materials. This review evaluates the literature pertaining to the precision fit of fixed implant frameworks fabricated by CAD/CAM. Following a comprehensive electronic search through PubMed (MEDLINE), 14 relevant articles were identified. The results indicate that the precision fit of CAD/CAM frameworks exceeded the fit of the 1-piece cast frameworks and laser-welded frameworks. A similar fit was observed for CAD/CAM frameworks and bonding of the framework body to prefabricated cylinders. The influence of CAD/CAM materials on the fit of a framework is minimal.

  16. Processing of a phosphoglycerate kinase reporter mRNA in Trypanosoma brucei is not coupled to transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mhairi; Haile, Simon; Jha, Bhaskar Anand; Cristodero, Marina; Li, Chi-Ho; Clayton, Christine

    2010-08-01

    Capping of mRNAs is strictly coupled to RNA polymerase II transcription and there is evidence, mainly from metazoans, that other steps in pre-mRNA processing show a similar linkage. In trypanosomes, however, the mRNA cap is supplied by a trans spliced leader sequence. Thus pre-mRNAs transcribed by RNA Polymerase I are capped by trans splicing, and translation-competent transgenic mRNAs can be produced by RNA Polymerase I and T7 RNA polymerase so long as the primary transcript has a splice acceptor signal. We quantified the efficiency of processing of trypanosome pre-mRNAs produced from a plasmid integrated either at the tubulin locus, or in an rRNA spacer, and transcribed by RNA polymerase II, RNA polymerase I or T7 RNA polymerase. The processing efficiencies were similar for primary transcripts from the tubulin locus, produced by RNA polymerase II, and for RNA from an rRNA spacer, transcribed by RNA polymerase I. Primary transcripts produced by T7 RNA polymerase from the tubulin locus were processed almost as well. There was therefore no evidence for recruitment of the 3'-splicing apparatus by the RNA polymerase. Abundant transcripts transcribed from the rRNA locus by T7 RNA polymerase were somewhat less efficiently processed.

  17. Development of a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pharmacy and therapeutics (P&T) subcommittee and CAM guide for providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jeffrey D; Cannon, H Eric; Lewis, Tamara; Shane-McWhorter, Laura

    2005-04-01

    The objective was 2-fold: (1) to evaluate the feasibility and value of developing a Pharmacy and Therapeutics (P&T) subcommittee aimed at scientifically evaluating complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products for an integrated managed care organization (IMCO) and (2) to assess provider acceptance and usefulness of a CAM guide. Three factors drove the decision to form a CAM P&T subcommittee to evaluate current commonly used CAM products: (1) physicians, pharmacists, and dieticians expressed a desire for an easy-to-use, scientifically based mechanism for evaluating the ever-increasing number of CAM products; (2) Intermountain Health Care Health Plans (Health Plans), the insurance division of this IMCO, offers access to certain CAM products to its members at a discounted price in an effort to remain competitive with other IMCOs; and (3) this IMCO owns and operates more than a dozen community pharmacies that sell CAM products. Some IMCO clinicians believed an efficacy and safety review of the products offered through the organization was warranted. Subcommittee members included clinical pharmacists (IMCO and university), pharmacy directors, a community pharmacist, practicing physicians (from the drug P&T committee), a medical director, dieticians and nutritionists, and a representative from the Health Plans sales department. The primary outcome was the development of a CAM guide listing recommendations for use of CAM products. Outcome measures included survey results (survey sent with guide to physicians and (pharmacists) regarding acceptance and usefulness of the guide. The CAM P&T subcommittee met monthly to evaluate current commonly used CAM products. A CAM guide was developed in paperback and electronic versions. The electronic version was downloadable to handheld devices. Thousands of CAM guides were disseminated to IMCO-employed physicians, network pharmacies, dieticians, and nutritionists affiliated with this managed care organization. A survey that

  18. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca(2+) mobilization and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi; Cho, Du-Hyong; Park, Young Mi; Kang, Duk-Hee; Jo, Inho

    2013-07-12

    Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser(1179)) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation. This study suggests that FIR radiation increases NO production via increasing CaMKII-mediated eNOS-Ser(1179) phosphorylation but TRPV channels may not be involved in this pathway. Our results may provide the molecular mechanism by which FIR radiation improves endothelial function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Novel Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expressed in actively growing mycelia of the basidiomycetous mushroom Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Keisuke; Yamada, Yusuke; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Akira; Asada, Yasuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2009-01-01

    We isolated cDNA clones for novel protein kinases by expression screening of a cDNA library from the basidiomycetous mushroom Coprinus cinereus. One of the isolated clones was found to encode a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein consisting of 488 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 53,906, which we designated CoPK12. The amino acid sequence of the catalytic domain of CoPK12 showed 46% identity with those of rat Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) I and CaMKIV. However, a striking difference between these kinases is that the critical Thr residue in the activating phosphorylation site of CaMKI/IV is replaced by a Glu residue at the identical position in CoPK12. As predicted from its primary sequence, CoPK12 was found to behave like an activated form of CaMKI phosphorylated by an upstream CaMK kinase, indicating that CoPK12 is a unique CaMK with different properties from those of the well-characterized CaMKI, II, and IV. CoPK12 was abundantly expressed in actively growing mycelia and phosphorylated various proteins, including endogenous substrates, in the presence of Ca2+/CaM. Treatment of mycelia of C. cinereus with KN-93, which was found to inhibit CoPK12, resulted in a significant reduction in growth rate of mycelia. These results suggest that CoPK12 is a new type of multifunctional CaMK expressed in C. cinereus, and that it may play an important role in the mycelial growth.

  20. JunoCam's Images of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Ravine, M. A.; Caplinger, M. A.; Orton, G. S.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Jensen, E.; Lipkaman, L.; Krysak, D.; Zimdar, R.; Bolton, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    JunoCam is a visible imager on the Juno spacecraft in orbit around Jupiter. It is a wide angle camera (58 deg field of view) with 4 color filters: red, green and blue (RGB) and methane at 889 nm, designed for optimal imaging of Jupiter's poles. Juno's elliptical polar orbit will offer unique views of Jupiter's polar regions with a spatial scale of 50 km/pixel. At closest approach the images will have a spatial scale of 3 km/pixel. As a push-frame imager on a rotating spacecraft, JunoCam uses time-delayed integration to take advantage of the spacecraft spin to extend integration time to increase signal. Images of Jupiter's poles reveal a largely uncharted region of Jupiter, as nearly all earlier spacecraft have orbited or flown by in the equatorial plane. Most of the images of Jupiter will be acquired in the +/-2 hours surrounding closest approach. The polar vortex, polar cloud morphology, and winds will be investigated. RGB color images of the aurora will be acquired if detectable. Stereo images and images taken with the methane filter will allow us to estimate cloud-top heights. Images of the cloud-tops will aid in understanding the data collected by other instruments on Juno that probe deeper in the atmosphere. During the two months that Jupiter is too close to the sun for ground-based observers to collect data, JunoCam will take images routinely to monitor large-scale features. Occasional, opportunistic images of the Galilean moons will be acquired.

  1. *Abstracts - 7th IN-CAM Research Symposium, Evaluating CAM Practices: Effectiveness, Integration, Economics & Safety - November 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Heather; Verhoef, Marja J

    2012-10-23

    Abstract The following are abstracts of oral and poster presentations given at the 7th IN-CAM Research Symposium - Evaluating CAM Practices: Effectiveness, Integration, Economics & Safety, and the 4th HomeoNet Research Forum, a pre-Symposium event. The IN-CAM Research Symposium was held November 2 to 4, 2012 at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. For more information, please visit: www.incamresearch.ca.

  2. CART peptide in the nucleus accumbens shell inhibits cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization to transient overexpression of α-Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Lixia; Meng, Qing; Sun, Xi; Lu, Xiangtong; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Qinghua; Yang, Jianhua; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hu, Zhen Zhen

    2018-01-04

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide is a widely distributed neurotransmitter that attenuates cocaine-induced locomotor activity when injected into the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Our previous work first confirmed that the inhibitory mechanism of the CART peptide on cocaine-induced locomotor activity is related to a reduction in cocaine-enhanced phosphorylated Ca2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinaseIIα (pCaMKIIα) and the enhancement of cocaine-induced D3R function. The present study investigated whether CART peptide inhibited cocaine-induced locomotor activity via inhibition of interactions between pCaMKIIα and the D3 dopamine receptor (D3R). We demonstrated that lentivirus-mediated gene transfer transiently increased pCaMKIIα expression, which peaked at 10 days after microinjection into the rat NAc shell, and induced a significant increase in Ca2+ influx along with greater behavioral sensitivity in the open field test after intraperitoneal injections of cocaine (15 mg/kg). However, western blot analysis and coimmunoprecipitation demonstrated that CART peptide treatment in lentivirus-transfected CaMKIIα-overexpressing NAc rat tissues or cells prior to cocaine administration inhibited the cocaine-induced Ca2+ influx and attenuated the cocaine-increased pCaMKIIα expression in lentivirus-transfected CaMKIIα-overexpressing cells. CART peptide decreased the cocaine-enhanced phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) expression via inhibition of the pCaMKIIα-D3R interaction, which may account for the prolonged locomotor sensitization induced by repeated cocaine treatment in lentivirus-transfected CaMKIIα-overexpressing cells. These results provide strong evidence for the inhibitory modulation of CART peptide in cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of exogenously applied hydrogen peroxide on antioxidant and osmoprotectant profiles and the C3-CAM shift in the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surówka, Ewa; Dziurka, Michał; Kocurek, Maciej; Goraj, Sylwia; Rapacz, Marcin; Miszalski, Zbigniew

    2016-08-01

    Exogenously applied H2O2 (50, 100 and 200mM) to Mesembryanthemum crystallinum root medium induced a transition from C3 to Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM), as evaluated by diurnal malate (Δmal) fluctuations. A very high concentration of H2O2 (400mM) reduced Δmal below the value measured in control plants. An increase of malate content during the night in 400mM H2O2-treated plants might suggest that malate decarboxylation is crucial for CAM functioning. We conclude that malate plays a dual role: i) a protective and signaling function before CAM expression, and ii) a storage form of CO2 in plants performing CAM. A slight stimulation of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry and net photosynthesis observed during the C3-CAM shift indicated that neither photoinhibition nor reduction of the photosynthetic rate were prerequisites for CAM. Moreover, CAM induction corresponded to a decrease of catalase activity. In CAM-performing plants, α-tocopherol, polyamines (putrescine and spermidine) and proline showed daily alterations and the content of α-tocopherol and polyamines was lower at the end of the day. In contrast, the proline concentration correlated with the applied H2O2 concentration and was higher at the end of the day in treated plants. The dynamic changes of antioxidant and osmolyte levels suggest their active role in preventing oxidative damage, stress acclimation mechanisms and involvement in metabolic regulation and/or signal transduction cascades. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. A conversation with Lucien Le Cam

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Grace L.

    1999-01-01

    Lucien Le Cam is currently Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He was born on November 18, 1924, in Croze, Creuse, France. He received a Licence es Sciences from the University of Paris in 1945, and a Ph.D. in Statistics from the University of California at Berkeley in 1952. He has been on the faculty of the Statistics Department at Berkeley since 1952 except for a year in Montreal, Canada, as the Director of the Centre...

  5. Inhibition of endogenous heat shock protein 70 attenuates inducible nitric oxide synthase induction via disruption of heat shock protein 70/Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1-Ca(2+) -calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1-nuclear factor-κB signals in BV-2 microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Lu, Xu; Wang, Jia; Tong, Lijuan; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) critically contributes to inflammation and host defense. The inhibition of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) prevents iNOS induction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. However, the role and mechanism of endogenous Hsp70 in iNOS induction in microglia remains unclear. This study addresses this issue in BV-2 microglia, showing that Hsp70 inhibition or knockdown prevents LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and nitric oxide production. Real-time PCR experiments showed that LPS-induced iNOS mRNA transcription was blocked by Hsp70 inhibition. Further studies revealed that the inhibition of Hsp70 attenuated LPS-stimulated nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB as well as the degradation of inhibitor of κB (IκB)-α and phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). This prevention effect of Hsp70 inhibition on IKKβ-NF-κB activation was found to be dependent on the Ca(2+) /calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)/transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) signals based on the following observations: 1) chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) or inhibition of CaMKII reduced LPS-induced increases in TAK1 phosphorylation and 2) Hsp70 inhibition reduced LPS-induced increases in CaMKII/TAK1 phosphorylation, intracellular pH value, [Ca(2+) ]i , and CaMKII/TAK1 association. Mechanistic studies showed that Hsp70 inhibition disrupted the association between Hsp70 and Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), which is an important exchanger responsible for Ca(2+) influx in LPS-stimulated cells. These studies demonstrate that the inhibition of endogenous Hsp70 attenuates the induction of iNOS, which likely occurs through the disruption of NHE1/Hsp70-Ca(2+) -CaMKII/TAK1-NF-κB signals in BV-2 microglia, providing further insight into the functions of Hsp70 in the CNS. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Development and validation of the CAM Health Belief Questionnaire (CHBQ and CAM use and attitudes amongst medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boker John

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The need for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM and holistic approaches in allopathic medical school curricula has been well articulated. Despite increased CAM instruction, feasible and validated instruments for measuring learner outcomes in this content area do not widely exist. In addition, baseline attitudes or beliefs of medical students towards CAM, and the factors that may have formed them, including use of CAM itself, remain unreported. Methods A 10-item measure (CHBQ – CAM Health Belief Questionnaire was constructed and administered to three successive classes of medical students simultaneously with the previously validated 29-item Integrative Medicine Attitude Questionnaire (IMAQ. Both measures were imbedded in a baseline needs assessment questionnaire. Demographic and other data were collected on students' use of CAM modalities and their awareness and use of primary CAM information resources. Analysis of CHBQ items was performed and its reliability and criterion-related validity were established. Results Response rate was 96.5% (272 of 282 students studied. The shorter CHBQ compared favorably with the longer IMAQ in internal consistency reliability. Cronbach's coefficient alpha was 0.75 and 0.83 for the CHBQ and IMAQ respectively. Students showed positive attitudes/beliefs towards CAM and high levels of self-reported CAM use. The majority (73.5% of students reported using at least one CAM modality, and 54% reported using at least two modalities. Eighty-one percent use the internet as a primary source of information for CAM. Conclusions The CHBQ is a practical, valid and reliable instrument for measuring medical student attitudes/beliefs and has potential utility for measuring the impact of CAM instruction. Medical students showed a high self-reported rate of CAM use and positive attitudes towards CAM. Short, didactic exposure to CAM instruction in the first year of medical school did not additionally

  7. Rho-kinase inhibitors from adlay seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Yhiya; Zhu, Qinchang; Tran, Hai-Bang; Afifi, Mohamed S; Halim, Ahmed F; Ashour, Ahmed; Fujimoto, Ryoji; Goto, Takahiro; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2017-07-19

    Rho-kinase enzymes are one of the most important targets recently identified in our bodies. Several lines of evidence indicate that these enzymes are involved in many diseases and cellular disorders. ROCK inhibitors may have clinical applications for cancer, hypertension, glaucoma, etc. Our study aims to identify the possible involvement of Rho-kinase inhibition to the multiple biological activities of adlay seeds and provide a rationale for their folkloric medicines. Hence, we evaluated Rho-kinase I and II inhibitory activity of the ethanol extract and 28 compounds derived from the seeds. A molecular docking assay was designed to estimate the binding affinity of the tested compounds with the target enzymes. The results of our study suggest a possible involvement of Rho-kinase inhibition to the multiple biological activities of the seeds. Furthermore, the results obtained with the tested compounds revealed some interesting skeletons as a scaffold for design and development of natural Rho-kinase inhibitors.

  8. Characterization of the human Activin-A receptor type II-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1 promoter and its regulation by Sp1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botella Luisa M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1 is a Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β receptor type I, mainly expressed in endothelial cells that plays a pivotal role in vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. Mutations in the ALK1 gene (ACVRL1 give rise to Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia, a dominant autosomal vascular dysplasia caused by a haploinsufficiency mechanism. In spite of its patho-physiological relevance, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of ACVRL1. Here, we have studied the different origins of ACVRL1 transcription, we have analyzed in silico its 5'-proximal promoter sequence and we have characterized the role of Sp1 in the transcriptional regulation of ACVRL1. Results We have performed a 5'Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5'RACE of ACVRL1 transcripts, finding two new transcriptional origins, upstream of the one previously described, that give rise to a new exon undiscovered to date. The 5'-proximal promoter region of ACVRL1 (-1,035/+210 was analyzed in silico, finding that it lacks TATA/CAAT boxes, but contains a remarkably high number of GC-rich Sp1 consensus sites. In cells lacking Sp1, ACVRL1 promoter reporters did not present any significant transcriptional activity, whereas increasing concentrations of Sp1 triggered a dose-dependent stimulation of its transcription. Moreover, silencing Sp1 in HEK293T cells resulted in a marked decrease of ACVRL1 transcriptional activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated multiple Sp1 binding sites along the proximal promoter region of ACVRL1 in endothelial cells. Furthermore, demethylation of CpG islands, led to an increase in ACVRL1 transcription, whereas in vitro hypermethylation resulted in the abolishment of Sp1-dependent transcriptional activation of ACVRL1. Conclusions Our results describe two new transcriptional start sites in ACVRL1 gene, and indicate that Sp1 is a key regulator of ACVRL1 transcription, providing new insights into

  9. Topographical expression of class IA and class II phosphoinositide 3-kinase enzymes in normal human tissues is consistent with a role in differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamp Gordon

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth factor, cytokine and chemokine-induced activation of PI3K enzymes constitutes the start of a complex signalling cascade, which ultimately mediates cellular activities such as proliferation, differentiation, chemotaxis, survival, trafficking, and glucose homeostasis. The PI3K enzyme family is divided into 3 classes; class I (subdivided into IA and IB, class II (PI3K-C2α, PI3K-C2β and PI3K-C2γ and class III PI3K. Expression of these enzymes in human tissue has not been clearly defined. Methods In this study, we analysed the immunohistochemical topographical expression profile of class IA (anti-p85 adaptor and class II PI3K (PI3K-C2α and PI3K-C2β enzymes in 104 formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded normal adult human (age 33–71 years, median 44 years tissue specimens including those from the gastrointestinal, genitourinary, hepatobiliary, endocrine, integument and lymphoid systems. Antibody specificity was verified by Western blotting of cell lysates and peptide blocking studies. Immunohistochemistry intensity was scored from undetectable to strong. Results PI3K enzymes were expressed in selected cell populations of epithelial or mesenchymal origin. Columnar epithelium and transitional epithelia were reactive but mucous secreting and stratified squamous epithelia were not. Mesenchymal elements (smooth muscle and endothelial cells and glomerular epithelium were only expressed PI3K-C2α while ganglion cells expressed p85 and PI3K-C2β. All three enzymes were detected in macrophages, which served as an internal positive control. None of the three PI3K isozymes was detected in the stem cell/progenitor compartments or in B lymphocyte aggregates. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that PI3K enzyme distribution is not ubiquitous but expressed selectively in fully differentiated, non-proliferating cells. Identification of the normal in vivo expression pattern of class IA and class II PI3K paves the way for further

  10. Microtensile bond strength of cad-cam and pressed-ceramic inlays to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, A Nilgün; Inan, Ozgür; Inan, Erkan; Oztürk, Bora

    2007-04-01

    CAD-CAM system is popular because of high esthetic and short fabrication time. But, there is limited information available about the microtensile bonding of luting cements to CAD-CAM inlays and to dentin. The aim of this study was to examine the bond strength of CAD-CAM (Cerec 3) and pressed-ceramic (IPS Empress 2) inlays to dentin surface by microtensile testing using two luting cements. Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were made in forty extracted molar teeth. An occlusal reduction of 2 mm was made; the bucco-lingual width of the proximal boxes was 4 mm, the occlusal width 3 mm and the depth of the pulpal and axial walls 2 mm. The proximal boxes were extended 1 mm below the cemento-enamel junction. Teeth were randomly assigned to 2 groups to evaluate the bonding of 2 ceramic systems, Cerec 3 (Group I) and IPS Empress 2 (Group II), to dentin. Each of the 2 groups were further divided into 2 luting cement groups, Panavia F (Group A) and Variolink II (Group B). After cementation, the teeth were sectioned into two 1.2x1.2 mm wide 'I' shape sections. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile testing at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used to evaluate the results. The mean microtensile bond strengths of Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2 bonding to dentin with luting agents in MPa were Panavia F (13.98+/-3.44), Variolink II (14.19+/-3.12) and Panavia F (15.12+/-3.15), Variolink II (15.45+/-3.08) respectively. No significant differences were found among the 2 ceramic systems (P>.05) and 2 luting cements with regard to dentin bond strengths (P>.05). There was no difference found between the dentin bond strength of the Cerec 3 and IPS Empress 2 inlays cemented with two luting cements.

  11. The Secondary Standards Programme for OmegaCAM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes Kleijn, G.; Vermeij, R.; Valentijn, E.; Kuijken, K.; Sterken, C.

    2007-01-01

    The OmegaCAM wide-field imager will start operations at the ESO VLT Survey Telescope at Paranal in 2007. The photometric calibration of OmegaCAM data depends on standard-star measurements that cover the complete 1°×1° FOV. A catalog fullfilling this requirement for 8 Landolt equatorial fields,

  12. Knowledge and training needs among Danish nurses about CAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Background: The increased use of CAM among the Danish population is well documented as are patient’s requests to discuss CAM with a healthcare professional. It is suggested that among different groups of healthcare professionals nurses are the most “open minded” about CAM. This makes it important...... to explore nurses’ knowledge about CAM and their needs for training. Methods: Similar to international investigations a Danish “CAM-knowledge” questionnaire was developed that included multiple choice, yes/no and 5 points scale answers. Validity was established through initial pilot testing. Contacts...... to a randomized sample of 2500 nurses were established through the Danish Nurses Foundation. The questionnaires were mailed by post with the possibility of anonymous return. The data material was analyzed using non-parametic methods. Results: The response rate was 67 % and 1458 completed questionnaires were...

  13. Cam Drive Step Mechanism of a Quadruped Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bionic quadruped robots received considerable worldwide research attention. For a quadruped robot walking with steady paces on a flat terrain, using a cam drive control mechanism instead of servomotors provides theoretical and practical benefits as it reduces the system weight, cost, and control complexities; thus it may be more cost beneficial for some recreational or household applications. This study explores the robot step mechanism including the leg and cam drive control systems based on studying the bone structure and the kinematic step sequences of dog. The design requirements for the cam drive robot legs have been raised, and the mechanical principles of the leg operating mechanism as well as the control parameters have been analyzed. A cam drive control system was constructed using three cams to control each leg. Finally, a four-leg demo robot was manufactured for experiments and it showed stable walking patterns on a flat floor.

  14. Treatment Preferences for CAM in Children with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls (mean age = 14.5 years ± 2.4; range = 8–18 years presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between CAM treatment preferences and patient's sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their self-reported level of functioning. Over 60% of patients elected to try at least one CAM approach for pain. The most popular CAM therapies were biofeedback, yoga and hypnosis; the least popular were art therapy and energy healing, with craniosacral, acupuncture and massage being intermediate. Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80% were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy, pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

  15. A phase I/II study of the Janus kinase (JAK)1 and 2 inhibitor ruxolitinib in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, Naveen; Kantarjian, Hagop; Kadia, Tapan; Cortes, Jorge; Borthakur, Gautam; Newberry, Kate; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Ravandi, Farhad; Jabbour, Elias; Dellasala, Sara; Pierce, Sherry; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-03-01

    Ruxolitinib is a potent and specific JAK1/JAK2 inhibitor recently approved for the treatment of myelofibrosis. We conducted a single-center phase I/II clinical study testing 3 dose levels (50 mg b.i.d. [n = 4], 100 mg b.i.d. [n = 5], and 200 mg b.i.d. [n = 18]). We enrolled 27 patients older than 14 years with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (n = 26) or acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 1). The median age was 66 (range, 25-88) years. Thirteen patients were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicities. The most common Grade 3 or 4 nonhematologic event was infection (n = 26 events; most frequently pneumonia; 15 of 26; 58%). One patient with multiple relapses after 7 lines of therapy had a CRp at a ruxolitinib dose of 200 mg b.i.d. In this cohort of heavily pretreated patients with relapsed or refractory acute leukemias, ruxolitinib was overall reasonably well tolerated, with 1 patient achieving CRp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex differences in pain-related behavior and expression of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in dorsal root ganglia of rats with diabetes type 1 and type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferhatovic, Lejla; Banozic, Adriana; Kostic, Sandra; Sapunar, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2013-06-01

    Sex differences in pain-related behavior and expression of calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in dorsal root ganglia were studied in rat models of Diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) and type 2 (DM2). DM1 was induced with 55mg/kg streptozotocin, and DM2 with a combination of high-fat diet and 35mg/kg of streptozotocin. Pain-related behavior was analyzed using thermal and mechanical stimuli. The expression of CaMKII was analyzed with immunofluorescence. Sexual dimorphism in glycemia, and expression of CaMKII was observed in the rat model of DM1, but not in DM2 animals. Increased expression of total CaMKII (tCaMKII) in small-diameter dorsal root ganglia neurons, which are associated with nociception, was found only in male DM1 rats. None of the animals showed increased expression of the phosphorylated alpha CaMKII isoform in small-diameter neurons. The expression of gamma and delta isoforms of CaMKII remained unchanged in all analyzed animal groups. Different patterns of glycemia and tCaMKII expression in male and female model of DM1 were not associated with sexual dimorphism in pain-related behavior. The present findings do not suggest sex-related differences in diabetic painful peripheral neuropathy in male and female diabetic rats. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. A casein kinase II phosphorylation site in the cytoplasmic domain of the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor determines the high affinity interaction of the AP-1 Golgi assembly proteins with membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauxion, F; Le Borgne, R; Munier-Lehmann, H; Hoflack, B

    1996-01-26

    The transport of proteins from the secretory to the endocytic pathway is mediated by carrier vesicles coated with the AP-1 Golgi assembly proteins and clathrin. The mannose 6-phosphate receptors (MPHs) are two major transmembrane proteins segregated into these transport vesicles. Together with the GTPase ARF-1, these cargo proteins are essential components for the efficient translocation of the cytosolic AP-1 onto membranes of the trans-Golgi network, the first step of clathrin coat assembly, MPR-negative fibroblasts have a low capacity of recruiting AP-1 which can be restored by re-expressing the MPRs in these cells. This property was used to identify the protein motif of the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CD-MPR) cytoplasmic domain that is essential for these interactions. Thus, the affinity of AP-1 for membranes and in vivo transport of cathepsin D were measured for MPR-negative cells re-expressing various CD-MPR mutants. The results indicate that the targeting of lysosomal enzymes requires the CD-PDR cytoplasmic domain that are different from tyrosine-based endocytosis motifs. The first is a casein kinase II phosphorylation site (ESEER) that is essential for high affinity binding of AP-1 and therefore probably acts as a dominant determinant controlling CD-MPR sorting in the trans-Golgi network. The second is the adjacent di-leucine motif (HLLPM), which, by itself, is not critical for AP-1 binding, but is absolutely required for a downstream sorting event.

  18. A novel mechanism for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II targeting to L-type Ca2+channels that initiates long-range signaling to the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohan; Marks, Christian R; Perfitt, Tyler L; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Lee, Amy; Jacobson, David A; Colbran, Roger J

    2017-10-20

    Neuronal excitation can induce new mRNA transcription, a phenomenon called excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. Among several pathways implicated in E-T coupling, activation of voltage-gated L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCCs) in the plasma membrane can initiate a signaling pathway that ultimately increases nuclear CREB phosphorylation and, in most cases, expression of immediate early genes. Initiation of this long-range pathway has been shown to require recruitment of Ca 2+ -sensitive enzymes to a nanodomain in the immediate vicinity of the LTCC by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that activated Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) strongly interacts with a novel binding motif in the N-terminal domain of Ca V 1 LTCC α1 subunits that is not conserved in Ca V 2 or Ca V 3 voltage-gated Ca 2+ channel subunits. Mutations in the Ca V 1.3 α1 subunit N-terminal domain or in the CaMKII catalytic domain that largely prevent the in vitro interaction also disrupt CaMKII association with intact LTCC complexes isolated by immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, these same mutations interfere with E-T coupling in cultured hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our findings define a novel molecular interaction with the neuronal LTCC that is required for the initiation of a long-range signal to the nucleus that is critical for learning and memory. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in the differential production of erythrose-4-phosphate dehydrogenase, 3-phosphoglycerate kinase and class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardey, Vincent; Vallet, Corinne; Robas, Nathalie; Charpentier, Bruno; Thouvenot, Benoit; Mougin, Annie; Hajnsdorf, Eliane; Régnier, Philippe; Springer, Mathias; Branlant, Christiane

    2005-09-01

    A gapA-pgk gene tandem coding the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase, is most frequently found in bacteria. However, in Enterobacteriaceae, gapA is replaced by an epd open reading frame (ORF) coding an erythrose-4-phosphate dehydrogenase and an fbaA ORF coding the class II fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase follows pgk. Although epd expression is very low in Escherichia coli, we show that, in the presence of glucose, the 3 epd, pgk and fbaA ORFs are efficiently cotranscribed from promoter epd P0. Conservation of promoter epd P0 is likely due to its important role in modulation of the metabolic flux during glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. As a consequence, we found that the epd translation initiation region and ORF have been adapted in order to limit epd translation and to create an efficient RNase E entry site. We also show that fbaA is cotranscribed with pgk, from promoter epd P0 or an internal pgk P1 promoter of the extended -10 class. The differential expression of pgk and fbaA also depends upon an RNase E segmentation process, leading to individual mRNAs with different stabilities. The secondary structures of the RNA regions containing the RNase E sites were experimentally determined which brings important information on the structural features of RNase E ectopic sites.

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM providers’ views of chronic low back pain patients’ expectations of CAM therapies: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafer Lisa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some researchers think that patients with higher expectations for CAM therapies experience better outcomes and that enthusiastic providers can enhance treatment outcomes. This is in contrast to evidence suggesting conventional medical providers often reorient patient expectations to better match what providers believe to be realistic. However, there is a paucity of research on CAM providers’ views of their patients’ expectations regarding CAM therapy and the role of these expectations in patient outcomes. Methods To better understand how CAM providers view and respond to their patients’ expectations of a particular therapy, we conducted 32 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with acupuncturists, chiropractors, massage therapists and yoga instructors identified through convenience sampling. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed thematically using Atlas ti version 6.1. Results CAM providers reported that they attempt to ensure that their patients’ expectations are realistic. Providers indicated they manage their patients’ expectations in a number of domains— roles and responsibilities of providers and patients, treatment outcomes, timeframe for improvement, and treatment experience. Providers reported that patients’ expectations change over time and that they need to continually manage these expectations to enhance patient engagement and satisfaction with treatment. Conclusions Providers of four types of CAM therapies viewed patients’ expectations as an important component of their experiences with CAM therapy and indicated that they try to align patient expectations with reality. These findings suggest that CAM providers are similar in this respect to conventional medical providers.

