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Sample records for cam bromeliad aechmea

  1. Differential usage of storage carbohydrates in the CAM bromeliad Aechmea 'Maya' during acclimation to drought and recovery from dehydration.

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    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M; Londers, Elsje; Verdoodt, Veerle; Godts, Christof; De Proft, Maurice P

    2009-02-01

    CAM requires a substantial investment of resources into storage carbohydrates to account for nocturnal CO(2) uptake, thereby restricting carbohydrate partitioning to other metabolic activities, including dark respiration, growth and acclimation to abiotic stress. Flexible modulation of carbon flow to the different competing sinks under changing environmental conditions is considered a key determinant for the growth, productivity and ecological success of the CAM pathway. The aim of the present study was to examine how shifts in carbohydrate partitioning could assure maintenance of photosynthetic integrity and a positive carbon balance under conditions of increasing water deprivation in CAM species. Measurements of gas exchange, leaf water relations, malate, starch and soluble sugar (glucose, fructose and sucrose) contents were made in leaves of the CAM bromeliad Aechmea 'Maya' over a 6-month period of drought and subsequently over a 2-month period of recovery from drought. Results indicated that short-term influences of water stress were minimized by elevating the level of respiratory recycling, and carbohydrate pools were maintained at the expense of export for growth while providing a comparable nocturnal carbon gain to that in well-watered control plants. Longer term drought resulted in a disproportionate depletion of key carbohydrate reserves. Sucrose, which was of minor importance for providing substrate for the dark reactions under well-watered conditions, became the major source of carbohydrate for nocturnal carboxylation as drought progressed. Flexibility in terms of the major carbohydrate source used to sustain dark CO(2) uptake is therefore considered a crucial factor in meeting the carbon and energy demands under limiting environmental conditions. Recovery from CAM-idling was found to be dependent on the restoration of the starch pool, which was used predominantly for provision of substrate for nocturnal carboxylation, while net carbon export was limited

  2. Bimodal pollination system of the bromeliad Aechmea nudicaulis involving hummingbirds and bees.

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    Schmid, S; Schmid, V S; Zillikens, A; Harter-Marques, B; Steiner, J

    2011-01-01

    In order to compare the effectiveness of birds and insects as pollinators, we studied the floral biology of the bromeliad Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Grisebach in the biome of the Atlantic rain forest, southern Brazil. On Santa Catarina Island, flowering extends from mid-September to the end of December, with diurnal anthesis. The reproductive system is obligatory xenogamy, thus pollinator-dependent. Flowers secrete 31.84 μl of nectar per day, with a mean sugar concentration of 23.2%. Highest nectar volume and sugar concentration occur at the beginning of anthesis. Most floral traits are characteristic for ornithophily, and nectar production appears to be adapted to the energy demand of hummingbirds. Continued secretion of the sucrose-dominated nectar attracts and binds visitors to inflorescences, strengthening trapline foraging behaviour. Experiments assessing seed set after single flower visits were performed with the most frequent visitors, revealing the hummingbird Thalurania glaucopis as the most effective pollen vector. In addition, bees are also functional pollinators, as substantiated by their high visitation frequency. We conclude that this pollination system is bimodal. Thus, there is redundancy in the pollination service provided by birds and bees, granting a high probability of successful reproduction in Ae. nudicaulis. © 2010 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. Oil road effects on the anuran community of a high canopy tank bromeliad (Aechmea zebrina in the upper Amazon basin, Ecuador.

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    Shawn F McCracken

    Full Text Available Tropical forest canopies are among the most species-rich terrestrial habitats on earth and one of the remaining relatively unexplored biotic frontiers. Epiphytic bromeliads provide microhabitat for a high diversity of organisms in tropical forest canopies and are considered a keystone resource. A number of amphibians inhabit these phytotelmata, yet their ecological role and status in forest canopies remains unknown. For this study, anurans were collected from an upper canopy tank bromeliad (Aechmea zebrina at ∼20-45 m (x¯ = 33 m above the forest floor. Bromeliads were sampled from trees located near trails in undisturbed primary rainforest and oil access roads in the Yasuní Biosphere Reserve of Amazonian Ecuador. We collected 95 anurans representing 10 species from 160 bromeliads in 32 trees. We used generalized linear mixed models to assess the effects of disturbance and habitat factors on the occupancy and abundance of anurans collected. Bromeliads in forest along oil roads had a lower occupancy and abundance of anurans than those in undisturbed forest, a somewhat unexpected result due to the intactness and quality of forest adjacent to the roads. Recorded habitat variables had no relationship with occupancy or abundance of anurans, and did not differ significantly between treatments. Our findings reveal that even the minimal footprint of natural resource extraction operations, primarily roads, in rainforest environments can have significant negative impacts on the unique upper canopy anuran community. Based on these results, we recommend that natural resource development treat rainforest habitat as an offshore system where roads are not used, employ industry best practice guidelines, and current access roads be protected from colonization and further deforestation.

  4. Effects of bromeliad flowering event on the community structuring of aquatic insect larvae associated with phytotelmata of Aechmea distichantha Lem. (Bromeliaceae

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    Felipe Emiliano Amadeo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: We aimed to understand how aquatic insect larvae communities associated with bromeliad phytotelmata are affected by plant architecture, predators and resources (local factors, and by geographical distance (regional factors in two different plant phenological phases. Bromeliad flowering results in plant structural changes, which favours insect dispersal. Considering that local and regional factors may affect the community of aquatic insect larvae, we expected that composition, beta diversity and the importance of those factors would differ in the vegetative growth and flowering phases. Methods We performed six samplings of the bromeliad associated fauna in 2010, three during the first semester - vegetative growth phase - and three during the second semester - flowering phase. In each sampling, we collected 12 plants along the rocky walls with similar location distribution, with a total of 72 bromeliads studied. Results Although beta diversity (PERMDISP did not differ between vegetative growth and flowering, NMDS followed by ANOSIM showed that composition was significantly different in the distinct phenological phases. IndVal results showed that three Diptera morphospecies were discriminant of the vegetative growth phase. In addition, pRDA revealed differences in the relative contribution of local and regional factors to explain insect larvae community structure. During the flowering phase, local factors predominated, while during vegetative growth, regional factors were more important. Conclusion Differences in dispersal rates between the two phenological phases, likely due to adult insect pollination and further oviposition, influenced community structuring. Therefore, flowering events account for differences not only in the composition, but also in community structuring of aquatic insect larvae inhabiting the phytotelmata of Aechmea distichantha Lem. (Bromeliaceae.

  5. Aechmea pectinata: a Hummingbird‐dependent Bromeliad with Inconspicuous Flowers from the Rainforest in South‐eastern Brazil

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    CANELA, MARIA BERNADETE FERREIRA; SAZIMA, MARLIES

    2003-01-01

    The pollination biology of Aechmea pectinata (Bromeliaceae) was studied in a submontane rainforest in south‐eastern Brazil. This species has a mainly clumped distribution and its aggregated individuals are likely to be clones. From October to January, during the flowering period, the distal third of its leaves becomes red. The inflorescence produces 1–15 flowers per day over a period of 20–25 d. The flowers are inconspicuous, greenish‐white coloured, tubular shaped with a narrow opening, and the stigma is situated just above the anthers. Anthesis begins at 0400 h and flowers last for about 13 h. The highest nectar volume and sugar concentration occur between 0600 and 1000 h, and decrease throughout the day. Aechmea pectinata is self‐incompatible and therefore pollinator‐dependent. Hummingbirds are its main pollinators (about 90 % of the visits), visiting flowers mainly in the morning. There is a positive correlation between the number of hummingbird visits per inflorescence and the production of nectar, suggesting that the availability of this resource is important in attracting and maintaining visitors. The arrangement of the floral structures favours pollen deposition on the bill of the hummingbirds. Flowers in clumps promote hummingbird territoriality, and a consequence is self‐pollination in a broader sense (geitonogamy) as individuals in assemblages are genetically close. However, trap‐lining and intruding hummingbirds promote cross‐pollination. These observations suggest that successful fruit set of A. pectinata depends on both the spatial distribution of its individuals and the interactions among hummingbirds. PMID:14573525

  6. Correlation between citric acid and nitrate metabolisms during CAM cycle in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana.

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    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Tiné, Marco Aurélio Silva; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-12-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) confers crucial adaptations for plants living under frequent environmental stresses. A wide metabolic plasticity can be found among CAM species regarding the type of storage carbohydrate, organic acid accumulated at night and decarboxylating system. Consequently, many aspects of the CAM pathway control are still elusive while the impact of this photosynthetic adaptation on nitrogen metabolism has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated a possible link between the CAM cycle and the nitrogen assimilation in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana by simultaneously characterizing the diel changes in key enzyme activities and metabolite levels of both organic acid and nitrate metabolisms. The results revealed that T. pohliana performed a typical CAM cycle in which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase phosphorylation seemed to play a crucial role to avoid futile cycles of carboxylation and decarboxylation. Unlike all other bromeliads previously investigated, almost equimolar concentrations of malate and citrate were accumulated at night. Moreover, a marked nocturnal depletion in the starch reservoirs and an atypical pattern of nitrate reduction restricted to the nighttime were also observed. Since reduction and assimilation of nitrate requires a massive supply of reducing power and energy and considering that T. pohliana lives overexposed to the sunlight, we hypothesize that citrate decarboxylation might be an accessory mechanism to increase internal CO₂ concentration during the day while its biosynthesis could provide NADH and ATP for nocturnal assimilation of nitrate. Therefore, besides delivering photoprotection during the day, citrate might represent a key component connecting both CAM pathway and nitrogen metabolism in T. pohliana; a scenario that certainly deserves further study not only in this species but also in other CAM plants that nocturnally accumulate citrate

  7. Directional growth of a clonal bromeliad species in response to spatial habitat heterogeneity

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    Sampaio, M.C.; Araujo, T.F.; Scarano, F.R.; Stuefer, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Habitat selection by directional growth of plants has previously been investigated but field evidence for this phenomenon is extremely scarce. In this study we demonstrate directional clonal growth in Aechmea nudicaulis, a monocarpic, perennial bromeliad native to spatially heterogeneous sandy

  8. The choice of bromeliads as a microhabitat by Scinax argyreornatus (Anura, Hylidae).

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    Pederassi, J; Lima, M S C S; Peixoto, O L; Souza, C A S

    2012-05-01

    The association of anurans to bromeliads presents different degrees of interaction such as: eventual, obligatory and bromeligen. The frog species Scinax argyreornatus shows a regular association with these plants. The goal of this study is to characterise the degree of association between the frog S. argyreornatus to different species of bromeliads. We identified which species of bromeliad is regularly associated with S. argyreornatus and recognised which factors interfere with this association preference. We analysed the Concentration of Relative Dominance of frogs per bromeliad species. As possible criteria for frog association preference to different bromeliads species we established the analysis of leaves number, length and width, number of leaf axils, stored water in the axils, pH and relative humidity, among other organographic components. Our observations were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey test. We also evaluated the preference for association by the constancy of Bodenheimer. The correlation matrix indicated that the relative humidity is the factor responsible for the frog-bromeliads association, except for Aechmea sp.. However Aechmea sp. was the species with greater constancy of occupation followed by Quesnelia arvensis and Neoregelia johannis. According to our statistical results, Aechmea sp. and Q. arvensis are not different regarding organographic parameters, but differ from N. johannis. Our observations suggest that the bromeliads organographic structure and the relative humidity are key conditions which influence the preferences of S. argyreornatus to bromeliad species, while the other features showed no correlation.

  9. Antioxidant content in two CAM bromeliad species as a response to seasonal light changes in a tropical dry deciduous forest.

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    González-Salvatierra, Claudia; Luis Andrade, José; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Sosa, Karlina; Manuel Peña-Rodríguez, Luis

    2010-07-01

    Plants have evolved photoprotective mechanisms to limit photodamage; one of these mechanisms involves the biosynthesis of antioxidant metabolites to neutralize reactive oxygen species generated when plants are exposed to excess light. However, it is known that exposure of plants to conditions of extreme water stress and high light intensity results in their enhanced susceptibility to over-excitation of photosystem II and to photooxidative stress. In this investigation we used the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl reduction assay to conduct a broad survey of the effect of water availability and light exposure conditions on the antioxidant activity of the leaf extracts of two bromeliad species showing crassulacean acid metabolism. One of these was an epiphyte, Tillandsia brachycaulos, and the other a terrestrial species, Bromelia karatas. Both species were found growing wild in the tropical dry deciduous forest of Dzibilchaltún National Park, México. The microenvironment of T. brachycaulos and B. karatas experiences significant diurnal and seasonal light variations as well as changes in temperature and water availability. The results obtained showed that, for both bromeliads, increases in antioxidant activity occurred during the dry season, as a consequence of water stress and higher light conditions. Additionally, in T. brachycaulos there was a clear correlation between high light intensity conditions and the content of anthocyanins which accumulated below the leaf epidermis. This result suggests that the role of these pigments is as photoprotective screens in the leaves. The red coloration below the leaf epidermis of B. karatas was not due to anthocyanins but to other unidentified pigments. 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. A Tank Bromeliad Favors Spider Presence in a Neotropical Inundated Forest.

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    Yann Hénaut

    Full Text Available Tank bromeliads are good models for understanding how climate change may affect biotic associations. We studied the relationships between spiders, the epiphytic tank bromeliad, Aechmea bracteata, and its associated ants in an inundated forest in Quintana Roo, Mexico, during a drought period while, exceptionally, this forest was dry and then during the flooding that followed. We compared spider abundance and diversity between 'Aechmea-areas' and 'control-areas' of the same surface area. We recorded six spider families: the Dipluridae, Ctenidae, Salticidae, Araneidae, Tetragnathidae and Linyphiidae among which the funnel-web tarantula, Ischnothele caudata, the only Dipluridae noted, was the most abundant. During the drought period, the spiders were more numerous in the Aechmea-areas than in the control-areas, but they were not obligatorily associated with the Aechmea. During the subsequent flooding, the spiders were concentrated in the A. bracteata patches, particularly those sheltering an ant colony. Also, a kind of specificity existed between certain spider taxa and ant species, but varied between the drought period and subsequent flooding. We conclude that climatic events modulate the relationship between A. bracteata patches and their associated fauna. Tank bromeliads, previously considered only for their ecological importance in supplying food and water during drought, may also be considered refuges for spiders during flooding. More generally, tank bromeliads have an important role in preserving non-specialized fauna in inundated forests.

  11. A Tank Bromeliad Favors Spider Presence in a Neotropical Inundated Forest.

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    Hénaut, Yann; Corbara, Bruno; Pélozuelo, Laurent; Azémar, Frédéric; Céréghino, Régis; Herault, Bruno; Dejean, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Tank bromeliads are good models for understanding how climate change may affect biotic associations. We studied the relationships between spiders, the epiphytic tank bromeliad, Aechmea bracteata, and its associated ants in an inundated forest in Quintana Roo, Mexico, during a drought period while, exceptionally, this forest was dry and then during the flooding that followed. We compared spider abundance and diversity between 'Aechmea-areas' and 'control-areas' of the same surface area. We recorded six spider families: the Dipluridae, Ctenidae, Salticidae, Araneidae, Tetragnathidae and Linyphiidae among which the funnel-web tarantula, Ischnothele caudata, the only Dipluridae noted, was the most abundant. During the drought period, the spiders were more numerous in the Aechmea-areas than in the control-areas, but they were not obligatorily associated with the Aechmea. During the subsequent flooding, the spiders were concentrated in the A. bracteata patches, particularly those sheltering an ant colony. Also, a kind of specificity existed between certain spider taxa and ant species, but varied between the drought period and subsequent flooding. We conclude that climatic events modulate the relationship between A. bracteata patches and their associated fauna. Tank bromeliads, previously considered only for their ecological importance in supplying food and water during drought, may also be considered refuges for spiders during flooding. More generally, tank bromeliads have an important role in preserving non-specialized fauna in inundated forests.

  12. A Tank Bromeliad Favors Spider Presence in a Neotropical Inundated Forest

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    Hénaut, Yann; Corbara, Bruno; Pélozuelo, Laurent; Azémar, Frédéric; Céréghino, Régis; Herault, Bruno; Dejean, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Tank bromeliads are good models for understanding how climate change may affect biotic associations. We studied the relationships between spiders, the epiphytic tank bromeliad, Aechmea bracteata, and its associated ants in an inundated forest in Quintana Roo, Mexico, during a drought period while, exceptionally, this forest was dry and then during the flooding that followed. We compared spider abundance and diversity between ‘Aechmea-areas’ and ‘control-areas’ of the same surface area. We recorded six spider families: the Dipluridae, Ctenidae, Salticidae, Araneidae, Tetragnathidae and Linyphiidae among which the funnel-web tarantula, Ischnothele caudata, the only Dipluridae noted, was the most abundant. During the drought period, the spiders were more numerous in the Aechmea-areas than in the control-areas, but they were not obligatorily associated with the Aechmea. During the subsequent flooding, the spiders were concentrated in the A. bracteata patches, particularly those sheltering an ant colony. Also, a kind of specificity existed between certain spider taxa and ant species, but varied between the drought period and subsequent flooding. We conclude that climatic events modulate the relationship between A. bracteata patches and their associated fauna. Tank bromeliads, previously considered only for their ecological importance in supplying food and water during drought, may also be considered refuges for spiders during flooding. More generally, tank bromeliads have an important role in preserving non-specialized fauna in inundated forests. PMID:25494055

  13. FROG ASSEMBLAGE ASSOCIATED WITH BROMELIADS IN A SANDY COASTAL PLAIN IN THE STATE OF ESPÍRITO SANTO, SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL

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    MARCIO MARQUES MAGESKI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Amphibians may use bromeliads for reproduction (i.e., bromeligenous species or only for refuge and foraging (i.e., bromelicolous species. The partition of bromeliad resources is essential to maintain the coexistence of the associated assemblages. We sampled 913 bromeliads in a sandy coastal plain (i.e., restinga habitat in southeastern Brazil and found 234 frogs belonging to seven species. One of the frog species was bromeligenous and the other six were facultative bromelicolous. The bromeliads of the genus Aechmea were the most frequently used by frogs. The low degree of frog occupancy of bromeliads (26% suggests habitat segregation. Our study highlights the importance of maintenance of bromeliad species for conservation of the associated frog assemblages.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Cultivated Bromeliad Accessions with Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR Markers

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    Yongming Yu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bromeliads are of great economic importance in flower production; however little information is available with respect to genetic characterization of cultivated bromeliads thus far. In the present study, a selection of cultivated bromeliads was characterized via inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers with an emphasis on genetic diversity and population structure. Twelve ISSR primers produced 342 bands, of which 287 (~84% were polymorphic, with polymorphic bands per primer ranging from 17 to 34. The Jaccard’s similarity ranged from 0.08 to 0.89 and averaged ~0.30 for the investigated bromeliads. The Bayesian-based approach, together with the un-weighted paired group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA-based clustering and the principal coordinate analysis (PCoA, distinctly grouped the bromeliads from Neoregelia, Guzmania, and Vriesea into three separately clusters, well corresponding with their botanical classifications; whereas the bromeliads of Aechmea other than the recently selected hybrids were not well assigned to a cluster. Additionally, ISSR marker was proven efficient for the identification of hybrids and bud sports of cultivated bromeliads. The findings achieved herein will further our knowledge about the genetic variability within cultivated bromeliads and therefore facilitate breeding for new varieties of cultivated bromeliads in future as well.

  15. Bromeliads in Caatinga: an oasis for invertebrates

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    Priscila Islair

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n1p67 The Bromeliaceae family exhibits several adaptations that allow the occurrence of its members in different physiognomies, including the Caatinga. The arrangement of leaves in rosette forms a cistern or tank, in which nutrient-rich water accumulates. This provides a microhabitat for reproduction, feeding, and larval development of many invertebrates. The aim of this study was to survey the bromeliad-associated invertebrate fauna to test the hypothesis of seasonal changes in community composition. We conducted two surveys in the rainy (February, 2011 and dry (August, 2012 seasons in the Floresta Nacional (Flona of Contendas do Sincorá, municipality of Contendas do Sincorá, Bahia state, Brazil. We delimited fifteen 5 m x 5 m sampling plots along a 355 m trail. Two terrestrial bromeliads (Aechmea bromeliifolia were collected per plot. Invertebrate fauna were identified and richness, abundance and composition were analyzed. The richness of taxa did not differ between seasons and was considered high for Caatinga. Abundance and composition differed between the rainy and dry seasons. The present study demonstrates the importance of bromeliads as available water resources for the local invertebrate community. Our findings also provide a framework for more in-depth studies on animal-plant interactions, and for the conservation of Caatinga animals and plants.

  16. Bromeliads in Caatinga: an oasis for invertebrates

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    Priscila Islair

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bromeliaceae family exhibits several adaptations that allow the occurrence of its members in different physiognomies, including the Caatinga. The arrangement of leaves in rosette forms a cistern or tank, in which nutrient-rich water accumulates. This provides a microhabitat for reproduction, feeding, and larval development of many invertebrates. The aim of this study was to survey the bromeliad-associated invertebrate fauna to test the hypothesis of seasonal changes in community composition. We conducted two surveys in the rainy (February, 2011 and dry (August, 2012 seasons in the Floresta Nacional (Flona of Contendas do Sincorá, municipality of Contendas do Sincorá, Bahia state, Brazil. We delimited fifteen 5 m x 5 m sampling plots along a 355 m trail. Two terrestrial bromeliads (Aechmea bromeliifolia were collected per plot. Invertebrate fauna were identified and richness, abundance and composition were analyzed. The richness of taxa did not differ between seasons and was considered high for Caatinga. Abundance and composition differed between the rainy and dry seasons. The present study demonstrates the importance of bromeliads as available water resources for the local invertebrate community. Our findings also provide a framework for more in-depth studies on animal-plant interactions, and for the conservation of Caatinga animal and plant.

  17. In vitro culture systems and acclimatization of Aechmea setigera Mart. ex Schult. & Schult. f. (Bromeliaceae

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    Janaína Medeiros Vasconcelos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aechmea setigera is an endemic bromeliad from Amazon with ornamental potential. Bromeliads have been propagated by tissue culture. The consistency of the culture medium in vitro multiplication influences the rate of propagation. In this sense, the objective of this study was to evaluate different culture systems with the use of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP on in vitro propagation and the effect of different substrates in acclimatization of plantlets Aechmea setigera. In vitro germinated seedlings were inoculated in MS medium in liquid stationary, semisolid, double-phase systems, plus 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP in different concentrations (0, 2.2, 4.4, 8.8 and 17.7 μM. The ex vitro rooting and acclimatization were performed on substrate Plantmax Forest ®, vermiculite and sawdust eucalyptus. After three successive subcultures, the double-phase system showed a higher number of regenerated shoots in comparison to other systems. Acclimatization using the combination of commercial substrate Plantmax Forest ® and vermiculite favored the growth of micropropagated plants. The use of a culture medium double-phase without growth regulator, and the rooting in acclimatization are feasible strategy for the micropropagation of A. setigera. Indexação

  18. Reproductive biology and pollination of Aechmea distichantha Lem. (Bromeliaceae Biologia reprodutiva e polinização em Aechmea distichantha Lem. (Bromeliaceae

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    Gilson João Scrok

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive biology, including phenology, flower biology, pollination, and the reproductive system in the bromeliad Aechmea distichantha were studied in an Araucaria forest in the state of Paraná. Phenology and reproduction in terricolous plants were followed in October 2006 and May - October of 2007. Flowering peaked from June to September and fruiting was from June to October. Flower anthesis lasted one day. Flowers were pollinated the most by the hummingbird Stephanoxis lalandi and the most common butterfly visitor was Lychnuchoides ozias ozias. Nectar concentration declined during anthesis, while nectar volume was constant. Aechmea distichantha is self-compatible with 30-45% fruit formation in self-pollination tests. Sunlight influences reproduction: when controlling for bromeliad and inflorescence size, plants in sunlight produced more seeds per fruit than plants in the shade. Reproduction was also associated with inflorescence size when controlling for bromeliad size. That is, larger inflorescences in similar sized plants produced more flowers and more seeds per fruit.A biologia reprodutiva, incluindo fenologia, biologia floral, polinização e sistemas reprodutivos foram estudados em Floresta com Araucária no Paraná. A fenologia e reprodução de plantas terrícolas foram acompanhadas em outubro 2006 e de maio a outubro de 2007. O pico de floração ocorreu de junho a setembro e a frutificação de junho a outubro. A antese durou um dia. As flores foram polinizadas principalmente por Stephanoxis lalandi e a borboleta mais freqüente foi Lychnuchoides ozias ozias. A concetração de nectar declinou durante a antese, enquanto que o volume de néctar permaneceu constante. Aechmea distichantha é auto-compatível com 30-45% de frutificação nos testes de autopolinização. A luz solar influenciou a reprodução: quando controlados o tamanho das bromélias e das inflorescências, plantas no sol produziram mais sementes por frutos que

  19. Functional structure of the bromeliad tank microbiome is strongly shaped by local geochemical conditions.

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    Louca, Stilianos; Jacques, Saulo M S; Pires, Aliny P F; Leal, Juliana S; González, Angélica L; Doebeli, Michael; Farjalla, Vinicius F

    2017-08-01

    Phytotelmata in tank-forming Bromeliaceae plants are regarded as potential miniature models for aquatic ecology, but detailed investigations of their microbial communities are rare. Hence, the biogeochemistry in bromeliad tanks remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the detritus within the tanks of two bromeliad species, Aechmea nudicaulis and Neoregelia cruenta, from a Brazilian sand dune forest. We used metagenomic sequencing for functional community profiling and 16S sequencing for taxonomic profiling. We estimated the correlation between functional groups and various environmental variables, and compared communities between bromeliad species. In all bromeliads, microbial communities spanned a metabolic network adapted to oxygen-limited conditions, including all denitrification steps, ammonification, sulfate respiration, methanogenesis, reductive acetogenesis and anoxygenic phototrophy. Overall, CO2 reducers dominated in abundance over sulfate reducers, and anoxygenic phototrophs largely outnumbered oxygenic photoautotrophs. Functional community structure correlated strongly with environmental variables, between and within a single bromeliad species. Methanogens and reductive acetogens correlated with detrital volume and canopy coverage, and exhibited higher relative abundances in N. cruenta. A comparison of bromeliads to freshwater lake sediments and soil from around the world, revealed stark differences in terms of taxonomic as well as functional microbial community structure. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Floral visitors of Aechmea constantinii (Mez L. B. Sm. (Bromeliaceae in a remnant of the Brazilian Northeast Atlantic Rainforest

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    Petrúcio Alexandre Fonseca Rios J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the floral visitors and potential pollinators of Aechmea constantinii (Mez L. B. Sm. (Bromeliaceae, a bromeliad endemic to the Brazilian Northeast Atlantic Rainforest. Reproductively-active individuals were observed systematically and their visitors were recorded and determined. The main recorded fl oral visitors were Glaucis hirsutus, Phaethornis ruber and Phaethornis pretrei (hummingbirds which executed frontal functional floral visits in which they touched the parts of the fl owers. Visits of Plebeia flavocincta, Plebeia sp., Trigona spinipes and Euglossa cordata (bees and Talides sergestu and Strymon ziba (butterflies were also recorded. In addition, two ants (Hymenoptera, Insecta, Formicidae were identifi ed in activity on the fl oral scapes and flowers of the studied bromeliad. The suggestion is made in the study that the A. constantinii is pollinated by hummingbirds since these birds executed direct frontal visits to the fl owers, touching reproductive structures. The identification of pollen on the bodies of bees and butterflies, as well as the contact executed by visitors, with the stigma of the visited flowers, offered an indication that these species may exert an influence as secondary pollinators of Aechmea constantinii.

  1. SEED MORPHOMETRY AND GERMINATION OF Aechmea costantinii (Mez L. B. Sm. (BROMELIACEAE

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    PETRÚCIO ALEXANDRE FONSECA RIOS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential economic and environmental benefits brought by bromeliads production are significant. It is noteworthy that the high degree of degradation of some ecosystems as the Atlantic forest involve reduction of these species. This factor has been worsened by the elevated degree of endemism of these plants, e.g. Aechmea costantinii (Mez L. B. Sm., which is a high ornamental potential bromeliad but understudied. Thus, the present research aimed to characterize physical and morphological features of A. costantinii fruit and seeds, describing the different stages of post - seminal development, as well as evaluating seed germination behavior with respect to temperature and light. For this purpose, we used fruit and seeds freshly harvested from an Atlantic Forest fragment, located in the city of Maceió, Alagoas State, Brazil. Tests were carried out under a completely randomized design, in a 6x4 factorial scheme (temperature x light with four replications of 25 seeds. The polyspermic fruit are of tricarpellate/triloculate type and originated from inferior ovary, containing an average of 73 elliptical and mucilaginous seeds with basal embryo. The germination is epigeal - type and occurs in a great intensity and high speed at 35 °C, regardless light presence or quality.

  2. An arboreal spider protects its offspring by diving into the water of tank bromeliads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénaut, Yann; Corbara, Bruno; Azémar, Frédéric; Céréghino, Régis; Dézerald, Olivier; Dejean, Alain

    2018-03-01

    Cupiennius salei (Ctenidae) individuals frequently live in association with tank bromeliads, including Aechmea bracteata, in Quintana Roo (Mexico). Whereas C. salei females without egg sacs hunt over their entire host plant, females carrying egg sacs settle above the A. bracteata reservoirs they have partially sealed with silk. There they avoid predators that use sight to detect their prey, as is known for many bird species. Furthermore, if a danger is more acute, these females dive with their egg sacs into the bromeliad reservoir. An experiment showed that this is not the case for males or females without egg sacs. In addition to the likely abundance of prey found therein, the potential of diving into the tank to protect offspring may explain the close association of this spider with bromeliads. These results show that, although arboreal, C. salei evolved a protective behavior using the water of tank bromeliads to protect offspring. Copyright © 2018 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. AfAP2-1, An Age-Dependent Gene of Aechmea fasciata, Responds to Exogenous Ethylene Treatment

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    Ming Lei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bromeliaceae family is one of the most morphologically diverse families with a pantropical distribution. To schedule an appropriate flowering time for bromeliads, ethylene is commonly used to initiate flower development in adult plants. However, the mechanism by which ethylene induces flowering in adult bromeliads remains unknown. Here, we identified an APETALA2 (AP2-like gene, AfAP2-1, in Aechmea fasciata. AfAP2-1 contains two AP2 domains and is a nuclear-localized protein. It functions as a transcriptional activator, and the activation domain is located in the C-terminal region. The expression level of AfAP2-1 is higher in juvenile plants than in adult plants, and the AfAP2-1 transcript level was rapidly and transiently reduced in plants treated with exogenous ethylene. Overexpression of AfAP2-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in an extremely delayed flowering phenotype. These results suggested that AfAP2-1 responds to ethylene and is a putative age-dependent flowering regulator in A. fasciata.

  4. Assessing genetic divergence in interspecific hybrids of Aechmea gomosepala and A. recurvata var. recurvata using inflorescence characteristics and sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

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    Zhang, F; Ge, Y Y; Wang, W Y; Shen, X L; Yu, X Y

    2012-12-03

    Conventional hybridization and selection techniques have aided the development of new ornamental crop cultivars. However, little information is available on the genetic divergence of bromeliad hybrids. In the present study, we investigated the genetic variability in interspecific hybrids of Aechmea gomosepala and A. recurvata var. recurvata using inflorescence characteristics and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. The morphological analysis showed that the putative hybrids were intermediate between both parental species with respect to inflorescence characteristics. The 16 SRAP primer combinations yield 265 bands, among which 154 (57.72%) were polymorphic. The genetic similarity was an average of 0.59 and ranged from 0.21 to 0.87, indicating moderate genetic divergence among the hybrids. The unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA)-based cluster analysis distinguished the hybrids from their parents with a genetic distance coefficient of 0.54. The cophenetic correlation was 0.93, indicating a good fit between the dendrogram and the original distance matrix. The two-dimensional plot from the principal coordinate analysis showed that the hybrids were intermediately dispersed between both parents, corresponding to the results of the UPGMA cluster and the morphological analysis. These results suggest that SRAP markers could help to identify breeders, characterize F(1) hybrids of bromeliads at an early stage, and expedite genetic improvement of bromeliad cultivars.

  5. Ramet demography of a nurse bromeliad in Brazilian restingas.

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    Sampaio, Michelle C; Picó, F Xavier; Scarano, Fabio R

    2005-04-01

    Restingas are sandy coastal plains that stand between the sea and the Brazilian Atlantic forest mountains. The predominant restinga vegetation type in northern Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is characterized by the formation of islands that begins with colonization by some pioneer herbs and/or woody plants. Pioneer plants are stress-resistant and nurse many other less-resistant plant species. Determining the spatiotemporal variation in the dynamics of nurse plants is essential to understand the ecological functioning of restingas as a whole. The goal of this study was to analyze the spatiotemporal variation in population dynamics of the nurse bromeliad Aechmea nudicaulis. We monitored A. nudicaulis ramets in different habitats, microhabitats, and years. We analyzed the spatiotemporal variation in demographic traits and in population growth rate. Results showed young ramet traits were more variable at the microhabitat level, and when variable, vegetative ramet traits varied at all spatiotemporal scales. Overall, λ values indicated that A. nudicaulis basically remained spatiotemporally stable as most of the λ values did not significantly differ from unity. Hence, the stability of A. nudicaulis in different microhabitats and habitats in the restinga may create several settlement opportunities for many other less-resistant species.

  6. Floral visitors of Aechmea constantinii (Mez L. B. Sm. (Bromeliaceae in a remnant of the Brazilian Northeast Atlantic Rainforest doi: 10.5007/2175-7925.2010v23n4p29

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    Petrúcio Alexandre Fonseca Rios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the fl oral visitors and potential pollinators of Aechmea constantinii (Mez L. B. Sm. (Bromeliaceae, a bromeliad endemic to the Brazilian Northeast Atlantic Rainforest. Reproductively-active individuals were observed systematically and their visitors were recorded and determined. The main recorded fl oral visitors were Glaucis hirsutus, Phaethornis ruber and Phaethornis pretrei (hummingbirds which executed frontal functional fl oral visits in which they touched the reproductive parts of the fl owers. Visits of Plebeia fl avocincta, Plebeia sp., Trigona spinipes and Euglossa cordata (bees and Talides sergestu and Strymon ziba (butterfl ies were also recorded. In addition, two ants (Hymenoptera, Insecta, Formicidae were identifi ed in activity on the fl oral scapes and fl owers of the studied bromeliad. The suggestion is made in the study that the A. constantinii is pollinated by hummingbirds since these birds executed direct frontal visits to the fl owers, touching reproductive structures. The identifi cation of pollen on the bodies of bees and butterfl ies, as well as the contact executed by visitors, with the stigma of the visited fl owers, offered an indication that these species may exert an infl uence as secondary pollinators of Aechmea constantinii.

  7. Heterogeneity of terrestrial bromeliad colonies and regeneration of Acacia praecox (Fabaceae in a humid-subtropical-Chaco forest, Argentina

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    Ignacio M Barberis

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available In several tropical and subtropical forests, plants of the understorey act as an ecological filter that differentially affects woody species regeneration. In convex sectors of the Schinopsis balansae (Anacardiaceae forests of the Southeastern Chaco there are dense colonies of terrestrial bromeliads. These may influence forest regeneration by intercepting rain water and propagules in their tanks. Within colonies, the spatial distribution of bromeliads is clumped because their clonal growth leaves numerous internal gaps. In this study we describe the internal heterogeneity of three bromeliad colonies (plots and analyze how this heterogeneity affects Acacia praecox regeneration (i.e. seedling recruitment and survival. In January 1996, we randomly placed three transects with 150 contiguous quadrats of 100 cm² in each plot. For each quadrat we recorded the type of floor cover (i.e. bromeliads, herbs, litter, or bare soil and the presence of A. praecox seeds or seedlings. In July 1996 we relocated the transects and recorded seedling survival. Bromeliad colonies showed a high internal heterogeneity. Almost half of the 450 quadrats were covered by two terrestrial bromeliads. Aechmea distichantha was recorded in 81% of all quadrats with bromeliads, and Bromelia serra in the others. All quadrats with bromeliads were covered by litter. Half of them were occupied by the bases of bromeliads and the others were covered by their leaves. In contrast, where bromeliads were not present, soil surface was covered by litter in 83% and by herbaceous vegetation in 11% of the quadrats; very few quadrats were covered by bare soil. In January 1996, we recorded 127 seeds and 176 seedlings of A. praecox. Seed and seedling densities of A. praecox were similar in quadrats with and without bromeliads, but variability in seedling density of A. praecox was higher within than among plots. Seed density was higher in quadrats covered by bromeliad leaves than inside the tanks

  8. Volume de água armazenado no tanque de bromélias, em restingas da costa brasileira Water volume stored in bromeliad tanks in Brazilian restinga habitats

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    Luciana Cogliatti-Carvalho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Muitas espécies de bromélias armazenam água da chuva em seu interior, sendo esta característica resultado da distribuição espiralada de suas folhas, que formam pequenos tanques. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar e comparar o volume de água efetivamente armazenado e o volume máximo que pode ser armazenado no tanque de diferentes espécies de bromélias de 13 restingas brasileiras. Em cada restinga, em 100 plots de 100 m² cada, registramos as espécies de bromélias-tanque, os parâmetros morfométricos e o volume efetivo e máximo em 20 indivíduos de cada espécie. Encontramos 32 espécies de bromélias-tanque, para as quais medimos o volume máximo e o volume efetivo de água armazenado. Em 59.007 rosetas, estimamos o volume máximo em 44.388 litros e medimos 17.000 litros de água efetivamente armazenados. Encontramos diferenças interespecíficas nos volumes máximo e efetivamente reservado de água, na biomassa, no número de folhas e no volume do cone da planta. Aechmea aquilega, A. blanchetiana e Hohenbergia castelanosii tiveram os maiores volumes efetivos. Somente A. nudicaulis e Billbergia amoena diferiram entre suas populações em todos os parâmetros analisados. As restingas de Maricá, Prado, Trancoso e Jurubatiba tiveram os maiores volumes de água.ha-1 armazenada nas bromélias-tanque. O volume máximo de água estimado para as bromélias-tanque variou entre espécies devido a diferenças na forma e no tamanho das bromélias.Many bromeliad species store rain water in tanks, as a result of the spiraled distribution of their leaves. The aim of this study was to evaluate how much water is stored and what is the maximum volume of water possible to be stored in different tank-bromeliad species in 13 different Brazilian restingas. The species were recorded in 100 plots of 100 m2, in each restinga habitat. For each bromeliad species, the effective and the maximum water stored in the tanks were measured. We found 32 tank-bromeliad

  9. Analysis of an alternative method for the study of bromeliad-associated fauna in plants with different foliar organization

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    Gerson A. Müller

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of an alternative method of collection (by suction of water for the study of Culicidae and Chironomidae (Diptera, Scirtidae (Coleoptera and Coenagrionidae (Odonata in bromeliads with different foliar architecture in a restinga at Florianópolis, SC, Brazil, was studied. The alternative method was less efficient to collect Culicidae and Chironomidae (Wilcoxon test p 0.05 from Aechmea lindenii. This method was less efficient to collect insects of all groups from Vriesea friburgensis (Wilcoxon test p A eficiência do método alternativo de coleta (por sucção da água para o estudo de Culicidae e Chironomidae (Diptera, Scirtidae (Coleoptera e Coenagrionidae (Odonata em bromélias com diferentes estruturas foliares de restinga em Florianópolis, SC, Brasil, foi estudada. O método alternativo foi menos eficiente para coletar Culicidae e Chironomidae (teste de Wilcoxon p 0, 05 a partir de Aechmea lindenii. Esse foi menos eficiente para coletar insetos de todos os grupos a partir de Vriesea friburgensis (teste de Wilcoxon p < 0,05. O método alternativo se mostrou eficiente em estimar a diversidade desses insetos nas duas espécies de bromélias. A alta mobilidade das formas imaturas dos coleópteros e libélulas e a disponibilidade de apenas um tanque em Aechea lindenii, em contraste com as várias axilas e Vriesea friburgensis, facilitando a sucção destas formas imaturas provavelmente influenciaram os resultados. Os resultados indicam que o método de sucção não deve substituir o desmanche no estudo de Culicidae e Chironomidae; ele pode ser útil para a obtenção de formas imaturas de Scirtidae e Coenagrionidae em bromélias de um só tanque.

  10. Specific leaf areas of the tank bromeliad Guzmania monostachia perform distinct functions in response to water shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freschi, Luciano; Takahashi, Cassia Ayumi; Cambui, Camila Aguetoni; Semprebom, Thais Ribeiro; Cruz, Aline Bertinatto; Mioto, Paulo Tamoso; de Melo Versieux, Leonardo; Calvente, Alice; Latansio-Aidar, Sabrina Ribeiro; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-05-01

    Leaves comprise most of the vegetative body of tank bromeliads and are usually subjected to strong longitudinal gradients. For instance, while the leaf base is in contact with the water accumulated in the tank, the more light-exposed middle and upper leaf sections have no direct access to this water reservoir. Therefore, the present study attempted to investigate whether different leaf portions of Guzmania monostachia, a tank-forming C(3)-CAM bromeliad, play distinct physiological roles in response to water shortage, which is a major abiotic constraint in the epiphytic habitat. Internal and external morphological features, relative water content, pigment composition and the degree of CAM expression were evaluated in basal, middle and apical leaf portions in order to allow the establishment of correlations between the structure and the functional importance of each leaf region. Results indicated that besides marked structural differences, a high level of functional specialization is also present along the leaves of this bromeliad. When the tank water was depleted, the abundant hydrenchyma of basal leaf portions was the main reservoir for maintaining a stable water status in the photosynthetic tissues of the apical region. In contrast, the CAM pathway was intensified specifically in the upper leaf section, which is in agreement with the presence of features more suitable for the occurrence of photosynthesis at this portion. Gas exchange data indicated that internal recycling of respiratory CO(2) accounted for virtually all nighttime acid accumulation, characterizing a typical CAM-idling pathway in the drought-exposed plants. Altogether, these data reveal a remarkable physiological complexity along the leaves of G. monostachia, which might be a key adaptation to the intermittent water supply of the epiphytic niche. Copyright 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. The occurrence of amphibians in bromeliads from a Southeastern Brazilian restinga habitat, with special reference to Aparasphenodon brunoi (Anura, Hylidae

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    TEIXEIRA R. L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Five species of anuran amphibians, all belonging to the family Hylidae, were collected at Praia das Neves, municipality of Presidente Kennedy, southeastern Brazil,. The species were represented by four genera: Scinax, Hyla, Aparasphenodon, and Trachycephalus. Four species (A. brunoi, Hyla albomarginata, Scinax altera, and S. cuspidatus were found during the dry season (August 1999, and two (A. brunoi and Trachycephalus nigromaculatus in the rainy season (February 2000. Aparasphenodon brunoi was the most abundant species in Praia das Neves. Some reproductive aspects and feeding habits of this hylid were investigated. Aparasphenodon brunoi was found mainly inside the bromeliad Aechmea lingulata, the largest plant analyzed. Fifteen specimens were collected during the dry season (August 1999 (11 males and 4 females. During the rainy season (February 2000, we collected 14 specimens (3 males, 10 females, and 1 juvenile. Sex-ratio was 1:1. Frogs ranged in snout-vent length from 31.2 to 69.3 mm. Females were larger than males. One female had 1,451 fully developed oocytes in her ovaries. The major groups of prey found in the stomachs were: Insecta, Myriapoda, and Arachnida. Blattodea, Orthoptera, Lepidoptera, and Hymenoptera (only ants were the main food types in frequency, number, and weight. Aparasphenodon brunoi is a threatened species in many habitats of southeastern Brazil. Only natural vegetation protection may guarantee its survival during the immediate future.

  12. The occurrence of amphibians in bromeliads from a southeastern Brazilian restinga habitat, with special reference to Aparasphenodon brunoi (Anura, Hylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, R L; Schineider, J A P; Almeida, G I

    2002-05-01

    Five species of anuran amphibians, all belonging to the family Hylidae, were collected at Praia das Neves, municipality of President Kennedy, southeastern Brazil. The species were represented by four genera: Scinax, Hyla, Aparasphenodon, and Trachycephalus. Four species (A. brunoi, Hyla albomarginata, Scinax altera, and S. cuspidatus) were found during the dry season (August 1999), and two (A. brunoi and Trachycephalus nigromaculatus) in the rainy season (February 2000). Aparasphenodon brunoi was the most abundant species in Praia das Neves. Some reproductive aspects and feeding habits of this hylid were investigated. Aparasphenodon brunoi was found mainly inside the bromeliad Aechmea lingulata, the largest plant analyzed. Fifteen specimens were collected during the dry season (August 1999) (11 males and 4 females). During the rainy season (February 2000), we collected 14 specimens (3 males, 10 females, and 1 juvenile). Sex-ratio was 1:1. Frogs ranged in snout-vent length from 31.2 to 69.3 mm. Females were larger than males. One female had 1,451 fully developed oocytes in her ovaries. The major groups of prey found in the stomachs were: Insecta, Myriapoda, and Arachnida. Blattodea, Orthoptera, Lepidoptera, and Hymenoptera (only ants) were the main food types in frequency, number, and weight. Aparasphenodon brunoi is a threatened species in many habitats of southeastern Brazil. Only natural vegetation protection may guarantee its survival during the immediate future.

  13. Diversification of Bromelioideae (Bromeliaceae) in the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest: A case study in Aechmea subgenus Ortgiesia.

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    Goetze, Márcia; Schulte, Katharina; Palma-Silva, Clarisse; Zanella, Camila M; Büttow, Miriam V; Capra, Fernanda; Bered, Fernanda

    2016-05-01

    Aechmea subgenus Ortgiesia comprises ca. 20 species distributed in Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, and Uruguay, with a center of diversity in the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest. We examined interspecific relationships of Ortgiesia based on Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP). Ninety-six accessions belonging to 14 species of Ortgiesia were sampled, and genotyped with 11 AFLP primer combinations. The neighbor joining (NJ) tree depicted two main genetic groups within Aechmea subgenus Ortgiesia, and four subgroups. The NJ tree showed short internal branches, indicating an overall shallow genetic divergence among Ortgiesia species as expected for the recently radiated subfamily Bromelioideae. Our results suggest that hybridization and/or incomplete lineage sorting may have hampered the reconstruction of interspecific relationships in Aechmea subgenus Ortgiesia. The mapping of petal color (yellow, blue, pink, or white), inflorescence type (simple or compound), and inflorescence shape (ellipsoid, subcylindric, cylindric, or pyramidal) against the NJ tree indicated that these characters are of limited taxonomic use in Aechmea subgenus Ortgiesia due to homoplasy. An analysis of the current distribution of Ortgiesia identified the southern region of the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest, between latitudes of 26° and 27°S, as the center of diversity for the subgenus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Bromeliad Selection by Two Salamander Species in a Harsh Environment

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    Ruano-Fajardo, Gustavo; Rovito, Sean M.; Ladle, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Bromeliad phytotelmata are frequently used by several Neotropical amphibian taxa, possibly due to their high humidity, microclimatic stability, and role as a refuge from predators. Indeed, the ability of phytotelmata to buffer against adverse environmental conditions may be instrumental in allowing some amphibian species to survive during periods of environmental change or to colonize sub-optimal habitats. Association between bromeliad traits and salamanders has not been studied at a fine scale, despite the intimate association of many salamander species with bromeliads. Here, we identify microhabitat characteristics of epiphytic bromeliads used by two species of the Bolitoglossa morio group (B. morio and B. pacaya) in forest disturbed by volcanic activity in Guatemala. Specifically, we measured multiple variables for bromeliads (height and position in tree, phytotelma water temperature and pH, canopy cover, phytotelma size, leaf size, and tree diameter at breast height), as well as salamander size. We employed a DNA barcoding approach to identify salamanders. We found that B. morio and B. pacaya occurred in microsympatry in bromeliads and that phytotelmata size and temperature of bromeliad microhabitat were the most important factors associated with the presence of salamanders. Moreover, phytotelmata with higher pH contained larger salamanders, suggesting that larger salamanders or aggregated individuals might modify pH. These results show that bromeliad selection is nonrandom with respect to microhabitat characteristics, and provide insight into the relationship between salamanders and this unique arboreal environment. PMID:24892414

  15. Bromeliad selection by two salamander species in a harsh environment.

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    Gustavo Ruano-Fajardo

    Full Text Available Bromeliad phytotelmata are frequently used by several Neotropical amphibian taxa, possibly due to their high humidity, microclimatic stability, and role as a refuge from predators. Indeed, the ability of phytotelmata to buffer against adverse environmental conditions may be instrumental in allowing some amphibian species to survive during periods of environmental change or to colonize sub-optimal habitats. Association between bromeliad traits and salamanders has not been studied at a fine scale, despite the intimate association of many salamander species with bromeliads. Here, we identify microhabitat characteristics of epiphytic bromeliads used by two species of the Bolitoglossa morio group (B. morio and B. pacaya in forest disturbed by volcanic activity in Guatemala. Specifically, we measured multiple variables for bromeliads (height and position in tree, phytotelma water temperature and pH, canopy cover, phytotelma size, leaf size, and tree diameter at breast height, as well as salamander size. We employed a DNA barcoding approach to identify salamanders. We found that B. morio and B. pacaya occurred in microsympatry in bromeliads and that phytotelmata size and temperature of bromeliad microhabitat were the most important factors associated with the presence of salamanders. Moreover, phytotelmata with higher pH contained larger salamanders, suggesting that larger salamanders or aggregated individuals might modify pH. These results show that bromeliad selection is nonrandom with respect to microhabitat characteristics, and provide insight into the relationship between salamanders and this unique arboreal environment.

  16. Substratos alternativos ao xaxim na produção de bromélia ornamental Alternative substrates to fern tree fiber in the production of ornamental bromeliad

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    Shoey Kanashiro

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar substratos alternativos para o cultivo da bromélia Aechmea fasciata (Lindley Baker, para substituir com eficiência as misturas formuladas com o xaxim Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl. Hook. Foram testados os substratos: casca de Pinus, casca de Eucalyptus, coxim, fibra de coco e xaxim, misturados com turfa e perlita, nas proporções 2:7:1, 5:4:1 e 8:1:1. O experimento foi realizado em condições de estufa com cobertura de polietileno, sombreada com tela a 70%. As bromélias foram cultivadas durante 435 dias, até o início do florescimento - estádio de comercialização. As variáveis analisadas foram as massas de matéria seca de: folhas, raiz, inflorescência, escapo floral e caule; além da massa de matéria seca total e a qualidade comercial. Os substratos formulados com xaxim ou casca de Pinus, nas proporções 2:7:1, 5:4:1 e 8:1:1, e com casca de Eucalyptus, fibra de coco ou coxim, na proporção 2:7:1, foram as misturas que apresentaram os melhores resultados. Os substratos formulados com casca de Eucalyptus, fibra de coco ou coxim, com 10% de turfa e 10% de perlita, na proporção 8:1:1, apresentaram os piores resultados.The objective of this study was to evaluate alternative substrates for the cultivation of the bromeliad Aechmea fasciata (Lindley Baker, to substitute the formulated mixtures with fern tree fiber from Dicksonia sellowiana (Presl. Hook. Tested substrates were: Pinus bark, Eucalyptus bark, coxim (made of coconut fiber, coir or fern tree fiber, mixed with peat and perlite, in the proportions 2:7:1, 5:4:1 and 8:1:1. The experiment was conducted in a greenhouse covered with polyethylene and shaded with shade cloth 70%. The bromeliads were cultivated during 435 days, until the beginning of the flowering, when they were suitable for commercialization. The evaluated parameters were dry masses of leaf, root, inflorescence, floral scape, and stem, besides total dry mass and the commercial

  17. Rainfall changes affect the algae dominance in tank bromeliad ecosystems

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    Pires, Aliny Patricia Flauzino; Leal, Juliana da Silva; Peeters, Edwin T. H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change and biodiversity loss have been reported as major disturbances in the biosphere which can trigger changes in the structure and functioning of natural ecosystems. Nonetheless, empirical studies demonstrating how both factors interact to affect shifts in aquatic ecosystems are still unexplored. Here, we experimentally test how changes in rainfall distribution and litter diversity affect the occurrence of the algae-dominated condition in tank bromeliad ecosystems. Tank bromeliads are miniature aquatic ecosystems shaped by the rainwater and allochthonous detritus accumulated in the bases of their leaves. Here, we demonstrated that changes in the rainfall distribution were able to reduce the chlorophyll-a concentration in the water of bromeliad tanks affecting significantly the occurrence of algae-dominated conditions. On the other hand, litter diversity did not affect the algae dominance irrespective to the rainfall scenario. We suggest that rainfall changes may compromise important self-reinforcing mechanisms responsible for maintaining high levels of algae on tank bromeliads ecosystems. We summarized these results into a theoretical model which suggests that tank bromeliads may show two different regimes, determined by the bromeliad ability in taking up nutrients from the water and by the total amount of light entering the tank. We concluded that predicted climate changes might promote regime shifts in tropical aquatic ecosystems by shaping their structure and the relative importance of other regulating factors. PMID:28422988

  18. Species-Specific Effects of Ant Inhabitants on Bromeliad Nutrition.

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    Ana Z Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Predator activities may lead to the accumulation of nutrients in specific areas of terrestrial habitats where they dispose of prey carcasses. In their feeding sites, predators may increase nutrient availability in the soil and favor plant nutrition and growth. However, the translocation of nutrients from one habitat to another may depend on predator identity and diet, as well as on the amount of prey intake. Here we used isotopic (15N and physiological methods in greenhouse experiments to evaluate the effects of the identity of predatory ants (i.e., the consumption of prey and nest sites on the nutrition and growth of the bromeliad Quesnelia arvensis. We showed that predatory ants with protein-based nutrition (i.e., Odontomachus hastatus, Gnamptogenys moelleri improved the performance of their host bromeliads (i.e., increased foliar N, production of soluble proteins and growth. On the other hand, the contribution of Camponotus crassus for the nutritional status of bromeliads did not differ from bromeliads without ants, possibly because this ant does not have arthropod prey as a preferred food source. Our results show, for the first time, that predatory ants can translocate nutrients from one habitat to another within forests, accumulating nutrients in their feeding sites that become available to bromeliads. Additionally, we highlight that ant contribution to plant nutrition may depend on predator identity and its dietary requirements. Nest debris may be especially important for epiphytic and terrestrial bromeliads in nutrient-poor environments.