  1. Machinability of CAD-CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Ramakiran; Nejat, Amir H; Lawson, Nathaniel C

    2017-08-01

    Although new materials are available for computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) fabrication, limited information is available regarding their machinability. The depth of penetration of a milling tool into a material during a timed milling cycle may indicate its machinability. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the tool penetration rate for 2 polymer-containing CAD-CAM materials (Lava Ultimate and Enamic) and 2 ceramic-based CAD-CAM materials (e.max CAD and Celtra Duo). The materials were sectioned into 4-mm-thick specimens (n=5/material) and polished with 320-grit SiC paper. Each specimen was loaded into a custom milling apparatus. The apparatus pushed the specimens against a milling tool (E4D Tapered 2016000) rotating at 40 000 RPM with a constant force of 0.98 N. After a 6-minute timed milling cycle, the length of each milling cut was measured with image analysis software under a digital light microscope. Representative specimens and milling tools were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The penetration rate of Lava Ultimate (3.21 ±0.46 mm/min) and Enamic (2.53 ±0.57 mm/min) was significantly greater than that of e.max CAD (1.12 ±0.32 mm/min) or Celtra Duo (0.80 ±0.21 mm/min) materials. SEM observations showed little tool damage, regardless of material type. Residual material was found on the tools used with polymer-containing materials, and wear of the embedding medium was seen on the tools used with the ceramic-based materials. Edge chipping was noted on cuts made in the ceramic-based materials. Lava Ultimate and Enamic have greater machinability and less edge chipping than e.max CAD and Celtra Duo. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of milling and postmilling procedures on the surface roughness of CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Smidt, Laura Nunes; Fracasso, Lisiane Martins; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2017-11-12

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and analyze the surface topography of five different CAD/CAM ceramics and one CAD/CAM composite resin for CEREC after milling and postmilling procedures. Blocks of the ceramics Mark II, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max CAD, Suprinity and Enamic, and blocks of the composite resin Lava Ultimate were milled at CEREC MCXL. Ten flat samples of each material were obtained. The surface roughness (Ra) test was performed before and after milling, crystallization, polishing, and glaze when indicated, followed by SEM and AFM analysis. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA with repeated measures and the Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). The milling step significantly increased the roughness of all the tested materials (P CAD and Suprinity) were more suitable to roughness than the other tested materials (P CAD/CAM materials, that is, fully sintered, should be only hand polished. The glaze step can be suppressed resulting in time saving. However, the glaze step in soft-milling lithium disilicate is imperative. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of light intensity on the morphology and CAM photosynthesis of Vanilla planifolia Andrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Claudia Díez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanilla planifolia is a neotropical orchid, whose fruits produce the natural vanilla, a fundamental ingredient for the food and cosmetic industry. Because of its importance in the world market, it is cultivated in many tropical countries and recently its cultivation has started in Colombia. This species requires shade for its development; however, the optimal of light conditions are unknown. This work evaluates the effect of different light intensities on CAM photosynthesis, physiology, morphology, and growth of this species. For this, vanilla seedlings were subjected to four treatments of relative illumination (RI (T1=8%, T2=17%, T3=31% and T4=67%. Most CO2 assimilation occurred along night in all treatments, which confirms that vanilla is a strong CAM species. Plants grown under high lighting (67% RI had almost half of the photosynthesis in treatments of intermediate lighting (17 and 31%, which is consistent with the lower nocturnal acid accumulation in that treatment. Likewise, the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Fv / Fm showed that in plants of the 67% RI occurred high radiation stress. On the other hand, vanilla plants reached greater length, leaf area, and total biomass when grown under intermediate radiation (17 and 31% RI. These results suggest that high radiation alters the functioning of vanilla plants, inhibiting photosynthesis and growth, and that highly shaded environments not significantly affected the CAM photosynthesis of vanilla; however, in the long-term this species showed higher photosynthesis and growth under intermediate levels of radiation

  4. [Cytoplasmic kinase inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Hiroyuki

    2010-10-01

    Protein kinases play essential roles in the regulation of cell proliferation. Point mutations or/and fusions of protein kinases are frequently identified in human cancers, and targeting such activated kinases provides us with a chance to eradicate tumor cells. This was first proved by imatinib mesylate that inhibits ABL tyrosine kinase and, thereby, efficiently kills malignant cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. In addition, other clinical trials are ongoing for kinase inhibitors against EML4--ALK in lung cancer, JAK2 in myeloproliferative disorders and BRAF in malignant melanoma. Early reports indeed reveal that such targeting compounds are promising drugs for human cancers with activated kinases.

  5. Examining the association between patient-centered communication and provider avoidance, CAM use, and CAM-use disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Tippens, Kimberly M

    2015-01-01

    Patients' perceptions of the quality of their relationships with health care providers may influence their health care-seeking behaviors and future interactions with providers, including use of conventional health care, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and disclosure of CAM use. The study examined the associations between perceived patient-centered communication and provider avoidance, CAM use, and CAM-use disclosure. This study used cross-sectional survey data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 3, a nationally representative survey of US adults collected between January 2008 and May 2008. Two questions asked about CAM use and CAM-use disclosure, and another asked about avoidance of doctors. For the independent variable, responses from 6 questions on patient-centered communication were averaged to create a scale score ranging from 1-4. The research team conducted multiple logistic regressions of the 3 primary outcome measures, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, presence or absence of a regular source of care, insurance status, frequency of visits to providers, and health status. All analyses were weighted to make the results representative of the US population aged ≥18 y. Approximately one-third of respondents (36%) had avoided seeing their doctors within the 12 mo prior to the survey. Approximately 24% had used CAM within the prior 12 mo, and 51.7% of CAM users had discussed their CAM use with their doctors. Higher levels of patient-centered communication were significantly associated with lower odds of provider avoidance (AOR=0.63; 95% CI=0.52, 0.76) and CAM use (AOR=0.60; 95% CI=0.46, 0.78) but were not associated with CAM-use disclosure. Findings suggest that patients may be more likely to avoid seeing their doctors and more likely to use CAM when they perceive low levels of patient-centered communication. Further research to understand the role of the characteristics of patient-provider relationships

  6. Identification of TROP2 (TACSTD2), an EpCAM-like molecule, as a specific marker for TGF-β1-dependent human epidermal Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenwort, Gregor; Jurkin, Jennifer; Yasmin, Nighat; Bauer, Thomas; Gesslbauer, Bernhard; Strobl, Herbert

    2011-10-01

    Langerin (CD207) expression is a hallmark of epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs); however, CD207(+) cells comprise several functional subsets. Murine studies showed that epidermal, but not dermal, CD207(+) cells require transforming growth factor-β 1 (TGF-β1) for development, whereas human data are lacking. Using gene profiling, we found that the surface molecule TROP2 (TACSTD2) is strongly and rapidly induced during TGF-β1-dependent LC commitment of human CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells or monocytes. TROP2 is conserved between mouse and human, and shares substantial amino-acid identity with EpCAM, a marker for murine epidermal LCs. To our knowledge, neither TROP2 nor EpCAM expression has been analyzed in human dendritic cell (DC) subsets. We found that (i) all human epidermal LCs are TROP2(+)EpCAM(+); (ii) human dermis lacks CD207(+)EpCAM(-) or CD207(+)TROP2(-) DCs, i.e., equivalents of murine dermal CD207(+) DCs; and (iii) pulmonary CD207(+) cells are TROP2(-)EpCAM(-). Moreover, although EpCAM was broadly expressed by pulmonary and intestinal epithelial cells, as well as by bone marrow erythroid progenitor cells, these cells lacked TROP2. However, although TROP2 is expressed by human LCs as well as by human and murine keratinocytes, most murine LCs, except of a small subset, lacked TROP2. Therefore, TROP2 is a marker for human TGF-β1-dependent epidermal LCs.

  7. Novel Diagnosis of Lyme Disease: Potential for CAM Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristo Vojdani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lyme disease (LD is the most common tick-borne disease in the northern hemisphere, producing a wide range of disabling effects on multiple human targets, including the skin, the nervous system, the joints and the heart. Insufficient clinical diagnostic methods, the necessity for prompt antibiotic treatment along with the pervasive nature of infection impel the development and establishment of new clinical diagnostic tools with increased accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The goal of this article is 4-fold: (i to detail LD infection and pathology, (ii to review prevalent diagnostic methods, emphasizing inherent problems, (iii to introduce the usage of in vivo induced antigen technology (IVIAT in clinical diagnostics and (iv to underscore the relevance of a novel comprehensive LD diagnostic approach to practitioners of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM. Utilization of this analytical method will increase the accuracy of the diagnostic process and abridge the time to treatment, with antibiotics, herbal medicines and nutritional supplements, resulting in improved quality of care and disease prognosis.

  8. The Hyper Suprime-Cam software pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, James; Armstrong, Robert; Bickerton, Steven; Furusawa, Hisanori; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Koike, Michitaro; Lupton, Robert; Mineo, Sogo; Price, Paul; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Yasuda, Naoki; AlSayyad, Yusra; Becker, Andrew C.; Coulton, William; Coupon, Jean; Garmilla, Jose; Huang, Song; Krughoff, K. Simon; Lang, Dustin; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lim, Kian-Tat; Lust, Nate B.; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Miyatake, Hironao; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Murata, Ryoma; More, Surhud; Okura, Yuki; Owen, Russell; Swinbank, John D.; Strauss, Michael A.; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Yamanoi, Hitomi

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the optical imaging data processing pipeline developed for the Subaru Telescope's Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) instrument. The HSC Pipeline builds on the prototype pipeline being developed by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope's Data Management system, adding customizations for HSC, large-scale processing capabilities, and novel algorithms that have since been reincorporated into the LSST codebase. While designed primarily to reduce HSC Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) data, it is also the recommended pipeline for reducing general-observer HSC data. The HSC pipeline includes high-level processing steps that generate coadded images and science-ready catalogs as well as low-level detrending and image characterizations.

  9. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 1: Measurement of elastic constants and microstructural characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Renan; Wendler, Michael; de Ligny, Dominique; Cicconi, Maria Rita; Petschelt, Anselm; Peterlik, Herwig; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    A deeper understanding of the mechanical behavior of dental restorative materials requires an insight into the materials elastic constants and microstructure. Here we aim to use complementary methodologies to thoroughly characterize chairside CAD/CAM materials and discuss the benefits and limitations of different analytical strategies. Eight commercial CAM/CAM materials, ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Elastic constants were evaluated using three methods: Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS), Resonant Beam Technique (RBT) and Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (PE). The microstructures were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX), Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Young's modulus (E), Shear modulus (G), Bulk modulus (B) and Poisson's ratio (ν) were obtained for each material. E and ν reached values ranging from 10.9 (Lava Ultimate) to 201.4 (e.max ZirCAD) and 0.173 (Empress CAD) to 0.47 (Lava Ultimate), respectively. RUS showed to be the most complex and reliable method, while the PE method the easiest to perform but most unreliable. All dynamic methods have shown limitations in measuring the elastic constants of materials showing high damping behavior (hybrid materials). SEM images, Raman spectra and XRD patterns were made available for each material, showing to be complementary tools in the characterization of their crystal phases. Here different methodologies are compared for the measurement of elastic constants and microstructural characterization of CAD/CAM restorative materials. The elastic properties and crystal phases of eight materials are herein fully characterized. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials

  10. Far-infrared radiation acutely increases nitric oxide production by increasing Ca{sup 2+} mobilization and Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase at serine 1179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Sangmi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Du-Hyong [Department of Neuroscience, School of Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Mi [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Duk-Hee [Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Inho, E-mail: inhojo@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Medicine and Ewha Medical Research Institute, Ewha Womans University Medical School, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Far-infrared (FIR) radiation increases eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation and NO production in BAEC. •CaMKII and PKA mediate FIR-stimulated increases in eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. •FIR increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. •Thermo-sensitive TRPV Ca{sup 2+} channels are unlikely to be involved in the FIR-mediated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation pathway. -- Abstract: Repeated thermal therapy manifested by far-infrared (FIR) radiation improves vascular function in both patients and mouse model with coronary heart disease, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Using FIR as a thermal therapy agent, we investigate the molecular mechanism of its effect on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and NO production. FIR increased the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1179 (eNOS-Ser{sup 1179}) in a time-dependent manner (up to 40 min of FIR radiation) in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) without alterations in eNOS expression. This increase was accompanied by increases in NO production and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Treatment with KN-93, a selective inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor, inhibited FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. FIR radiation itself also increased the temperature of culture medium. As transient receptors potential vanilloid (TRPV) ion channels are known to be temperature-sensitive calcium channels, we explore whether TRPV channels mediate these observed effects. Reverse transcription-PCR assay revealed two TRPV isoforms in BAEC, TRPV2 and TRPV4. Although ruthenium red, a pan-TRPV inhibitor, completely reversed the observed effect of FIR radiation, a partial attenuation (∼20%) was found in cells treated with Tranilast, TRPV2 inhibitor. However, ectopic expression of siRNA of TRPV2 showed no significant alteration in FIR radiation-stimulated eNOS-Ser{sup 1179} phosphorylation. This

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Australian hospital-based nurses: knowledge, attitude, personal and professional use, reasons for use, CAM referrals, and socio-demographic predictors of CAM users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorofi, Seyed Afshin; Arbon, Paul

    2017-05-01

    This study was intended to examine CAM among Australian hospital-based nurses, identifying their knowledge, attitude, personal and professional use, reasons for use, CAM referrals, and socio-demographic predictors of CAM users. Nurses holding a qualification in nursing and working in surgical wards were included using a convenience sampling technique. A self-complete questionnaire was developed to achieve the aims of the study. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were calculated to describe and analyse data. Overall, 95.7% and 49.7% of nurses reported personal and professional use of CAM, respectively. The most popular CAM/CAM domain personally and professionally used by nurses was massage therapy and mind-body therapies. The primary reason for personal use of CAM was "[it] fits into my way of life/philosophy". Furthermore, massage therapists were the most commonly recommended CAM practitioners to patients. Only 15.8% of nurses would always ask patients about use of herbal medicines as part of nursing history taking. Over one-fifth (22.4%) of nurses rated their attitude as having a very positive, and 60.3% rated themselves as having very little or no knowledge of CAM. A positive correlation was also found between knowledge and attitude about CAM. Positive attitude and higher knowledge about CAM were positively correlated to CAM referrals. Several socio-demographic factors predicted personal and professional use of CAM. This study revealed that nurses generally believe not to have sufficient knowledge of CAM but are open to use CAM with patients. Nurses' positive attitude toward and personal use of CAM could be an indication that they are poised for further integration of evidence-based CAM into nursing practice to treat whole person. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The first light curve analysis of eclipsing binary NR Cam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakkoli, F.; Hasanzadeh, A.; Poro, A.

    2015-05-01

    New observations of the eclipsing binary system NR Cam were carried out using a CCD in B, V, and R filters and new times of light minimum and new ephemeris were obtained. The B, V, and R light curves were analyzed using both the Binary Maker 3.0 and PHOEBE 0.31 programs to determine some geometrical and physical parameters of the system. These results show that NR Cam is an overcontact binary and that both components are Main Sequence stars. The O'Connell effect on NR Cam was studied and some variations in spot parameters were obtained over the different years.

  13. CAD/CAM Preparation Design Effects on Endodontically Treated and Restored Molars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    CAD /CAM Preparation Design Effects on Endodontically Treated and Restored Molars Aaron T. Krance CAD /CAM Preparation Design Effect on...manuscript entitled: CAD /CAM Preparation Design Effect on Endodonticallv Treated and Restored Molars is appropriately acknowledged and beyond brief...by a CAD /CAM technique on endodontically treated molars restored with the endocrown method versus ceramic full coverage based on amalgam cores with

  14. In Vivo Post-Cardiac Arrest Myocardial Dysfunction Is Supported by Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II-Mediated Calcium Long-Term Potentiation and Mitigated by Alda-1, an Agonist of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher; Shang, Ching; Taghavi, Fouad; Downey, Peter; Zalewski, Adrian; Rubio, Gabriel R; Liu, Jing; Homburger, Julian R; Grunwald, Zachary; Qi, Wei; Bollensdorff, Christian; Thanaporn, Porama; Ali, Ayyaz; Riemer, Kirk; Kohl, Peter; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Gerstenfeld, Edward; Large, Stephen; Ali, Ziad; Ashley, Euan

    2016-09-27

    Survival after sudden cardiac arrest is limited by postarrest myocardial dysfunction, but understanding of this phenomenon is constrained by a lack of data from a physiological model of disease. In this study, we established an in vivo model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation, characterized the biology of the associated myocardial dysfunction, and tested novel therapeutic strategies. We developed rodent models of in vivo postarrest myocardial dysfunction using extracorporeal membrane oxygenation resuscitation followed by invasive hemodynamics measurement. In postarrest isolated cardiomyocytes, we assessed mechanical load and Ca(2) (+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) simultaneously using the microcarbon fiber technique and observed reduced function and myofilament calcium sensitivity. We used a novel fiberoptic catheter imaging system and a genetically encoded calcium sensor, GCaMP6f, to image CICR in vivo. We found potentiation of CICR in isolated cells from this extracorporeal membrane oxygenation model and in cells isolated from an ischemia/reperfusion Langendorff model perfused with oxygenated blood from an arrested animal but not when reperfused in saline. We established that CICR potentiation begins in vivo. The augmented CICR observed after arrest was mediated by the activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Increased phosphorylation of CaMKII, phospholamban, and ryanodine receptor 2 was detected in the postarrest period. Exogenous adrenergic activation in vivo recapitulated Ca(2+) potentiation but was associated with lesser CaMKII activation. Because oxidative stress and aldehydic adduct formation were high after arrest, we tested a small-molecule activator of aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2, Alda-1, which reduced oxidative stress, restored calcium and CaMKII homeostasis, and improved cardiac function and postarrest outcome in vivo. Cardiac arrest and reperfusion lead to CaMKII activation and calcium long-term potentiation, which

  15. Interaction of LDL receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) with postsynaptic scaffold proteins via its C-terminal PDZ domain-binding motif, and its regulation by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qing-Bao; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Yamauchi, Takashi; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yoshimura, Yoshiyuki; Miyazawa, Shoko; Nakayama, Kohzo; Saitoh, Fuminori; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Lu, Yonghao; Kondo, Hisatake; Endo, Shogo

    2006-06-01

    We cloned here a full-length cDNA of Dem26[Tian et al. (1999)Mol. Brain Res., 72, 147-157], a member of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene family from the rat brain. We originally named the corresponding protein synaptic LDL receptor-related protein (synLRP) [Tian et al. (2002) Soc. Neurosci. Abstr., 28, 405] and have renamed it LRP4 to accord it systematic nomenclature (GenBank(TM) accession no. AB073317). LRP4 protein interacted with postsynaptic scaffold proteins such as postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 via its C-terminal tail sequence, and associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor subunit. The mRNA of LRP4 was localized to dendrites, as well as somas, of neuronal cells, and the full-length protein of 250 kDa was highly concentrated in the brain and localized to various subcellular compartments in the brain, including synaptic fractions. Immunocytochemical study using cultured cortical neurons suggested surface localization in the neuronal cells both in somas and dendrites. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylated the C-terminal cytoplasmic region of LRP4 at Ser1887 and Ser1900, and the phosphorylation at the latter site suppressed the interaction of the protein with PSD-95 and synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97). These findings suggest a postsynaptic role for LRP4, a putative endocytic multiligand receptor, and a mechanism in which CaMKII regulates PDZ-dependent protein-protein interactions and receptor dynamics.

  16. Behavioral and structural responses to chronic cocaine require a feedforward loop involving ΔFosB and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the nucleus accumbens shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Alfred J; Vialou, Vincent; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Feng, Jian; Kourrich, Saïd; Collins, Miles; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George; Turecki, Gustavo; Neve, Rachael; Thomas, Mark; Nestler, Eric J

    2013-03-06

    The transcription factor ΔFosB and the brain-enriched calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα) are induced in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) by chronic exposure to cocaine or other psychostimulant drugs of abuse, in which the two proteins mediate sensitized drug responses. Although ΔFosB and CaMKIIα both regulate AMPA glutamate receptor expression and function in NAc, dendritic spine formation on NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs), and locomotor sensitization to cocaine, no direct link between these molecules has to date been explored. Here, we demonstrate that ΔFosB is phosphorylated by CaMKIIα at the protein-stabilizing Ser27 and that CaMKII is required for the cocaine-mediated accumulation of ΔFosB in rat NAc. Conversely, we show that ΔFosB is both necessary and sufficient for cocaine induction of CaMKIIα gene expression in vivo, an effect selective for D1-type MSNs in the NAc shell subregion. Furthermore, induction of dendritic spines on NAc MSNs and increased behavioral responsiveness to cocaine after NAc overexpression of ΔFosB are both CaMKII dependent. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time induction of ΔFosB and CaMKII in the NAc of human cocaine addicts, suggesting possible targets for future therapeutic intervention. These data establish that ΔFosB and CaMKII engage in a cell-type- and brain-region-specific positive feedforward loop as a key mechanism for regulating the reward circuitry of the brain in response to chronic cocaine.

  17. The effects of urotensin II on migration and invasion are mediated by NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Ying; Shi, Zheng-Ming; Yu, Xiao-Tong; Feng, Ping; Wang, Xue-Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a vasoactive neuropeptide involved in migration and invasion in various cell types. However, the effects of UII on human hepatoma cells still remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanism of UII on migration and invasion in human hepatoma cells. Migration was measured by wound healing assays and a Transwell(®) methodology, and invasion was analyzed using Matrigel(®) invasion chambers. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were detected using a 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe, and flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were evaluated by western blotting. Cell proliferation and actin polymerization were examined using cell proliferation reagent WST-1 and F-actin immunohistochemistry staining. Exposure to UII promoted migration and invasion in hepatoma cells compared with that in cells without UII. UII also increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) expression in a time-independent manner. Furthermore, UII markedly enhanced ROS generation and NADPH oxidase subunit expression, and consequently facilitated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The UT antagonist urantide or the antioxidant/NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin decreased UII-induced ROS production. JNK phosphorylation, migration, invasion, and MMP9/2 expression were also reversed by pretreatment with apocynin. Urantide and JNK inhibitor SP600125 abrogated migration, invasion, or MMP9/2 expression in response to UII. UII induced actin polymerization and fascin protein expression, and could be reversed by apocynin and SP600125. Exogenous UII induced migration and invasion in hepatoma cells that mainly involved NADPH oxidase-derived ROS through JNK activation. UT played an additional role in regulating hepatoma cells migration and invasion. Thus, our data suggested an important effect of UII in hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Time to Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with your health care providers any complementary and alternative medicines you take or are thinking about starting. Photo: ... and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). But less than one-third who use ...

  19. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  20. Finding the Evidence in CAM: a Student's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Ghassemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This commentary offers a future health care provider's perspective on the role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in Western (namely, in US medical education and practice. As a student of both public health and medicine in the United States, Jeffrey Ghassemi is interested in CAM's contribution to improving medical practice and teaching. The commentary highlights the ambiguous definitions of CAM to Westerners despite the rising popularity of and expenditures for alternative modalities of care. It then argues for collaboration between alternative and established medical communities to ascertain the scientific merits of CAM. It concludes by calling for a new medical paradigm that embraces the philosophies of both communities to advance education and patient care.

  1. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, Y. (Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States))

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  2. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, Y. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  3. The Etiology and Arthroscopic Surgical Management of Cam Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Gaudiani, Michael A; Ranawat, Anil S

    2016-07-01

    Cam-type deformity of the proximal femur is a relative increase in the discrepancy of the femoral head-neck offset. The etiology is unknown; several conditions have been implicated in the development of abnormal proximal femoral anatomy. Recent evidence suggests that high-impact sports place stress on the immature physis during growth and may play an important role. Imaging is essential in the initial diagnostic workup, characterization of pathology, preoperative planning, and intraoperative decision making. Short-term and mid-term outcomes for arthroscopic osteoplasty of cam lesions for both isolated cam-type deformity and mixed cam-pincer femoroacetabular impingement have been well-described and are favorable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Antioxidant, DNA interaction, VEGFR2 kinase, topoisomerase I and in vitro cytotoxic activities of heteroleptic copper(II) complexes of tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines and diimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleel, A; Mahendiran, D; Veena, V; Sakthivel, N; Rahiman, A Kalilur

    2016-11-01

    A series of heteroleptic mononuclear copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L(1-3))(diimine)]ClO4 (1-6) containing three tetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine core ligands, ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(1)), ethyl 5-methyl-7-(4-diethylamino-2-hydroxyphenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(2)) or ethyl 5-methyl-7-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-4,7-dihydrotetrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-6-carboxylate (HL(3)), and two diimine coligands, 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) have been synthesized and characterized by spectral methods. The geometry of complexes have been determined with the help of electronic absorption and EPR splitting patterns, which suggest four coordinated square planar geometry around copper(II) ion. The lowering of HOMO-LUMO band gap value of complex 4 implies its higher biological activity compared to other complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that the complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed groove mode of binding, which was further supported by docking simulation. The complexes 3 and 4 strongly inhibit the topoisomerase I, and also strongly interact with VEGFR2 kinase receptor via π-π, σ-π and hydrogen bonding interaction. Gel electrophoresis experiments demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave plasmid DNA in the absence of activators. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the complexes were examined on three cancerous cell lines such as human lung (A549), cervical (HeLa) and colon (HCT-15), and two normal cells such as human embryonic kidney (HEK) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The live cell and fluorescent imaging of cancer cells were observed with acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining assay. All encouraging chemical and biological findings indicate that the complex 4 is a suitable candidate for drug target. Copyright © 2016

  5. Cam Drive Step Mechanism of a Quadruped Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Qun Sun; Chong Wang; Dongjie Zhao; Cuihua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Bionic quadruped robots received considerable worldwide research attention. For a quadruped robot walking with steady paces on a flat terrain, using a cam drive control mechanism instead of servomotors provides theoretical and practical benefits as it reduces the system weight, cost, and control complexities; thus it may be more cost beneficial for some recreational or household applications. This study explores the robot step mechanism including the leg and cam drive control systems based on...

  6. Incorporation of CAD/CAM Restoration Into Navy Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Aided Design and Computer- Aided Manufacturing Restorations: A Review of the Literature. Journal of international oral health : JIOH 2015;7:96-104...CAD/CAM Computer-aided design /Computer-assisted manufacturing CDT Common Dental Terminology DENCAS Dental Common Access System DTF Dental...to reduce avoidable dental emergencies for deployed sailors and marines. Dental Computer-aided design /Computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM

  7. Availability Analysis of the Ventilation Stack CAM Interlock System

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J

    2000-01-01

    Ventilation Stack Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) Interlock System failure modes, failure frequencies, and system availability have been evaluated for the RPP. The evaluation concludes that CAM availability is as high as assumed in the safety analysis and that the current routine system surveillance is adequate to maintain this availability credited in the safety analysis, nor is such an arrangement predicted to significantly improve system availability.

  8. Aquatic CAM photosynthesis: a brief history of its discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic CAM (Crassulacean Acid Metabolism) photosynthesis was discovered while investigating an unrelated biochemical pathway concerned with anaerobic metabolism. George Bowes was a significant contributor to this project early in its infancy. Not only did he provide me with some valuable perspectives on peer review rejections, but by working with his gas exchange system I was able to take our initial observations of diel fluctuations in malic acid to the next level, showing this aquatic plant exhibited dark CO2 uptake. CAM is universal in all aquatic species of the worldwide Lycophyta genus Isoetes and non-existent in terrestrial Isoetes. Outside of this genus aquatic CAM has a limited occurrence in three other families, including the Crassulaceae. This discovery led to fascinating adventures in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes in search of Stylites, a terrestrial relative of Isoetes. Stylites is a plant that is hermetically sealed from the atmosphere and obtains all of its carbon from terrestrial sources and recycles carbon through CAM. Considering the Mesozoic origin of Isoetes in shallow pools, coupled with the fact that aquatic Isoetes universally possess CAM, suggests the earliest evolution of CAM photosynthesis was most likely not in terrestrial plants.

  9. The pineapple genome and the evolution of CAM photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Ray; VanBuren, Robert; Wai, Ching Man; Tang, Haibao; Schatz, Michael C; Bowers, John E; Lyons, Eric; Wang, Ming-Li; Chen, Jung; Biggers, Eric; Zhang, Jisen; Huang, Lixian; Zhang, Lingmao; Miao, Wenjing; Zhang, Jian; Ye, Zhangyao; Miao, Chenyong; Lin, Zhicong; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Hongye; Yim, Won C; Priest, Henry D; Zheng, Chunfang; Woodhouse, Margaret; Edger, Patrick P; Guyot, Romain; Guo, Hao-Bo; Guo, Hong; Zheng, Guangyong; Singh, Ratnesh; Sharma, Anupma; Min, Xiangjia; Zheng, Yun; Lee, Hayan; Gurtowski, James; Sedlazeck, Fritz J; Harkess, Alex; McKain, Michael R; Liao, Zhenyang; Fang, Jingping; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Weichang; Qin, Yuan; Wang, Kai; Chen, Li-Yu; Shirley, Neil; Lin, Yann-Rong; Liu, Li-Yu; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Wright, Chris L; Bulone, Vincent; Tuskan, Gerald A; Heath, Katy; Zee, Francis; Moore, Paul H; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Leebens-Mack, James H; Mockler, Todd; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Freeling, Michael; Sankoff, David; Paterson, Andrew H; Zhu, Xinguang; Yang, Xiaohan; Smith, J Andrew C; Cushman, John C; Paull, Robert E; Yu, Qingyi

    2015-12-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) is the most economically valuable crop possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a photosynthetic carbon assimilation pathway with high water-use efficiency, and the second most important tropical fruit. We sequenced the genomes of pineapple varieties F153 and MD2 and a wild pineapple relative, Ananas bracteatus accession CB5. The pineapple genome has one fewer ancient whole-genome duplication event than sequenced grass genomes and a conserved karyotype with seven chromosomes from before the ρ duplication event. The pineapple lineage has transitioned from C3 photosynthesis to CAM, with CAM-related genes exhibiting a diel expression pattern in photosynthetic tissues. CAM pathway genes were enriched with cis-regulatory elements associated with the regulation of circadian clock genes, providing the first cis-regulatory link between CAM and circadian clock regulation. Pineapple CAM photosynthesis evolved by the reconfiguration of pathways in C3 plants, through the regulatory neofunctionalization of preexisting genes and not through the acquisition of neofunctionalized genes via whole-genome or tandem gene duplication.

  10. Impact of different adhesives on work of adhesion between CAD/CAM polymers and resin composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keul, Christine; Müller-Hahl, Manuel; Eichberger, Marlis; Liebermann, Anja; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2014-09-01

    To determine the impact of pre-treatment of adhesive systems on the work of adhesion (WA) between CAD/CAM polymers and resin composite cements and compare with conventional tests of previous studies. Surface parameters were measured by contact angle measurement (2700 measurements) and WA was calculated. Five CAD/CAM polymers were used for fabrication of specimens (n=75/subgroup): artBloc Temp (A), Telio CAD (B), Nano Composite CFI-C (C), exp. CAD/CAM nanohybrid composite (D), and LAVA Ultimate (E). Then, air-abraded specimens were pre-treated (n=15 per group): Ambarino P60 (I), Monobond Plus/Heliobond (II), visio.link (III), VP connect (IV), and no pre-treatment (V). Resin composite cement specimens (n=75) were smoothed out homogeneously on a glass plate (n=15/group): RelyX ARC (RXA), Variolink II (VAR), Panavia F2.0 (PAN), RelyX Unicem (RXU), and Clearfil SA Cement (CSA). Contact angles were determined with 3 drops of distilled water and diiodomethane each. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis-H test and Spearman-Rho correlation (p<0.05). CAD/CAM materials (B), (A), and (C) showed higher WA compared to (D) and (E). (II) and (IV) resulted in higher WA than (I), (III) and (V). VAR had the significantly lowest WA, followed by RXU, RXA, CSA and PAN. No correlation occurred between WA and TBS/SBS whereas polar component of surface free energy of CAD/CAM resin and spreading coefficient showed significant positive correlation with TBS/SBS. Determination of WA is not a proper method to draw conclusions about the bond between resin materials. Destructive test methods are not dispensable. The successful outcome of fixed dental restorations depends, among others, on the quality of bonding between the tooth and the restoration. Additional pre-treatment of the dental CAD/CAM resin restoration by bonding systems can be recommended for clinical use. Pre-treatment showed a significant impact on the surface properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Involvement of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases in mycelial growth of the basidiomycetous mushroom, Coprinus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameshita, Isamu; Yamada, Yusuke; Nishida, Tetsuyuki; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Akira; Asada, Yasuhiko

    2007-09-01

    Although multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaM-kinases) are widely distributed in animal cells, the occurrence of CaM-kinases in the basidiomycetous mushroom has not previously been documented. When the extracts from various developmental stages from mycelia to the mature fruiting body of Coprinus cinereus were analyzed by Western blotting using Multi-PK antibodies, which had been generated to detect a wide variety of protein serine/threonine kinases (Ser/Thr kinases), a variety of stage-specific Ser/Thr kinases was detected. Calmodulin (CaM) overlay assay using digoxigenin-labeled CaM detected protein bands of 65 kDa, 58 kDa, 46 kDa, 42 kDa, and 38 kDa only in the presence of CaCl(2), suggesting that these bands were CaM-binding proteins. When the CaM-binding fraction was prepared from mycelial extract of C. cinereus by CaM-Sepharose and analyzed with Multi-PK antibodies, two major immunoreactive bands corresponding to 65 kDa and 46 kDa were detected. CaM-binding fraction, thus obtained, exhibited Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent protein kinase activity toward protein substrates such as histones. These CaM-kinases were found to be highly expressed in the actively growing mycelia, but not in the resting mycelial cells. Mycelial growth was enhanced by the addition of CaCl(2) in the culture media, but inhibited by the addition of EGTA or trifluoperazine, a potent CaM inhibitor. This suggested that CaM-dependent enzymes including CaM-kinases play crucial roles in mycelial growth of basidiomycete C. cinereus.

  12. Structure of the CaMKIIdelta/calmodulin complex reveals the molecular mechanism of CaMKII kinase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rellos

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Long-term potentiation (LTP, a long-lasting enhancement in communication between neurons, is considered to be the major cellular mechanism underlying learning and memory. LTP triggers high-frequency calcium pulses that result in the activation of Calcium/Calmodulin (CaM-dependent kinase II (CaMKII. CaMKII acts as a molecular switch because it remains active for a long time after the return to basal calcium levels, which is a unique property required for CaMKII function. Here we describe the crystal structure of the human CaMKIIdelta/Ca2+/CaM complex, structures of all four human CaMKII catalytic domains in their autoinhibited states, as well as structures of human CaMKII oligomerization domains in their tetradecameric and physiological dodecameric states. All four autoinhibited human CaMKIIs were monomeric in the determined crystal structures but associated weakly in solution. In the CaMKIIdelta/Ca2+/CaM complex, the inhibitory region adopted an extended conformation and interacted with an adjacent catalytic domain positioning T287 into the active site of the interacting protomer. Comparisons with autoinhibited CaMKII structures showed that binding of calmodulin leads to the rearrangement of residues in the active site to a conformation suitable for ATP binding and to the closure of the binding groove for the autoinhibitory helix by helix alphaD. The structural data, together with biophysical interaction studies, reveals the mechanism of CaMKII activation by calmodulin and explains many of the unique regulatory properties of these two essential signaling molecules. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3-D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the installation and use of the Web plugin are available in Text S1.

  13. The beta subunit of casein kinase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Piontek, K; Schmidt-Spaniol, I

    1991-01-01

    cDNAs encoding the beta subunit of pig and mouse CKII were isolated. The porcine cDNA was expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and used for the production of anti-CKII-beta subunit specific antibodies.......cDNAs encoding the beta subunit of pig and mouse CKII were isolated. The porcine cDNA was expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli and used for the production of anti-CKII-beta subunit specific antibodies....

  14. CAD/CAM produces dentures with improved fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmassl, Otto; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Grunert, Ingrid; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca

    2018-02-22

    Resin polymerisation shrinkage reduces the congruence of the denture base with denture-bearing tissues and thereby decreases the retention of conventionally fabricated dentures. CAD/CAM denture manufacturing is a subtractive process, and polymerisation shrinkage is not an issue anymore. Therefore, CAD/CAM dentures are assumed to show a higher denture base congruence than conventionally fabricated dentures. It has been the aim of this study to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures provided by four different manufacturers (AvaDent, Merz Dental, Whole You, Wieland/Ivoclar) were generated from ten different master casts. Ten conventional dentures (pack and press, long-term heat polymerisation) made from the same master casts served as control group. The master casts and all denture bases were scanned and matched digitally. The absolute incongruences were measured using a 2-mm mesh. Conventionally fabricated dentures showed a mean deviation of 0.105 mm, SD = 0.019 from the master cast. All CAD/CAM dentures showed lower mean incongruences. From all CAD/CAM dentures, AvaDent Digital Dentures showed the highest congruence with the master cast surface with a mean deviation of 0.058 mm, SD = 0.005. Wieland Digital Dentures showed a mean deviation of 0.068 mm, SD = 0.005, Whole You Nexteeth prostheses showed a mean deviation of 0.074 mm, SD = 0.011 and Baltic Denture System prostheses showed a mean deviation of 0.086 mm, SD = 0.012. CAD/CAM produces dentures with better fit than conventional dentures. The present study explains the clinically observed enhanced retention and lower traumatic ulcer-frequency in CAD/CAM dentures.

  15. Stereological analysis of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha -containing dorsal root ganglion neurons in the rat: colocalization with isolectin Griffonia simplicifolia, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or vanilloid receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Susan M; Hargett, Gregory L

    2002-06-17

    The enzyme Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is widely distributed in the nervous system. A previous report describes immunostaining for CaMKII alpha in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. In this study, CaMKII alpha is colocalized in the rat with three putative markers of nociceptive DRG neurons, isolectin Griffonia simplicifolia (I-B4), identifying small-diameter, "peptide-poor" neurons; calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), identifying " peptide-rich" neurons; or the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), identifying neurons activated by heat, acid, and capsaicin. Lumbar 4 and 5 DRG sections were labeled using immunofluorescence or lectin binding histochemistry, and percentages of single and double-labeled CaMKIIalpha neurons were determined. Stereological estimates of total neuron number in the L4 DRG were 13,815 +/- 2,798 and in the L5 DRG were 14,111 +/- 4,043. Percentages of single-labeled L4 DRG neurons were 41% +/- 2% CaMKII alpha, 38% +/- 3% I-B4, 44% +/- 3% CGRP, and 32% +/- 6% VR1. Percentages of single-labeled L5 DRG neurons were 44% +/- 5% CaMKII alpha, 48% +/- 2% I-B4, 41% +/- 7% CGRP, and 39% +/- 14% VR1. For L4 and L5, respectively, estimates of double-labeled CaMKII alpha neurons showed 34% +/- 2% and 38% +/- 17% labeled for I-B4, 25% +/- 14% and 19% +/- 10% labeled for CGRP, and 37% +/- 7% and 38% +/- 5% labeled for VR1. Conversely, for L4 and L5, respectively, 39% +/- 14% and 38% +/- 7% I-B4 binding neurons, 24% +/- 12% and 23% +/- 10% CGRP neurons, and 42% +/- 7% and 35% +/- 7% VR1 neurons labeled for CaMKIIalpha. The mean diameter of CaMKII alpha - labeled neurons was approximately 27 microm, confirming that this enzyme was preferentially localized in small DRG neurons. The results indicate that subpopulations of DRG neurons containing CaMKII alpha are likely to be involved in the processing of nociceptive information. Thus, this enzyme may play a critical role in the modulation of nociceptor activity and plasticity of primary

  16. Moderate Alcohol Drinking and the Amygdala Proteome: Identification and Validation of Calcium/Calmodulin Dependent Kinase II and AMPA Receptor Activity as Novel Molecular Mechanisms of the Positive Reinforcing Effects of Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salling, Michael C; Faccidomo, Sara P; Li, Chia; Psilos, Kelly; Galunas, Christina; Spanos, Marina; Agoglia, Abigail E; Kash, Thomas L; Hodge, Clyde W

    2016-03-15

    Despite worldwide consumption of moderate amounts of alcohol, the neural mechanisms that mediate the transition from use to abuse are not fully understood. Here, we conducted a high-throughput screen of the amygdala proteome in mice after moderate alcohol drinking (n = 12/group) followed by behavioral studies (n = 6-8/group) to uncover novel molecular mechanisms of the positive reinforcing properties of alcohol that strongly influence the development of addiction. Two-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization tandem time-of-flight identified 29 differentially expressed proteins in the amygdala of nondependent C57BL/6J mice following 24 days of alcohol drinking. Alcohol-sensitive proteins included calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha (CaMKIIα) and a network of functionally linked proteins that regulate neural plasticity and glutamate-mediated synaptic activity. Accordingly, alcohol drinking increased α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isooxazole receptor (AMPAR) in central amygdala (CeA) and phosphorylation of AMPAR GluA1 subunit at a CaMKII locus (GluA1-Ser831) in CeA and lateral amygdala. Further, CaMKIIα-Thr286 and GluA1-Ser831 phosphorylation was increased in CeA and lateral amygdala of mice that lever-pressed for alcohol versus the nondrug reinforcer sucrose. Mechanistic studies showed that targeted pharmacologic inhibition of amygdala CaMKII or AMPAR activity specifically inhibited the positive reinforcing properties of alcohol but not sucrose. Moderate alcohol drinking increases the activity and function of plasticity-linked protein networks in the amygdala that regulate the positive reinforcing effects of the drug. Given the prominence of positive reinforcement in the etiology of addiction, we propose that alcohol-induced adaptations in CaMKIIα and AMPAR signaling in the amygdala may serve as a molecular gateway from use to abuse. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published

  17. Prevalence of Cam Morphology in Females with Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Levy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cam and pincer are two common morphologies responsible for femoroacetabular impingement. Previous literature has reported that cam deformity is predominantly a male morphology, while being significantly less common in females. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cam morphology in female subjects diagnosed with symptomatic FAI. All females presenting to the senior author’s clinic diagnosed with symptomatic FAI between December 2006 and Cam and pincer are two common morphologies responsible for femoroacetabular impingement. Previous literature has reported that cam deformity is predominantly a male morphology, while being significantly less common in females. Cam morphology is commonly assessed with the alpha angle, measured on radiographs. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cam morphology utilizing the alpha angle in female subjects diagnosed with symptomatic FAI. All females presenting to the senior author’s clinic diagnosed with symptomatic FAI between December 2006 and January 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Alpha (α angles were measured on AP (anteroposterior and lateral (Dunn 90°, cross-table lateral, and/or frog-leg lateral plain radiographs by two blinded physicians, and the largest measured angle was used. Using Gosvig et al.’s classification, alpha angle was characterized as (pathologic > 57°, borderline (51-56°, subtle (46-50°, very subtle (43-45°, or normal (≤42°. Three hundred and ninety-one patients (438 hips were analyzed (age 36.2 ± 12.3 years. Among the hips included, 35.6% were normal, 14.6% pathologic, 15.1% borderline, 14.6% subtle, and 20.1% very subtle. There was no correlation between alpha angle and patient age (R = 0.17 or body mass index (BMI (R = 0.05. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for α-angle measurements was 0.84. Sixty-four percent of females in this cohort had an alpha angle > 42°. Subtle cam deformity plays a significant role in

  18. CamBAfx: Workflow Design, Implementation and Application for Neuroimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Cinly; Bullmore, Edward T.; Wink, Alle-Meije; Sendur, Levent; Barnes, Anna; Achard, Sophie; Aspden, John; Abbott, Sanja; Yue, Shigang; Kitzbichler, Manfred; Meunier, David; Maxim, Voichita; Salvador, Raymond; Henty, Julian; Tait, Roger; Subramaniam, Naresh; Suckling, John

    2009-01-01

    CamBAfx is a workflow application designed for both researchers who use workflows to process data (consumers) and those who design them (designers). It provides a front-end (user interface) optimized for data processing designed in a way familiar to consumers. The back-end uses a pipeline model to represent workflows since this is a common and useful metaphor used by designers and is easy to manipulate compared to other representations like programming scripts. As an Eclipse Rich Client Platform application, CamBAfx's pipelines and functions can be bundled with the software or downloaded post-installation. The user interface contains all the workflow facilities expected by consumers. Using the Eclipse Extension Mechanism designers are encouraged to customize CamBAfx for their own pipelines. CamBAfx wraps a workflow facility around neuroinformatics software without modification. CamBAfx's design, licensing and Eclipse Branding Mechanism allow it to be used as the user interface for other software, facilitating exchange of innovative computational tools between originating labs. PMID:19826470

  19. Concerns of hydrothermal degradation in CAD/CAM zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Covel, N S; Guess, P C; Rekow, E D; Zhang, Y

    2010-01-01

    Zirconia-based restorations are widely used in prosthetic dentistry; however, their susceptibility to hydrothermal degradation remains elusive. We hypothesized that CAD/CAM machining and subsequent surface treatments, i.e., grinding and/or grit-blasting, have marked effects on the hydrothermal degradation behavior of Y-TZP. CAD/CAM-machined Y-TZP plates (0.5 mm thick), both with and without subsequent grinding with various grit sizes or grit-blasting with airborne alumina particles, were subjected to accelerated aging tests in a steam autoclave. Results showed that the CAD/CAM-machined surfaces initially exhibited superior hydrothermal degradation resistance, but deteriorated at a faster rate upon prolonged autoclave treatment compared with ground and grit-blasted surfaces. The accelerated hydrothermal degradation of CAD/CAM surfaces is attributed to the CAD/CAM machining damage and the absence of surface compressive stresses in the fully sintered material. Clinical relevance for surface treatments of zirconia frameworks in terms of hydrothermal and structural stabilities is addressed.

  20. Improvement of cam performance curve using B-Spline curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriman, A. B.; Syafiq, A. K. M.; Hashim, M. S. M.; Hazry, D.; Razlan, Z. M.; Wan, K.; Daud, R.; Cheng, E. M.; Zaaba, S. K.; Azizan, Azizi

    2017-10-01

    The mathematical modeling approach has been applied in order to increase the cam profile curve of Modenas CT115s performance by using MATLAB software as a programmed to calculate the mechanism of the cam profile. Cam is used inside the engine to push the rocker and consequently open and close the engine valve that allows the fuel-air mixture to be entered during the combustion process. The B-Spline curve was implemented in order to enhance the current performance of the cam profile. The calculation had been done by using manual and MATLAB software. The results obtained has been analyzed and interpreted in plotting the graphs. From the analysis, the profile that had the highest displacement factor, sk produced higher cam curve performance of the engine. Thus, it can be concluded that the increase of the displacement factor, sk can increase the engine performance as the valve displace further in which allow higher fuel-air mixture entrance during the combustion process.

  1. User rate of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) of patients visiting a counseling facility for CAM of a German comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Jutta; Micke, Oliver; Muecke, Ralph; Buentzel, Jens; Prott, Franz Josef; Kleeberg, Ulrich; Senf, Bianca; Muenstedt, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    In Europe about 40% to 50% of patients with cancer use complementary or alternative medicine (CAM). Only scarce data regarding the use of CAM have been reported from comprehensive cancer Centers. We carried out a survey on patients attending the counseling Unit for CAM of a German comprehensive cancer Center using a standardized questionnaire. A total of 165 patients participated in the survey; 60% had already used CAM. Trace elements and vitamins were most often used. Strengthening oneself and one's immune system were the two main reasons (73% and 69% respectively for CAM use). The most important sources of information are print media and physicians (41% and 35% respectively). The two main reasons for using CAM were practitioners spending more time with patients and patients having experienced positive effects from CAM. For patients with cancer becoming active is an important goal, while disappointment in conventional medicine is not. Accepting patients' motivation for autonomy may help oncologists to increase adherence to conventional therapy.

  2. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  3. [CAM products as therapeutic placebos: theoretical and bioethical reflections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöne-Seifert, Bettina; Friedrich, Daniel R; Reichardt, Jan-Ole

    2015-01-01

    In Germany as well as in many other countries the project of 'integrating' CAM interventions into conventional medicine is currently underway. It is a highly contested endeavour. One backdoor of justifying CAM interventions - even if, according to the scientific standards of conventional medicine, they have been proved to lack specific effectiveness - is their use as therapeutic placebos. In this paper we will first discuss general critical considerations regarding deceptive placebo use and then argue that in the specific case of CAM interventions used as placebos general ethical reservations are reinforced by the fact that their use is prone to promote a non- or antiscientific attitude among physicians and patients, which we consider highly problematic. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  4. The application of CAD / CAM technology in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susic, I.; Travar, M.; Susic, M.

    2017-05-01

    Information and communication technologies have found their application in the healthcare sector, including the frameworks of modern dentistry. CAD / CAM application in dentistry is the process by which is attained finished dental restoration through fine milling process of ready ceramic blocks. CAD / CAM is an acronym of english words Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) / Computer-Aided-Manufacture (CAM), respectively dental computer aided design and computer aided manufacture of inlays, onlays, crowns and bridges. CAD / CAM technology essentially allows you to create a two-dimensional and three-dimensional models and their materialization by numerical controlled machines. In order to operate more efficiently, reduce costs, increase user/patient satisfaction and ultimately achieve profits, many dental offices in the world have their attention focused on implementation of modern IT solutions in everyday practice. In addition to the specialized clinic management software, inventory control, etc., or hardware such as the use of lasers in cosmetic dentistry or intraoral scanning, recently the importance is given to the application of CAD / CAM technology in the field of prosthetic. After the removal of pathologically altered tooth structure, it is necessary to achieve restoration that will be most similar to the anatomy of a natural tooth. Applying CAD / CAM technology on applicable ceramic blocks it can be obtained very quick, but also very accurate restoration, in the forms of inlays, onlays, bridges and crowns. The paper presents the advantages of using this technology as well as satisfaction of the patients and dentists by using systems as: Cercon, Celay, Cerec, Lava, Everest, which represent imperative of modern dentistry in creating fixed dental restorations.

  5. Passivity of conventional and CAD/CAM fabricated implant frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Gabriela Monteiro; de França, Danilo Gonzaga Bernardo; Silva Neto, João Paulo; Barbosa, Gustavo Augusto Seabra

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the passivity by measuring the passive fit and strain development of frameworks screwed on abutments, made by CAD/CAM technology, and to compare these parts with samples manufactured by conventional casting. Using CAD/CAM technology, four samples were made from zirconia (Zircad) and four samples were manufactured from cobalt-chrome (CoCrcad). The control groups were four specimens of cobalt-chrome, made by one-piece casting (CoCrci), with a total of 12 frameworks. To evaluate the passive fit, the vertical misfit at the abutment-framework interface was measured with scanning electron microscopy (250×) when only one screw was tightened. The mean strain in these frameworks was analyzed by photoelasticity test. A significant difference in the passive fit was observed between the control and sample groups. CoCrcad exhibited the best value of passive fit (48.76±13.45 µm) and CoCrci the worst (187.55±103.63 µm); Zircad presented an intermediate value (103.81±43.15 µm). When compared to the other groups, CoCrci showed the highest average stress around the implants (17.19±7.22 kPa). It was concluded that CAD/CAM-fabricated frameworks exhibited better passivity compared with conventionally fabricated frameworks. CAD/CAM-fabricated Co-Cr frameworks may exhibit better passive fit compared with CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia frameworks. Even so, similar levels of stress were achieved for CAD/CAM-fabricated frameworks.

  6. About Jupiter's Reflectance Function in JunoCam Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichstaedt, G.; Orton, G. S.; Momary, T.; Hansen, C. J.; Caplinger, M.

    2017-09-01

    NASA's Juno spacecraft has successfully completed several perijove passes. JunoCam is Juno's visible light and infrared camera. It was added to the instrument complement to investigate Jupiter's polar regions, and for education and public outreach purposes. Images of Jupiter taken by JunoCam have been revealing effects that can be interpreted as caused by a haze layer. This presumed haze layer appears to be structured, and it partially obscures Jupiter's cloud top. With empirical investigation of Jupiter's reflectance function we intend to separate light contributed by haze from light reflected off Jupiter's cloud tops, enabling both layers to be investigated separately.

  7. Marginal Integrity of CAD/CAM Fixed Partial Dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Rosentritt, Martin; Behr, Michael; Kolbeck, Carola; Handel, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Computer-aided design (CAD) and manufacturing (CAM) allows the milling of high strength zirconia fixed partial dentures (FPD), however bonding to an inert ZrO2 ceramic surface may effect the marginal integrity of the FPDs. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of zirconia FPDs at the interfaces between zirconia, cement, and tooth. Methods 32 3-unit FPDs were fabricated of the CAD/CAM Y-TZP zirconia (Lava, 3M Espe, Germany) according to the manufactur...

  8. Illness narratives in cancer: CAM and spiritual practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Anita; Evron, Lotte; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: In this paper,we investigate Danish cancer patients’ narratives on spiritual beliefs and practices and the relationship these practices may have to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Design: Narrative inquiry is used to uncover how spiritual beliefs and practices may......, religious and spiritual issues were not extensively unfolded in participants’ illness narratives. However, these issues were significantly elaborated on in narratives by four female participants. Conclusion: We propose that for some cancer patients CAM may function, not only or primarily as a treatment...

  9. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations.

  10. CAM visual stimulation with conventional method of occlusion treatment in amblyopia: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Jafari

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Using of CAM visual stimulation along with conventional occlusion will further improve visual acuity and stereopsis in amblyopic children. These findings recommended the CAM visual stimulation as an accompanying and complementary method in amblyopia treatment.

  11. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  12. Cam impingement of the hip: a risk factor for hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricola, Rintje; Waarsing, Jan H; Arden, Nigel K; Carr, Andrew J; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Thomas, Geraint E; Weinans, Harrie; Glyn-Jones, Sion

    2013-10-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is characterized by abnormal contact between the proximal femur and the acetabulum. Two subtypes have been described: pincer impingement, caused by an overcovered acetabulum; and cam impingement, which occurs as a result of an aspherical femoral head (cam abnormality). A strong correlation exists between cam impingement and the subsequent development of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Major cam abnormalities confer a high risk of OA. However, the association between cam abnormalities and the pathology of OA has been difficult to compare between studies, as different methods have been used to define the abnormality. Cam abnormalities are acquired during skeletal growth and could be influenced by high impact sporting activities. Preventative treatments aiming to reduce the incidence of cam abnormalities and subsequent OA could, therefore, be developed. In this Perspective, we discuss the current understanding of FAI, focusing on cam abnormalities and their association with OA.

  13. A new radiological index for assessing asphericity of the femoral head in cam impingement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosvig, K K; Jacobsen, S; Palm, H

    2007-01-01

    Femoroacetabular cam impingement is thought to be a cause of premature osteoarthritis of the hip. The presence of cam malformation was determined in 2803 standardised anteroposterior (AP) pelvic radiographs from the Copenhagen Osteoarthritis Study by measuring the alpha (alpha) angle...

  14. The CAM-S: development and validation of a new scoring system for delirium severity in 2 cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Sharon K; Kosar, Cyrus M; Tommet, Douglas; Schmitt, Eva M; Puelle, Margaret R; Saczynski, Jane S; Marcantonio, Edward R; Jones, Richard N

    2014-04-15

    Quantifying the severity of delirium is essential to advancing clinical care by improved understanding of delirium effect, prognosis, pathophysiology, and response to treatment. To develop and validate a new delirium severity measure (CAM-S) based on the Confusion Assessment Method. Validation analysis in 2 independent cohorts. Three academic medical centers. The first cohort included 300 patients aged 70 years or older scheduled for major surgery. The second included 919 medical patients aged 70 years or older. A 4-item short form and a 10-item long form were developed. Association of the maximum CAM-S score during hospitalization with hospital and posthospital outcomes related to delirium was evaluated. Representative results included adjusted mean length of stay, which increased across levels of short-form severity from 6.5 days (95% CI, 6.2 to 6.9 days) to 12.7 days (CI, 11.2 to 14.3 days) (P for trend < 0.001) and across levels of long-form severity from 5.6 days (CI, 5.1 to 6.1 days) to 11.9 days (CI, 10.8 to 12.9 days) (P for trend < 0.001). Representative results for the composite outcome of adjusted relative risk of death or nursing home residence at 90 days increased progressively across levels of short-form severity from 1.0 (referent) to 2.5 (CI, 1.9 to 3.3) (P for trend < 0.001) and across levels of long-form severity from 1.0 (referent) to 2.5 (CI, 1.6 to 3.7) (P for trend < 0.001). Data on clinical outcomes were measured in an older data set limited to patients aged 70 years or older. The CAM-S provides a new delirium severity measure with strong psychometric properties and strong associations with important clinical outcomes. National Institute on Aging.

  15. Comparison of phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins from HeLa and Krebs II ascites-tumour cells by cyclic AMP-dependent and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Beier, H; Speichermann, N

    1980-01-01

    identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Almost identical results were obtained when ribosomal subunits from HeLa or ascites-tumour cells were used. About 50-60% of the total radioactive phosphate incorporated into small-subunit ribosomal proteins by either kinase was associated with protein S6...

  16. Correction of the X-linked immunodeficiency phenotype by transgenic expression of human Bruton tyrosine kinase under the control of the class II major histocompatibility complex Ea locus control region.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); S. Raguz (Selina); A.P.M. de Wit (Ton); G.M. Dingjan (Gemma); H.F.J. Savelkoul (Huub); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractBruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for the development of pre-B cells to mature B cell stages. Btk-deficient mice manifest an X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) defect characterized by a reduction of peripheral IgMlow IgDhigh B cells, a lack of peritoneal CD5+ B cells, low serum

  17. Correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in Chicago area children with diabetes (DM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jennifer L; Cao, Dingcai; Miller, Jonathan G; Lipton, Rebecca B

    2009-08-01

    To correlate complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in children with diabetes mellitus (DM) with DM control and other family or disease characteristics. Parents/guardians of children with DM were interviewed about demographics, clinical characteristics, CAM use, health care beliefs, psychosocial variables, and religious beliefs. The child's hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) value from the visit was collected. Statistical analyses included chi(2), Fisher's exact test, and 2-sample t-tests. 106 families with type 1 DM were interviewed. 33% of children tried CAM in the last year; 75% of parents had ever tried CAM. Children most commonly tried faith healing or prayer; parents most commonly tried faith healing or prayer, chiropractic, massage, and herbal teas. Children were more likely to have used CAM if their parents or siblings used CAM or their family was more religious. They were more likely to have discussed CAM with their providers if they used CAM. Parents of child CAM users reported more problems with DM treatment adherence. Children with DM used CAM. There were no differences in DM control, demographics, healthcare beliefs, stress, or quality of life between CAM users and non-users. Practitioners should inquire about CAM use to improve DM care for children.

  18. The development of cam-type deformity in adolescent and young male soccer players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Agricola (Rintje); J.H.J.M. Bessems (Gert); A.Z. Ginai (Abida); M.P. Heijboer (Rien); R.A. van der Heijden (Rianne); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); H.H. Weinans (Harrie); J.H. Waarsing (Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Cam impingement is a well-recognized cause of hip pain and might cause osteoarthritis of the hip. Clinically, cam impingement is mostly observed in young, active male patients, but only a few studies have focused on the manifestation of cam-type deformities during skeletal

  19. The role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Germany - a focus group study of GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joos, S.; Musselmann, B.; Miksch, A.; Rosemann, T.J.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been a marked increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in recent years worldwide. In Germany, apart from 'Heilpraktiker' (= state-licensed, non-medical CAM practitioners), some general practitioners (GPs) provide CAM in their practices. This paper

  20. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Studying Kinetochore Kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saurin, Adrian T; Kops, Geert J P L

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic kinetochores are signaling network hubs that regulate chromosome movements, attachment error-correction, and the spindle assembly checkpoint. Key switches in these networks are kinases and phosphatases that enable rapid responses to changing conditions. Describing the mechanisms and dynamics

  2. Pyruvate kinase blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003357.htm Pyruvate kinase blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... energy when oxygen levels are low. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. In the laboratory, white blood ...

  3. ChemCam analysis of Martian fine dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasue, Jeremie; Mangold, Nicolas; Cousin, Agnes; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Wiens, Roger; Gasnault, Olivier; Rapin, William; Schroder, Susanne; Ollila, Ann; Fabre, Cécile; Berger, Gilles; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Dehouck, Erwin; Forni, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre; Anderson, Ryan; Bridges, Nathan; Clark, Benton; Clegg, Samuel; d'Uston, Claude; Goetz, Walter; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lanza, Nina; Madsen, Morten; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton; Sautter, Violaine; Martin-Torres, Javier; Zorzano, Maria-Paz; MSL Science Team

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we examine the chemical composition of dust observed by the Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover at Gale Crater. The Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy technique analyses samples without preparation, which allows detection of the elemental composition of surface deposits. Mars aeolian fine dust (graphite for carbon and an alloy of titanium). ChemCam passive spectroscopy also indicates varying deposition of the dust cover on the CCCT.Major elements are quantified and shown to be very similar to the fine soils encountered at Gale crater. The composition is also similar to the soils and fine dust measured by APXS for the elements common to both instruments. The minor elements quantified by ChemCam (Ba, Sr, Rb, Li, Mn, Cr) are within the range of soil surveys, but we see a higher concentration of Li than in other types of remotely characterized targets. Sulfur is possibly detected at the ChemCam limit of detection. Hydrogen is clearly identified, indicating that this fine dust is a contributor to the H content of the martian soils, as also detected by the SAM and CheMin instruments, and provides constraints as to which fraction of the Martian surface is hydrated and altered. In conclusion, the finest fraction of dust particles on the surface of Mars contains hydrated components mixed intimately within the fine aeolian dust fraction, suggesting that this dust likely originates from mechanical weathering of altered grains.

  4. Design of the OmegaCAM Instrument Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruffolo, Andrea; Bortolussi, Alessandro; De Pizzol, Luigi; Magagna, Carlo E.

    2002-12-01

    OmegaCAM is a wide field optical imager that is expected to start its operations towards the end of 2003, at the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), part of the VLT Observatory, operated in Paranal (Chile) by the European Southern Observatory (ESO). OmegaCAM will almost completely fill VST one squared degree field of view with a CCD imaging mosaic 16k x 16k pixels in size. In addition to the scientific array, four auxiliary CCDs will be used for autoguiding and image analysis. Despite its conceptual simplicity and due to the large size of the CCD mosaic, OmegaCAM posed several challenges in the design of its mechanics, electronics, cryogenics and software. In this paper we report on the design of the OmegaCAM Instrument Software (INS), which is in charge of the control and operations of the instrument. We first introduce the instrument control system characteristics and the INS software development process. We then describe the main characteristics of the INS subsystems in charge of instrument functions control, autoguiding, image analysis and operations coordination. Finally, we discuss the performances expected from the software in the acquisition and storage of the large amount of data that will come from the scientific array.

  5. S-Cam Update - Novel Capabilities for Resolving Old Problems !

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, N.; Moore, P.

    2000-09-01

    In a previous article in this newsletter (ING Newsletter, No. 1, p. 13) we presented the novel Superconducting Tunnel Junction detector (STJ). A novel technological advance ready to open up the skies for new discoveries. Since then much work has been done by the team at ESA to improve S-Cam and the third run of this camera has been successfully completed.

  6. Synthesis and analysis of coupler curves with combined planar cam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cam and follower mechanisms are widely used to convert a rotary input motion into a controlled reciprocating or oscillating motion as output in machines or robots. As this mechanism has an ability to provide unlimited variety of output motions. Many works are done on the synthesis of coupler curves or path generation ...