  19. Free-living ciliates from epiphytic tank bromeliads in Mexico.

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    Durán-Ramírez, Carlos Alberto; García-Franco, José Guadalupe; Foissner, Wilhelm; Mayén-Estrada, Rosaura

    2015-02-01

    The ciliate diversity of Mexican bromeliads is poorly known. We studied the ciliate community of two species of epiphytic tank bromeliads from 48 individuals of Tillandsia heterophylla and four of T. prodigiosa. The bromeliads occurred on over 22 tree host species. Samples were collected during 2009 and 2010 in a mountain cloud forest and in two coffee plantations and in a pine-oak forest. The ciliates were identified in live and protargol preparations. We recorded 61 ciliate species distributed in 39 genera grouped in eight classes. Ten species were frequent in the 52 samples (20 ± 3.2) and Leptopharynx bromeliophilus was the most frequent recorded in 25 samples. Thirty-three species are new for the fauna of Mexico, 24 species have been recorded for the first time in tank bromeliads. The classes Spirotrichea, Oligohymenophorea and Colpodea presented the highest number of species, 16, 14, and 12, respectively. Colpoda was the most species-rich genus being present with six species. A low similarity between areas and seasons was obtained with Jaccard's index. We conclude that the two bromeliads species host a rich ciliate diversity whose knowledge contributes to the question of ciliate distribution and specifically, in tank bromeliads. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Plant structure predicts leaf litter capture in the tropical montane bromeliad Tillandsia turneri

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    F. Ospina-Bautista

    Full Text Available Abstract Leaves intercepted by bromeliads become an important energy and matter resource for invertebrate communities, bacteria, fungi, and the plant itself. The relationship between bromeliad structure, defined as its size and complexity, and accumulated leaf litter was studied in 55 bromeliads of Tillandsia turneri through multiple regression and the Akaike information criterion. Leaf litter accumulation in bromeliads was best explained by size and complexity variables such as plant cover, sheath length, and leaf number. In conclusion, plant structure determines the amount of litter that enters bromeliads, and changes in its structure could affect important processes within ecosystem functioning or species richness.

  1. Plant structure predicts leaf litter capture in the tropical montane bromeliad Tillandsia turneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina-Bautista, F; Estévez Varón, J V

    2016-05-03

    Leaves intercepted by bromeliads become an important energy and matter resource for invertebrate communities, bacteria, fungi, and the plant itself. The relationship between bromeliad structure, defined as its size and complexity, and accumulated leaf litter was studied in 55 bromeliads of Tillandsia turneri through multiple regression and the Akaike information criterion. Leaf litter accumulation in bromeliads was best explained by size and complexity variables such as plant cover, sheath length, and leaf number. In conclusion, plant structure determines the amount of litter that enters bromeliads, and changes in its structure could affect important processes within ecosystem functioning or species richness.

  2. Diversity and distribution of epiphytic bromeliads in a Brazilian subtropical mangrove

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    MARIANA M. DE SOUSA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is not unusual to find epiphytic bromeliads in mangroves, but most studies on mangrove vegetation do not record their presence. This study aimed to evaluate the diversity and distribution of epiphytic bromeliads in a subtropical mangrove. The richness, abundance and life form (atmospheric and tank of bromeliads were recorded and compared among host tree species and waterline proximity. The effects of diameter and height of host trees on the abundance of bromeliads were also assessed. The mangrove was composed of Avicennia schaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle. We recorded seven bromeliad species of the genera Tillandsia and Vriesea. The waterline proximity did not affect the abundance or diversity of bromeliads, but atmospheric forms were predominant near the waterline, whereas tank bromeliads were more frequent in the interior of the mangrove. The three mangrove species hosted bromeliads, but L. racemosa was the preferred host. The species composition showed that the distribution of bromeliads is more related to the host species than to the distance from the waterline. Bromeliad abundance increased with tree size. Bromeliads can be biological indicators of ecosystem health; therefore, inventories and host tree preferences are necessary knowledge for an adequate management of sensitive ecosystems as mangroves.

  3. Diversity and distribution of epiphytic bromeliads in a Brazilian subtropical mangrove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Mariana M DE; Colpo, Karine D

    2017-01-01

    It is not unusual to find epiphytic bromeliads in mangroves, but most studies on mangrove vegetation do not record their presence. This study aimed to evaluate the diversity and distribution of epiphytic bromeliads in a subtropical mangrove. The richness, abundance and life form (atmospheric and tank) of bromeliads were recorded and compared among host tree species and waterline proximity. The effects of diameter and height of host trees on the abundance of bromeliads were also assessed. The mangrove was composed of Avicennia schaueriana, Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle. We recorded seven bromeliad species of the genera Tillandsia and Vriesea. The waterline proximity did not affect the abundance or diversity of bromeliads, but atmospheric forms were predominant near the waterline, whereas tank bromeliads were more frequent in the interior of the mangrove. The three mangrove species hosted bromeliads, but L. racemosa was the preferred host. The species composition showed that the distribution of bromeliads is more related to the host species than to the distance from the waterline. Bromeliad abundance increased with tree size. Bromeliads can be biological indicators of ecosystem health; therefore, inventories and host tree preferences are necessary knowledge for an adequate management of sensitive ecosystems as mangroves.

  4. Bromeliad catchments as habitats for methanogenesis in tropical rainforest canopies

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    Shana K. Goffredi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tropical epiphytic plants within the family Bromeliaceae are unusual in that they possess foliage capable of retaining water and impounded material. This creates an acidic (pH 3.5-6.5 and anaerobic (< 1 ppm O2 environment suspended in the canopy. Results from a Costa Rican rainforest show that most bromeliads (n = 75/86 greater than ~20 cm in plant height or ~4-5 cm tank depth, showed presence of methanogens within the lower anoxic horizon of the tank. Archaea were dominated by methanogens (77-90% of recovered ribotypes and community structure, although variable, was generally comprised of a single type, closely related to either hydrogenotrophic Methanoregula or Methanocella, a specific clade of aceticlastic Methanosaeta, or Methanosarcina. Juvenile bromeliads, or those species, such as Guzmania, with shallow tanks, generally did not possess methanogens, as assayed by PCR specific for methanogen 16S rRNA genes, nor did artificial catchments (~ 100 ml volume, in place 6-12 months prior to sample collection. Methanogens were not detected in soil (n = 20, except in one case, in which the dominant ribotype was different from nearby bromeliads. Recovery of methyl coenzyme M reductase genes supported the occurrence of hydrogenotrophic and aceticlastic methanogens within bromeliad tanks, as well as the trend, via QPCR analysis of mcrA, of increased methanogenic capacity with increased plant height. Methane production rates of up to 300 nmol CH4 ml tank water -1 day-1 were measured in microcosm experiments. These results suggest that bromeliad-associated archaeal communities may play an important role in the cycling of carbon in neotropical forests.

  5. Ammonium intensifies CAM photosynthesis and counteracts drought effects by increasing malate transport and antioxidant capacity in Guzmania monostachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paula Natália; Gaspar, Marília; Smith, J Andrew C; Mercier, Helenice

    2018-04-09

    Guzmania monostachia (Bromeliaceae) is a tropical epiphyte capable of up-regulating crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) in its photosynthetic tissues in response to changing nutrient and water availability. Previous studies have shown that under drought there is a gradient of increasing CAM expression from the basal (youngest) to the apical (oldest) portion of the leaves, and additionally that nitrogen deficiency can further increase CAM intensity in the leaf apex of this bromeliad. The present study investigated the inter-relationships between nitrogen source (nitrate and/or ammonium) and water deficit in regulating CAM expression in G. monostachia leaves. The highest CAM activity was observed under ammonium nutrition in combination with water deficit. This was associated with enhanced activity of the key enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, elevated rates of ATP- and PPi-dependent proton transport at the vacuolar membrane in the presence of malate, and increased transcript levels of the vacuolar malate channel-encoding gene, ALMT. Water deficit was consistently associated with higher levels of total soluble sugars, which were maximal under ammonium nutrition, as were the activities of several antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase). Thus, ammonium nutrition, whilst associated with the highest degree of CAM induction in G. monostachia, also mitigates the effects of water deficit by osmotic adjustment and can limit oxidative damage in the leaves of this bromeliad under conditions that may be typical of its epiphytic habitat.

  6. Cryogenic Cam Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Kenneth J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A cryogenic cam butterfly valve has a body that includes an axially extending fluid conduit formed there through. A disc lug is connected to a back side of a valve disc and has a circular bore that receives and is larger than a cam of a cam shaft. The valve disc is rotatable for a quarter turn within the body about a lug axis that is offset from the shaft axis. Actuating the cam shaft in the closing rotational direction first causes the camming side of the cam of the cam shaft to rotate the disc lug and the valve disc a quarter turn from the open position to the closed position. Further actuating causes the camming side of the cam shaft to translate the valve disc into sealed contact with the valve seat. Opening rotational direction of the cam shaft reverses these motions.

  7. Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in an urban botanical garden of dengue endemic Rio de Janeiro. Are bromeliads productive habitats for the invasive vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Márcio Goulart; Simões, Taynãna César; do Nascimento, Teresa Fernandes Silva; Teixeira, Maria Lucia França; Lounibos, Leon Philip; de Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenço

    2012-01-01

    Immatures of both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have been found in water-holding bromeliad axils in Brazil. Removal of these plants or their treatment with insecticides in public and private gardens have been undertaken during dengue outbreaks in Brazil despite uncertainty as to their importance as productive habitats for dengue vectors. From March 2005-February 2006, we sampled 120 randomly selected bromeliads belonging to 10 species in a public garden less than 200 m from houses in a dengue-endemic neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 2,816 mosquito larvae and pupae was collected, with an average of 5.87 immatures per plant per collection. Culex (Microculex) pleuristriatus and Culex spp of the Ocellatus Group were the most abundant culicid species, found in all species of bromeliads; next in relative abundance were species of the genus Wyeomyia. Only two individuals of Ae. aegypti (0.07%) and five of Ae. albopictus (0.18%) were collected from bromeliads. By contrast, immatures of Ae. aegypti were found in manmade containers in nearly 5% of nearby houses. These results demonstrate that bromeliads are not important producers of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus and, hence, should not be a focus for dengue control. However, the results of this study of only one year in a single area may not represent outcomes in other urban localities where bromeliads, Ae. aegypti and dengue coincide in more disturbed habitats. PMID:20140379

  8. Loss of phytotelmata due to an invasive bromeliad-eating weevil and its potential effects on faunal diversity and biogeochemical cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Teresa M.; Frank, J. Howard; Cave, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Epiphytic tank bromeliads are important ecosystem engineers because they form phytotelmata that create habitat, increase species richness and abundance, create water sources and nutrient reservoirs in the canopy, and collect and redirect nutrients in forest ecosystems. Native bromeliad populations have been devastated in Florida (USA) because an invasive bromeliad-eating weevil (Metamasius callizona) has been destroying the plants. Tillandsia utriculata is a tank bromeliad that was once widespread from central to south Florida. Its populations have been hit hard by the weevil and are declining rapidly. This study quantifies the mortality rate caused by the weevil in a population of T. utriculata at the Enchanted Forest Sanctuary in central Florida and estimates the associated loss of phytotelmata. Estimations of phytotelmata were calculated for the T. utriculata baseline population, the population at 6 months into the study when 87% of the population was destroyed, and at the end of the study when less than 3% of the bromeliad population remained (99% of all deaths were caused by the weevil). The baseline population contained 16,758 L of water. At six months, there were 3180 L, and at the end of the study, there were 408 L. The loss of phytotelmata results in the loss of habitat, a decrease in biological diversity, and altered water and nutrient cycles and availability.

  9. Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in an urban botanical garden of dengue endemic Rio de Janeiro - Are bromeliads productive habitats for the invasive vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Goulart Mocellin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Immatures of both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have been found in water-holding bromeliad axils in Brazil. Removal of these plants or their treatment with insecticides in public and private gardens have been undertaken during dengue outbreaks in Brazil despite uncertainty as to their importance as productive habitats for dengue vectors. From March 2005-February 2006, we sampled 120 randomly selected bromeliads belonging to 10 species in a public garden less than 200 m from houses in a dengue-endemic neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 2,816 mosquito larvae and pupae was collected, with an average of 5.87 immatures per plant per collection. Culex (Microculex pleuristriatus and Culex spp of the Ocellatus Group were the most abundant culicid species, found in all species of bromeliads; next in relative abundance were species of the genus Wyeomyia. Only two individuals of Ae. aegypti (0.07% and five of Ae. albopictus(0.18% were collected from bromeliads. By contrast, immatures of Ae. aegypti were found in manmade containers in nearly 5% of nearby houses. These results demonstrate that bromeliads are not important producers of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus and, hence, should not be a focus for dengue control. However, the results of this study of only one year in a single area may not represent outcomes in other urban localities where bromeliads, Ae. aegypti and dengue coincide in more disturbed habitats.

  10. Host trait combinations drive abundance and canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Cleber Juliano Neves; Dyonisio, Júlio César; Rossatto, Davi Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are strongly dependent on the conditions created by their host's traits and a certain degree of specificity is expected between them, even if these species are largely abundant in a series of tree hosts of a given environment, as in the case of atmospheric bromeliads. Despite their considerable abundance in these environments, we hypothesize that stochasticity alone cannot explain the presence and abundance of atmospheric bromeliads on host trees, since host traits could have a greater influence on the establishment of these bromeliads. We used secondary and reforested seasonal forests and three distinct silvicultures to test whether species richness, phylogenetic diversity and functional diversity of trees can predict the differential presence, abundance and distribution of atmospheric bromeliads on hosts. We compared the observed parameters of their assemblage with null models and performed successive variance hierarchic partitions of abundance and distribution of the assemblage to detect the influence of multiple traits of the tree hosts. Our results do not indicate direct relationships between the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads and phylogenetic or functional diversity of trees, but instead indicate that bromeliads occurred on fewer tree species than expected by chance. We distinguished functional tree patterns that can improve or reduce the abundance of atmospheric bromeliads, and change their distribution on branches and trunk. While individual tree traits are related to increased abundance, species traits are related to the canopy distribution of atmospheric bromeliad assemblages. A balance among these tree functional patterns drives the atmospheric bromeliad assemblage of the forest patches. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  11. Native bromeliads as biomonitors of airborne chemical elements in a Brazilian restinga forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, C; Fernandes, E A.N.; Franca, E J; Bacchi, M A; Tagliaferro, F S [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    Epiphytic bromeliads have been used as biomonitors of air pollution since they have specialized structures in leaves for absorbing humidity and nutrients available in the atmosphere. Leaves of five bromeliad species were collected in the conservation unit Parque Estadual Ilha do Cardoso, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, and analyzed by INAA. Vriesea carinata was the species showing most accumulation, with the highest mass fractions of K, Na, Rb and Zn. Similar results were previously found for the same species collected in the dense ombrophilous forest. Chemical composition of bromeliads provided an indication of the atmosphere status in the conservation unit. (author)

  12. Native bromeliads as biomonitors of airborne chemical elements in a Brazilian restinga forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, C.; Fernandes, E.A.N.; Franca, E.J.; Bacchi, M.A.; Tagliaferro, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    Epiphytic bromeliads have been used as biomonitors of air pollution since they have specialized structures in leaves for absorbing humidity and nutrients available in the atmosphere. Leaves of five bromeliad species were collected in the conservation unit Parque Estadual Ilha do Cardoso, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, and analyzed by INAA. Vriesea carinata was the species showing most accumulation, with the highest mass fractions of K, Na, Rb and Zn. Similar results were previously found for the same species collected in the dense ombrophilous forest. Chemical composition of bromeliads provided an indication of the atmosphere status in the conservation unit. (author)

  13. Microhabitat use and spatial distribution in Picado’s Bromeliad Treefrog, Isthmohyla picadoi (Anura, Hylidae

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    Adam M. M. Stuckert

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Isthmohyla picadoi is a Neotropical hylid frog found in upper humid montane forests of Costa Rica and Panama. The species is of particular interest because it continues to persist in an area in which the amphibian community has otherwise been decimated by the pathogenic fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. Ground search, ladder climbing, and tree climbing techniques were used to locate 32 individuals; including adult males and females, juveniles, andmetamorphosing frogs. The majority of frogs were found in bromeliads, although some individuals were found on plants of the Euphorbiaceae, Musaceae, and Heliconiaceae families. Most frogs were found in larger bromeliads (45 cm or wider. There was a positive correlation between SUL and bromeliad width within the population but not within maturity classes (adult males, adult females, all adults, nonmetamorphosingjuveniles, suggesting that juvenile and adult frogs differ in bromeliad usage. Ranges of SUL and body weight in this particular population are much greater than those reported in previous species accounts.

  14. Reproductive strategies and colonizing ability of two sympatric epiphytic bromeliads in a tropical premontane area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cascante Marin, A.M.; de Jong, M.; Borg, E.D.; Oostermeijer, J.G.B.; Wolf, J.H.D.; den Nijs, J.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    Predispersal characteristics that affect the reproductive success in plants may influence their colonizing ability. We evaluated this hypothesis in two sympatric epiphytic bromeliads in Costa Rica, Guzmania monostacbia and Tillandsia fasciculata, that show contrasting levels of local seedling

  15. Unraveling algae and cyanobacteria biodiversity in bromeliad phytotelmata in different vegetation formations in Bahia State, Northeastern Brazil

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    Geraldo José Peixoto Ramos

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Knowledge of algal and cyanobacterial diversity of phytotelmata remains poorly-known, especially for bromeliads from different vegetation formations. We investigated the microalgae communities of four species of tank bromeliads from different vegetation formations in Bahia State, Northeast Brazil, highlighting the composition, richness and diversity of taxa. Sampling of water stored in bromeliads was carried out quarterly between 2014 and 2016, and abiotic variables and morphometric attributes of bromeliads were measured. A total of 89 taxa of algae and cyanobacteria were recorded for the four bromeliad species studied. The microalgae communities of the phytotelmata varied among vegetation formations, with one tank bromeliad, Alcantarea nahoumii, with more complex architecture (higher number of leaves and thus more cavities, being distinguished by its high species richness (73 taxa. The bromeliads exhibited little similarity in species composition, with only one species (Phacus polytrophos occurring in all four species. Throughout the entire sampling period, classes with higher species richness, especially due to A. nahoumii, were Zygnematophyceae, Cyanophyceae and Chlorophyceae, which accounted for about 80 % of all species inventoried. Our results contribute to the knowledge of microalga communities of bromeliad phytotelmata in Brazil with regard to species richness and composition, as well as significant environmental characteristics.

  16. Determinação de metais em água e folha de AECHMEA BLANCHETIANA (BAKER L.B

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    Jaline R. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the concentrations of calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium and sodium in the water and leaves of Aechmea blanchetiana (Baker L.B species collected between the cities of Ilhéus and Itacaré, Bahia, Brazil and verify if the metals found in the water can be absorbed by the leaves. Flame atomic absorption spectrometry (F AAS and flame photometry were used for the determination of metals. pH measurements, dissolved oxygen and water temperature were also made. The results obtained were used in an exploratory analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA showed clearly the distinct formation of two clusters and the correlation analysis indicated that the leaves of A. blanchetiana seem to absorb iron, calcium, manganese and zinc from the water tank.

  17. Tank bromeliad water: similar or distinct environments for research of bacterial bioactives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, F L; Santos, H F; Peixoto, R S; Rosado, A S; Araujo, F V

    2014-01-01

    The Atlantic Rainforest does not have a uniform physiognomy, its relief determines different environmental conditions that define the composition of its flora and fauna. Within this ecosystem, bromeliads that form tanks with their leaves hold water reservoirs throughout the year, maintaining complex food chains, based mainly on autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria. Some works concluded that the water held by tank bromeliads concentrate the microbial diversity of their ecosystem. To investigate the bacterial diversity and the potential biotechnology of these ecosystems, tank bromeliads of the Neoregelia cruenta species from the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil were used as models for this research. Bacteria isolated from these models were tested for production of bioactive compounds. DGGE of the water held by tank bromeliads was performed in different seasons, locations and sun exposure to verify whether these environmental factors affect bacterial communities. The DGGE bands profile showed no grouping of bacterial community by the environmental factors tested. Most of the isolates demonstrated promising activities in the tests performed. Collectively, these results suggest that tank bromeliads of the N. cruenta species provide important habitats for a diverse microbial community, suggesting that each tank forms a distinct micro-habitat. These tanks can be considered excellent sources for the search for new enzymes and/or new bioactive composites of microbial origin.

  18. The presence of Abronia oaxacae (Squamata: Anguidae in tank bromeliads in temperate forests of Oaxaca, Mexico

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    GI. Cruz-Ruiz

    Full Text Available The presence of lizards in bromeliads has been widely documented. Nevertheless, the possibility of some type of preference or specificity among lizards for particular bromeliad species has not yet been investigated. Therefore, this study aims to document the presence of Abronia oaxacae in six species of tank bromeliads found in pine forests, pine-live oak forests, and live oak groves during both the rainy season and the dry season. Three adult individuals of Abronia oaxacae were collected; one in a Tillandsia violácea (pine-live oak forest, one in a T. calothyrsus (live oak grove, and one in a T. prodigiosa (live oak grove. All three specimens were collected in sampling efforts carried out during the dry season. The results of the present study suggest that A. oaxacae shows no preference for a single, specific bromeliad species, although it does have a certain preference for a few select species. The presence of A. oaxacae in bromeliads during the dry season could be related to the cooler, moister microhabitat that these plants represent.

  19. Spatial heterogeneity and the distribution of bromeliad pollinators in the Atlantic Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varassin, Isabela Galarda; Sazima, Marlies

    2012-08-01

    Interactions between plants and their pollinators are influenced by environmental heterogeneity, resulting in small-scale variations in interactions. This may influence pollinator co-existence and plant reproductive success. This study, conducted at the Estação Biológica de Santa Lúcia (EBSL), a remnant of the Atlantic Forest in southeastern Brazil, investigated the effect of small-scale spatial variations on the interactions between bromeliads and their pollinators. Overall, hummingbirds pollinated 19 of 23 bromeliad species, of which 11 were also pollinated by bees and/or butterflies. However, spatial heterogeneity unrelated to the spatial location of plots or bromeliad species abundance influenced the presence of pollinators. Hummingbirds were the most ubiquitous pollinators at the high-elevation transect, with insect participation clearly declining as transect elevation increased. In the redundancy analysis, the presence of the hummingbird species Phaethornis eurynome, Phaethornis squalidus, Ramphodon naevius, and Thalurania glaucopis, and the butterfly species Heliconius erato and Heliconius nattereri in each plot was correlated with environmental factors such as bromeliad and tree abundance, and was also correlated with horizontal diversity. Since plant-pollinator interactions varied within the environmental mosaics at the study site, this small-scale environmental heterogeneity may relax competition among pollinators, and may explain the high diversity of bromeliads and pollinators generally found in the Atlantic Forest.

  20. Cavities in bromeliad stolons used as nest sites by Euglossa cordata (Hymenoptera, Euglossini

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    Samuel Boff

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we describe nests of the orchid bee Euglossa cordata that were constructed in cavities of Aechmea distichantha (Bromeliaceae stolons. We present data about nest and cell size, number of adults and brood, and analyses of larval provisions. The presence of E. cordata carcasses embedded in the resin of nest partitions indicates that these nests were used by multiple generations. Based on larval provisioning, E. cordata is polylectic and relies heavily on a few plant species.

  1. Bromeliad-associated mosquitoes from Atlantic forest in Santa Catarina Island, southern Brazil (Diptera, Culicidae, with new records for the State of Santa Catarina Mosquitos associados a bromélias em Mata Atlântica na Ilha de Santa Catarina, sul do Brasil (Diptera, Culicidae, com novos registros para o Estado de Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Azulim Müller

    Full Text Available Bromeliad-associated mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae in Atlantic Forest in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, southern Brazil, were studied, examining plants of Vriesea philippocoburgi Wawra and Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii at secondary Atlantic rain forest, and A. lindenii and Vriesea friburgensis Mez var. paludosa (L. B. Smith at "restinga" per month, during 12 months. No immature forms of mosquitoes were collected from A. lindenii in the secondary forest. Collections obtained 368 immature mosquitoes, none of them from A. lindenii from rain forest. Culex (Microculex spp. constituted 79.8% of the total, Wyeomyia (Phoniomyia spp. 17.93%, and Anopheles (Kerteszia cruzii (Dyar & Knab, 1908 only 1.36%. The study shows the great predominance of species of medical importance not yet proved, and the small number of immature stages of anopheline mosquitoes. The rainfall, but not the mean temperatures, significantly influenced the quantity of mosquitoes from V. philippocoburgi. Significant differences between the quantities of immature forms of all the bromeliad species were found, and the shape of the plants could be important to the abundance of mosquitoes. All six species of Cx. (Microculex found are recorded for the first time in the State of Santa Catarina, and all six species of Wyeomyia (Phoniomyia are recorded for the first time in bromeliads in this state.Mosquitos (Diptera: Culicidae associados a bromélias em Mata Atlântica na Ilha de Santa Catarina, no Estado de Santa Catarina, foram estudados. Foram examinadas mensalmente plantas de Vriesea philippocoburgi Wawra e Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii de floresta atlântica pluvial ombrófila e A. lindenii e Vriesea friburgensis Mez var. paludosa (L. B. Smith de restinga, durante 12 meses. As coletas resultaram em 368 formas imaturas de mosquitos, sendo que nenhuma foi coletada em A. lindenii de mata ombrófila. Culex (Microculex spp. constituíram 79,8% do total

  2. Germination of Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Griseb. (Bromeliaceae) in different substracts as alternatives to Dicksonia sellowiana Hook - DOI: 10.4025/actasciagron.v30i1.1134

    OpenAIRE

    Anacleto, Adilson; UFPR; Negrelle, Raquel Rejane Bonato; UFPR; Koehler, Henrique Soares; UFPR

    2008-01-01

    For this study, the germination of Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Griseb. (Bromeliaceae) was evaluated. Production attempts from seeds for this species have taken place in an empirical form, using substrate based on xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook.) powder, the use of which is currently restricted, as it is an endangered species. Five easily accessible alternative substratum were tested: worm humus, sand, coconut shell fiber, forest litter, and Plantmax®. The experiment was conducted using a comple...

  3. Tank bromeliads capture Saharan dust in El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Dana L.; Moynihan, Kylen M.; Ariori, Carolyn; Bodkin, Gavin; Doria, Gabriela; Enright, Katherine; Hatfield-Gardner, Rémy; Kravet, Emma; Nuttle, C. Miller; Shepard, Lisa; Ku, Timothy C. W.; O'Connell, Suzanne; Resor, Phillip G.

    2018-01-01

    Dust from Saharan Africa commonly blows across the Atlantic Ocean and into the Caribbean. Most methods for measuring this dust either are expensive if collected directly from the atmosphere, or depend on very small concentrations that may be chemically altered if collected from soil. Tank bromeliads in the dwarf forest of El Yunque National Forest, Puerto Rico, have a structure of overlapping leaves used to capture rainwater and other atmospheric inputs. Therefore, it is likely that these bromeliads are collecting in their tanks Saharan dust along with local inputs. Here we analyze the elemental chemistry, including rare earth elements (REEs), of tank contents in order to match their chemical fingerprint to a provenance of the Earth's crust. We find that the tank contents differ from the local soils and bedrock and are more similar to published values of Saharan dust. Our study confirms the feasibility of using bromeliad tanks to trace Saharan dust in the Caribbean.

  4. Relevance of leaf surface contamination for assessing chemical composition of bromeliads in a restinga forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, C; Fernandes, E A.N.; Franca, E J; Bacchi, M A; Tagliaferro, F S [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2008-11-15

    Resuspended soil and other airborne particles adhered to the leaf surface affect the chemical composition of the plant. A well-defined cleaning procedure is necessary to avoid this problem, providing a correct assessment of the inherent chemical composition of bromeliads. To evaluate the influence of a washing procedure, INAA was applied for determining chemical elements in the leaves of bromeliads from Vriesea carinata species, both non-washed and washed with Alconox, EDTA and bi-distilled water. Br, Ce, Hg, La, Sc, Se, Sm and Th showed higher mass fractions in nonwashed leaves. The washing procedure removed the exogenous material without leaching chemical elements from inside the tissues. (author)

  5. Relevance of leaf surface contamination for assessing chemical composition of bromeliads in a restinga forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, C.; Fernandes, E.A.N.; Franca, E.J.; Bacchi, M.A.; Tagliaferro, F.S.

    2008-01-01

    Resuspended soil and other airborne particles adhered to the leaf surface affect the chemical composition of the plant. A well-defined cleaning procedure is necessary to avoid this problem, providing a correct assessment of the inherent chemical composition of bromeliads. To evaluate the influence of a washing procedure, INAA was applied for determining chemical elements in the leaves of bromeliads from Vriesea carinata species, both non-washed and washed with Alconox, EDTA and bi-distilled water. Br, Ce, Hg, La, Sc, Se, Sm and Th showed higher mass fractions in nonwashed leaves. The washing procedure removed the exogenous material without leaching chemical elements from inside the tissues. (author)

  6. Gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters of ornamental bromeliads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Gonçalves da Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence are widely used in physiological and ecological studies; however, few studies have used these techniques with ornamental plants. This study tested the potential contribution of gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence to evaluate the water and nutrients uptake by the tank and root system of epiphyte bromeliad Guzmania lingulata. For this purpose, we conducted an experiment with different water regime and another with different concentrations of nitrogen. The experiments were: 1 - Watering: Control (application of water into Tank and Root, Tank (watering into Tank, Root (watering Root and Drought (water suspension during the 90 days of experimentation and 2 - Nitrogen: Plants fertilized with Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solution exclusively into Tank or Root with nitrogen concentrations of control and 2.62 or 5.34 mM N applied as urea. The Fv /Fm ratio allowed comparing the treatments between experiments, demonstrating that Root and Tank both have the capacity to maintain G. lingulata photosynthetic activity and growth, while Drought treatment (water suspension was the limiting factor for energy conversion efficiency of PSII. However, gas exchange was more permissive as a parameter for comparing treatments in the nitrogen experiment, providing important information about the general aspects of the photosynthetic process in the watering experiment. Both gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence can support the evaluation of G. lingulata physiological status and can be useful tools in ornamental horticultural studies.

  7. Germinação de Aechmea nudicaulis (L. Griseb. (Bromeliaceae em diferentes substratos alternativos ao pó de xaxim = Germination of Aechmea nudicaulis (L. Griseb. (Bromeliaceae in different substracts as alternatives to Dicksonia sellowiana Hook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Anacleto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a germinação das sementes de Aechmea nudicaulis (L. Griseb. (Bromeliaceae. As tentativas de produção desta espécie, a partir de sementes, têm ocorrido de forma empírica, utilizando-se substrato à base de pó de xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook., que tem restrições de uso, por estar ameaçada de extinção. Foram testados cinco tipos alternativos de substratos de fácil acessibilidade: húmus de minhoca, areia, fibra de casca de coco, serapilheira e Plantmax®. O experimento foi realizado em delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com quatro repetições e 50 sementes por unidade experimental, àtemperatura ambiente, em viveiro rústico, coberto com sombrite (70%. Leituras semanais foram efetuadas, durante 70 dias. A melhor performance, como substituto alternativo, foi a da serapilheira, que apresentou valores de germinação de 79,5% e sobrevivência de 97%,estatisticamente similares aos obtidos com xaxim (78%; 94,75%; Tukey, p For this study, the germination of Aechmea nudicaulis (L. Griseb. (Bromeliaceae was evaluated. Production attempts from seeds for this species have taken place in an empirical form, using substratebased on xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook. powder, the use of which is currently restricted, as it is an endangered species. Five easily accessible alternative substratum were tested: worm humus, sand, coconut shell fiber, forest litter, and Plantmax®. The experiment wasconducted using a completely randomized design, with four replications and 50 seeds per experimental unit, at room temperature in a rustic nursery covered with 70% shade cloth. Weekly readings were performed during 70 days. The best alternative as a substitute toxaxim was forest litter, due to its germinability of 79.5% and survival rates of 97%, significantly similar to xaxim (78%; 94.75%; Tukey p < 0,05. Additionally, this product features positive characteristics such as high availability, low cost, and easy recycling.

  8. PreCam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allam, Sahar S. [Fermilab; Tucker, Douglas L. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) will be taking the next step in probing the properties of Dark Energy and in understanding the physics of cosmic acceleration. A step towards the photometric calibration of DES is to have a quick, bright survey in the DES footprint (PreCam), using a pre-production set of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) CCDs and a set of 100 mm×100 mm DES filters. The objective of the PreCam Survey is to create a network of calibrated DES grizY standard stars that will be used for DES nightly calibrations and to improve the DES global relative calibrations. Here, we describe the first year of PreCam observation, results, and photometric calibrations.

  9. Epiphytic bromeliad communities in secondary and mature forest in a tropical premontane area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cascante Marin, A.M.; Wolf, J.H.D.; Oostermeijer, J.G.B.; den Nijs, J.C.M.; Sanahuja, O.; Duran Apuy, A.

    2006-01-01

    We analyzed the differences in species richness, community composition, population structure and within-tree location of epiphytic bromeliads in contiguous secondary and mature forests in a premontane area in Costa Rica. Diversity in the mature forest was highest, and the communities differed in

  10. CAMS achievements in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Oe.; Fantoni, P.; Iguchi, Y.; Meyer, G.; Soerensen, A.; Dyck, C. van.

    1996-01-01

    CAMS (Computerized Accident Management Support) is a system being developed as a joint research activity at the Halden Reactor Project with additional financing from the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) and the Nordic NKS/RAK-2 project. Three types of users are envisaged: the staff in the control room, the staff in the technical support centre and the staff at a national emergency centre. It is still an experimental system. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate kindly accepted to test CAMS at a safety exercise on the 4th of May, 1995. CAMS is designed assuming automatic data transfer from the plant. Missing the data link, a simulator running in the next room was updated now and then with data received by phone. As seen from CAMS, it did not matter if the data came from a fake plant or from a real plant, except that the data were delayed. Overall, it seemed that CAMS can be a very important tool for a national authority. A data link from the plant would increase its usefulness. Several comments on design features were collected and will be used to improve the system. The model needs more inputs to control the main parameters, and a larger repertoire of fault conditions should be put into the model. In the second half of 1995 the work on CAMS has concentrated upon designing new modules for signal validation, tracking simulation and state identification. This will provide better capabilities for on-line monitoring and assessment of the plant state. Further, it has been proposed to introduce Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to assist in risk monitoring. A first prototype has been made on a personal computer showing the main features of such a PSA module. (au)

  11. Are algae relevant to the detritus-based food web in tank-bromeliads?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Brouard

    Full Text Available We assessed the occurrence of algae in five species of tank-bromeliads found in contrasting environmental sites in a Neotropical, primary rainforest around the Nouragues Research Station, French Guiana. The distributions of both algal abundance and biomass were examined based on physical parameters, the morphological characteristics of bromeliad species and with regard to the structure of other aquatic microbial communities held in the tanks. Algae were retrieved in all of the bromeliad species with mean densities ranging from ∼10(2 to 10(4 cells/mL. Their biomass was positively correlated to light exposure and bacterial biomass. Algae represented a tiny component of the detrital food web in shaded bromeliads but accounted for up to 30 percent of the living microbial carbon in the tanks of Catopsis berteroniana, located in a highly exposed area. Thus, while nutrient supplies are believed to originate from wind-borne particles and trapped insects (i.e., allochtonous organic matter, our results indicate that primary producers (i.e., autochtonous organic matter are present in this insectivorous bromeliad. Using a 24-h incubation of size-fractionated and manipulated samples from this plant, we evaluated the impact of mosquito foraging on algae, other microorganisms and rotifers. The prey assemblages were greatly altered by the predation of mosquito larvae. Grazing losses indicated that the dominant algal taxon, Bumilleriopsis sp., like protozoa and rotifers, is a significant part of the diet of mosquito larvae. We conclude that algae are a relevant functional community of the aquatic food web in C. berteroniana and might form the basis of a complementary non-detrital food web.

  12. Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in an urban botanical garden of dengue endemic Rio de Janeiro--are bromeliads productive habitats for the invasive vectors Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Márcio Goulart; Simões, Taynãna César; Nascimento, Teresa Fernandes Silva do; Teixeira, Maria Lucia França; Lounibos, Leon Philip; Oliveira, Ricardo Lourenço de

    2009-12-01

    Immatures of both Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus have been found in water-holding bromeliad axils in Brazil. Removal of these plants or their treatment with insecticides in public and private gardens have been undertaken during dengue outbreaks in Brazil despite uncertainty as to their importance as productive habitats for dengue vectors. From March 2005-February 2006, we sampled 120 randomly selected bromeliads belonging to 10 species in a public garden less than 200 m from houses in a dengue-endemic neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro. A total of 2,816 mosquito larvae and pupae was collected, with an average of 5.87 immatures per plant per collection. Culex (Microculex) pleuristriatus and Culex spp of the Ocellatus Group were the most abundant culicid species, found in all species of bromeliads; next in relative abundance were species of the genus Wyeomyia. Only two individuals of Ae. aegypti (0.07%) and five of Ae. albopictus(0.18%) were collected from bromeliads. By contrast, immatures of Ae. aegypti were found in manmade containers in nearly 5% of nearby houses. These results demonstrate that bromeliads are not important producers of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus and, hence, should not be a focus for dengue control. However, the results of this study of only one year in a single area may not represent outcomes in other urban localities where bromeliads, Ae. aegypti and dengue coincide in more disturbed habitats.

  13. Inflorescences of the Bromeliad Vriesea friburgensis as Nest Sites and Food Resources for Ants and Other Arthropods in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Volker S.; Langner, Simone; Steiner, Josefina; Zillikens, Anne

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, the usage of bromeliad inflorescences as nesting sites for ants and other arthropods was studied. Frequencies of occurrence of nests were recorded from hollow stems of dried infructescences of the bromeliad Vriesea friburgensis on Santa Catarina Island, southern Brazil. Three habitat types were studied: miconietum and two types of restinga, one with low (restinga-low) and one with high vegetation cover (restinga-high). Additionally, flower visitation by ants was examined i...

  14. Environmental controls over methane emissions from bromeliad phytotelmata: The role of phosphorus and nitrogen availability, temperature, and water content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotowska, Martyna M.; Werner, Florian A.

    2013-12-01

    bromeliads are common epiphytic plants throughout neotropical forests that store significant amounts of water in phytotelmata (tanks) formed by highly modified leafs. Methanogenic archaea in these tanks have recently been identified as a significant source of atmospheric methane. We address the effects of environmental drivers (temperature, tank water content, sodium phosphate [P], and urea [N] addition) on methane production in anaerobically incubated bromeliad slurry and emissions from intact bromeliad tanks in montane Ecuador. N addition ≥ 1 mg g-1 had a significantly positive effect on headspace methane concentrations in incubation jars while P addition did not affect methane production at any dosage (≤ 1 mg g-1). Tank bromeliads (Tillandsia complanata) cultivated in situ showed significantly increased effluxes of methane in response to the addition of 26 mg N addition per tank but not to lower dosage of N or any dosage of P (≤ 5.2 mg plant-1). There was no significant interaction between N and P addition. The brevity of the stimulatory effect of N addition on plant methane effluxes (1-2 days) points at N competition by other microorganisms or bromeliads. Methane efflux from plants closely followed within-day temperature fluctuations over 24 h cycles, yet the dependency of temperature was not exponential as typical for terrestrial wetlands but instead linear. In simulated drought, methane emission from bromeliad tanks was maintained with minimum amounts of water and regained after a short lag phase of approximately 24 h. Our results suggest that methanogens in bromeliads are primarily limited by N and that direct effects of global change (increasing temperature and seasonality, remote fertilization) on bromeliad methane emissions are of moderate scale.

  15. Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae assemblages associated with Nidularium and Vriesea bromeliads in Serra do Mar, Atlantic Forest, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marques Tatiani C

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most substantial and best preserved area of Atlantic Forest is within the biogeographical sub-region of Serra do Mar. The topographic complexity of the region creates a diverse array of microclimates, which can affect species distribution and diversity inside the forest. Given that Atlantic Forest includes highly heterogeneous environments, a diverse and medically important Culicidae assemblage, and possible species co-occurrence, we evaluated mosquito assemblages from bromeliad phytotelmata in Serra do Mar (southeastern Brazil. Methods Larvae and pupae were collected monthly from Nidularium and Vriesea bromeliads between July 2008 and June 2009. Collection sites were divided into landscape categories (lowland, hillslope and hilltop based on elevation and slope. Correlations between bromeliad mosquito assemblage and environmental variables were assessed using multivariate redundancy analysis. Differences in species diversity between bromeliads within each category of elevation were explored using the Renyi diversity index. Univariate binary logistic regression analyses were used to assess species co-occurrence. Results A total of 2,024 mosquitoes belonging to 22 species were collected. Landscape categories (pseudo-F value = 1.89, p = 0.04, bromeliad water volume (pseudo-F = 2.99, p = 0.03 and bromeliad fullness (Pseudo-F = 4.47, p An. homunculus was associated with Cx. ocellatus and the presence of An. cruzii was associated with Cx. neglectus, Cx. inimitabilis fuscatus and Cx. worontzowi. Anopheles cruzii and An. homunculus were taken from the same bromeliad, however, the co-occurrence between those two species was not statistically significant. Conclusions One of the main findings of our study was that differences in species among mosquito assemblages were influenced by landscape characteristics. The bromeliad factor that influenced mosquito abundance and assemblage structure was fullness. The findings of the current

  16. Variações na morfoanatomia foliar de Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae sob distintas condições ambientais Leaf morphoanatomy variation in Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae under distinct environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Heinig Voltolini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae-Bromelioideae ocorre em restingas e Floresta Pluvial de Encosta Atlântica em Santa Catarina e Nordeste do Rio Grande do Sul, BR. Pode ser encontrada total ou parcialmente exposta à irradiação solar e em distintas formas de vida - terrícola, rupícola e epifítica. O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar morfoanatomicamente às características de folhas de A. lindenii var. lindenii em distintas condições ambientais. Foram coletadas, na Ilha de Santa Catarina (Florianópolis, SC, folhas de plantas terrícolas em restinga herbácea (alta irradiação solar, rupícolas de costões rochosos (alta irradiação solar, terrícolas e epifíticas de sub-bosques (baixa irradiação solar de restinga arbórea e rupícolas de sub-bosque (baixa irradiação solar de Floresta Pluvial de Encosta Atlântica. Foram mensurados comprimento, largura, área da lâmina e bainha foliar, densidade estomática, comprimento e largura das células-guarda, espessura total e das estruturas constituintes na lâmina foliar. As características anatômicas qualitativas são semelhantes nas distintas condições analisadas. A baixa irradiação solar determina maior expansão da área foliar, decorrente do alongamento da lâmina. Lâmina e bainha foliares têm maior largura sob alta irradiação. A densidade estomática foi maior em folhas de plantas sob alta irradiação solar. A espessura total da lâmina foliar foi menor em plantas terrícolas sob alta irradiação, porém não mostrou diferenças estatísticas significativas entre as outras condições.Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae-Bromelioideae occurs in restingas and hillside Atlantic rain forest in Santa Catarina and northeastern Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. It is found totally or partially exposed to solar radiation and in different life forms - terricolous, rupicolous and epiphytes. The aim of this work was to compare

  17. Germinação de Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Griseb. (Bromeliaceae) em diferentes substratos alternativos ao pó de xaxim

    OpenAIRE

    Anacleto,Adilson; Negrelle,Raquel Rejane Bonato; Koehler,Henrique Soares

    2008-01-01

    Avaliou-se a germinação das sementes de Aechmea nudicaulis (L.) Griseb. (Bromeliaceae). As tentativas de produção desta espécie, a partir de sementes, têm ocorrido de forma empírica, utilizando-se substrato à base de pó de xaxim (Dicksonia sellowiana Hook.), que tem restrições de uso, por estar ameaçada de extinção. Foram testados cinco tipos alternativos de substratos de fácil acessibilidade: húmus de minhoca, areia, fibra de casca de coco, serapilheira e Plantmax®. O experimento foi realiza...

  18. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the CAM epiphyte Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides, Bromeliaceae and its comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Poczai

    Full Text Available Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides is an epiphytic bromeliad widely distributed throughout tropical and warm temperate America. This plant is highly adapted to extreme environmental conditions. Striking features of this species include specialized trichomes (scales covering the surface of its shoots aiding the absorption of water and nutrients directly from the atmosphere and a specific photosynthesis using crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM. Here we report the plastid genome of Spanish moss and present the comparison of genome organization and sequence evolution within Poales. The plastome of Spanish moss has a quadripartite structure consisting of a large single copy (LSC, 87,439 bp, two inverted regions (IRa and IRb, 26,803 bp and short single copy (SSC, 18,612 bp region. The plastid genome had 37.2% GC content and 134 genes with 88 being unique protein-coding genes and 20 of these are duplicated in the IR, similar to other reported bromeliads. Our study shows that early diverging lineages of Poales do not have high substitution rates as compared to grasses, and plastid genomes of bromeliads show structural features considered to be ancestral in graminids. These include the loss of the introns in the clpP and rpoC1 genes and the complete loss or partial degradation of accD and ycf genes in the Graminid clade. Further structural rearrangements appeared in the graminids lacking in Spanish moss, which include a 28-kb inversion between the trnG-UCC-rps14 region and 6-kb in the trnG-UCC-psbD, followed by a third <1kb inversion in the trnT sequence.

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the CAM epiphyte Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides, Bromeliaceae) and its comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poczai, Péter; Hyvönen, Jaakko

    2017-01-01

    Spanish moss (Tillandsia usneoides) is an epiphytic bromeliad widely distributed throughout tropical and warm temperate America. This plant is highly adapted to extreme environmental conditions. Striking features of this species include specialized trichomes (scales) covering the surface of its shoots aiding the absorption of water and nutrients directly from the atmosphere and a specific photosynthesis using crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). Here we report the plastid genome of Spanish moss and present the comparison of genome organization and sequence evolution within Poales. The plastome of Spanish moss has a quadripartite structure consisting of a large single copy (LSC, 87,439 bp), two inverted regions (IRa and IRb, 26,803 bp) and short single copy (SSC, 18,612 bp) region. The plastid genome had 37.2% GC content and 134 genes with 88 being unique protein-coding genes and 20 of these are duplicated in the IR, similar to other reported bromeliads. Our study shows that early diverging lineages of Poales do not have high substitution rates as compared to grasses, and plastid genomes of bromeliads show structural features considered to be ancestral in graminids. These include the loss of the introns in the clpP and rpoC1 genes and the complete loss or partial degradation of accD and ycf genes in the Graminid clade. Further structural rearrangements appeared in the graminids lacking in Spanish moss, which include a 28-kb inversion between the trnG-UCC-rps14 region and 6-kb in the trnG-UCC-psbD, followed by a third <1kb inversion in the trnT sequence.

  20. First records of pollen rain in bromeliad tanks in an area of caatinga in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Mirella de Souza Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Species of Bromeliaceae have leaves in a spiral configuration. Because of the shape of the rosette thus formed and the imbricate configuration of the leaf sheaths, there is usually a tank in which rainwater and other components of the environment, including pollen grains, accumulate, making such tanks effective pollen rain collectors. The objective of this study was to use bromeliads as a tool to increase knowledge about the vegetation of the caatinga (shrublands in the Canudos region of the state of Bahia, located in the semi-arid zone of Brazil, as well as to analyze the dynamics of pollen dispersal and deposition. To that end, we collected samples of the water from the tanks of bromeliads at the Canudos Biological Station. A total of 149 pollen types were detected, 88 of which could be identified botanically. The families that were the most well-represented among the pollen types were Fabaceae (with 25, Asteraceae (with 9, and Euphorbiaceae (with 7. Ten pollen types were presented as potential indicators of caatinga vegetation. We conclude that tank bromeliads are useful for gathering information about pollen rain and pollen dynamics, as well as about the transport and deposition of pollen in the caatinga.

  1. Bromeliad ornamental species: conservation issues and challenges related to commercialization - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v34i1.7314

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Mitchell

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bromeliads grow almost exclusively in the New World tropics and subtropics, mainly in South America in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (ca. 1200 species. Within the last few decades, their beautiful shapes and colors, low maintenance and easy adaptability to small gardens have brought bromeliads into worldwide use as ornamental plants. While the ornamental bromeliad trade could make significant contributions to household economies in rural areas, the trade may represent a significant threat in some of the bromeliad biodiversity hotspot countries such as Brazil, Bolivia and Colombia. This paper presents an overview of production volumes, analysis of the Brazilian bromeliads trade chain – at the state, national and international levels – and recommendations to address development and conservation challenges.

  2. Mosquitoes of the Caatinga: 2. Species from periodic sampling of bromeliads and tree holes in a dry Brazilian forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marteis, Letícia Silva; Natal, Delsio; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb; Medeiros-Sousa, Antônio Ralph; Corte, Roseli La

    2017-07-01

    The Caatinga is a dry tropical forest, located in the Brazilian semiarid region and rich in phytotelmata. This study investigated the culicid fauna of phytotelmata of the caatinga by sampling for 19 consecutive months aquatic immatures from tree holes and bromeliads. A total of 127L of water was taken from the plants, containing 6764 immature culicids of 16 species, of which 11 (69%) are undescribed and respond to 90% of the total abundance of the specimens collected. Epiphytic bromeliads harbor a large number of immature Culicidae, although terrestrial bromeliads are the most abundant and widely distributed in the region. The richness of culicid species was similar between terrestrial and epiphytic bromeliads and lower in habitats represented by tree hole phytotelmata. There was no similarity in the composition of culicid species that developed in bromeliads or tree holes. Temperature and humidity were the environmental parameters most strongly associated with the proportion of positive plants. The Caatinga has a great number of endemic species that remain unknown to science and many additional culicid species may await discovery from there. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimisation Methods for Cam Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia–Mari Popa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the criteria which represent the base of optimizing the cam mechanisms and also we perform the calculations for several types of mechanisms. We study the influence of the constructive parameters in case of the simple machines with rotation cam and follower (flat or curve of translation on the curvature radius and that of the transmission angle. As it follows, we present the optimization calculations of the cam and flat rotation follower mechanisms, as well as the calculations for optimizing the cam mechanisms by circular groove followers’ help. For an easier interpretation of the results, we have visualized the obtained cam in AutoCAD according to the script files generated by a calculation program.

  4. Biologia floral e polinização de Aechmea beeriana (Bromeliaceae) em vegetação de baixio na Amazônia Central.

    OpenAIRE

    NARA, Angelic Katz; WEBBER, Antonio Carlos

    2002-01-01

    O presente estudo trata a biologia floral, a polinização e o sistema reprodutivo de Aechmea beeriana Smith & Spencer, acrescidas de algumas informações fenológicas. A espécie foi estudada nos arredores de Manaus-AM. A. beeriana ocorre principalmente como epífita a várias alturas, com preferência por locais mais sombreados. Apresenta-se adaptada a síndrome de ornitofilia, com antese diurna e inflorescências vistosas. A antese possui duração de um dia e as flores são homogâmicas. Os indivíduos ...

  5. Camønoen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyimóthy, Szilvia; Widtfeld Meged, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Coastal communities in Denmark have experienced a steady socioeconomic decline, which has further been aggravated by a stagnating tourism and agricultural sector. Within this context, coastal regions are attempting to harness the potentials of the emerging collaborative economy and its communitar......Coastal communities in Denmark have experienced a steady socioeconomic decline, which has further been aggravated by a stagnating tourism and agricultural sector. Within this context, coastal regions are attempting to harness the potentials of the emerging collaborative economy and its...... communitarian business models, such as car-sharing, social dining and peer rental of property. These sharing models thrive primarily in urban settings with a high density of assets, triggering the question: how can sparse and loosely connected coastal resources be mobilized to create value for tourists...... is augmented by a digital platform on which hikers may directly connect with local citizens and book experiences ranging from private dinners to bird-watching and berry-picking. The platform Camønoen.org is hosted by the regional museum, which neither charges for intermediation, nor is responsible for vetting...

  6. Effects of climate and forest structure on palms, bromeliads and bamboos in Atlantic Forest fragments of Northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilário, R R; Toledo, J J

    2016-01-01

    Palms, bromeliads and bamboos are key elements of tropical forests and understanding the effects of climate, anthropogenic pressure and forest structure on these groups is crucial to forecast structural changes in tropical forests. Therefore, we investigated the effects of these factors on the abundance of these groups in 22 Atlantic forest fragments of Northeastern Brazil. Abundance of bromeliads and bamboos were assessed through indexes. Palms were counted within a radius of 20 m. We also obtained measures of vegetation structure, fragment size, annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality and human population density. We tested the effects of these predictors on plant groups using path analysis. Palm abundance was higher in taller forests with larger trees, closed canopy and sparse understory, which may be a result of the presence of seed dispersers and specific attributes of local palm species. Bromeliads were negatively affected by both annual precipitation and precipitation seasonality, what may reflect adaptations of these plants to use water efficiently, but also the need to capture water in a regular basis. Bamboos were not related to any predictor variable. As climate and forest structure affected the abundance of bromeliads and palms, human-induced climatic changes and disturbances in forest structure may modify the abundance of these groups. In addition, soil properties and direct measurements of human disturbance should be used in future studies in order to improve the predictability of models about plant groups in Northeastern Atlantic Forest.