  7. Footage: Action Cam Shorts as Cartographic Captures of Time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, N.

    2015-01-01

    This short article reflects on short videos of action cam footage that are widely disseminated on online platforms. These first-person perspective shorts are compared to early cinema’s phantom rides in the use of point-of-view shots, and a dizzying effect of heightened mobility and versatility in

  8. Footage: Action Cam Shorts as Cartographic Captures of Time.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, N.

    2015-01-01

    This short article reflects on short videos of action cam footage that are widely disseminated on online platforms. These first-person perspective shorts are compared to early cinema’s phantom rides in the use of point-of-view shots, and a dizzying effect of heightened mobility and versatility in

  9. SenseCam: A new tool for memory rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, L; Silva, A R; Fitamen, C; Moulin, C J A; Souchay, C

    2016-12-01

    The emergence of life-logging technologies has led neuropsychologist to focus on understanding how this new technology could help patients with memory disorders. Despite the growing number of studies using life-logging technologies, a theoretical framework supporting its effectiveness is lacking. This review focuses on the use of life-logging in the context of memory rehabilitation, particularly the use of SenseCam, a wearable camera allowing passive image capture. In our opinion, reviewing SenseCam images can be effective for memory rehabilitation only if it provides more than an assessment of prior occurrence in ways that reinstates previous thoughts, feelings and sensory information, thus stimulating recollection. Considering the fact that, in memory impairment, self-initiated processes are impaired, we propose that the environmental support hypothesis can explain the value of SenseCam for memory retrieval. Twenty-five research studies were selected for this review and despite the general acceptance of the value of SenseCam as a memory technique, only a small number of studies focused on recollection. We discuss the usability of this tool to improve episodic memory and in particular, recollection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shembish, F.A.; Tong, H.; Kaizer, M.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. METHODS: Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava

  11. A Study to Detect CAM Plants in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagjjav Oyunger el

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to discover CAM plants from the Mongolian flora, four species, Orostachys spinosa (L. C. A. Mey ., O. malacophylla (Pall. Fisch ., O. thyrsiflora Fisch . and Sedum aizoon L. of Crassulaceae D.C . family were examined in terms of their leaf anatomy , photosynthesis and transpiration intensity for a 24- hour cycle. Photosynthesis by these plants has been studied using isotope-discriminate analysis ( δ 13 C and a special method for CAM. Transpiration was measured by the weight-method and leaf anatomy and stomatal movement by microscopy . 13 C/ 12 C value of Orostachys spinosa , O. thyrsiflora C 4 -like (-13.44 %ο ,- 18.10 %ο , O. malacophylla , Sedum aizoon C 3 -like (-25.03 %ο ,-26.32 %ο . CAM plant characters are clearly discovered in two species Orostachys spinosa and O. malacophylla. Although dif ferences in the acidity value cycle of Sedum aizoon in terms of a 24-hour cycle was similar to the previous two plants, stomatal movement was commonly closed during night and day showing that we need to conduct more future studies for this species. Orostachys thyrsiflora does not have CAM photosynthetic response.

  12. Performance Characteristics of a Cam Turning Attachment | Tuleun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A modification of a cylindrical turning unit has been done to give a non-cylindrical turning attachment for production of irregular shapes, like cams on the lathe machine. To assess the performance of the attachment, cutting forces have been measured using a 'Sigma' Cutting Tool Dynamometer. Furthermore, the effect of ...

  13. The pineapple genome and the evolution of CAM photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) is the most economically valuable crop possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a photosynthetic carbon assimilation pathway with high water-use efficiency, and the second most important tropical fruit. We sequenced the genomes of pineapple varieties F153 ...

  14. Development and comparison of nonradioactive in vitro kinase assays for NIMA-related kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guixian; Aulabaugh, Ann; Pocas, Jennifer; Liu, Hao; Kriz, Ron; Sampath, Deepak

    2006-11-01

    NIMA (never in mitosis arrest)-related kinase 2 (Nek2) is a serine/threonine kinase required for centrosome splitting and bipolar spindle formation during mitosis. Currently, two in vitro kinase assays are commercially available: (i) a radioactive assay from Upstate Biotechnology and (ii) a nonradioactive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay from Invitrogen. However, due to several limitations such as radioactive waste management and lower sensitivity, a need for more robust nonradioactive assays would be ideal. Accordingly, we have developed four quantitative and sensitive nonradioactive Nek2 in vitro kinase assays: (i) a dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) using peptides identified from a physiologically relevant protein substrate, (ii) DELFIA using Nek2 itself, (iii) a homogeneous time-resolved FRET assay termed LANCE, and (iv) A method of detecting phosphorylated products by HPLC. The DELFIA and LANCE assays are robust in that they generated more than 10-fold and 20-fold increases in signal-to-noise ratios, respectively, and are amenable to robotic high-throughput screening platforms. Validation of all four assays was confirmed by identifying a panel of small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors from an internal corporate library. The most potent compounds consistently demonstrated less than 100 nM activity regardless of the assay format and therefore were complementary. In summary, the Nek2 in vitro time-resolved FRET kinase assays reported are sensitive, quantitative, reproducible and amenable to high-throughput screening with improved waste management over radioactive assays.

  15. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases: Function, structure, and inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boura, Evzen, E-mail: boura@uochb.cas.cz; Nencka, Radim, E-mail: nencka@uochb.cas.cz

    2015-10-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) synthesize phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P), a key member of the phosphoinositide family. PI4P defines the membranes of Golgi and trans-Golgi network (TGN) and regulates trafficking to and from the Golgi. Humans have two type II PI4Ks (α and β) and two type III enzymes (α and β). Recently, the crystal structures were solved for both type II and type III kinase revealing atomic details of their function. Importantly, the type III PI4Ks are hijacked by +RNA viruses to create so-called membranous web, an extensively phosphorylated and modified membrane system dedicated to their replication. Therefore, selective and potent inhibitors of PI4Ks have been developed as potential antiviral agents. Here we focus on the structure and function of PI4Ks and their potential in human medicine.

  16. Translucency of esthetic dental restorative CAD/CAM materials and composite resins with respect to thickness and surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Liebermann, Anja; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2015-06-01

    Little information is available about the translucency of monolithic CAD/CAM materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the translucency of restorative CAD/CAM materials and direct composite resins with respect to thickness and surface roughness. In total, 240 disk-shaped specimens (12×14×1 mm and 12×14×2 mm) of 3 different CAD/CAM glass ceramics (CELTRA Duo, IPS e.max CAD, IPS Empress CAD), a fine-structure feldspathic ceramic (VITA Mark II), a hybrid ceramic (VITA Enamic), a resin nanoceramic composite resin (LAVA Ultimate), an experimental (CAD/CAM nanohybrid composite resin), 2 interim materials (Telio CAD; VITA CAD-Temp), and 3 direct composite resins (Tetric EvoCeram; Filtek Supreme XTE; Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) were fabricated (n=10). After 3 different surface pretreatments (polished, rough SiC P1200, or SiC P500), absolute translucency and surface roughness were measured using spectrophotometry and tactile profilometry. The influence of material type, thickness, and roughness on absolute translucency was analyzed using a multivariate analysis, 1-way ANOVA, and the Tukey HSD post hoc test (P<.05). Pearson correlations and statistical hypothesis tests were used to assess the results (P<.05). The effect of all tested parameters was significant among the materials (P<.05). The greatest influence on the measured translucency was thickness (partial eta squared ηP²=.988), closely followed by material (.982), and the pretreatment method (.835). The surface roughness was strongly influenced by the pretreatment method (.975) and type of material (.941). Thickness and surface roughness are major factors affecting the absolute translucency of adhesively luted restorations. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bonding between CAD/CAM resin and resin composite cements dependent on bonding agents: three different in vitro test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Simona; Keul, Christine; Roos, Malgorzata; Edelhoff, Daniel; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bonding properties between CAD/CAM resin and three resin composite cements combined with different bonding agents using three test methods. Four hundred twenty CAD/CAM resin substrates were fabricated and divided into three test methods (shear bond strength (SBS, n = 180), tensile bond strength (TBS, n = 180) and work of adhesion (WA, n = 60)), further into four pretreatment methods (VP connect (VP), visio.link (VL), Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CP) and no pretreatment (CG)) and three cements (RelyX ARC, Variolink II and Clearfil SA Cement). Each subgroup contained 15 specimens. SBS and TBS were measured after 24 h H2O/37 °C + 5000 thermal-cycles (5/55 °C) and failure types were assessed. WA was determined for pretreated CAD/CAM resin and non-polymerized resin composite cements. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis H, Chi(2) and Spearman's Rho tests. Within SBS and TBS tests, CGs and groups pretreated with CP (regardless of resin composite cements), and VP pretreated with Clearfil SA Cement showed no bond. However, CG combined with RelyX ARC showed a TBS of 5.6 ± 1.3 MPa. In general, highest bond strength was observed for groups treated with VL. CG and groups pretreated using VL showed lower WA than the groups treated with VP or CP. Measured TBS values were higher than SBS ones. In general, SBS and TBS showed similar trends for the ranges of the values for the groups. WA results were not comparable with SBS/TBS results and admitted, therefore, no conclusions on it. For a clinical use of XHIP-CAD/CAM resin, the bond surface should be additionally pretreated with visio.link as bonding agent.

  18. Linking cytochrome P450cam (Cyp101) to its redox partner putidaredoxin and probing new reactions of the P450cam system

    OpenAIRE

    Rojubally, Adina

    2008-01-01

    The most recognized activity of P450cam is the oxidation of the unactivated C-H bond at C-5 of D (+)-camphor to an alcohol moiety. This hydroxylation reaction has few counterparts in chemical synthesis; hence, the application of cytochrome P450cam for industrial purposes has practical potential. P450¬cam requires a carefully orchestrated reaction cycle, which includes two electron transfer partners: putidaredoxin (Pdx) and putidaredoxin reductase (Pdr). Studies have shown that Pdx plays an es...

  19. Evolution of CAM and C4 carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms for concentrating carbon around the Rubisco enzyme, which drives the carbon-reducing steps in photosynthesis, are widespread in plants; in vascular plants they are known as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and C4 photosynthesis. CAM is common in desert succulents, tropical epiphytes, and aquatic plants and is characterized by nighttime fixation of CO2. The proximal selective factor driving the evolution of this CO2-concentrating pathway is low daytime CO2, which results from the unusual reverse stomatal behavior of terrestrial CAM species or from patterns of ambient CO2 availability for aquatic CAM species. In terrestrials the ultimate selective factor is water stress that has selected for increased water use efficiency. In aquatics the ultimate selective factor is diel fluctuations in CO2 availability for palustrine species and extreme oligotrophic conditions for lacustrine species. C4 photosynthesis is based on similar biochemistry but carboxylation steps are spatially separated in the leaf rather than temporally as in CAM. This biochemical pathway is most commonly associated with a specialized leaf anatomy known as Kranz anatomy; however, there are exceptions. The ultimate selective factor driving the evolution of this pathway is excessively high photorespiration that inhibits normal C3 photosynthesis under high light and high temperature in both terrestrial and aquatic habitats. CAM is an ancient pathway that likely has been present since the Paleozoic era in aquatic species from shallow-water palustrine habitats. While atmospheric CO2 levels have undoubtedly affected the evolution of terrestrial plant carbon-concentrating mechanisms, there is reason to believe that past atmospheric changes have not played as important a selective role in the aquatic milieu since palustrine habitats today are not generally carbon sinks, and the selective factors driving aquatic CAM are autogenic. Terrestrial CAM, in contrast, is of increasing selective value under

  20. Comparative in vitro wear resistance of CAD/CAM composite resin and ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Li; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2016-02-01

    Composite resin is a promising option in computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) dentistry; however, the wear resistance of composite resin remains a primary concern. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the wear resistance of 5 CAD/CAM materials (n=10), consisting of 4 composite resins (3M Lava Ultimate, Kerr experimental composite resin material, Vita Enamic, 3M Paradigm MZ100) and 1 ceramic (Vita Mark II) in contact with natural human enamel cusps. Specimens were loaded into a computer-controlled mastication simulator and subjected to 200000 mechanical cycles (49 N) against natural human enamel simultaneously with 500 thermal cycles (5°C to 50°C to 5°C). The wear resistance was analyzed by measuring the vertical substance loss (the maximum depth of the worn area) in the contact point area of the specimen. The worn surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy to determine the wear patterns. Vita Mark II exhibited the best wear resistance among the tested materials, followed by 3M Lava Ultimate, Vita Enamic, and 3M Paradigm MZ100. The Kerr experimental material exhibited the lowest wear resistance, yet its results were not significantly different from those of the 3 other composite resin blocks (P>.05). Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the wear resistance of composite resin blocks in contact with enamel cusps was significantly lower than that of a ceramic block. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Secondary Standards programme for OmegaCAM at the VST

    OpenAIRE

    Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Vermeij, Ronald; Valentijn, Edwin; Kuijken, Koen

    2006-01-01

    The OmegaCAM wide-field imager will start operations at the ESO VLT Survey Telescope at Paranal, Chile, in 2007. The photometric calibration of OmegaCAM data depends on standard star measurements that cover the complete 1 square degree FoV of OmegeaCAM. A catalog fullfilling this requirement for eight Landolt equatorial fields, denoted the OmegaCAM Secondary Standards Catalog, will be constructed from OmegaCAM observations during the first year of operations. Here we present the 'Preliminary ...

  2. Catalase activity during C3-CAM transition in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomska, E; Miszalski, Z; Slesak, I; Ratajczak, R

    1999-12-01

    Treatment with 0.4 mol dm(-3) NaCl caused a C3-CAM shift in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. leaves. In parallel to the CAM induction the activity of CAT was significantly decreased. In C3 and in CAM plants CAT activity showed daily fluctuations, with the maximum at the end of the light period. The oscillations of CAT were more pronounced in CAM than in C3 plants. In M. crystallinum CAT activity seems to respond more to CAM induction than to salinity.

  3. Determination of the transphosphorylation sites of Jak2 kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Feng, Jian; Witthuhn, Bruce A.; Sekine, Yuichi; Ihle, James N.

    2004-01-01

    Janus kinases are the key enzymes involved in the initial transmission of signals in response to type I and II cytokines. Activation of the signal begins with the transphosphorylation of Jak kinases. Substrates that give rise to downstream events are recruited to the receptor complex in part by interactions with phosphorylated tyrosines. The identity of many of the phosphotyrosines responsible for recruitment has been elucidated as being receptor-based tyrosines. The ability of Jaks to recrui...

  4. Influence of CAD/CAM zirconia for implant-abutment manufacturing on gingival fibroblasts and oral keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Bell, A; Weyhrauch, M; Schmidtmann, I; Scheller, H; Lehmann, K M

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the influence of three CAD/CAM zirconia ceramics for implant-abutment manufacturing on cell viability, migration ability, and cytotoxicity of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) and oral keratinocytes (HOK) in vitro. HGF and HOK were cultured on zirconia ceramic disks (VITA In-Ceram YZ, Ivoclar IPS e.max ZirCAD, Sirona inCoris ZI) and on control disks made of tissue culture polystyrene. Cell viability was analyzed by a MTT assay. Migration ability was detected by a scratch assay. A ToxiLight assay was used to analyze the influence of the tested zirconia ceramics on adenylate kinase (ADK) release and cytotoxicity. At MTT assay, HGF showed an increased cell viability compared to the control after 9 and 12 days for all ceramics (p each ≤0.0002) while HOK demonstrated a decreased cell viability after 9 and 12 days for all ceramics (p each ≤0.0003). At scratch assay, HGF exhibited for all ceramics decreased relative distances of the scratch wound compared to the control from 24 to 48 h (p each zirconia ceramics on HGF and HOK could be shown. The analyzed zirconia ceramics could influence oral soft-tissue cells that might affect the esthetic outcome after implant placement using CAD/CAM zirconia abutments.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Campylobacter jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, Associated with a Large Outbreak of Foodborne Illness in Fukuoka, Japan, in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Naoto; Yamamoto, Shiori; Maruyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-15

    Here, we report the draft genome sequences of Campylobacter jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, which were associated with a large outbreak of foodborne illness originating from undercooked chicken sushi in Fukuoka, Japan, in May 2016. Their genome sizes were 1,690,901 and 1,704,736 bp, with 22 and 23 rRNAs, 9 and 9 tRNAs, and 411× and 419× coverage for C. jejuni CAM970 and C. coli CAM962, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Asakura et al.

  6. Signal Integration at Elongation Factor 2 Kinase: THE ROLES OF CALCIUM, CALMODULIN, AND SER-500 PHOSPHORYLATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Clint D J; Giles, David H; Stancu, Gabriel; Chitjian, Catrina A; Ferguson, Scarlett B; Wellmann, Rebecca M; Kaoud, Tamer S; Ghose, Ranajeet; Dalby, Kevin N

    2017-02-03

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF-2K), the only calmodulin (CaM)-dependent member of the unique α-kinase family, impedes protein synthesis by phosphorylating eEF-2. We recently identified Thr-348 and Ser-500 as two key autophosphorylation sites within eEF-2K that regulate its activity. eEF-2K is regulated by Ca2+ ions and multiple upstream signaling pathways, but how it integrates these signals into a coherent output, i.e. phosphorylation of eEF-2, is unclear. This study focuses on understanding how the post-translational phosphorylation of Ser-500 integrates with Ca2+ and CaM to regulate eEF-2K. CaM is shown to be absolutely necessary for efficient activity of eEF-2K, and Ca2+ is shown to enhance the affinity of CaM toward eEF-2K. Ser-500 is found to undergo autophosphorylation in cells treated with ionomycin and is likely also targeted by PKA. In vitro, autophosphorylation of Ser-500 is found to require Ca2+ and CaM and is inhibited by mutations that compromise binding of phosphorylated Thr-348 to an allosteric binding pocket on the kinase domain. A phosphomimetic Ser-500 to aspartic acid mutation (eEF-2K S500D) enhances the rate of activation (Thr-348 autophosphorylation) by 6-fold and lowers the EC50 for Ca2+/CaM binding to activated eEF-2K (Thr-348 phosphorylated) by 20-fold. This is predicted to result in an elevation of the cellular fraction of active eEF-2K. In support of this mechanism, eEF-2K knock-out MCF10A cells reconstituted with eEF-2K S500D display relatively high levels of phospho-eEF-2 under basal conditions. This study reports how phosphorylation of a regulatory site (Ser-500) integrates with Ca2+ and CaM to influence eEF-2K activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use by menopausal women: a systematic review of surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzki, P; Lee, M S; Moon, T W; Choi, T Y; Park, T Y; Ernst, E

    2013-05-01

    Large proportions of women have turned to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for relief from their menopausal symptoms. This highlights the need for more rigorous research into CAM. This article is aimed at critically reviewing surveys that examine the prevalence of CAM use by menopausal women worldwide. Eleven databases were searched for peer-reviewed surveys published in any language between 01 January 2000 and 27 October 2012. The bibliographies of the retrieved articles and relevant book chapters were also hand searched. Twenty-six surveys were identified, and they included a total of 32,465 menopausal women. The majority of these surveys were of poor methodological quality. Based on 6 surveys, 32.9% of women stated they were current/regular CAM users. Based on 9 surveys, 50.5% of women reported that they used CAM specifically for their menopausal symptoms. The average 12-month prevalence of CAM use was 47.7% (range: 33.1-56.2). Fifty-five percent of women did not disclose their use of CAM to their healthcare professional. The majority of women sought information about CAM from the media. The most popular CAM modality was herbal medicine, followed by soy/phytoestrogens, evening primrose oil, relaxation and yoga. There are a large number of predominantly low-quality surveys monitoring the prevalence of CAM use among menopausal women worldwide. The available evidence suggests that the prevalence of CAM use is high. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Perspectives of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Erin; Sevigny, Marika; Sabarre, Kelley-Anne; Phillips, Karen P

    2014-10-14

    Infertility patients are increasingly using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to supplement or replace conventional fertility treatments. The objective of this study was to determine the roles of CAM practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted in Ottawa, Canada in 2011 with CAM practitioners who specialized in naturopathy, acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, hypnotherapy and integrated medicine. CAM practitioners played an active role in both treatment and support of infertility, using a holistic, interdisciplinary and individualized approach. CAM practitioners recognized biological but also environmental and psychosomatic determinants of infertility. Participants were receptive to working with physicians, however little collaboration was described. Integrated infertility patient care through both collaboration with CAM practitioners and incorporation of CAM's holistic, individualized and interdisciplinary approaches would greatly benefit infertility patients.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in advanced cancer: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truant, Tracy L; Porcino, Antony J; Ross, Brenda C; Wong, Margurite E; Hilario, Carla T

    2013-09-01

    This systematic review synthesizes knowledge about the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among advanced cancer patients. EBSCO and Ovid databases were searched using core concepts, including advanced cancer, CAM, integrative medicine, and decision-making. Articles included in the final review were analyzed using narrative synthesis methods, including thematic analysis, concept mapping, and critical reflection on the synthesis process. Results demonstrate that advanced cancer patients who are younger, female, more educated, have longer duration of disease, and have previously used CAM are more likely to use CAM during this stage of illness. Key themes identified include patterns of and reasons for use; and barriers and facilitators to informed CAM decision-making. Knowledge regarding the use of CAM in advanced cancer remains in its nascent stages. Findings suggest a need for more research on understanding the dynamic process of CAM decision-making in the advanced cancer population from the patients' perspective.

  10. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM as Part of the Oncological Treatment: Survey about Patients' Attitude towards CAM in a University-Based Oncology Center in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin A Kessel

    Full Text Available To understand if and which patients would be open-minded to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use parallel to their oncological treatment. Moreover, we sought to determine which methods are most accepted and which are the primary motivators to use CAM.We developed and anonymously conducted a questionnaire for patients in the oncology center (TU Munich. Questions focus on different CAM methods, previous experiences, and willingness to apply or use CAM when offered in a university-based setting.A total of 171 of 376 patients (37.4% women, 62.0% men, 0.6% unknown participated. This corresponds to a return rate of 45%. Median age was 64 years (17-87 years. Of all participants, 15.2% used CAM during their oncological therapy; 32.7% have used it in the past. The majority (81.9% was not using CAM during therapy; 55.5% have not used CAM in the past respectively. The analysis revealed a significant correlation between education and CAM use during therapy (r = 0.18; p = 0.02, and CAM use in the past (r = 0.17; p = 0.04. Of all patients using CAM during therapy, favored methods were food supplements (42.3%, vitamins/minerals (42.3%, massage (34.6%. Motivations are especially the reduction of side effect and stress, the positive effect of certain CAM-treatments on the immune system and tumor therapy. Results showed no difference between women and men. Most patients not having had any experience with CAM complain about the deficiency of information by their treating oncologist (31.4% as well as missing treatment possibilities (54.3%.Since many patients believe in study results demonstrating the efficacy of CAM, it stresses our task to develop innovative study protocols to investigate the outcomes of certain CAM on symptom reduction or other endpoints. Thus, prospective trials and innovative evidence-based treatment concepts to include CAM into high-end oncology is what patients demand and what a modern oncology center should offer.

  11. Application of Kinase Inhibitors for Anti-aging Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Mercedes; Ayala, Antonio; Marotta, Francesco; Arguelles, Sandro

    2017-11-16

    Protein phosphorylation, mediated by protein kinases, has important physiological and pathological implications in our lives. Targeting kinase is one of the most interesting of the emerging topics in the pharmaceutical industry, especially since there is a focus on cancer therapy. Given that kinases may be involved in the aging process the focus will be on using the kinase inhibitor for anti-aging intervention to enhance healthspan and increase longevity. In this review, we will summarize: (i) the impact of the phosphoproteomic approach to elucidate molecular mechanisms of diseases; (ii) importance of the drug discovery approach for targeting kinases; (iii) the dysregulation of Janus kinase (JAK) / signal-transducing adapter molecules (STAT) and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6Ks) pathway in aging and the age-related process; (iv) the epidemiological studies available in order to see whether a correlation between JAK/STAT and S6Ks mRNA expression levels exist in cancer and in patient outcome; (v) finally, we will show selected inhibitors of these kinases approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. From Phosphosites to Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Stephanie; Refsgaard, Jan C; Olsen, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    Kinases play a pivotal role in propagating the phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks in living cells. With the overwhelming quantities of phosphoproteomics data being generated, the number of identified phosphorylation sites (phosphosites) is ever increasing. Often, proteomics investigations...... sequence motifs, mostly based on large scale in vivo and in vitro experiments. The context of the kinase and the phosphorylated proteins in a biological system is equally important for predicting association between the enzymes and substrates, an aspect that is also being tackled with available...

  13. High-performance CAM-based Prolog execution scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Yahia, Tahar; Dana, Michel

    1991-03-01

    In this paper, we present an execution scheme allowing a direct and a pipeline evaluation of a Prolog Program. The execution scheme enhances Prolog performances in interpreted mode, by means of associative processing tools embodied in Content Addressable Memories and potential parallelism existing between clauses selection, unification, and access to clause arguments. The interpretation algorithm is distributed on several processing units, which are Content Addressable Memories (CAMs). These latter are generic and reconfigurable dealing with much more Artificial Intelligence applications, through improved target languages like Prolog, Lisp, and Object oriented languages. The model has been evaluated with a functional simulator written in Le-lisp. The results show the CAMs feasibility in improving Prolog execution at performances greater than 160 KLIPS, in interpreted mode.

  14. Lucrécio, Camões e os deuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Torres

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata do uso que Lucrécio e Camões fizeram dos deuses da mitologia clássica, por razões pertinentes às convenções da poesia épica e a despeito de sua descrença na existência dos mesmos, sugerindo que ambos constróem os deuses para depois desconstruí-los de forma cabal e definitiva.

  15. An open CAM system for dentistry on the basis of China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and industrial CAM software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Liu, Shusheng; Shi, Shenggen; Yang, Jianzhong

    2011-10-01

    China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and domestically developed industrial computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology were used for full crown fabrication and measurement of crown accuracy, with an attempt to establish an open CAM system for dental processing and to promote the introduction of domestic dental computer-aided design (CAD)/CAM system. Commercially available scanning equipment was used to make a basic digital tooth model after preparation of crown, and CAD software that comes with the scanning device was employed to design the crown by using domestic industrial CAM software to process the crown data in order to generate a solid model for machining purpose, and then China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool was used to complete machining of the whole crown and the internal accuracy of the crown internal was measured by using 3D-MicroCT. The results showed that China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool in combination with domestic industrial CAM technology can be used for crown making and the crown was well positioned in die. The internal accuracy was successfully measured by using 3D-MicroCT. It is concluded that an open CAM system for dentistry on the basis of China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and domestic industrial CAM software has been established, and development of the system will promote the introduction of domestically-produced dental CAD/CAM system.

  16. A phase I/II trial of AT9283, a selective inhibitor of aurora kinase in children with relapsed or refractory acute leukemia: challenges to run early phase clinical trials for children with leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vormoor, B; Veal, G J; Griffin, M J; Boddy, A V; Irving, J; Minto, L; Case, M; Banerji, U; Swales, K E; Tall, J R; Moore, A S; Toguchi, M; Acton, G; Dyer, K; Schwab, C; Harrison, C J; Grainger, J D; Lancaster, D; Kearns, P; Hargrave, D; Vormoor, J

    2017-06-01

    Aurora kinases regulate mitosis and are commonly overexpressed in leukemia. This phase I/IIa study of AT9283, a multikinase inhibitor, was designed to identify maximal tolerated doses, safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic activity in children with relapsed/refractory acute leukemia. The trial suffered from poor recruitment and terminated early, therefore failing to identify its primary endpoints. AT9283 caused tolerable toxicity, but failed to show clinical responses. Future trials should be based on robust preclinical data that provide an indication of which patients may benefit from the experimental agent, and recruitment should be improved through international collaborations and early combination with established treatment strategies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Product Recommendation System Based on Personal Preference Model Using CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoko; Yoshioka, Nobukazu; Orihara, Ryohei; Furukawa, Koichi

    Product recommendation system is realized by applying business rules acquired by data maining techniques. Business rules such as demographical patterns of purchase, are able to cover the groups of users that have a tendency to purchase products, but it is difficult to recommend products adaptive to various personal preferences only by utilizing them. In addition to that, it is very costly to gather the large volume of high quality survey data, which is necessary for good recommendation based on personal preference model. A method collecting kansei information automatically without questionnaire survey is required. The constructing personal preference model from less favor data is also necessary, since it is costly for the user to input favor data. In this paper, we propose product recommendation system based on kansei information extracted by text mining and user's preference model constructed by Category-guided Adaptive Modeling, CAM for short. CAM is a feature construction method that can generate new features constructing the space where same labeled examples are close and different labeled examples are far away from some labeled examples. It is possible to construct personal preference model by CAM despite less information of likes and dislikes categories. In the system, retrieval agent gathers the products' specification and user agent manages preference model, user's likes and dislikes. Kansei information of the products is gained by applying text mining technique to the reputation documents about the products on the web site. We carry out some experimental studies to make sure that prefrence model obtained by our method performs effectively.

  18. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in prostate and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Yiannis; Hadjipavlou, Marios; Khan, Shahid; Rane, Abhay

    2013-12-01

    To provide an overview of the scientific and clinical studies underlying the most common vitamin and herbal preparations used in prostate and bladder cancer and evaluate the evidence behind them. A literature search was undertaken on PubMed using various keywords relating to the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in prostate and bladder cancer.Vitamin E and selenium supplementation can potentially have adverse effects by increasing the risk of prostate cancer. Initial clinical studies of pomegranate and green tea, investigating their chemotherapeutic properties in prostate and bladder cancer have yielded encouraging results. Curcumin, resveratrol, and silibinin have potential anticancer properties through multiple molecular targets; their clinical effectiveness in prostate and bladder cancer is yet to be evaluated. Zyflamend, like PC-SPES, is a combined CAM therapy used in prostate cancer. Acupuncture is popular among patients experiencing hot flushes who are receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Conclusive evidence for the use of CAM in prostate and bladder cancer is lacking and not without risk.

  19. CAMS as a tool for human factors research in spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Juergen

    2004-01-01

    The paper reviews a number of research studies that were carried out with a PC-based task environment called Cabin Air Management System (CAMS) simulating the operation of a spacecraft's life support system. As CAMS was a multiple task environment, it allowed the measurement of performance at different levels. Four task components of different priority were embedded in the task environment: diagnosis and repair of system faults, maintaining atmospheric parameters in a safe state, acknowledgement of system alarms (reaction time), and keeping a record of critical system resources (prospective memory). Furthermore, the task environment permitted the examination of different task management strategies and changes in crew member state (fatigue, anxiety, mental effort). A major goal of the research programme was to examine how crew members adapted to various forms of sub-optimal working conditions, such as isolation and confinement, sleep deprivation and noise. None of the studies provided evidence for decrements in primary task performance. However, the results showed a number of adaptive responses of crew members to adjust to the different sub-optimal working conditions. There was evidence for adjustments in information sampling strategies (usually reductions in sampling frequency) as a result of unfavourable working conditions. The results also showed selected decrements in secondary task performance. Prospective memory seemed to be somewhat more vulnerable to sub-optimal working conditions than performance on the reaction time task. Finally, suggestions are made for future research with the CAMS environment.

  20. Use of three-dimensional, CAD/CAM-assisted, virtual surgical simulation and planning in the pediatric craniofacial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Rachel; Gougoutas, Alexander; Nguyen, Vinh; Taylor, Jesse; Bastidas, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Virtual Surgical Planning (VSP) and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) have recently helped improve efficiency and accuracy in many different craniofacial surgeries. Research has mainly focused on the use in the adult population with the exception of the use for mandibular distractions and cranial vault remodeling in the pediatric population. This study aims to elucidate the role of VSP and CAD/CAM in complex pediatric craniofacial cases by exploring its use in the correction of midface hypoplasia, orbital dystopia, mandibular reconstruction, and posterior cranial vault expansion. A retrospective analysis of thirteen patients who underwent 3d, CAD/CAM- assisted preoperative surgical planning between 2012 and 2016 was performed. All CAD/CAM assisted surgical planning was done in conjunction with a third party vendor (either 3D Systems or Materialise). Cutting and positioning guides as well as models were produced based on the virtual plan. Surgeries included free fibula mandible reconstruction (n = 4), lefort I osteotomy and distraction (n = 2), lefort II osteotomy with monobloc distraction (n = 1), expansion of the posterior vault for correction of chiari malformation (n = 3), and secondary orbital and midface reconstruction for facial trauma (n = 3). The patient's age, diagnosis, previous surgeries, length of operating time, complications, and post-surgery satisfaction were determined. In all cases we found presurgical planning was helpful to improve accuracy and significantly decrease intra-operative time. In cases where distraction was used, the planned and actual vectors were found to be accurate with excellent clinical outcomes. There were no complications except for one patient who experienced a wound infection post-operatively which did not alter the ultimate reconstruction. All patients experienced high satisfaction with their outcomes and excellent subjective aesthetic results were achieved. Preoperative planning using

  1. Patterns of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummet, Colleen M; Spector, Michael L; Dawson, Deborah V; Fischer, Mark; Holmes, David C; Warren, John; Nisly, Nicole L

    2015-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a diverse collection of approaches used to prevent or treat diseases. The goal of this study was to examine relationships between dental patient characteristics and current usage of CAM therapies. The CAM definition encompassed 24 therapies excluding prayer. Associations and trends in usage were assessed for gender, income, education, and age. Multivariable logistic and negative binomial models were used to identify factors impacting the use and number of CAM therapies used. In dental patients (n = 402), nearly 67 percent of subjects reported at least one CAM treatment. Gender was significantly associated with recent utilization of CAM, biological, manipulative (all P dental patients reported use of CAM therapies. While CAM therapies and those who use them are diverse, given their widespread use, they clearly have potential impacts on the oral health of the public. Knowledge of the characteristics of dental patients who use CAM therapies is a first step in developing a broader understanding how CAM therapies and associated beliefs may affect oral health and public health programs. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  2. Gas exchange and leaf anatomy of a C3-CAM hybrid, Yucca gloriosa (Asparagaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyduk, Karolina; Burrell, Nia; Lalani, Falak; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2016-03-01

    While the majority of plants use the typical C3 carbon metabolic pathway, ~6% of angiosperms have adapted to carbon limitation as a result of water stress by employing a modified form of photosynthesis known as Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM plants concentrate carbon in the cells by temporally separating atmospheric carbon acquisition from fixation into carbohydrates. CAM has been studied for decades, but the evolutionary progression from C3 to CAM remains obscure. In order to better understand the morphological and physiological characteristics associated with CAM photosynthesis, phenotypic variation was assessed in Yucca aloifolia, a CAM species, Yucca filamentosa, a C3 species, and Yucca gloriosa, a hybrid species derived from these two yuccas exhibiting intermediate C3-CAM characteristics. Gas exchange, titratable leaf acidity, and leaf anatomical traits of all three species were assayed in a common garden under well-watered and drought-stressed conditions. Yucca gloriosa showed intermediate phenotypes for nearly all traits measured, including the ability to acquire carbon at night. Using the variation found among individuals of all three species, correlations between traits were assessed to better understand how leaf anatomy and CAM physiology are related. Yucca gloriosa may be constrained by a number of traits which prevent it from using CAM to as high a degree as Y. aloifolia. The intermediate nature of Y. gloriosa makes it a promising system in which to study the evolution of CAM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. Gas exchange and leaf anatomy of a C3–CAM hybrid, Yucca gloriosa (Asparagaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyduk, Karolina; Burrell, Nia; Lalani, Falak; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2016-01-01

    While the majority of plants use the typical C3 carbon metabolic pathway, ~6% of angiosperms have adapted to carbon limitation as a result of water stress by employing a modified form of photosynthesis known as Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM plants concentrate carbon in the cells by temporally separating atmospheric carbon acquisition from fixation into carbohydrates. CAM has been studied for decades, but the evolutionary progression from C3 to CAM remains obscure. In order to better understand the morphological and physiological characteristics associated with CAM photosynthesis, phenotypic variation was assessed in Yucca aloifolia, a CAM species, Yucca filamentosa, a C3 species, and Yucca gloriosa, a hybrid species derived from these two yuccas exhibiting intermediate C3–CAM characteristics. Gas exchange, titratable leaf acidity, and leaf anatomical traits of all three species were assayed in a common garden under well-watered and drought-stressed conditions. Yucca gloriosa showed intermediate phenotypes for nearly all traits measured, including the ability to acquire carbon at night. Using the variation found among individuals of all three species, correlations between traits were assessed to better understand how leaf anatomy and CAM physiology are related. Yucca gloriosa may be constrained by a number of traits which prevent it from using CAM to as high a degree as Y. aloifolia. The intermediate nature of Y. gloriosa makes it a promising system in which to study the evolution of CAM. PMID:26717954

  4. Evaluating rare amino acid substitutions (RGC_CAMs in a yeast model clade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Polzin

    Full Text Available When inferring phylogenetic relationships, not all sites in a sequence alignment are equally informative. One recently proposed approach that takes advantage of this inequality relies on sites that contain amino acids whose replacement requires multiple substitutions. Identifying these so-called RGC_CAM substitutions (after Rare Genomic Changes as Conserved Amino acids-Multiple substitutions requires that, first, at any given site in the amino acid sequence alignment, there must be a minimum of two different amino acids; second, each amino acid must be present in at least two taxa; and third, the amino acids must require a minimum of two nucleotide substitutions to replace each other. Although theory suggests that RGC_CAM substitutions are expected to be rare and less likely to be homoplastic, the informativeness of RGC_CAM substitutions has not been extensively evaluated in biological data sets. We investigated the quality of RGC_CAM substitutions by examining their degree of homoplasy and internode certainty in nearly 2.7 million aligned amino acid sites from 5,261 proteins from five species belonging to the yeast Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade whose phylogeny is well-established. We identified 2,647 sites containing RGC_CAM substitutions, a number that contrasts sharply with the 100,887 sites containing RGC_non-CAM substitutions (i.e., changes between amino acids that require only a single nucleotide substitution. We found that RGC_CAM substitutions had significantly lower homoplasy than RGC_non-CAM ones; specifically RGC_CAM substitutions showed a per-site average homoplasy index of 0.100, whereas RGC_non-CAM substitutions had a homoplasy index of 0.215. Internode certainty values were also higher for sites containing RGC_CAM substitutions than for RGC_non-CAM ones. These results suggest that RGC_CAM substitutions possess a strong phylogenetic signal and are useful markers for phylogenetic inference despite their rarity.

  5. Functional significance of the hepaCAM gene in bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Lie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hepaCAM gene encodes a new immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule, and its expression is suppressed in a variety of human cancers. Additionally, hepaCAM possesses properties often observed in tumor suppressor genes. However, the expression and biological function of hepaCAM has not been investigated in bladder cancer. Therefore we sought to examine hepaCAM expression and the relationship between its structure and function in human transitional cell carcinoma of bladder (TCCB. Materials and methods HepaCAM expression was evaluated in 28 normal and 34 TCCB bladder specimens and 2 TCCB cell lines using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The wild-type hepaCAM and the extracellular domain-truncated mutant gene were transfected into the TCCB cell line T24, and the biological properties of both the wild-type gene and the domain-truncated mutant were then assessed. Results HepaCAM expression was down-regulated in 82% (28/34 of TCCB specimens and undetectable in the 2 TCCB cell lines tested. The localization of hepaCAM appeared to be dependent on cell density in T24 cells. In widely spread cells, hepaCAM accumulated on the perinuclear membrane and the cell surface protrusions, whereas in confluent cells, hepaCAM was predominantly localized at the sites of cell-cell contacts on the cell membrane. Functionally, hepaCAM expressed not only increased cell spreading, delayed cell detachment, enhanced wound healing and increased cell invasion; it also inhibited cell growth (P Conclusions HepaCAM is involved in cell adhesion and growth control, and its expression is frequently silenced in TCCB. The extracellular domain of hepaCAM is essential to its physiological and biological functions.

  6. Colour parameters and shade correspondence of CAD-CAM ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Pecho, Oscar E; Ghinea, Razvan; Cardona, Juan C; Pérez, María M

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate colour differences between (1) CAD-CAM ceramic systems considering shades A1, A2 and A3 and the corresponding nominal shade of VC (Vita Classical shade guide) and (2) shades A1-A2, A2-A3 and A1, A2 and A3 within the same ceramic system. Samples of shades A1, A2 and A3 were fabricated (n=5) from CAD-CAM ceramic blocks (IPS e.max(®) CAD LT and HT, IPS Empress(®) CAD LT and HT, Paradigm™ C, and VITABLOCS(®) Mark II) and polished to 1.0±0.01mm in thickness. Spectral reflectance and colour coordinates were measured using a spectroradiometer inside a viewing booth using the CIE D65 illuminant and the d/0° geometry. Spectral reflectance curves were compared using VAF coefficient and were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U test (α=0.05). Colour coordinates were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test with Bonferroni correction (α=0.001). All colour differences (ΔEab(*) and ΔE00) were analyzed through comparisons with the PT - perceptibility and AT - acceptability thresholds for dental ceramics. ΔE between ceramic systems and its corresponding shade ranged from 6.32 to 13.42 (ΔEab(*)) and 4.48 to 9.30 (ΔE00). ΔE between shades A1-A2, A2-A3 and A1, A2 and A3 ranged, respectively, 1.93-4.82, 1.22-5.59 and 3.63-8.84 (ΔEab(*)); 1.54-3.87, 1.03-3.90 and 2.95-6.51 (ΔE00). Considering the corresponding nominal shade from VC, none of the ceramic systems showed colour differences below the AT. In addition, some ceramic systems showed colour differences below AT (shades A1-A2 and A2-A3) and below PT (shades A2-A3). Careful adjustments should be made to the final shade of CAD-CAM ceramic restorations to reach a clinically acceptable shade match. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. l-Carnitine ameliorates the oxidative stress response to angiotensin II by modulating NADPH oxidase through a reduction in protein kinase c activity and NF-κB translocation to the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca, Antonio J; Ruiz-Armenta, María V; Zambrano, Sonia; Miguel-Carrasco, José L; González-Roncero, Francisco M; Fortuño, Ana; Revilla, Elisa; Mate, Alfonso; Vázquez, Carmen M

    2017-08-01

    l-Carnitine (LC) exerts beneficial effects in arterial hypertension due, in part, to its antioxidant capacity. We investigated the signalling pathways involved in the effect of LC on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced NADPH oxidase activation in NRK-52E cells. Ang II increased the generation of superoxide anion from NADPH oxidase, as well as the amount of hydrogen peroxide and nitrotyrosine. Co-incubation with LC managed to prevent these alterations and also reverted the changes in NADPH oxidase expression triggered by Ang II. Cell signalling studies evidenced that LC did not modify Ang II-induced phosphorylation of Akt, p38 MAPK or ERK 1/2 . On the other hand, a significant decrease in PKC activity, and inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) translocation, were attributable to LC incubation. In conclusion, LC counteracts the pro-oxidative response to Ang II by modulating NADPH oxidase enzyme via reducing the activity of PKC and the translocation of NF-kB to the nucleus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of different adhesives combined with two resin composite cements on shear bond strength to polymeric CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bähr, Nora; Keul, Christine; Edelhoff, Daniel; Eichberger, Marlis; Roos, Malgorzata; Gernet, Wolfgang; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2013-01-01

    This study tested the impact of different adhesives and resin composite cements on shear bond strength (SBS) to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based CAD/CAM materials. SBS specimens were fabricated and divided into five main groups (n=30/group) subject to conditioning: 1. Monobond Plus/Heliobond (MH), 2. Visio.link (VL), 3. Ambarino P60 (AM), 4. exp. VP connect (VP), and 5. no conditioning-control group (CG). All cemented specimens using a. Clearfil SA Cement and b. Variolink II were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C. Additionally, one half of the specimens were thermocycled for 5,000 cycles (5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 20 s). SBS was measured; data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, four- and one-way ANOVA, unpaired two-sample t-test and Chi(2)-test. CAD/CAM materials without additional adhesives showed no bond to resin composite cements. Highest SBS showed VL with Variolink II on composite-based material, before and after thermocycling.

  9. Chemistry of diagenetic features analyzed by ChemCam at Pahrump Hills, Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachon, Marion; Mangold, Nicolas; Forni, Olivier; Kah, Linda C.; Cousin, Agnes; Wiens, Roger C.; Anderson, Ryan; Blaney, Diana L.; Blank, Jen G.; Calef, Fred J.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Fabre, Cecile; Fisk, Martin R.; Gasnault, Olivier; Grotzinger, John P.; Kronyak, Rachel; Lanza, Nina L.; Lasue, Jeremie; Le Deit, Laetitia; Le Mouelic, Stephane; Maurice, Sylvestre; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Oehler, D. Z.; Payre, Valerie; Rapin, William; Schroder, Susanne; Stack, Katherine M.; Sumner, Dawn

    2017-01-01

    The Curiosity rover's campaign at Pahrump Hills provides the first analyses of lower Mount Sharp strata. Here we report ChemCam elemental composition of a diverse assemblage of post-depositional features embedded in, or cross-cutting, the host rock. ChemCam results demonstrate their compositional diversity, especially compared to the surrounding host rock: (i) Dendritic aggregates and relief enhanced features, characterized by a magnesium enhancement and sulfur detection, and interpreted as Mg-sulfates; (ii) A localized observation that displays iron enrichment associated with sulfur, interpreted as Fe-sulfate; (iii) Dark raised ridges with varying Mg- and Ca-enriched compositions compared to host rock; (iv) Several dark-toned veins with calcium enhancement associated with fluorine detection, interpreted as fluorite veins. (v) Light-toned veins with enhanced calcium associated with sulfur detection, and interpreted as Ca-sulfates. The diversity of the Pahrump Hills diagenetic assemblage suggests a complex post-depositional history for fine-grained sediments for which the origin has been interpreted as fluvial and lacustrine. Assessment of the spatial and relative temporal distribution of these features shows that the Mg-sulfate features are predominant in the lower part of the section, suggesting local modification of the sediments by early diagenetic fluids. In contrast, light-toned Ca-sulfate veins occur in the whole section and cross-cut all other features. A relatively late stage shift in geochemical conditions could explain this observation. The Pahrump Hills diagenetic features have no equivalent compared to targets analyzed in other locations at Gale crater. Only the light-toned Ca-sulfate veins are present elsewhere, along Curiosity's path, suggesting they formed through a common late-stage process that occurred at over a broad area.

  10. NPEO North Pole Web Cams observe Arctic Summertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untersteiner, N.; Overland, J. E.; Soreide, N. N.

    2004-12-01

    In 2002, 2003, and 2004, North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) automatic instrumented stations were deployed on an ice floe near the North Pole and started recording and telemetering data in April/May. The field teams also installed Web Cameras to show the installations and some scenery. These "web cams" collect and transmit images throughout the entire summer, from the beginning of snow melt to freeze-up in autumn and the onset of darkness. To appreciate the value of these data and images we should bear in mind that the proverbial "inaccessibility of the frozen Arctic Ocean" due to cold and darkness applies to the mild summer even more than to the cold and dark winter. The onset of melting usually occurs in early June, when the temperature reaches 0°C and the surface layer turns into a constant-temperature ice bath. In 2002, the temperature record shows an abrupt warming to about 0°C, on 24 May, suggesting an early arrival of the melt season. The warming event coincides with about a week of low short-wave (250 Wm-2) and high long-wave (300 Wm-2) down-welling radiation, which are typical of low overcast conditions. The web cam pictures of that period confirm the overcast. Both radiation and temperature values remained in the normal range for the rest of the summer, and freeze-up occurred as usual in the last week of August. Based on the early warming event in May, one may have expected an early onset of surface melting. Contrary to that expectation, the web cams show that it was not until late July 2002 when the snow cover took on a soggy appearance and isolated melt ponds appeared on the surface. For the rest of the summer, the web cam pictures show only insignificant melt pond coverage until the deposition of new snow in late August. The pictures clearly show that snow from the preceding winter survived the entire summer, and we must assume that there was no, or very little, ice ablation at the surface. In light of recent news about global warming and

  11. Possible Interrelationship between Changes in F-actin and Myosin II, Protein Phosphorylation and Cell Volume Regulation in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Stine F.; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2002-01-01

    F-actin; myosin II; osmotic; Rho kinase; p38; PKC; MLCK; serine/threonine phosphatase; blebbing; NHE1......F-actin; myosin II; osmotic; Rho kinase; p38; PKC; MLCK; serine/threonine phosphatase; blebbing; NHE1...

  12. Multiple host kinases contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Roppenser

    Full Text Available SopB is a type 3 secreted effector with phosphatase activity that Salmonella employs to manipulate host cellular processes, allowing the bacteria to establish their intracellular niche. One important function of SopB is activation of the pro-survival kinase Akt/protein kinase B in the infected host cell. Here, we examine the mechanism of Akt activation by SopB during Salmonella infection. We show that SopB-mediated Akt activation is only partially sensitive to PI3-kinase inhibitors LY294002 and wortmannin in HeLa cells, suggesting that Class I PI3-kinases play only a minor role in this process. However, depletion of PI(3,4 P2/PI(3-5 P3 by expression of the phosphoinositide 3-phosphatase PTEN inhibits Akt activation during Salmonella invasion. Therefore, production of PI(3,4 P2/PI(3-5 P3 appears to be a necessary event for Akt activation by SopB and suggests that non-canonical kinases mediate production of these phosphoinositides during Salmonella infection. We report that Class II PI3-kinase beta isoform, IPMK and other kinases identified from a kinase screen all contribute to Akt activation during Salmonella infection. In addition, the kinases required for SopB-mediated activation of Akt vary depending on the type of infected host cell. Together, our data suggest that Salmonella has evolved to use a single effector, SopB, to manipulate a remarkably large repertoire of host kinases to activate Akt for the purpose of optimizing bacterial replication in its host.

  13. Optimal Design of Grooved Cam Profile Using Non-uniform Rational B-splines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Guantao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the fatigue damage in grooved cam mechanisms, grooved cam profile was reconstructed with non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS. Considering joint friction, dynamic model of grooved cam mechanisms was established and the contact stress between grooved cam and follower was calculated using Hertz contact theory. Taking the minimum contact stress and the minimum acceleration as optimal objectives, integrated design model for respective kinematic and dynamic design approaches was set up. The integrated design mode was optimized to search Pareto-optimal solution by an improved artificial fish swarm algorithm, and optimized NURBS profile for grooved cam was acquired. The results show NURBS profile has better kinematic and dynamic performances. The impacts on grooved cam mechanism are reduced and wear characteristics are improved.

  14. Influence of CAD/CAM tool and material on tool wear and roughness of dental prostheses after milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Vennat, Elsa; Mawussi, Bernardin

    2015-08-01

    Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) machining influences the surface roughness of dental restorations and tool wear. Roughness must be suitable to meet clinical requirements, and the tool must last as long as possible. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the influence of the CAD/CAM tool-material couple on tool wear and surface roughness after milling. Three tools (Lyra conical tool Ø1 mm; GACD SASU, Lyra conical tool Ø1.05 mm; GACD SASU, and Cerec cylinder pointed tool 12S; Sirona Dental Systems GmbH) and 3 CAD/CAM materials (Lava Ultimate; 3M ESPE, Mark II; VITA Zahnfabrik H. Rauter GmbH, and Enamic; VITA Zahnfabrik H. Rauter GmbH) were tested. The tool wear of 6 tool-material couples at a feed rate of 2 m/min was analyzed before and after 8 minutes of flank and climb milling with optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and tool weighing. The surface roughness after milling was observed for 9 tool-material couples for flank and climb milling. Feed rates of 1, 2, 3, and 4.8 m/min were used for each couple. Ra, Rt, Rz, Sa, Sq, and Sz roughness criteria were measured. A paired comparison of tool-material couples was conducted with the Kruskal-Wallis test. The Mark II material led to more severe tool wear. Milling of Lava Ultimate resulted in chip deposits on the tool grit. The Cerec cylinder pointed tool 12S was less worn for each material tested. The Cerec cylinder pointed tool 12S and the Lyra conical tool Ø1.05 mm provided similar roughness measurements for the 3 materials tested. The Lyra conical tool Ø1.05 mm tool provided better roughness than the Lyra conical tool Ø1 mm tool for the Enamic material. Tool lifetime calculated by volume of milled material removed should be the measure provided by CAD/CAM manufacturers instead of a number of blocks. This tool lifetime should be provided for the milling conditions associated with the material milled. Material hardness and tool grit are key factors

  15. Polypeptide Composition of Envelope Membranes Isolated from Chloroplasts of C_3, C_4, and CAM Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce G., Foster; Gerald E, Edwards; Department of Botany, Washington State University:(Present)United States Department of Agriculture, Appalachian Soil and Water Conservation Research Laboratory; Department of Botany, Washington State University

    1983-01-01

    Chloroplast envelopes were isolated from chloroplasts purified from Spinacea oleracea L. (C_3), Panicum miliaceum L. (NAD-malic enzyme-type C_4), Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop. (NADP-malic enzyme-type C_4). Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier (constitutive CAM), and from Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L. (inducible CAM) performing either C_3 photosynthesis or Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). For each species, methods were developed to isolate chloroplast envelopes free of thylakoid ...

  16. Sobre figuras de oposição em dois sonetos de Camões

    OpenAIRE

    Marnoto, Rita

    2012-01-01

    (2012). Sobre figuras de oposição em dois sonetos de Camões. In Rita Marnoto (Coord.), Comentário a Camões. Vol. 1. Sonetos (147-204). Lisboa: CIEC, Cotovia. ISBN 978 972 795 330 1 figuras de oposição, visão histórica e seu uso em dois sonetos de Camões

  17. Demand for CAM Practice at Hospitals in Japan: A Population Survey in Mie Prefecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Togo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies have been provided at hospitals along with conventional medicine in industrialized nations. Previous studies conducted in Japan revealed high proportion of Japanese had experience of using CAM, but failed to discuss how it should be provided. The present study aims to clarify the demand for CAM practice at hospitals in Japan. A questionnaire consisting of 41 questions was mailed to 10 000 adults randomly selected from the electoral roll of Mie prefecture, Japan in January 2007. The questionnaire asked the subjects about demand for CAM practice at hospitals, types of CAM therapy to be provided and associated reasons. Sociodemographic characteristics, perceived health status, experience and purpose of CAM use, and information resource for CAM were also surveyed. Completed answers were collected from 2824 (28.6% respondents. Two thousand and nineteen (71.5% of the respondents demanded CAM practice at hospitals with the most likely reason of “patients can receive treatment under the guidance of a physicians”. The three most popular CAM therapies were Kampo, acupressure/massage/Shiatsu and acupuncture/moxibustion. The demand was positively associated with gender, ages of 40–59 years, annual household incomes of 5–7 million yen, occupation of specialist and technical workers and sales workers and poor health status. Higher demand was observed among those who used both CAM and conventional medical therapies for curative purposes. In conclusion, Japanese show a high demand for CAM practice, hoping to use CAM for curative purposes with monitoring by physicians at hospitals.

  18. Resolution of thylakoid polyphenol oxidase and a protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Race, H.L.; Davenport, J.W.; Hind, G.

    1995-12-31

    The predominant protein kinase activity in octylglucoside (OG) extracts of spinach thylakoids has been attributed to a 64-kDa protein, tp64. Recent work calls into question the relation between tp64 and protein kinase activity, which were fractionated apart using fluid phase IEF and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Hind et al. sequenced tp64 from the cDNA and showed it to be a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) homolog. Its transit peptide indicates a location for the mature protein within the thylakoid lumen, where there is presumably no ATP and where it is remote from the presumed kinase substrates: the stromally exposed regions of integral PS-II membrane proteins. Here the authors suggest that the kinase is a 64-kDa protein distinct from tp64.

  19. Flexural resistance of Cerec CAD/CAM system ceramic blocks. Part 1: Chairside materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichi, Alessandro; Sedda, Maurizio; Del Siena, Francesco; Louca, Chris; Ferrari, Marco

    2013-10-01

    This study tested the materials available on the market for Cerec CAD/CAM, comparing the mean flexural strength in an ISO standardized set-up, since the ISO standard for testing such materials was issued later than the marketing of the materials tested. Following the recent Standard ISO 6872:2008, eight types of ceramic blocks were tested: Paradigm C, IPS Empress CAD LT, IPS Empress CAD Multi, Cerec Blocs, Cerec Blocs PC, Triluxe, Triluxe Forte, Mark II. Specimens were cut out from ceramic blocks, finished, polished, and tested in a three-point bending test apparatus until failure. Flexural strength, Weibull characteristic strength, and Weibull modulus, were calculated. The results obtained from the materials for flexural strength were IPS Empress CAD (125.10 +/- 13.05), Cerec Blocs (112.68 +/- 7.97), Paradigm C (109.14 +/- 10.10), Cerec Blocs PC (105.40 +/- 5.39), Triluxe Forte (105.06 +/- 4.93), Mark II (102.77 +/- 3.60), Triluxe (101.95 +/- 7.28) and IPS Empress CAD Multi (100.86 +/- 15.82). All the tested materials had a flexural strength greater than 100 MPa, thereby satisfying the requirements of the ISO standard for the clinical indications of the materials tested. In all tested materials the Weibull characteristic strength was greater than 100 MPa.

  20. Verification of Kaplan turbine cam curves realization accuracy at power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džepčeski Dane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of approximately constant value of Kaplan turbine efficiency, for relatively large net head changes, is a result of turbine runner variable geometry. Dependence of runner blades position change on guide vane opening represents the turbine cam curve. The cam curve realization accuracy is of great importance for the efficient and proper exploitation of turbines and consequently complete units. Due to the reasons mentioned above, special attention has been given to the tests designed for cam curves verification. The goal of this paper is to provide the description of the methodology and the results of the tests performed in the process of Kaplan turbine cam curves verification.

  1. Mind-body CAM interventions: current status and considerations for integration into clinical health psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Crystal

    2013-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly used for treating myriad health conditions and for maintaining general health. The present article provides an overview of current CAM use with a specific focus on mind-body CAM and its efficacy in treating health conditions. Characteristics of CAM users are presented, and then evidence regarding the efficacy of mind-body treatments (biofeedback, meditation, guided imagery, progressive muscle relaxation, deep breathing, hypnosis, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong) is reviewed. Demographics associated with CAM use are fairly well-established, but less is known about their psychological characteristics. Although the efficacy of mind-body CAM modalities for health conditions is receiving a great deal of research attention, studies have thus far produced a weak base of evidence. Methodological limitations of current research are reviewed. Suggestions are made for future research that will provide more conclusive knowledge regarding efficacy and, ultimately, effectiveness of mind-body CAM. Considerations for clinical applications, including training and competence, ethics, treatment tailoring, prevention efforts, and diversity, conclude the article. Integration of CAM modalities into clinical health psychology can be useful for researchers taking a broader perspective on stress and coping processes, illness behaviors, and culture; for practitioners seeking to incorporate CAM perspectives into their work; and for policy makers in directing healthcare resources wisely. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The cam-type deformity--what is it: SCFE, osteophyte, or a new disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenrock, Klaus A; Schwab, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Cam-type deformity of the proximal femur is a risk factor for the development of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement and a prearthrotic condition of the hip. The etiology of cam-type deformity remains unclear. There are a number of causes of cam-type deformity including sequellae of slipped capital femoral epiphysis, Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease or Perthes-like deformities, postinfectious, and traumatic. However, the majority of cam-type deformities arise without any apparent preexisting hip disease. These "idiopathic" cam-type deformities likely represent a majority of cases, and show clear racial and sex differences, as well as developmental and genetic influences. Idiopathic cam-type deformity also seems to be a distinct entity from residual or silent slipped capital femoral epiphysis, as well as osteoarthritis-induced osteophytes. In this paper we examine the different pathogenetic aspects of the proximal femur that contribute to cam-type deformity and/or symptomatic cam-type femoroacetabular impingement.

  3. CAM for Pediatric Pain: What is State-of-the-Research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reviewed the evidence for the efficacy of CAM approaches for pediatric pain (volume 2; issue 2; 2005 using criteria developed by the American Psychological Association Division 12 Task Force. Our review focused on CAM modalities that had been tested with at least one controlled trial or multiple baseline study. In addition, only those trials in which children comprised the study sample were included. Thus, several CAM modalities were not included in our review. Key ethical and other reasons for the limited literature on CAM for pediatric pain as well as directions for future studies are discussed.

  4. Initiating a Reiki or CAM program in a healthcare organization--developing a business plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) services, such as Reiki, continue to be offered to consumers in many hospitals and other health care organizations. There is growing interest among nurses, doctors, and other health care providers for the integration of CAM therapies into traditional settings. Health care organizations are responding to this need but may not know how to start CAM programs. Starting a Reiki program in a health care setting must be envisioned in a business model approach. This article introduces nurses and other health care providers to the basic concepts of business plan development and important steps to follow when starting a Reiki or CAM program.

  5. Examining CAM use disclosure using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Tippens, Kimberly M

    2013-10-01

    To improve understanding of factors that may influence disclosure of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in the U.S. Cross-sectional survey. Data are from the 2001 Health Care Quality Survey (HCQS), a nationally representative study of adults aged 18 and older living in the continental United States. Using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, we conducted multivariate logistic regressions to identify factors associated with disclosing CAM use among the sub-sample of recent CAM users (n=1995). Disclosure of CAM use. Most CAM users (71.0%) disclosed their use of CAM to their doctors. Contextual, individual, and health behavior factors were associated with CAM use disclosure. Of particular interest, disclosure was significantly more likely among those who perceived high quality relationships with their providers (AOR=1.59, CI: 1.01, 2.49) and among those who had a regular source of medical care (AOR=1.54, CI: 1.03, 2.29). The odds of disclosure were also higher among those who used practitioner-provided CAM, with (AOR=2.02, CI: 1.34, 3.06) or without (AOR=1.52, CI: 1.05, 2.20) concurrent herbal medicine use, compared to those who used herbal medicines only. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use is a useful framework for examining factors that may influence disclosure of CAM use. Further research should examine these relationships using more comprehensive measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. JAK protein kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James E

    2005-06-01

    In humans, the Janus protein tyrosine kinase family (JAKs) contains four members: JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and TYK2. JAKs phosphorylate signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) simultaneously with other phosphorylations required for activation, and there are several cellular mechanisms in place to inhibit JAK/STAT signaling. That one might be able to modulate selected JAK/STAT-mediated cellular signals by inhibiting JAK kinase activity to effect a positive therapeutic outcome is a tantalizing prospect, as yet incompletely realized. While current data suggest no therapeutic use for JAK1 and TYK2 inhibition, JAK2 inhibition seems a promising but not definitively tested mechanism for treatment of leukemia. More promising, however, are data indicating a possible therapeutic use of JAK3 inhibition. The restriction of the JAK3-deficient phenotype to the hematopoietic system and the resulting profound immune suppression suggest that JAK3 could be a target for immunosuppressive therapies used to prevent organ transplant rejection.