  7. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Low Back Pain and CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section CAM Low Back Pain and CAM Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of ... benefit from CAM treatment for conditions such as low back pain. Photo courtesy of Glenn Scimonelli "Oh, my aching ...

  8. Starch distribution in anthers, microspores and pollen grains in Aechmea recurvata (Klotzsch.) L.B.Sm., Dyckia racinae L.B.Sm. and Tillandsia aeranthos (Loisel.) L.B.Sm. (Bromeliaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,João Marcelo Santos de; Martins,Merielem Saldanha; Dorneles,Mariane Paludette; Freitas,Cesar Carvalho de

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative description of the starch distribution in the anthers, microspores and pollen grains of Aechmea recurvata, Dyckia racinae and Tillandsia aeranthos. Flowers at different stages of development were processed according to plant microtechniques for observation by light microscope. Ten stages of embryological development were used as references for the comparative analysis of starch distribution and dynamics. The structural data showed a greater starch accumulatio...

  9. Perturbation vectors to evaluate air quality using lichens and bromeliads: a Brazilian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monna, F; Marques, A N; Guillon, R; Losno, R; Couette, S; Navarro, N; Dongarra, G; Tamburo, E; Varrica, D; Chateau, C; Nepomuceno, F O

    2017-10-17

    Samples of one lichen species, Parmotrema crinitum, and one bromeliad species, Tillandsia usneoides, were collected in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, at four sites differently affected by anthropogenic pollution. The concentrations of aluminum, cadmium, copper, iron, lanthanum, lead, sulfur, titanium, zinc, and zirconium were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. The environmental diagnosis was established by examining compositional changes via perturbation vectors, an underused family of methods designed to circumvent the problem of closure in any compositional dataset. The perturbation vectors between the reference site and the other three sites were similar for both species, although body concentration levels were different. At each site, perturbation vectors between lichens and bromeliads were approximately the same, whatever the local pollution level. It should thus be possible to combine these organisms, though physiologically different, for air quality surveys, after making all results comparable with appropriate correction. The use of perturbation vectors seems particularly suitable for assessing pollution level by biomonitoring, and for many frequently met situations in environmental geochemistry, where elemental ratios are more relevant than absolute concentrations.

  10. Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Thyroid Disease (CAM) WHAT IS COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (CAM)? Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) is defined ...

  11. Bromeliad ornamental species: conservation issues and challenges related to commercialization=Espécies ornamentais de bromélias: conservação e desafios relacionados a sua comercialização

    OpenAIRE

    Darcy Mitchell; Raquel Rejane Bonato Negrelle; Adilson Anacleto

    2012-01-01

    Bromeliads grow almost exclusively in the New World tropics and subtropics, mainly in South America in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (ca. 1200 species). Within the last few decades, their beautiful shapes and colors, low maintenance and easy adaptability to small gardens have brought bromeliads into worldwide use as ornamental plants. While the ornamental bromeliad trade could make significant contributions to household economies in rural areas, the trade may represent a significant threat in...

  12. A Novel Radiation Hardened CAM

    CERN Document Server

    Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This poster describes an innovative Content Addressable Memory cell with radiation hardened (RH-CAM) architecture. The RH-CAM is designed in a commercial 28 nm CMOS technology. The circuit has been simulated in worst-case conditions, and the effects due to single particles are analyzed injecting a fault current into a circuit node. The proposed architecture can perform on-time pattern recognition tasks in harsh environments, such as very front-end electronics in hadron colliders and in space applications.

  13. Scleroderma, Stress and CAM Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Kit Hui

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease influenced by interplay among genetic and environmental factors, of which one is stress. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is frequently used to treat stress and those diseases in which stress has been implicated. Results are presented from a survey of patients with scleroderma. Respondents were a convenient sample of those attending a national conference in Las Vegas in 2002. Findings implicate stress in the onset, continuation and exacerbation of scleroderma. The implication is that CAM providers may be filling an important patient need in their provision of services that identify and treat stress and its related disorders.

  14. A new quantitative classification of ecological types in the bromeliad genus Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae) based on trichomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, Mosti; Papini, Alessio; Brighigna, Luigi

    2008-03-01

    Using collection specimens, we measured the density and wing area of trichomes in 37 species of the bromeliad genus Tillandsia, specifically the abaxial proximal, abaxial distal, adaxial proximal and adaxial distal parts of the leaf. The product of the trichome "wing" area by the number of trichomes (means) produced a pure number (T) that was correlated to ecological features. The correlation was positive with respect to arid environments (xeric Tillands) and negative with respect to humid environments (mesic Tillands). Bulbous, and particularly myrmecophytic species and species with tanks, represented particular categories. Other intermediate types were identified based on the T number, totalling five ecological types. In comparison with other systems of ecological typification for Tillands and other Bromeliaceae, the present system offers measurable data whose analysis is reproducible.

  15. Population dynamics of the epiphytic bromeliad Tillandsia butzii in cloud forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Aceves, Tarin; Hernández-Apolinar, Mariana

    2016-02-01

    Epiphytes are a major component of tropical montane cloud forests. Over-exploitation and forest loss and degradation affect remnant populations. In this study, we analysed the population dynamics of the epiphytic bromeliad Tillandsia butzii over a 2-y period in a tropical montane cloud forest fragment in southern Mexico. Matrix analysis revealed that the T. butzii population is likely to be stable at the study site. On average the λ value did not differ significantly from unity: λ (95% confidence interval) = 0.978 (0.936-1.001). λ was highly influenced by stasis, to a lesser extent by growth and only slightly by fecundity. Overall, adult plant stasis and phalanx growth habit played a fundamental role in population maintenance. T. butzii tolerance to xeric conditions may contribute to population stability in the studied region.

  16. Variação morfológica e reprodutiva de Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae Morphological and reproductive variation of Aechmea lindenii (E. Morren Baker var. lindenii (Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Lenzi

    2006-06-01

    luminosity and on an understory of a "restinga arbórea" (low luminosity, in Florianópolis, SC, where the results indicate that the luminosity can influence the bromeliad's phenotype, nectar production, phenology and reproductive success. The shade tolerant plants are bigger and present a flowering period of around 120 days, while the heliophytic plants are smaller and blossom throughout all year. The species presents ornithophilous floral attributes, being the volume (16,7 µL ± 4 and concentration (27,25% of the nectar produced by the flowers characteristic of a hummingbird pollinated flower. The frequent visitation of Amazilia fimbriata, Thalurania glaucopis and Thalurania sp. (Trochilidae confirms this suggestion; however bees and butterflies can also be considered potential pollinators, suggesting co-evolution of secondary floral syndromes. Based on the results of manual pollination tests and on the development of the polinic tubes, can be concluded that the species does not present self-incompatibility, forming fruits with fertile seeds, with a germination rate higher than 80%, both in cross-pollination as well as in selfing tests. The heliophytic population presented a high rate of parthenocarpy (52, 95% and showed to be a safe and efficient method to evaluate the fertilization of the flowers, being possible to relate the frequency and abundance of parthenocarpy to the absence or inefficiency of the pollinators. The fruits and seeds were dispersed by birds of the families Thraupidae and Pipridae and predated by larva of the butterfly Tecla sp. (Lycaenidae.

  17. Multiple lines of evidence shed light on the occurrence of paramecium (ciliophora, oligohymenophorea) in bromeliad tank water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buosi, Paulo R B; Cabral, Adalgisa F; Simão, Taiz L L; Utz, Laura R P; Velho, Luiz F M

    2014-01-01

    Phytotelmata are vegetal structures that hold water from the rain, and organic matter from the forest and the soil, resulting in small, compartmentalized bodies of water, which provide an essential environment for the establishment and development of many organisms. These microenvironments generally harbor endemic species, but many organisms that are found in lakes and rivers, are also present. Here, we report, for the first time, the occurrence of the ciliate genus Paramecium in the tank of the bromeliad species Aechmaea distichantha. The identification of the Paramecium species was performed based on live observations, protargol impregnation, scanning electronic microscopy, and sequencing of the 18s rRNA. The absence of Paramecium from bromeliad tank water was highlighted in several earlier investigations, and may be due to the fact that this species is unable to make cysts. The occurrence of Paramecium multimicronucleatum in our samples may be explained by the proximity between the bromeliads and the river, a potential source of the species. Further, we also believe that the counting methodology used in our study provides a more accurate analysis of the species diversity, since we investigated all samples within a maximum period of 6 h after sampling, allowing minimum loss of specimens. © 2013 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2013 International Society of Protistologists.

  18. Facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants: powerful tools for unravelling the functional elements of CAM photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Klaus; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2014-07-01

    Facultative crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) describes the optional use of CAM photosynthesis, typically under conditions of drought stress, in plants that otherwise employ C3 or C4 photosynthesis. In its cleanest form, the upregulation of CAM is fully reversible upon removal of stress. Reversibility distinguishes facultative CAM from ontogenetically programmed unidirectional C3-to-CAM shifts inherent in constitutive CAM plants. Using mainly measurements of 24h CO2 exchange, defining features of facultative CAM are highlighted in five terrestrial species, Clusia pratensis, Calandrinia polyandra, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, Portulaca oleracea and Talinum triangulare. For these, we provide detailed chronologies of the shifts between photosynthetic modes and comment on their usefulness as experimental systems. Photosynthetic flexibility is also reviewed in an aquatic CAM plant, Isoetes howellii. Through comparisons of C3 and CAM states in facultative CAM species, many fundamental biochemical principles of the CAM pathway have been uncovered. Facultative CAM species will be of even greater relevance now that new sequencing technologies facilitate the mapping of genomes and tracking of the expression patterns of multiple genes. These technologies and facultative CAM systems, when joined, are expected to contribute in a major way towards our goal of understanding the essence of CAM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum in the southeastern Atlantic forest: a challenge to the bromeliad-malaria paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Gabriel Zorello; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento; Levy, Debora; Fukuya, Linah Akemi; de Oliveira, Tatiane Marques Porangaba; Maselli, Luciana Morganti Ferreira; Conn, Jan Evelyn; Massad, Eduardo; Bydlowski, Sergio Paulo; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2015-04-25

    Recently an unexpectedly high prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum was found in asymptomatic blood donors living in the southeastern Brazilian Atlantic forest. The bromeliad-malaria paradigm assumes that transmission of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium malariae involves species of the subgenus Kerteszia of Anopheles and only a few cases of P. vivax malaria are reported annually in this region. The expectations of this paradigm are a low prevalence of P. vivax and a null prevalence of P. falciparum. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify if P. falciparum is actively circulating in the southeastern Brazilian Atlantic forest remains. In this study, anophelines were collected with Shannon and CDC-light traps in seven distinct Atlantic forest landscapes over a 4-month period. Field-collected Anopheles mosquitoes were tested by real-time PCR assay in pools of ten, and then each mosquito from every positive pool, separately for P. falciparum and P. vivax. Genomic DNA of P. falciparum or P. vivax from positive anophelines was then amplified by traditional PCR for sequencing of the 18S ribosomal DNA to confirm Plasmodium species. Binomial probabilities were calculated to identify non-random results of the P. falciparum-infected anopheline findings. The overall proportion of anophelines naturally infected with P. falciparum was 4.4% (21/480) and only 0.8% (4/480) with P. vivax. All of the infected mosquitoes were found in intermixed natural and human-modified environments and most were Anopheles cruzii (22/25 = 88%, 18 P. falciparum plus 4 P. vivax). Plasmodium falciparum was confirmed by sequencing in 76% (16/21) of positive mosquitoes, whereas P. vivax was confirmed in only 25% (1/4). Binomial probabilities suggest that P. falciparum actively circulates throughout the region and that there may be a threshold of the forested over human-modified environment ratio upon which the proportion of P. falciparum-infected anophelines increases significantly. These results

  20. A study on copper and zinc effects in the growth of Aechmea blanchetiana (Baker) L.B. Smith seedlings cultivated in vitro. Application of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zampieri, Maria Cristina Tessari

    2010-01-01

    Metals are components of the biosphere, occurring naturally in soil and plants, but as a result of human actions, their levels have been greatly increased, depending on the region. Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) are essential for the growth and development of plants, however if in excess become toxic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of plants to absorb Cu and Zn and what effects they cause in seedlings cultivated in vitro. The results of this study may contribute primarily in agricultural and environmental research. The plant investigated was the Aechmea blanchetiana species of the Bromeliaceae family. It is a terrestrial or epiphytic species used as an ornamental plant. The cultivation of seedlings for this study and their exposure to different concentrations of Cu and Zn were performed at the Institute of Botany (IBt) of Sao Paulo. After seed germination, the seedlings were transferred for growth in a culture media containing different concentrations of Cu or Zn. After this period of in vitro cultivation, the seedlings were analyzed for morphometry, anatomy and by neutron activation analysis. Quality control of the results from neutron activation analysis was carried out by the analysis of certified reference materials. The data obtained showed good precision and accuracy for several elements determined. The highest concentrations of Cu used in the exposure were those that caused major structural changes in morphometric and anatomical parameters, however for the Zn no significant differences were verified for most parameters. The A. blanchetiana proved to be a bioaccumulator species of Zn, absorbing high levels of this element in the aerial parts and roots. (author)

  1. Experimental Study on Revetec Engine Cam Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasim, Maisara Mohyeldin; Chui, Lee Giok; Anwar, Khirul Azhar bin

    2012-01-01

    In Revetec engine (three-lobed) cam replaces the crankshaft to convert the reciprocating motion of the engine piston, to a rotating motion in the drive line. Since the cam controls the piston movement, the cam profile has a great effect on engine performance. In this paper an experimental study was done to a (three- lobed) cam with Cycloidal motion profile but with different ratios between the base circle radius of the cam and the radius of the roller follower. DEWESoft was used to find the displacement and the vibration of the piston, and compare the actual results from the test with the theoretical results from the cam profile equation. The results showed that there is a periods of miss contact between the follower and the cam when the ratio between the base circle radius of the cam and the radius of the roller follower is less than a certain value, and also increasing of vibration. The suggested ratio between the cam and follower radius is to be more than 2:1.

  2. The path to CAM6: coupled simulations with CAM5.4 and CAM5.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Peter A.; Gettelman, Andrew; Hannay, Cecile; Larson, Vincent E.; Neale, Richard B.; Craig, Cheryl; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2018-01-01

    This paper documents coupled simulations of two developmental versions of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) towards CAM6. The configuration called CAM5.4 introduces new microphysics, aerosol, and ice nucleation changes, among others to CAM. The CAM5.5 configuration represents a more radical departure, as it uses an assumed probability density function (PDF)-based unified cloud parameterization to replace the turbulence, shallow convection, and warm cloud macrophysics in CAM. This assumed PDF method has been widely used in the last decade in atmosphere-only climate simulations but has never been documented in coupled mode. Here, we compare the simulated coupled climates of CAM5.4 and CAM5.5 and compare them to the control coupled simulation produced by CAM5.3. We find that CAM5.5 has lower cloud forcing biases when compared to the control simulations. Improvements are also seen in the simulated amplitude of the Niño-3.4 index, an improved representation of the diurnal cycle of precipitation, subtropical surface wind stresses, and double Intertropical Convergence Zone biases. Degradations are seen in Amazon precipitation as well as slightly colder sea surface temperatures and thinner Arctic sea ice. Simulation of the 20th century results in a credible simulation that ends slightly colder than the control coupled simulation. The authors find this is due to aerosol indirect effects that are slightly stronger in the new version of the model and propose a solution to ameliorate this. Overall, in these early coupled simulations, CAM5.5 produces a credible climate that is appropriate for science applications and is ready for integration into the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR's) next-generation climate model.

  3. COMPARISON OF DIET AND USE OF BROMELIADS BETWEEN A BROMELICOLOUS AND A BROMELIGENOUS ANURAN AT AN INSELBERG IN THE SOUTHEASTERN OF BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PERTEL WESLEI

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Anurans from an inselberg in southeastern Brazil were studied using a sample ofsixty tank of bromeliads Alcantharea sp. We found 153 tadpoles of S. arduous, 21adults of S. arduous, 30 adults of T. miliaris, and two adults of Scinax x-signatus,which were not considered in our analyses. Tadpoles of S. arduous were present in35% of the analyzed plants. Adults of S. arduous (bromeligeneous occurred in 25%of analyzed plants, while adults of T. miliaris (bromelicolous occurred in 30%.Apparently the presence of toe pads in S. arduous allow them to occupy the centerportion of bromeliads, while T. miliaris, which lack pads on their toes, were foundon the base of the plant axils. The number of anuran species and the abundance ofindividuals found were low. This may be a result of the high altitude of our studiedsite or a restriction imposed by the saxicolous environment, such as high temperaturesand low humidity during the day. Both species can be considered generalist feedersdue to their wide variety of ingested prey. Formicidae was their main prey but wasabsent segregation in the bromeliads. Blattodea was very common inside the bromeliadaxils and represented the most signifi cant prey by weight in both frog species. Weconclude that both anurans forage inside and outside of bromeliads. Trophic nichebreadth in S. arduous was larger than in T. miliaris. Even both species being commoninhabitants of the same environment, they demonstrated a marked spatial segregationin the bromeliads. Based on their diet, however, there may be disputes for territoryoutside of the bromeliads.

  4. Potential impact of harvesting on the population dynamics of two epiphytic bromeliads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Aceves, Tarin; Hernández-Apolinar, Mariana; Valverde, Teresa

    2014-08-01

    Large numbers of epiphytes are extracted from cloud forests for ornamental use and illegal trade in Latin America. We examined the potential effects of different harvesting regimes on the population dynamics of the epiphytic bromeliads Tillandsia multicaulis and Tillandsia punctulata. The population dynamics of these species were studied over a 2-year period in a tropical montane cloud forest in Veracruz, Mexico. Prospective and retrospective analyses were used to identify which demographic processes and life-cycle stages make the largest relative contribution to variation in population growth rate (λ). The effect of simulated harvesting levels on population growth rates was analysed for both species. λ of both populations was highly influenced by survival (stasis), to a lesser extent by growth, and only slightly by fecundity. Vegetative growth played a central role in the population dynamics of these organisms. The λ value of the studied populations did not differ significantly from unity: T. multicaulis λ (95% confidence interval) = 0.982 (0.897-1.060) and T. punctulata λ = 0.967 (0.815-1.051), suggesting population stability. However, numerical simulation of different levels of extraction showed that λ would drop substantially even under very low (2%) harvesting levels. Matrix analysis revealed that T. multicaulis and T. punctulata populations are likely to decline and therefore commercial harvesting would be unsustainable. Based on these findings, management recommendations are outlined.

  5. Alteration of Hormonal Levels in a Rootless Epiphytic Bromeliad in Different Phenological Phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier; Endres

    1999-11-01

    Major changes in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and cytokinin (CK) levels occur at different phenological phases of Tillandsia recurvata shoots. This epiphytic rootless bromeliad was chosen as suitable material for hormonal analysis because CK synthesis is restricted to the shoots, thus avoiding problems in the interpretation of results caused by translocation and interconversion of CK forms between roots and leaves encountered in plants with both organs. Young plants of T. recurvata have weak apical dominance because side shoots appeared early in development, and branch growth was correlated with a strong increase in the level of zeatin. The flowering phase was characterized by a significant increase in free base CKs, zeatin, and isopentenyladenine compared with the levels found in adult vegetative shoots. In contrast, both free-base CKs declined in the fruiting phenological phase, and the IAA level increased dramatically. It was concluded that in phases characterized by intense organ formation, such as in the juvenile and flowering stages, there was an enhancement of CK content, mainly caused by zeatin, leading to a lower IAA/CK ratio. Higher ratios were correlated with phases that showed no organogenesis, such as adult and fruiting phenologies.

  6. Ecophysiology of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüttge, Ulrich

    2004-06-01

    Crassulacean Acid Metabolism (CAM) as an ecophysiological modification of photosynthetic carbon acquisition has been reviewed extensively before. Cell biology, enzymology and the flow of carbon along various pathways and through various cellular compartments have been well documented and discussed. The present attempt at reviewing CAM once again tries to use a different approach, considering a wide range of inputs, receivers and outputs. Input is given by a network of environmental parameters. Six major ones, CO(2), H(2)O, light, temperature, nutrients and salinity, are considered in detail, which allows discussion of the effects of these factors, and combinations thereof, at the individual plant level ('physiological aut-ecology'). Receivers of the environmental cues are the plant types genotypes and phenotypes, the latter including morphotypes and physiotypes. CAM genotypes largely remain 'black boxes', and research endeavours of genomics, producing mutants and following molecular phylogeny, are just beginning. There is no special development of CAM morphotypes except for a strong tendency for leaf or stem succulence with large cells with big vacuoles and often, but not always, special water storage tissues. Various CAM physiotypes with differing degrees of CAM expression are well characterized. Output is the shaping of habitats, ecosystems and communities by CAM. A number of systems are briefly surveyed, namely aquatic systems, deserts, salinas, savannas, restingas, various types of forests, inselbergs and paramós. While quantitative census data for CAM diversity and biomass are largely missing, intuition suggests that the larger CAM domains are those systems which are governed by a network of interacting stress factors requiring versatile responses and not systems where a single stress factor strongly prevails. CAM is noted to be a strategy for variable, flexible and plastic niche occupation rather than lush productivity. 'Physiological syn-ecology' reveals

  7. Yeasts and coliform bacteria of water accumulated in bromeliads of mangrove and sand dune ecosystems of southeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, A N; Rosa, C A; Morais, P B; Mendonça-Hagler, L C; Franco, G M; Araujo, F V; Soares, C A

    1993-10-01

    Yeasts and coliform bacteria were isolated from water that accumulated in the central cups and adjacent leaf axilae of two bromeliads, Neoregelia cruenta of a coastal sand dune and Quesnelia quesneliana of a mangrove ecosystem near the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The mean total coliform counts were above 10,000 per 100 mL for waters of both plants, but the mean fecal coliform counts were only 74 per 100 mL for Q. quesneliana and mostly undetected in water from N. cruenta. Of 90 fecal coliform isolates, 51 were typical of Escherichia coli in colony morphology and indol, methyl red, Volges-Proskauer, and citrate (IMViC) tests. Seven representatives of the typical E. coli cultures were identified as this species, but the identifications of nine other coliform bacteria were mostly dubious. The yeast community of N. cruenta was typical of plant surfaces with basidiomycetous yeasts anamorphs, and the black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans was prevalent. Quesnelia quesneliana had a substantial proportion of ascomycetous yeasts and their anamorphs, including a probable new biotype of Saccharomyces unisporus. Our results suggested that the microbial communities in bromeliad waters are typically autochtonous and not contaminants.

  8. CAM Stochastic Volatility Model for Option Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwan Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The coupled additive and multiplicative (CAM noises model is a stochastic volatility model for derivative pricing. Unlike the other stochastic volatility models in the literature, the CAM model uses two Brownian motions, one multiplicative and one additive, to model the volatility process. We provide empirical evidence that suggests a nontrivial relationship between the kurtosis and skewness of asset prices and that the CAM model is able to capture this relationship, whereas the traditional stochastic volatility models cannot. We introduce a control variate method and Monte Carlo estimators for some of the sensitivities (Greeks of the model. We also derive an approximation for the characteristic function of the model.

  9. Camshaft bearing arrangement for overhead cam engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, M.

    1985-01-01

    In an assembly for an internal combustion engine comprising a cylinder block, a cylinder head detachably affixed to the cylinder block by a plurality of threaded fastening means, a plurality of poppet valves supported for reciprocation in the cylinder head and a camshaft for operating the poppet valves, the improvement is described comprising a cam carrier detachably affixed to the cylinder head and overlying the threaded fastening means, and a bearing cap affixed to the cam carrier. The cam carrier and the bearing cap have bearing surfaces for journaling the camshaft.

  10. Species Composition and Ecological Aspects of Immature Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae in Bromeliads in Urban Parks in the City of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Ceretti-Junior

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bromeliads can be epiphytic, terrestrial or saxicolous and use strategies to allow water to be re­tained in their leaf axils, where various arthropods can be found. These include mosquitoes, whose larvae are the most abundant and commonly found organisms in the leaf axils. The objective of this study was to look for im­mature forms of mosquitoes (the larval and pupal stages in bromeliads in municipal parks in São Paulo and to discuss the ecological and epidemiological importance of these insects.Methods: From October 2010 to July 2013, immature mosquitoes were collected from bromeliads in 65 munici­pal parks in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, using suction samplers. The immature forms were maintained until adult forms emerged, and these were then identified morphologically.Results: Two thousand forty-two immature-stage specimens belonging to the genera Aedes, Culex, Trichoprosopon, Toxorhynchites, Limatus and Wyeomyia were found in bromeliads in 15 of the 65 parks visited. Aedes albopictus was the most abundant species (660 specimens collected, followed by Culex quinquefasciatus (548 specimens and Cx. (Microculex imitator (444. The taxa with the most widespread distribution were Ae. aegypti and Toxorhynchites spp, followed by Ae. albopictus and Cx. quinquefasciatus.Conclusion: Bromeliads in urban parks are refuges for populations of native species of Culicidae and breeding sites for exotic species that are generally of epidemiological interest. Hence, administrators and surveillance and mosquito-control agencies must constantly monitor these microenvironments as the presence of these species endangers the health of park users and employees as well as people living near the parks. 

  11. A study on copper and zinc effects in the growth of Aechmea blanchetiana (Baker) L.B. Smith seedlings cultivated in vitro. Application of neutron activation analysis; Estudo sobre os efeitos do cobre e zinco no crescimento da plantula de Aechmea blanchetiana (Baker) L.B. Smith cultivada in vitro. Aplicacao da analise por ativacao com neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zampieri, Maria Cristina Tessari

    2010-07-01

    Metals are components of the biosphere, occurring naturally in soil and plants, but as a result of human actions, their levels have been greatly increased, depending on the region. Copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) are essential for the growth and development of plants, however if in excess become toxic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of plants to absorb Cu and Zn and what effects they cause in seedlings cultivated in vitro. The results of this study may contribute primarily in agricultural and environmental research. The plant investigated was the Aechmea blanchetiana species of the Bromeliaceae family. It is a terrestrial or epiphytic species used as an ornamental plant. The cultivation of seedlings for this study and their exposure to different concentrations of Cu and Zn were performed at the Institute of Botany (IBt) of Sao Paulo. After seed germination, the seedlings were transferred for growth in a culture media containing different concentrations of Cu or Zn. After this period of in vitro cultivation, the seedlings were analyzed for morphometry, anatomy and by neutron activation analysis. Quality control of the results from neutron activation analysis was carried out by the analysis of certified reference materials. The data obtained showed good precision and accuracy for several elements determined. The highest concentrations of Cu used in the exposure were those that caused major structural changes in morphometric and anatomical parameters, however for the Zn no significant differences were verified for most parameters. The A. blanchetiana proved to be a bioaccumulator species of Zn, absorbing high levels of this element in the aerial parts and roots. (author)

  12. AFSC/FMA/CAMS Data Objects

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CAMS system consists of a set of tables and packages that provide authentication services to all other North Pacific Groundfish and Halibut Observing Program...

  13. CAMS: OLAPing Multidimensional Data Streams Efficiently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzocrea, Alfredo

    In the context of data stream research, taming the multidimensionality of real-life data streams in order to efficiently support OLAP analysis/mining tasks is a critical challenge. Inspired by this fundamental motivation, in this paper we introduce CAMS (C ube-based A cquisition model for M ultidimensional S treams), a model for efficiently OLAPing multidimensional data streams. CAMS combines a set of data stream processing methodologies, namely (i) the OLAP dimension flattening process, which allows us to obtain dimensionality reduction of multidimensional data streams, and (ii) the OLAP stream aggregation scheme, which aggregates data stream readings according to an OLAP-hierarchy-based membership approach. We complete our analytical contribution by means of experimental assessment and analysis of both the efficiency and the scalability of OLAPing capabilities of CAMS on synthetic multidimensional data streams. Both analytical and experimental results clearly connote CAMS as an enabling component for next-generation Data Stream Management Systems.

  14. CAM and stack air sampler design guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, T.D.

    1994-01-01

    About 128 air samplers and CAMs presently in service to detect and document potential radioactive release from 'H' and 'F' area tank farm ventilation stacks are scheduled for replacement and/or upgrade by Projects S-5764, S-2081, S-3603, and S-4516. The seven CAMs scheduled to be upgraded by Project S-4516 during 1995 are expected to provide valuable experience for the three remaining projects. The attached document provides design guidance for the standardized High Level Waste air sampling system

  15. Model Documentation for the MiniCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenkert, Antoinette L.; Smith, Steven J.; Kim, Son H.; Pitcher, Hugh M.

    2003-07-17

    The MiniCAM, short for the Mini-Climate Assessment Model, is an integrated assessment model of moderate complexity focused on energy and agriculture sectors. The model produces emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide) and other radiatively important substances such as sulfur dioxide. Through incorporation of the simple climate model MAGICC, the consequences of these emissions for climate change and sea-level rise can be examined. The MiniCAM is designed to be fast and flexible.

  16. Immunomodulation of Autoimmune Arthritis by Herbal CAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaprasad H. Venkatesha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a debilitating autoimmune disease of global prevalence. The disease is characterized by synovial inflammation leading to cartilage and bone damage. Most of the conventional drugs used for the treatment of RA have severe adverse reactions and are quite expensive. Over the years, increasing proportion of patients with RA and other immune disorders are resorting to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for their health needs. Natural plant products comprise one of the most popular CAM for inflammatory and immune disorders. These herbal CAM belong to diverse traditional systems of medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, Kampo, and Ayurvedic medicine. In this paper, we have outlined the major immunological pathways involved in the induction and regulation of autoimmune arthritis and described various herbal CAM that can effectively modulate these immune pathways. Most of the information about the mechanisms of action of herbal products in the experimental models of RA is relevant to arthritis patients as well. The study of immunological pathways coupled with the emerging application of genomics and proteomics in CAM research is likely to provide novel insights into the mechanisms of action of different CAM modalities.

  17. Chiropractic and CAM Utilization: A Descriptive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeker William C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions Data Sources A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. Data Selection A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Data Synthesis Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Results Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Conclusion Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine.

  18. Genomic analyses of the CAM plant pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jisen; Liu, Juan; Ming, Ray

    2014-07-01

    The innovation of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis in arid and/or low CO2 conditions is a remarkable case of adaptation in flowering plants. As the most important crop that utilizes CAM photosynthesis, the genetic and genomic resources of pineapple have been developed over many years. Genetic diversity studies using various types of DNA markers led to the reclassification of the two genera Ananas and Pseudananas and nine species into one genus Ananas and two species, A. comosus and A. macrodontes with five botanical varieties in A. comosus. Five genetic maps have been constructed using F1 or F2 populations, and high-density genetic maps generated by genotype sequencing are essential resources for sequencing and assembling the pineapple genome and for marker-assisted selection. There are abundant expression sequence tag resources but limited genomic sequences in pineapple. Genes involved in the CAM pathway has been analysed in several CAM plants but only a few of them are from pineapple. A reference genome of pineapple is being generated and will accelerate genetic and genomic research in this major CAM crop. This reference genome of pineapple provides the foundation for studying the origin and regulatory mechanism of CAM photosynthesis, and the opportunity to evaluate the classification of Ananas species and botanical cultivars. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Chiropractic and CAM utilization: a descriptive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Dana J; Meeker, William C

    2007-01-22

    To conduct a descriptive review of the scientific literature examining use rates of modalities and procedures used by CAM clinicians to manage chronic LBP and other conditions A literature of PubMed and MANTIS was performed using the key terms Chiropractic; Low Back Pain; Utilization Rate; Use Rate; Complementary and Alternative Medicine; and Health Services in various combinations. A total of 137 papers were selected, based upon including information about chiropractic utilization, CAM utilization and low back pain and other conditions. Information was extracted from each paper addressing use of chiropractic and CAM, and is summarized in tabular form. Thematic analysis of the paper topics indicated that there were 5 functional areas covered by the literature: back pain papers, general chiropractic papers, insurance-related papers, general CAM-related papers; and worker's compensation papers. Studies looking at chiropractic utilization demonstrate that the rates vary, but generally fall into a range from around 6% to 12% of the population, most of whom seek chiropractic care for low back pain and not for organic disease or visceral dysfunction. CAM is itself used by people suffering from a variety of conditions, though it is often used not as a primary intervention, but rather as an additional form of care. CAM and chiropractic often offer lower costs for comparable results compared to conventional medicine.

  20. A new quantitative classification of ecological types in the bromeliad genus Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae based on trichomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosti Stefano

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Using collection specimens, we measured the density and wing area of trichomes in 37 species of the bromeliad genus Tillandsia, specifically the abaxial proximal, abaxial distal, adaxial proximal and adaxial distal parts of the leaf. The product of the trichome "wing" area by the number of trichomes (means produced a pure number (T that was correlated to ecological features. The correlation was positive with respect to arid environments (xeric Tillands and negative with respect to humid environments (mesic Tillands. Bulbous, and particularly myrmecophytic species and species with tanks, represented particular categories. Other intermediate types were identified based on the T number, totalling five ecological types. In comparison with other systems of ecological typification for Tillands and other Bromeliaceae, the present system offers measurable data whose analysis is reproducible. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 191-203. Epub 2008 March 31.Medimos el número por milímetro cuadrado y el área del "ala" (parte móvil de los tricomas en las partes adaxial próxima y distal, y adaxial próxima y distal, de la hoja de 37 especies de bromelias del género Tillandsia. El producto del área del ala para el número de los tricomas (promedio produjo un número puro (T. Hallamos que T se correlaciona con las características ecológicas de las tilandsias investigadas. La correlación es positiva con respecto a ambientes áridos (especies xéricas y negativa con respecto a los ambientes húmedos (especies mésicas. Las especies con bulbo, y particularmente las asociadas con hormigas y especies con de tanque representan categorías particulares. Identificamos otros tipos intermedios, agradando así cinco tipos ecológicos. En comparación con otros sistemas de tipificación ecológica, este sistema ofrece la ventaja de ser reproducible y cuantitativo.

  1. CO2 Acquisition Membrane (CAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Larry W.; Way, J. Douglas; Vlasse, Marcus

    2003-01-01

    The objective of CAM is to develop, test, and analyze thin film membrane materials for separation and purification of carbon dioxide (CO2) from mixtures of gases, such as those found in the Martian atmosphere. The membranes are targeted toward In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) applications that will operate in extraterrestrial environments and support future unmanned and human space missions. A primary application is the Sabatier Electrolysis process that uses Mars atmosphere CO2 as raw material for producing water, oxygen, and methane for rocket fuel and habitat support. Other applications include use as an inlet filter to collect and concentrate Mars atmospheric argon and nitrogen gases for habitat pressurization, and to remove CO2 from breathing gases in Closed Environment Life Support Systems (CELSS). CAM membrane materials include crystalline faujasite (FAU) zeolite and rubbery polymers such as silicone rubber (PDMS) that have been shown in the literature and via molecular simulation to favor adsorption and permeation of CO2 over nitrogen and argon. Pure gas permeation tests using commercial PDMS membranes have shown that both CO2 permeance and the separation factor relative to other gases increase as the temperature decreases, and low (Delta)P(Sub CO2) favors higher separation factors. The ideal CO2/N2 separation factor increases from 7.5 to 17.5 as temperature decreases from 22 C to -30 C. For gas mixtures containing CO2, N2, and Ar, plasticization decreased the separation factors from 4.5 to 6 over the same temperature range. We currently synthesize and test our own Na(+) FAU zeolite membranes using standard formulations and secondary growth methods on porous alumina. Preliminary tests with a Na(+) FAU membrane at 22 C show a He/SF6 ideal separation factor of 62, exceeding the Knudsen diffusion selectivity by an order of magnitude. This shows that the membrane is relatively free from large defects and associated non-selective (viscous flow) transport

  2. Characterization of SynCAM surface trafficking using a SynCAM derived ligand with high homophilic binding affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breillat, Christelle; Thoumine, Olivier; Choquet, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    In order to better probe SynCAM function in neurons, we produced a fusion protein between the extracellular domain of SynCAM1 and the constant fragment of human IgG (SynCAM-Fc). Whether in soluble form or immobilized on latex microspheres, the chimera bound specifically to the surface of hippocampal neurons and recruited endogenous SynCAM molecules. SynCAM-Fc was also used in combination with Quantum Dots to follow the mobility of transfected SynCAM receptors at the neuronal surface. Both immobile and highly mobile SynCAM were found. Thus, SynCAM-Fc behaves as a high affinity ligand that can be used to study the function of SynCAM at the neuronal membrane

  3. Different in the dark: The effect of habitat characteristics on community composition and beta diversity in bromeliad microfauna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Busse

    Full Text Available The mechanisms which structure communities have been the focus of a large body of research. Here, we address the question if habitat characteristics describing habitat quality may drive changes in community composition and beta diversity of bromeliad-inhabiting microfauna. In our system, changes in canopy cover along an environmental gradient may affect resource availability, disturbance in form of daily water temperature fluctuations and predation, and thus may lead to changes in community structure of bromeliad microfauna through differences in habitat quality along this gradient. Indeed, we observed distinct changes in microfauna community composition along the environmental gradient explained by changes in the extent of daily water temperature fluctuations. We found beta diversity to be higher under low habitat quality (low canopy cover than under high habitat quality (high canopy cover, which could potentially be explained by a higher relative importance of stochastic processes under low habitat quality. We also partitioned beta diversity into turnover and nestedness components and we found a nested pattern of beta diversity along the environmental gradient, with communities from the lower-quality habitat being nested subsets of communities from the higher-quality habitat. However, this pattern resulted from an increase in microfauna alpha diversity with an increase in habitat quality. By providing insights into microfauna-environment relationships our results contribute to the mechanistic understanding of community dynamics in small freshwater bodies. Here, we highlight the importance of habitat characteristics representing habitat quality in structuring communities, and suggest that this information may help to improve conservation practices of small freshwater ecosystems.

  4. Different in the dark: The effect of habitat characteristics on community composition and beta diversity in bromeliad microfauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiqueira, Pablo A. P.; Neutzling, Alexandre S.; Wolf, Anna M.; Romero, Gustavo Q.; Petermann, Jana S.

    2018-01-01

    The mechanisms which structure communities have been the focus of a large body of research. Here, we address the question if habitat characteristics describing habitat quality may drive changes in community composition and beta diversity of bromeliad-inhabiting microfauna. In our system, changes in canopy cover along an environmental gradient may affect resource availability, disturbance in form of daily water temperature fluctuations and predation, and thus may lead to changes in community structure of bromeliad microfauna through differences in habitat quality along this gradient. Indeed, we observed distinct changes in microfauna community composition along the environmental gradient explained by changes in the extent of daily water temperature fluctuations. We found beta diversity to be higher under low habitat quality (low canopy cover) than under high habitat quality (high canopy cover), which could potentially be explained by a higher relative importance of stochastic processes under low habitat quality. We also partitioned beta diversity into turnover and nestedness components and we found a nested pattern of beta diversity along the environmental gradient, with communities from the lower-quality habitat being nested subsets of communities from the higher-quality habitat. However, this pattern resulted from an increase in microfauna alpha diversity with an increase in habitat quality. By providing insights into microfauna-environment relationships our results contribute to the mechanistic understanding of community dynamics in small freshwater bodies. Here, we highlight the importance of habitat characteristics representing habitat quality in structuring communities, and suggest that this information may help to improve conservation practices of small freshwater ecosystems. PMID:29401522

  5. Kerteszia Theobald (Diptera: Culicidae) mosquitoes and bromeliads: A landscape ecology approach regarding two species in the Atlantic rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Leonardo Suveges Moreira; Rodrigues de Sá, Ivy Luizi; Bergamaschi, Denise Pimentel; Sallum, Maria Anice Mureb

    2016-12-01

    On the ecological scale of an organism, a homogeneous geographical landscape can represent a mosaic of heterogeneous landscapes. The bionomy of Kerteszia mosquitoes can contribute to foundation landscape ecology by virtue of in the role of the configuration and composition of the habitat played in the distribution of mosquito species. Thus, this study aimed: to compare the abundance of Kerteszia in dense tropical rainforest, restinga and rural area, to assess the bioecological characteristics of the main bromeliads hosting Kerteszia, and to associate the bioecological arrangement of the bromeliads with Kerteszia distribution. Field collections were conducted in a monthly schedule from December of 2010 to November 2011. The vegetation of landscapes was characterized on the basis of a digital cartographic database, the manual of the Brazilian vegetation, environmental atlas information, satellite images and visits to the sites. Multivariate generalized linear models were employed using the R-project statistical program. The results were: Anopheles cruzii was the most frequent species in dense tropical rainforest (67.42%), with a positive association (deviance=25.8; P=0.002). Anopheles bellator was more abundant in the Restinga area (78.97%), with a positive association (deviance=10.4, P=0.018). There was a positive aggregation of Restinga with An. bellator (RR=2.42) but a lower level with An. cruzii (RR=0.31). Thus we can conclude that landscape characteristics influence the distribution of Kerteszia mosquitoes. An. bellator has a higher prevalence in Restinga areas, whereas An. cruzii was the most prevalent in the dense tropical rainforest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of CAM therapy: understanding the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2011-02-01

    By definition, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) attempts to diagnose and treat illnesses in unconventional ways. CAM has been classified as: (1) alternative medical systems (eg, traditional Chinese medicine [including acupuncture], naturopathic medicine, ayurvedic medicine, and homeopathy); (2) biologic-based therapies (eg, herbal, special dietary, and individual biologic treatments); (3) energy therapies (eg, Reiki, therapeutic touch, magnet therapy, Qi Gong, and intercessory prayer); (4) manipulative and body-based systems (eg, chiropractic, osteopathy, and massage); and (5) mind-body interventions (eg, meditation, biofeedback, hypnotherapy, and the relaxation response). This review focuses on how to assess the effectiveness of CAM therapies for chronic musculoskeletal pains, emphasizing the role of specific and nonspecific analgesic mechanisms, including placebo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Innovative Radiation Hardened CAM Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This article describes an innovative Content Addressable Memory (CAM) cell with radiation hardened (RH) architecture. The RH-CAM is designed in a commercial 28 nm CMOS technology. The circuit has been simulated in worst-case conditions, and the effects due to single particles have been analyzed by injecting a current pulse into a circuit node. The proposed architecture is suitable for on-time pattern recognition tasks in harsh environments, such as front-end electronics in hadron colliders and in space applications.

  8. What´s in the tank? Nematodes and other major components of the meiofauna of bromeliad phytotelms in lowland Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotz, Gerhard; Traunspurger, Walter

    2016-03-15

    Nematodes are a very diverse and extremely abundant group of animals, but their occurrence in the tropics is surprisingly little understood. We investigated the meiofauna of epiphytic tank bromeliads in the lowlands of Panama with particular emphasis on nematodes. We encountered 89 morphospecies of nematodes in 54 bromeliad tanks, which were sampled in the wet and the dry season. Rotifers were by far the most abundant group in both the dry and the wet season (with up to 960 individual ml(-1)), followed by nematodes, annelids and harpacticoid copepods. Individual plants hosted up to 25 nematode species. These nematodes represented a diversity of feeding guilds, suction-feeders and deposit-feeders being most abundant. The relative abundances of feeding-types of nematodes differed considerably in the wet and dry season. Both species richness and abundance were strongly correlated with the size of the phytotelms and the season, while species diversity assessed with the Shannon-index was affected by neither of the two. This is the first study with a particular focus on the diversity of nematodes in tank bromeliads. We document a meiofauna of considerable abundance and diversity, which suggests important functional roles in ecological processes such as decomposition, which in turn warrants further study.

  9. Patients’ views of CAM as spiritual practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Anita; Evron, Lotte; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann

    2011-01-01

    significantly elaborated upon in narratives by four female participants to warrant more detailed consideration and analysis. Conclusion: It is suggested that for some cancer patients CAM may function, not just as a treatment for cancer related symptoms and side effects, but also as a form of spiritual practice...

  10. CAM: A Collaborative Object Memory System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Nijholt, Antinus; Kröner, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Physical design objects such as sketches, drawings, collages, storyboards and models play an important role in supporting communication and coordination in design studios. CAM (Cooperative Artefact Memory) is a mobile-tagging based messaging system that allows designers to collaboratively store

  11. performance characteristics of a cam turning attachment

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    ABSTRACT. A modification of a cylindrical turning unit has been done to give a non- cylindrical turning attachment for production of irregular shapes, like cams on the lathe machine. To assess the performance of the attachment, cutting forces have been measured using a 'Sigma' Cutting Tool. Dynamometer. Furthermore ...

  12. Extrativismo de bromélias no Estado do Paraná Bromeliads wild harvesting in State of Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rejane Bonato Negrelle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Visando a contribuir para o melhor entendimento da participação da atividade extrativista no âmbito da comercialização de bromélias no Brasil, apresentou-se resultado de pesquisa que buscou: a identificar e caracterizar os extrativistas de bromélias formalmente registrados e os informais no Estado do Paraná; b identificar e caracterizar as metodologias de coleta, o preparo e vias de comercialização das plantas coletadas; c levantar a opinião dos extrativistas sobre facilidades e dificuldades desta atividade. O extrativismo de bromélias no Paraná foi identificado em 12 municípios, englobando 31 famílias extratoras, predominantemente concentradas no litoral do Paraná (n=10 e Município de Ortigueira (n=7. Foram identificados dois tipos básicos de extrativistas: residente e oportunista, com diferenças marcantes entre estes, especialmente no que se refere a volume e forma de extração. Foram identificadas 21 espécies submetidas ao extrativismo, sendo as mais frequentemente coletadas: Vriesea incurvata Gaudich. comercializada por 90% dos entrevistados, Nidularium innocentii Lem. (77%, Vriesea platynema Gaudich. (67%, Tillandsia stricta Sol. ex Ker Gawl. (55% e Vriesea carinata Lem. (55%.Aiming to contribute to the better understanding of the wild harvesting participation in the context of the bromeliads trade, the results from a study focused on: a identifying and to characterizing the bromeliads wild harvesters (formally and not formally registered in the State of the Paraná; b identifying and characterizing the harvesting methodologies, preparation and trade routes, and c surveying the harvesters opinion on the facilities and difficulties of bromeliads wild harvesting are presented. The bromeliads wild harvesting was detected in 12 municipalities at Parana State, involving 31 harvester families, most of them concentrated at the coastal zone (n=10 and Ortigueira Mun. (7. Two basic harvester types were identified: resident and

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use of women with breast cancer : Self-help CAM attracts other women than guided CAM therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N. N.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Henselmans, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Examine stability of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) of breast cancer patients, reasons for CAM use, and sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological predictors of CAM use. Methods: CAM use was assessed after adjuvant therapy and six months later. Following the CAM

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine use of women with breast cancer: Self-help CAM attracts other women than guided CAM therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N. N.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Henselmans, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Examine stability of use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) of breast cancer patients, reasons for CAM use, and sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological predictors of CAM use. Methods: CAM use was assessed after adjuvant therapy and six months later. Following the CAM

  15. Knowledge and training needs among Danish nurses about CAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita

    2010-01-01

    to explore nurses’ knowledge about CAM and their needs for training. Methods: Similar to international investigations a Danish “CAM-knowledge” questionnaire was developed that included multiple choice, yes/no and 5 points scale answers. Validity was established through initial pilot testing. Contacts...... to a randomized sample of 2500 nurses were established through the Danish Nurses Foundation. The questionnaires were mailed by post with the possibility of anonymous return. The data material was analyzed using non-parametic methods. Results: The response rate was 67 % and 1458 completed questionnaires were...... of CAM also tend to have a theoretical background of CAM. Around 75 % of the nurses agree or partly agree that it is important for nurses to receive education about CAM and that nurses have knowledge about CAM that enables them to advise patients. Training needs concerning CAM were indicated by 52...

  16. Introduction to Analytical Methods for Internal Combustion Engine Cam Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, J J

    2013-01-01

    Modern design methods of Automotive Cam Design require the computation of a range of parameters. This book provides a logical sequence of steps for the derivation of the relevant equations from first principles, for the more widely used cam mechanisms. Although originally derived for use in high performance engines, this work is equally applicable to the design of mass produced automotive and other internal combustion engines.   Introduction to Analytical Methods for Internal Combustion Engine Cam Mechanisms provides the equations necessary for the design of cam lift curves with an associated smooth acceleration curve. The equations are derived for the kinematics and kinetics of all the mechanisms considered, together with those for cam curvature and oil entrainment velocity. This permits the cam shape, all loads, and contact stresses to be evaluated, and the relevant tribology to be assessed. The effects of asymmetry on the manufacture of cams for finger follower and offset translating curved followers is ...

  17. Starch distribution in anthers, microspores and pollen grains in Aechmea recurvata (Klotzsch. L.B.Sm., Dyckia racinae L.B.Sm. and Tillandsia aeranthos (Loisel. L.B.Sm. (Bromeliaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Marcelo Santos de Oliveira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative description of the starch distribution in the anthers, microspores and pollen grains of Aechmea recurvata, Dyckia racinae and Tillandsia aeranthos. Flowers at different stages of development were processed according to plant microtechniques for observation by light microscope. Ten stages of embryological development were used as references for the comparative analysis of starch distribution and dynamics. The structural data showed a greater starch accumulation in the parietal layers and connective of D. racinae. It was observed that in the species studied, starch began to accumulate in microspore mother cell stage. The pollen grains in D. racinae and in T. aeranthos present two amylogenesis-amylolysis cycles, while A. recurvata presents only one. One amylogenesis-amylolysis cycle occurs in the parietal layers and/or connective tissue in all three species. The pollen grains in the three species are dispersed without starch and are characterized as the starchless type. Starch dynamics presents a close relation to the development of sporangia, microspores and pollen grains. It is believed that differences in the starch distribution and accumulation are related to the abiotic factors where the species are found.

  18. Search for rapid variability of 53 Cam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zverko, J.

    1982-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of magnetic Ap star 53 Cam made at the Skalnate Pleso Observatory in 1978 and 1979 are analyzed from the point of view of rapid variability. The observations were made with an intermediate passband filter, effective wavelength 526 nm. Besides the differences msub(53Cam)-msub(Comp), the behaviour was also investigated of the deflections for the comparison star during the observation runs. A strong correlation between the behaviour of the comparison and variable star light curve was found and the appearance differs from night to night depending on atmospheric conditions. Each observation run is analyzed in detail and it was concluded that all observed variations are only apparent and due to the variability of atmospheric extinction above the observation site. (author)

  19. CAD/CAM-assisted breast reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchels, Ferry; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner; Wiggenhauser, Paul Severin; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Warne, David; Barry, Mark; Ong, Fook Rhu; Chong, Woon Shin

    2011-01-01

    The application of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques in the clinic is growing slowly but steadily. The ability to build patient-specific models based on medical imaging data offers major potential. In this work we report on the feasibility of employing laser scanning with CAD/CAM techniques to aid in breast reconstruction. A patient was imaged with laser scanning, an economical and facile method for creating an accurate digital representation of the breasts and surrounding tissues. The obtained model was used to fabricate a customized mould that was employed as an intra-operative aid for the surgeon performing autologous tissue reconstruction of the breast removed due to cancer. Furthermore, a solid breast model was derived from the imaged data and digitally processed for the fabrication of customized scaffolds for breast tissue engineering. To this end, a novel generic algorithm for creating porosity within a solid model was developed, using a finite element model as intermediate.

  20. CAM and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Hankey

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the form of the Transcendental Meditation program CAM offers a method of eliminating deep-rooted stress, the efficacy of which has been demonstrated in several related studies. Any discussion of CAM and post-traumatic stress disorder should include a study of its application to Vietnam War Veterans in which improvements were observed on all variables, and several participants were able to return to work after several years of being unable to hold a job. The intervention has been studied for its impact on brain and autonomic nervous system function. It has been found to be highly effective against other stress-related conditions such as hypertension, and to improve brain coherence—a measure of effective brain function. It should be considered a possible ‘new and improved mode of treatment’ for PTSD, and further studies of its application made.

  1. Drought tolerance associated with vertical stratification of two co-occurring epiphytic bromeliads in a tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Eric A; Andrade, Jose Luis

    2004-05-01

    Vertical stratification of epiphytes generally has not been reported for dry forests. For two epiphytic Crassulacean acid metabolism bromeliads that segregate vertically, it was hypothesized that different potentials for photoprotection or shade tolerance rather than drought tolerance is responsible for the observed stratification. The light environment, capacity for photoprotection, germination response to light quality, and responses to light and drought were thus examined for Tillandsia brachycaulos and T. elongata. Vertical and light-environment distributions differed for the two species but photoprotection and photodamage did not where they occurred at similar field locations; T. brachycaulos had a higher pigment acclimation to light. Tillandsia brachycaulos had higher acid accumulation under low light as opposed to T. elongata, which responded similarly to all but the highest light treatment. Tillandsia brachycaulos maintained positive total daily net CO(2) uptake through 30 d of drought; T. elongata had a total daily net CO(2) loss after 7 d of drought. The vertical stratification was most likely the result of the sensitivity to drought of T. elongata rather than differences in photoprotection or shade tolerance between the two species. Tillandsia elongata occurs in more exposed locations, which may be advantageous for rainfall interception and dew formation.

  2. High but not dry: diverse epiphytic bromeliad adaptations to exposure within a seasonally dry tropical forest community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-García, C; Mejia-Chang, M; Griffiths, H

    2012-02-01

    • Vascular epiphytes have developed distinct lifeforms to maximize water uptake and storage, particularly when delivered as pulses of precipitation, dewfall or fog. The seasonally dry forest of Chamela, Mexico, has a community of epiphytic bromeliads with Crassulacean acid metabolism showing diverse morphologies and stratification within the canopy. We hypothesize that niche differentiation may be related to the capacity to use fog and dew effectively to perform photosynthesis and to maintain water status. • Four Tillandsia species with either 'tank' or 'atmospheric' lifeforms were studied using seasonal field data and glasshouse experimentation, and compared on the basis of water use, leaf water δ(18) O, photosynthetic and morphological traits. • The atmospheric species, Tillandsia eistetteri, with narrow leaves and the lowest succulence, was restricted to the upper canopy, but displayed the widest range of physiological responses to pulses of precipitation and fog, and was a fog-catching 'nebulophyte'. The other atmospheric species, Tillandsia intermedia, was highly succulent, restricted to the lower canopy and with a narrower range of physiological responses. Both upper canopy tank species relied on tank water and stomatal closure to avoid desiccation. • Niche differentiation was related to capacity for water storage, dependence on fog or dewfall and physiological plasticity. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Generous-like flowers: nectar production in two epiphytic bromeliads and a meta-analysis of removal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordano, Mariano; Ornelas, Juan Francisco

    2004-08-01

    Animal-pollinated angiosperm plants that respond positively to nectar removal by replenishment invest energy that can entail a reproductive cost. We investigated whether or not nectar removal stimulates replenishment in two hummingbird-pollinated bromeliad species. Nectar replenishment rates were also assessed by removing nectar from manually pollinated flowers because pollination events might be used as signals to save energy by preventing allocation to post-pollination nectar production. Then we synthesized the current understanding of nectar removal effects by reviewing existing published studies with a meta-analysis. The magnitude and significance of estimated nectar removal effects and factors associated with variation in size and direction of nectar removal effects were elucidated with the meta-analysis. We found that both Tillandsia species strongly respond to repeated nectar removal by producing >3 times additional nectar. Nectar secretion patterns were not altered by pollination (stigmatic pollen deposition) and we found no evidence of nectar reabsorption. Although the effect size varied widely across systems and/or environmental conditions, the meta-analysis showed that nectar removal had overall a positive effect on nectar replenishment (mainly among species inhabiting wet tropical habitats such as Tillandsia), and a negative effect on the secretion of additional sugar, suggesting that those plants are resource limited and conservative in the secretion of additional sugar.

  4. Camões e a cosmogonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J. M.

    2003-08-01

    Os Lusíadas, escrito por Luis de Camões em 1572, é um poema épico renascentista e a visão Cosmogônica do autor é apresentada, principalmente, no último canto do poema, quando Tétis mostra ao Gama a Máquina do Mundo. A Cosmogonia de Camões neste poema reflete uma visão de uma época de transição, que ainda não incorporou os elementos da revolução Copernicana. É uma visão Grego- Ptolomaica e também medieval. O poeta guia-se pela tradução e notas feita por Pedro Nunes, inventor do Nonio, do Tratado da Esfera "De Sphaera" do Astrônomo Inglês John Holywood, mais conhecido pelo nome latinizado de Johannes Sacrobosco. Outra provável fonte de Camões, de acordo com Luciano Antonio Pereira da Silva em Astronomia de os Lusíadas, é o "Theoricae novae Planetarum" (1460) do astrólogo Alemão Jorge Purbáquio (1423 - 1461). A Astronomia de Os Lusíadas representa a ciência do tempo de Camões. Camões nunca emprega a palavra constelação e seu catálogo é bastante completo. A Máquina do Mundo tem a Terra no centro. Em redor, em círculos concêntricos, a lua (Diana), Mercúrio, Vênus, o Sol (Febo), Marte, Júpiter e Saturno. Envolvendo estes astros tem o firmamento seguido pelo "Céu Áqueo" ou cristalino, depois o 1o Móbil, esfera que arrasta todas as outras consigo. Este trabalho, multidisciplinar, serve tanto para ensinar aos alunos da Física como das Ciências Humanas, a concepção de mundo do renascimento de uma forma belamente poética em versos decassílabos Este trabalho também ajuda na apreciação do maior clássico da língua portuguesa e mostra como as Ciências e as artes, em geral, estão correlacionadas e refletem a visão de mundo da época em que foi produzida.

  5. Availability Analysis of the Ventilation Stack CAM Interlock System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YOUNG, J.

    2000-01-01

    Ventilation Stack Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) Interlock System failure modes, failure frequencies and system availability have been evaluated for the RPP. The evaluation concludes that CAM availability is as high as assumed in the safety analysis and that the current routine system surveillance is adequate to maintain this availability. Further, requiring an alarm to actuate upon CAM failure is not necessary to maintain the availability credited in the safety analysis, nor is such an arrangement predicted to significantly improve system availability. However, if CAM failures were only detected by the 92-day functional tests required in the Authorization Basis (AB), CAM availability would be much less than that credited in the safety analysis. Therefore it is recommended that the current surveillance practice of daily simple system checks, 30-day source checks and 92-day functional tests be continued in order to maintain CAM availability

  6. Laia de Camões — O épico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lygia Alvares Correa

    1951-06-01

    Full Text Available CIDADE ('liernatii. Laia de Camões — O épico, Revista da Faculdade  de Letras. Tomo XVI. 2.°' série. ns. I e 2. Universidade de Lisboa  1950. (Primeiro Parágrafo do Artigo Este segundo volume que a respeito de Camões escreve o Prof. Cidade surge 14 anos após, "Luiz de Camões".

  7. Test plan for FY-91 alpha CAM evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1991-03-01

    This report describes the test plan for evaluating the Merlin Gerin, Inc., Edgar alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) and associated analysis system to be conducted by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the Department of Energy. INEL has evaluated other commercial alpha CAM systems to detect transuranic contaminants during waste handling and retrieval operations. This test plan outlines experimental methods, sampling methods, sampling and analysis techniques, and equipment needed and safety and quality requirements to test the commercial CAM. 8 refs., 3 figs

  8. Treatment Preferences for CAM in Children with Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Tsao, Jennie C. I.; Meldrum, Marcia; Kim, Su C.; Jacob, Margaret C.; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2006-01-01

    CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls) (mean age = 14.5 years ± 2.4; range = 8–18 years) presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examin...

  9. QUANTIFICATION OF ANGIOGENESIS IN THE CHICKEN CHORIOALLANTOIC MEMBRANE (CAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blacher

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM provides a suitable in vivo model to study angiogenesis and evaluate several pro- and anti-angiogenic factors and compounds. In the present work, new developments in image analysis are used to quantify CAM angiogenic response from optical microscopic observations, covering all vascular components, from the large supplying and feeding vessels down to the capillary plexus. To validate our methodology angiogenesis is quantified during two phases of CAM development (day 7 and 13 and after treatment with an antiangiogenic modulator of the angiogenesis. Our morphometric analysis emphasizes that an accurate quantification of the CAM vasculature needs to be performed at various scales.

  10. Expression, crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of the Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P450cam operon repressor CamR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenaka, Katsumi; Fukushi, Kouji; Aramaki, Hironori; Shirakihara, Yasuo

    2005-01-01

    The P. putida cytochrome P450cam operon repressor CamR has been expressed in E. coli and crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2. The Pseudomonas putida cam repressor (CamR) is a homodimeric protein that binds to the camO DNA operator to inhibit the transcription of the cytochrome P450cam operon camDCAB. CamR has two functional domains: a regulatory domain and a DNA-binding domain. The binding of the inducer d-camphor to the regulatory domain renders the DNA-binding domain unable to bind camO. Native CamR and its selenomethionyl derivative have been overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. Native CamR was crystallized under the following conditions: (i) 12–14% PEG 4000, 50 mM Na PIPES, 0.1 M KCl, 1% glycerol pH 7.3 at 288 K with and without camphor and (ii) 1.6 M P i , 50 mM Na PIPES, 2 mM camphor pH 6.7 at 278 K. The selenomethionyl derivative CamR did not crystallize under either of these conditions, but did crystallize using 12.5% PEG MME 550, 25 mM Na PIPES, 2.5 mM MgCl 2 pH 7.3 at 298 K. Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies revealed the space group to be orthorhombic (P2 1 2 1 2), with unit-cell parameters a = 48.0, b = 73.3, c = 105.7 Å. Native and selenomethionyl derivative data sets were collected to 3 Å resolution at SPring-8 and the Photon Factory

  11. *Abstracts - 7th IN-CAM Research Symposium, Evaluating CAM Practices: Effectiveness, Integration, Economics & Safety - November 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, Heather; Verhoef, Marja J

    2012-10-23

    Abstract The following are abstracts of oral and poster presentations given at the 7th IN-CAM Research Symposium - Evaluating CAM Practices: Effectiveness, Integration, Economics & Safety, and the 4th HomeoNet Research Forum, a pre-Symposium event. The IN-CAM Research Symposium was held November 2 to 4, 2012 at the Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. For more information, please visit: www.incamresearch.ca.

  12. New Content Addressable Memory (CAM) Technologies for Big Data and Intelligent Electronics Enabled by Magneto-Electric Ternary CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-11

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0198 NEW CONTENT ADDRESSABLE MEMORY (CAM) TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIG DATA AND INTELLIGENT ELECTRONICS ENABLED BY MAGNETO-ELECTRIC...MEMORY (CAM) TECHNOLOGIES FOR BIG DATA AND INTELLIGENT ELECTRONICS ENABLED BY MAGNETO-ELECTRIC TERNARY CAM 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-1-7655 5b... electronic applications, such as internet of things, big data, wireless sensors, and mobile devices, have begun to focus on the importance of energy

  13. Edge strength of CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeilschifter, Maria; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Rosentritt, Martin

    2018-05-16

    To investigate the edge force of CAD/CAM materials as a function of (a) material, (b) thickness, and (c) distance from the margin. Materials intended for processing with CAD/CAM were investigated: eight resin composites, one resin-infiltrated ceramic, and a clinically proven lithiumdisilicate ceramic (reference). To measure edge force (that is, load to failure/crack), plates (d = 1 mm) were fixed and loaded with a Vickers diamond indenter (1 mm/min, Zwick 1446) at a distance of 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, 0.9, and 1.0 mm from the edge. Edge force was defined as a loading force at a distance of 0.5 mm. The type of failure was determined. To investigate the influence of the thickness, all data were determined on 1-mm and 2-mm plates. To test the influence of bonding and an underlying dentin, individual 1-mm plates were bonded to a 1-mm-thick dentin-like (concerning modulus of elasticity) resin composite. For the 1-mm plates, edge force varied between 64.4 ± 24.2 N (Shofu Block HC) and 183.2 ± 63.3 N (ceramic reference), with significant (p ≤ 0.001) differences between the materials. For the 2-mm plates, values between 129.2 ± 32.5 N (Lava Ultimate) and 230.3 ± 67.5 N (Cerasmart) were found. Statistical comparison revealed no significant differences (p > 0.109) between the materials. Brilliant Crios (p = 0.023), Enamic (p = 0.000), Shofu Blocks HC (p = 0.009), and Grandio Bloc (p = 0.002) showed significantly different edge force between the 1-mm- and 2-mm-thick plates. The failure pattern was either cracking, (severe) chipping, or fracture. Material, material thickness, and distance from the edge impact the edge force of CAD/CAM materials. CAD/CAM materials should be carefully selected on the basis of their individual edge force and performance during milling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cam-driven monochromator for QEXAFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caliebe, W.A. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); So, I. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Lenhard, A. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Siddons, D.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    We have developed a cam-drive for quickly tuning the energy of an X-ray monochromator through an X-ray absorption edge for quick extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (QEXAFS). The data are collected using a 4-channel, 12-bit multiplexed VME analog to digital converter and a VME angle encoder. The VME crate controller runs a real-time operating system. This system is capable of collecting 2 EXAFS-scans in 1 s with an energy stability of better than 1 eV. Additional improvements to increase the speed and the energy stability are under way.

  15. Cam-driven monochromator for QEXAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliebe, W. A.; So, I.; Lenhard, A.; Siddons, D. P.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a cam-drive for quickly tuning the energy of an X-ray monochromator through an X-ray absorption edge for quick extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (QEXAFS). The data are collected using a 4-channel, 12-bit multiplexed VME analog to digital converter and a VME angle encoder. The VME crate controller runs a real-time operating system. This system is capable of collecting 2 EXAFS-scans in 1 s with an energy stability of better than 1 eV. Additional improvements to increase the speed and the energy stability are under way.

  16. Cam-driven monochromator for QEXAFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliebe, W.A.; So, I.; Lenhard, A.; Siddons, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed a cam-drive for quickly tuning the energy of an X-ray monochromator through an X-ray absorption edge for quick extended X-ray absorption spectroscopy (QEXAFS). The data are collected using a 4-channel, 12-bit multiplexed VME analog to digital converter and a VME angle encoder. The VME crate controller runs a real-time operating system. This system is capable of collecting 2 EXAFS-scans in 1 s with an energy stability of better than 1 eV. Additional improvements to increase the speed and the energy stability are under way

  17. Effect of canopy position on germination and seedling survival of epiphytic bromeliads in a Mexican humid montane forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Manuela; Hülber, Karl; Hietz, Peter

    2005-05-01

    Seeds of epiphytes must land on branches with suitable substrates and microclimates to germinate and for the resulting seedlings to survive. It is important to understand the fate of seeds and seedlings in order to model populations, but this is often neglected when only established plants are included in analyses. The seeds of five bromeliad species were exposed to different canopy positions in a Mexican montane forest, and germination and early seedling survival were recorded. Additionally, the survival of naturally dispersed seedlings was monitored in a census over 2.5 years. Survival analysis, a procedure rarely used in plant ecology, was used to study the influence of branch characteristics and light on germination and seedling survival in natural and experimental populations. Experimental germination percentages ranged from 7.2 % in Tillandsia deppeana to 33.7 % in T. juncea, but the seeds of T. multicaulis largely failed to germinate. Twenty months after exposure between 3.5 and 9.4 % of the seedlings were still alive. There was no evidence that canopy position affected the probability of germination, but time to germination was shorter in less exposed canopy positions indicating that higher humidity accelerates germination. More experimental seedlings survived when canopy openness was high, whereas survival in census-seedlings was influenced by moss cover. While mortality decreased steadily with age in juveniles of the atmospheric Tillandsia, in the more mesomorphic Catopsis sessiliflora mortality increased dramatically in the dry season. Seedling mortality, rather than the failure to germinate, accounts for the differential distribution of epiphytes within the canopy studied. With few safe sites to germinate and high seedling mortality, changes of local climate may affect epiphyte populations primarily through their seedling stage.

  18. Camerobiid mites (Acariformes: Raphignathina: Camerobiidae inhabiting epiphytic bromeliads and soil litter of tropical dry forest with analysis of setal homology in the genus Neophyllobius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Paredes-León

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the camerobiid mites living on epiphytic bromeliads and the forest floor of a Mexican tropical dry forest was carried out. We found three new species of the genus Neophyllobius, which are described in this paper; the first two, namely N. cibyci sp. nov. and N. tepoztlanensis sp. nov., were both found inhabiting bromeliads (Tillandsia spp. and living on two tree species (Quercus obtusata and Sapium macrocarpum; the third, N. tescalicola sp. nov., was found in soil and litter under Q. obtusata. These three new species can be differentiated from other species in the genus by a combination of morphological characters in adult females, mainly those setae on femora and genua I. The idiosoma and leg setal ontogeny of a camerobiid mite is presented for the first time in this paper, illustrating chaetotaxic notations and their relative positions in N. cibyci sp. nov. larva, protonymph and adults (female and male, and establishing setal homologies among instars. Setal homology with other species in the cohort Raphignathina is briefly discussed. Additionally, a compilation and an identification key to all known species of camerobiid mites in Mexico is provided.

  19. GammaCam trademark radiation imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    GammaCam trademark, a gamma-ray imaging system manufactured by AIL System, Inc., would benefit a site that needs to locate radiation sources. It is capable of producing a two-dimensional image of a radiation field superimposed on a black and white visual image. Because the system can be positioned outside the radiologically controlled area, the radiation exposure to personnel is significantly reduced and extensive shielding is not required. This report covers the following topics: technology description; performance; technology applicability and alternatives; cost; regulatory and policy issues; and lessons learned. The demonstration of GammaCam trademark in December 1996 was part of the Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) whose objective is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5). The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that by using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources, significant benefits can be achieved when compared to baseline D and D technologies

  20. Valve cam design using numerical step-by-step method

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilyev, Aleksandr; Bakhracheva, Yuliya; Kabore, Ousman; Zelenskiy, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    This article studies the numerical step-by-step method of cam profile design. The results of the study are used for designing the internal combustion engine valve gear. This method allows to profile the peak efficiency of cams in view of many restrictions, connected with valve gear serviceability and reliability.

  1. The use of economic evaluation in CAM: an introductory framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Emily; Solomon, Daniela; Adams, Jon; Graves, Nicholas

    2010-11-11

    For CAM to feature prominently in health care decision-making there is a need to expand the evidence-base and to further incorporate economic evaluation into research priorities.In a world of scarce health care resources and an emphasis on efficiency and clinical efficacy, CAM, as indeed do all other treatments, requires rigorous evaluation to be considered in budget decision-making. Economic evaluation provides the tools to measure the costs and health consequences of CAM interventions and thereby inform decision making. This article offers CAM researchers an introductory framework for understanding, undertaking and disseminating economic evaluation. The types of economic evaluation available for the study of CAM are discussed, and decision modelling is introduced as a method for economic evaluation with much potential for use in CAM. Two types of decision models are introduced, decision trees and Markov models, along with a worked example of how each method is used to examine costs and health consequences. This is followed by a discussion of how this information is used by decision makers. Undoubtedly, economic evaluation methods form an important part of health care decision making. Without formal training it can seem a daunting task to consider economic evaluation, however, multidisciplinary teams provide an opportunity for health economists, CAM practitioners and other interested researchers, to work together to further develop the economic evaluation of CAM.

  2. The use of economic evaluation in CAM: an introductory framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background For CAM to feature prominently in health care decision-making there is a need to expand the evidence-base and to further incorporate economic evaluation into research priorities. In a world of scarce health care resources and an emphasis on efficiency and clinical efficacy, CAM, as indeed do all other treatments, requires rigorous evaluation to be considered in budget decision-making. Methods Economic evaluation provides the tools to measure the costs and health consequences of CAM interventions and thereby inform decision making. This article offers CAM researchers an introductory framework for understanding, undertaking and disseminating economic evaluation. The types of economic evaluation available for the study of CAM are discussed, and decision modelling is introduced as a method for economic evaluation with much potential for use in CAM. Two types of decision models are introduced, decision trees and Markov models, along with a worked example of how each method is used to examine costs and health consequences. This is followed by a discussion of how this information is used by decision makers. Conclusions Undoubtedly, economic evaluation methods form an important part of health care decision making. Without formal training it can seem a daunting task to consider economic evaluation, however, multidisciplinary teams provide an opportunity for health economists, CAM practitioners and other interested researchers, to work together to further develop the economic evaluation of CAM. PMID:21067622

  3. The use of economic evaluation in CAM: an introductory framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For CAM to feature prominently in health care decision-making there is a need to expand the evidence-base and to further incorporate economic evaluation into research priorities. In a world of scarce health care resources and an emphasis on efficiency and clinical efficacy, CAM, as indeed do all other treatments, requires rigorous evaluation to be considered in budget decision-making. Methods Economic evaluation provides the tools to measure the costs and health consequences of CAM interventions and thereby inform decision making. This article offers CAM researchers an introductory framework for understanding, undertaking and disseminating economic evaluation. The types of economic evaluation available for the study of CAM are discussed, and decision modelling is introduced as a method for economic evaluation with much potential for use in CAM. Two types of decision models are introduced, decision trees and Markov models, along with a worked example of how each method is used to examine costs and health consequences. This is followed by a discussion of how this information is used by decision makers. Conclusions Undoubtedly, economic evaluation methods form an important part of health care decision making. Without formal training it can seem a daunting task to consider economic evaluation, however, multidisciplinary teams provide an opportunity for health economists, CAM practitioners and other interested researchers, to work together to further develop the economic evaluation of CAM.

  4. Cam Drive Step Mechanism of a Quadruped Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bionic quadruped robots received considerable worldwide research attention. For a quadruped robot walking with steady paces on a flat terrain, using a cam drive control mechanism instead of servomotors provides theoretical and practical benefits as it reduces the system weight, cost, and control complexities; thus it may be more cost beneficial for some recreational or household applications. This study explores the robot step mechanism including the leg and cam drive control systems based on studying the bone structure and the kinematic step sequences of dog. The design requirements for the cam drive robot legs have been raised, and the mechanical principles of the leg operating mechanism as well as the control parameters have been analyzed. A cam drive control system was constructed using three cams to control each leg. Finally, a four-leg demo robot was manufactured for experiments and it showed stable walking patterns on a flat floor.

  5. Knowledge and training needs among Danish nurses about CAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Background: The increased use of CAM among the Danish population is well documented as are patient’s requests to discuss CAM with a healthcare professional. It is suggested that among different groups of healthcare professionals nurses are the most “open minded” about CAM. This makes it important...... to explore nurses’ knowledge about CAM and their needs for training. Methods: Similar to international investigations a Danish “CAM-knowledge” questionnaire was developed that included multiple choice, yes/no and 5 points scale answers. Validity was established through initial pilot testing. Contacts...... to a randomized sample of 2500 nurses were established through the Danish Nurses Foundation. The questionnaires were mailed by post with the possibility of anonymous return. The data material was analyzed using non-parametic methods. Results: The response rate was 67 % and 1458 completed questionnaires were...

  6. Treatment Preferences for CAM in Children with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls (mean age = 14.5 years ± 2.4; range = 8–18 years presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between CAM treatment preferences and patient's sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their self-reported level of functioning. Over 60% of patients elected to try at least one CAM approach for pain. The most popular CAM therapies were biofeedback, yoga and hypnosis; the least popular were art therapy and energy healing, with craniosacral, acupuncture and massage being intermediate. Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80% were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy, pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

  7. Treatment Preferences for CAM in children with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jennie C I; Meldrum, Marcia; Kim, Su C; Jacob, Margaret C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2007-09-01

    CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls) (mean age = 14.5 years +/- 2.4; range = 8-18 years) presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between CAM treatment preferences and patient's sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their self-reported level of functioning. Over 60% of patients elected to try at least one CAM approach for pain. The most popular CAM therapies were biofeedback, yoga and hypnosis; the least popular were art therapy and energy healing, with craniosacral, acupuncture and massage being intermediate. Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80%) were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy), pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM providers’ views of chronic low back pain patients’ expectations of CAM therapies: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafer Lisa M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some researchers think that patients with higher expectations for CAM therapies experience better outcomes and that enthusiastic providers can enhance treatment outcomes. This is in contrast to evidence suggesting conventional medical providers often reorient patient expectations to better match what providers believe to be realistic. However, there is a paucity of research on CAM providers’ views of their patients’ expectations regarding CAM therapy and the role of these expectations in patient outcomes. Methods To better understand how CAM providers view and respond to their patients’ expectations of a particular therapy, we conducted 32 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with acupuncturists, chiropractors, massage therapists and yoga instructors identified through convenience sampling. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed thematically using Atlas ti version 6.1. Results CAM providers reported that they attempt to ensure that their patients’ expectations are realistic. Providers indicated they manage their patients’ expectations in a number of domains— roles and responsibilities of providers and patients, treatment outcomes, timeframe for improvement, and treatment experience. Providers reported that patients’ expectations change over time and that they need to continually manage these expectations to enhance patient engagement and satisfaction with treatment. Conclusions Providers of four types of CAM therapies viewed patients’ expectations as an important component of their experiences with CAM therapy and indicated that they try to align patient expectations with reality. These findings suggest that CAM providers are similar in this respect to conventional medical providers.

  9. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers' views of chronic low back pain patients' expectations of CAM therapies: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Lisa M; Hsu, Clarissa; Eaves, Emery Rose; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Turner, Judith; Cherkin, Daniel C; Sims, Colette; Sherman, Karen J

    2012-11-27

    Some researchers think that patients with higher expectations for CAM therapies experience better outcomes and that enthusiastic providers can enhance treatment outcomes. This is in contrast to evidence suggesting conventional medical providers often reorient patient expectations to better match what providers believe to be realistic. However, there is a paucity of research on CAM providers' views of their patients' expectations regarding CAM therapy and the role of these expectations in patient outcomes. To better understand how CAM providers view and respond to their patients' expectations of a particular therapy, we conducted 32 semi-structured, qualitative interviews with acupuncturists, chiropractors, massage therapists and yoga instructors identified through convenience sampling. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed thematically using Atlas ti version 6.1. CAM providers reported that they attempt to ensure that their patients' expectations are realistic. Providers indicated they manage their patients' expectations in a number of domains- roles and responsibilities of providers and patients, treatment outcomes, timeframe for improvement, and treatment experience. Providers reported that patients' expectations change over time and that they need to continually manage these expectations to enhance patient engagement and satisfaction with treatment. Providers of four types of CAM therapies viewed patients' expectations as an important component of their experiences with CAM therapy and indicated that they try to align patient expectations with reality. These findings suggest that CAM providers are similar in this respect to conventional medical providers.

  10. Machinability of CAD-CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Ramakiran; Nejat, Amir H; Lawson, Nathaniel C

    2017-08-01

    Although new materials are available for computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) fabrication, limited information is available regarding their machinability. The depth of penetration of a milling tool into a material during a timed milling cycle may indicate its machinability. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the tool penetration rate for 2 polymer-containing CAD-CAM materials (Lava Ultimate and Enamic) and 2 ceramic-based CAD-CAM materials (e.max CAD and Celtra Duo). The materials were sectioned into 4-mm-thick specimens (n=5/material) and polished with 320-grit SiC paper. Each specimen was loaded into a custom milling apparatus. The apparatus pushed the specimens against a milling tool (E4D Tapered 2016000) rotating at 40 000 RPM with a constant force of 0.98 N. After a 6-minute timed milling cycle, the length of each milling cut was measured with image analysis software under a digital light microscope. Representative specimens and milling tools were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The penetration rate of Lava Ultimate (3.21 ±0.46 mm/min) and Enamic (2.53 ±0.57 mm/min) was significantly greater than that of e.max CAD (1.12 ±0.32 mm/min) or Celtra Duo (0.80 ±0.21 mm/min) materials. SEM observations showed little tool damage, regardless of material type. Residual material was found on the tools used with polymer-containing materials, and wear of the embedding medium was seen on the tools used with the ceramic-based materials. Edge chipping was noted on cuts made in the ceramic-based materials. Lava Ultimate and Enamic have greater machinability and less edge chipping than e.max CAD and Celtra Duo. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Should CAM and CAM Training Programs Be Included in the Curriculum of Schools That Provide Health Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the knowledge levels and attitudes of School of Health and Vocational School of Health students toward complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. Methods: Three hundred thirty-three (333 students studying at the Mehmet Akif Ersoy University School of Health and the Golhisar Vocational School of Health in Burdur, Turkey, were included in the study. Research data were collected by using a survey method based on the expressed opinions of the participants. Results: Of the participants, 69.7% were female and 97% were single (unmarried. Of cigarette users and those with chronic illnesses, 46.8% and 47.8%, respectively, used CAM. Those using CAM were statistically more likely to be female (P < 0.021, to have higher grades (P < 0.007, to be single (P < 0.005, to be vocational school of health graduates (P < 0.008, and to have fathers at work (P < 0.021. While 9.6% of the students thought CAM to be nonsense, 10.8% thought that the methods of CAM should be tried before consulting a doctor. Conclusion: A majority of the students in the study population were found to use complementary and alternative medicine, but that they lacked information about its methods. As a way to address this, CAM should be included in the curriculum of schools that provide health education, and CAM training programs should be given to healthcare professionals to improve their knowledge of CAM. In Turkey, many more studies should be performed to determine nurses’ and doctors’ knowledge of and attitudes about CAM methods so that they can give correct guidance to society and take more active responsibility in improving patient safety.

  12. Comércio de bromélias no Paraná Bromeliads production and trade in Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Anacleto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se um estudo prospectivo da cadeia produtiva de bromélias no Estado do Paraná, objetivando conhecer o perfil do produtor paranaense, com respectiva capacidade de atender às demandas de mercado, identificar e caracterizar os diferentes níveis da cadeia produtiva e detectar os principais pontos de estrangulamento do desenvolvimento desse setor. Para tanto, foram entrevistados 19 produtores, 160 varejistas e 18 atacadistas. A quantidade de bromélias oriundas da produção do Paraná e aptas ao mercado era de 5.340 plantas ao ano, inferior à demanda do Estado. As condições exigidas pelos varejistas (v e atacadistas (a para aquisição de bromélias dos produtores regionais eram: preço igual ou inferior ao praticado em São Paulo (exigido por: v = 134; a = 18, qualidade da produção condizente com a encontrada no mercado (v = 86; a = 16, capacidade de efetuar entregas periódicas (v = 81; a = 11 e capacidade de atendimento dos pedidos extras (v = 55; a = 7. Não foi encontrado produtor no Estado do Paraná que pudesse atender a todas as exigências de forma simultânea. Os principais entraves que impediam a inserção da produção no mercado regional eram decorrentes da inaplicabilidade dos modelos de gestão da produção rural, adotados pelos produtores, e das incongruências tecnológicas observadas na maioria dos viveiros de cultivo, que resultavam em produção de baixa qualidade.This paper is a prospective study about the bromeliads production and trade in Paraná State, Brazil, which aimed to know the producers' profile in Paraná State with the respective capacity of meeting market demands, identify and characterize the different levels of the bromeliads production chain, as well as detect the main bottlenecks to the development of this sector. A total of 19 producers were interviewed; 160 retailers and 18 wholesalers. The amount of bromeliads from the regional production and suitable to be the traded was 5340 plants per

  13. Finding the Evidence in CAM: a Student's Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Ghassemi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This commentary offers a future health care provider's perspective on the role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in Western (namely, in US medical education and practice. As a student of both public health and medicine in the United States, Jeffrey Ghassemi is interested in CAM's contribution to improving medical practice and teaching. The commentary highlights the ambiguous definitions of CAM to Westerners despite the rising popularity of and expenditures for alternative modalities of care. It then argues for collaboration between alternative and established medical communities to ascertain the scientific merits of CAM. It concludes by calling for a new medical paradigm that embraces the philosophies of both communities to advance education and patient care.

  14. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  15. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, Y. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  16. Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, Y. (Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States))

    1992-04-01

    For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

  17. Surgical hip dislocation for treatment of cam femoroacetabular impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind M Chaudhary

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Cam femoroacetabular Impingement causing pain and limitation of hip movements was treated by open osteochondroplasty after surgical hip dislocation. This reduced pain, improved hip motion and gave good to excellent results in the short term.

  18. Synthesis and analysis of coupler curves with combined planar cam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Further, kinematic simulation of both mechanisms was performed to estimate the error and validate the proposed ... separation of cam follower contact was simulated by using Matlab Simulink tool. Results ..... Detail process of model creation ...

  19. Availability Analysis of the Ventilation Stack CAM Interlock System

    CERN Document Server

    Young, J

    2000-01-01

    Ventilation Stack Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) Interlock System failure modes, failure frequencies, and system availability have been evaluated for the RPP. The evaluation concludes that CAM availability is as high as assumed in the safety analysis and that the current routine system surveillance is adequate to maintain this availability credited in the safety analysis, nor is such an arrangement predicted to significantly improve system availability.

  20. Trend and application of CAD/CAM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Man Ok

    1984-09-01

    This report is about trend and application of CAD/CAM system, giving descriptions of computer aided design which helps construction, engineering and drafting tasks. It also tells of computer aided manufacturing related general design of manufactures, which includes process design, production management, decision of work technology, processing. The need and application of CAD/CAM system is increasing more and more for industry each area.

  1. Incorporation of CAD/CAM Restoration Into Navy Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-26

    CAD/CAM Computer-aided design /Computer-assisted manufacturing CDT Common Dental Terminology DENCAS Dental Common Access System DTF Dental...to reduce avoidable dental emergencies for deployed sailors and marines. Dental Computer-aided design /Computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM...this time by allowing for rapid scanning, designing , development, and production of dental restorations. Using this technology gives dentists the

  2. Aquatic CAM photosynthesis: a brief history of its discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2014-01-01

    Aquatic CAM (Crassulacean Acid Metabolism) photosynthesis was discovered while investigating an unrelated biochemical pathway concerned with anaerobic metabolism. George Bowes was a significant contributor to this project early in its infancy. Not only did he provide me with some valuable perspectives on peer review rejections, but by working with his gas exchange system I was able to take our initial observations of diel fluctuations in malic acid to the next level, showing this aquatic plant exhibited dark CO2 uptake. CAM is universal in all aquatic species of the worldwide Lycophyta genus Isoetes and non-existent in terrestrial Isoetes. Outside of this genus aquatic CAM has a limited occurrence in three other families, including the Crassulaceae. This discovery led to fascinating adventures in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes in search of Stylites, a terrestrial relative of Isoetes. Stylites is a plant that is hermetically sealed from the atmosphere and obtains all of its carbon from terrestrial sources and recycles carbon through CAM. Considering the Mesozoic origin of Isoetes in shallow pools, coupled with the fact that aquatic Isoetes universally possess CAM, suggests the earliest evolution of CAM photosynthesis was most likely not in terrestrial plants.

  3. The pineapple genome and the evolution of CAM photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Ray; VanBuren, Robert; Wai, Ching Man; Tang, Haibao; Schatz, Michael C; Bowers, John E; Lyons, Eric; Wang, Ming-Li; Chen, Jung; Biggers, Eric; Zhang, Jisen; Huang, Lixian; Zhang, Lingmao; Miao, Wenjing; Zhang, Jian; Ye, Zhangyao; Miao, Chenyong; Lin, Zhicong; Wang, Hao; Zhou, Hongye; Yim, Won C; Priest, Henry D; Zheng, Chunfang; Woodhouse, Margaret; Edger, Patrick P; Guyot, Romain; Guo, Hao-Bo; Guo, Hong; Zheng, Guangyong; Singh, Ratnesh; Sharma, Anupma; Min, Xiangjia; Zheng, Yun; Lee, Hayan; Gurtowski, James; Sedlazeck, Fritz J; Harkess, Alex; McKain, Michael R; Liao, Zhenyang; Fang, Jingping; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Weichang; Qin, Yuan; Wang, Kai; Chen, Li-Yu; Shirley, Neil; Lin, Yann-Rong; Liu, Li-Yu; Hernandez, Alvaro G; Wright, Chris L; Bulone, Vincent; Tuskan, Gerald A; Heath, Katy; Zee, Francis; Moore, Paul H; Sunkar, Ramanjulu; Leebens-Mack, James H; Mockler, Todd; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L; Freeling, Michael; Sankoff, David; Paterson, Andrew H; Zhu, Xinguang; Yang, Xiaohan; Smith, J Andrew C; Cushman, John C; Paull, Robert E; Yu, Qingyi

    2015-12-01

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) is the most economically valuable crop possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a photosynthetic carbon assimilation pathway with high water-use efficiency, and the second most important tropical fruit. We sequenced the genomes of pineapple varieties F153 and MD2 and a wild pineapple relative, Ananas bracteatus accession CB5. The pineapple genome has one fewer ancient whole-genome duplication event than sequenced grass genomes and a conserved karyotype with seven chromosomes from before the ρ duplication event. The pineapple lineage has transitioned from C3 photosynthesis to CAM, with CAM-related genes exhibiting a diel expression pattern in photosynthetic tissues. CAM pathway genes were enriched with cis-regulatory elements associated with the regulation of circadian clock genes, providing the first cis-regulatory link between CAM and circadian clock regulation. Pineapple CAM photosynthesis evolved by the reconfiguration of pathways in C3 plants, through the regulatory neofunctionalization of preexisting genes and not through the acquisition of neofunctionalized genes via whole-genome or tandem gene duplication.

  4. PhenoCam Dataset v1.0: Digital Camera Imagery from the PhenoCam Network, 2000-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset provides a time series of visible-wavelength digital camera imagery collected through the PhenoCam Network at each of 133 sites in North America and...

  5. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) as Part of the Oncological Treatment: Survey about Patients? Attitude towards CAM in a University-Based Oncology Center in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Kessel, Kerstin A.; Lettner, Sabrina; Kessel, Carmen; Bier, Henning; Biedermann, Tilo; Friess, Helmut; Herrschbach, Peter; Gschwend, J?rgen E.; Meyer, Bernhard; Peschel, Christian; Schmid, Roland; Schwaiger, Markus; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Combs, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To understand if and which patients would be open-minded to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use parallel to their oncological treatment. Moreover, we sought to determine which methods are most accepted and which are the primary motivators to use CAM. Methods We developed and anonymously conducted a questionnaire for patients in the oncology center (TU Munich). Questions focus on different CAM methods, previous experiences, and willingness to apply or use CAM when off...

  6. CAD/CAM produces dentures with improved fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmassl, Otto; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Grunert, Ingrid; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca

    2018-02-22

    Resin polymerisation shrinkage reduces the congruence of the denture base with denture-bearing tissues and thereby decreases the retention of conventionally fabricated dentures. CAD/CAM denture manufacturing is a subtractive process, and polymerisation shrinkage is not an issue anymore. Therefore, CAD/CAM dentures are assumed to show a higher denture base congruence than conventionally fabricated dentures. It has been the aim of this study to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures provided by four different manufacturers (AvaDent, Merz Dental, Whole You, Wieland/Ivoclar) were generated from ten different master casts. Ten conventional dentures (pack and press, long-term heat polymerisation) made from the same master casts served as control group. The master casts and all denture bases were scanned and matched digitally. The absolute incongruences were measured using a 2-mm mesh. Conventionally fabricated dentures showed a mean deviation of 0.105 mm, SD = 0.019 from the master cast. All CAD/CAM dentures showed lower mean incongruences. From all CAD/CAM dentures, AvaDent Digital Dentures showed the highest congruence with the master cast surface with a mean deviation of 0.058 mm, SD = 0.005. Wieland Digital Dentures showed a mean deviation of 0.068 mm, SD = 0.005, Whole You Nexteeth prostheses showed a mean deviation of 0.074 mm, SD = 0.011 and Baltic Denture System prostheses showed a mean deviation of 0.086 mm, SD = 0.012. CAD/CAM produces dentures with better fit than conventional dentures. The present study explains the clinically observed enhanced retention and lower traumatic ulcer-frequency in CAD/CAM dentures.

  7. Reasons for continuing use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in students: a consumer commitment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Fuschia M; Salamonsen, Anita; Kristoffersen, Agnete E

    2016-02-24

    Research on continued CAM use has been largely atheoretical and has not considered the broader range of psychological and behavioral factors that may be involved. The purpose of this study was to test a new conceptual model of commitment to CAM use that implicates utilitarian (trust in CAM) and symbolic (perceived fit with CAM) in psychological and behavioral dimensions of CAM commitment. A student sample of CAM consumers, (N = 159) completed a survey about their CAM use, CAM-related values, intentions for future CAM use, CAM word-of-mouth behavior, and perceptions of being an ongoing CAM consumer. Analysis revealed that the utilitarian, symbolic, and CAM commitment variables were significantly related, with r's ranging from .54 to .73. A series hierarchical regression analyses controlling for relevant demographic variables found that the utilitarian and symbolic values uniquely accounted for significant and substantial proportion of the variance in each of the three CAM commitment indicators (R(2) from .37 to .57). The findings provide preliminary support for the new model that posits that CAM commitment is a multi-dimensional psychological state with behavioral indicators. Further research with large-scale samples and longitudinal designs is warranted to understand the potential value of the new model.

  8. Prevalence of Cam Morphology in Females with Femoroacetabular Impingement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Levy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cam and pincer are two common morphologies responsible for femoroacetabular impingement. Previous literature has reported that cam deformity is predominantly a male morphology, while being significantly less common in females. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cam morphology in female subjects diagnosed with symptomatic FAI. All females presenting to the senior author’s clinic diagnosed with symptomatic FAI between December 2006 and Cam and pincer are two common morphologies responsible for femoroacetabular impingement. Previous literature has reported that cam deformity is predominantly a male morphology, while being significantly less common in females. Cam morphology is commonly assessed with the alpha angle, measured on radiographs. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of cam morphology utilizing the alpha angle in female subjects diagnosed with symptomatic FAI. All females presenting to the senior author’s clinic diagnosed with symptomatic FAI between December 2006 and January 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Alpha (α angles were measured on AP (anteroposterior and lateral (Dunn 90°, cross-table lateral, and/or frog-leg lateral plain radiographs by two blinded physicians, and the largest measured angle was used. Using Gosvig et al.’s classification, alpha angle was characterized as (pathologic > 57°, borderline (51-56°, subtle (46-50°, very subtle (43-45°, or normal (≤42°. Three hundred and ninety-one patients (438 hips were analyzed (age 36.2 ± 12.3 years. Among the hips included, 35.6% were normal, 14.6% pathologic, 15.1% borderline, 14.6% subtle, and 20.1% very subtle. There was no correlation between alpha angle and patient age (R = 0.17 or body mass index (BMI (R = 0.05. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC for α-angle measurements was 0.84. Sixty-four percent of females in this cohort had an alpha angle > 42°. Subtle cam deformity plays a significant role in

  9. Criadouros de Aedes (Stegomyia aegypti (Linnaeus, 1762 em bromélias nativas na Cidade de Vitória, ES Aedes (Stegomyia aegypti (Linnaeus, 1762 breeding sites in native bromeliads in Vitória City, ES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Benedito Malta Varejão

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Alguns insetos transmissores de doenças procriam exclusivamente nas proximidades das residências. O Aedes aegypti, responsável por epidemias de dengue em cidades brasileiras, representa sério risco também para a febre amarela. Com o insucesso da campanha de erradicação do inseto, justifica-se a busca de criadouros fora do alcance das medidas de controle atualmente adotadas. Na Cidade de Vitória, ES, investigou-se a ocorrência de criadouros de Aedes aegypti na água coletada em bromélias nativas, sobre as rochas. Paralelamente, avaliou-se a infestação predial nas áreas urbanas contíguas. Em quatro das cinco áreas investigadas foram encontradas larvas de culicídeos nas bromélias, sendo que em duas foi identificado Aedes aegypti. A presença dos criadouros em bromélias não guardou relação com a infestação predial nas áreas próximas. Torna-se necessário definir se os criadouros em bromélias constituem focos primários do Aedes aegypti, ou se representam uma conseqüência da elevada infestação urbana.Some insects that are vectors of human diseases have accompanied man in his migrations throughout the world and breed exclusively in the proximity of human dwellings. The mosquito Aedes aegypti has been responsible for epidemics of dengue in Brazil and its presence also constitutes a serious risk for future outbreaks of urban yellow fever. The failure of campaigns to eradicate this species justifies the search for alternative breeding sites, which may be beyond the reach of present control measures. In this study the occurrence of Aedes aegypti breeding sites in native bromeliads on rocky slopes was investigated in five areas of Vitória, capital of the Brazilian State of Espírito Santo, ES. Water contained in the bromeliads was collected with the aid of a suction apparatus to search for culicid larvae. The degree of infestation of buildings in adjacent urban areas was evaluated simultaneously. Culicid larvae were found in

  10. Bromeliad ornamental species: conservation issues and challenges related to commercialization=Espécies ornamentais de bromélias: conservação e desafios relacionados a sua comercialização

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcy Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromeliads grow almost exclusively in the New World tropics and subtropics, mainly in South America in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest (ca. 1200 species. Within the last few decades, their beautiful shapes and colors, low maintenance and easy adaptability to small gardens have brought bromeliads into worldwide use as ornamental plants. While the ornamental bromeliad trade could make significant contributions to household economies in rural areas, the trade may represent a significant threat in some of the bromeliad biodiversity hotspot countries such as Brazil, Bolivia and Colombia. This paper presents an overview of production volumes, analysis of the Brazilian bromeliads trade chain – at the state, national and international levels – and recommendations to address development and conservation challenges.Bromélias crescem quase que exclusivamente nas regiões tropicais e subtropicais do Novo Mundo, ocorrendo principalmente na Floresta Atlântica brasileira na América do Sul. (ca. 1200 espécies. Nas últimas décadas, pelas suas belas formas e cores, baixa demanda de manutenção e fácil adaptabilidade a pequenos jardins, as bromélias tem sido mundialmente utilizadas como plantas ornamentais. O comércio de bromélias ornamentais pode promover significante acréscimo de renda em áreas rurais, mas por outro lado pode também significar uma ameaça à manutenção da diversidade destes recursos biológicos, especialmente em países como Brasil, Bolívia e Colômbia. Este trabalho apresenta uma caracterização geral dos volumes de produção e da cadeia brasileira de comercialização de bromélias - em nível estadual, nacional e internacional assim como recomendações para promover o desenvolvimento deste setor e superar desafios relacionados ao uso sustentável deste recurso.

  11. Experimentally induced cam impingement in the sheep hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenrock, Klaus A; Fiechter, Ruth; Tannast, Moritz; Mamisch, Tallal C; von Rechenberg, Brigitte

    2013-04-01

    Sheep hips have a natural non-spherical femoral head similar to a cam-type deformity in human beings. By performing an intertrochanteric varus osteotomy, cam-type femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI) during flexion can be created. We tested the hypotheses that macroscopic lesions of the articular cartilage and an increased Mankin score (MS) can be reproduced by an experimentally induced cam-type FAI in this ovine in vivo model. Furthermore, we hypothesized that the MS increases with longer ambulatory periods. Sixteen sheep underwent unilateral intertrochanteric varus osteotomy of the hip with the non-operated hip as a control. Four sheep were sacrificed after 14, 22, 30, and 38-weeks postoperatively. We evaluated macroscopic chondrolabral alterations, and recorded the MS, based on histochemical staining, for each ambulatory period. A significantly higher prevalence of macroscopic chondrolabral lesions was found in the impingement zone of the operated hips. The MS was significantly higher in the acetabular/femoral cartilage of the operated hips. Furthermore, these scores increased as the length of the ambulatory period increased. Cam-type FAI can be induced in an ovine in vivo model. Localized chondrolabral degeneration of the hip, similar to that seen in humans (Tannast et al., Clin Orthop Relat Res 2008; 466: 273-280; Beck et al., J Bone Joint Surg Br 2005; 87: 1012-1018), can be reproduced. This experimental sheep model can be used to study cam-type FAI. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  12. The Pleiotropic Role of L1CAM in Tumor Vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Angiolini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the formation of new vessels, is a key step in the development, invasion, and dissemination of solid tumors and, therefore, represents a viable target in the context of antitumor therapy. Indeed, antiangiogenic approaches have given promising results in preclinical models and entered the clinical practice. However, in patients, the results obtained so far with antiangiogenic drugs have not completely fulfilled expectations, especially because their effect has been transient with tumors developing resistance and evasion mechanisms. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie tumor vascularization and the functional regulation of cancer vessels is a prerequisite for the development of novel and alternative antiangiogenic treatments. The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM, a cell surface glycoprotein previously implicated in the development and plasticity of the nervous system, is aberrantly expressed in the vasculature of various cancer types. L1CAM plays multiple pro-angiogenic roles in the endothelial cells of tumor-associated vessels, thus emerging as a potential therapeutic target. In addition, L1CAM prevents the maturation of cancer vasculature and its inhibition promotes vessel normalization, a process that is thought to improve the therapeutic response of tumors to cytotoxic drugs. We here provide an overview on tumor angiogenesis and antiangiogenic therapies and summarize the current knowledge on the biological role of L1CAM in cancer vasculature. Finally, we highlight the clinical implications of targeting L1CAM as a novel antiangiogenic and vessel-normalizing approach.

  13. The inducible CAM plants in putative lunar lander experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlak, Olexii; Zaetz, Iryna; Soldatkin, Olexii; Rogutskyy, Ivan; Danilchenko, Boris; Mikheev, Olexander; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Vidmachenko, Anatolii; Foing, Bernard H.; Kozyrovska, Natalia

    Precursory lunar lander experiments on growing plants in locker-based chambers will increase our understanding of effect of lunar conditions on plant physiology. The inducible CAM (Cras-sulacean Acid Metabolism)-plants are reasonable model for a study of relationships between environmental challenges and changes in plant/bacteria gene expression. In inducible CAM-plants the enzymatic machinery for the environmentally activated CAM switches on from a C3-to a full-CAM mode of photosynthesis in response to any stresses (Winter et al., 2008). In our study, Kalanchoe spp. are shown to be promising candidates for putative lunar experiments as resistant to irradiation and desiccation, especially after inoculation with a bacterial consortium (Boorlak et al., 2010). Within frames of the experiment we expect to get information about the functional activity of CAM-plants, in particular, its organogenesis, photosystem, the circadian regulation of plant metabolism on the base of data gaining with instrumental indications from expression of the reporter genes fused to any genes involved in vital functions of the plant (Kozyrovska et al., 2009). References 1. Winter K., Garcia M., Holtum J. (2008) J. Exp. Bot. 59(7):1829-1840 2. Bourlak O., Lar O., Rogutskyy I., Mikheev A., Zaets I., Chervatyuk N., de Vera J.-P., Danilchenko A.B. Foing B.H., zyrovska N. (2010) Space Sci. Technol. 3. Kozyrovska N.O., Vidmachenko A.P., Foing B.H. et al. Exploration/call/estec/ESA. 2009.

  14. Aedes albopictus em bromélias de solo em Ilhabela, litoral do Estado de São Paulo Aedes albopictus in soil bromeliads in Ilhabela, coastal area of Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela R A M Marques

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a presença de Aedes albopictus em bromélias de solo localizadas em ambientes ecologicamente distintos, em termos de positividade, densidade e volume de água. MÉTODOS: O estudo foi realizado no município de Ilhabela, litoral norte do Estado de São Paulo. Realizaram-se coletas quinzenais, de março de 1998 a julho de 1999, em tanques de bromélias localizadas nos ambientes urbano, periurbano e mata; o conteúdo aquático das plantas foi medido e registrado. O tratamento dos dados baseou-se na análise da freqüência de bromélias com presença de Ae. albopictus (ANOVA, abundância (Kruskal-Wallis e volume de água das bromélias positivas (Teste t de Student. RESULTADOS: A presença e a densidade de Ae. albopictus em bromélias de solo variou com o tipo de ambiente. Os maiores percentuais de positividade (85% e abundância (81% foram observados nas plantas localizadas em ambiente urbano. Constatou-se ainda preferência dos mosquitos pelas bromélias com maiores volumes de água (média de 300 ml. CONCLUSÕES: As diferentes freqüências com que Ae. albopictus foi registrado nos ambientes e suas respectivas densidades mostraram sua capacidade de invasão a novos habitats. Recomenda-se intensificar a vigilância entomológica nessas plantas, dada a sua capacidade em traduzir-se em criadouros permanentes. A presença desse mosquito de importância médica em bromélias em área preservada da Mata Atlântica poderá resultar em agravo à saúde.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the presence of Aedes albopictus in soil bromeliads in ecologically distinct environments in terms of positivity, density and volume of water. METHODS: The study was carried out in the municipality of Ilhabela, North coast of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Collections were fortnightly performed between March 1998 and July 1999, in containers of bromeliads located in urban, peri-urban and forest environments. The water content in plants was measured and recorded

  15. [Tailored cranioplasty using CAD-CAM technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitanovics, Dusán; Major, Ottó; Lovas, László; Banczerowski, Péter

    2014-11-30

    cranioplasty. Combined with 3D CAD- CAM method excellent aesthetic and functional result was achieved. In our study no case of infection occured. Proper preoperative preparation is important.

  16. The application of CAD / CAM technology in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susic, I.; Travar, M.; Susic, M.

    2017-05-01

    Information and communication technologies have found their application in the healthcare sector, including the frameworks of modern dentistry. CAD / CAM application in dentistry is the process by which is attained finished dental restoration through fine milling process of ready ceramic blocks. CAD / CAM is an acronym of english words Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) / Computer-Aided-Manufacture (CAM), respectively dental computer aided design and computer aided manufacture of inlays, onlays, crowns and bridges. CAD / CAM technology essentially allows you to create a two-dimensional and three-dimensional models and their materialization by numerical controlled machines. In order to operate more efficiently, reduce costs, increase user/patient satisfaction and ultimately achieve profits, many dental offices in the world have their attention focused on implementation of modern IT solutions in everyday practice. In addition to the specialized clinic management software, inventory control, etc., or hardware such as the use of lasers in cosmetic dentistry or intraoral scanning, recently the importance is given to the application of CAD / CAM technology in the field of prosthetic. After the removal of pathologically altered tooth structure, it is necessary to achieve restoration that will be most similar to the anatomy of a natural tooth. Applying CAD / CAM technology on applicable ceramic blocks it can be obtained very quick, but also very accurate restoration, in the forms of inlays, onlays, bridges and crowns. The paper presents the advantages of using this technology as well as satisfaction of the patients and dentists by using systems as: Cercon, Celay, Cerec, Lava, Everest, which represent imperative of modern dentistry in creating fixed dental restorations.

  17. Angle assessment by EyeCam, goniophotography, and gonioscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Mani; Perera, Shamira A; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Tun, Tin A; Park, Judy; Kumar, Rajesh S; Friedman, David S; Aung, Tin

    2012-09-01

    To compare EyeCam (Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, CA) and goniophotography in detecting angle closure, using gonioscopy as the reference standard. In this hospital-based, prospective, cross-sectional study, participants underwent gonioscopy by a single observer, and EyeCam imaging and goniophotography by different operators. The anterior chamber angle in a quadrant was classified as closed if the posterior trabecular meshwork could not be seen. A masked observer categorized the eyes as per the number of closed quadrants, and an eye was classified as having angle closure if there were 2 or more quadrants of closure. Agreement between the methods was analyzed by κ statistic and comparison of area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). Eighty-five participants (85 eyes) were included, the majority of whom were Chinese. Angle closure was detected in 38 eyes (45%) with gonioscopy, 40 eyes (47%) using EyeCam, and 40 eyes (47%) with goniophotography (P=0.69 in both comparisons, McNemar test). The agreement for angle closure diagnosis (by eye) between gonioscopy and the 2 imaging modalities was high (κ=0.86; 95% Confidence Interval (CI), 0.75-0.97), whereas the agreement between EyeCam and goniophotography was not as good (κ=0.72; 95% CI, 0.57-0.87); largely due to lack of agreement in the nasal and temporal quadrants (κ=0.55 to 0.67). The AUC for detecting eyes with gonioscopic angle closure was similar for goniophotography and EyeCam (AUC 0.93, sensitivity=94.7%, specificity=91.5%; P>0.95). EyeCam and goniophotography have similarly high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of gonioscopic angle closure.