  7. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases belonging to the thymidine kinase 2 (TK2)-like group vary significantly in substrate specificity, kinetics and feed-back regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Petersen, Gitte Ebert; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Piskur, Jure

    2002-01-25

    In eukaryotic cells deoxyribonucleoside kinases belonging to three phylogenetic sub-families have been found: (i) thymidine kinase 1 (TK1)-like enzymes, which are strictly pyrimidine deoxyribonucleoside-specific kinases; (ii) TK2-like enzymes, which include pyrimidine deoxyribonucleoside kinases and a single multisubstrate kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK); and (iii) deoxycytidine/deoxyguanosine kinase (dCK/dGK)-like enzymes, which are deoxycytidine and/or purine deoxyribonucleoside-specific kinases. We cloned and characterized two new deoxyribonucleoside kinases belonging to the TK2-like group from the insect Bombyx mori and the amphibian Xenopus laevis. The deoxyribonucleoside kinase from B. mori (Bm-dNK) turned out to be a multisubstrate kinase like Dm-dNK. But uniquely for a deoxyribonucleoside kinase, Bm-dNK displayed positive cooperativity with all four natural deoxyribonucleoside substrates. The deoxyribonucleoside kinase from X. laevis (Xen-PyK) resembled closely the human and mouse TK2 enzymes displaying their characteristic Michaelis-Menten kinetic with deoxycytidine and negative cooperativity with its second natural substrate thymidine. Bm-dNK, Dm-dNK and Xen-PyK were shown to be homodimers. Significant differences in the feedback inhibition by deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates between these three enzymes were found. The insect multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinases Bm-dNK and Dm-dNK were only inhibited by thymidine triphosphate, while Xen-PyK was inhibited by thymidine and deoxycytidine triphosphate in a complex pattern depending on the deoxyribonucleoside substrate. The broad substrate specificity and different feedback regulation of the multisubstrate insect deoxyribonucleoside kinases may indicate that these enzymes have a different functional role than the other members of the TK2-like group. Copyright 2002 Academic Press.

  8. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  9. Ethyl p-methoxycinnamate from Kaempferia galanga inhibits angiogenesis through tyrosine kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juni Ekowati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Many tumors express on their receptor tyrosine kinases vascular endothelial growth factor activity associated with angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis through reduction of tyrosine kinase activity is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. The present study aimed to determine the mechanism and potency of ethyl p-methoxycinnamate (EPMC isolated from Kaempferia galanga as angiogenesis inhibitor. Methods A laboratory experimental study was conducted using chorio-allantoic membranes (CAMs of nine-day old chicken eggs induced by 60ng basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF. Ethyl p-methoxycinnamate (EPMC potency was determined at dosages of 30, 60, 90 and 120 mg and compared with celecoxib 60 mg as reference drug and one negative bFGF-induced control group. Neovascularization and endothelial cell count in CAM blood vessels were evaluated. To predict the antiangiogenic mechanism of EPMC, a docking study was performed with the Molegro Virtual Docker program on tyrosine kinase as receptor (PDB 1XKK. Results Angiogenesis stimulation by bFGF was prevented significantly (p<0.05 by EPMC at dosages of 30, 60, 90 and 120 mg and this activity was dose dependent. Molecular docking showed interaction between EPMC functional groups and tyrosine kinase amino acids at Met766, Met793, Thr854, Thr790, Gln791 and Ala743. There was an association between EPMC antiangiogenic activity and docking study results. Conclusions Ethyl p-methoxycinnamate is a potential new angiogenesis inhibitor through interaction with tyrosine kinase. EPMC could be a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of angiogenesis-related diseases.

  10. Phosphorylation and mRNA splicing of collapsin response mediator protein-2 determine inhibition of rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) II function in carcinoma cell migration and invasion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Couchman, John R; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    II-CRMP-2 interactions. Using phosphorylation-mimetic and -resistant CRMP-2L constructs, it was revealed that phosphorylation of CRMP-2L negatively regulates its inhibitory function in ROCK-dependent haptotactic cell migration, as well as invasion of human colon carcinoma cells. Collectively...

  11. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shembish, Fatma A; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N; Thompson, Van P; Opdam, Niek J; Zhang, Yu

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n=24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n=24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electron microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450N. Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3-4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Strong discontinuity with cam clay under large deformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katic, Natasa; Hededal, Ole

    2008-01-01

    The work shows simultaneous implementation of Strong discontinuity approach (SDA) by means of Enhanced Assumed Strain (EAS) and Critical State Soil Mechanics CSSM) in large strain regime. The numerical model is based on an additive decomposition of the displacement gradient into a conforming and ...... and an enhanced part. The localized deformations are approximated by means of a discontinuous displacement field. The applied algorithm leads to a predictor/corrector procedure which is formally identical to the returnmapping algorithm of classical (local and continuous) Cam clay model....

  13. a Beat Perioid Observation of the Asynchronous Polar by Cam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainger, Jonathan

    We propose to observe the hard X-ray bright asynchronous polar BY Cam throughout its beat cycle in order to investigate the changes in the magnetic capture of the accretion stream as the secondary star changes in azimuth with respect to the white dwarf. Regular snap-shots of the light curve will reveal the order behind the chaos. Previous observations have been taken in 3 days or less, our monitoring plan over 21 days offers the only real hope of understanding these difficult systems.

  14. Applying DER-CAM for IIT Microgrid Explansion Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Li, Zuyi [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Wang, Jianhui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Chen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-19

    The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) is an economic and environmental model of customer DER adoption. This model has been in development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory since 2000. The objective of the model is to find optimal DER investments while minimizing total energy costs or carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, or achieving a weighted objective that simultaneously considers both criteria. The Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Microgrid project started in August 2008, and the majority of the project was completed in May 2013. IIT Microgrid, funded mostly by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as State and philanthropic contributions, empowers the campus consumers with the objective of establishing a smart microgrid that is highly reliable, economically viable, environmentally friendly, fuel-efficient, and resilient in extreme circumstances with a self-healing capability. In this project, we apply DER-CAM to study the expansion planning of the IIT Microgrid. First, the load data, environmental data, utility data, and technology data for the IIT Microgrid are gathered and organized to follow the DER-CAM input requirements. Then, DERCAM is applied to study the expansion planning of the IIT Microgrid for different cases, where different objectives in DER-CAM and different utility conditions are tested. Case 1 considers the objective of minimizing energy costs with fixed utility rates and 100% electric utility availability. Case 2 considers the objective of minimizing energy costs with real-time utility rates and 4 emergency weeks when the IIT Microgrid does not have access to the electric utility grid and has to operate in island mode. In Case 3, the utility rates are restored to fixed values and 100% electric utility availability is assumed, but a weighted multi-objective (Obj: a × costs + b × CO2 emissions, where a and b are weights for cost minimization and CO2 emissions minimization) is utilized to

  15. CAD/CAM from the graphic-design perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, A.

    1982-11-01

    CAD/CAM systems have evolved elaborate human-computer interfaces in order to facilitate the creation of highly detailed and specialized schematic diagrams and texts. Although these systems have powerful capacities in terms of graphics editing, data manipulation, and data storage, insufficient attention has been given to making the online interface (together with supporting documentation) user-friendly, i.e., understandable, memorable, and appealing to the general user. Graphic-design considerations in particular have been routinely overlooked. Graphic design concerns typography, symbol design, color, spatial layout, and temporal sequencing. Graphic design can assist computer science by providing insight and expertise in designing effective communication between human being and machine.

  16. Circadian and pharmacological regulation of casein kinase I in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-12-31

    Dec 31, 2008 ... Agostino P. V., Ferreyra G. A., Murad A. D., Watanabe Y. and. Golombek D. A. 2004 Diurnal, circadian and photic regulation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and neuronal nitric ox- ide synthase in the hamster suprachiasmatic nuclei. Neurochem. Int. 44, 617–625. Agostino P. V., Harrington M. E., ...

  17. Evaluation of a computed tomography-based navigation system prototype for hip arthroscopy in the treatment of femoroacetabular cam impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Alexander; Horisberger, Monika; Herzog, Richard F

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a new computed tomography-based computer navigation system on the accuracy of arthroscopic offset correction in patients with cam type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), and to evaluate if the accuracy of offset restoration compromises the early clinical outcome. We prospectively treated 50 patients (25 navigated and 25 non-navigated) by hip arthroscopy and arthroscopic offset restoration for cam FAI. The patients were a mean age 42.9 years, and the average follow-up was 26.7 months, with no patients lost to follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed preoperatively and 6 weeks postoperatively. A postoperative alpha angle of less than 50 degrees or a reduction of the alpha angle of more than 20 degrees was considered to be successful offset restoration. Outcomes were measured with a visual analogue scale for pain, range of motion, and the nonarthritic hip score. The mean alpha angle improved from 76.5 degrees (range, 57 degrees to 110 degrees) to 54.2 degrees (range, 40 degrees to 84 degrees). In both the navigated and the non-navigated groups, 6 patients (24%) showed insufficient offset correction. Range of motion, visual analogue scale for pain scores, and nonarthritic hip scores significantly improved in all subgroups. Statistical analysis showed no significant difference regarding the clinical outcome between patients with sufficient and insufficient correction of the alpha angle. In this series, a significant percentage of patients (24%) showed an insufficient correction of the alpha angle after hip arthroscopy for cam FAI. This study shows that the presented navigation system could not improve this rate and that the insufficient accuracy of reduction of the alpha angle does not appear to compromise the early clinical outcome. Level II, prospective comparative study.

  18. On understanding the very different science premises meaningful to CAM versus orthodox medicine: part I--the fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiller, William A

    2010-03-01

    In previous articles by this author and his colleagues in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, it has been shown that physical reality consists of two uniquely different categories of substance, one being electric charge-based while the other appears to be magnetic charge-based. Normally, only the electric atom/molecule type of substance is accessible by our traditional measurement instruments. We label this condition as the uncoupled state of physical reality that is our long-studied, electric atom/molecule level of nature. The second level of physical reality is invisible to traditional measurement instruments when the system is in the uncoupled state but is accessible to these same instruments when the system is in the coupled state of physical reality. The coupling of these two unique levels has been shown to occur via the application of a sufficient intensity of human consciousness in the form of specific intentions. Part II of this article (in a forthcoming issue) explores the thermodynamics of complementary and 328 alternative medicine (CAM) through five different space-time applications involving coupled state physics to show their relevance to today's medicine: (1) homeopathy; (2) the placebo effect; (3) long-range, room temperature, macroscopic-size-scale, information entanglement; (4) explanation for dark matter/energy plus possible human levitation; and (5) electrodermal diagnostic devices. The purpose is to clearly differentiate the use and limitations of uncoupled state physics in nature and today's traditional medicine from coupled state physics in tomorrow's CAM. Existing orthodox science provides the technical underpinnings and mindset for today's orthodox medicine. Psycho-energetic science will provide the technical underpinnings and mindset for CAM.

  19. Specificity of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases in mouse egg activation

    OpenAIRE

    Medvedev, Sergey; Stein, Paula; Schultz, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    CaMKIIγ, the predominant CaMKII isoform in mouse eggs, controls egg activation by regulating cell cycle resumption. In this study we further characterize the involvement and specificity of CaMKIIγ in mouse egg activation. Using exogenous expression of different cRNAs in Camk2g−/− eggs, we show that the other multifunctional CaM kinases, CaMKI, and CaMKIV, are not capable of substituting CaMKIIγ to initiate cell cycle resumption in response to a rise in intracellular Ca2+. Exogenous expression...

  20. Regulation of Autophagy by Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Savitha; Jain, Kirti; Basu, Alakananda, E-mail: alakananda.basu@unthsc.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Immunology, Institute for Cancer Research, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, TX 76107 (United States)

    2011-06-09

    Autophagy is a process of self-degradation that maintains cellular viability during periods of metabolic stress. Although autophagy is considered a survival mechanism when faced with cellular stress, extensive autophagy can also lead to cell death. Aberrations in autophagy are associated with several diseases, including cancer. Therapeutic exploitation of this process requires a clear understanding of its regulation. Although the core molecular components involved in the execution of autophagy are well studied there is limited information on how cellular signaling pathways, particularly kinases, regulate this complex process. Protein kinases are integral to the autophagy process. Atg1, the first autophagy-related protein identified, is a serine/threonine kinase and it is regulated by another serine/threonine kinase mTOR. Emerging studies suggest the participation of many different kinases in regulating various components/steps of this catabolic process. This review focuses on the regulation of autophagy by several kinases with particular emphasis on serine/threonine protein kinases such as mTOR, AMP-activated protein kinase, Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK, p38 and JNK) and protein kinase C that are often deregulated in cancer and are important therapeutic targets.

  1. Biofuel crops with CAM photosynthesis: Economic potential on moisture-limited lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Mark; Hartzell, Samantha; Porporato, Amilcare

    2017-04-01

    As the demand for food and renewable energy increases, the intelligent utilization of marginal lands is becoming increasingly critical. In marginal lands classified by limited rainfall or soil salinity, the cultivation of traditional C3 and C4 photosynthesis crops often is economically infeasible. However, in such lands, nontraditional crops with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis show great economic potential for cultivation. CAM crops including Opuntia (prickly pear) and Ananas (pineapple) achieve a water use efficiency which is three fold higher than C4 crops such as corn and 6-fold higher than C3 crops such as wheat, leading to a comparable annual productivity with only 20% of the water demand. This feature, combined with a shallow rooting depth and a high water storage capacity, allows CAM plants to take advantage of small, infrequent rainfall amounts in shallow, quickly draining soils. Furthermore, CAM plants typically have properties (e.g., high content of non-structural carbohydrates) that are favorable for biofuel production. Here, for marginal lands characterized by low soil moisture availability and/or high salinity, we assess the potential productivity and economic benefits of CAM plants. CAM productivity is estimated using a recently developed model which simulates CAM photosynthesis under a range of soil and climate conditions. From these results, we compare the energy and water resource inputs required by CAM plants to those required by more traditional C3 and C4 crops (corn, wheat, sorghum), and we evaluate the economic potential of CAM crops as sources of food, fodder, or biofuel in marginal soils. As precipitation events become more intense and infrequent, we show that even though marginal land area may increase, CAM crop cultivation shows great promise for maintaining high productivity with minimal water inputs. Our analysis indicates that on marginal lands, widespread cultivation of CAM crops as biofuel feedstock may help

  2. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Meena S., E-mail: meena.moran@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Ma Shuangge [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [University of Michigan, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan [Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Higgins, Susan A. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Shoreline Medical Center, Guilford, Connecticut (United States); Weidhaas, Joanne B. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Lloyd, Shane [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Peschel, Richard [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Therapy, Lawrence and Memorial Hospital, New London, Connecticut (United States); Gaudreau, Bryant [Department of Radiation Therapy, William W. Backus Hospital, Norwich, Connecticut (United States); Rockwell, Sara [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  3. Disclosure of Complementary and Alternative Medicine to Conventional Medical Providers: Variation by Race/Ethnicity and Type of CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Maria T.; Wade, Christine; Kronenberg, Fredi

    2009-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is often used alongside conventional medical care, yet fewer than half of patients disclose CAM use to medical doctors. CAM disclosure is particularly low among racial/ethnic minorities, but reasons for differences, such as type of CAM used or quality of conventional healthcare, have not been explored. Objective We tested the hypotheses that disclosure of CAM use to medical doctors is higher for provider-based CAM and among non-Hispanic whites, and that access to and quality of conventional medical care account for racial/ethnic differences in CAM disclosure. Methods Bivariate and multiple variable analyses of the 2002 National Health Interview Survey and 2001 Health Care Quality Survey were performed. Results Disclosure of CAM use to medical providers was higher for provider-based than self-care CAM. Disclosure of any CAM was associated with access to and quality of conventional care and higher among non-Latino whites relative to minorities. Having a regular doctor and quality patient–provider relationship mitigated racial/ethnic differences in CAM disclosure. Conclusion Insufficient disclosure of CAM use to conventional providers, particularly for self-care practices and among minority populations, represents a serious challenge in medical encounter communications. Efforts to improve disclosure of CAM use should be aimed at improving consistency of care and patient–physician communication across racial/ethnic groups. PMID:19024232

  4. Status of the NectarCAM camera project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glicenstein, J.-F.; Barcelo, M.; Barrio, J.-A.; Blanch, O.; Boix, J.; Bolmont, J.; Boutonnet, C.; Brun, P.; Chabanne, E.; Champion, C.; Colonges, S.; Corona, P.; Courty, B.; Delagnes, E.; Delgado, C.; Diaz, C.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Fegan, S.; Ferreira, O.; Fesquet, M.; Fontaine, G.; Fouque, N.; Henault, F.; Gascón, D.; Giebels, B.; Herranz, D.; Hermel, R.; Hoffmann, D.; Horan, D.; Houles, J.; Jean, P.; Karkar, S.; Knödlseder, J.; Martinez, G.; Lamanna, G.; LeFlour, T.; Lévêque, A.; Lopez-Coto, R.; Louis, F.; Moudden, Y.; Moulin, E.; Nayman, P.; Nunio, F.; Olive, J.-F.; Panazol, J.-L.; Pavy, S.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Punch, M.; Prast, Julie; Ramon, P.; Rateau, S.; Ribó, M.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Sanuy, A.; Sizun, P.; Sieiro, J.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tejedor, L. A.; Toussenel, F.; Vasileiadis, G.; Voisin, V.; Waegebert, V.; Zurbach, C.

    2014-07-01

    NectarCAM is a camera designed for the medium-sized telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) covering the central energy range 100 GeV to 30 TeV. It has a modular design based on the NECTAr chip, at the heart of which is a GHz sampling Switched Capacitor Array and 12-bit Analog to Digital converter. The camera will be equipped with 265 7-photomultiplier modules, covering a field of view of 7 to 8 degrees. Each module includes the photomultiplier bases, High Voltage supply, pre-amplifier, trigger, readout and Thernet transceiver. Events recorded last between a few nanoseconds and tens of nanoseconds. A flexible trigger scheme allows to read out very long events. NectarCAM can sustain a data rate of 10 kHz. The camera concept, the design and tests of the various subcomponents and results of thermal and electrical prototypes are presented. The design includes the mechanical structure, the cooling of electronics, read-out, clock distribution, slow control, data-acquisition, trigger, monitoring and services. A 133-pixel prototype with full scale mechanics, cooling, data acquisition and slow control will be built at the end of 2014.

  5. Extensions to the D-Cam sub-unit architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Padraig; Connell, Joseph

    2005-06-01

    Multispectral imaging produces large amounts of data which extend processing, transmission and storage systems to their upper limits. Although there are several interface standards specific to image data acquisition, such as CameraLink, it is Firewire which provides a high-speed data bus, integrated control capability, without loss of flexibility, and which is commonly available as a low cost solution. The class of multispectral imaging requires a different treatment of the processing principals than standard imaging. The same spatial region is captured multiple times using different optical wavelengths. This technique finds application in such diverse areas as coastal monitoring, fruit sorting and automated agriculture. Modifications and additional features to the camera operating and configuration parameters are therefore required which are not generally present with conventional imaging sensors. This paper describes extensions to the IIDC Digital Camera (D-Cam) specification in the development of a Firewire technology platform for transmitting the data structures described and for providing real-time, online control of spectral information acquisition. Additionally, it describes how a set of registers in the sub-unit architecture of the Firewire protocol is augmented to accommodate the demands of a multispectral system. The extensions are specification conformant and do not alter underlining compliance with the base standard. The paper also describes the implementation of the extended D-Cam in the Firewire subsystem of a smart multispectral camera used in commercial applications.

  6. Westerly wind bursts simulated in CAM4 and CCSM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Tao; Tang, Youmin; Zhou, Lei; Islam, Siraj Ul; Zhang, Chan; Li, Xiaojing; Ling, Zheng

    2017-04-01

    The equatorial westerly wind bursts (WWBs) play an important role in modulating and predicting the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In this study, the ability of the Community Atmospheric Model version 4 (CAM4) and the Community Climate System Model version 4 (CCSM4) in simulating WWBs is systematically evaluated. Many characteristics of WWBs, including their longitude distributions, durations, zonal extensions, variabilities at seasonal, intraseasonal, and interannual timescales, as well as their relations with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and ENSO, are discussed. Generally speaking, these characteristics of WWBs can be successfully reproduced by CAM4, owning to the improvement of the deep convection in the model. In CCSM4, significant bias such as the lack of the equatorial Pacific WWBs in boreal spring season and the weak modulation by a strong MJO are found. Our findings confirm the fact that the WWBs are greatly modulated by the surface temperature. It's also suggested that improving the air-sea coupling in CCSM4 may improve model performance in simulating WWBs, and may further improve the predictability of ENSO in the coupled model.

  7. Bacterial Protein-Tyrosine Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Lei; Kobir, Ahasanul; Jers, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    enzymes that are unique in exploiting the ATP/GTP-binding Walker motif to catalyze phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues. Characterized for the first time only a decade ago, BY-kinases have now come to the fore. Important regulatory roles have been linked with these enzymes, via their involvement......Bacteria and Eukarya share essentially the same family of protein-serine/threonine kinases, also known as the Hanks-type kinases. However, when it comes to protein-tyrosine phosphorylation, bacteria seem to have gone their own way. Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are bacterial...... in exopolysaccharide production, virulence, DNA metabolism, stress response and other key functions of the bacterial cell. BY-kinases act through autophosphorylation (mainly in exopolysaccharide production) and phosphorylation of other proteins, which have in most cases been shown to be activated by tyrosine...

  8. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments by Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, Lillian M.; Mackintosh, Virginia H.; Myers, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may elect to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments with their children in place of, or in addition to, conventional treatments. CAM treatments are controversial and understudied and, for most, the efficacy has not been established. The current study (n = 248) examined…

  9. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM. 872.3661... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3661 Optical Impression Systems for CAD... (CAD/CAM) is a device used to record the topographical characteristics of teeth, dental impressions, or...

  10. SenseCam: a wearable camera that stimulates and rehabilitates autobiographical memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Steve; Berry, Emma; Wood, Ken

    2011-10-01

    SenseCam is a wearable digital camera that captures an electronic record of the wearer's day. It does this by automatically recording a series of still images through its wide-angle lens, and simultaneously capturing a log of data from a number of built-in electronic sensors. Subsequently reviewing a sequence of images appears to provide a powerful autobiographical memory cue. A preliminary evaluation of SenseCam with a patient diagnosed with severe memory impairment was extremely positive; periodic review of images of events recorded by SenseCam resulted in significant recall of those events. Following this, a great deal of work has been undertaken to explore this phenomenon and there are early indications that SenseCam technology may be beneficial to a variety of patients with physical and mental health problems, and is valuable as a tool for investigating normal memory through behavioural and neuroimaging means. Elsewhere, it is becoming clear that judicious use of SenseCam could significantly impact the study of human behaviour. Meanwhile, research and development of the technology itself continues with the aim of providing robust hardware and software tools to meet the needs of clinicians, patients, carers, and researchers. In this paper we describe the history of SenseCam, and the design and operation of the SenseCam device and the associated viewing software, and we discuss some of the ongoing research questions being addressed with the help of SenseCam.

  11. A methodological framework for evaluating the evidence for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Johannesen, Helle

    2011-01-01

    In spite of lacking evidence for effects on cancer progression itself, an increasing number of cancer patients use various types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). There is disagreement between CAM practitioners, researchers and clinical oncologists, as to how evidence concerning ef...... to different types of research questions and discussing the relevance of different research methodologies for different types of effects....

  12. A Survey of CAD/CAM Technology Applications in the U.S. Shipbuilding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    46. Material Handling C. Steel Work Prodction 47. Stockyard & Treatment 48. cutting 49. Forming 50. Subassembly 51. Structural Unit Assembly 52...Applied to Steel work Production . . CAD/CAM Technologies Applied to Manufacturing and Production Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CAD/CAM...ALABAMA SHIPBUILDING & DRY DOCK AMERICAN SHIPBUILDING CO. AVONDALE SHIPYARDS BATH IRON WORKS BAY SHIPBUILDING BETHLEHEM STEEL & SHIPBUILDING Beaumont

  13. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer. However, cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes has not been investigated in breast cancer tissues, particularly in Iranian population. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast cancer ...

  14. Cam-Follower Mechanism Design for Narrow Loom Beat Up Motion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The topology of the kinematics is developed by using the graph theory method of kinematic synthesis. The forces required to drive the plate-cam and follower system were modeled and the components such as the plate-cam, camshaft, the follower and the drive mechanism were synthesized for smooth operation of the ...

  15. Monitoring the photometric behavior of OmegaCAM with Astro-WISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes Kleijn, G. A.; Kuijken, K. H.; Valentijn, E. A.; Boxhoorn, D. R.; Begeman, K. G.; Deul, E. R.; Helmich, E. M.; Rengelink, R.

    The OmegaCAM wide-field optical imager is the sole instrument on the VLT Survey Telescope at ESO's Paranal Observatory. The instrument, as well as the telescope, have been designed for surveys with very good, natural seeing-limited image quality over a 1 square degree field. OmegaCAM was

  16. Evolution of a CAM anatomy predates the origins of Crassulacean acid metabolism in the Agavoideae (Asparagaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyduk, Karolina; McKain, Michael R; Lalani, Falak; Leebens-Mack, James

    2016-12-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a modified form of photosynthesis that has arisen independently at least 35 times in flowering plants. The occurrence of CAM is often correlated with shifts to arid, semiarid, or epiphytic habits, as well as transitions in leaf morphology (e.g. increased leaf thickness) and anatomy (e.g. increased cell size and packing). We assess shifts between C3 and CAM photosynthesis in the subfamily Agavoideae (Asparagaceae) through phylogenetic analysis of targeted loci captured from the nuclear and chloroplast genomes of over 60 species. Carbon isotope data was used as a proxy for mode of photosynthesis in extant species and ancestral states were estimated on the phylogeny. Ancestral character state mapping suggests three independent origins of CAM in the Agavoideae. CAM species differ from C3 species in climate space and are found to have thicker leaves with densely packed cells. C3 ancestors of CAM species show a predisposition toward CAM-like morphology. Leaf characteristics in the ancestral C3 species may have enabled the repeated evolution of CAM in the Agavoideae subfamily. Anatomical changes, including a tendency toward 3D venation, may have initially arisen in C3 ancestors in response to aridity as a way to increase leaf succulence for water storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Remission after Acute Treatment in Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders: Findings from the CAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kendall, Philip C.; Sakolsky, Dara; Compton, Scott N.; Piacentini, John; Albano, Anne Marie; Walkup, John T.; Sherrill, Joel; Coffey, Kimberly A.; Rynn, Moira A.; Keeton, Courtney P.; McCracken, James T.; Bergman, Lindsey; Iyengar, Satish; Birmaher, Boris; March, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report on remission rates in anxious youth who participated in the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS). The CAMS, a multisite clinical trial, randomized 488 children and adolescents (ages 7-17 years; 79% Caucasian; 50% female) with separation, social, and/or generalized anxiety disorder to a 12-week treatment of…

  18. Bidirectional modulation of endogenous EpCAM expression to unravel its function in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, B. T. F.; Huisman, C.; Stolzenburg, S.; Kazemier, H. G.; Ruiters, M. H. J.; Blancafort, P.; Rots, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is overexpressed on most carcinomas. Dependent on the tumour type, its overexpression is either associated with improved or worse patient survival. For ovarian cancer, however, the role of EpCAM remains unclear. Methods: Cell survival of

  19. Effects of competition on induction of crassulacean acid metabolism in a facultative CAM plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo; Li, Wei; He, Yongli

    2017-06-01

    Abiotic drivers of environmental stress have been found to induce CAM expression (nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM species such as Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. The role played by biotic factors such as competition with non-CAM species in affecting CAM expression, however, remains largely understudied. This research investigated the effects of salt and water conditions on the competition between M. crystallinum and the C3 grass Bromus mollis with which it is found to coexist in California's coastal grasslands. We also investigated the extent to which CAM expression in M. crystallinum was affected by the intensity of the competition with B. mollis. We found that M. crystallinum had a competitive advantage over B. mollis in drought and saline conditions, while B. mollis exerted strong competitive effects on M. crystallinum in access to light and soil nutrients in high water conditions. This strong competitive effect even outweighed the favorable effects of salt or water additions in increasing the biomass and productivity of M. crystallinum in mixture. Regardless of salt conditions, M. crystallinum did not switch to CAM photosynthesis in response to this strong competitive effect from B. mollis. Disturbance (i.e., grass cutting) reduced the competitive pressure by B. mollis and allowed for CAM expression in M. crystallinum when it was grown mixed with B. mollis. We suggest that moderate competition with other functional groups can enhance CAM expression in M. crystallinum, thereby affecting its plasticity and ability to cope with biological stress.

  20. A CAM- and starch-deficient mutant of the facultative CAM species Mesembryanthemum crystallinum reconciles sink demands by repartitioning carbon during acclimation to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Muhammad Sajjad; Barnes, Jeremy D; Cushman, John C; Borland, Anne M

    2012-03-01

    In the halophytic species Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, the induction of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) by salinity requires a substantial investment of resources in storage carbohydrates to provide substrate for nocturnal CO(2) uptake. Acclimation to salinity also requires the synthesis and accumulation of cyclitols as compatible solutes, maintenance of root respiration, and nitrate assimilation. This study assessed the hierarchy and coordination of sinks for carbohydrate in leaves and roots during acclimation to salinity in M. crystallinum. By comparing wild type and a CAM-/starch-deficient mutant of this species, it was sought to determine if other metabolic sinks could compensate for a curtailment in CAM and enable acclimation to salinity. Under salinity, CAM deficiency reduced 24 h photosynthetic carbon gain by >50%. Cyclitols were accumulated to comparable levels in leaves and roots of both the wild type and mutant, but represented only 5% of 24 h carbon balance. Dark respiration of leaves and roots was a stronger sink for carbohydrate in the mutant compared with the wild type and implied higher maintenance costs for the metabolic processes underpinning acclimation to salinity when CAM was curtailed. CAM required the nocturnal mobilization of >70% of primary carbohydrate in the wild type and >85% of carbohydrate in the mutant. The substantial allocation of carbohydrate to CAM limited the export of sugars to roots, and the root:shoot ratio declined under salinity. The data suggest a key role for the vacuole in regulating the supply and demand for carbohydrate over the day/night cycle in the starch-/CAM-deficient mutant.

  1. In-office bleaching efficacy on stain removal from CAD/CAM and direct resin composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Amal; Ardu, Stefano; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2017-11-11

    To evaluate the efficacy of in-office bleaching on stain removal from stained resin composite and ceramic computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) blocks and direct resin composites. Forty disk-shaped samples were fabricated from each of nine materials: six CAD/CAM (VITABLOCS Mark II, Paradigm MZ100, Exp Vita Hybrid Ceramic, VITA ENAMIC, Exp Kerr, and LAVA Ultimate) and three direct resin composites (Filtek Supreme, Venus Diamond, and Filtek Silorane). Samples were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8), each stained with a particular staining solution. Using a calibrated spectrophotometer and a black background, L*a*b* values were assessed before and after 120 days of staining. Samples were subjected to in-office bleaching using 40% hydrogen peroxide gel for one hour. At subsequent assessment, color change (ΔE) was calculated as the difference between L*a*b* values. Both ANOVA and the Duncan test were used to identify differences between groups (α = 0.05). Bleaching resulted in significant differences in ΔE values for all materials (P < .001). Bleaching efficacy was highly influenced by material composition and staining solution. Residual color values after bleaching for ceramic and hybrid ceramics ranged from -0.49 to 2.35, within the clinically acceptable maximum of 3.3. Values after bleaching for resin-based CAD/CAM ranged from -0.7 to 7.08 while direct resin composites values ranged from -1.47 to 25.13. Coffee left the greatest residual color on all materials. Based on material nature, 40% hydrogen peroxide bleaching can remove staining. The new resin-based CAD/CAM blocks showed promising results in terms of color stability. Bleaching using 40% hydrogen peroxide can be an effective method to remove stains from dental restorations. In this way, restoration replacement as a result of discoloration may no longer be necessary. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Kinase inhibitors: a new class of antirheumatic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyttaris VC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Vasileios C KyttarisDivision of Rheumatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The outlook for patients with rheumatoid arthritis has improved significantly over the last three decades with the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. However, despite the use of methotrexate, cytokine inhibitors, and molecules targeting T and B cells, a percentage of patients do not respond or lose their response over time. The autoimmune process in rheumatoid arthritis depends on activation of immune cells, which utilize intracellular kinases to respond to external stimuli such as cytokines, immune complexes, and antigens. In the past decade, small molecules targeting several kinases, such as p38 MAPK, Syk, and JAK have been developed. Several p38 MAPK inhibitors proved ineffective in treating rheumatoid arthritis. The Syk inhibitor, fostamatinib, proved superior to placebo in Phase II trials and is currently under Phase III investigation. Tofacitinib, a JAK1/3 inhibitor, was shown to be efficacious in two Phase III trials, while VX-509, a JAK3 inhibitor, showed promising results in a Phase II trial. Fostamatinib and tofacitinib were associated with increased rates of infection, elevation of liver enzymes, and neutropenia. Moreover, fostamatinib caused elevations of blood pressure and diarrhea, while tofacitinib was associated with an increase in creatinine and elevation of lipid levels.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, kinase inhibitors, mitogen-activated phosphokinase p38, spleen tyrosine kinase, Janus kinases

  3. Cam Deformity and Hip Degeneration Presents 10 to 17 Years After Fixation of a Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Jakob; Gosvig, Kasper; Magnussen, Erland

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is hypothesized to result in cam deformity and femoroacetabular impingement. We examined: (1)cam-type deformity, (2) labral degeneration, chondrolabral damage, and osteoarthritic development, (3) the clinical and patient...