  18. Prevalence of cam hip shape morphology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, E; Wall, P D H; Robinson, B; Fernandez, M; Parsons, H; Buchbinder, R; Griffin, D R

    2016-06-01

    Cam hip shape morphology is a recognised cause of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and is associated with hip osteoarthritis. Our aim was to systematically review the available epidemiological evidence assessing the prevalence of cam hip shape morphology in the general population and any studied subgroups including subjects with and without hip pain. All studies that reported the prevalence of cam morphology, measured by alpha angles, in subjects aged 18 and over, irrespective of study population or presence of hip symptoms were considered for inclusion. We searched AMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and CENTRAL in October 2015. Two authors independently identified eligible studies and assessed risk of bias. We planned to pool data of studies considered clinically homogenous. Thirty studies met inclusion criteria. None of the included studies were truly population-based: three included non-representative subgroups of the general population, 19 included differing clinical populations, while eight included professional athletes. All studies were judged to be at high risk of bias. Due to substantial clinical heterogeneity meta analysis was not possible. Across all studies, the prevalence estimates of cam morphology ranged from 5 to 75% of participants affected. We were unable to demonstrate a higher prevalence in selected subgroups such as athletes or those with hip pain. There is currently insufficient high quality data to determine the true prevalence of cam morphology in the general population or selected subgroups. Well-designed population-based epidemiological studies that use homogenous case definitions are required to determine the prevalence of cam morphology and its relationship to hip pain. Copyright © 2016 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CAD/CAM: improved design quality, increased productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, D. E.; England, J.

    1980-01-01

    Maintaining productivity levels while assuring the quality of engineering products grows increasingly more difficult and costly for industries such as the energy industry which are heavily committed to product design. The man/machine interface made possible through the development of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology can be applied to the design process as a tool for increased control to assure the quality of the final engineering product. The quality-control aspects of CAD/CAM technology are addressed in this presentation.

  20. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  1. CAM visual stimulation with conventional method of occlusion treatment in amblyopia: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Jafari

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Using of CAM visual stimulation along with conventional occlusion will further improve visual acuity and stereopsis in amblyopic children. These findings recommended the CAM visual stimulation as an accompanying and complementary method in amblyopia treatment.

  2. design analysis of cam-follower system for beat up motion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    A cam swing roller-follower mechanism is designed for the beat-up motion of a horizontal narrow loom. The system consists of a radial plate-cam driven by a camshaft keyed to the plate cam. A slay bar which act as the beater is attached to the radial swing roller-follower and assembled on the plate cam. A continuous ...

  3. Evaluation of complementary-alternative medicine (CAM) questionnaire development for Indonesian clinical psychologists: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Andrian; Newcombe, Peter A; Pohlman, Annie

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate questionnaire development to measure the knowledge of Complementary-Alternative Medicine (CAM), attitudes towards CAM, CAM experiences, and CAM educational needs of clinical psychologists in Indonesia. A 26-item questionnaire was developed through an extensive literature search. Data was obtained from provisional psychologists from the Master of Professional Clinical Psychology programs at two established public universities in urban areas of Indonesia. To validate the questionnaire, panel reviews by executive members of the Indonesian Clinical Psychology Association (ICPA), experts in health psychology, and experts in public health and CAM provided their professional judgements. The self-reporting questionnaire consisted of four scales including: knowledge of CAM (6 items), attitudes towards CAM (10 items), CAM experiences (4 items), and CAM educational needs (6 items). All scales, except CAM Experiences, were assessed on a 7-point Likert scale. Sixty provisional psychologists were eligible to complete the questionnaire with a response rate of 73% (N=44). The results showed that the CAM questionnaire was reliable (Cronbach's coefficient alpha range=0.62-0.96; item-total correlation range=0.14-0.92) and demonstrated content validity. Following further psychometric evaluation, the CAM questionnaire may provide the evidence-based information to inform the education and practice of Indonesian clinical psychologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The pineapple genome and the evolution of CAM photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) is the most economically valuable crop possessing crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), a photosynthetic carbon assimilation pathway with high water-use efficiency, and the second most important tropical fruit. We sequenced the genomes of pineapple varieties F153 ...

  5. CAMS--A Think Tank for Global Ocean Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaharl, Victoria A.

    1985-01-01

    The Center for the Analysis of Marine Systems (CAMS) was created as an interdisciplinary "think tank" to meet needs of modern oceanography. The international research center's focus and success rests on theory, observation, and computer modeling. Projects involving lava flow and year-to-year variations in abundance of fish are described. (DH)

  6. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM): Time to Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to discuss with your health care providers any complementary and alternative medicines you take or are thinking about starting. Photo: ... adults 50 and older use some form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). But less than one-third who use ...

  7. Fatigue resistance of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shembish, F.A.; Tong, H.; Kaizer, M.; Janal, M.N.; Thompson, V.P.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. METHODS: Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava

  8. Schools (Students) Exchanging CAD/CAM Files over the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Gary S.; Smallwood, James E.

    This document discusses how students and schools can benefit from exchanging computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) files over the Internet, explains how files are exchanged, and examines the problem of selected hardware/software incompatibility. Key terms associated with information search services are defined, and several…

  9. SenseCam: A new tool for memory rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubourg, L; Silva, A R; Fitamen, C; Moulin, C J A; Souchay, C

    2016-12-01

    The emergence of life-logging technologies has led neuropsychologist to focus on understanding how this new technology could help patients with memory disorders. Despite the growing number of studies using life-logging technologies, a theoretical framework supporting its effectiveness is lacking. This review focuses on the use of life-logging in the context of memory rehabilitation, particularly the use of SenseCam, a wearable camera allowing passive image capture. In our opinion, reviewing SenseCam images can be effective for memory rehabilitation only if it provides more than an assessment of prior occurrence in ways that reinstates previous thoughts, feelings and sensory information, thus stimulating recollection. Considering the fact that, in memory impairment, self-initiated processes are impaired, we propose that the environmental support hypothesis can explain the value of SenseCam for memory retrieval. Twenty-five research studies were selected for this review and despite the general acceptance of the value of SenseCam as a memory technique, only a small number of studies focused on recollection. We discuss the usability of this tool to improve episodic memory and in particular, recollection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Fabricating Complete Dentures with CAD/CAM and RP Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Erdem, Ali; Aglarci, Osman Sami; Dilber, Erhan

    2015-06-01

    Two techological approaches for fabricating dentures; computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and rapid prototyping (RP), are combined with the conventional techniques of impression and jaw relation recording to determine their feasibility and applicability. Maxillary and mandibular edentulous jaw models were produced using silicone molds. After obtaining a gypsum working model, acrylic bases were crafted, and occlusal rims for each model were fabricated with previously determined standard vertical and centric relationships. The maxillary and mandibular relationships were recorded with guides. The occlusal rims were then scanned with a digital scanner. The alignment of the maxillary and mandibular teeth was verified. The teeth in each arch were fabricated in one piece, or set, either by CAM or RP. Conventional waxing and flasking was then performed for both methods. These techniques obviate a practitioner's need for technicians during design and provide the patient with an opportunity to participate in esthetic design with the dentist. In addition, CAD/CAM and RP reduce chair time; however, the materials and techniques need further improvements. Both CAD/CAM and RP techniques seem promising for reducing chair time and allowing the patient to participate in esthetics design. Furthermore, the one-set aligned artificial tooth design may increase the acrylic's durability. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  11. Quantifying seasonal fallback on invertebrates, pith, and bromeliad leaves by white-faced capuchin monkeys (Cebus capucinus) in a tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosdossy, Krisztina N; Melin, Amanda D; Fedigan, Linda M

    2015-09-01

    Fallback foods (FBFs) are hypothesized to shape the ecology, morphology, and behavior of primates, including hominins. Identifying FBFs is therefore critical for revealing past and present foraging adaptations. Recent research suggests invertebrates act as seasonal FBFs for many primate species and human populations. Yet, studies measuring the consumption of invertebrates relative to ecological variation are widely lacking. We address this gap by examining food abundance and entomophagy by primates in a seasonal forest. We study foraging behavior of white-faced capuchins (Cebus capucinus)-a species renowned for its intelligence and propensity for extractive foraging-along with the abundance of invertebrates, dietary ripe fruits, pith, and bromeliads. Consumption events and processing time are recorded during focal animal samples. We determine abundance of vegetative foods through phenological and density records. Invertebrates are collected in malaise, pan, and terrestrial traps; caterpillar abundance is inferred from frass traps. Invertebrates are abundant throughout the year and capuchins consume invertebrates-including caterpillars-frequently when fruit is abundant. However, capuchins spend significantly more time processing protected invertebrates when fruit and caterpillars are low in abundance. Invertebrate foraging patterns are not uniform. Caterpillar consumption is consistent with a preferred strategy, whereas capuchins appear to fallback on invertebrates requiring high handling time. Capuchins are convergent with hominins in possessing large brains and high levels of sensorimotor intelligence, thus our research has broad implications for primate evolution, including factors shaping cognitive innovations, brain size, and the role of entomophagy in the human diet. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Cotterillia bromelicola nov. gen., nov. spec., a gonostomatid ciliate (Ciliophora, Hypotricha) from tank bromeliads (Bromeliaceae) with de novo originating dorsal kineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foissner, Wilhelm; Stoeck, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Cotterillia bromelicola nov. gen., nov. spec. was discovered in the tanks of the Mexican bromeliad Tillandsia heterophylla. Its morphology, ontogenesis, and 18S rDNA were studied with standard methods. Cotterillia has many cirral rows on both sides of the body. Uniquely, and thus used to diagnose the new genus Cotterillia, it has dorsal kineties originating de novo, producing neokinetal waves where the parental dorsal kineties reorganize to "combined rows", consisting of dorsal bristles anteriorly and of cirri posteriorly. Thus, up to four generations of bristles and cirri occur on the dorsal body surface. Cotterillia bromelicola has a gonostomatid body and adoral zone of membranelles, while the dense ciliature and the neokinetal waves resemble kahliellid hypotrichs. However, the de novo origin of anlage 1 and the molecular analyses show convincingly that Cotterillia belongs to the GonostomatidaeSmall and Lynn, 1985, for which an improved diagnosis is provided. Thus, neokinetal waves originated several times independently. The molecular differences between Trachelostyla, Gonostomum, and Cotterillia are small (≤ 5%) compared to their distinct morphologies and ontogeneses, suggesting that the 18S rDNA underestimates generic diversity. Our study emphasizes the need of combined morphological, ontogenetic, and molecular investigations to unravel the complex phylogeny and evolution of hypotrich ciliates. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Optimising the cam profile of an electronic unit pump for a heavy-duty diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Tao; Dai, Hefei; Lei, Yan; Cao, Chunlei; Li, Xuchu

    2015-01-01

    For a fuel system with a tangent cam or a constant-velocity cam, the peak injection pressure continues to rise as the injection duration increases, but overly high peak pressures induce mechanical loads and wear, limiting the maximum engine speed and injection quantity. To improve the performance of an EUP (Electronic Unit Pump) fuel system for heavy-duty diesel engines, this work proposes a new pump cam, namely the constant-pressure cam. It helps the EUP run at a higher speed and deliver larger fuel quantities while maintaining a constant peak injection pressure, which improves the power of the heavy-duty diesel engine. A model based on the EUP was built to determine the three constraints for optimising the constant-pressure cam: 1) the pump pressure should equal the nozzle pressure; 2) the cam speed should decrease with the increase in the injection duration; and 3) the cam acceleration gradient should be zero. An EUP system was tested with the tangent cam and the optimised cam under different conditions. The experimental results show that the EUP system with the optimised cam delivers more injection quantity and runs at higher engine speeds while maintaining the same peak pressure as the tangent cam. - Highlights: • We propose a constant-pressure cam to improve the power of heavy-duty diesel engine. • We deduce three constraints for the CP (constant-peak pressure) cam based on a model. • The EUP system with the new cam works well under higher engine speed. • The peak pressure of the constant-pressure cam fuel system maintains high

  14. Abnormal placental development and early embryonic lethality in EpCAM-null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Nagao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: EpCAM (CD326 is encoded by the tacstd1 gene and expressed by a variety of normal and malignant epithelial cells and some leukocytes. Results of previous in vitro experiments suggested that EpCAM is an intercellular adhesion molecule. EpCAM has been extensively studied as a potential tumor marker and immunotherapy target, and more recent studies suggest that EpCAM expression may be characteristic of cancer stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To gain insights into EpCAM function in vivo, we generated EpCAM -/- mice utilizing an embryonic stem cell line with a tacstd1 allele that had been disrupted. Gene trapping resulted in a protein comprised of the N-terminus of EpCAM encoded by 2 exons of the tacstd1 gene fused in frame to betageo. EpCAM +/- mice were viable and fertile and exhibited no obvious abnormalities. Examination of EpCAM +/- embryos revealed that betageo was expressed in several epithelial structures including developing ears (otocysts, eyes, branchial arches, gut, apical ectodermal ridges, lungs, pancreas, hair follicles and others. All EpCAM -/- mice died in utero by E12.5, and were small, developmentally delayed, and displayed prominent placental abnormalities. In developing placentas, EpCAM was expressed throughout the labyrinthine layer and by spongiotrophoblasts as well. Placentas of EpCAM -/- embryos were compact, with thin labyrinthine layers lacking prominent vascularity. Parietal trophoblast giant cells were also dramatically reduced in EpCAM -/- placentas. CONCLUSION: EpCAM was required for differentiation or survival of parietal trophoblast giant cells, normal development of the placental labyrinth and establishment of a competent maternal-fetal circulation. The findings in EpCAM-reporter mice suggest involvement of this molecule in development of vital organs including the gut, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, eyes, and limbs.

  15. Abnormal placental development and early embryonic lethality in EpCAM-null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Zhu, Jianjian; Heneghan, Mallorie B; Hanson, Jeffrey C; Morasso, Maria I; Tessarollo, Lino; Mackem, Susan; Udey, Mark C

    2009-12-31

    EpCAM (CD326) is encoded by the tacstd1 gene and expressed by a variety of normal and malignant epithelial cells and some leukocytes. Results of previous in vitro experiments suggested that EpCAM is an intercellular adhesion molecule. EpCAM has been extensively studied as a potential tumor marker and immunotherapy target, and more recent studies suggest that EpCAM expression may be characteristic of cancer stem cells. To gain insights into EpCAM function in vivo, we generated EpCAM -/- mice utilizing an embryonic stem cell line with a tacstd1 allele that had been disrupted. Gene trapping resulted in a protein comprised of the N-terminus of EpCAM encoded by 2 exons of the tacstd1 gene fused in frame to betageo. EpCAM +/- mice were viable and fertile and exhibited no obvious abnormalities. Examination of EpCAM +/- embryos revealed that betageo was expressed in several epithelial structures including developing ears (otocysts), eyes, branchial arches, gut, apical ectodermal ridges, lungs, pancreas, hair follicles and others. All EpCAM -/- mice died in utero by E12.5, and were small, developmentally delayed, and displayed prominent placental abnormalities. In developing placentas, EpCAM was expressed throughout the labyrinthine layer and by spongiotrophoblasts as well. Placentas of EpCAM -/- embryos were compact, with thin labyrinthine layers lacking prominent vascularity. Parietal trophoblast giant cells were also dramatically reduced in EpCAM -/- placentas. EpCAM was required for differentiation or survival of parietal trophoblast giant cells, normal development of the placental labyrinth and establishment of a competent maternal-fetal circulation. The findings in EpCAM-reporter mice suggest involvement of this molecule in development of vital organs including the gut, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, eyes, and limbs.

  16. Evolution of CAM and C4 carbon-concentrating mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms for concentrating carbon around the Rubisco enzyme, which drives the carbon-reducing steps in photosynthesis, are widespread in plants; in vascular plants they are known as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and C4 photosynthesis. CAM is common in desert succulents, tropical epiphytes, and aquatic plants and is characterized by nighttime fixation of CO2. The proximal selective factor driving the evolution of this CO2-concentrating pathway is low daytime CO2, which results from the unusual reverse stomatal behavior of terrestrial CAM species or from patterns of ambient CO2 availability for aquatic CAM species. In terrestrials the ultimate selective factor is water stress that has selected for increased water use efficiency. In aquatics the ultimate selective factor is diel fluctuations in CO2 availability for palustrine species and extreme oligotrophic conditions for lacustrine species. C4 photosynthesis is based on similar biochemistry but carboxylation steps are spatially separated in the leaf rather than temporally as in CAM. This biochemical pathway is most commonly associated with a specialized leaf anatomy known as Kranz anatomy; however, there are exceptions. The ultimate selective factor driving the evolution of this pathway is excessively high photorespiration that inhibits normal C3 photosynthesis under high light and high temperature in both terrestrial and aquatic habitats. CAM is an ancient pathway that likely has been present since the Paleozoic era in aquatic species from shallow-water palustrine habitats. While atmospheric CO2 levels have undoubtedly affected the evolution of terrestrial plant carbon-concentrating mechanisms, there is reason to believe that past atmospheric changes have not played as important a selective role in the aquatic milieu since palustrine habitats today are not generally carbon sinks, and the selective factors driving aquatic CAM are autogenic. Terrestrial CAM, in contrast, is of increasing selective value under

  17. Shared origins of a key enzyme during the evolution of C4 and CAM metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Arakaki, Monica; Osborne, Colin P.; Bräutigam, Andrea; Sage, Rowan F.; Hibberd, Julian M.; Kelly, Steven; Covshoff, Sarah; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Hancock, Lillian; Edwards, Erika J.

    2014-01-01

    CAM and C4 photosynthesis are two key plant adaptations that have evolved independently multiple times, and are especially prevalent in particular groups of plants, including the Caryophyllales. We investigate the origin of photosynthetic PEPC, a key enzyme of both the CAM and C4 pathways. We combine phylogenetic analyses of genes encoding PEPC with analyses of RNA sequence data of Portulaca, the only plants known to perform both CAM and C4 photosynthesis. Three distinct gene lineages encoding PEPC exist in eudicots (namely ppc-1E1, ppc-1E2 and ppc-2), one of which (ppc-1E1) was recurrently recruited for use in both CAM and C4 photosynthesis within the Caryophyllales. This gene is present in multiple copies in the cacti and relatives, including Portulaca. The PEPC involved in the CAM and C4 cycles of Portulaca are encoded by closely related yet distinct genes. The CAM-specific gene is similar to genes from related CAM taxa, suggesting that CAM has evolved before C4 in these species. The similar origin of PEPC and other genes involved in the CAM and C4 cycles highlights the shared early steps of evolutionary trajectories towards CAM and C4, which probably diverged irreversibly only during the optimization of CAM and C4 phenotypes. PMID:24638902

  18. A methodological framework for evaluating the evidence for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariae, Robert; Johannesen, Helle

    2011-01-01

    In spite of lacking evidence for effects on cancer progression itself, an increasing number of cancer patients use various types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). There is disagreement between CAM practitioners, researchers and clinical oncologists, as to how evidence concerning...... effects of CAM can and should be produced, and how the existing evidence should be interpreted. This represents a considerable challenge for oncologists; both in terms of patient needs for an informed dialogue regarding CAM, and because some types of CAM may interact with standard treatments....... There is a need for insight into which kinds of CAM may work, for whom they work, what the possible effects and side-effects are, and in what ways such effects may come about. The present article presents a framework for evaluating effects of CAM by suggesting a taxonomy of different levels of evidence related...

  19. Perspectives of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Erin; Sevigny, Marika; Sabarre, Kelley-Anne; Phillips, Karen P

    2014-10-14

    Infertility patients are increasingly using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to supplement or replace conventional fertility treatments. The objective of this study was to determine the roles of CAM practitioners in the support and treatment of infertility. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted in Ottawa, Canada in 2011 with CAM practitioners who specialized in naturopathy, acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, hypnotherapy and integrated medicine. CAM practitioners played an active role in both treatment and support of infertility, using a holistic, interdisciplinary and individualized approach. CAM practitioners recognized biological but also environmental and psychosomatic determinants of infertility. Participants were receptive to working with physicians, however little collaboration was described. Integrated infertility patient care through both collaboration with CAM practitioners and incorporation of CAM's holistic, individualized and interdisciplinary approaches would greatly benefit infertility patients.

  20. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) as Part of the Oncological Treatment: Survey about Patients' Attitude towards CAM in a University-Based Oncology Center in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kerstin A; Lettner, Sabrina; Kessel, Carmen; Bier, Henning; Biedermann, Tilo; Friess, Helmut; Herrschbach, Peter; Gschwend, Jürgen E; Meyer, Bernhard; Peschel, Christian; Schmid, Roland; Schwaiger, Markus; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-01-01

    To understand if and which patients would be open-minded to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use parallel to their oncological treatment. Moreover, we sought to determine which methods are most accepted and which are the primary motivators to use CAM. We developed and anonymously conducted a questionnaire for patients in the oncology center (TU Munich). Questions focus on different CAM methods, previous experiences, and willingness to apply or use CAM when offered in a university-based setting. A total of 171 of 376 patients (37.4% women, 62.0% men, 0.6% unknown) participated. This corresponds to a return rate of 45%. Median age was 64 years (17-87 years). Of all participants, 15.2% used CAM during their oncological therapy; 32.7% have used it in the past. The majority (81.9%) was not using CAM during therapy; 55.5% have not used CAM in the past respectively. The analysis revealed a significant correlation between education and CAM use during therapy (r = 0.18; p = 0.02), and CAM use in the past (r = 0.17; p = 0.04). Of all patients using CAM during therapy, favored methods were food supplements (42.3%), vitamins/minerals (42.3%), massage (34.6%). Motivations are especially the reduction of side effect and stress, the positive effect of certain CAM-treatments on the immune system and tumor therapy. Results showed no difference between women and men. Most patients not having had any experience with CAM complain about the deficiency of information by their treating oncologist (31.4%) as well as missing treatment possibilities (54.3%). Since many patients believe in study results demonstrating the efficacy of CAM, it stresses our task to develop innovative study protocols to investigate the outcomes of certain CAM on symptom reduction or other endpoints. Thus, prospective trials and innovative evidence-based treatment concepts to include CAM into high-end oncology is what patients demand and what a modern oncology center should offer.

  1. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM as Part of the Oncological Treatment: Survey about Patients' Attitude towards CAM in a University-Based Oncology Center in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin A Kessel

    Full Text Available To understand if and which patients would be open-minded to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM use parallel to their oncological treatment. Moreover, we sought to determine which methods are most accepted and which are the primary motivators to use CAM.We developed and anonymously conducted a questionnaire for patients in the oncology center (TU Munich. Questions focus on different CAM methods, previous experiences, and willingness to apply or use CAM when offered in a university-based setting.A total of 171 of 376 patients (37.4% women, 62.0% men, 0.6% unknown participated. This corresponds to a return rate of 45%. Median age was 64 years (17-87 years. Of all participants, 15.2% used CAM during their oncological therapy; 32.7% have used it in the past. The majority (81.9% was not using CAM during therapy; 55.5% have not used CAM in the past respectively. The analysis revealed a significant correlation between education and CAM use during therapy (r = 0.18; p = 0.02, and CAM use in the past (r = 0.17; p = 0.04. Of all patients using CAM during therapy, favored methods were food supplements (42.3%, vitamins/minerals (42.3%, massage (34.6%. Motivations are especially the reduction of side effect and stress, the positive effect of certain CAM-treatments on the immune system and tumor therapy. Results showed no difference between women and men. Most patients not having had any experience with CAM complain about the deficiency of information by their treating oncologist (31.4% as well as missing treatment possibilities (54.3%.Since many patients believe in study results demonstrating the efficacy of CAM, it stresses our task to develop innovative study protocols to investigate the outcomes of certain CAM on symptom reduction or other endpoints. Thus, prospective trials and innovative evidence-based treatment concepts to include CAM into high-end oncology is what patients demand and what a modern oncology center should offer.

  2. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Lais Pêgas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tufting enteropathy (TE, also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED, is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epithelial diseases, or to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. The authors report a case of a Brazilian child with TE associated with c.556-14A>G mutation in the EpCAM gene (NM_002354.2.

  3. Illness narratives in cancer: CAM and spiritual practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Anita; Evron, Lotte; Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: In this paper,we investigate Danish cancer patients’ narratives on spiritual beliefs and practices and the relationship these practices may have to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Design: Narrative inquiry is used to uncover how spiritual beliefs and practices may......, religious and spiritual issues were not extensively unfolded in participants’ illness narratives. However, these issues were significantly elaborated on in narratives by four female participants. Conclusion: We propose that for some cancer patients CAM may function, not only or primarily as a treatment...... for cancer related symptoms and side effects, but as a spiritual practice as well. For some individuals this may be true to an even higher extent than in established religious institutions....

  4. Tufting enteropathy with EpCAM mutation: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pêgas,Karla Lais; Cambruzzi,Eduardo; Ferrelli,Regis Schander; Silva,Carolina Soares da; Guedes,Renata Rostirola; Adami,Marina; Dias,Eduardo Montagner; Melere,Melina Utz; Ceza,Marilia Rosso; Steinhaus,Cintia; Epifanio,Matias; Salomon,Julie; Ferreira,Cristina Targa

    2014-01-01

    Tufting enteropathy (TE), also known as intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), is a rare congenital enteropathy related to an earlyonset of severe intractable diarrhea due to specific abnormalities of the intestinal epithelium and mutations of the EpCAM gene. TE is characterized by clinical and histological heterogeneity, such as with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria, and abnormalities of basement membrane. TE can be associated with malformations, other epith...

  5. Lucrécio, Camões e os deuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Torres

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo trata do uso que Lucrécio e Camões fizeram dos deuses da mitologia clássica, por razões pertinentes às convenções da poesia épica e a despeito de sua descrença na existência dos mesmos, sugerindo que ambos constróem os deuses para depois desconstruí-los de forma cabal e definitiva.

  6. Potentials for the Modified Cam-Clay model

    OpenAIRE

    Zouain , Nestor; Pontes , Ivaldo; Vaunat , Jean

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Energy and dissipation pseudo-potentials are employed to derive constitutive relationships, in the context of thermodynamic concepts, for the widely used Modified Cam-Clay (MCC) model for soil mechanics. A variational formulation of the MCC evolution equations is proposed in this paper. Since plastic collapse of MCC soils cannot be embedded in the classical limit analysis theory, finding the critical amplification of the load that produces plastic collapse is formulated in...

  7. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 2: Flexural strength testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Mevec, Daniel; Harrer, Walter; Lube, Tanja; Danzer, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Strength is one of the preferred parameters used in dentistry for determining clinical indication of dental restoratives. However, small dimensions of CAD/CAM blocks limit reliable measurements with standardized uniaxial bending tests. The objective of this study was to introduce the ball-on-three-ball (B3B) biaxial strength test for dental for small CAD/CAM block in the context of the size effect on strength predicted by the Weibull theory. Eight representative chairside CAD/CAM materials ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Specimens were prepared with highly polished surfaces in rectangular plate (12×12×1.2mm 3 ) or round disc (Ø=12mm, thickness=1.2mm) geometries. Specimens were tested using the B3B assembly and the biaxial strength was determined using calculations derived from finite element analyses of the respective stress fields. Size effects on strength were determined based on results from 4-point-bending specimens. A good agreement was found between the biaxial strength results for the different geometries (plates vs. discs) using the B3B test. Strength values ranged from 110.9MPa (Vitablocs Mark II) to 1303.21MPa (e.max ZirCAD). The strength dependency on specimen size was demonstrated through the calculated effective volume/surface. The B3B test has shown to be a reliable and simple method for determining the biaxial strength restorative materials supplied as small CAD/CAM blocks. A flexible solution was made available for the B3B test in the rectangular plate geometry. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biodistribution studies of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-directed monoclonal antibodies in the EpCAM-transgenic mouse tumor model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosterink, Jos G. W.; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N.; Hendrikse, Harry H.; Van Zanten, Jacoba; Van Garderen, Evert; Harmsen, Martin C.; De Leij, Lou F. M. H.

    2007-01-01

    The human pancarcinoma-associated epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) (EGP-2, CO17-1A) is a well-known target for carcinoma-directed immunotherapy. Mouse-derived mAbs directed to EpCAM have been used to treat colon carcinoma patients showing well-tolerable toxic side effects but limited

  9. An open CAM system for dentistry on the basis of China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and industrial CAM software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Liu, Shusheng; Shi, Shenggen; Yang, Jianzhong

    2011-10-01

    China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and domestically developed industrial computer-aided manufacture (CAM) technology were used for full crown fabrication and measurement of crown accuracy, with an attempt to establish an open CAM system for dental processing and to promote the introduction of domestic dental computer-aided design (CAD)/CAM system. Commercially available scanning equipment was used to make a basic digital tooth model after preparation of crown, and CAD software that comes with the scanning device was employed to design the crown by using domestic industrial CAM software to process the crown data in order to generate a solid model for machining purpose, and then China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool was used to complete machining of the whole crown and the internal accuracy of the crown internal was measured by using 3D-MicroCT. The results showed that China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool in combination with domestic industrial CAM technology can be used for crown making and the crown was well positioned in die. The internal accuracy was successfully measured by using 3D-MicroCT. It is concluded that an open CAM system for dentistry on the basis of China-made 5-axis simultaneous contouring CNC machine tool and domestic industrial CAM software has been established, and development of the system will promote the introduction of domestically-produced dental CAD/CAM system.

  10. Position paper -- Continuous air monitor (CAM) acquisition recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to document the decision not to acquire continuous air monitors (CAM's) from government excess/surplus supplies. The procurement plan for equipment to be acquired for project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF), stipulates that radiation monitoring equipment will be supplied by WHC via the stock retained within the excess/surplus inventory or utilization of procured instruments from canceled projects. Technological advances within the radiation detection industry have ultimately outdated the instruments that are available within the excess/surplus stock. These machines represent the technology of the 1970's era. The CAM models in use or within the excess/surplus supplies are obsolete and have been discontinued by the manufacturer. Therefore, the majority of the excess/surplus CAM's are being reacquired and disassembled by instrument shops for in-house acquisition of spare parts for the instruments that are still presently in-service. It is being recommended by W-236A projects department that the strategy to acquire surplus/excess radiation monitoring devices be modified. The recommendation is to directly procure instruments that are equal to the technology available within this industry

  11. CAMS newly detected meteor showers and the sporadic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, P.; Nénon, Q.; Gural, P. S.; Albers, J.; Haberman, B.; Johnson, B.; Morales, R.; Grigsby, B. J.; Samuels, D.; Johannink, C.

    2016-03-01

    The Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) video-based meteoroid orbit survey adds 60 newly identified showers to the IAU Working List of Meteor Showers (numbers 427, 445-446, 506-507, and part of 643-750). 28 of these are also detected in the independent SonotaCo survey. In total, 230 meteor showers and shower components are identified in CAMS data, 177 of which are detected in at least two independent surveys. From the power-law size frequency distribution of detected showers, we extrapolate that 36% of all CAMS-observed meteors originated from ∼700 showers above the N = 1 per 110,000 shower limit. 71% of mass falling to Earth from streams arrives on Jupiter-family type orbits. The transient Geminids account for another 15%. All meteoroids not assigned to streams form a sporadic background with highest detected numbers from the apex source, but with 98% of mass falling in from the antihelion source. Even at large ∼7-mm sizes, a Poynting-Robertson drag evolved population is detected, which implies that the Grün et al. collisional lifetimes at these sizes are underestimated by about a factor of 10. While these large grains survive collisions, many fade on a 104-y timescale, possibly because they disintegrate into smaller particles by processes other than collisions, leaving a more resilient population to evolve.

  12. Motion laws synthesis for cam mechanisms with multiple follower displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornyj, Yu I.; Skeeba, V. Yu; Kirillov, A. V.; Martynova, T. G.; Skeeba, P. Yu

    2018-03-01

    The research discusses the cam mechanisms design. The analysis of specialized literature indicates that the synthesis of the cam mechanisms laws of motion is currently done mainly by a standard set of acceleration curves. In some cases, the designer needs to synthesize a new acceleration law which should be task-specific and enforce a certain production step. The values of the technological loads and inertia forces loads generated by the mechanism are calculated to analyze the slay mechanism behavior in the production of closely woven fabrics. Mathematical packages MathCad and SolidWorks are used in calculations. As a result of the research, the authors propose the methodology for synthesizing the slay mechanism with multiple follower displacements for the point of contact between the reed and the fabric edge. Theoretical studies have been tested on a specific machine model (STB loom). The authors have synthesized the motion law of the filling threads beat-up mechanism for the production of strong fabrics. New basic and closing cam profiles are proposed. The results are designed to enhance the possibilities of the looms and to recommend the most efficient equipment operation modes for the producers.

  13. Gas exchange and leaf anatomy of a C3-CAM hybrid, Yucca gloriosa (Asparagaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyduk, Karolina; Burrell, Nia; Lalani, Falak; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2016-03-01

    While the majority of plants use the typical C3 carbon metabolic pathway, ~6% of angiosperms have adapted to carbon limitation as a result of water stress by employing a modified form of photosynthesis known as Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM plants concentrate carbon in the cells by temporally separating atmospheric carbon acquisition from fixation into carbohydrates. CAM has been studied for decades, but the evolutionary progression from C3 to CAM remains obscure. In order to better understand the morphological and physiological characteristics associated with CAM photosynthesis, phenotypic variation was assessed in Yucca aloifolia, a CAM species, Yucca filamentosa, a C3 species, and Yucca gloriosa, a hybrid species derived from these two yuccas exhibiting intermediate C3-CAM characteristics. Gas exchange, titratable leaf acidity, and leaf anatomical traits of all three species were assayed in a common garden under well-watered and drought-stressed conditions. Yucca gloriosa showed intermediate phenotypes for nearly all traits measured, including the ability to acquire carbon at night. Using the variation found among individuals of all three species, correlations between traits were assessed to better understand how leaf anatomy and CAM physiology are related. Yucca gloriosa may be constrained by a number of traits which prevent it from using CAM to as high a degree as Y. aloifolia. The intermediate nature of Y. gloriosa makes it a promising system in which to study the evolution of CAM. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  14. Temporal and spatial transcriptomic and microRNA dynamics of CAM photosynthesis in pineapple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Ching M; VanBuren, Robert; Zhang, Jisen; Huang, Lixian; Miao, Wenjing; Edger, Patrick P; Yim, Won C; Priest, Henry D; Meyers, Blake C; Mockler, Todd; Smith, J Andrew C; Cushman, John C; Ming, Ray

    2017-10-01

    The altered carbon assimilation pathway of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis results in an up to 80% higher water-use efficiency than C 3 photosynthesis in plants making it a potentially useful pathway for engineering crop plants with improved drought tolerance. Here we surveyed detailed temporal (diel time course) and spatial (across a leaf gradient) gene and microRNA (miRNA) expression patterns in the obligate CAM plant pineapple [Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.]. The high-resolution transcriptome atlas allowed us to distinguish between CAM-related and non-CAM gene copies. A differential gene co-expression network across green and white leaf diel datasets identified genes with circadian oscillation, CAM-related functions, and source-sink relations. Gene co-expression clusters containing CAM pathway genes are enriched with clock-associated cis-elements, suggesting circadian regulation of CAM. About 20% of pineapple microRNAs have diel expression patterns, with several that target key CAM-related genes. Expression and physiology data provide a model for CAM-specific carbohydrate flux and long-distance hexose transport. Together these resources provide a list of candidate genes for targeted engineering of CAM into C 3 photosynthesis crop species. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluating rare amino acid substitutions (RGC_CAMs in a yeast model clade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Polzin

    Full Text Available When inferring phylogenetic relationships, not all sites in a sequence alignment are equally informative. One recently proposed approach that takes advantage of this inequality relies on sites that contain amino acids whose replacement requires multiple substitutions. Identifying these so-called RGC_CAM substitutions (after Rare Genomic Changes as Conserved Amino acids-Multiple substitutions requires that, first, at any given site in the amino acid sequence alignment, there must be a minimum of two different amino acids; second, each amino acid must be present in at least two taxa; and third, the amino acids must require a minimum of two nucleotide substitutions to replace each other. Although theory suggests that RGC_CAM substitutions are expected to be rare and less likely to be homoplastic, the informativeness of RGC_CAM substitutions has not been extensively evaluated in biological data sets. We investigated the quality of RGC_CAM substitutions by examining their degree of homoplasy and internode certainty in nearly 2.7 million aligned amino acid sites from 5,261 proteins from five species belonging to the yeast Saccharomyces sensu stricto clade whose phylogeny is well-established. We identified 2,647 sites containing RGC_CAM substitutions, a number that contrasts sharply with the 100,887 sites containing RGC_non-CAM substitutions (i.e., changes between amino acids that require only a single nucleotide substitution. We found that RGC_CAM substitutions had significantly lower homoplasy than RGC_non-CAM ones; specifically RGC_CAM substitutions showed a per-site average homoplasy index of 0.100, whereas RGC_non-CAM substitutions had a homoplasy index of 0.215. Internode certainty values were also higher for sites containing RGC_CAM substitutions than for RGC_non-CAM ones. These results suggest that RGC_CAM substitutions possess a strong phylogenetic signal and are useful markers for phylogenetic inference despite their rarity.

  16. Pattern and predictors of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among pediatric patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Jan H; Reuner, Gitta; Kadish, Navah E; Pietz, Joachim; Schubert-Bast, Susanne

    2013-10-01

    Parents of pediatric patients with chronic conditions such as epilepsy increasingly opt for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, data on the pattern and reasons of CAM use in childhood epilepsy are scarce. The objectives of this study were as follows: first, to characterize CAM use among pediatric patients with epilepsy by assessing its spectrum, prevalence, costs, and frequency of use; second, to evaluate the influence of CAM use on compliance and satisfaction with conventional care as well as to explore parent-child neurologist communication concerning CAM; and third, to investigate predictors of CAM use. A postal survey was administered to all parents of pediatric outpatients with epilepsy aged 6 to 12, who have received treatment at the neuropediatric outpatient clinic of the University Children's Hospital Heidelberg between 2007 and 2009. One hundred thirty-two of the 297 distributed questionnaires were suitable for inclusion in statistical analysis (44.7%). Forty-nine participants indicated that their children used CAM during the previous year (37.1%). Thirty different types of CAM were used, with homeopathy (55.1%), osteopathy (24.5%), and kinesiology (16.3%) being the most commonly named. A mean of 86€ (0€-500€) and 3h (1 h-30 h) per month was committed to CAM treatment. Only 53% of the users informed their child neurologist of the additional CAM treatment, while 85.6% of all parents wished to discuss CAM options with their child neurologist. Seventy-five percent of users considered the CAM treatment effective. Among the participants most likely to seek CAM treatment are parents whose children show a long duration of epileptic symptoms, parents who make use of CAM treatment themselves, and parents who value a holistic and natural treatment approach. A substantial portion of pediatric patients with epilepsy receive CAM treatment. The high prevalence of use and significant level of financial and time resources spent on CAM indicate the

  17. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--the digital workflow from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapie, L; Lebon, N; Mawussi, B; Fron Chabouis, H; Duret, F; Attal, J-P

    2015-01-01

    As digital technology infiltrates every area of daily life, including the field of medicine, so it is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Apart from chairside practice, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental solutions can be considered a chain of digital devices and software for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use the technology often do not have the time or knowledge to understand it. A basic knowledge of the CAD/CAM digital workflow for dental restorations can help dentists to grasp the technology and purchase a CAM/CAM system that meets the needs of their office. This article provides a computer-science and mechanical-engineering approach to the CAD/CAM digital workflow to help dentists understand the technology.

  18. Demand for CAM Practice at Hospitals in Japan: A Population Survey in Mie Prefecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Togo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies have been provided at hospitals along with conventional medicine in industrialized nations. Previous studies conducted in Japan revealed high proportion of Japanese had experience of using CAM, but failed to discuss how it should be provided. The present study aims to clarify the demand for CAM practice at hospitals in Japan. A questionnaire consisting of 41 questions was mailed to 10 000 adults randomly selected from the electoral roll of Mie prefecture, Japan in January 2007. The questionnaire asked the subjects about demand for CAM practice at hospitals, types of CAM therapy to be provided and associated reasons. Sociodemographic characteristics, perceived health status, experience and purpose of CAM use, and information resource for CAM were also surveyed. Completed answers were collected from 2824 (28.6% respondents. Two thousand and nineteen (71.5% of the respondents demanded CAM practice at hospitals with the most likely reason of “patients can receive treatment under the guidance of a physicians”. The three most popular CAM therapies were Kampo, acupressure/massage/Shiatsu and acupuncture/moxibustion. The demand was positively associated with gender, ages of 40–59 years, annual household incomes of 5–7 million yen, occupation of specialist and technical workers and sales workers and poor health status. Higher demand was observed among those who used both CAM and conventional medical therapies for curative purposes. In conclusion, Japanese show a high demand for CAM practice, hoping to use CAM for curative purposes with monitoring by physicians at hospitals.

  19. Sobre figuras de oposição em dois sonetos de Camões

    OpenAIRE

    Marnoto, Rita

    2012-01-01

    (2012). Sobre figuras de oposição em dois sonetos de Camões. In Rita Marnoto (Coord.), Comentário a Camões. Vol. 1. Sonetos (147-204). Lisboa: CIEC, Cotovia. ISBN 978 972 795 330 1 figuras de oposição, visão histórica e seu uso em dois sonetos de Camões

  20. Introduction of effect and consideration of the introduction of CAD/CAM system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Man Ok

    1984-12-01

    This reports introduction of effect and consideration of the introduction of computer-aided design and computer aided manufacturing system. It includes outline of CAD/CAM system like definition, classification, system kinds, and development process of CAD/CAM system, technology, market trend development prospect, and value on introduction of this system, and current application of CAD/CAM system in major application area, development countries and Korea.

  1. Longevity of Single-Tooth All-Ceramic CAD/CAM Restorations: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    to the application of CAD/CAM technology in dentistry . The initial monetary investment for the equipment is significant. Systems currently on the...CURRENT DENTAL CAD/CAM SYSTEMS Current CAD/CAM systems in dentistry include: CEREC (CEramic REConstruction) and CEREC Acquisition Center (AC) with...of Adhesive Dentistry , 1 (3), 255- 265. 42     Bindl A, & Mörmann W. (2002). An up to 5-year clinical evaluation of posterior In- Ceram CAD

  2. Different CAD/CAM-processing routes for zirconia restorations: influence on fitting accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorst, Philipp; Junghanns, Janet; Dittmer, Marc P; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch, Meike

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different processing routes on the fitting accuracy of four-unit zirconia fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) fabricated by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Three groups of zirconia frameworks with ten specimens each were fabricated. Frameworks of one group (CerconCAM) were produced by means of a laboratory CAM-only system. The other frameworks were made with different CAD/CAM systems; on the one hand by in-laboratory production (CerconCAD/CAM) and on the other hand by centralized production in a milling center (Compartis) after forwarding geometrical data. Frameworks were then veneered with the recommended ceramics, and marginal accuracy was determined using a replica technique. Horizontal marginal discrepancy, vertical marginal discrepancy, absolute marginal discrepancy, and marginal gap were evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with the level of significance chosen at 0.05. Mean horizontal discrepancies ranged between 22 μm (CerconCAM) and 58 μm (Compartis), vertical discrepancies ranged between 63 μm (CerconCAD/CAM) and 162 μm (CerconCAM), and absolute marginal discrepancies ranged between 94 μm (CerconCAD/CAM) and 181 μm (CerconCAM). The marginal gap varied between 72 μm (CerconCAD/CAM) and 112 μm (CerconCAM, Compartis). Statistical analysis revealed that, with all measurements, the marginal accuracy of the zirconia FDPs was significantly influenced by the processing route used (p manufacture of four-unit FDPs.

  3. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to as...

  4. The use of CAM and conventional treatments among primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis Martyn; Croft Peter; Artus Majid

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the single most cited reason for use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Primary care is the most frequent conventional medical service used by patients with pain in the UK. We are unaware, however, of a direct evidence of the extent of CAM use by primary care patients, and how successful they perceive it to be. Methods Aims and objectives To determine CAM use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain who have consulted a...

  5. A systematic review of the traits and cognitions associated with use of and belief in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Niall; Moss, Tim; Galbraith, Victoria; Purewal, Satvinder

    2018-08-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use is widespread despite the controversy over its effectiveness. Although previous reviews have examined the demographics and attitudes of CAM users, there is no existing review on the traits or cognitions which characterise either CAM users or those who believe in CAM effectiveness. The current systematic review set out to address these gaps in the literature by applying a narrative synthesis. A bibliographic search and manual searches were undertaken and key authors were contacted. Twenty-three papers were selected. The trait openness to experience was positively associated with CAM use but not CAM belief. Absorption and various types of coping were also positively associated with CAM use and belief. No other trait was reliably associated with CAM use or belief. Intuitive thinking and ontological confusions were positively associated with belief in CAM effectiveness; intuitive thinking was also positively associated with CAM use. Studies researching cognitions in CAM use/belief were mostly on non-clinical samples, whilst studies on traits and CAM use/belief were mostly on patients. The quality of studies varied but unrepresentative samples, untested outcome measures and simplistic statistical analyses were the most common flaws. Traits and cognition might be important correlates of CAM use and also of faith in CAM.

  6. Verification of Kaplan turbine cam curves realization accuracy at power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džepčeski Dane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of approximately constant value of Kaplan turbine efficiency, for relatively large net head changes, is a result of turbine runner variable geometry. Dependence of runner blades position change on guide vane opening represents the turbine cam curve. The cam curve realization accuracy is of great importance for the efficient and proper exploitation of turbines and consequently complete units. Due to the reasons mentioned above, special attention has been given to the tests designed for cam curves verification. The goal of this paper is to provide the description of the methodology and the results of the tests performed in the process of Kaplan turbine cam curves verification.

  7. CAM for Pediatric Pain: What is State-of-the-Research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reviewed the evidence for the efficacy of CAM approaches for pediatric pain (volume 2; issue 2; 2005 using criteria developed by the American Psychological Association Division 12 Task Force. Our review focused on CAM modalities that had been tested with at least one controlled trial or multiple baseline study. In addition, only those trials in which children comprised the study sample were included. Thus, several CAM modalities were not included in our review. Key ethical and other reasons for the limited literature on CAM for pediatric pain as well as directions for future studies are discussed.

  8. Fiber-optical switch using cam-micromotor driven by scratch drive actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Hosoya, H.; Wada, A.; Hane, K.

    2005-01-01

    We fabricated a 1 × 1 fiber-optic switch using a cam-micromotor driven by scratch drive actuators (SDAs). Using the cam-micromotor, mechanical translation and precise positioning of an optical fiber were performed. An optical fiber of diameter 50 µm was bent and pushed out with a cam-mechanism driven by the SDAs fabricated by surface micromachining. The maximum rotation speed of the cam-micromotor was 7.5 rpm at a driving frequency of 1.5 kHz. The transient time of the switch to attenuate coupling efficiency less than -40 dB was around 10 ms.

  9. CamOn: A Real-Time Autonomous Camera Control System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Jhala, Arnav Harish

    2009-01-01

    This demonstration presents CamOn, an autonomous cam- era control system for real-time 3D games. CamOn employs multiple Artificial Potential Fields (APFs), a robot motion planning technique, to control both the location and orienta- tion of the camera. Scene geometry from the 3D environment...... contributes to the potential field that is used to determine po- sition and movement of the camera. Composition constraints for the camera are modelled as potential fields for controlling the view target of the camera. CamOn combines the compositional benefits of constraint- based camera systems, and improves...

  10. A review of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by people with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Sherri A

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, unpredictable disease of the central nervous system without a known cure. Because of this, people with MS often seek complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) to manage their disease symptoms. The goal of this review article was to describe the use of CAM by individuals diagnosed with MS. Evidence was obtained by searching Medline (1950-2007), EBSCOhost and PubMed for studies relating CAM to MS. Results from the literature showed that people with MS reported that they used CAM from 27 to 100%. The major reasons for choosing CAM were as follows: conventional treatment was not effective, anecdotal reports of CAM's help, and doctor referral. The types of CAM reported by people with MS included exercise, vitamins, herbal and mineral supplements, relaxation techniques, acupuncture, cannabis and massage. The major symptoms treated by CAM as noted in the literature were pain, fatigue and stress. There is a need for further research to evaluate the effectiveness of CAM with MS patients and their application by occupational therapists. The limitation of this literature review was the low response rate in many of the surveys reported. 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

  11. Initiating a Reiki or CAM program in a healthcare organization--developing a business plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) services, such as Reiki, continue to be offered to consumers in many hospitals and other health care organizations. There is growing interest among nurses, doctors, and other health care providers for the integration of CAM therapies into traditional settings. Health care organizations are responding to this need but may not know how to start CAM programs. Starting a Reiki program in a health care setting must be envisioned in a business model approach. This article introduces nurses and other health care providers to the basic concepts of business plan development and important steps to follow when starting a Reiki or CAM program.

  12. Development of PSA module for computerized accident management support (CAMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Yukihiro

    1996-10-01

    CAMS (Computerised Accident Management Support) is a system that will provide assistance in case of the accidents in a nuclear power plant. The PSA module was developed in order to give useful information in this situation applying the PSA method, which is a comprehensive source of safety knowledge. This module contains plant-specific PSA data, comprising event trees, failure probabilities etc. It has several event trees categorised according to the initiating events. Each event tree has an initiating event frequency and branching probabilities. The various support systems for branches are considered and their dependencies are calculated logically. This module can be activated by data from the state identification (SI) module of CAMS. If an initiating event occurs, the event tree is re-calculated and the PSA module shows which systems of the plant should be activated to bring the plant to a safe state. If the plant responds to the event in the normal way, the plant will be shut down and come to a safe state. However, if some functions do not work, the PSA module generates another path and gives information about the critical systems. If the state of the plant is changed, either by the operators or automatically by the control system, the PSA module follows the new path. Because the estimation of the core damage frequency should be very quick in the accident situation, a simplified model of the event tree and fault trees was adopted. It enabled the PSA module to calculates the CDF within 5 seconds on a standard type work station. The development of the module has been successful. However, further development of the functionality of the module is suggested like real connection to a plant and to the strategy generator module of CAMS, applications for operational support, low power operation optimisation, etc. (author)

  13. Optical properties of CAD-CAM ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Nogueira, Audrea D; Pecho, Oscar E

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the direct transmittance (T%), translucency, opacity and opalescence of CAD-CAM ceramic systems and the correlation between the translucency parameter (TP) and the contrast ratio (CR). Specimens of shades A1, A2 and A3 (n=5) were fabricated from CAD-CAM ceramic blocks (IPS e.max(®) CAD HT and LT, IPS Empress(®) CAD HT and LT, Paradigm™ C, and VITABLOCS(®) Mark II) and polished to 1.0±0.01mm in thickness. A spectrophotometer (Lambda 20) was used to measure T% on the wavelength range of 400-780nm. Another spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade(®) Advance) was used to measure the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) coordinates and the reflectance value (Y) of samples on white and black backgrounds. TP, CR and the opalescence parameter (OP) were calculated. Data were statistically analysed using VAF (variance accounting for) coefficient with Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, Bonferroni correction and Pearson's correlation. T% of some ceramic systems is dependent on the wavelength. The spectral behaviour showed a slight and constant increase in T% up to approximately 550nm, then some ceramics changed the behaviour as the wavelength gets longer. TP and CR values ranged, respectively, from 16.79 to 21.69 and from 0.52 to 0.64 (r(2)=-0.97). OP values ranged from 3.01 to 7.64. The microstructure of CAD-CAM ceramic systems influenced the optical properties. TP and CR showed a strong correlation for all ceramic systems evaluated. Yet, all ceramics showed some degree of light transmittance. In addition to shade, this study showed that other optical properties influence on the natural appearance of dental ceramics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. CAD/CAM and scientific data management at Dassault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, P.

    1984-01-01

    The history of CAD/CAM and scientific data management at Dassault are presented. Emphasis is put on the targets of the now commercially available software CATIA. The links with scientific computations such as aerodynamics and structural analysis are presented. Comments are made on the principles followed within the company. The consequences of the approximative nature of scientific data are examined. Consequence of the new history function is mainly its protection against copy or alteration. Future plans at Dassault for scientific data appear to be in opposite directions compared to some general tendencies.

  15. Electromigration of /sup 153,154/Eu on CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xianyun, He; Peiji, Chong

    1986-05-01

    The electromigration of /sup 153,154/Eu was studied with cellulose acetate membrane (CAM) as the supporting material. The factors influencing the migration were investigated, including electric field intensity, concentration and pH of the electrolyte, ionic strength and temperature. The stability constant of EuR/sup 2+/ complex and its electromobility were determined to be 1549 and 1.2 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sup 2//s. V respectively under the following conditions: (alpha-HIBA) = 0.4 M, mu = 0.01, Voltage = 1000 V.

  16. Strong discontinuity with cam clay under large deformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katic, Natasa; Hededal, Ole

    2008-01-01

    The work shows simultaneous implementation of Strong discontinuity approach (SDA) by means of Enhanced Assumed Strain (EAS) and Critical State Soil Mechanics CSSM) in large strain regime. The numerical model is based on an additive decomposition of the displacement gradient into a conforming and ...... and an enhanced part. The localized deformations are approximated by means of a discontinuous displacement field. The applied algorithm leads to a predictor/corrector procedure which is formally identical to the returnmapping algorithm of classical (local and continuous) Cam clay model....

  17. Applying DER-CAM for IIT Microgrid Explansion Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Li, Zuyi [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Wang, Jianhui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Chen [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-19

    The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) is an economic and environmental model of customer DER adoption. This model has been in development at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory since 2000. The objective of the model is to find optimal DER investments while minimizing total energy costs or carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, or achieving a weighted objective that simultaneously considers both criteria. The Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT) Microgrid project started in August 2008, and the majority of the project was completed in May 2013. IIT Microgrid, funded mostly by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as State and philanthropic contributions, empowers the campus consumers with the objective of establishing a smart microgrid that is highly reliable, economically viable, environmentally friendly, fuel-efficient, and resilient in extreme circumstances with a self-healing capability. In this project, we apply DER-CAM to study the expansion planning of the IIT Microgrid. First, the load data, environmental data, utility data, and technology data for the IIT Microgrid are gathered and organized to follow the DER-CAM input requirements. Then, DERCAM is applied to study the expansion planning of the IIT Microgrid for different cases, where different objectives in DER-CAM and different utility conditions are tested. Case 1 considers the objective of minimizing energy costs with fixed utility rates and 100% electric utility availability. Case 2 considers the objective of minimizing energy costs with real-time utility rates and 4 emergency weeks when the IIT Microgrid does not have access to the electric utility grid and has to operate in island mode. In Case 3, the utility rates are restored to fixed values and 100% electric utility availability is assumed, but a weighted multi-objective (Obj: a × costs + b × CO2 emissions, where a and b are weights for cost minimization and CO2 emissions minimization) is utilized to

  18. The use of CAM and conventional treatments among primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Martyn

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the single most cited reason for use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. Primary care is the most frequent conventional medical service used by patients with pain in the UK. We are unaware, however, of a direct evidence of the extent of CAM use by primary care patients, and how successful they perceive it to be. Methods Aims and objectives To determine CAM use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain who have consulted about their pain in primary care. Study design Face-to-face interview-based survey. Setting Three general practices in North Staffordshire. Participants Respondents to a population pain survey who had reported having musculoskeletal pain in the survey and who had consulted about their pain in primary care in the previous 12 months as well as consenting to further research and agreeing to an interview. Information was gathered about their pain and the use of all treatments for pain, including CAM, in the previous year. Results 138 interviews were completed. 116 participants (84% had used at least one CAM treatment for pain in the previous year. 65% were current users of CAM. The ratio of over-the-counter CAM use to care from a CAM provider was 3:2. 111 participants (80% had used conventional treatment. 95 (69% were using a combination of CAM and conventional treatment. Glucosamine and fish oil were the most commonly used CAM treatments (38%, 35% respectively. Most CAM treatments were scored on average as being helpful, and users indicated that they intended to use again 87% of the CAM treatments they had already used. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that most primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain have used CAM in the previous year, usually in combination with conventional treatments. The high prevalence and wide range of users experiences of benefit and harm from CAM strengthen the argument for more research into this type of medicine

  19. The use of CAM and conventional treatments among primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artus, Majid; Croft, Peter; Lewis, Martyn

    2007-05-04

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is the single most cited reason for use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Primary care is the most frequent conventional medical service used by patients with pain in the UK. We are unaware, however, of a direct evidence of the extent of CAM use by primary care patients, and how successful they perceive it to be. To determine CAM use among patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain who have consulted about their pain in primary care. Face-to-face interview-based survey. Three general practices in North Staffordshire. Respondents to a population pain survey who had reported having musculoskeletal pain in the survey and who had consulted about their pain in primary care in the previous 12 months as well as consenting to further research and agreeing to an interview. Information was gathered about their pain and the use of all treatments for pain, including CAM, in the previous year. 138 interviews were completed. 116 participants (84%) had used at least one CAM treatment for pain in the previous year. 65% were current users of CAM. The ratio of over-the-counter CAM use to care from a CAM provider was 3:2. 111 participants (80%) had used conventional treatment. 95 (69%) were using a combination of CAM and conventional treatment. Glucosamine and fish oil were the most commonly used CAM treatments (38%, 35% respectively). Most CAM treatments were scored on average as being helpful, and users indicated that they intended to use again 87% of the CAM treatments they had already used. We provide direct evidence that most primary care consulters with chronic musculoskeletal pain have used CAM in the previous year, usually in combination with conventional treatments. The high prevalence and wide range of users experiences of benefit and harm from CAM strengthen the argument for more research into this type of medicine to quantify benefit and assess safety. The observation that most users of conventional medicine also used CAM

  20. Family medicine residency program directors attitudes and knowledge of family medicine CAM competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum using an online survey tool. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. A survey was distributed by the Council of Academic Family Medicine (CAFM) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via e-mail. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded, giving a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into the residency curriculum. Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In terms of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum; yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%); and financial resources (29%). While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers that prevent residencies from implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biofuel crops with CAM photosynthesis: Economic potential on moisture-limited lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Mark; Hartzell, Samantha; Porporato, Amilcare

    2017-04-01

    As the demand for food and renewable energy increases, the intelligent utilization of marginal lands is becoming increasingly critical. In marginal lands classified by limited rainfall or soil salinity, the cultivation of traditional C3 and C4 photosynthesis crops often is economically infeasible. However, in such lands, nontraditional crops with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) photosynthesis show great economic potential for cultivation. CAM crops including Opuntia (prickly pear) and Ananas (pineapple) achieve a water use efficiency which is three fold higher than C4 crops such as corn and 6-fold higher than C3 crops such as wheat, leading to a comparable annual productivity with only 20% of the water demand. This feature, combined with a shallow rooting depth and a high water storage capacity, allows CAM plants to take advantage of small, infrequent rainfall amounts in shallow, quickly draining soils. Furthermore, CAM plants typically have properties (e.g., high content of non-structural carbohydrates) that are favorable for biofuel production. Here, for marginal lands characterized by low soil moisture availability and/or high salinity, we assess the potential productivity and economic benefits of CAM plants. CAM productivity is estimated using a recently developed model which simulates CAM photosynthesis under a range of soil and climate conditions. From these results, we compare the energy and water resource inputs required by CAM plants to those required by more traditional C3 and C4 crops (corn, wheat, sorghum), and we evaluate the economic potential of CAM crops as sources of food, fodder, or biofuel in marginal soils. As precipitation events become more intense and infrequent, we show that even though marginal land area may increase, CAM crop cultivation shows great promise for maintaining high productivity with minimal water inputs. Our analysis indicates that on marginal lands, widespread cultivation of CAM crops as biofuel feedstock may help

  2. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, Meena S.; Ma Shuangge; Jagsi, Reshma; Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan; Higgins, Susan A.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Lloyd, Shane; Peschel, Richard; Gaudreau, Bryant; Rockwell, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  3. Disclosure of Complementary and Alternative Medicine to Conventional Medical Providers: Variation by Race/Ethnicity and Type of CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Maria T.; Wade, Christine; Kronenberg, Fredi

    2009-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is often used alongside conventional medical care, yet fewer than half of patients disclose CAM use to medical doctors. CAM disclosure is particularly low among racial/ethnic minorities, but reasons for differences, such as type of CAM used or quality of conventional healthcare, have not been explored. Objective We tested the hypotheses that disclosure of CAM use to medical doctors is higher for provider-based CAM and among non-Hispanic whites, and that access to and quality of conventional medical care account for racial/ethnic differences in CAM disclosure. Methods Bivariate and multiple variable analyses of the 2002 National Health Interview Survey and 2001 Health Care Quality Survey were performed. Results Disclosure of CAM use to medical providers was higher for provider-based than self-care CAM. Disclosure of any CAM was associated with access to and quality of conventional care and higher among non-Latino whites relative to minorities. Having a regular doctor and quality patient–provider relationship mitigated racial/ethnic differences in CAM disclosure. Conclusion Insufficient disclosure of CAM use to conventional providers, particularly for self-care practices and among minority populations, represents a serious challenge in medical encounter communications. Efforts to improve disclosure of CAM use should be aimed at improving consistency of care and patient–physician communication across racial/ethnic groups. PMID:19024232

  4. Dental calculus detection using the VistaCam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibaie, Fardad; Walsh, Laurence J

    2016-12-01

    The VistaCam® intra-oral camera system (Dürr Dental, Bietigheim-Bissingen, Germany) is a fluorescence system using light emitting diodes that produce a 405-nm violet light. This wavelength has potential application for detection of dental calculus based on red emissions from porphyrin molecules. This study assessed the digital scores obtained for both supragingival and subgingival calculus on 60 extracted teeth and compared these with lesions of dental caries. It has also examined the effect of saliva and blood on the fluorescence readings for dental calculus. VistaCam fluorescence scores for both supragingival (1.7-3.3) and subgingival calculus (1.3-2.4) were higher than those for sound root surfaces (0.9-1.1) and dental caries (0.9-2.2) ( p  calculus samples were not affected by the presence of saliva or blood. These results suggest that the use of violet light fluorescence could be a possible adjunct to clinical examination for deposits of dental calculus.

  5. Rational redesign of the biodegradative enzyme cytochrome P450 cam:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornstein, R.; Paulsen, M.; Bass, M.; Arnold, G.

    1991-03-01

    Cytochromes P450, a superfamily of monooxygenase enzymes present in all kingdoms of living organisms, are very versatile with respect to substrate range and catalytic functionality. Many recalcitrant halogenated hydrocarbons, on DOE sites and throughout the nation, result in serious environmental impact. Cytochromes P450 have been shown to be catalytically capable of, at least partial, dehalogenation of some such compounds. Clearly, however, their active site stereochemistry and related functional components are not well suited for this role because the rates of dehalogenation are generally rather modest. The evolution of modified active site and access channel structures may proceed very slowly if multiple genetic changes are simultaneously required for enzyme adaptation. Since each mutational event is by itself a rare event, a basic premise of our research is that designing multiple changes into an enzyme may be more timely than waiting for them to occur biologically either via natural selection or under laboratory-controlled conditions. Starting with available high-resolution x-ray crystal structures, molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have been used to probe the basic structure/function principles and conformational fluctuations of the biodegradative enzyme, cytochrome P450cam (camphor hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida) and active site mutants, to provide the fundamental understanding necessary for rational engineering of the enzyme for modified substrate specificity. In the present paper, we review our progress to data, in the area of molecular dynamics simulations and active site redesign of P450cam. 36 refs., 2 figs

  6. Removal of trimethylamine (fishy odor) by C₃ and CAM plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraphech, Phattara; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2015-08-01

    From screening 23 plant species, it was found that Pterocarpus indicus (C3) and Sansevieria trifasciata (crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)) were the most effective in polar gaseous trimethylamine (TMA) uptake, reaching up to 90% uptake of initial TMA (100 ppm) within 8 h, and could remove TMA at cycles 1-4 without affecting photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry. Up to 55 and 45% of TMA was taken up by S. trifasciata stomata and leaf epicuticular wax, respectively. During cycles 1-4, interestingly, S. trifasciata changed its stomata apertures, which was directly induced by gaseous TMA and light treatments. In contrast, for P. indicus the leaf epicuticular wax and stem were the major pathways of TMA removal, followed by stomata; these pathways accounted for 46, 46, and 8%, respectively, of TMA removal percentages. Fatty acids, particularly tetradecanoic (C14) acid and octadecanoic (C18) acid, were found to be the main cuticular wax components in both plants, and were associated with TMA removal ability. Moreover, the plants could degrade TMA via multiple metabolic pathways associated with carbon/nitrogen interactions. In CAM plants, one of the crucial pathways enabled 78% of TMA to be transformed directly to dimethylamine (DMA) and methylamine (MA), which differed from C3 plant pathways. Various metabolites were also produced for further detoxification and mineralization so that TMA was completely degraded by plants.

  7. Status of the NectarCAM camera project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glicenstein, J.F.; Delagnes, E.; Fesquet, M.; Louis, F.; Moudden, Y.; Moulin, E.; Nunio, F.; Sizun, P.

    2014-01-01

    NectarCAM is a camera designed for the medium-sized telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) covering the central energy range 100 GeV to 30 TeV. It has a modular design based on the NECTAr chip, at the heart of which is a GHz sampling Switched Capacitor Array and 12-bit Analog to Digital converter. The camera will be equipped with 265 7-photomultiplier modules, covering a field of view of 7 to 8 degrees. Each module includes the photomultiplier bases, High Voltage supply, pre-amplifier, trigger, readout and Thernet transceiver. Events recorded last between a few nanoseconds and tens of nanoseconds. A flexible trigger scheme allows to read out very long events. NectarCAM can sustain a data rate of 10 kHz. The camera concept, the design and tests of the various sub-components and results of thermal and electrical prototypes are presented. The design includes the mechanical structure, the cooling of electronics, read-out, clock distribution, slow control, data-acquisition, trigger, monitoring and services. A 133-pixel prototype with full scale mechanics, cooling, data acquisition and slow control will be built at the end of 2014. (authors)

  8. Transcription factors and molecular epigenetic marks underlying EpCAM overexpression in ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, B. T. F.; de Groote, M. L.; Kazemier, H. G.; Arendzen, A. J.; Terpstra, P.; Ruiters, M. H. J.; McLaughlin, P. M. J.; Rots, M. G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is overexpressed on carcinomas, and its downregulation inhibits the oncogenic potential of multiple tumour types. Here, we investigated underlying mechanisms of epcam overexpression in ovarian carcinoma. METHODS: Expression of EpCAM and DNA

  9. Camões e Garret: navegações do Restelo a Cascais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Motta Oliveira

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Esse ensaio pretende analisar a presença de Luís de Camões, em especialdo Camões épico, em algumas das principais obras de Almeida Garrett, mostrando que essa presença faz uma navegação que partindo de Restelo chega a Cascais.

  10. Community asset mapping, mobilisation and management (CA/M) approach: a case study

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Saidi, MEM

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available by the community. The paper will present a practical application and recommendations based on a CA/M implementation in the Imperani Tourism and Training Centre (ITTC) project in Ficksburg. The ITTC experience has contributed to the development of a CA/M Guideline...

  11. Lyapunov-based constrained engine torque control using electronic throttle and variable cam timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feru, E.; Lazar, M.; Gielen, R.H.; Kolmanovsky, I.V.; Di Cairano, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, predictive control of a spark ignition engine equipped with an electronic throttle and a variable cam timing actuator is considered. The objective is to adjust the throttle angle and the engine cam timing in order to reduce the exhaust gas emissions while maintaining fast and

  12. Cam-Follower Mechanism Design for Narrow Loom Beat Up Motion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The topology of the kinematics is developed by using the graph theory method of kinematic synthesis. The forces required to drive the plate-cam and follower system were modeled and the components such as the plate-cam, camshaft, the follower and the drive mechanism were synthesized for smooth operation of the ...

  13. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Treatments by Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christon, Lillian M.; Mackintosh, Virginia H.; Myers, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may elect to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments with their children in place of, or in addition to, conventional treatments. CAM treatments are controversial and understudied and, for most, the efficacy has not been established. The current study (n = 248) examined…

  14. Effects of competition on induction of crassulacean acid metabolism in a facultative CAM plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo; Li, Wei; He, Yongli

    2017-06-01

    Abiotic drivers of environmental stress have been found to induce CAM expression (nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM species such as Mesembryanthemum crystallinum. The role played by biotic factors such as competition with non-CAM species in affecting CAM expression, however, remains largely understudied. This research investigated the effects of salt and water conditions on the competition between M. crystallinum and the C 3 grass Bromus mollis with which it is found to coexist in California's coastal grasslands. We also investigated the extent to which CAM expression in M. crystallinum was affected by the intensity of the competition with B. mollis. We found that M. crystallinum had a competitive advantage over B. mollis in drought and saline conditions, while B. mollis exerted strong competitive effects on M. crystallinum in access to light and soil nutrients in high water conditions. This strong competitive effect even outweighed the favorable effects of salt or water additions in increasing the biomass and productivity of M. crystallinum in mixture. Regardless of salt conditions, M. crystallinum did not switch to CAM photosynthesis in response to this strong competitive effect from B. mollis. Disturbance (i.e., grass cutting) reduced the competitive pressure by B. mollis and allowed for CAM expression in M. crystallinum when it was grown mixed with B. mollis. We suggest that moderate competition with other functional groups can enhance CAM expression in M. crystallinum, thereby affecting its plasticity and ability to cope with biological stress.

  15. Marginal adaptation and CAD-CAM technology: A systematic review of restorative material and fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2018-04-01

    The comparative assessment of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology and other fabrication techniques pertaining to marginal adaptation should be documented. Limited evidence exists on the effect of restorative material on the performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether the marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM single crowns, fixed dental prostheses, and implant-retained fixed dental prostheses or their infrastructures differs from that obtained by other fabrication techniques using a similar restorative material and whether it depends on the type of restorative material. An electronic search of English-language literature published between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2016, was conducted of the Medline/PubMed database. Of the 55 included comparative studies, 28 compared CAD-CAM technology with conventional fabrication techniques, 12 contrasted CAD-CAM technology and copy milling, 4 compared CAD-CAM milling with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), and 22 investigated the performance of a CAD-CAM system regarding marginal adaptation in restorations/infrastructures produced with different restorative materials. Most of the CAD-CAM restorations/infrastructures were within the clinically acceptable marginal discrepancy (MD) range. The performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation is influenced by the restorative material. Compared with CAD-CAM, most of the heat-pressed lithium disilicate crowns displayed equal or smaller MD values. Slip-casting crowns exhibited similar or better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with CAD-CAM. Cobalt-chromium and titanium implant infrastructures produced using a CAD-CAM system elicited smaller MD values than zirconia. The majority of cobalt-chromium restorations/infrastructures produced by DMLS displayed better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with the casting technique. Compared with copy

  16. Treatment expectations for CAM interventions in pediatric chronic pain patients and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jennie C I; Meldrum, Marcia; Bursch, Brenda; Jacob, Margaret C; Kim, Su C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2005-12-01

    Patient expectations regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) interventions have important implications for treatment adherence, attrition and clinical outcome. Little is known, however, about parent and child treatment expectations regarding CAM approaches for pediatric chronic pain problems. The present study examined ratings of the expected benefits of CAM (i.e. hypnosis, massage, acupuncture, yoga and relaxation) and conventional medicine (i.e. medications, surgery) interventions in 45 children (32 girls; mean age = 13.8 years +/- 2.5) and parents (39 mothers) presenting for treatment at a specialty clinic for chronic pediatric pain. Among children, medications and relaxation were expected to be significantly more helpful than the remaining approaches (P CAM to be fairly low with parents' expectations only somewhat more positive. The current findings suggest that educational efforts directed at enhancing treatment expectations regarding CAM, particularly among children with chronic pain, are warranted.

  17. Ceramic dental biomaterials and CAD/CAM technology: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Raymond Wai Kim; Chow, Tak Wah; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2014-10-01

    Ceramics are widely used as indirect restorative materials in dentistry because of their high biocompatibility and pleasing aesthetics. The objective is to review the state of the arts of CAD/CAM all-ceramic biomaterials. CAD/CAM all-ceramic biomaterials are highlighted and a subsequent literature search was conducted for the relevant subjects using PubMed followed by manual search. Developments in CAD/CAM technology have catalyzed researches in all-ceramic biomaterials and their applications. Feldspathic glass ceramic and glass infiltrated ceramic can be fabricated by traditional laboratory methods or CAD/CAM. The advent of polycrystalline ceramics is a direct result of CAD/CAM technology without which the fabrication would not have been possible. The clinical uses of these ceramics have met with variable clinical success. Multiple options are now available to the clinicians for the fabrication of aesthetic all ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenotype-dependent effects of EpCAM expression on growth and invasion of human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martowicz, Agnieszka; Spizzo, Gilbert; Gastl, Guenther; Untergasser, Gerold

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer and stem cells and has emerged as an attractive target for immunotherapy of breast cancer patients. This study analyzes the effects of EpCAM on breast cancer cell lines with epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype. For this purpose, shRNA-mediated knockdown of EpCAM gene expression was performed in EpCAM high breast cancer cell lines with epithelial phenotype (MCF-7, T47D and SkBR3). Moreover, EpCAM low breast carcinoma cell lines with mesenchymal phenotype (MDA-MB-231, Hs578t) and inducible overexpression of EpCAM were used to study effects on proliferation, migration and in vivo growth. In comparison to non-specific silencing controls (n/s-crtl) knockdown of EpCAM (E#2) in EpCAM high cell lines resulted in reduced cell proliferation under serum-reduced culture conditions. Moreover, DNA synthesis under 3D culture conditions in collagen was significantly reduced. Xenografts of MCF-7 and T47D cells with knockdown of EpCAM formed smaller tumors that were less invasive. EpCAM low cell lines with tetracycline-inducible overexpression of EpCAM showed no increased cell proliferation or migration under serum-reduced growth conditions. MDA-MB-231 xenografts with EpCAM overexpression showed reduced invasion into host tissue and more infiltrates of chicken granulocytes. The role of EpCAM in breast cancer strongly depends on the epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype of tumor cells. Cancer cells with epithelial phenotype need EpCAM as a growth- and invasion-promoting factor, whereas tumor cells with a mesenchymal phenotype are independent of EpCAM in invasion processes and tumor progression. These findings might have clinical implications for EpCAM-based targeting strategies in patients with invasive breast cancer

  19. CAM use in pediatric neurology: an exploration of concurrent use with conventional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicia-Connolly, Elaine; Adams, Denise; Bateman, Justin; Dagenais, Simon; Clifford, Tammy; Baydala, Lola; King, W James; Vohra, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that up to 60% of children with neurologic conditions have tried complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). To assess the use of CAM among patients presenting to neurology clinics at two academic centers in Canada. A survey instrument was developed to inquire about use of CAM products and therapies, including reasons for use, perceived helpfulness, and concurrent use with conventional medicine, and administered to patients or their parents/guardians at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa. Overall CAM use at the Stollery was 78%, compared to 48% at CHEO. The most common CAM products used were multi-vitamins (84%), vitamin C (37%), homeopathic remedies (24%), and fish oil/omega 3 s (22%). The most common CAM practices used were massage (47%), chiropractic (37%), faith healing (18%), aromatherapy (16%), homeopathy (16%), and relaxation (16%). Many patients used CAM products at the same time as conventional medicine but just over half (57%) discussed this concurrent use with their physician. CAM use is common in pediatric neurology patients and most respondents felt that it was helpful, with few or no harms associated. However, this use is often undisclosed, increasing possibility of interactions with conventional drugs. We urge clinicians to inquire about CAM use during routine history taking at every patient visit. Parents would clearly like more information about CAM from their specialty clinics; such information would be easier to share if more primary data were available about the safety and effectiveness of commonly used therapies.

  20. Is Ep-CAM Expression a Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarker for Colorectal Cancer? A Systematic Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu Han

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: The present findings suggest that Ep-CAM expression may be associated with CRC carcinogenesis, while the loss of Ep-CAM expression is correlated with the progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis of CRC. Ep-CAM expression may be a useful biomarker for the clinical diagnosis of CRC.

  1. Prevalence and Predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Use among Ivy League College Students: Implications for Student Health Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versnik Nowak, Amy L.; DeGise, Joe; Daugherty, Amanda; O'Keefe, Richard; Seward, Samuel, Jr.; Setty, Suma; Tang, Fanny

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Determine prevalence and types of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies used and test the significance of demographics and social cognitive constructs as predictors of CAM use in a college sample. Secondary purpose was to guide the integration of CAM therapies into college health services. Participants: Random,…

  2. Accuracy of CAD-CAM-fabricated removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Christin; Hey, Jeremias; Schweyen, Ramona; Setz, Jürgen M

    2018-04-01

    The conventional fabrication of removable partial dentures (RPDs) is a complex, error-prone, time-consuming, and expensive process. The use of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) techniques, especially rapid prototyping, promises a more effective method for fabricating RPD frameworks. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the fit of RPD clasps fabricated by means of 4 different CAD-CAM-systems and to compare those fittings with that of the conventional lost-wax casting technique (LWT). A master model of a partially edentulous maxilla with the canines and second molars as the remaining teeth was fabricated. After the model was optically scanned, we designed a quadrangularly supported RPD with 4 clasps and a palatal strap major connector. A standard tessellation language data set was used to fabricate 12 identical RPDs by using 4 different CAD-CAM techniques: indirect rapid prototyping (wax inject printing combined with LWT), direct rapid prototyping (selective laser melting), indirect milling (wax milling with LWT), and direct milling (resin milling [polyetheretherketone]). Three conventionally cast RPDs (LWT) served as the control group. The fit accuracy of the clasps (n=12 for each group) was determined in both the horizontal and vertical dimensions by using light microscopy. Indirectly milled RPDs (117 ±34 μm horizontal and 45 ±21 μm vertical) and directly milled RPDs (43 ±23 μm horizontal, and 38 ±21 μm vertical) showed significantly better (P<.05) fit than did conventionally fabricated LWT RPDs (133 ±59 μm horizontal; 73 ±25 μm vertical). The worst fit was found for RPDs fabricated using indirect rapid prototyping (323 ±188 μm horizontal and 112 ±60 μm vertical) or direct rapid prototyping (365 ±205 μm horizontal and 363 ±133 μm vertical), which were unstable on the master model, making them unsuitable for clinical use. Most RPDs exhibited smaller vertical measuring distances. Compared with the LWT

  3. Lacie phase 1 Classification and Mensuration Subsystem (CAMS) rework experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhikara, R. S.; Hsu, E. M.; Liszcz, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment was designed to test the ability of the Classification and Mensuration Subsystem rework operations to improve wheat proportion estimates for segments that had been processed previously. Sites selected for the experiment included three in Kansas and three in Texas, with the remaining five distributed in Montana and North and South Dakota. The acquisition dates were selected to be representative of imagery available in actual operations. No more than one acquisition per biophase were used, and biophases were determined by actual crop calendars. All sites were worked by each of four Analyst-Interpreter/Data Processing Analyst Teams who reviewed the initial processing of each segment and accepted or reworked it for an estimate of the proportion of small grains in the segment. Classification results, acquisitions and classification errors and performance results between CAMS regular and ITS rework are tabulated.

  4. Innovative Design of Cam-Controlled Planetary Gear Trains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsiang Hsieh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to perform the innovation design for the new structures of cam-controlled planetary gear trains (CCPGTs, based on the creative mechanism design methodology. Firstly, the design requirements and design constraints are summarized according to the kinematics characteristics of existing CCPGTs. Then, the (4, 5 and (5, 7 graphs are generated by the theory of number synthesis. After that, the atlas of feasible specialized graphs is obtained. Finally, the atlas of new designs is obtained through the particularization process. In addition, an illustrated example is given, and the feasibility of the design is verified by computer simulation using ADAMS software. The result indicates that new design can produce a more wide range of non-uniform motion than the existing design. Therefore, they are better alternatives for driving a variable speed input mechanism.

  5. Paper-Less CAD/CAM For Accelerator Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, R M; Alford, O; Bertolini, L R

    2001-01-01

    Computer-aided design and manufacture (CAD/CAM) have enabled advances in the design and manufacture of many accelerator components, though government procurement rules tend to inhibit its use. We developed and executed a method that provides adequate documentation for the procurement process, industrial vendor manufacturing processes, and laboratory installation activities. We detail our experiences in the design and manufacture of 60 separate and unique PEP-II Low Energy Ring Interaction Region vacuum chambers totaling ∼ 140m in length as an example of how we used this technique, reducing design effort and manufacturing risk while streamlining the production process. We provide ''lessons learned'' to better implement and execute the process in subsequent iterations. We present our study to determine the estimated savings in the design and production of the Spallation Neutron Source room temperature linac if this process were utilized

  6. Model-Based Engineering and Manufacturing CAD/CAM Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domm, T.D.; Underwood, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    than a single computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) system. The Inteznet was a technology that all companies were considering to either transport information more easily throughout the corporation or as a conduit for business, as the small firm was doing Successfully. Because PrdEngineer is the de facto CAD standard fbr the NWC, the Benchmark Team targeted companies using Parametric Technology Corporation (PTC) software tools. Most of the companies used Pm'Engineer for design to some degree, but found the PTC CAM product, PdManufacture lacking as compared to alternate CAM solutions. All of the companies visited found the data exchange between CAD/CAM systems problematic. It was apparent that these companies were trying to consolidate their software tools to reduce translation but had not been able to do so because no single solution had all the needed capabilities. In regard to organizational structure and human resources, two companies were found to be using product or program teams. These teams consisted of the technical staff capable of completing the entire task and were xmintained throughout the project. This same strategy was evident at another of the companies but with more mobility of members. For all companies visited except the small work structure breakdown and responsibility were essentially the same as Y-12's at this time. The functions of numerical control (NC), desi and process planning were separate and distinct. The team made numerous recommendations that are detailed in the report

  7. Grinding damage assessment for CAD-CAM restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Philippe; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Anselm Wiskott, H W; Durual, Stéphane; Scherrer, Susanne S

    2017-03-01

    To assess surface/subsurface damage after grinding with diamond discs on five CAD-CAM restorative materials and to estimate potential losses in strength based on crack size measurements of the generated damage. The materials tested were: Lithium disilicate (LIT) glass-ceramic (e.max CAD), leucite glass-ceramic (LEU) (Empress CAD), feldspar ceramic (VM2) (Vita Mark II), feldspar ceramic-resin infiltrated (EN) (Enamic) and a composite reinforced with nano ceramics (LU) (Lava Ultimate). Specimens were cut from CAD-CAM blocs and pair-wise mirror polished for the bonded interface technique. Top surfaces were ground with diamond discs of respectively 75, 54 and 18μm. Chip damage was measured on the bonded interface using SEM. Fracture mechanics relationships were used to estimate fracture stresses based on average and maximum chip depths assuming these to represent strength limiting flaws subjected to tension and to calculate potential losses in strength compared to manufacturer's data. Grinding with a 75μm diamond disc induced on a bonded interface critical chips averaging 100μm with a potential strength loss estimated between 33% and 54% for all three glass-ceramics (LIT, LEU, VM2). The softer materials EN and LU were little damage susceptible with chips averaging respectively 26μm and 17μm with no loss in strength. Grinding with 18μm diamond discs was still quite detrimental for LIT with average chip sizes of 43μm and a potential strength loss of 42%. It is essential to understand that when grinding glass-ceramics or feldspar ceramics with diamond discs surface and subsurface damage are induced which have the potential of lowering the strength of the ceramic. Careful polishing steps should be carried out after grinding especially when dealing with glass-ceramics. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of degradative plasmid CAM-OCT on responses of Pseudomonas bacteria to UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBeth, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of plasmid CAM-OCT on responses to UV irradiation was compared in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in Pseudomonas putida, and in Pseudomonas putida mutants carrying mutations in UV response genes. CAM-OCT substantially increased both survival and mutagenesis in the two species. P. aeruginosa strains without CAM-OCT exhibited much higher UV sensitivity than did P. putida strains. UV-induced mutagenesis of plasmid-free P. putida was easily detected in three different assays (two reversion assays and one forward mutation assay), whereas UV mutagenesis of P. aeruginosa without CAM-OCT was seen only in the forward mutation assay. These results suggest major differences in DNA repair between the two species and highlight the presence of error-prone repair functions on CAM-OCT. A number of P. putida mutants carrying chromosomal mutations affecting either survival or mutagenesis after UV irradiation were isolated, and the effect of CAM-OCT on these mutants was determined. All mutations producing a UV-sensitive phenotype in P. putida were fully suppressed by the plasmid, whereas the plasmid had a more variable effect on mutagenesis mutations, suppressing some and producing no suppression of others. On the basis of the results reported here and results obtained by others with plasmids carrying UV response genes, it appears that CAM-OCT may differ either in regulation or in the number and functions of UV response genes encoded

  9. Use of EyeCam for imaging the anterior chamber angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Shamira A; Baskaran, Mani; Friedman, David S; Tun, Tin A; Htoon, Hla M; Kumar, Rajesh S; Aung, Tin

    2010-06-01

    To compare EyeCam (Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, CA) imaging with gonioscopy for detecting angle closure. In this prospective, hospital-based study, subjects underwent gonioscopy by a single observer and EyeCam imaging by a different operator. EyeCam images were graded by two masked observers. The anterior chamber angle in a quadrant was classified as closed if the trabecular meshwork could not be seen. The eye was classified as having angle closure if two or more quadrants were closed. One hundred fifty-two subjects were studied. The mean age was 57.4 years (SD 12.9) and there were 82 (54%) men. Of the 152 eyes, 21 (13.8%) had angle closure. The EyeCam provided clear images of the angles in 98.8% of subjects. The agreement between the EyeCam and gonioscopy for detecting angle closure in the superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal quadrants based on agreement coefficient (AC1) statistics was 0.73, 0.75, 0.76, and 0.72, respectively. EyeCam detected more closed angles than did gonioscopy in all quadrants (P gonioscopy, 21/152 (13.8%) eyes were diagnosed as angle closure compared to 41 (27.0%) of 152 with EyeCam (P gonioscopy for detecting angle closure. However, it detected more closed angles than did gonioscopy in all quadrants.

  10. Comparative evaluation of RetCam vs. gonioscopy images in congenital glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj V Azad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare clarity, exposure and quality of anterior chamber angle visualization in congenital glaucoma patients, using RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images. Design: Cross-sectional study Participants. Congenital glaucoma patients over age of 5 years. Materials and Methods: A prospective consecutive pilot study was done in congenital glaucoma patients who were older than 5 years. Methods used are indirect gonioscopy and RetCam imaging. Clarity of the image, extent of angle visible and details of angle structures seen were graded for both methods, on digitally recorded images, in each eye, by two masked observers. Outcome Measures: Image clarity, interobserver agreement. Results: 40 eyes of 25 congenital glaucoma patients were studied. RetCam image had excellent clarity in 77.5% of patients versus 47.5% by gonioscopy. The extent of angle seen was similar by both methods. Agreement between RetCam and gonioscopy images regarding details of angle structures was 72.50% by observer 1 and 65.00% by observer 2. Conclusions: There was good agreement between RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images in detecting angle structures of congenital glaucoma patients. However, RetCam provided greater clarity, with better quality, and higher magnification images. RetCam can be a useful alternative to gonioscopy in infants and small children without the need for general anesthesia.

  11. Comparative evaluation of RetCam vs. gonioscopy images in congenital glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Raj V; Chandra, Parijat; Chandra, Anuradha; Gupta, Aparna; Gupta, Viney; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2014-02-01

    To compare clarity, exposure and quality of anterior chamber angle visualization in congenital glaucoma patients, using RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images. Cross-sectional study Participants. Congenital glaucoma patients over age of 5 years. A prospective consecutive pilot study was done in congenital glaucoma patients who were older than 5 years. Methods used are indirect gonioscopy and RetCam imaging. Clarity of the image, extent of angle visible and details of angle structures seen were graded for both methods, on digitally recorded images, in each eye, by two masked observers. Image clarity, interobserver agreement. 40 eyes of 25 congenital glaucoma patients were studied. RetCam image had excellent clarity in 77.5% of patients versus 47.5% by gonioscopy. The extent of angle seen was similar by both methods. Agreement between RetCam and gonioscopy images regarding details of angle structures was 72.50% by observer 1 and 65.00% by observer 2. There was good agreement between RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images in detecting angle structures of congenital glaucoma patients. However, RetCam provided greater clarity, with better quality, and higher magnification images. RetCam can be a useful alternative to gonioscopy in infants and small children without the need for general anesthesia.

  12. Optional use of CAM photosynthesis in two C4 species, Portulaca cyclophylla and Portulaca digyna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtum, Joseph A M; Hancock, Lillian P; Edwards, Erika J; Winter, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    Low levels of crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) are demonstrated in two species with C 4 photosynthesis, Portulaca cyclophylla and P. digyna. The expression of CAM in P. cyclophylla and P. digyna is facultative, i.e. optional. Well-watered plants did not accumulate acid at night and exhibited gas-exchange patterns consistent with C 4 photosynthesis. CAM-type nocturnal acidification was reversible in that it was induced following drought and lost when droughted plants were rewatered. In P. cyclophylla, droughting was accompanied by a small but discernible net uptake of CO 2 during the dark, whereas in P. digyna, net CO 2 exchange at night approached the CO 2 compensation point but did not transition beyond it. This report brings the number of known C 4 species with a capacity for expressing CAM to six. All are species of Portulaca. The observation of CAM in P. cyclophylla and P. digyna is the first for species in the opposite-leaved (OL) Portulacelloid-anatomy lineage of Portulaca and for the Australian clade therein. The other four species are within the alternate-leaved (AL) lineage, in the Atriploid-anatomy Oleracea and the Pilosoid-anatomy Pilosa clades. Studies of the evolutionary origins of C 4 and CAM in Portulaca will benefit from a more wide-range survey of CAM across its species, particularly in the C 3 -C 4 intermediate-containing Cryptopetala clade. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Day/night regulation of aquaporins during the CAM cycle in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Amezcua-Romero, Julio C; Pantoja, Omar

    2012-03-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum exhibits induction of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) after a threshold stage of development, by exposure to long days with high light intensities or by water and salt stress. During the CAM cycle, fluctuations in carbon partitioning within the cell lead to transient drops in osmotic potential, which are likely stabilized/balanced by passive movement of water via aquaporins (AQPs). Protoplast swelling assays were used to detect changes in water permeability during the day/night cycle of CAM. To assess the role of AQPs during the same period, we followed transcript accumulation and protein abundance of four plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) and one tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP). CAM plants showed a persistent rhythm of specific AQP protein abundance changes throughout the day/night cycle, including changes in amount of McPIP2;1, McTIP1;2, McPIP1;4 and McPIP1;5, while the abundance of McPIP1;2 was unchanged. These protein changes did not appear to be coordinated with transcript levels for any of the AQPs analysed; however, they did occur in parrallel to alterations in water permeability, as well as variations in cell osmolarity, pinitol, glucose, fructose and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPc) levels measured throughout the day/night CAM cycle. Results suggest a role for AQPs in maintaining water balance during CAM and highlight the complexity of protein expression during the CAM cycle. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of mechanical and optical behavior of current esthetic dental restorative CAD/CAM composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Liebermann, Anja; Eichberger, Marlis; Güth, Jan-Frederik

    2015-03-01

    To determine the mechanical and optical properties of CAD/CAM composites (LAVA Ultimate, Cerasmart, Shofu Block and two exp. CAD/CAM composites), a hybrid material (VITA Enamic), a leucite (IPS Empress CAD) and a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max CAD). Three-point flexural strength (FS) was investigated according ISO 6872:2008 (N=240/n=30). Two-body wear (TBW) was analyzed in a chewing simulator (1,200,000 cycles, 50N, 5°/55°C) using human teeth as antagonists (N=120/n=15). Quantitative analysis of wear was carried out with a 3D-scanner and associated matching software. Discoloration rate (DR) after 14 days of storage in cress, curry, red wine, and distilled water (N=384/n=12), and translucency (T) (N=384/n=48) of CAD/CAM materials were measured in a spectrophotometer (400-700nm wavelength). Data were analyzed using two-/one-way ANOVA with Scheffé post-hoc test, Kruskal-Wallis-H test, and linear mixed models (α=0.05). IPS e.max CAD showed the highest FS (pCAD/CAM composites (exception: Shofu Block). The lowest FS showed VITA Enamic and IPS Empress CAD (pCAD, VITA Enamic, exp. CAD/CAM composite 2, followed by IPS e.max presented lower material TBW than the remaining CAD/CAM materials (pcurry>cress>distilled water) exerted the highest influence on DR (pCAD/CAM material. Glass-ceramics showed lower DR than CAD/CAM composites (pCAD/CAM composites presented moderate FS, high T and antagonist friendly behavior. Glass-ceramic demonstrated the most favorable DR and lowest TBW on the material side. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of EyeCam and anterior segment optical coherence tomography in detecting angle closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Mani; Aung, Tin; Friedman, David S; Tun, Tin A; Perera, Shamira A

    2012-12-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of EyeCam (Clarity Medical Systems, Pleasanton, CA, USA) and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT, Visante; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA, USA) in detecting angle closure, using gonioscopy as the reference standard. Ninety-eight phakic patients, recruited from a glaucoma clinic, underwent gonioscopy by a single examiner, and EyeCam and ASOCT imaging by another examiner. Another observer, masked to gonioscopy findings, graded EyeCam and ASOCT images. For both gonioscopy and EyeCam, a closed angle in a particular quadrant was defined if the posterior trabecular meshwork was not visible. For ASOCT, angle closure was defined by any contact between the iris and angle anterior to the scleral spur. An eye was diagnosed as having angle closure if ≥2 quadrants were closed. Agreement and area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) were evaluated. The majority of subjects were Chinese (69/98, 70.4%) with a mean age of 60.6 years. Angle closure was diagnosed in 39/98 (39.8%) eyes with gonioscopy, 40/98 (40.8%) with EyeCam and 56/97 (57.7%) with ASOCT. The agreement (kappa statistic) for angle closure diagnosis for gonioscopy versus EyeCam was 0.89; gonioscopy versus ASOCT and EyeCam versus ASOCT were both 0.56. The AUC for detecting eyes with gonioscopic angle closure with EyeCam was 0.978 (95% CI: 0.93-1.0) and 0.847 (95% CI: 0.76-0.92, p < 0.01) for ASOCT. The diagnostic performance of EyeCam was better than ASOCT in detecting angle closure when gonioscopic grading was used as the reference standard. The agreement between the two imaging modalities was moderate. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  16. Sources of CAM3 vorticity bias during northern winter from diagnostic study of the vorticity equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotjahn, Richard [University of California, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, Davis, CA (United States); Pan, Lin-Lin; Tribbia, Joseph [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2011-06-15

    CAM3 (Community Atmosphere Model version 3) simulation bias is diagnosed using the vorticity equation. The study compares CAM3 output with ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts) 40 year reanalysis (ERA-40) data. A time mean vorticity bias equation is also formulated and the terms are grouped into categories: linear terms, nonlinear terms, transient contributions, and friction (calculated as a residual). Frontal cyclone storms have much weaker band passed kinetic energy and enstrophy in CAM3. The downstream end of the North Atlantic storm track (NAST) has large location error. While the vorticity equation terms have similar amplitude ranking in CAM3 and ERA-40 at upper levels, the ranking differs notably in the lower troposphere. The linear and friction terms dominate the vorticity bias equation. The transient terms contribute along the storm track, but the nonlinear terms are generally much smaller, with the primary exception being over the Iberian peninsula. Friction is much stronger in CAM3. As evidence, nearly all wavelengths (including the longest planetary waves) have smaller amplitude in CAM3 than in ERA-40 vorticity data. Negative near surface vorticity tendency bias on the European side of the Arctic is linked to the NAST track error (evident in the divergence term). CAM3 misses the Beaufort high in sea level pressure (SLP) due to low level warm temperature bias, too little vortex compression, and to too little horizontal advection of negative vorticity compared with ERA-40. Generally lower SLP values in CAM3 over the entire Arctic follow from lower level warm bias in CAM3. (orig.)

  17. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundt Marlon P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. Method A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Results Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%, headaches (9.9%, and knee pain (6.5%; the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248, chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162, acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69, yoga (6.1%, n = 55, herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62, and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54. CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8% and prolotherapy (87.7%, whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. Conclusion This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

  18. CAM therapies among primary care patients using opioid therapy for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Sara; Rabago, David P; Mundt, Marlon P; Fleming, Michael F

    2007-05-16

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is an increasingly common therapy used to treat chronic pain syndromes. However; there is limited information on the utilization and efficacy of CAM therapy in primary care patients receiving long-term opioid therapy. A survey of CAM therapy was conducted with a systematic sample of 908 primary care patients receiving opioids as a primary treatment method for chronic pain. Subjects completed a questionnaire designed to assess utilization, efficacy and costs of CAM therapies in this population. Patients were treated for a variety of pain problems including low back pain (38.4%), headaches (9.9%), and knee pain (6.5%); the average duration of pain was 16 years. The median morphine equivalent opioid dose was 41 mg/day, and the mean dose was 92 mg/day. Forty-four percent of the sample reported CAM therapy use in the past 12 months. Therapies utilized included massage therapy (27.3%, n = 248), chiropractic treatment (17.8%, n = 162), acupuncture (7.6%, n = 69), yoga (6.1%, n = 55), herbs and supplements (6.8%, n = 62), and prolotherapy (5.9%, n = 54). CAM utilization was significantly related to age female gender, pain severity income pain diagnosis of neck and upper back pain, and illicit drug use. Medical insurance covered chiropractic treatment (81.8%) and prolotherapy (87.7%), whereas patients primarily paid for other CAM therapies. Over half the sample reported that one or more of the CAM therapies were helpful. This study suggests CAM therapy is widely used by patients receiving opioids for chronic pain. Whether opioids can be reduced by introducing such therapies remains to be studied.

  19. Complete Dentures Fabricated with CAD/CAM Technology and a Traditional Clinical Recording Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeva, Nadica; Kovacevska, Gordana; Janev, Edvard

    2017-10-15

    The introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology into complete denture (CD) fabrication ushered in a new era in removable prosthodontics. Commercially available CAD/CAM denture systems are expected to improve upon the disadvantages associated with conventional fabrication. The purpose of this report is to present the workflow involved in fabricating a CD with a traditional clinical recording method and CAD/CAM technology and to summarize the advantages to the dental practitioner and the patient.

  20. DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF A CRIMPING DEVICE WITH MULTIPLE CAMS USING MSC ADAMS II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Popescu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the present paper, the author presents the results of the dynamic analysis with MSC ADAMS of the mechanism with a crimping device with 12 tightening cams, designed and used in the technological process of assembly of the indigenous electrical detonators. In this sense, the mechanism with multiple cams is considered a mechanical system and is treated as an assembly of rigid bodies connected by mechanical connections and elastic elements. For shaping and simulation of the mechanism with multiple cams using ADAMS program, the author got through the following stages: construction of the pattern, its testing and simulation, validation, finishing, parametrization, optimization of the pattern.

  1. CAD/CAM/CAI Application for High-Precision Machining of Internal Combustion Engine Pistons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Postnov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CAD/CAM/CAI application solutions for internal combustion engine pistons machining was analyzed. Low-volume technology of internal combustion engine pistons production was proposed. Fixture for CNC turning center was designed.

  2. Interactive Gaussian Graphical Models for Discovering Depth Trends in ChemCam Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyen, D. A.; Komurlu, C.; Lanza, N. L.

    2018-04-01

    Interactive Gaussian graphical models discover surface compositional features on rocks in ChemCam targets. Our approach visualizes shot-to-shot relationships among LIBS observations, and identifies the wavelengths involved in the trend.

  3. A Unique Opportunity for an Intercultural Discussion on CAM and Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marotta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The meeting of the APASL, Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver, was held in December 2004, in New Delhi, India. The meeting was held under the patronage of the APASL Committee and Board of Presidents of the National Liver Association and in conjunction with the annual conference of the Indian Association for the Study of Liver (INASL. The congress was designed to have a core meeting with three parallel sessions running throughout, dedicated research workshops and intensive breakfast sessions. This report concentrates on the two sessions devoted to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM and shows the latest research in CAM for liver disease and the concerns of doctors about integrating CAM with more traditional treatments. With researchers and practitioners gathering from all over the world, it was a unique opportunity for an intercultural discussion on CAM and liver disease.

  4. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    oncogene, affects progression, treatment, and diagnosis of many adenocarcinomas. C-myc has been shown to be a downstream target of EpCAM and is also one of the most important proto-oncogenes routinely overexpressed in breast cancer.

  5. Improving Convection and Cloud Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guang J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-11-07

    The fundamental scientific objectives of our research are to use ARM observations and the NCAR CAM5 to understand the large-scale control on convection, and to develop improved convection and cloud parameterizations for use in GCMs.

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Co-overexpression of EpCAM and c-myc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purpose:The overexpression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) ... Half LIM domain protein2), and the transcription factor Lef1 that is cleaved by presenilin-2 ..... and self-renewal capability, producing a rapidly dividing tumor mass.

  7. A Space Cam Mechanism for Power Transmission of an Opposite-cylinder Piston Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Haoyue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of improving the engine’s power density, we put forward a new type of power transmission mechanism which is used for opposed-cylinder engine. The gas pressure acts on the cam through the piston and push rod, and the spindle rotation of external is driven by the cam. The design of spatial cam work surface is completed by using the enveloping theory of a family of space curves, the force between roller and cam is analyzed using dynamic analysis software. Under the condition of equal number, size and stroke of piston, the new one with larger power density is more compact in structure than the traditional power transmission mechanism, and the reaction force on either side of the main shaft and the acting force between pistons and cylinders are smaller than those in traditional one, which prolongs the service life of the pistons.

  8. Memory for staged events: Supporting older and younger adults' memory with SenseCam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Ali; Poirier, Marie; Conway, Martin A

    2018-03-01

    Two experiments measured the effect of retrieval support provided by a wearable camera, SenseCam, on older and younger adults' memory for a recently experienced complex staged event. In each experiment, participants completed a series of tasks in groups, and the events were recalled 2 weeks later, after viewing SenseCam images (experimental condition) or thinking about the event (control condition). When IQ and education were matched, young adults recalled more event details than older adults, demonstrating an age-related deficit for novel autobiographical material. Reviewing SenseCam images increased the number of details recalled by older and younger adults, and the effect was similar for both groups. These results suggest that memory can be supported by the use of SenseCam, but the age-related deficit is not eliminated.

  9. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP) recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI) at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patients with Cam FAI. This functional femoral rotation could provoke a patellofemoral imbalance that may be, in theory, responsible for patellofemoral pain in this particular patient. In our case, Cam FAI resolution was related to the resolution of AKP.

  10. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Sanchis-Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patients with Cam FAI. This functional femoral rotation could provoke a patellofemoral imbalance that may be, in theory, responsible for patellofemoral pain in this particular patient. In our case, Cam FAI resolution was related to the resolution of AKP.

  11. Digital Dentistry — Digital Impression and CAD/CAM System Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabor Alin-Gabriel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Digital imprint and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM systems offer several benefits compared to traditional techniques. The use of a CAD/CAM system to scan preparations and generate restorations in-office, removes a second appointment for the patient. The existence of precision benefits in using complete systems and chairside scanning systems, has been proven. CAD/CAM restorations have a good longevity and meet the accepted clinical parameters. New digital impression methods are presently accessible, and before long, the long-awaited goal of sparing patients of one the most unpleasant practices in clinical dentistry, acquiring dental impressions, will be exchanged by intraoral digital scanning. CAD/CAM systems existing nowadays, can feed data through accurate digital scans created from plaster models, straight to manufacturing systems that can shape ceramic or resin restorations with no requirement of a physical copy of the prepared, adjacent, and antagonist teeth.

  12. Comparison of denture tooth movement between CAD-CAM and conventional fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2018-01-01

    Data comparing the denture tooth movement of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) and conventional denture processing techniques are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the denture tooth movement of pack-and-press, fluid resin, injection, CAD-CAM-bonded, and CAD-CAM monolithic techniques for fabricating dentures to determine which process produces the most accurate and reproducible prosthesis. A total of 50 dentures were evaluated, 10 for each of the 5 groups. A master denture was fabricated and milled from prepolymerized poly(methyl methacrylate). For the conventional processing techniques (pack-and-press, fluid resin, and injection) a polyvinyl siloxane putty mold of the master denture was made in which denture teeth were placed and molten wax injected. The cameo surface of each wax-festooned denture was laser scanned, resulting in a standard tessellation language (STL) format file. The CAD-CAM dentures included 2 subgroups: CAD-CAM-bonded teeth in which the denture teeth were bonded into the milled denture base and CAD-CAM monolithic teeth in which the denture teeth were milled as part of the denture base. After all specimens had been fabricated, they were hydrated for 24 hours, and the cameo surface laser scanned. The preprocessing and postprocessing scan files of each denture were superimposed using surface-matching software. Measurements were made at 64 locations, allowing evaluation of denture tooth movement in a buccal, lingual, mesial-distal, and occlusal direction. The use of median and interquartile range values was used to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Levene and Kruskal-Wallis analyses of variance were used to evaluate differences between processing techniques (α=.05). The CAD-CAM monolithic technique was the most accurate, followed by fluid resin, CAD-CAM-bonded, pack-and-press, and injection. CAD-CAM monolithic technique was the most reproducible, followed by pack-and-press, CAD-CAM

  13. Fracture strength testing of crowns made of CAD/CAM composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ryota; Asakura, Masaki; Ando, Akihiro; Kumano, Hirokazu; Ban, Seiji; Kawai, Tatsushi; Takebe, Jun

    2018-03-28

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) composite resin crowns have sufficient strength to withstand the bite force of the molar teeth. The null hypothesis was that the fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite resin crowns is lower than the average maximum bite force of the molar tooth. The crowns, which shape is the right maxillary first molar, were fabricated using four CAD/CAM blanks made of composite resins (Block HC: HC, KZR-CAD HR: HR, KZR-CAD HR2: HR2, Avencia Block: AVE) and one CAD/CAM blank made of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max CAD: IPS), which was used as a control. Fracture strength of fabricated crowns bonded to metal abutment and biaxial flexural strength of the materials were evaluated. The results of fracture strength test and biaxial flexural strength test showed different tendencies. The fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite resin crowns except HC ranged from 3.3kN to 3.9kN, and was similar to that of IPS (3.3kN). In contrast, biaxial flexural strength of CAD/CAM composite resins ranged from 175MPa to 247MPa, and was significantly lower than that of IPS (360MPa). All CAD/CAM composite resin crowns studied presented about 3-4 times higher fracture strength than the average maximum bite force of the molar tooth (700-900N), which result leads to the conclusion that CAD/CAM composite resin crowns would have sufficient strength to withstand the bite force of the molar teeth. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparative evaluation of RetCam vs. gonioscopy images in congenital glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Azad, Raj V; Chandra, Parijat; Chandra, Anuradha; Gupta, Aparna; Gupta, Viney; Sihota, Ramanjit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare clarity, exposure and quality of anterior chamber angle visualization in congenital glaucoma patients, using RetCam and indirect gonioscopy images. Design: Cross-sectional study Participants. Congenital glaucoma patients over age of 5 years. Materials and Methods: A prospective consecutive pilot study was done in congenital glaucoma patients who were older than 5 years. Methods used are indirect gonioscopy and RetCam imaging. Clarity of the image, extent of angle visible a...