  4. Marginal adaptation and CAD-CAM technology: A systematic review of restorative material and fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2017-09-27

    The comparative assessment of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology and other fabrication techniques pertaining to marginal adaptation should be documented. Limited evidence exists on the effect of restorative material on the performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether the marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM single crowns, fixed dental prostheses, and implant-retained fixed dental prostheses or their infrastructures differs from that obtained by other fabrication techniques using a similar restorative material and whether it depends on the type of restorative material. An electronic search of English-language literature published between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2016, was conducted of the Medline/PubMed database. Of the 55 included comparative studies, 28 compared CAD-CAM technology with conventional fabrication techniques, 12 contrasted CAD-CAM technology and copy milling, 4 compared CAD-CAM milling with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), and 22 investigated the performance of a CAD-CAM system regarding marginal adaptation in restorations/infrastructures produced with different restorative materials. Most of the CAD-CAM restorations/infrastructures were within the clinically acceptable marginal discrepancy (MD) range. The performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation is influenced by the restorative material. Compared with CAD-CAM, most of the heat-pressed lithium disilicate crowns displayed equal or smaller MD values. Slip-casting crowns exhibited similar or better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with CAD-CAM. Cobalt-chromium and titanium implant infrastructures produced using a CAD-CAM system elicited smaller MD values than zirconia. The majority of cobalt-chromium restorations/infrastructures produced by DMLS displayed better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with the casting technique. Compared with copy

  5. L1CAM expression in endometrial carcinomas is regulated by usage of two different promoter regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeifer Marco

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM was originally identified as a neural adhesion molecule involved in axon guidance. In many human epithelial carcinomas L1CAM is overexpressed and thereby augments cell motility, invasion and metastasis formation. L1CAM positive carcinomas are associated with bad prognosis. Recent data point out that L1CAM is regulated in a fashion similar to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Previous studies have implied the transcription factors Slug and/or β-catenin in L1CAM transcriptional regulation. However, the regulation of human L1CAM expression at the transcriptional level is not well understood. Results To better understand the molecular basis of L1CAM transcriptional regulation, we carried out a detailed characterization of the human L1CAM promoter. We identified two transcription start sites, the first in front of a non-translated exon 0 (promoter 1 and the other next to the first protein-coding exon 1 (promoter 2. Both sites could be verified in endometrial carcinoma (EC cell lines and appear to be used in a cell-type specific manner. The two identified promoter regions showed activity in luciferase reporter assays. Chromatin-IP analyses confirmed the in silico predicted E-boxes, binding sites for transcription factors Snail and Slug, as well as Lef-1 sites, which are related to β-catenin-mediated transcriptional regulation, in both promoters. Overexpression of β-catenin exclusively augmented activity of promoter 1 whereas Slug enhanced promoter 1 and 2 activity suggesting that both promoters can be active. Overexpression of β-catenin or Slug could upregulate L1CAM expression in a cell-type specific manner. Conclusions Our results, for the first time, provide evidence that the L1CAM gene has two functionally active promoter sites that are used in a cell-type specific manner. Slug and β-catenin are involved L1CAM transcriptional regulation. Nevertheless, Slug rather than

  6. Spectroscopic observations of the RS CVn-type binary systems SV Cam and XY UMa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainger, P. P.; Hilditch, R. W.; Edwin, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocities of the primary components of the two RS CVn-type binary systems SV Cam and XY UMa are presented, for the first time for XY UMa. Neither secondary component could be detected. A change of 5.0 + or - 13 km/sec in the systemic velocity of SV Cam is found over 40 years, which lends some support to the current model of SV Cam being a triple system. If the masses of the G3 V primary components of both systems are assumed to be 1 solar mass, then the secondaries are 0.7 (SV Cam) and 0.6 (XY UMa) solar masses; all four stars are main sequence objects with SV Cam being rather more evolved than XY UMa.

  7. Spectroscopic observations of the RS CVn-type binary systems SV Cam and XY UMa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainger, P.P.; Hilditch, R.W.; Edwin, R.P. (Saint Andrews Univ. (UK). Observatory)

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocities of the primary components of the two RS CVn-type binary systems SV Cam and XY UMa are presented, for the first time for XY UMa. Neither secondary component could be detected. A change of 5.0+-1.3km s{sup -1} in the systemic velocity of SV Cam is found over 40 years which lends some support to the current model of SV Cam being a triple system. If the masses of the G3 V primary components of both systems are assumed to be one solar mass, then the secondaries are 0.7 (SV CAM) and 0.6 (XY UMa) solar masses; all four stars are main sequence objects with SV Cam being rather more evolved than XY UMa. (author).

  8. Contemporary dental CAD/CAM: modern chairside/lab applications and the future of computerized dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neal

    2014-01-01

    CAD/CAM in dentistry has been particularly useful in enabling the fabrication of custom, patient-specific restorations and prosthetics without the need for traditional analog dental laboratory methods. While the optimal use of CAD/CAM technology must be determined on a case-by-case basis, it is important for clinicians to recognize the opportunity to utilize computerized technology in patient therapy to provide more highly efficient, accurate, and potentially ideal outcomes. This article will discuss and evaluate the state-ofthe- art of CAD/CAM dentistry for both chairside and laboratory-based solutions. Current options for CAD/CAM technology in the treatment of patients for comprehensive dentistry along with the most common uses of chairside and laboratory-based applications will be explored. The discussion will also identify recent and future trends in CAD/CAM applications in dentistry.

  9. Ceramic dental biomaterials and CAD/CAM technology: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Raymond Wai Kim; Chow, Tak Wah; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2014-10-01

    Ceramics are widely used as indirect restorative materials in dentistry because of their high biocompatibility and pleasing aesthetics. The objective is to review the state of the arts of CAD/CAM all-ceramic biomaterials. CAD/CAM all-ceramic biomaterials are highlighted and a subsequent literature search was conducted for the relevant subjects using PubMed followed by manual search. Developments in CAD/CAM technology have catalyzed researches in all-ceramic biomaterials and their applications. Feldspathic glass ceramic and glass infiltrated ceramic can be fabricated by traditional laboratory methods or CAD/CAM. The advent of polycrystalline ceramics is a direct result of CAD/CAM technology without which the fabrication would not have been possible. The clinical uses of these ceramics have met with variable clinical success. Multiple options are now available to the clinicians for the fabrication of aesthetic all ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimal Design of a Cam Mechanism with Translating Flat-Face Follower using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tsiafis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The optimum design of a cam mechanism is a time consuming task, due to the numerous alternatives considerations. In the present work, the problem of design parameters optimization of a cam mechanism with translating flat - face follower is investigated from a multi - objective point of view. The design parameters, just like the cam base circle radius, the follower face width and the follower offset can be determined considering as the optimization criteria minimization of the cam size, of the input torque and of the contact stress. During the optimization procedure, a number of constraints regarding the pressure angle, the contact stress, etcare taken into account. The optimization approach, based on genetic algorithm, is applied to find the optimal solutions with respect to the a fore - mentioned objective function and to Ensure the kinematic requirements. Finally, the dynamic behavior of the designed cam mechanism is investigated considering the frictional forces.

  11. Identification of casein kinase 1, casein kinase 2, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-like activities in Trypanosoma evansi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Galán-Caridad

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma evansi contains protein kinases capable of phosphorylating endogenous substrates with apparent molecular masses in the range between 20 and 205 kDa. The major phosphopolypeptide band, pp55, was predominantly localized in the particulate fraction. Anti-alpha and anti-beta tubulin monoclonal antibodies recognized pp55 by Western blot analyses, suggesting that this band corresponds to phosphorylated tubulin. Inhibition experiments in the presence of emodin, heparin, and 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate indicated that the parasite tubulin kinase was a casein kinase 2 (CK2-like activity. GTP, which can be utilized instead of ATP by CK2, stimulated rather than inactivated the phosphorylation of tubulin in the parasite homogenate and particulate fraction. However, GTP inhibited the cytosolic CK2 responsible for phosphorylating soluble tubulin and other soluble substrates. Casein and two selective peptide substrates, P1 (RRKDLHDDEEDEAMSITA for casein kinase (CK1 and P2 (RRRADDSDDDDD for CK2, were recognized as substrates in T. evansi. While the enzymes present in the soluble fraction predominantly phosphorylated P1, P2 was preferentially labeled in the particulate fractions. These results demonstrated the existence of CK1-like and CK2-like activities primarily located in the parasite cytosolic and membranous fractions, respectively. Histone II-A and kemptide (LRRASVA also behaved as suitable substrates, implying the existence of other Ser/Thr kinases in T. evansi. Cyclic AMP only increased the phosphorylation of histone II-A and kemptide in the cytosol, demonstrating the existence of soluble cAMP-dependent protein kinase-like activities in T. evansi. However, no endogenous substrates for this enzyme were identified in this fraction. Further evidences were obtained by using PKI (6-22, a reported inhibitor of the catalytic subunit of mammalian cAMP-dependent protein kinases, which specifically hindered the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of histone II

  12. Epothilone B enhances surface EpCAM expression in ovarian cancer Hey cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabi, Shohreh; Yang, Chia-Ping Huang; Goldberg, Gary L; Horwitz, Susan Band

    2010-11-01

    Epothilone B (EpoB), like Taxol, stabilizes microtubules resulting in an inhibition of microtubule dynamic instability. The drug is being evaluated in phase III clinical trials. An EpoB analog, Ixabepilone, was approved by the FDA for the treatment of taxane-resistant metastatic breast cancer. Epithelial cell adhesion antigen (EpCAM) expression is significantly higher in epithelial ovarian cancer cells compared to normal cells. The effects of EpoB and other microtubule-interacting agents on surface EpCAM expression were studied. Biochemical methods, immunofluorescence and flow cytometry were used to identify EpCAM expression on the surface of the ovarian cancer cell line, Hey, after exposure to EpoB. The relationship between EpoB-mediated surface EpCAM expression and EpoB-induced α-tubulin acetylation, a surrogate marker for stable microtubules, in Hey cells also was investigated. Nanomolar concentrations of EpoB, Taxol, discodermolide or vinblastine caused a marked increase in surface EpCAM expression in Hey cells. Alpha-tubulin acetylation was increased following treatment with Taxol, EpoB and discodermolide, but not with vinblastine, indicating that drug-enhanced surface EpCAM expression does not correlate with tubulin acetylation or stabilization. Unexpectedly, EpoB did not have a significant effect on EpCAM mRNA expression, nor did it alter the level of total cellular EpCAM in Hey cells. The results indicate that disruption of the microtubule cytoskeleton is associated with the redistribution of cell surface antigens in ovarian cancer cells. The increase in cell surface EpCAM antigen density may facilitate the antibody targeting of EpCAM-positive ovarian cancer cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence and Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use among Ivy League College Students: Implications for Student Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnik Nowak, Amy L.; DeGise, Joe; Daugherty, Amanda; O'Keefe, Richard; Seward, Samuel, Jr.; Setty, Suma; Tang, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Determine prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used and test the significance of demographics and social cognitive constructs as predictors of CAM use in a college sample. Secondary purpose was to guide the integration of CAM therapies into college health services. Participants: Random,…

  14. Prevalence and Characteristics of CAM Use among People Living with HIV and AIDS in Lebanon: Implications for Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Abou-Rizk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the prevalence and determinants of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use among People Living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA in Lebanon and to identify related issues that may affect patient care. A cross-sectional survey design was used to interview 116 PLWHA in Beirut. The questionnaire addressed sociodemographic and disease characteristics as well as CAM use. The main outcome of the study was CAM use since diagnosis. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses. Overall, 46.6% of participants reported using one or more CAM therapies, with herbs and herbal products being the most commonly used (63%. A higher education level was associated with a 3-fold increase in the odds of CAM use. Among users, 20% used CAM as alternative to conventional treatment, 48% were not aware of CAM-drug interactions, 89% relied on nonhealth care sources for their choice of CAM, and 44% did not disclose CAM use to their physician. CAM use is prevalent among Lebanese PLWHA. Findings of this study highlighted the need to educate health care practitioners to have an open communication and a patient-centered approach discussing CAM use during routine care and to enhance awareness of PLWHA on safe use of CAM.

  15. The fracture resistance of a CAD/CAM Resin Nano Ceramic (RNC) and a CAD ceramic at different thicknesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.; Trindade, F.Z.; de Jager, N.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to investigate the influence of restoration thickness to the fracture resistance of adhesively bonded Lava™ Ultimate CAD/CAM, a Resin Nano Ceramic (RNC), and IPS e.max CAD ceramic. Methods Polished Lava™ Ultimate CAD/CAM (Group L), sandblasted Lava™ Ultimate CAD/CAM

  16. Is Ep-CAM Expression a Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker for Colorectal Cancer? A Systematic Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu Han

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The present findings suggest that Ep-CAM expression may be associated with CRC carcinogenesis, while the loss of Ep-CAM expression is correlated with the progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis of CRC. Ep-CAM expression may be a useful biomarker for the clinical diagnosis of CRC.

  17. Focal adhesion kinase signaling in cardiac hypertrophy and failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.G. Franchini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Focal adhesion kinase (FAK is a broadly expressed tyrosine kinase implicated in cellular functions such as migration, growth and survival. Emerging data support a role for FAK in cardiac development, reactive hypertrophy and failure. Data reviewed here indicate that FAK plays a critical role at the cellular level in the responses of cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts to biomechanical stress and to hypertrophic agonists such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The signaling mechanisms regulated by FAK are discussed to provide insight into its role in the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy and failure.

  18. Sagittal Subtalar and Talocrural Joint Assessment During Ambulation With Controlled Ankle Movement (CAM) Boots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Benjamin D; Exten, Emily L; Cross, Janelle A; Kruger, Karen M; Law, Brian; Fritz, Jessica M; Harris, Gerald

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine sagittal plane talocrural and subtalar kinematic differences between barefoot and controlled ankle movement (CAM) boot walking. This study used fluoroscopic images to determine talar motion relative to tibia and calcaneal motion relative to talus. Fourteen male subjects (mean age 24.1 ± 3.5 years) screened for normal gait were tested. A fluoroscopy unit was used to collect images at 200 Hz during stance. Sagittal motion of the talocrural and subtalar joints were analyzed barefoot and within short and tall CAM boots. Barefoot talocrural mean maximum plantar and dorsiflexion were 9.2 ± 5.4 degrees and -7.5 ± 7.4 degrees, respectively; short CAM boot mean maximum plantar and dorsiflexion were 3.2 ± 4.0 degrees and -4.8 ± 10.2 degrees, respectively; and tall CAM boot mean maximum plantar and dorsiflexion were -0.2 ± 3.5 degrees and -2.4 ± 5.1 degrees, respectively. Talocrural mean range of motion (ROM) decreased from barefoot (16.7 ± 5.1 degrees) to short CAM boot (8.0 ± 4.9 degrees) to tall CAM boot (2.2 ± 2.5 degrees). Subtalar mean maximum plantarflexion angles were 5.3 ± 5.6 degrees for barefoot walking, 4.1 ± 5.9 degrees for short CAM boot walking, and 3.0 ± 4.7 degrees for tall CAM boot walking. Mean minimum subtalar plantarflexion angles were 0.7 ± 3.2 degrees for barefoot walking, 0.7 ± 2.9 degrees for short CAM boot walking, and 0.1 ± 4.8 degrees for tall CAM boot walking. Subtalar mean ROM decreased from barefoot (4.6 ± 3.9 degrees) to short CAM boot (3.4 ± 3.8 degrees) to tall CAM boot (2.9 ± 2.6 degrees). Tall and short CAM boot intervention was shown to limit both talocrural and subtalar motion in the sagittal plane during ambulation. The greatest reductions were seen with the tall CAM boot, which limited talocrural motion by 86.8% and subtalar motion by 37.0% compared to barefoot. Short CAM boot intervention reduced talocrural motion by 52.1% and subtalar motion by 26.1% compared to

  19. Evidence of Drought Stress Memory in the Facultative CAM, Aptenia cordifolia: Possible Role of Phytohormones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Fleta-Soriano

    Full Text Available Although plant responses to drought stress have been studied in detail in several plant species, including CAM plants, the occurrence of stress memory and possible mechanisms for its regulation are still very poorly understood. In an attempt to better understand the occurrence and possible mechanisms of regulation of stress memory in plants, we measured the concentrations of phytohormones in Aptenia cordifolia exposed to reiterated drought, together with various stress indicators, including leaf water contents, photosynthesis and mechanisms of photo- and antioxidant protection. Results showed that plants exposed to drought stress responded differently if previously challenged with a first drought. Gibberellin levels decreased upon exposure to the first drought and remained lower in double-stressed plants compared with those exposed to stress for the first time. In contrast, abscisic acid levels were higher in double- than single-stressed plants. This occurred in parallel with alterations in hydroperoxide levels, but not with malondialdehyde levels, thus suggesting an increased oxidation state that did not result in oxidative damage in double-stressed plants. It is concluded that (i drought stress memory occurs in double-stressed A. cordifolia plants, (ii both gibberellins and abscisic acid may play a role in plant response to repeated periods of drought, and (iii changes in abscisic acid levels in double-stressed plants may have a positive effect by modulating changes in the cellular redox state with a role in signalling, rather than cause oxidative damage to the cell.

  20. Machining variability impacts on the strength of a 'chair-side' CAD-CAM ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Owen; Cao, Xu; Sunnar, Parminder; Fleming, Garry J P

    2012-08-01

    To develop a novel methodology to generate specimens for bi-axial flexure strength (BFS) determination from a 'chair-side' CAD-CAM feldspathic ceramic with surface defect integrals analogous to the clinical state. The hypotheses tested were: BFS and surface roughness (R(a)) are independent of machining variability introduced by the renewal or deterioration of form-grinding tools and that a post-machining annealing cycle would significantly modify BFS. Nominally identical disc-shaped specimens (11 mm diameter, 1.1mm thickness) were machined with identical design and operative parameters from Vita Mark II feldspathic ceramic. Six individual bur sets (Groups A-F) generated 14 specimens each. Three groups were annealed between glass transition and softening temperatures. 3D contact profilometry determined surface roughness before and following annealing and prior to BFS determination. Scanning electron microscopy was undertaken to examine machining tools and perform fractographic analyses of ceramic fracture fragments. Statistical analysis included independent and pairwise analyses of R(a)-values (Pmachining order and BFS or R(a) were observed (P>0.05). Surface roughness and the nature of strength limiting defects appear to be probabilistic with flaw generation dependent on a random selection of a bur and a random machining sequence. The variability in BFS with machining could account for premature clinical failures. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Academic doctors' views of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and its role within the NHS: an exploratory qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Alison

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a marked increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in the UK population in recent years. Surveys of doctors' perspectives on CAM have identified a variety of views and potential information needs. While these are useful for describing the proportions of doctors who hold particular attitudes towards CAM, they are less helpful for understanding why. In addition, while the views of non-academic doctors have begun to be studied, the perspective and rationales of academic doctors remains under-researched. It seems important to investigate the views of those with a research-orientation, given the emphasis on the need for more scientific evidence in recent debates on CAM. Methods This exploratory study used qualitative methods to explore academic doctors' views of CAM and the rationales they provided for their views. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to identify doctors with a dual clinical and academic role in the Bristol area, with an anticipated variety of views on CAM. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine doctors. The data were analysed thematically, drawing on the Framework Approach. Results The doctors expressed a spectrum of views on CAM, falling into three broad groups: the 'enthusiasts', the 'sceptics' and the 'undecided'. Scepticism or uncertainty about the value of CAM was prominent, except among those practising a form of CAM. A variety of rationales underpinned their perspectives on CAM, a key recurring rationale being their perspective on the scientific evidence base. The main themes arising included: the role of doctors' professional experiences of conventional medicine and CAM in shaping their attitudes towards CAM, doctor-patient communication about CAM and patient disclosure, whether there is a need for training and education in CAM for doctors, a hierarchy of acceptability of CAM and the nature of evidence; and the role of CAM within the NHS. Conclusion

  2. Hyper Suprime-Cam: autoguider and Shack-Hartmann systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Komiyama, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakaya, Hidehiko; Furusawa, Hisanori; Tomono, Daigo; Kawanomoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Yoko

    2008-07-01

    We present methodology of the autoguider (AG) and Shack-Hartmann (SH) sensing systems which will be used for a wide-field camera, Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC), on the prime focus of the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. For both systems, stellar images are formed on the HSC science CCDs. Although light from AG stars must pass through bandpass filters, we can obtain enough photons for AG stars brighter than mAB autoguiding. Spatial number density of such bright stars from the SDSS database requires an area of about two 2k×4k CCDs for AG stars. The optics of SH system except for the imaging CCDs is located within the HSC filter unit.

  3. MKID multicolor array status and results from DemoCam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaerth, James A.; Czakon, Nicole G.; Day, Peter K.; Downes, Thomas P.; Duan, Ran; Gao, Jiansong; Glenn, Jason; Golwala, Sunil R.; Hollister, Matthew I.; LeDuc, Henry G.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Maloney, Philip R.; Noroozian, Omid; Nguyen, Hien T.; Sayers, Jack; Siegel, Seth; Vaillancourt, John E.; Vayonakis, Anastasios; Wilson, Philip R.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2010-07-01

    We present the results of the latest multicolor Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) focal plane arrays in the submillimeter. The new detectors on the arrays are superconducting resonators which combine a coplanar waveguide section with an interdigitated capacitor, or IDC. To avoid out-of-band pickup by the capacitor, a stepped-impedance filter is used to prevent radiation from reaching the absorptive aluminum section of the resonator. These arrays are tested in the preliminary demonstration instrument, DemoCam, a precursor to the Multicolor Submillimeter Inductance Camera, MUSIC. We present laboratory results of the responsivity to light both in the laboratory and at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. We assess the performance of the detectors in filtering out-of-band radiation, and find the level of excess load and its effect on detector performance. We also look at the array design characteristics, and the implications for the optimization of sensitivities expected by MUSIC.

  4. Chemical composition of umbu (Spondias tuberosa Arr. Cam seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Vilela Borges

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The umbu tree (Spondias tuberosa Arr. Cam is an important fruit tree the economy of the semi-arid northeastern region of Brazil. With the objective of finding use for the seeds, physical and chemical characterizations of the seeds from 2 cultivars in 2 maturation stages were carried out and their fatty acid and mineral profiles determined. The results showed no differences between the seeds analyzed. The yield was about 10% and the dimensions as follows: length from 1.48 to 2.11 cm and width from 0.76 to 1.16 cm. The average lipid content was 55% of which 69% was unsaturated and the average protein content was 24%. The seeds were a good source of the following minerals: P, K, Mg, Fe and Cu. The overall results indicated that the oil or the seeds could be used for food stuffs if no toxic agents were found.

  5. Citation et allusion dans le Décaméron

    OpenAIRE

    Perrus, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Étant donné la complexité du réseau intertextuel présent dans le Décaméron, cette étude se borne à l'examen de quelques cas de citations, de réminiscences, et surtout d'allusions en relation avec la stratégie de l'auteur, la pratique allusiva occupant un large espace dans l'œuvre de Boccace. Y sont distinguées les citations présentes dans le discours auctorial (proemio, discours d'exorde et de conclusion des narrateurs) – discours de défense ou usage ludique voire parodique de la citation – e...

  6. Effects of tributylborane-activated adhesive and two silane agents on bonding computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Ayano; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of an experimental adhesive agent [methyl methacrylate-tributylborane liquid (MT)] and two adhesive agents containing silane on the bonding between a resin composite block of a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and a light-curing resin composite veneering material. The surfaces of CAD/CAM resin composite specimens were ground with silicon-carbide paper, treated with phosphoric acid, and then primed with either one of the two silane agents [Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SC) and GC Ceramic Primer II (GC)], no adhesive control (Cont), or one of three combinations (MT/SC, MT/GC, and MT/Cont). A light-curing resin composite was veneered on the primed CAD/CAM resin composite surface. The veneered specimens were subjected to thermocycling between 4 and 60 °C for 10,000 cycles, and the shear bond strengths were determined. All data were analyzed using analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey-Kramer HSD test (α = 0.05, n = 8). MT/SC (38.7 MPa) exhibited the highest mean bond strengths, followed by MT/GC (30.4 MPa), SC (27.9 MPa), and MT/Cont (25.7 MPa), while Cont (12.9 MPa) and GC (12.3 MPa) resulted in the lowest bond strengths. The use of MT in conjunction with a silane agent significantly improved the bond strength. Surface treatment with appropriate adhesive agents was confirmed as a prerequisite for veneering CAD/CAM resin composite restorations.

  7. Transmission of light in the visible spectrum (400-700 nm) and blue spectrum (360-540 nm) through CAD/CAM polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Jan-Frederik; Kauling, Ana Elisa Colle; Ueda, Kazuhiko; Florian, Beuer; Stimmelmayr, Michael

    2016-12-01

    CAD/CAM-fabricated long-term temporary restorations from high-density polymers can be applied for a wide range of indications. Milled from monolithic, mono-colored polymer blocks, the translucency of the material plays an important role for an esthetically acceptable result. The aim of this study was to compare the transmittance through visible light and blue light of CAD CAM polymers to a glass-ceramic material of the same color. Ambarino High-Class (AM), Telio-CAD (TC), Zenotec PMMA (ZT), Cercon base PMMA (CB), CAD Temp (CT), Artbloc Temp (AT), Polycon ae (PS), New Outline CAD (NC), QUATTRO DISK Eco PMMA (GQ), Lava Ultimate (LU), and Paradigm MZ 100 (PA) were employed in this study using the feldspathic glass-ceramic Vita Mark II (MK) as control group. Using a spectrophotometer, the overall light transmittance was measured for each material (n = 40) and was calculated as the integration (t c (λ) dλ [10(-5)]) of all t c values for the wavelengths of blue light (360-540 nm). Results were compared to previous data of the authors for visible light (400 to 700 nm). Wilcoxon test showed significant differences between the light transmittance of visible and blue light for all materials. CAD/CAM polymers showed different translucency for blue and visible light. This means clinicians may not conclude from the visible translucency of a material to its permeability for blue light. This influences considerations regarding light curing. CAD/CAM polymers need to be luted adhesively; therefore, clinicians should be aware about the amount of blue light passing through a restoration.

  8. Effect of abutment tooth color, cement color, and ceramic thickness on the resulting optical color of a CAD/CAM glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced crown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, John C; Lebeau, Dene; Nunokawa, Gary

    2011-02-01

    A dark-colored prepared abutment tooth may negatively affect the esthetic outcome of a ceramic restoration if the tooth is restored using translucent enamel-like ceramic materials. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cumulative effect that the tooth abutment color, cement color, and ceramic thickness have on the resulting optical color of a CAD/CAM glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced crown. A CAD/CAM glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced monolithic crown (IPS e.max CAD LT) was fabricated. Three possible crown restoration variables were tested in vitro. The procedure examined 4 prepared abutment tooth colors (light, medium light, medium dark, and dark), 2 cement (Variolink II) colors (translucent and opaque), and 4 ceramic thickness values (1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 2.0 mm, and 2.5 mm). The color of each combination was measured using a spectrophotometer, and the average values of the color difference (ΔE) were calculated. The data were analyzed with a 3-way ANOVA (tooth abutment color, ceramic thickness, and luting agent) and Tukey's HSD test (α=.05), which evaluated within-group effects of the tooth abutment color to the ΔE at each ceramic thickness. The ΔE values of a CAD/CAM glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced crown were significantly influenced by the tooth abutment color (Pcrowns were cemented using the opaque cement. This study demonstrated that underlying tooth abutment color, cement color, and ceramic thickness all influence the resulting optical color of CAD/CAM glass-ceramic lithium disilicate-reinforced restorations. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Retention of Resin Composite CAM Crowns Following Different Bonding Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat, Amir Hossein

    Objectives: Resin composite CAM materials offer more efficient milling, however, there is a high incidence of clinical debonding when this material is used for full-coverage crowns. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of different surface treat-ments and primers on the crown retention of a new resin composite CAM material. Methods: 120 molars were prepared with a 24 degree taper, 1.5mm height, and axial walls in dentin. Surface area was measured by digital microscopy and preparations were scanned with an intraoral scanner. Crowns were milled from an experimental com-posite material with 4mm occlusal height. Teeth were randomly allocated to 12 groups (n= 10) based on the possible combinations of three surface treatments (Control, Alumina air abrasion [50mum Al2O3 at 0.28MPa], Hydrofluoric acid etch [5% HF acid for 20 sec]), silane application (with or without Kerr Silane), and adhesive application (with or without Optibond XTR adhesive). Optibond XTR adhesive was applied to the tooth preparations and crowns were bonded with MaxCem Elite. Crowns were fatigued for 100,000 cycles at 100N in water. Crowns were debonded in tension in a universal testing machine at 1mm/min. Crown retention strength (maximum load/area of preparation) was analyzed using a three-way ANOVA with Tukey's post-hoc tests. Results: Surface treatment, silane and adhesive applications independently affect the retention force (pResin composite crowns should be alumina particle abraded and coated with silane and adhesive.

  10. Helmet-Cam: tool for assessing miners' respirable dust exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecala, A B; Reed, W R; Joy, G J; Westmoreland, S C; O'Brien, A D

    2013-09-01

    Video technology coupled with datalogging exposure monitors have been used to evaluate worker exposure to different types of contaminants. However, previous application of this technology used a stationary video camera to record the worker's activity while the worker wore some type of contaminant monitor. These techniques are not applicable to mobile workers in the mining industry because of their need to move around the operation while performing their duties. The Helmet-Cam is a recently developed exposure assessment tool that integrates a person-wearable video recorder with a datalogging dust monitor. These are worn by the miner in a backpack, safety belt or safety vest to identify areas or job tasks of elevated exposure. After a miner performs his or her job while wearing the unit, the video and dust exposure data files are downloaded to a computer and then merged together through a NIOSH-developed computer software program called Enhanced Video Analysis of Dust Exposure (EVADE). By providing synchronized playback of the merged video footage and dust exposure data, the EVADE software allows for the assessment and identification of key work areas and processes, as well as work tasks that significantly impact a worker's personal respirable dust exposure. The Helmet-Cam technology has been tested at a number of metal/nonmetal mining operations and has proven to be a valuable assessment tool. Mining companies wishing to use this technique can purchase a commercially available video camera and an instantaneous dust monitor to obtain the necessary data, and the NIOSH-developed EVADE software will be available for download at no cost on the NIOSH website.