  15. Luís de Camões - O Lírico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigismundo Spina

    1953-03-01

    Full Text Available CIDADE (Hernani. - Luís de Camões - O Lírico . Livraria Bertrand, Lisboa, 1952. 354 pp. (Primeiro Parágrafo do Artigo Os estudos da obra lírica de Camões levados a efeito pela erudição de Hernani Cidade datam de quase 20 anos, quando em 1936, na "Revista da Faculdade de Lisboa", escreveu "LUIS DE CAMÕES" - o Lírico.

  16. Understanding, perceptions and self-use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Malaysian pharmacy students

    OpenAIRE

    Baig Mirza R; Hameed Abdul; Naing Cho M; Babar Muneer G; Yong Chew S; Hasan Syed S; Iqbal Shahid M; Kairuz Therese

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background In recent times the basic understanding, perceptions and CAM use among undergraduate health sciences students have become a topic of interest. This study was aimed to investigate the understanding, perceptions and self-use of CAM among pharmacy students in Malaysia. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 systematically sampled pharmacy students from two private and one public university. A validated, self-administered questionnaire comprised of seven secti...

  17. Understanding, perceptions and self-use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Malaysian pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Syed S; Yong, Chew S; Babar, Muneer G; Naing, Cho M; Hameed, Abdul; Baig, Mirza R; Iqbal, Shahid M; Kairuz, Therese

    2011-10-13

    In recent times the basic understanding, perceptions and CAM use among undergraduate health sciences students have become a topic of interest. This study was aimed to investigate the understanding, perceptions and self-use of CAM among pharmacy students in Malaysia. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 systematically sampled pharmacy students from two private and one public university. A validated, self-administered questionnaire comprised of seven sections was used to gather the data. A systematic sampling was applied to recruit the students. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were applied using SPSS® version 18. Overall, the students tend to disagree that complementary therapies (CM) are a threat to public health (mean score = 3.6) and agreed that CMs include ideas and methods from which conventional medicine could benefit (mean score = 4.7). More than half (57.8%) of the participants were currently using CAM while 77.6% had used it previously. Among the current CAM modalities used by the students, CM (21.9%) was found to be the most frequently used CAM followed by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) (21%). Most of the students (74.8%) believed that lack of scientific evidence is one of the most important barriers obstructing them to use CAM. More than half of the students perceived TCM (62.8%) and music therapy (53.8%) to be effective. Majority of them (69.3%) asserted that CAM knowledge is necessary to be a well-rounded professional. This study reveals a high-percentage of pharmacy students who were using or had previously used at least one type of CAM. Students of higher professional years tend to agree that CMs include ideas and methods from which conventional medicine could benefit.

  18. Understanding, perceptions and self-use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among Malaysian pharmacy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig Mirza R

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent times the basic understanding, perceptions and CAM use among undergraduate health sciences students have become a topic of interest. This study was aimed to investigate the understanding, perceptions and self-use of CAM among pharmacy students in Malaysia. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 500 systematically sampled pharmacy students from two private and one public university. A validated, self-administered questionnaire comprised of seven sections was used to gather the data. A systematic sampling was applied to recruit the students. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were applied using SPSS® version 18. Results Overall, the students tend to disagree that complementary therapies (CM are a threat to public health (mean score = 3.6 and agreed that CMs include ideas and methods from which conventional medicine could benefit (mean score = 4.7. More than half (57.8% of the participants were currently using CAM while 77.6% had used it previously. Among the current CAM modalities used by the students, CM (21.9% was found to be the most frequently used CAM followed by Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM (21%. Most of the students (74.8% believed that lack of scientific evidence is one of the most important barriers obstructing them to use CAM. More than half of the students perceived TCM (62.8% and music therapy (53.8% to be effective. Majority of them (69.3% asserted that CAM knowledge is necessary to be a well-rounded professional. Conclusions This study reveals a high-percentage of pharmacy students who were using or had previously used at least one type of CAM. Students of higher professional years tend to agree that CMs include ideas and methods from which conventional medicine could benefit.

  19. New developments on ChemCam laser transmitter and potential applications for other planetology programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Benoît; Durand, Eric; Maurice, Sylvestre; Bruneau, Didier; Montmessin, Franck

    2017-11-01

    ChemCam is a LIBS Instrument mounted on the MSL 2011 NASA mission. The laser transmitter of this Instrument has been developed by the French society Thales Optronique (former Thales Laser) with a strong technical support from CNES. The paper will first rapidly present the performance of this laser and will then describe the postChemCam developments realized on and around this laser for new planetology programs.

  20. CAM, free speech, and the British legal system: overstepping the mark?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Lionel R

    2009-10-01

    The British Chiropractic Association recently won a libel case against the science writer and CAM 'skeptic' Dr Simon Singh for publishing an article in a British newspaper in which he accused them of promoting 'bogus' treatments. This has ignited a campaign in the UK to 'keep the libel laws out of science'. In this article, the tension between media freedom of expression and defamation law is examined, and possible ramifications for CAM in the UK explored.

  1. Do CAD/CAM dentures really release less monomer than conventional dentures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Wiedemair, Verena; Huck, Christian; Klaunzer, Florian; Steinmassl, Otto; Grunert, Ingrid; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) dentures are assumed to have more favourable material properties than conventionally fabricated dentures, among them a lower methacrylate monomer release. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures were generated from ten different master casts by using four different CAD/CAM systems. Conventional, heat-polymerised dentures served as control group. Denture weight and volume were measured; the density was calculated, and the denture surface area was assessed digitally. The monomer release after 7 days of water storage was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Whole You Nexteeth and Wieland Digital Dentures had significantly lower mean volume and weight than conventional dentures. Baltic Denture System and Whole You Nexteeth had a significantly increased density. Baltic Denture System had a significantly smaller surface area. None of the CAD/CAM dentures released significantly less monomer than the control group. All tested dentures released very low amounts of methacrylate monomer, but not significantly less than conventional dentures. A statistically significant difference might nevertheless exist in comparison to other, less recommendable denture base materials, such as the frequently used autopolymerising resins. CAD/CAM denture fabrication has numerous advantages. It enables the fabrication of dentures with lower resin volume and lower denture weight. Both could increase the patient comfort. Dentures with higher density might exhibit more favourable mechanical properties. The hypothesis that CAD/CAM dentures release less monomer than conventional dentures could, however, not be verified.

  2. SenseCam reminiscence and action recall in memory-unimpaired people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamon, John G; Moskowitz, Tacie N; Swan, Ashley E; Zhong, Boyuan; Golembeski, Amy; Liong, Christopher; Narzikul, Alexa C; Sosan, Olumide A

    2014-01-01

    Case studies of memory-impaired individuals consistently show that reminiscing with SenseCam images enhances event recall. This exploratory study examined whether a similar benefit would occur for the consolidation of memories in memory-unimpaired people. We tested delayed recall for atypical actions observed on a lengthy walk. Participants used SenseCam, a diary, or no external memory aid while walking, followed by reminiscence with SenseCam images, diary entries, or no aid, either alone (self-reminiscence) or with the experimenter (social reminiscence). One week later, when tested without SenseCam images or diary entries, prior social reminiscence produced greater recall than self-reminiscence, but there were no differences between memory aid conditions for action free recall or action order recall. When methodological variables were controlled, there was no recall advantage for SenseCam reminiscence with memory-unimpaired participants. The case studies and present study differ in multiple ways, making direct comparisons problematic. SenseCam is a valuable aid to the memory impaired, but its mnemonic value for non-clinical populations remains to be determined.

  3. Complementing a Rural Pharmacy Course with CAM: Reflections from a Decade of Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maree Simpson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Substantial complementary medicines (CAM use is reported worldwide. Australian consumers use CAM for health maintenance, minor self-limiting disease states, and also for chronic conditions. The increasing use of CAM has required pharmacists to become increasingly more knowledgeable about CAM and the ethics of CAM recommendation. When the first Australian non-metropolitan pharmacy program was started at Charles Sturt University, in 1997, it was decided to incorporate two innovative courses to assist rurally educated students to engage with health consumers who expect pharmacists to be able to assist them with CAM. This discussion traces and reflects on the development, implementation and current situation of the Complementary Medicines for Pharmacy course. Over time, this course has evolved from a final year elective with a focus on familiarization to a mandated course with a phytomedicine focus to an integrated topic in final year with a focus on evidence, quality of evidence and professional decision-making demonstrated in a reflective professional portfolio. Of potentially greater importance, however, has been the introduction of complementary medicines as a topic in every year of the course with the goal of facilitating effective professional engagement with health consumers.

  4. Integration of CAM and CNC operation through code editing and manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosli Darmawan; Shalina Sheik Muhammad

    2004-01-01

    The IT technology for engineering design and manufacturing has gone through significant advancement for the last 30 years. It is widely acknowledged that IT would provide competitive advantage for engineering company in term of production cycle, productivity and efficiency. The recent development in this area is on the total system integration. While standard off-shelf CAD/CAM/CNC software and hardware packages would provide solution for system integration, more often than not users will stumble upon compatibility problems. Moreover, most of the integration deals with CAD and CAM systems. CNC integration has not been fully developed. Users always found problems in the integration of CAM and CNC machine due to the different level of technological development. CNC codes have not fundamentally progressed in the last 50 years, while CAD/CAM software packages have undergone massive evolution and improvement. This paper discusses a practical solution of CAM and CNC integration through code editing and manipulation within the CAM system in order to comply with the CNC machine requirements. (Author)

  5. Psychological and behavioral mechanisms influencing the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, K; Komura, K; Tokoro, A; Kuromaru, T; Ohshima, A; Ito, T; Sumiyoshi, Y; Hyodo, I

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the psychological and behavioral mechanisms of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in Japanese cancer patients using two applied behavioral models, the transtheoretical model (TTM), and theory of planned behavior (TPB). Questionnaires were distributed to 1100 patients at three cancer treatment facilities in Japan and data on 521 cancer patients were used in the final analysis. The questionnaire included items based on TTM and TPB variables, as well as three psychological batteries. According to the TTM, 88 patients (17%) were in precontemplation, 226 (43%) in contemplation, 33 (6%) in preparation, 71 (14%) in action, and 103 (20%) in maintenance. The model derived from structural equation modeling revealed that the stage of CAM use was significantly affected by the pros, cons, expectation from family, norms of medical staff, use of chemotherapy, period from diagnosis, and place of treatment. The primary factor for the stage of CAM use was the expectation from family. The findings revealed the existence of a number of psychologically induced potential CAM users, and psychological variables including positive attitude for CAM use and perceived family expectation greatly influence CAM use in cancer patients.

  6. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--accuracy from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapie, Laurent; Lebon, Nicolas; Mawussi, Bernardin; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    As is the case in the field of medicine, as well as in most areas of daily life, digital technology is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available not only for chairside practice but also for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental practice can be considered as the handling of devices and software processing for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use dental CAD/CAM systems often do not have enough information to understand the variations offered by such technology practice. Knowledge of the random and systematic errors in accuracy with CAD/CAM systems can help to achieve successful restorations with this technology, and help with the purchasing of a CAD/CAM system that meets the clinical needs of restoration. This article provides a mechanical engineering viewpoint of the accuracy of CAD/ CAM systems, to help dentists understand the impact of this technology on restoration accuracy.

  7. 40 Gbps data acquisition system for NectarCAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Dirk; Houles, Julien; NectarCAM Team; CTA Consortium, the

    2017-10-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) will be the next generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory. It will be made up of approximately 100 telescopes of three different sizes, from 4 to 23 meters in diameter. The previously presented prototype of a high speed data acquisition (DAQ) system for CTA (CHEP 2012, [6]) has become concrete within the NectarCAM project, one of the most challenging camera projects with very demanding needs for bandwidth of data handling. We designed a Linux-PC system able to concentrate and process without packet loss the 40 Gb/s average data rate coming from the 265 Front End Boards (FEB) through Gigabit Ethernet links, and to reduce data to fit the two ten-Gigabit Ethernet downstream links by external trigger decisions as well as custom tailored compression algorithms. Within the given constraints, we implemented de-randomisation of the event fragments received as relatively small UDP packets emitted by the FEB, using off-the-shelf equipment as required by the project and for an operation period of at least 30 years. We tested out-of-the-box interfaces and used original techniques to cope with these requirements, and set up a test bench with hundreds of synchronous Gigabit links in order to validate and tune the acquisition chain including downstream data logging based on zeroMQ and Google ProtocolBuffers [8].

  8. The Systemic Theory of Living Systems and Relevance to CAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Olalde Rangel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Systemic Theory of Living Systems is being published in several parts in eCAM. The theory is axiomatic. It originates from the phenomenological idea that physiological health is based on three factors: integrity of its structure or organization, O, functional organic energy reserve, E, and level of active biological intelligence, I. From the theory is derived a treatment strategy called Systemic Medicine (SM. This is based on identifying and prescribing phytomedicines and/or other medications that strengthen each factor. Energy-stimulating phytomedicines increase available energy and decrease total entropy of an open biological system by providing negative entropy. The same occurs with phytomedicines that act as biological intelligence modulators. They should be used as the first line of treatment in all ailments, since all pathologies, by definition, imply a higher than normal organic entropy. SM postulates that the state of health, H, of an individual, is effectively equal to the product of the strength of each factor H = O × E × I. SM observes that when all three factors are brought back to ideal levels, patients' conditions begin the recovery to normal health.

  9. Fringing in MonoCam Y4 filter images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.; Nomerotski, A.; Fisher-Levine, M.

    2017-01-01

    We study the fringing patterns observed in MonoCam, a camera with a single Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) CCD sensor. Images were taken at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona (NOFS) employing its 1.3 m telescope and an LSST y 4 filter. Fringing occurs due to the reflection of infrared light (700 nm or larger) from the bottom surface of the CCD which constructively or destructively interferes with the incident light to produce a net ''fringe'' pattern which is superimposed on all images taken. Emission lines from the atmosphere, dominated by hydroxyl (OH) spectra, can change in their relative intensities as the night goes on, producing different fringe patterns in the images taken. We found through several methods that the general shape of the fringe patterns remained constant, though with slight changes in the amplitude and phase of the fringes. We also found that a superposition of fringes from two monochromatic lines taken in the lab offered a reasonable description of the sky data.

  10. Minimoon Survey with Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedicke, Robert; Boe, Ben; Bolin, Bryce T.; Bottke, William; Chyba, Monique; Denneau, Larry; Dodds, Curt; Granvik, Mikael; Kleyna, Jan; Weryk, Robert J.

    2017-10-01

    We will present the status of our search for minimoons using Hyper Suprime-Cam on the Subaru telescope on Maunkea, Hawaii. We use the term 'minimoon' to refer to objects that are gravitationally bound to the Earth-Moon system, make at least one revolution around the barycenter in a co-rotating frame relative to the Earth-Sun axis, and are within 3 Earth Hill-sphere radii (˜12 LD). There are one or two 1 to 2 meter diameter minimoons in the steady state population at any time, and about a dozen larger than 50 cm diameter. `Drifters' are also bound to the Earth-Moon system but make less than one revolution about the barycenter. The combined population of minimoons and drifters provide a new opportunity for scientific exploration of small asteroids and testing concepts for in-situ resource utilization. These objects provide interesting challenges for rendezvous missions because of their limited lifetime and complicated trajectories. Furthermore, they are difficult to detect because they are small, available for a limited time period, and move quickly across the sky.

  11. Fenologia reprodutiva de espécies de bromélias na Serra da Piedade, MG, Brasil Reproductive phenology of bromeliad species at Serra da Piedade, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Rodrigues Marques

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho objetivou caracterizar a fenologia reprodutiva das espécies de Bromeliaceae da Serra da Piedade. Das dezoito espécies estudadas, 72% floresceram na estação chuvosa e 28% na estação seca. Observou-se que a floração das bromélias ao longo do gradiente altitudinal da Serra da Piedade foi seqüencial e influenciada pela sazonalidade das chuvas. A maioria das espécies que ocorrem no habitat xérico pedregoso (acima de 1.400 m de altitude apresentou a floração na estação chuvosa, enquanto que três das cinco espécies que ocorrem no ambiente mésico florestal (abaixo de 1.300 m de altitude floresceram na estação seca. Espécies simpátricas com características florais semelhantes, como Tillandsia stricta, T. gardneri, Vriesea crassa e V. citrina, também apresentaram floração seqüencial. A dispersão das espécies com sementes aladas (Pitcairnoideae e plumosas (Tillandsioideae ocorreu na estação seca, exceto para Dyckia saxatilis e Racinaea aerisincola. Foi observada assincronia na maturação dos frutos e dispersão das sementes entre as bromélias zoocóricas. É provável que essas condições permitam às espécies de bromélias da Serra da Piedade evitar a sobreposição do uso de animais vetores de pólen e de sementes.This work characterizes the phenology of Bromeliaceae species at Serra da Piedade. Of the i8 species studied, 72% flowered in the rainy season and 28% in the dry season. We observed sequential flowering of bromeliads along the entire altitudinal gradient at Serra da Piedade; flowering was also influenced by rainfall seasonality. Most species that occur in the rocky xeric habitat (above 1400 m altitude flowered during the rainy season, while three of the five species found in the mesic forest (below 1300 m altitude flowered in the dry season. Sympatric species with similar floral characteristics, such as Tillandsia stricta, T. gardneri, Vriesea citrina and V. crassa, also flowered

  12. Epigenetic regulation of L1CAM in endometrial carcinoma: comparison to cancer–testis (CT-X) antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirmer, Uwe; Fiegl, Heidi; Pfeifer, Marco; Zeimet, Alain G; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Bode, Peter K; Tischler, Verena; Altevogt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    L1CAM was originally identified as an adhesion molecule involved in neural development. In many human carcinomas L1CAM is over-expressed and is associated with a bad prognosis. We previously reported that L1CAM was absent in the vast majority of endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (ECs) (type 1) but was strongly expressed in the more aggressive serous and clear-cell ECs (termed type 2). The differential regulation of L1CAM in ECs is not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that it can be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms. Here we investigated the role of DNA-methylation of the L1CAM promoter for expression. We also studied the relationship to cancer testis (CT-X) antigens that co-localize with L1CAM on chromosome Xq28, a region that is often activated in human tumors. We used EC cell lines and primary tumor tissues for our analysis. For expression analysis we employed RT-PCR and Western blotting. DNA-Methylation of the L1CAM promoter was determined after bisulfite conversation and DNA sequencing. Tumor tissues were examined by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. We demonstrate that the treatment of L1CAM low/negative expressing EC cell lines with 5 ′ -Azacytidine (5-AzaC) or knock-down of DNMT1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) as well as the HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA) up-regulated L1CAM at the mRNA and protein level. The L1CAM gene has two promoter regions with two distinct CpG islands. We observed that the expression of L1CAM correlated with hypermethylation in promoter 1 and 5-AzaC treatment affected the DNA-methylation pattern in this region. The CT-X antigens NY-ESO-1, MAGE-A3 and MAGE-A4 were also strongly up-regulated by 5-AzaC or knock-down of DNMT1 but did not respond to treatment with TSA. Primary EC tumor tissues showed a variable methylation pattern of the L1CAM promoter. No striking differences in promoter methylation were observed between tumor areas with L1CAM expression and those without expression. L1CAM expression

  13. The influence of humidity, nutrients and light on the establishment of the epiphytic bromeliad Tillandsia guatemalensis in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C Castro Hernández

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In the highlands of Chiapas, rapid habitat destruction and alteration threaten epiphytes. Presumably, forest transformation increases open and border-type vegetation, characterized by drier conditions than those prevailing deeper in the forest. If so, mesic epiphytes should be especially affected. We investigated the role of water availability during the growth of a population of the wide-ranging mesic C3 phytotelm bromeliad Tillandsia guatemalensis. Chiapas experiences a pronounced dry season from November to April when average monthly precipitation falls below 30 mm. T. guatemalensis observed in situ released seeds during this interval and high germination rates occurred about seven weeks after the rainy weather returned (over 93%, an observation confirmed in the laboratory. Many of the tiny seedlings disappeared before they could anchor to the substrate, probably flushed off by torrential rains. Over half of the seedlings comprising a naturally established population died during the dry season. High seedling mortality was also deduced from the size-class structure of natural populations. Seedling mortality on bark taken from the tree base up to a height of 1.3 m of bigger trees is similar on two species of oak compared to two species of pine. These barks also possessed high water retaining capacity. Oak bark derived from higher up the tree, however, absorbed a larger amount of water per surface area and liberated water during a longer period of time than the bark of Pinus tecunumanii taken from similar locations on the host tree. Additionally, the water retaining capacity of the bark of larger trees was generally greater. We suggest that such differences in water retaining capacity explain, at least in part, why epiphytes favor oaks, the lower parts of pine trees, and larger (older trees. After the development of the phytotelm growth form, mortality in a natural population falls. Our experiments on phytotelm plants that appeared stressed

  14. Advances in computer-aided engineering : CAD/CAM-research at Delft University of Technology. Report of the VF-project CAD/CAM 1989-1994

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Undetermined, U.

    1994-01-01

    This book contains a collection of articles describing on-going CAD/CAM-research at several engineering faculties at Delft University of Technology. Two main themes covered in this book are 'Conceptual design of complex products' and 'Product modelling and product data exchange'.

  15. Quantitative determination of the organ distribution of the cell adhesion molecule cell-CAM 105 by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odin, P.; Oebrink, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have previously identified a 105,000-Da plasma membrane glycoprotein, denoted cell-CAM 105, that is involved in intercellular adhesion of reaggregating rat hepatocytes. In this communication they report on the development of a radioimmunoassay for cell-CAM 105, employing purified cell-CAM 105, specific antisera against the molecule, and formalin-fixed protein A-containing staphylococci for precipitation of the immune complexes. The assay was shown to be sensitive, specific, precise, rapid, and easy to perform. They used this radioimmunoassay in investigations of the occurrence of cell-CAM 105 in different rat organs. Cell-CAM 105 was present in a wide spectrum of organs in varying amounts. The highest concentrations were found in the gastrointestinal tract, liver, some secretory glands, vagina, kidney, and lung. The results were confirmed by immunoblotting, which revealed one distinct protein component, corresponding to cell-CAM 105, in each positive organ

  16. The CUPCIG (CAM-Use in Primary Care in Germany) Study:Part I-Pain. Study Protocol of a Pilot-trial to Assess Feasibility, Acceptability and Perceived Effectiveness of CAM in Pain Disorders in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schencking, Martin; Sönnichsen, Andreas; Bassüner, Susanne; Redaelli, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    There is limited valid data available on CAM procedures for chronic joint and neuropathic pain in primary care in Germany. Indiviual CAM qualifications of the general practitioners (GPs) and the potential of cost reduction through CAM treatment are almost unknown. The aim of this pilot trial preceding the main study is to examine the survey mode, to estimate the response rate by GPs with or without an additional qualification for CAM, and to identify the status quo in therapeutic approaches for chronic pain disorders in primary care. This is a cross-sectional study with an ex post facto design among German GPs consisting of 2 parts: In a first step, a pilot trial precedes the main study targeting 200 GPs with and 200 GPs without additional qualification in CAM in a selected region. The results of the CUPCIG study comprise the distribution of pain types treated in primary care practices, the GPs' attitude toward complementary pain therapy, pharmacological or CAM treatment, the estimate of cost reduction through CAM treatment of pain, the application of diverse CAM procedures, and biographical data. The CUPCIG study serves to compile pain therapy approaches in primary care in Germany with respect to the individual CAM expertise of the GPs. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  17. Comparison of Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM PMMA-Based Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Gülce; Murat, Sema; Yilmaz, Burak

    2018-01-28

    To compare the flexural strength of different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) poly(methyl methacrylate)-based (PMMA) polymers and conventional interim resin materials after thermocycling. Rectangular-shaped specimens (n = 15, for each material) (25 × 2 × 2 mm 3 ) were fabricated from 3 CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers (Telio CAD [T]; M-PM-Disc [M]; Polident-PMMA [P]), 1 bis-acrylate composite resin (Protemp 4 [PT]), and 1 conventional PMMA (ArtConcept Artegral Dentine [C]) according to ISO 10477:2004 Standards (Dentistry-Polymer-Based Crown and Bridge Materials). The specimens were subjected to 10,000 thermocycles (5 to 55°C). Three-point flexural strength of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine at a 1.0 mm/min crosshead speed, and the flexural strength data (σ) were calculated (MPa). The flexural strength values were statistically analyzed using 1-way ANOVA, and Tukey HSD post-hoc test for multiple comparisons (α = 0.05). Flexural strength values ranged between 66.1 ± 13.1 and 131.9 ± 19.8 MPa. There were significant differences among the flexural strengths of tested materials, except for between T and P CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers (p > 0.05). CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymer M had the highest flexural strength and conventional PMMA had the lowest (p CAD/CAM PMMA-based T and P polymers had significantly higher flexural strength than the bis-acrylate composite resin (p CAD/CAM PMMA-based M (p CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers was greater than the flexural strength of bis-acrylate composite resin, which had a greater flexural strength compared to conventional PMMA resin. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in cancer patients: An Italian multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Della Pepa, Chiara; Tralongo, Paolo; Fulvi, Alberto; Martellotta, Ferdinando; Lleshi, Arben; Nasti, Guglielmo; Fisichella, Rossella; Romano, Carmela; De Divitiis, Chiara; Taibi, Rosaria; Fiorica, Francesco; Di Francia, Raffaele; Di Mari, Anna; Del Pup, Lino; Crispo, Anna; De Paoli, Paolo; Santorelli, Adriano; Quagliariello, Vincenzo; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Tirelli, Umberto; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-04-11

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) include a wide range of products (herbs, vitamins, minerals, and probiotics) and medical practices, developed outside of the mainstream Western medicine. Patients with cancer are more likely to resort to CAM first or then in their disease history; the potential side effects as well as the costs of such practices are largely underestimated. We conducted a descriptive survey in five Italian hospitals involving 468 patients with different malignancies. The survey consisted of a forty-two question questionnaire, patients were eligible if they were Italian-speaking and receiving an anticancer treatment at the time of the survey or had received an anticancer treatment no more than three years before participating in the survey. Of our patients, 48.9% said they use or have recently used CAM. The univariate analysis showed that female gender, high education, receiving treatment in a highly specialized institute and receiving chemotherapy are associated with CAM use; at the multivariate analysis high education (Odds Ratio, (OR): 1.96 95% Confidence Interval, CI, 1.27-3.05) and receiving treatment in a specialized cancer center (OR: 2.75 95% CI, 1.53-4.94) were confirmed as risk factors for CAM use. Roughly half of our patients receiving treatment for cancer use CAM. It is necessary that health professional explore the use of CAM with their cancer patients, educate them about potentially beneficial therapies in light of the limited available evidence of effectiveness, and work towards an integrated model of health-care provision.

  19. Modified FlowCAM procedure for quantifying size distribution of zooplankton with sample recycling capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Wong

    Full Text Available We have developed a modified FlowCAM procedure for efficiently quantifying the size distribution of zooplankton. The modified method offers the following new features: 1 prevents animals from settling and clogging with constant bubbling in the sample container; 2 prevents damage to sample animals and facilitates recycling by replacing the built-in peristaltic pump with an external syringe pump, in order to generate negative pressure, creates a steady flow by drawing air from the receiving conical flask (i.e. vacuum pump, and transfers plankton from the sample container toward the main flowcell of the imaging system and finally into the receiving flask; 3 aligns samples in advance of imaging and prevents clogging with an additional flowcell placed ahead of the main flowcell. These modifications were designed to overcome the difficulties applying the standard FlowCAM procedure to studies where the number of individuals per sample is small, and since the FlowCAM can only image a subset of a sample. Our effective recycling procedure allows users to pass the same sample through the FlowCAM many times (i.e. bootstrapping the sample in order to generate a good size distribution. Although more advanced FlowCAM models are equipped with syringe pump and Field of View (FOV flowcells which can image all particles passing through the flow field; we note that these advanced setups are very expensive, offer limited syringe and flowcell sizes, and do not guarantee recycling. In contrast, our modifications are inexpensive and flexible. Finally, we compared the biovolumes estimated by automated FlowCAM image analysis versus conventional manual measurements, and found that the size of an individual zooplankter can be estimated by the FlowCAM image system after ground truthing.

  20. EpCAM as multi-tumour target for near-infrared fluorescence guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driel, P. B. A. A. van; Boonstra, M. C.; Prevoo, H. A. J. M.; Giessen, M. van de; Snoeks, T. J. A.; Tummers, Q. R. J. G.; Keereweer, S.; Cordfunke, R. A.; Fish, A.; Eendenburg, J. D. H. van; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Dijkstra, J.; Velde, C. J. H. van de; Kuppen, P. J. K.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; Löwik, C. W. G. M.; Sier, C. F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of resection margins during cancer surgery can be challenging, often resulting in incomplete tumour removal. Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) aims to aid the surgeon to visualize tumours and resection margins during surgery. FGS relies on a clinically applicable imaging system in combination with a specific tumour-targeting contrast agent. In this study EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule) is evaluated as target for FGS in combination with the novel Artemis imaging system. The NIR fluorophore IRDye800CW was conjugated to the well-established EpCAM specific monoclonal antibody 323/A3 and an isotype IgG1 as control. The anti-EpCAM/800CW conjugate was stable in serum and showed preserved binding capacity as evaluated on EpCAM positive and negative cell lines, using flow cytometry and cell-based plate assays. Four clinically relevant orthotopic tumour models, i.e. colorectal cancer, breast cancer, head and neck cancer, and peritonitis carcinomatosa, were used to evaluate the performance of the anti-EpCAM agent with the clinically validated Artemis imaging system. The Pearl Impulse small animal imaging system was used as reference. The specificity of the NIRF signal was confirmed using bioluminescence imaging and green-fluorescent protein. All tumour types could clearly be delineated and resected 72 h after injection of the imaging agent. Using NIRF imaging millimetre sized tumour nodules were detected that were invisible for the naked eye. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated the distribution and tumour specificity of the anti-EpCAM agent. This study shows the potential of an EpCAM specific NIR-fluorescent agent in combination with a clinically validated intraoperative imaging system to visualize various tumours during surgery

  1. Information management and complementary alternative medicine: the anatomy of information about CAMs through PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Salvatore; Argano, Christiano; Colomba, Daniela; Ippolito, Calogero; Gargano, Vincenzo; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Licata, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing interest about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and the use of CAM interventions has become more common among people. For these reasons, health professionals must be able to effectively manage information in this field of knowledge according to an evidence-based point of view. This study assessed the anatomy of the available information about CAMs using PubMed, to give practical instructions to manage information in this field. We also analyzed the anatomy of information according to each alternative medicine branch, narrow and broad search methods, subset filters for indexed-for-Medline and non-indexed citations, and different publication types including randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses. Our results demonstrated that the use of CAMs subset (supplied by PubMed search engine) leads to a great number of citations determining an information overload. Our data reveal that it would be more useful to search for the CAM separately, identifying specific items and study design. Moreover, we found the largest number of randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses related to herbal medicine and acupuncture, neither RCTs nor meta-analyses were available for bach and flower remedies, auriculoacupuncture, iridology, and pranotherapy. For the first time, our study gives a comprehensive view of the anatomy of information regarding CAMs and each branch of them. We suggest a methodological approach to face with searching information about this emerging issue from an evidence-based point of view. Finally, our data pointed out some "grey zones" since neither RCTs nor meta-analyses were available for some CAMs.

  2. APPLICATIONS OF ACTION CAM SENSORS IN THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL YARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pepe

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, special digital cameras called “action camera” or “action cam”, have become popular due to their low price, smallness, lightness, strength and capacity to make videos and photos even in extreme environment surrounding condition. Indeed, these particular cameras have been designed mainly to capture sport actions and work even in case of dirt, bumps, or underwater and at different external temperatures. High resolution of Digital single-lens reflex (DSLR cameras are usually preferred to be employed in photogrammetric field. Indeed, beyond the sensor resolution, the combination of such cameras with fixed lens with low distortion are preferred to perform accurate 3D measurements; at the contrary, action cameras have small and wide-angle lens, with a lower performance in terms of sensor resolution, lens quality and distortions. However, by considering the characteristics of the action cameras to acquire under conditions that may result difficult for standard DSLR cameras and because of their lower price, these could be taken into consideration as a possible and interesting approach during archaeological excavation activities to document the state of the places. In this paper, the influence of lens radial distortion and chromatic aberration on this type of cameras in self-calibration mode and an evaluation of their application in the field of Cultural Heritage will be investigated and discussed. Using a suitable technique, it has been possible to improve the accuracy of the 3D model obtained by action cam images. Case studies show the quality and the utility of the use of this type of sensor in the survey of archaeological artefacts.

  3. miR-21-3p is a positive regulator of L1CAM in several human carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doberstein, Kai; Bretz, Niko P; Schirmer, Uwe; Fiegl, Heidi; Blaheta, Roman; Breunig, Christian; Müller-Holzner, Elisabeth; Reimer, Dan; Zeimet, Alain G; Altevogt, Peter

    2014-11-28

    Expression of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) occurs frequently in human cancers and is associated with poor prognosis in cancers such as ovarian, endometrial, breast, renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. L1CAM promotes cell motility, invasion, chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Elucidating genetic processes involved in the expression of L1CAM in cancers is of considerable importance. Transcription factors such as SLUG, β-catenin/TCF-LEF, PAX8 and VHL have been implicated in the re-activation of L1CAM in various types of cancers. There is increasing evidence that micro-RNAs can also have strong effects on gene expression. Here we have identified miR-21-3p as a positive regulator of L1CAM expression. Over-expression of miR-21-3p (miR-21*) but not the complementary sequence miR-21-5p (miR-21) could strongly augment L1CAM expression in renal, endometrial and ovarian carcinoma derived cell lines by an unknown mechanism involving transcriptional activation of the L1CAM gene. In patient cohorts from renal, endometrial and ovarian cancers we observed a strong positive correlation of L1CAM and miR-21-3p expressions. Although L1CAM alone was a reliable marker for overall and disease free survival, the combination of L1CAM and miR-21-3p expressions strongly enhanced the predictive power. Our findings shed new light on the complex regulation of L1CAM in cancers and advocate the use of L1CAM/miR-21-3p for diagnostic application. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in Germany – A focus group study of GPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemann Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been a marked increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM in recent years worldwide. In Germany, apart from 'Heilpraktiker' (= state-licensed, non-medical CAM practitioners, some general practitioners (GPs provide CAM in their practices. This paper aims to explore the attitudes of GPs about the role of CAM in Germany, in relation to the healthcare system, quality of care, medical education and research. Furthermore, experiences of GPs integrating CAM in their daily practice were explored. Methods Using a qualitative methodological approach 3 focus groups with a convenience sample of 17 GPs were conducted. The discussions were transcribed verbatim and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results The majority of the participating GPs had integrated one or more CAM therapies into their every-day practice. Four key themes were identified based on the topics covered in the focus groups: the role of CAM within the German healthcare system, quality of care, education and research. Within the theme 'role of CAM within the healthcare system' there were five categories: integration of CAM, CAM in the Statutory Health Insurance, modernisation of the Statutory Health Insurance Act, individual healthcare services and 'Heilpraktiker'. Regarding quality of care there were two broad groups of GPs: those who thought patients would benefit from standardizing CAM and those who feared that quality control would interfere with the individual approach of CAM. The main issues identified relating to research and education were the need for the development of alternative research strategies and the low quality of existing CAM education respectively. Conclusion The majority of the participating GPs considered CAM as a reasonable complementary approach within primary care. The study increased our understanding of GPs attitudes about the role of CAM within the German healthcare system and the use of

  5. Types and sociodemographic correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among people with epilepsy in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asmi, Abdullah; Al Maniri, Abdullah; Al-Farsi, Yahya M; Burke, David T; Al Asfoor, Fatema M H; Al Busaidi, Ibrahim; Al Breiki, Mohamed H A; Lahiri, Shaon; Braidy, Nady; Essa, Musthafa M; Al-Adawi, Samir

    2013-11-01

    Nonpharmacological treatment strategies that originate from sociocultural teachings and are beyond the scope of allopathic medicine are commonly used among people with epilepsy (PWE) in many parts of the world. The present study explored the types and sociodemographic correlates of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among PWE in Oman among attendees of a neurological unit at a tertiary care center. Data on the types of CAM were gathered from telephone interviews. The relevant demographic and clinical characteristics of the participants were obtained from electronic medical records. Of the total of 101 participants, 73.3% were CAM users. The majority of these participants have not disclosed their CAM use to their allopathic health-care providers. The most common types of CAM reported were those falling under the 'mind-body' type (incantations and fumigation) and biologically based (herbal concoctions) or a combination of them. Compared to non-CAM users, a significant and greater proportion of CAM users attributed the etiology of their illness to nonbiomedical factors such as 'evil eyes' (P=0.04). The multivariate logistic regression model indicated that the use of CAM was highly associated with age of Oman. The most utilized type of CAM falls under the umbrella of mind-body practice. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of glazing and aging on the surface properties of CAD/CAM resin blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekçe, Neslihan; Fidan, Sinan; Tuncer, Safa; Kara, Dilan; Demirci, Mustafa

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the effect of accelerated aging on surface properties of glazed CAD/CAM resin blocks using a 2D surface profilometer and a 3D non-contact optical profilometer. Three types of CAD/CAM resin restorative materials, LAVA Ultimate (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), VITA Enamic (Vita Zahnfabrik H. Rauter, Bad Säckingen, Germany), and Cerasmart (GC Corparation, Tokyo, Japan) were used for this study. CAD/CAM blocks were cut in 3-mm thickness slabs and divided into three groups; Group 1: control group (specimens polished with 600 grit SCI paper); Group 2: specimens sandblasted, silanized, and glazed with Optiglaze Color (GC); Group 3: glazed specimens subjected to 5000 thermocycles (n=15). The surface roughness (R a and R z ) was evaluated using a profilometer and a 3D scanning instrument. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test ( P .05). For VITA and Cerasmart, the specimens in Group 1 exhibited significantly higher R a values than Group 2 ( P .05). Glaze material Optiglaze Color makes CAD/CAM resin surfaces smooth and glazed CAD/CAM surfaces seem resistant to deterioration under 5000 thermocycles.

  7. Treatment Expectations for CAM Interventions in Pediatric Chronic Pain Patients and their Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Patient expectations regarding complementary and alternative medicine (CAM interventions have important implications for treatment adherence, attrition and clinical outcome. Little is known, however, about parent and child treatment expectations regarding CAM approaches for pediatric chronic pain problems. The present study examined ratings of the expected benefits of CAM (i.e. hypnosis, massage, acupuncture, yoga and relaxation and conventional medicine (i.e. medications, surgery interventions in 45 children (32 girls; mean age = 13.8 years ± 2.5 and parents (39 mothers presenting for treatment at a specialty clinic for chronic pediatric pain. Among children, medications and relaxation were expected to be significantly more helpful than the remaining approaches (P < 0.01. However, children expected the three lowest rated interventions, acupuncture, surgery and hypnosis, to be of equal benefit. Results among parents were similar to those found in children but there were fewer significant differences between ratings of the various interventions. Only surgery was expected by parents to be significantly less helpful than the other approaches (P < 0.01. When parent and child perceptions were compared, parents expected hypnosis, acupuncture and yoga, to be more beneficial than did children, whereas children expected surgery to be more helpful than did parents (P < 0.01. Overall, children expected the benefits of CAM to be fairly low with parents' expectations only somewhat more positive. The current findings suggest that educational efforts directed at enhancing treatment expectations regarding CAM, particularly among children with chronic pain, are warranted.

  8. PreCam: A Precursor Observational Campaign for Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Allam, S.; Annis, J. T.; Bailey, T.; Balbinot, E.; Bernstein, J. P.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Burke, D. L.; Butner, M.; Camargo, J. I. B.; da Costa, L. A. N.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Estrada, J.; Fausti, A.; Gerke, B.; Guarino, V.; Head, H. H.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Lorenzon, W.; Maia, M. A. G.; Maki, L.; Marshall, J.; Nord, B.; Neilsen, E.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Park, D.; Peoples, J.; Rastawicki, D.; Rheault, J. -P.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Seitzer, P.; Smith, J. A.; Spinka, H.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.

    2013-04-01

    PreCam, a precursor observational campaign supporting the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is designed to produce a photometric and astrometric catalog of nearly a hundred thousand standard stars within the DES footprint, while the PreCam instrument also serves as a prototype testbed for the Dark Energy Camera's hardware and software. This catalog represents a potential 100-fold increase in Southern Hemisphere photometric standard stars, and therefore will be an important component in the calibration of the Dark Energy Survey. We provide details on the PreCam instrument's design, construction, and testing, as well as results from a subset of the 51 nights of PreCam survey observations on the University of Michigan Department of Astronomy's Curtis-Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We briefly describe the preliminary data processing pipeline that has been developed for PreCam data and the preliminary results of the instrument performance, as well as astrometry and photometry of a sample of stars previously included in other southern sky surveys.

  9. Expression of EpCam and Villin in Barrett’s Esophagus and in Gastric Cardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Anders

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study we aimed to clarify the potential of EpCAM and villin as in vivo biomarkers for both Barrett esophagus (BE-associated neoplasia and BE versus cardiac mucosa. Immunohistochemical staining in BE with various degrees of intraepithelial neoplasia (IN, Barrett carcinoma (BC and in normal cardiac mucosa (CM revealed a lack of EpCam and villin in squamous esophageal epithelium. All specimens of IN and BC showed EpCam with varying staining intensities. In 57% of CM samples a weak signal was detected; the remainder displayed strong EpCam expression. Villin was found in 97% of BE specimens and in all those with IN; 37% of BC and 75% of CM specimens were also positive. We conclude that expression of EpCam and villin differs only between squamous epithelium and BE. Determination of these proteins does not allow discrimination between different degrees of neoplasia or between esophageal intestinal metaplasia and cardiac mucosa.

  10. Engineering task plan for rotary mode core sampling exhausters CAM high radiation interlock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system is primarily made up of the Rotary Mode Core Sample Trucks (RMCST) and the RMCS Exhausters. During RMCS operations an Exhauster is connected to a tank riser and withdraws gases from the tank dome vapor space at approximately 200 Standard Cubic Feet per Minute (SCFM). The gases are passed through two High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters before passing out the exhaust stack to the atmosphere. A Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) monitors the exhaust gases in the exhaust stack for beta particle and gamma radiation. The CAM has a high radiation alarm output and a detector fail alarm output. The CAM alarms are currently connected to the data logger only. The CAM alarms require operator response per procedure LMHC 1998 but no automatic functions are initiated by the CAM alarms. Currently, there are three events that can cause an automatic shut down of the Exhauster. These are, Low Tank Pressure, Highnow Stack Flow and High HEPA Filter Differential Pressure (DP)

  11. Comparative characterization of a novel cad-cam polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albero, Alberto; Pascual, Agustín; Camps, Isabel; Grau-Benitez, María

    2015-10-01

    The field of dental ceramics for CAD-CAM is enriched with a new innovative material composition having a porous three-dimensional structure of feldspathic ceramic infiltrated with acrylic resins.The aim of this study is to determine the mechanical properties of Polymer-Infiltrated-Ceramic-Network (PICN) and compare its performance with other ceramics and a nano-ceramic resin available for CAD-CAM systems. In this study a total of five different materials for CAD-CAM were investigated. A polymer-infiltrated ceramic (Vita Enamic), a nano-ceramic resin (Lava Ultimate), a feldspathic ceramic (Mark II), a lithium disilicate ceramic (IPS-e max CAD) and finally a Leucite based ceramic (Empress - CAD). From CAD-CAM blocks, 120 bars (30 for each material cited above) were cut to measure the flexural strength with a three-point-bending test. Strain at failure, fracture stress and Weibull modulus was calculated. Vickers hardness of each material was also measured. IPS-EMAX presents mechanical properties significantly better from the other materials studied. Its strain at failure, flexural strength and hardness exhibited significantly higher values in comparison with the others. VITA ENAMIC and LAVA ULTIMATE stand out as the next most resistant materials. The flexural strength, elastic modulus similar to a tooth as well as having less hardness than ceramics make PICN materials an option to consider as a restorative material. Ceramic infiltrated with resin, CAD-CAM, Weibull modulus, flexural strength, micro hardness.

  12. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practices and dietary patterns in children with inflammatory bowel disease in Singapore and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Fangyi; Seah Lee, Way; Lin, Charlotte; Ng, Ruey Terng; Yee Wong, Shin; Lim, Su Lin; Quak, Seng Hock; Aw, Marion

    2017-12-26

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has been associated with adverse effects and self-imposed dietary restrictions. The prevalence of its use in Asian children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence, types, and factors associated with the use of CAM among children with IBD from Singapore and Malaysia, and to ascertain if dietary restriction was prevalent in patients who used CAM. A cross-sectional study was conducted in which parents of children with IBD attending two tertiary pediatric IBD referral centres in Singapore and Malaysia were interviewed. Data about demographics, conventional treatment, complementary therapies and dietary patterns were collected in a questionnaire. Of 64 children with IBD interviewed, 83% (n = 53) reported the use of CAM (Singapore [90%] vs. Malaysia [76%]; p = 0.152). The median number of CAM agents used was two (range 1-10). The three most common types of CAM used were probiotics (64%), vitamin and mineral supplements (55%), and food-based therapies (36%). Among individual CAM categories, the use of food-based therapies was correlated significantly with nationality (r = 0.497, p history of weight loss due to IBD (r = 0.340, p = 0.013) and avoidance of certain foods to prevent a relapse (r = 0.289, p = 0.036). Parents who rated their child's disease activity as more severe were less likely to use CAM (r = -0.257, p = 0.041). Fifty-nine percent of CAM users reported physician awareness of their CAM use. The overall self-perceived efficacy of CAM in improving IBD symptoms was 34%. Of the dietary patterns explored, only intake of dairy products was associated with CAM use (r = 0.306, p = 0.019). Use of CAM is prevalent in children with IBD in Malaysia and Singapore. Further studies to elucidate reasons influencing CAM use, dietary patterns and efficacy of commonly used CAM would be required. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in an Italian cohort of pediatric headache patients: the tip of the iceberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Libera, D; Colombo, B; Pavan, G; Comi, G

    2014-05-01

    The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in paediatric populations is considerably increased, especially for pain and chronic conditions, as demonstrated by epidemiological surveys both in Europe and in the USA. In our study, CAM was used in 76 % patients of a cohort of 124 children affected by headache (age 4-16 years; 67 % female; 70 % migraine without aura, 12 % migraine with aura, 18 % tensive headache according to IHS criteria) consecutively recruited at a Pediatric Headache University Center. CAM was used as preventive treatment in 80 % cases. The main reasons for seeking CAM were: the wish of avoiding chronic use of drugs with their related side effects, the desire of an integrated approach, the reported inefficacy of conventional medicine, and a more suitable children disposition to CAM than to pharmacological compound. Female gender, younger age, migraine without aura, parents' higher educational status, maternal use of CAM and other associated chronic conditions, correlated with CAM use (p CAM also to treat other diseases (i.e. allergies, colitis, asthma, insomnia, muscle-scheletric disorders and dysmenorrhoea). The most assumed CAM were: herbal remedies (64 %) such as Valeriana, Ginkgo biloba, Boswellia serrata, Vitex agnus-castus, passion flower, Linden tree; vitamins/minerals supplements (40 %) with magnesium, 5-Hydroxytryptophan, vitamin B6 or B12, Multivitamin compounds; Homeopathy (47 %) with Silicea, Ignatia Amara, Pulsatilla, Aconitum, Nux Vomica, Calcarea phosphorica; physical treatment (45 %) such as Ayurvedic massage, shiatsu, osteopathy; yoga (33 %); acupuncture (11 %). CAM-often integrated with conventional care-was auto-prescribed in 30 % of the cases, suggested by non-physician in 22 %, by the General Practitioner in 24 % and by paediatrician in 24 %. Both general practitioners and neurologists were mostly unaware of their patients' CAM use. In conclusion, neurologists should inquire for CAM use and be prepared to learn about CAM

  14. "We make choices we think are going to save us": Debate and stance identification for online breast cancer CAM discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaodian; Qiu, Lin; Chen, Frank; Zhang, Weinan; Yu, Yong; Elhadad, Noémie

    2017-04-01

    Patients discuss complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in online health communities. Sometimes, patients' conflicting opinions toward CAM-related issues trigger debates in the community. The objectives of this paper are to identify such debates, identify controversial CAM therapies in a popular online breast cancer community, as well as patients' stances towards them. To scale our analysis, we trained a set of classifiers. We first constructed a supervised classifier based on a long short-term memory neural network (LSTM) stacked over a convolutional neural network (CNN) to detect automatically CAM-related debates from a popular breast cancer forum. Members' stances in these debates were also identified by a CNN-based classifier. Finally, posts automatically flagged as debates by the classifier were analyzed to explore which specific CAM therapies trigger debates more often than others. Our methods are able to detect CAM debates with F score of 77%, and identify stances with F score of 70%. The debate classifier identified about 1/6 of all CAM-related posts as debate. About 60% of CAM-related debate posts represent the supportive stance toward CAM usage. Qualitative analysis shows that some specific therapies, such as Gerson therapy and usage of laetrile, trigger debates frequently among members of the breast cancer community. This study demonstrates that neural networks can effectively locate debates on usage and effectiveness of controversial CAM therapies, and can help make sense of patients' opinions on such issues under dispute. As to CAM for breast cancer, perceptions of their effectiveness vary among patients. Many of the specific therapies trigger debates frequently and are worth more exploration in future work.