  11. Fatigue resistance of ultrathin CAD/CAM complete crowns with a simplified cementation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magne, Pascal; Carvalho, Adriana O; Bruzi, Greciana; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    Traditional tooth preparation for complete crowns requires a substantial amount of hard tissue reduction. This is in contrast with the principles of minimally invasive dentistry. An ultrathin complete crown preparation is proposed instead. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the fatigue resistance and failure mode of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ultrathin complete molar crowns placed with self-adhesive cement. Different restorative materials (resin nanoceramic [RNC], feldspathic ceramic [FEL], and lithium disilicate [LD]) were compared. Forty-five extracted molars with a standardized crown preparation were restored with the Cerec 3 CAD/CAM system using FEL, LD, or RNC (n=15). FEL and LD restorations were etched with hydrofluoric acid and silanated. RNC restorations and all preparations were treated with airborne-particle abrasion. All restorations (thickness=0.7 mm) were cemented with RelyX Unicem II Automix cement and submitted to cyclic isometric loading, beginning with a load of 200 N (5000 cycles) and followed by stages of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200, and 1400 N at a maximum of 30 000 cycles each. The specimens were loaded until failure or for a maximum of 185 000 cycles. The failure mode was categorized as "catastrophic," "possibly reparable," or "reparable." The groups were compared using life table survival analysis (log rank test at α=.05). Previously published data from the same authors about traditional complete crowns (thickness 1.5 mm) using the same experimental design were included for comparison. All specimens survived the fatigue test until the 600 N step. RNC, LD, and FEL failed at an average load of 1014 N (1 survival), 1123 N (2 survivals), and 987 N (no survivals), and no difference in survival rate was found. No catastrophic failures were reported after the fatigue test. Comparison with previously published data showed that 1.5-mm thick complete crowns demonstrated higher survival rates than

  12. Effect of CAD-CAM porcelain veneers thickness on their cemented color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hanan; Atta, Osama; El-Mowafy, Omar; Khan, Saad A

    2010-01-01

    To determine the effect of thickness of porcelain veneers constructed from CAD-CAM on their final color when two resin cements were used. Buccal surfaces of extracted sound human molars with shade 3M2 [verified using digital spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade-Vident)] were reduced to expose flat enamel surfaces. CAD-CAM blocks (Vitablokcs Mark II) of the same shade were sectioned into three groups of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7mm thickness. Each group was subdivided into two subgroups; one subgroup was cemented to enamel using an etch-and-rinse resin cement (Calibra/Prime and bond-NT, Dentsply) and the other was cemented to enamel using a self-etching resin cement (Panavia-F, Kuraray). The shade of the two resin cements was "light". Change in color (ΔE) between the selected shade (3M2) and the resulted shade was measured for each specimen using a digital spectrophotometer (Vita Easyshade-Vident). Means and SDs were calculated and data was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc tukey's. Change in color (ΔE) between the selected and the produced shade for the Calibra subgroups was 2.8 (0.3) for the 0.3mm, 1.67 (0.2) for the 0.5mm thick specimens and 1.26 (0.3) for the 0.7mm. Panavia F subgroups showed ΔE of 2 (0.4) for the 0.3mm, 1.13 (0.23) for the 0.5mm thick specimens and 1.21 (0.31) for the 0.7mm. The 0.7mm subgroups showed no significant difference in color change among the two cements (P>.05), however, Calibra resulted in significantly higher change in color values for the 0.5mm thick specimens (Pveneer thickness from 0.5 to 0.7mm did not significantly affect the final color of cemented veneers. Whilst the color was significantly affected at the thickness of 0.3mm. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanical and optical properties of monolithic CAD-CAM restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Nazmiye; Us, Yesim Olcer

    2017-08-04

    Achieving natural tooth appearance with sufficient mechanical strength is one of the most challenging issues of computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) materials. However, limited evidence is available regarding their optical and mechanical properties for proper and evidence-based material selection in clinical practice. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess and compare the translucency and biaxial flexural strength of 5 monolithic CAD-CAM restorative materials. Disk-shaped specimens (n=30) of each material (Lava Ultimate [LU], Vita Enamic [VE], Vitablocs Mark II [VMII], Vita Suprinity [VS], and IPS e.max CAD [IPS]) with a diameter of 12 mm and a thickness of 1.2 ±0.05 mm were prepared. A spectrophotometer was used to measure the translucency parameter. The specimens were then subjected to a biaxial flexure test using 3 balls and loaded with a piston in a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred (International Organization for Standardization standard 6872). Weibull statistics were used to evaluate the characteristic strength and reliability of each material. Chemical compositions were analyzed using an energy dispersive spectrometer, and microstructural analysis was conducted using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and the Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). Significant differences were found among the materials concerning translucency and biaxial flexural strength (P<.05). The highest mean transparency value was obtained in the VS group, whereas the lowest mean value was obtained in the VE group. The VS group produced the highest mean biaxial flexural strength, followed by the IPS, LU, VE, and VMII groups. Based on the results of the present study, zirconia-reinforced glass-ceramic revealed higher mean translucency and biaxial flexural strength than resin nanoceramic, feldspathic ceramic, lithium disilicate ceramic, and dual

  14. Modeling analysis of the benefits of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) for sustainable agriculture in arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, M. S.; Vico, G.; Porporato, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    In view of the pressing needs to sustainably manage water and soil resources, especially in arid and semi-arid regions, here we propose a new carbon assimilation model that couples a simple yet mechanistic description of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis to the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The model captures the full coupling of the CAM photosynthetic pathway with fluctuations in environmental conditions (cycles of light availability and air humidity, changes in soil moisture as driven by plant transpiration and rainfall occurrence). As such, the model is capable of reproducing the different phases of CAM, including daytime stomatal closure and photosynthesis from malic acid, afternoon stomatal opening for direct carbon assimilation, and nighttime stomatal opening for CO2 uptake and malic acid synthesis. Thanks to its versatility, our model allows us to relate CAM productivity, for both obligate and facultative CAM plants, to various soil moisture conditions including hydroclimatic scenarios of rainfall frequency and intensity as well as different night-time conditions of temperature, wind speed, and humidity. Our analyses show the potential productive benefits of CAM cultivation in dryland environments as feedstock and possible biofuel source, in terms of sustainable water use and economic benefits. In particular, the model is used to explore conditions where CAM plant resiliency to water stress makes these plants a more sustainable alternative to C3 and C4 species for potential deficit irrigation.

  15. Optional use of CAM photosynthesis in two C4 species, Portulaca cyclophylla and Portulaca digyna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtum, Joseph A M; Hancock, Lillian P; Edwards, Erika J; Winter, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Low levels of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) are demonstrated in two species with C4 photosynthesis, Portulaca cyclophylla and P. digyna. The expression of CAM in P. cyclophylla and P. digyna is facultative, i.e. optional. Well-watered plants did not accumulate acid at night and exhibited gas-exchange patterns consistent with C4 photosynthesis. CAM-type nocturnal acidification was reversible in that it was induced following drought and lost when droughted plants were rewatered. In P. cyclophylla, droughting was accompanied by a small but discernible net uptake of CO2 during the dark, whereas in P. digyna, net CO2 exchange at night approached the CO2 compensation point but did not transition beyond it. This report brings the number of known C4 species with a capacity for expressing CAM to six. All are species of Portulaca. The observation of CAM in P. cyclophylla and P. digyna is the first for species in the opposite-leaved (OL) Portulacelloid-anatomy lineage of Portulaca and for the Australian clade therein. The other four species are within the alternate-leaved (AL) lineage, in the Atriploid-anatomy Oleracea and the Pilosoid-anatomy Pilosa clades. Studies of the evolutionary origins of C4 and CAM in Portulaca will benefit from a more wide-range survey of CAM across its species, particularly in the C3-C4 intermediate-containing Cryptopetala clade. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolutionary history of PEPC genes in green plants: Implications for the evolution of CAM in orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hua; Zhang, Liang-Sheng; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zheng, Bao-Qiang; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) gene is the key enzyme in CAM and C4 photosynthesis. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of the PEPC family was performed using sequences from 60 available published plant genomes, the Phalaenopsis equestris genome and RNA-Seq of 15 additional orchid species. The PEPC family consists of three distinct subfamilies, PPC-1, PPC-2, and PPC-3, all of which share a recent common ancestor in chlorophyte algae. The eudicot PPC-1 lineage separated into two clades due to whole genome duplication (WGD). Similarly, the monocot PPC-1 lineage also divided into PPC-1M1 and PPC-1M2 through an ancient duplication event. The monocot CAM- or C4-related PEPC originated from the clade PPC-1M1. WGD may not be the major driver for the performance of CAM function by PEPC, although it increased the number of copies of the PEPC gene. CAM may have evolved early in monocots, as the CAM-related PEPC of orchids originated from the monocot ancient duplication, and the earliest CAM-related PEPC may have evolved immediately after the diversification of monocots, with CAM developing prior to C4. Our results represent the most complete evolutionary history of PEPC genes in green plants to date and particularly elucidate the origin of PEPC in orchids. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative fracture strength analysis of Lava and Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taek-Ka; Pak, Hyun-Soon; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE All-ceramic crowns are subject to fracture during function. To minimize this common clinical complication, zirconium oxide has been used as the framework for all-ceramic crowns. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia crown systems: Lava and Digident. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and twenty Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were fabricated. A metal die was also duplicated from the original prepared tooth for fracture testing. A universal testing machine was used to determine the fracture strength of the crowns. RESULTS The mean fracture strengths were as follows: 54.9 ± 15.6 N for the Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and 87.0 ± 16.0 N for the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns. The difference between the mean fracture strengths of the Lava and Digident crowns was statistically significant (Pveneering porcelain and the core whereas the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed fracture only of the veneering porcelain. CONCLUSION The fracture strengths of CAD/CAM zirconia crowns differ depending on the compatibility of the core material and the veneering porcelain. PMID:23755332

  18. Discrimination in health care and CAM use in a representative sample of U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, Sheryl; Faith, Jennifer; Keon, Karen Levy; Tippens, Kimberly M

    2013-06-01

    Discrimination in medical settings may influence patient attitudes about health care and health-seeking behaviors. Patients who experience discrimination may seek alternative means of health care, including use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between discrimination in health care and CAM use. Data come from the 2001 Health Care Quality Survey (HCQS), which used a multistage sampling design with random-digit dialing, oversampling telephone exchanges with higher densities of African-American, Hispanic, and Asian households. The 2001 HCQS sample consisted of 6722 adults living in the continental United States. To correct for the disproportionate sample design, data were adjusted using sample weights to make the results representative of the U.S. population 18 years and older. Present analyses were limited to 6008 respondents who had visited a doctor or clinic or had been admitted to the hospital in the last 2 years. Outcome measures were CAM use, practitioner-provided CAM use, and herbal medicine use. In adjusted logistic regression analyses, discrimination in health care was significantly associated with use of herbal medicines alone (adjusted odds ratio=1.47, confidence interval: 1.05, 2.04), but not with use of practitioner-provided CAM (i.e., use of acupuncture, chiropractor, traditional healer or herbalist, alone or in combination with herbal medicines). Further research is needed to examine the direction of the relationship between discrimination and CAM use and differences by CAM modality.

  19. Comparative evaluation of RetCam vs. gonioscopy images in congenital glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj V Azad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare clarity, exposure and quality of anterior chamber angle visualization in congenital glaucoma patients, using RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images. Design: Cross-sectional study Participants. Congenital glaucoma patients over age of 5 years. Materials and Methods: A prospective consecutive pilot study was done in congenital glaucoma patients who were older than 5 years. Methods used are indirect gonioscopy and RetCam imaging. Clarity of the image, extent of angle visible and details of angle structures seen were graded for both methods, on digitally recorded images, in each eye, by two masked observers. Outcome Measures: Image clarity, interobserver agreement. Results: 40 eyes of 25 congenital glaucoma patients were studied. RetCam image had excellent clarity in 77.5% of patients versus 47.5% by gonioscopy. The extent of angle seen was similar by both methods. Agreement between RetCam and gonioscopy images regarding details of angle structures was 72.50% by observer 1 and 65.00% by observer 2. Conclusions: There was good agreement between RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images in detecting angle structures of congenital glaucoma patients. However, RetCam provided greater clarity, with better quality, and higher magnification images. RetCam can be a useful alternative to gonioscopy in infants and small children without the need for general anesthesia.

  20. Day/night regulation of aquaporins during the CAM cycle in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Amezcua-Romero, Julio C; Pantoja, Omar

    2012-03-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum exhibits induction of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) after a threshold stage of development, by exposure to long days with high light intensities or by water and salt stress. During the CAM cycle, fluctuations in carbon partitioning within the cell lead to transient drops in osmotic potential, which are likely stabilized/balanced by passive movement of water via aquaporins (AQPs). Protoplast swelling assays were used to detect changes in water permeability during the day/night cycle of CAM. To assess the role of AQPs during the same period, we followed transcript accumulation and protein abundance of four plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and one tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP). CAM plants showed a persistent rhythm of specific AQP protein abundance changes throughout the day/night cycle, including changes in amount of McPIP2;1, McTIP1;2, McPIP1;4 and McPIP1;5, while the abundance of McPIP1;2 was unchanged. These protein changes did not appear to be coordinated with transcript levels for any of the AQPs analysed; however, they did occur in parrallel to alterations in water permeability, as well as variations in cell osmolarity, pinitol, glucose, fructose and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) levels measured throughout the day/night CAM cycle. Results suggest a role for AQPs in maintaining water balance during CAM and highlight the complexity of protein expression during the CAM cycle. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of five CAD/CAM materials by microstructural characterization and mechanical tests: a comparative in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Nesrin; Gultekin, Pinar; Turp, Volkan; Akgungor, Gokhan; Sen, Deniz; Mijiritsky, Eitan

    2018-01-08

    Polymer infiltrated ceramics and nano-ceramic resins are the new restorative materials which have been developed in order to enhance the adverse properties of glass-matrix ceramics and resin composites. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the characteristics of various CAD/CAM materials through mechanical, microstructural, and SEM analysis. Five test groups (n = 22) were formed by using the indicated CAD/CAM blocks: VITA Enamic (VITA Zahnfabrik), Lava Ultimate (3 M ESPE), IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent), IPS Empress CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent), and VITA Mark II (VITA Zahnfabrik). Two specimens from each test group were used for XRD and EDS analysis. Remaining samples were divided into two subgroups (n = 10). One subgroup specimens were thermocycled (5 °C to 55 °C, 30s, 10,000 cycles) whereas the other were not. All of the specimens were evaluated in terms of flexural strength, Vickers hardness, and fracture toughness. Results were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD, and Student's t tests (α = .05). Fractured specimens were evaluated using SEM. The highest Vickers microhardness value was found for VITA Mark II (p CAD was found to have the highest flexural strength (p CAD was also higher than other tested block materials (p CAD groups. It should be realised that simulated aging process seem to affect ceramic-polymer composite materials more significantly than glass ceramics.

  2. Asymmetric epiphyseal closure of the femoral head as a potential cause of the primary cam lesion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Je; Jung, Gwang Young; Kim, Eung Ju; Chun, Young Soo; Rhyu, Kee Hyung

    2016-09-01

    Cam-type femoroacetabular impingement is a pathologic condition caused by repetitive impact of the abnormal femur on a normal acetabular rim, resulting in damage to the articular cartilage. Excluding cases with known underlying diseases, the development of primary cam deformity is not well understood. Here, we describe a patient with cam-type femoroacetabular impingement exhibiting delayed epiphyseal closure at the site of the cam lesion. The authors believe that this may represent a cause of primary cam deformity, and hereby report the case with review of the literature.

  3. Highly efficient elimination of colorectal tumor-initiating cells by an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody engaging human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Herrmann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available With their resistance to genotoxic and anti-proliferative drugs and potential to grow tumors and metastases from very few cells, cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells (TICs are a severe limitation for the treatment of cancer by conventional therapies. Here, we explored whether human T cells that are redirected via an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody called MT110 can lyse colorectal TICs and prevent tumor growth from TICs. MT110 recognizes EpCAM, a cell adhesion molecule expressed on TICs from diverse human carcinoma, which was recently shown to promote tumor growth through engagement of elements of the wnt pathway. MT110 was highly potent in mediating complete redirected lysis of KRAS-, PI3 kinase- and BRAF-mutated colorectal TICs, as demonstrated in a soft agar assay. In immunodeficient mice, MT110 prevented growth of tumors from a 5,000-fold excess of a minimally tumorigenic TIC dose. T cells engaged by MT110 may provide a potent therapeutic means to eradicate TICs and bulk tumor cells derived thereof.

  4. Evaluation of mechanical and optical behavior of current esthetic dental restorative CAD/CAM composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Liebermann, Anja; Eichberger, Marlis; Güth, Jan-Frederik

    2015-03-01

    To determine the mechanical and optical properties of CAD/CAM composites (LAVA Ultimate, Cerasmart, Shofu Block and two exp. CAD/CAM composites), a hybrid material (VITA Enamic), a leucite (IPS Empress CAD) and a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max CAD). Three-point flexural strength (FS) was investigated according ISO 6872:2008 (N=240/n=30). Two-body wear (TBW) was analyzed in a chewing simulator (1,200,000 cycles, 50N, 5°/55°C) using human teeth as antagonists (N=120/n=15). Quantitative analysis of wear was carried out with a 3D-scanner and associated matching software. Discoloration rate (DR) after 14 days of storage in cress, curry, red wine, and distilled water (N=384/n=12), and translucency (T) (N=384/n=48) of CAD/CAM materials were measured in a spectrophotometer (400-700nm wavelength). Data were analyzed using two-/one-way ANOVA with Scheffé post-hoc test, Kruskal-Wallis-H test, and linear mixed models (α=0.05). IPS e.max CAD showed the highest FS (pCAD/CAM composites (exception: Shofu Block). The lowest FS showed VITA Enamic and IPS Empress CAD (pCAD, VITA Enamic, exp. CAD/CAM composite 2, followed by IPS e.max presented lower material TBW than the remaining CAD/CAM materials (pcurry>cress>distilled water) exerted the highest influence on DR (pCAD/CAM material. Glass-ceramics showed lower DR than CAD/CAM composites (pCAD/CAM composites presented moderate FS, high T and antagonist friendly behavior. Glass-ceramic demonstrated the most favorable DR and lowest TBW on the material side. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The prevalence extent of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among Saudis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowais, Norah A; Alyousefi, Nada A

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: There is worldwide interest in the use of CAM. Studying CAM in Saudi population is important as it will reflect the influence of psychosocial, cultural and religious factors on health beliefs and behaviors. The objective of this study was to present an updated review on the use of CAM practices in Saudi Arabia including commonly used types, common conditions for which it has been used and who uses CAM. Methods: This review used data from national surveys conducted in Saudi Arabia and published between 2000 and 2015. The literature search was performed considering standards adopted such as Moose guidelines for observational studies. Two authors independently reviewed each article. The search yielded 73 articles, and a total of 36 articles were included. Further careful data extraction was carried out by two independents reviewers. Results: Most of the reviewed studies were cross-sectional in design and were published between 2014 and 2015, and mostly in Riyadh region. Substantial difference in the findings for the patterns of CAM use was revealed. The most commonly employed practice was of spiritual type such as prayer and reciting Quran alone or on water. Other types include herbs (8-76%), honey (14-73%) and dietary products (6-82%). Cupping (Alhijamah) was least used (4-45%). Acupuncture was more practiced among professionals. Conclusion: The utilization of CAM is widely practiced in Saudi Arabia. There is need for efforts to promote research in the field of CAM to address each practice individually. Population surveys should be encouraged supported by mass media to raise knowledge and awareness about the practice of different CAM modalities. The national center of CAM should play a major role in these efforts.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: phosphoglycerate kinase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing Registry: Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 deficiency Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (1 link) Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases (CLIMB) (UK): Phosphoglycerate Kinase Deficiency (PDF) General Information ...

  7. Microtensile Bond Strength of Cad-Cam and Pressed-Ceramic Inlays to Dentin

    OpenAIRE

    ?zt?rk, A. Nilg?n; ?nan, ?zg?r; ?nan, Erkan; ?zt?rk, Bora

    2007-01-01

    Objectives CAD-CAM system is popular because of high esthetic and short fabrication time. But, there is limited information available about the microtensile bonding of luting cements to CAD-CAM inlays and to dentin. The aim of this study was to examine the bond strength of CAD-CAM (Cerec 3) and pressed-ceramic (IPS Empress 2) inlays to dentin surface by microtensile testing using two luting cements. Materials and Methods Standardized mesio-occlusal cavities were made in forty extracted molar ...

  8. Using bluetooth and GPS metadata to measure event similarity in SenseCam Images

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Daragh; Lavelle, Barry; Doherty, Aiden R.; Jones, Gareth J.F.; Smeaton, Alan F.

    2007-01-01

    The Microsoft SenseCam is a small multi-sensor camera worn around the user's neck. It was designed primarily for lifelog recording. At present, the SenseCam passively records up to 3,000 images per day as well as logging data from several on-board sensors. The sheer volume of image and sensor data captured by the SenseCam creates a number of challenges in the areas of segmenting whole day recordings into events, and searching for events. In this paper, we use content and contextual informatio...

  9. Complete Dentures Fabricated with CAD/CAM Technology and a Traditional Clinical Recording Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeva, Nadica; Kovacevska, Gordana; Janev, Edvard

    2017-10-15

    The introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology into complete denture (CD) fabrication ushered in a new era in removable prosthodontics. Commercially available CAD/CAM denture systems are expected to improve upon the disadvantages associated with conventional fabrication. The purpose of this report is to present the workflow involved in fabricating a CD with a traditional clinical recording method and CAD/CAM technology and to summarize the advantages to the dental practitioner and the patient.

  10. Electronic cam motion generation with special reference to constrained velocity, acceleration, and jerk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Shu; Jeng, Shyr-Long; Chieng, Wei-Hua

    2004-07-01

    Electronic cam motion involves velocity tracking control of the master motor and trajectory generation of the slave motor. Special concerns such as the limits of the velocity, acceleration, and jerk are beyond the considerations in the conventional electronic cam motion control. This study proposes the curve-fitting of a Lagrange polynomial to the cam profile, based on trajectory optimization by cubic B-spline interpolation. The proposed algorithms may yield a higher tracking precision than the conventional master-slaves control method does, providing an optimization problem is concerned. The optimization problem contains three dynamic constraints including velocity, acceleration, and jerk of the motor system.

  11. Partial contribution of Rho-kinase inhibition to the bioactivity of Ganoderma lingzhi and its isolated compounds: insights on discovery of natural Rho-kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amen, Yhiya; Zhu, Qinchang; Tran, Hai-Bang; Afifi, Mohamed S; Halim, Ahmed F; Ashour, Ahmed; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies identified Rho-kinase enzymes (ROCK-I and ROCK-II) as important targets that are involved in a variety of diseases. Synthetic Rho-kinase inhibitors have emerged as potential therapeutic agents to treat disorders such as hypertension, stroke, cancer, diabetes, glaucoma, etc. Our study is the first to screen the total ethanol extract of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lingzhi with thirty-five compounds for Rho-kinase inhibitory activity. Moreover, a molecular binding experiment was designed to investigate the binding affinity of the compounds at the active sites of Rho-kinase enzymes. The structure-activity relationship analysis was investigated. Our results suggest that the traditional uses of G. lingzhi might be in part due to the ROCK-I and ROCK-II inhibitory potential of this mushroom. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed some interesting features of the lanostane triterpenes that potentiate their Rho-kinase inhibition. These findings would be helpful for further studies on the design of Rho-kinase inhibitors from natural sources and open the door for contributions from other researchers for optimizing the development of natural Rho-kinase inhibitors.

  12. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in autism spectrum disorder (ASD): comparison of Chinese and western culture (Part A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, V C N

    2009-03-01

    A cross-sectional survey of the use of CAM by children was undertaken in the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital in Hong Kong (March-December 2006). A questionnaire survey concerning the use of CAM was administered to chief caretakers (only the mothers) who accompanied children with neurodevelopmental disabilities followed up in our Neurodevelopmental paediatrics clinics. Four hundred and thirty agreed for interview of which 98 (22.8%) had Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). CAM was used in 40.8% for ASD and 21.4% of non-ASD (p ASD in this part A paper. The three most common type of CAM use was Acupuncture (47.5%), Sensory Integration (42.5%), and Chinese Medicine (30%). About 76.9% of interviewees expected CAM to augment conventional treatment. Although 47.5% used both conventional western medicine and CAM, only 22.4% disclosed the use of CAM to Doctors. The following factors were significantly related to CAM use: father's job and mother's religion. Our frequency of CAM used in children with ASD was lower in Canada (52%) and USA (74%, 92%). The main CAM use in western culture was biological-based therapy whereas acupuncture was the most common CAM used in our locality.

  13. Distribution of protein kinase Mzeta and the complete protein kinase C isoform family in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, M U; Benedikz, Eirikur; Hernandez, I

    2000-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of at least ten isoforms, nine of which are expressed in brain (alpha, betaI, betaII, gamma, delta, straightepsilon, eta, zeta, iota/lambda). Our previous studies have shown that many of these PKCs participate in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region....... These results suggest that the compartmentalization of PKC isoforms in neurons may contribute to their function, with the location of PKMzeta prominent in areas notable for long-term synaptic plasticity....

  14. Evaluation of Shipbuilding CAD/CAM/CIM Systems - Phase II (Requirements for Future Systems)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Odense Steel Shipyard SENER Ingenieria y Sistemas Peter Marks and Kathleen Riles, Authors of Aligning Technology Torben Andersen, Executive Vice...Sener Ingenieria y Sistemas - FORAN 3 • Intergraph-ISDP ● Black and Veatch - POWRTRAK. The information gleaned from these visits was immense. Perhaps

  15. Urotensin II-induced signaling involved in proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Iglewski

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Myriam Iglewski, Stephen R GrantDepartment of Integrative Physiology, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USAAbstract: The urotensin II receptor, bound by the ligand urotensin II, generates second ­messengers, ie, inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol, which stimulate the subsequent release of calcium (Ca2+ in vascular smooth muscle cells. Ca2+ influx leads to the activation of Ca2+-dependent kinases (CaMK via calmodulin binding, resulting in cellular proliferation. We hypothesize that urotensin II signaling in pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells (Pac1 and primary aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (PAVSMC results in phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinases leading to cellular proliferation. Exposure of Pac1 cultures to urotensin II increased intracellular Ca2+, subsequently activating Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKK, and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase Type I (CaMKI, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, and protein kinase D. Treatment of Pac1 and PAVSMC with urotensin II increased proliferation as measured by 3H-thymidine uptake. The urotensin II-induced increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation was inhibited by a CaMKK inhibitor. Taken together, our results demonstrate that urotensin II stimulation of smooth muscle cells leads to a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase-mediated increase in cellular proliferation.Keywords: urotensin II receptor, CaMKI, hypertrophy, CaMKK, protein kinase D

  16. An open label phase II study evaluating first-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer patients with tumors showing high EGFR gene copy number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Anna; Suszko-Kazarnowicz, Malgorzata; Duchnowska, Renata; Szczesna, Aleksandra; Ratajska, Magdalena; Sowa, Aleksander; Limon, Janusz; Biernat, Wojciech; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Jassem, Jacek; Dziadziuszko, Rafal

    2017-01-01

    Background First-line treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in NSCLC is effective in patients with activating EGFR mutations. The activity of erlotinib in patients harboring high EGFR gene copy number has been considered debatable. Patients and Methods A multicenter, open-label, single-arm phase II clinical trial was performed to test the efficacy of erlotinib in the first-line treatment of NSCLC patients harboring high EGFR gene copy number defined as =4 copies in =40% of cells. Findings Between December 2007 and April 2011, tumor samples from 149 subjects were screened for EGFR gene copy number by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), Out of 49 patients with positive EGFR FISH test, 45 were treated with erlotinib. Median PFS in the intent-to-treat population was 3.3 months (95%CI: 1.83.9 months), and median overall survival was 7.9 months (95% CI: 5.112.6 months). Toxicity profile of erlotinib was consistent with its known safety profile. The trial was stopped prematurely at 63% of originally planned sample size due to accumulating evidence that EGFR gene copy number should not be used to select NSCLC patients to first-line therapy with EGFR TKI. Data on erlotinib efficacy according to EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations are additionally presented. Interpretation This trial argues against using high gene copy number for selection of NSCLC patients to first-line therapy with EGFR TKIs. The study adds to the discussion on efficacy of other targeted agents in patients with target gene amplified tumors. PMID:27924059

  17. An open label phase II study evaluating first-line EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib in non-small cell lung cancer patients with tumors showing high EGFR gene copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szutowicz-Zielińska, Ewa; Konopa, Krzysztof; Kowalczyk, Anna; Suszko-Każarnowicz, Małgorzata; Duchnowska, Renata; Szczęsna, Aleksandra; Ratajska, Magdalena; Sowa, Aleksander; Limon, Janusz; Biernat, Wojciech; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Jassem, Jacek; Dziadziuszko, Rafał

    2017-03-07

    First-line treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in NSCLC is effective in patients with activating EGFR mutations. The activity of erlotinib in patients harboring high EGFR gene copy number has been considered debatable. A multicenter, open-label, single-arm phase II clinical trial was performed to test the efficacy of erlotinib in the first-line treatment of NSCLC patients harboring high EGFR gene copy number defined as ≥4 copies in ≥40% of cells. Between December 2007 and April 2011, tumor samples from 149 subjects were screened for EGFR gene copy number by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), Out of 49 patients with positive EGFR FISH test, 45 were treated with erlotinib. Median PFS in the intent-to-treat population was 3.3 months (95%CI: 1.8-3.9 months), and median overall survival was 7.9 months (95% CI: 5.1-12.6 months). Toxicity profile of erlotinib was consistent with its known safety profile. The trial was stopped prematurely at 63% of originally planned sample size due to accumulating evidence that EGFR gene copy number should not be used to select NSCLC patients to first-line therapy with EGFR TKI. Data on erlotinib efficacy according to EGFR, KRAS and BRAF mutations are additionally presented. This trial argues against using high gene copy number for selection of NSCLC patients to first-line therapy with EGFR TKIs. The study adds to the discussion on efficacy of other targeted agents in patients with target gene amplified tumors.

  18. CAD/CAM/CAI Application for High-Precision Machining of Internal Combustion Engine Pistons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Postnov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CAD/CAM/CAI application solutions for internal combustion engine pistons machining was analyzed. Low-volume technology of internal combustion engine pistons production was proposed. Fixture for CNC turning center was designed.

  19. Improving Convection and Cloud Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The fundamental scientific objectives of our research are to use ARM observations and the NCAR CAM5 to understand the large-scale control on convection, and to develop improved convection and cloud parameterizations for use in GCMs.

  20. A Unique Opportunity for an Intercultural Discussion on CAM and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marotta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The meeting of the APASL, Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver, was held in December 2004, in New Delhi, India. The meeting was held under the patronage of the APASL Committee and Board of Presidents of the National Liver Association and in conjunction with the annual conference of the Indian Association for the Study of Liver (INASL. The congress was designed to have a core meeting with three parallel sessions running throughout, dedicated research workshops and intensive breakfast sessions. This report concentrates on the two sessions devoted to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and shows the latest research in CAM for liver disease and the concerns of doctors about integrating CAM with more traditional treatments. With researchers and practitioners gathering from all over the world, it was a unique opportunity for an intercultural discussion on CAM and liver disease.

  1. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer.

  2. CamOn: A Real-Time Autonomous Camera Control System