  15. Soil Diversity and Hydration as Observed by ChemCam at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, P.-Y.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Schröder, S.; Cousin, A.; Berger, G.; Clegg, S. M.; Lasue, J.; Maurice, S.; Sautter, V.; Le Mouélic, S.; Wiens, R. C.; Fabre, C.; Goetz, W.; Bish, D.; Mangold, N.; Ehlmann, B.; Lanza, N.; Harri, A.-M.; Anderson, R.; Rampe, E.; McConnochie, T. H.; Pinet, P.; Blaney, D.; Léveillé, R.; Archer, D.; Barraclough, B.; Bender, S.; Blake, D.; Blank, J. G.; Bridges, N.; Clark, B. C.; DeFlores, L.; Delapp, D.; Dromart, G.; Dyar, M. D.; Fisk, M.; Gondet, B.; Grotzinger, J.; Herkenhoff, K.; Johnson, J.; Lacour, J.-L.; Langevin, Y.; Leshin, L.; Lewin, E.; Madsen, M. B.; Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A.; Mischna, M. A.; Moores, J. E.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.; Perez, R.; Renno, N.; Sirven, J.-B.; Tokar, R.; de la Torre, M.; d'Uston, L.; Vaniman, D.; Yingst, A.; Kemppinen, Osku; Minitti, Michelle; Cremers, David; Bell, James F.; Edgar, Lauren; Farmer, Jack; Godber, Austin; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Wellington, Danika; McEwan, Ian; Newman, Claire; Richardson, Mark; Charpentier, Antoine; Peret, Laurent; King, Penelope; Weigle, Gerald; Schmidt, Mariek; Li, Shuai; Milliken, Ralph; Robertson, Kevin; Sun, Vivian; Baker, Michael; Edwards, Christopher; Farley, Kenneth; Griffes, Jennifer; Miller, Hayden; Newcombe, Megan; Pilorget, Cedric; Rice, Melissa; Siebach, Kirsten; Stack, Katie; Stolper, Edward; Brunet, Claude; Hipkin, Victoria; Marchand, Geneviève; Sánchez, Pablo Sobrón; Favot, Laurent; Cody, George; Steele, Andrew; Flückiger, Lorenzo; Lees, David; Nefian, Ara; Martin, Mildred; Gailhanou, Marc; Westall, Frances; Israël, Guy; Agard, Christophe; Baroukh, Julien; Donny, Christophe; Gaboriaud, Alain; Guillemot, Philippe; Lafaille, Vivian; Lorigny, Eric; Paillet, Alexis; Pérez, René; Saccoccio, Muriel; Yana, Charles; Armiens-Aparicio, Carlos; Rodríguez, Javier Caride; Blázquez, Isaías Carrasco; Gómez, Felipe Gómez; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Hettrich, Sebastian; Malvitte, Alain Lepinette; Jiménez, Mercedes Marín; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Martín-Soler, Javier; Martín-Torres, F. Javier; Jurado, Antonio Molina; Mora-Sotomayor, Luis; Caro, Guillermo Muñoz; López, Sara Navarro; Peinado-González, Verónica; Pla-García, Jorge; Manfredi, José Antonio Rodriguez; Romeral-Planelló, Julio José; Fuentes, Sara Alejandra Sans; Martinez, Eduardo Sebastian; Redondo, Josefina Torres; Urqui-O'Callaghan, Roser; Mier, María-Paz Zorzano; Chipera, Steve; Mauchien, Patrick; Manning, Heidi; Fairén, Alberto; Hayes, Alexander; Joseph, Jonathan; Squyres, Steven; Sullivan, Robert; Thomas, Peter; Dupont, Audrey; Lundberg, Angela; DeMarines, Julia; Grinspoon, David; Reitz, Günther; Prats, Benito; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Genzer, Maria; Haukka, Harri; Kahanpää, Henrik; Kauhanen, Janne; Kemppinen, Osku; Paton, Mark; Polkko, Jouni; Schmidt, Walter; Siili, Tero; Wray, James; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Poitrasson, Franck; Patel, Kiran; Gorevan, Stephen; Indyk, Stephen; Paulsen, Gale; Gupta, Sanjeev; Schieber, Juergen; Geffroy, Claude; Baratoux, David; Cros, Alain; Lee, Qiu-Mei; Pallier, Etienne; Parot, Yann; Toplis, Mike; Brunner, Will; Heydari, Ezat; Achilles, Cherie; Oehler, Dorothy; Sutter, Brad; Cabane, Michel; Coscia, David; Israël, Guy; Szopa, Cyril; Robert, François; Nachon, Marion; Buch, Arnaud; Stalport, Fabien; Coll, Patrice; François, Pascaline; Raulin, François; Teinturier, Samuel; Cameron, James; Dingler, Robert; Jackson, Ryan Steele; Johnstone, Stephen; Little, Cynthia; Nelson, Tony; Williams, Richard B.; Jones, Andrea; Kirkland, Laurel; Treiman, Allan; Baker, Burt; Cantor, Bruce; Caplinger, Michael; Davis, Scott; Duston, Brian; Edgett, Kenneth; Fay, Donald; Hardgrove, Craig; Harker, David; Herrera, Paul; Jensen, Elsa; Kennedy, Megan R.; Krezoski, Gillian; Krysak, Daniel; Lipkaman, Leslie; Malin, Michael; McCartney, Elaina; McNair, Sean; Nixon, Brian; Posiolova, Liliya; Ravine, Michael; Salamon, Andrew; Saper, Lee; Stoiber, Kevin; Supulver, Kimberley; Van Beek, Jason; Van Beek, Tessa; Zimdar, Robert; French, Katherine Louise; Iagnemma, Karl; Miller, Kristen; Summons, Roger; Goesmann, Fred; Hviid, Stubbe; Johnson, Micah; Lefavor, Matthew; Lyness, Eric; Breves, Elly; Fassett, Caleb; Bristow, Thomas; DesMarais, David; Edwards, Laurence; Haberle, Robert; Hoehler, Tori; Hollingsworth, Jeff; Kahre, Melinda; Keely, Leslie; McKay, Christopher; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William; Choi, David; Conrad, Pamela; Dworkin, Jason P.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Floyd, Melissa; Freissinet, Caroline; Garvin, James; Glavin, Daniel; Harpold, Daniel; Jones, Andrea; Mahaffy, Paul; Martin, David K.; McAdam, Amy; Pavlov, Alexander; Raaen, Eric; Smith, Michael D.; Stern, Jennifer; Tan, Florence; Trainer, Melissa; Meyer, Michael; Posner, Arik; Voytek, Mary; Anderson, Robert C.; Aubrey, Andrew; Beegle, Luther W.; Behar, Alberto; Brinza, David; Calef, Fred; Christensen, Lance; Crisp, Joy A.; Feldman, Jason; Feldman, Sabrina; Flesch, Gregory; Hurowitz, Joel; Jun, Insoo; Keymeulen, Didier; Maki, Justin; Morookian, John Michael; Parker, Timothy; Pavri, Betina; Schoppers, Marcel; Sengstacken, Aaron; Simmonds, John J.; Spanovich, Nicole; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Webster, Christopher R.; Yen, Albert; Cucinotta, Francis; Jones, John H.; Ming, Douglas; Morris, Richard V.; Niles, Paul; Nolan, Thomas; Radziemski, Leon; Berman, Daniel; Dobrea, Eldar Noe; Williams, Rebecca M. E.; Lewis, Kevin; Cleghorn, Timothy; Huntress, Wesley; Manhès, Gérard; Hudgins, Judy; Olson, Timothy; Stewart, Noel; Sarrazin, Philippe; Grant, John; Vicenzi, Edward; Wilson, Sharon A.; Bullock, Mark; Ehresmann, Bent; Hamilton, Victoria; Hassler, Donald; Peterson, Joseph; Rafkin, Scot; Zeitlin, Cary; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry; Karpushkina, Natalya; Kozyrev, Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mitrofanov, Igor; Mokrousov, Maxim; Nikiforov, Sergey; Prokhorov, Vasily; Sanin, Anton; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Wolff, Michael; McLennan, Scott; Botta, Oliver; Drake, Darrell; Bean, Keri; Lemmon, Mark; Schwenzer, Susanne P.; Lee, Ella Mae; Sucharski, Robert; Hernández, Miguel Ángel de Pablo; Ávalos, Juan José Blanco; Ramos, Miguel; Kim, Myung-Hee; Malespin, Charles; Plante, Ianik; Muller, Jan-Peter; Navarro-González, Rafael; Ewing, Ryan; Boynton, William; Downs, Robert; Fitzgibbon, Mike; Harshman, Karl; Morrison, Shaunna; Dietrich, William; Kortmann, Onno; Palucis, Marisa; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Williams, Amy; Lugmair, Günter; Wilson, Michael A.; Rubin, David; Jakosky, Bruce; Balic-Zunic, Tonci; Frydenvang, Jens; Jensen, Jaqueline Kløvgaard; Kinch, Kjartan; Koefoed, Asmus; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Boyd, Nick; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; Perrett, Glynis; Pradler, Irina; VanBommel, Scott; Jacob, Samantha; Owen, Tobias; Rowland, Scott; Atlaskin, Evgeny; Savijärvi, Hannu; Boehm, Eckart; Böttcher, Stephan; Burmeister, Sönke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; García, César Martín; Mueller-Mellin, Reinhold; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert; Bridges, John C.; Benna, Mehdi; Franz, Heather; Bower, Hannah; Brunner, Anna; Blau, Hannah; Boucher, Thomas; Carmosino, Marco; Atreya, Sushil; Elliott, Harvey; Halleaux, Douglas; Rennó, Nilton; Wong, Michael; Pepin, Robert; Elliott, Beverley; Spray, John; Thompson, Lucy; Gordon, Suzanne; Williams, Joshua; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Bentz, Jennifer; Nealson, Kenneth; Popa, Radu; Kah, Linda C.; Moersch, Jeffrey; Tate, Christopher; Day, Mackenzie; Kocurek, Gary; Hallet, Bernard; Sletten, Ronald; Francis, Raymond; McCullough, Emily; Cloutis, Ed; ten Kate, Inge Loes; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Arvidson, Raymond; Fraeman, Abigail; Scholes, Daniel; Slavney, Susan; Stein, Thomas; Ward, Jennifer; Berger, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    The ChemCam instrument, which provides insight into martian soil chemistry at the submillimeter scale, identified two principal soil types along the Curiosity rover traverse: a fine-grained mafic type and a locally derived, coarse-grained felsic type. The mafic soil component is representative of widespread martian soils and is similar in composition to the martian dust. It possesses a ubiquitous hydrogen signature in ChemCam spectra, corresponding to the hydration of the amorphous phases found in the soil by the CheMin instrument. This hydration likely accounts for an important fraction of the global hydration of the surface seen by previous orbital measurements. ChemCam analyses did not reveal any significant exchange of water vapor between the regolith and the atmosphere. These observations provide constraints on the nature of the amorphous phases and their hydration.

  16. Application of CAD/CAE/CAM in forging process: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Baharuddin Abdullah; Hamouda, A.M.S.

    2005-01-01

    Forging can be described as the process in which metal is plastically deformed with application of huge pressure. The process not only changes the shape but also improves the properties of the forged parts due to grain size refinement. Conventionally, the empirical trial and error method has been applied, but recently there are various tools are employed to improved product quality and economic of the process. For example, Computer Aided Design (CAD) is widely used in modeling of the process, while Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) tools have been utilized in analyzing the process. To physically demonstrate the process, Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) such as CNC machine has been exploited. In order to improve forging process efficiency, an integrated system that combines all advantages of CAD, CAM and CAE need to be developed. This paper presents an overview of computer aided simulation such as CAD, CAE and CAM application in forging process. (Author)

  17. Surface and top-of-atmosphere radiative feedback kernels for CESM-CAM5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergrass, Angeline G.; Conley, Andrew; Vitt, Francis M.

    2018-02-01

    Radiative kernels at the top of the atmosphere are useful for decomposing changes in atmospheric radiative fluxes due to feedbacks from atmosphere and surface temperature, water vapor, and surface albedo. Here we describe and validate radiative kernels calculated with the large-ensemble version of CAM5, CESM1.1.2, at the top of the atmosphere and the surface. Estimates of the radiative forcing from greenhouse gases and aerosols in RCP8.5 in the CESM large-ensemble simulations are also diagnosed. As an application, feedbacks are calculated for the CESM large ensemble. The kernels are freely available at https://doi.org/10.5065/D6F47MT6" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.5065/D6F47MT6, and accompanying software can be downloaded from https://github.com/apendergrass/cam5-kernels" target="_blank">https://github.com/apendergrass/cam5-kernels.

  18. Design of a cam-form tool in precision reuse of a digital paper display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pa, Pai-Shan

    2010-01-01

    A reuse fabrication module that uses micro electroremoving as a precision machining process with a new design of the cam-form tool to remove defective indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film from the optical PET surfaces of a digital paper display is presented. A small diameter of the cathode of the cam-form tool corresponds to a higher removal rate for the ITO nanostructure. A small edge radius of the anode and a small gap width between the cathode and the ITO surface takes less time for the same amount of ITO removal. A higher feed rate of the optical PET diaphragm combines with enough electric power to drive fast micro-electroremoving. The high rotational speed of the cam-form tool can improve the effect of dreg discharge and is advantageous to associate with the fast feed rate of the optical PET diaphragm.

  19. INTEGRASI SOFTWARE CAD-CAM DALAM SISTEM OPERASI MESIN BUBUT CNC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuris Setyoadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM adalah sebuah teknologi aplikasi yang menggunakan perangkat lunak komputer dan mesin untuk memfasilitasi dan mengotomatisasi proses manufaktur. Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM adalah penerus dari Computer Aided Engineering (CAE dan sering digunakan bersama dengan Computer-Aided Design (CAD. Bidang manufaktur, perangkat komputer telah dipergunakan untuk mengontrol mesin-mesin produksi otomatis dengan ketepatan tinggi, misalnya mesin CNC. ?é?áArtikel ini membahas tentang penggunaan software CAD-CAM (SOLIDWorks dan CAMWorks yang terintegrasi kemudian diaplikasikan ke mesin bubut CNC yang menggunakan software Mach3, Mach3 adalah software yang bisa mengubah komputer dekstop menjadi sebuah piranti kontroller mesin CNC. Software SOLIDWorks, CAMWorks dan Mach3 diintegrasikan ke dalam sistem operasi mesin bubut CNC sehingga proses koreksi dan modifikasi format perintah gerakan dalam G/M code dapat dilakukan dalam software tersebut.

  20. Fabricating CAD/CAM Implant-Retained Mandibular Bar Overdentures: A Clinical and Technical Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chui Ling Goo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the clinical and technical aspects in the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with knife-edge ridge at the mandibular anterior edentulous region, using implant-retained overdentures. The application of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM in the fabrication of the overdenture framework simplifies the laboratory process of the implant prostheses. The Nobel Procera CAD/CAM System was utilised to produce a lightweight titanium overdenture bar with locator attachments. It is proposed that the digital workflow of CAD/CAM milled implant overdenture bar allows us to avoid numerous technical steps and possibility of casting errors involved in the conventional casting of such bars.

  1. Soil diversity and hydration as observed by ChemCam at Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslin, P.-Y.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Schroder, S.; Cousin, A.; Berger, G.; Clegg, S.M.; Lasue, J.; Maurice, S.; Sautter, V.; Le Mouélic, S.; Wiens, R.C.; Fabre, C.; Goetz, W.; Bish, D.L.; Mangold, N.; Ehlmann, B.; Lanza, N.; Harri, A.-M.; Anderson, Ryan Bradley; Rampe, E.; McConnochie, T.H.; Pinet, P.; Blaney, D.; ,; Archer, D.; Barraclough, B.; Bender, S.; Blake, D.; Blank, J.G.; Bridges, N.; Clark, B. C.; DeFlores, L.; Delapp, D.; Dromart, G.; Dyar, M.D.; Fisk, M. R.; Gondet, B.; Grotzinger, J.; Herkenhoff, K.; Johnson, J.; Lacour, J.-L.; Langevin, Y.; Leshin, L.; Lewin, E.; Madsen, M.B.; Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, Alissa; Mischna, M.A.; Moores, J.E.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.; ,; Renno, N.; Sirven, J.B.; Tokar, R.; de la Torre, M.; d'Uston, L.; Vaniman, D.; Yingst, A.

    2013-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument, which provides insight into martian soil chemistry at the submillimeter scale, identified two principal soil types along the Curiosity rover traverse: a fine-grained mafic type and a locally derived, coarse-grained felsic type. The mafic soil component is representative of widespread martian soils and is similar in composition to the martian dust. It possesses a ubiquitous hydrogen signature in ChemCam spectra, corresponding to the hydration of the amorphous phases found in the soil by the CheMin instrument. This hydration likely accounts for an important fraction of the global hydration of the surface seen by previous orbital measurements. ChemCam analyses did not reveal any significant exchange of water vapor between the regolith and the atmosphere. These observations provide constraints on the nature of the amorphous phases and their hydration.

  2. ChemCam on MSL 2009: first laser induced breakdown spectrometer for space science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    ChemCam is one of the 10 instrument suites on the Mars Science Laboratory, a martian rover being built by Jet Propulsion Laboratory, for the next NASA mission to Mars (MSL 2009). ChemCam is an instrument package consisting of two remote sensing instruments: a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI). LIBS provides elemental compositions of rocks and soils, while the RMI places the LIBS analyses in their geomorphologic context. Both instruments rely on an autofocus capability to precisely focus on the chosen target, located at distances from the rover comprised between 1 and 9 m for LIBS, and 2 m and infinity for RMI. ChemCam will help determine which samples, within the vicinity of the MSL rover, are of sufficient interest to use the contact and in-situ instruments for further characterization. It will provide valuable analyses of samples that are inaccessible to contact and in-situ instruments, and of a much larger number of samples than can be done with this kind of instrument. ChemCam also has a capability to provide passive spectroscopy data of rocks and soils on Mars. ChemCam hardware consists of a Mast Unit (MU), provided by France, and a Body Unit (BU) built and tested in the USA. The Flight Model of the MU is assembled, tested and now available in the USA, while the BU is currently being assembled and tested. Both will be connected by the end of year '08 for end-to-end functional and performance tests, before delivery to JPL and assembly on the MSL rover. Launch is scheduled for October 09. After describing the concept of ChemCam, this presentation focuses on its French part, Mast Unit. The results presented show that Mast Unit is able to generate a plasma and collect its light, over the full applicable ranges of distances and temperatures on Mars.

  3. Survey on the use of CAD-CAM technology by UK and Irish dental technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, E; Nesbit, M; Petridis, H

    2017-05-12

    Statement of the problem Digital workflows (CAD/CAM) have been introduced in dentistry during recent years. No published information exists on dental technicians' use and reporting of this technology.Purpose The aim of this cross sectional survey was to identify the extent digital technology has infiltrated the workplace and to investigate the factors affecting the use of CAD-CAM technology by dental laboratory technicians within Ireland and the UK.Materials and methods A web-based questionnaire was composed (Opinio, Object Planet Inc. Oslo, Norway) and distributed to UK and Irish dental technicians. Answers to all questions were anonymous and grouped such that general information was gathered initially, followed by branching of the survey into two sections depending on whether or not the respondent worked with CAD-CAM technology. Results were compiled and statistical analysis (Fisher's Exact test, SPSS, IBM, Armonk, New York, USA) was performed in order to investigate any correlation between various demographic variables and the answers provided.Results The survey was distributed to 760 UK technicians and 77 Irish technicians. The total number of completed surveys was 105, which yielded a total response rate of 14%. Most technicians reported using some form of CAD/CAM aspect in the workflow, and this was more significant for technicians working in large laboratories. Most training received was company-led. Large laboratories were also significantly correlated with less outsourcing of CAD/CAM work and a change in dental material use leading to the increase of zirconia and the decrease of noble alloys. Dental technicians did not report any significant change in working relationships and staffing as a result of CAD/CAM incorporation. High initial investment cost was the most common reason quoted from non-users, along with the lack of such technology in their working environment.

  4. CAM and Cell Fate Targeting: Molecular and Energetic Insights into Cell Growth and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Ventura

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based medicine is switching from the analysis of single diseases at a time toward an integrated assessment of a diseased person. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM offers multiple holistic approaches, including osteopathy, homeopathy, chiropractic, acupuncture, herbal and energy medicine and meditation, all potentially impacting on major human diseases. It is now becoming evident that acupuncture can modify the expression of different endorphin genes and the expression of genes encoding for crucial transcription factors in cellular homeostasis. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields have been found to prime the commitment to a myocardial lineage in mouse embryonic stem cells, suggesting that magnetic energy may direct stem cell differentiation into specific cellular phenotypes without the aid of gene transfer technologies. This finding may pave the way to novel approaches in tissue engineering and regeneration. Different ginseng extracts have been shown to modulate growth and differentiation in pluripotent cells and to exert wound-healing and antitumor effects through opposing activities on the vascular system, prompting the hypothesis that ancient compounds may be the target for new logics in cell therapy. These observations and the subtle entanglement among different CAM systems suggest that CAM modalities may deeply affect both the signaling and transcriptional level of cellular homeostasis. Such a perception holds promises for a new era in CAM, prompting reproducible documentation of biological responses to CAM-related strategies and compounds. To this end, functional genomics and proteomics and the comprehension of the cell signaling networks may substantially contribute to the development of a molecular evidence–based CAM.

  5. Calcium Sulfate Characterized by ChemCam/Curiosity at Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachon, M.; Clegg, S. N.; Mangold, N.; Schroeder, S.; Kah, L. C.; Dromart, G.; Ollila, A.; Johnson, J. R.; Oehler, D. Z.; Bridges, J. C.; hide

    2014-01-01

    Onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover, the ChemCam instrument consists of :(1) a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) for elemental analysis of the targets [1;2] and (2) a Remote Micro Imager (RMI), for the imaging context of laser analysis [3]. Within the Gale crater, Curiosity traveled from Bradbury Landing through the Rocknest region and into Yellowknife Bay (YB). In the latter, abundant light-toned fracture-fill material were seen [4;5]. ChemCam analysis demonstrate that those fracture fills consist of calcium sulfates [6].

  6. The influence of polishing techniques on pre-polymerized CAD\\CAM acrylic resin denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alammari, Manal Rahma

    2017-10-01

    Lately, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has broadly been successfully employed in dentistry. The CAD/CAM systems have recently become commercially available for fabrication of complete dentures, and are considered as an alternative technique to conventionally processed acrylic resin bases. However, they have not yet been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to inspect the effects of mechanical polishing and chemical polishing on the surface roughness (Ra) and contact angle (wettability) of heat-cured, auto-cured and CAD/CAM denture base acrylic resins. This study was conducted at the Advanced Dental Research Laboratory Center of King Abdulaziz University from March to June 2017. Three denture base materials were selected: heat cure poly-methylmethacrylate resin, thermoplastic (polyamide resin) and (CAD\\CAM) denture base resin. Sixty specimens were prepared and divided into three groups, twenty in each. Each group was divided according to the polishing techniques into (Mech P) and (Chem P), ten specimens in each; surface roughness and wettability were investigated. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 22, using one-way ANOVA and Pearson coefficient. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests were used for comparing the surface roughness values between three groups which revealed a statistical significant difference between them (p 1 CAD\\CAM denture base material (group III) showed the least mean values (1.08±0.23, 1.39±0.31, Mech P and Chem P respectively). CAD/CAM showed the least contact angle in both polishing methods, which were statistically significant at 5% level (p=0.034 and pCAD\\CAM denture base resin with superior smooth surface compared to chemical polishing. Mechanical polishing is considered the best effective polishing technique. CAD/CAM denture base material should be considered as the material of choice for complete denture construction in the near future, especially for older dental

  7. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Marleen; Valjakova, Emilija Bajraktarova; De Munck, Jan; Mishevska, Cece Bajraktarova; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC paper; 2. sandblasting with 30-μm Al2O3; 3. tribochemical silica coating (CoJet). Subsequent chemical surface treatments involved either no further treatment (control), HF acid etching (HF), silanization (S, or HF acid etching followed by silanization (HF+S). Two specimens with the same surface treatment were bonded together using two dual-curing luting composites: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (self-etching) or Panavia SA Cement (self-adhesive). After 1 week of water storage, the microtensile bond strength of the sectioned microspecimens was measured and the failure mode was evaluated. The bonding performance of the six CAD/CAM materials was significantly influenced by surface treatment (linear mixed models, p CAD (p = 0.0115), and Lava Ultimate (p CAD/CAM materials: Vita Mark II and IPS Empress CAD: S, HF+S; Celtra Duo: HF, HF+S; IPS e.max CAD: HF+S; Vita Enamic: HF+S, S. For Lava Ultimate, the highest bond strengths were obtained with HF, S, HF+S. Failure analysis showed a relation between bond strength and failure type: more mixed failures were observed with higher bond strengths. Mainly adhesive failures were noticed if no further surface treatment was done. The percentage of adhesive failures was higher for CAD/CAM materials with higher flexural strength (Celtra Duo, IPS e.max CAD, and Lava Ultimate). The bond strength of luting composites to novel CAD/CAM materials is influenced by surface treatment. For each luting composite, an adhesive cementation protocol can be specified in order to obtain the highest bond to the

  8. Effectiveness and efficiency of a CAD/CAM orthodontic bracket system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew W; Koroluk, Lorne; Ko, Ching-Chang; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Mengqi; Nguyen, Tung

    2015-12-01

    The first straight-wire appliance was introduced over 40 years ago to increase the consistency and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. More recently, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used to create individualized orthodontic appliances. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of CAD/CAM customized orthodontic appliances compared with direct and indirect bonded stock orthodontic brackets. This retrospective study included 3 treatment groups: group 1 patients were direct bonded with self-ligating appliances, group 2 patients were indirect bonded with self-ligating appliances, and group 3 patients were indirect bonded with CAD/CAM self-ligating appliances. Complete pretreatment and posttreatment records were obtained for all patients. The American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) Discrepancy Index was used to evaluate the pretreatment records, and the posttreatment outcomes were analyzed using the ABO Cast-Radiograph Evaluation. All data collection and analysis were completed by 1 evaluator. There were no statistically significant differences in the ABO Discrepancy Index or the ABO Cast-Radiograph Evaluation among the groups. Treatment times for the 3 groups were significantly different; the CAD/CAM group was the shortest at 13.8 ± 3.4 months, compared with 21.9 ± 5.0 and 16.9 ± 4.1 months for the direct bonded and indirect bonded groups, respectively. The number of treatment appointments for the CAD/CAM group was significantly fewer than for the direct bonded group. The CAD/CAM orthodontic bracket system evaluated in this study was as effective in treatment outcome measures as were standard brackets bonded both directly and indirectly. The CAD/CAM appliance was more efficient in regard to treatment duration, although the decrease in total archwire appointments was minimal. Further investigation is needed to better quantify the clinical benefits of CAD/CAM orthodontic

  9. Light irradiance through novel CAD-CAM block materials and degree of conversion of composite cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lise, Diogo Pedrollo; Van Ende, Annelies; De Munck, Jan; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Cardoso Vieira, Luiz Clovis; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2018-02-01

    To assess light irradiance (LI) delivered by two light-curing units (LCU's) and to measure the degree of conversion (DC) of three composite cements, when cured through different thicknesses of two novel CAD-CAM block materials. 100-μm-thick films of a dual-curable composite cement (G-CEM LinkAce, GC), a light-curable flowable resin-based composite (RBC) (G-ænial Universal Flo, GC) and a micro-hybrid RBC (G-ænial Posterior, GC) were investigated as luting agents. Two 'polymer-ceramic' CAD-CAM blocks (Cerasmart, GC; Enamic, Vita Zahnfabrik) were sectioned in slabs with different thicknesses (1, 3 and 5mm). LI at the bottom of the specimens was measured using a calibrated spectrometer, while being light-cured through the CAD-CAM block slabs for 40s with a low- (±500mW/cm 2 ) or high- (±1,600mW/cm 2 ) irradiance LCU (n=5). After light-curing, micro-Raman spectra of the composite films were acquired to determine DC at 5min, 10min, 1h and 24h. LI data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis followed by post-hoc comparisons, while a linear mixed-effect model was applied for the DC analysis. In addition, the CAD-CAM blocks ultrastructure was characterized upon argon-ion slicing using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Finally, light transmission (LT) through each CAD-CAM block material was assessed using a spectrophotometer. Curing-light attenuation and DC were significantly influenced by thickness and type of the overlying material. LCU only had a significant effect on DC of the micro-hybrid RBC. DC significantly increased over time for all composite cements. CAD-CAM block structural analysis revealed a relatively small and homogenous filler configuration (mean filler size of 0.2-0.5μm) for Cerasmart, while Enamic contained ceramic grains varying in shape and size (1-10μm), which were interconnected by the polymer-based network. LT was much higher at a wavelength range of 300-800nm for Cerasmart than for Enamic. Light-curable composite cements

  10. A Step-by-Step Conservative Approach for CAD-CAM Laminate Veneers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Durán Ojeda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of CAD/CAM technology has allowed the fabrication of ceramic restorations efficiently and with predictable results. Lithium disilicate is a type of glass ceramic material that can be used for the elaboration of laminate veneers, being monolithic restorations which require characterization through a covering ceramic in order to achieve acceptable esthetic results. The next case report shows a predictable clinical protocol for the rehabilitation of the anterior teeth through the preparation of CAD/CAM veneers (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein which have been characterized by a nanofluorapatite ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein through the layering technique.

  11. Estudio de la variabilidad genética en camélidos bolivianos

    OpenAIRE

    Barreta Pinto, Julia

    2013-01-01

    El estudio de los camélidos sudamericanos es de gran interés en los países andinoscomo Perú, Bolivia, Chile, Argentina, debido a su importante valor económico y suimportancia en el mantenimiento y desarrollo de las poblaciones rurales en dichos países. Dada la falta de estudios genéticos centrados en las poblaciones de camélidos quehabitan en Bolivia, y la necesidad de realizar una valoración de la diversidad genética deestas poblaciones, la presente Tesis doctoral ha abordado el estudio gené...

  12. 28th International Conference on CAD/CAM, Robotics and Factories of the Future

    CERN Document Server

    Syan, Chanan

    2016-01-01

    This volume is based on the proceedings of the 28th International Conference on CAD/CAM, Robotics and Factories of the Future. This book specially focuses on the positive changes made in the field of robotics, CAD/CAM and future outlook for emerging manufacturing units. Some of the important topics discussed in the conference are product development and sustainability, modeling and simulation, automation, robotics and handling systems, supply chain management and logistics, advanced manufacturing processes, human aspects in engineering activities, emerging scenarios in engineering education and training. The contents of this set of proceedings will prove useful to both researchers and practitioners.

  13. Chick ex ovo culture and ex ovo CAM assay: how it really works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohle, Daniel S; Pasa, Susanne D; Gustmann, Sebastian; Laub, Markus; Wissler, Josef H; Jennissen, Herbert P; Dünker, Nicole

    2009-11-30

    Chicken eggs in the early phase of breeding are between in vitro and in vivo systems and provide a vascular test environment not only to study angiogenesis but also to study tumorigenesis. After the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) has developed, its blood vessel network can be easily accessed, manipulated and observed and therefore provides an optimal setting for angiogenesis assays. Since the lymphoid system is not fully developed until late stages of incubation, the chick embryo serves as a naturally immunodeficient host capable of sustaining grafted tissues and cells without species-specific restrictions. In addition to nurturing developing allo- and xenografts, the CAM blood vessel network provides a uniquely supportive environment for tumor cell intravasation, dissemination, and vascular arrest and a repository where arrested cells extravasate to form micro metastatic foci. For experimental purposes, in most of the recent studies the CAM was exposed by cutting a window through the egg shell and experiments were carried out in ovo, resulting in significant limitations in the accessibility of the CAM and possibilities for observation and photo documentation of effects. When shell-less cultures of the chick embryo were used(1-4), no experimental details were provided and, if published at all, the survival rates of these cultures were low. We refined the method of ex ovo culture of chick embryos significantly by introducing a rationally controlled extrusion of the egg content. These ex ovo cultures enhance the accessibility of the CAM and chick embryo, enabling easy in vivo documentation of effects and facilitating experimental manipulation of the embryo. This allows the successful application to a large number of scientific questions: (1) As an improved angiogenesis assay(5,6), (2) an experimental set up for facilitated injections in the vitreous of the chick embryo eye(7-9), (3) as a test environment for dissemination and intravasation of dispersed tumor

  14. AffectCam : arousal- augmented sensecam for richer recall of episodic memories

    OpenAIRE

    Sas, Corina; Fratczak, Thomasz; Rees, Matthew; Gellersen, Hans; Kalnikaitė, Vaiva; Coman, Alina; Höök, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of AffectCam, a wearable system integrating SenseCam and BodyMedia SenseWear for capturing galvanic skin response as a measure of bodily arousal. AffectCam’s algorithms use arousal as a filtering mechanism for selecting the most personally relevant photos captured during people’s ordinary daily life, i.e. high arousal photos. We discuss initial findings showing that emotional arousal does improve the quality of memory recall associated with emoti...

  15. Calibrating the ChemCam LIBS for Carbonate Minerals on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Roger C.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Ollila, Ann M.; Barefield, James E.; Lanza, Nina; Newsom, Horton E.

    2009-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument suite on board the NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover includes the first LIBS instrument for extraterrestrial applications. Here we examine carbonate minerals in a simulated martian environment using the LIDS technique in order to better understand the in situ signature of these materials on Mars. Both chemical composition and rock type are determined using multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Composition is confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Our initial results suggest that ChemCam can recognize and differentiate between carbonate materials on Mars.

  16. Cam Femoroacetabular Impingement as a Possible Explanation of Recalcitrant Anterior Knee Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Joan Carles

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a patient with chronic anterior knee pain (AKP) recalcitrant to conservative treatment who returned to our office for severe hip pain secondary to Cam femoroacetabular impingement (Cam FAI) at 10 months after the onset of knee pain. This case highlights the fact that the main problem is not in the patella but in the hip in some patients with AKP. We hypothesize that there is an external femoral rotation in order to avoid the impingement and therefore the hip pain in patie...

  17. Optimal piston motion for maximum net output work of Daniel cam engines with low heat rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badescu, Viorel

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The piston motion of low heat rejection compression ignition engines is optimized. • A realistic model taking into account the cooling system is developed. • The optimized cam is smaller for cylinders without thermal insulation. • The optimized cam size depends on ignition moment and cooling process intensity. - Abstract: Compression ignition engines based on classical tapper-crank systems cannot provide optimal piston motion. Cam engines are more appropriate for this purpose. In this paper the piston motion of a Daniel cam engine is optimized. Piston acceleration is taken as a control. The objective is to maximize the net output work during the compression and power strokes. A major research effort has been allocated in the last two decades for the development of low heat rejection engines. A thermally insulated cylinder is considered and a realistic model taking into account the cooling system is developed. The sinusoidal approximation of piston motion in the classical tapper-crank system overestimates the engine efficiency. The exact description of the piston motion in tapper-crank system is used here as a reference. The radiation process has negligible effects during the optimization. The approach with no constraint on piston acceleration is a reasonable approximation. The net output work is much larger (by 12–13%) for the optimized system than for the classical tapper-crank system, for similar thickness of cylinder walls and thermal insulation. Low heat rejection measures are not of significant importance for optimized cam engines. The optimized cam is smaller for a cylinder without thermal insulation than for an insulated cylinder (by up to 8%, depending on the local polar radius). The auto-ignition moment is not a parameter of significant importance for optimized cam engines. However, for given cylinder wall and insulation materials there is an optimum auto-ignition moment which maximizes the net output work. The optimum auto

  18. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Comparison of Chinese and Western Culture (Part A)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, V. C. N.

    2009-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey of the use of CAM by children was undertaken in the Duchess of Kent Children's Hospital in Hong Kong (March-December 2006). A questionnaire survey concerning the use of CAM was administered to chief caretakers (only the mothers) who accompanied children with neurodevelopmental disabilities followed up in our…

  19. Ep-CAM expression in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus: a potential therapeutic target and prognostic marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiper Matthias

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the expression and test the clinical significance of the epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC to check the suitability of esophageal SCC patients for Ep-CAM directed targeted therapies. Methods The Ep-CAM expression was immunohistochemically investigated in 70 primary esophageal SCCs using the monoclonal antibody Ber-EP4. For the interpretation of the staining results, we used a standardized scoring system ranging from 0 to 3+. The survival analysis was calculated from 53 patients without distant metastasis, with R0 resection and at least 2 months of clinical follow-up. Results Ep-CAM neo-expression was observed in 79% of the tumors with three expression levels, 1+ (26%, 2+ (11% and 3+ (41%. Heterogeneous expression was observed at all expression levels. Interestingly, tumors with 3+ Ep-CAM expression conferred a significantly decreased median relapse-free survival period (log rank, p = 0.0001 and median overall survival (log rank, p = 0.0003. Multivariate survival analysis disclosed Ep-CAM 3+ expression as independent prognostic factor. Conclusion Our results suggest Ep-CAM as an attractive molecule for targeted therapy in esophageal SCC. Considering the discontenting results of the current adjuvant concepts for esophageal SCC patients, Ep-CAM might provide a promising target for an adjuvant immunotherapeutic intervention.

  20. Study on a new type variable valve lift timing mechanism with a three dimensional cam; Sanjigen cam ni yoru shinkahen valve lift timing kiko ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, M; Song, C [Nippon Institute of Technology, Saitama (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The variable valve timing mechanism was invented to get a torque band at wide engine speed, and to reduce a compression job and pumping loss by a miler cycle at partial load. In this paper, the new type variable valve timing mechanism applying a three dimensional cam was proposed. Also, the feature of mechanism and the control system was done obviously. Further, about a miler cycle, a thermodynamics -like consideration was described. 5 refs., 8 figs.

  1. The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in 1 001 German adults: results of a population-based telephone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, B; Groenewold, M; Schoefer, Y; Schäfer, T

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the patterns of use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in a representative adult population in Germany. A population-based telephone survey was conducted in Lübeck, Germany. We performed computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI) in order to obtain information on demographics, health status, prevalence of CAM usage, motivation for using CAM, type of CAM and health problems for which CAM were used. 1,001 adults (median age 48 years) participated in the study (response 46.8%). 79.6% of the interviewed subjects reported health problems. The most frequently named problems were chronic pain (45.3%), circulation problems (32.9%) and colds with fever (27.8%). Non-users of CAM had a lower incidence (76.6%) of overall illness than users (83.5%) (OR 0.65, 0.47-0.89). 42.3% of the participants had used CAM. The CAM user group consisted of significantly more females (72.8 vs. 55.5%) (OR 2.32, 1.74-3.08) and involved better educated subjects (school education >12 years, 36.6 vs. 27.9%, OR 3.25, 1.35-7.81) than the non-user group. The main health problems for which CAM was used were chronic pain (36.3%), some cases of uncomplicated colds (16.9%) and for improving general health (14.7%). Three procedures accounted for the majority of usage: Acupuncture (34.5%), homeopathy (27.3%) and herbal medicine (9.7%). A large number of participants reported as the main reason for using CAM the wish to avoid drugs as much as possible (31.7%). 26.7% reported opting for CAM due to the recommendation of their physician. 23.9% gave unsatisfactory results of conventional medicine as reason for CAM usage. CAM is used widely for different complaints by the general population. This frequent use of CAM has implications for the health-care system and health policy.

  2. Use of selected complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments in veterans with cancer or chronic pain: a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    McEachrane-Gross, F Patricia; Liebschutz, Jane M; Berlowitz, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is emerging as an important form of care in the United States. We sought to measure the prevalence of selected CAM use among veterans attending oncology and chronic pain clinics and to describe the characteristics of CAM use in this population. Methods The self-administered, mail-in survey included questions on demographics, health beliefs, medical problems and 6 common CAM treatments (herbs, dietary supplements, chiropractic ca...

  3. The varied contribution of significant others to Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) uptake by men with cancer: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafke, Nadja; Eliott, Jaklin A; Olver, Ian N; Wittert, Gary A

    2014-06-01

    To explore how men's Significant Others (SOs), including family members and close friends, contribute to the uptake and maintenance of specific CAM therapies. This study was the second, qualitative phase of a mixed-methods project investigating the use of CAM in an Australian male cancer population. Male participants were purposefully selected from a pool of 403 patients who answered a survey in the first quantitative phase (94% response rate and 86% consent rate for follow-up interview). Then semi-structured interviews among 26 men with a variety of cancers and 24 SOs were conducted. All 43 interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Men used CAM/Natural products to cope with physical concerns, and this was actively supported by men's SOs who contributed to the uptake and maintenance of these CAMs. The shared CAM preparation and consumption functioned to strengthen the bond between men and their SOs, and also helped men's SOs to cope with uncertainty and regain control. In contrast, men practiced CAM/Mind-body medicine to receive emotional benefits, and only rarely shared this practice with their SOs, indicating a need for coping with emotions in a private way. Men's CAM use is a multifaceted process that can be better understood by considering CAM categories separately. CAM/Natural products help men to cope with physical concerns, while CAM/Mind-body medicine assist men to cope with their emotions in a private way. Oncology professionals can use this information to better promote and implement integrative cancer care services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Usage of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) among osteoarthritis patients attending an urban multi-specialist hospital in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obalum, D C; Ogo, C N

    2011-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), a chronic degenerative disease of synovial joints is characterised by pain and stiffness. Aim of treatment is pain relief. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) refers to practices which are not an integral part of orthodox medicine. To determine the pattern of usage of CAM among OA patients in Nigeria. Consecutive patients with OA attending orthopaedic clinic of Havana Specialist Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria were interviewed over a 6- month period st st of 1 May to 31 October 2007 on usage of CAM. Structured and open-ended questions were used. Demographic data, duration of OA and treatment as well as compliance to orthodox medications were documented. One hundred and sixty four patients were studied.120 (73.25%) were females and 44(26.89%) were males. Respondents age range between 35-74 years. 66(40.2%) patients used CAM. 35(53.0%) had done so before presenting to the hospital. The most commonly used CAM were herbal products used by 50(75.8%) of CAM users. Among herbal product users, 74.0% used non- specific local products, 30.0% used ginger, 36.0% used garlic and 28.0% used Aloe Vera. Among CAM users, 35(53.0%) used local embrocation and massage, 10(15.2%) used spiritual methods. There was no significant difference in demographics, clinical characteristics and pain control among CAM users and non-users. Many OA patients receiving orthodox therapy also use CAM. Medical doctors need to keep a wary eye on CAM usage among patients and enquire about this health-seeking behaviour in order to educate them on possible drug interactions, adverse effects and long term complications.

  5. Use of selected complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments in veterans with cancer or chronic pain: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachrane-Gross, F Patricia; Liebschutz, Jane M; Berlowitz, Dan

    2006-10-06

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is emerging as an important form of care in the United States. We sought to measure the prevalence of selected CAM use among veterans attending oncology and chronic pain clinics and to describe the characteristics of CAM use in this population. The self-administered, mail-in survey included questions on demographics, health beliefs, medical problems and 6 common CAM treatments (herbs, dietary supplements, chiropractic care, massage therapy, acupuncture and homeopathy) use. We used the chi-square test to examine bivariate associations between our predictor variables and CAM use. Seventy-two patients (27.3%) reported CAM use within the past 12 months. CAM use was associated with more education (p = 0.02), higher income (p = 0.006), non-VA insurance (p = 0.003), additional care outside the VA (p = 0.01) and the belief that lifestyle contributes to illness (p = 0.015). The diagnosis of chronic pain versus cancer was not associated with differential CAM use (p = 0.15). Seventy-six percent of CAM non-users reported that they would use it if offered at the VA. Use of 6 common CAM treatments among these veterans is lower than among the general population, but still substantial. A large majority of veterans reported interest in using CAM modalities if they were offered at the VA. A national assessment of veteran interest in CAM may assist VA leaders to respond to patients' needs.

  6. A roadmap for research on crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) to enhance sustainable food and bioenergy production in a hotter, drier world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Cushman, John C; Borland, Anne M; Edwards, Erika J; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A; Owen, Nick A; Griffiths, Howard; Smith, J Andrew C; De Paoli, Henrique C; Weston, David J; Cottingham, Robert; Hartwell, James; Davis, Sarah C; Silvera, Katia; Ming, Ray; Schlauch, Karen; Abraham, Paul; Stewart, J Ryan; Guo, Hao-Bo; Albion, Rebecca; Ha, Jungmin; Lim, Sung Don; Wone, Bernard W M; Yim, Won Cheol; Garcia, Travis; Mayer, Jesse A; Petereit, Juli; Nair, Sujithkumar S; Casey, Erin; Hettich, Robert L; Ceusters, Johan; Ranjan, Priya; Palla, Kaitlin J; Yin, Hengfu; Reyes-García, Casandra; Andrade, José Luis; Freschi, Luciano; Beltrán, Juan D; Dever, Louisa V; Boxall, Susanna F; Waller, Jade; Davies, Jack; Bupphada, Phaitun; Kadu, Nirja; Winter, Klaus; Sage, Rowan F; Aguilar, Cristobal N; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry; Holtum, Joseph A M

    2015-08-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is a specialized mode of photosynthesis that features nocturnal CO2 uptake, facilitates increased water-use efficiency (WUE), and enables CAM plants to inhabit water-limited environments such as semi-arid deserts or seasonally dry forests. Human population growth and global climate change now present challenges for agricultural production systems to increase food, feed, forage, fiber, and fuel production. One approach to meet these challenges is to increase reliance on CAM crops, such as Agave and Opuntia, for biomass production on semi-arid, abandoned, marginal, or degraded agricultural lands. Major research efforts are now underway to assess the productivity of CAM crop species and to harness the WUE of CAM by engineering this pathway into existing food, feed, and bioenergy crops. An improved understanding of CAM has potential for high returns on research investment. To exploit the potential of CAM crops and CAM bioengineering, it will be necessary to elucidate the evolution, genomic features, and regulatory mechanisms of CAM. Field trials and predictive models will be required to assess the productivity of CAM crops, while new synthetic biology approaches need to be developed for CAM engineering. Infrastructure will be needed for CAM model systems, field trials, mutant collections, and data management. © 2015 ORNL/UT-Battelle New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. SoilCAM: soil contamination: advanced integrated characterisation and time-lapse monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    French, H.K.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Meju, M.

    2009-01-01

    The SoilCAM project is aimed at improving current methods for monitoring contaminant distribution and biodegradation in the subsurface. Currently proven methods, based on invasive sampling of soil, soil water and gaseous phase, are unable to provide sufficiently accurate data with high enough

  8. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  9. Effects of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) on the Metabolism and Transport of Anticancer Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooiman, K.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM), such as herbs and dietary supplements, has become more popular among cancer patients. Cancer patients use these supplements for different reasons such as reduction of side effects and improvement of their quality of life. In general, the use

  10. Performance evaluation of Siemens E.Cam® Spect System at Korle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance evaluation of Siemens E.Cam® Spect System at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital (Ghana. ... The tests were performed according to National Electrical Manufac-turers Association protocols, and different measuring instruments and phantoms containing 99m-Tc were used. Extrinsic uniformity, System energy ...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of sensor and a computer with software. (b) Classification. Class II (Special Controls). The device... entitled “Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Optical Impression Systems for Computer Assisted.../CAM. (a) Identification. An optical impression system for computer assisted design and manufacturing...

  12. Cam deformity and acetabular dysplasia as risk factors for hip osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosnijeh, Fatemeh Saberi; Zuiderwijk, Maria E; Versteeg, Mathijs; Smeele, Hieronymus T W; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Agricola, Rintje; Oei, Edwin H G; Waarsing, Jan H; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M; van Meurs, Joyce B J

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Cam deformity and acetabular dysplasia have been recognized as relevant risk factors for hip osteoarthritis (OA) in a few prospective studies with limited sample sizes. To date, however, no evidence is available from prospective studies regarding whether the magnitude of these

  13. THE FOURIER SERIES USED IN ANALYSE OF THE CAM MECHANISMS FOR THE SHOEMAKING MACHINES (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOVAN-DRAGOMIR Alina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A computer assisted procedure for the cinematic analysis of the mechanism of a cam is essential in making a certain type of research operations. They mainly refer to the optimization of operations running on specific machinery, or to the re-design of the mechanism, in order to make the mechanism digital. This analysis seems even more important, when we consider the fact that most of the machines used in shoe industry nowadays use a cam mechanism. The paper is devided in two parts. In first part, it is elaborated a method of finding of a function G(x, belonging to a Fourier series, which approximates the numerical values {xi, yi}, with the biggest accuracy. Finding the function that approximates the most accurately the data set, for the position parameters of the follower S(ω, ( will lead to a complete kinematic and dynamic analysis of the cam mechanism. These values repeat with T = 2π period. In second part, the method is tasted using MatCAD work sessions which allow a numerical and graphical analysis of the mathematical relations involved, in order to test the reability of the method. The set of experimental data are resulted after measuring a cam mechanism of a machine used in shoemaking.

  14. "Baby-Cam" and Researching with Infants: Viewer, Image and (Not) Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwick, Sheena

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a methodological reflection on how "baby-cam" enhanced ethically reflective attitudes in a large-scale research project that set out to research with infants in Australian early childhood education and care settings. By juxtaposing digital images produced by two different digital-camera technologies and drawing on…

  15. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RT-qPCR method, our results showed that EpCAM was overexpressed in 48% of malignant and 11.1% of benign .... to 45% of patients with breast cancer in different studies ..... in cancer maintenance, development, drug resistance, as well.

  16. Workflow of CAD / CAM Scoliosis Brace Adjustment in Preparation Using 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Tournavitis, Nicos; Nan, Xiaofeng; Borysov, Maksym; Paul, Lothar

    2017-01-01

    High correction bracing is the most effective conservative treatment for patients with scoliosis during growth. Still today braces for the treatment of scoliosis are made by casting patients while computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided manufacturing (CAM) is available with all possibilities to standardize pattern specific brace treatment and improve wearing comfort. CAD / CAM brace production mainly relies on carving a polyurethane foam model which is the basis for vacuuming a polyethylene (PE) or polypropylene (PP) brace. Purpose of this short communication is to describe the workflow currently used and to outline future requirements with respect to 3D printing technology. Description of the steps of virtual brace adjustment as available today are content of this paper as well as an outline of the great potential there is for the future 3D printing technology. For 3D printing of scoliosis braces it is necessary to establish easy to use software plug-ins in order to allow adding 3D printing technology to the current workflow of virtual CAD / CAM brace adjustment. Textures and structures can be added to the brace models at certain well defined locations offering the potential of more wearing comfort without losing in-brace correction. Advances have to be made in the field of CAD / CAM software tools with respect to design and generation of individually structured brace models based on currently well established and standardized scoliosis brace libraries.

  17. Hydrocephalus and intestinal aganglionosis : Is L1CAM a modifier gene in Hirschsprung disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parisi, MA; Kapur, RP; Neilson, [No Value; Hofstra, RMW; Holloway, LW; Michaelis, RC; Leppig, KA

    2002-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus associated with aqueductal stenosis and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum has been described in newborn males with mutations in L1CAM, a gene that encodes a neural cell adhesion molecule. These males usually have severe mental retardation and may have spastic paraplegia and

  18. A distributed data base management facility for the CAD/CAM environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balza, R. M.; Beaudet, R. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    Current/PAD research in the area of distributed data base management considers facilities for supporting CAD/CAM data management in a heterogeneous network of computers encompassing multiple data base managers supporting a variety of data models. These facilities include coordinated execution of multiple DBMSs to provide for administration of and access to data distributed across them.

  19. CLIC main beam quadrupole active pre-alignment based on cam movers

    CERN Document Server

    Kemppinen, J; Leuxe, R; Mainaud Durand, H; Sandomierski, J; Sosin, M

    2012-01-01

    Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a study for a future 48 km long linear electron-positron collider in the multi TeV range. Its target luminosity can only be reached if the main beam quadrupoles (MB quads) are actively pre-aligned within 17 µm in sliding windows of 200 m with respect to a straight reference line. In addition to the positioning requirement, the pre-alignment system has to provide a rigid support for the nano-stabilization system to ensure that the first eigenfrequency is above 100 Hz. Re-adjustment based on cam movers was chosen for detailed studies to meet the stringent pre-alignment requirements. There are four different types of MB quads in CLIC. Their lengths and masses vary so that at least two types of cam movers have to be developed. The validation of the cams with less stringent space restrictions has proceeded to a test setup in 5 degrees of freedom (DOF). Prototypes of the more demanding, smaller cams have been manufactured and they are under tests in 1 DOF. This paper describes the...

  20. CAMS as a tool for identifying and predicting abnormal plant states using real-time simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, P.F.; Soerenssen, A.; Meyer, G.

    1999-01-01

    CAMS (Computerised Accident Management Support) is a system that provides assistance to the staff in a nuclear power plant control room, in the technical support centre and in the national safety centre. Support is offered in identification of the current plant state, in assessment of the future development of the accident and in planning mitigation strategies. CAMS is a modular system, where several modules perform different tasks under the control and supervision of a central knowledge based system, which is responsible of the syncronisation and the flow of information through the activated modules. A CAMS prototype has been tested by the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate during a safety exercise in Sweden in 1995, with satisfactory results. Future developments include automatic control of the Predictive Simulator by the State Identification, for the generation of possible mitigation strategies, and the development of an improved user interface which considers the integration of the system in an advanced control room. CAMS is a system developed as a joint research activity at the Halden Reactor Project in close cooperation with member organisations. The project, started in 1993, has now arrived to the second prototype version, which has been presented and demonstrated at several seminars and workshops around the world. (author)

  1. Health psychology as a context for massage therapy: a conceptual model with CAM as mediator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M; Rich, Grant J

    2014-04-01

    Health psychology represents a context within which massage therapy research, education, and practice can be positioned for the mutual benefit of both. Furthermore, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) more often than not plays a mediating role in relating massage therapy to health psychology. On occasion, though, the linkage between health psychology and massage therapy can be quite direct without the mediating influence of CAM. This paper, accordingly, advances a conceptual model via both flowchart and Venn diagram displays for viewing the health psychology context for massage therapy with the possibility of CAM as a mediating factor. Attention is also given to the broad range of issues constituting contemporary health psychology as well as its correspondence to an equally diverse array of client populations and health conditions addressed in massage therapy research. Future directions in the areas of health psychology, CAM, and massage therapy are proposed with a view toward a mutual and reciprocal benefit accruing to these behavioral and health science arenas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Substrate binding in the active site of cytochrome P450cam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Groenhof, A.R.; Ehlers, A.W.; Lammertsma, K.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the binding of camphor in the active site of cytochrome P450cam with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A strong hydrogen bond (>6 kcal/mol) to a tyrosine residue (Tyr96) is observed, that may account for the high specificity of the reaction taking place. The DFT

  3. "Physician, Heal Thyself": How Teaching Holistic Medicine Differs from Teaching CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Pole, John

    2001-01-01

    Describes the fundamental difference between complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and holistic medicine, highlighting holistic medicine's emphasis on the promotion of healthy lifestyles for practitioners and patients alike. Asserts that offering physicians-to-be more course work in holistic medicine could lay the groundwork for future…

  4. A Review of CAM for Procedural Pain in Infancy: Part II. Other Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is the second in a two-part series reviewing the empirical evidence for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM approaches for the management of pain related to medical procedures in infants up to 6 weeks of age. Part I of this series investigated the effects of sucrose with or without non-nutritive sucking (NNS. The present article examines other CAM interventions for procedural pain including music-based interventions, olfactory stimulation, kangaroo care and swaddling. Computerized databases were searched for relevant studies including prior reviews and primary trials. Preliminary support was revealed for the analgesic effects of the CAM modalities reviewed. However, the overall quality of the evidence for these approaches remains relatively weak. Additional well-designed trials incorporating rigorous methodology are required. Such investigations will assist in the development of evidence-based guidelines on the use of CAM interventions either alone or in concert with conventional approaches to provide safe, reliable analgesia for infant procedural pain.

  5. De CAD/CAM-brug vervaardigd met behulp van een composiet mock-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denissen, H.; Đozic, A.

    2010-01-01

    Het esthetische aspect van een brugconstructie in het front is niet altijd voorspelbaar. Dit geldt voor zowel conventionele bruggen als bruggen die computerondersteund worden ontworpen (computer-aided design, cad ) en geproduceerd (computer-aided manufacturing, cam ). Een cruciale factor is het

  6. Biotransformation of the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene by cytochrome P450cam and P450BM-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowden, Rebecca J; Yasmin, Samina; Rees, Nicholas H; Bell, Stephen G; Wong, Luet-Lok

    2005-01-07

    The sesquiterpenoids are a large class of naturally occurring compounds with biological functions and desirable properties. Oxidation of the sesquiterpene (+)-valencene by wild type and mutants of P450cam from Pseudomonas putida, and of P450BM-3 from Bacillus megaterium, have been investigated as a potential route to (+)-nootkatone, a fine fragrance. Wild type P450cam did not oxidise (+)-valencene but the mutants showed activities up to 9.8 nmol (nmol P450)(-1) min(-1), with (+)-trans-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone constituting >85% of the products. Wild type P450BM-3 and mutants had higher activities (up to 43 min(-1)) than P450cam but were much less selective. Of the many products, cis- and trans-(+)-nootkatol, (+)-nootkatone, cis-(+)-valencene-1,10-epoxide, trans-(+)-nootkaton-9-ol, and (+)-nootkatone-13S,14-epoxide were isolated from whole-cell reactions and characterised. The selectivity patterns suggest that (+)-valencene has one binding orientation in P450cam but multiple orientations in P450BM-3.

  7. Soil diversity and hydration as observed by ChemCam at Gale Crater, Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meslin, P.-Y.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Schröder, S.; Cousin, A.; Berger, G.; Clegg, S.M.; Lasue, J.; Maurice, S.; Sautter, V.; Le Mouélic, S.; Wiens, R.C.; Fabre, C.; Goetz, W.; Bish, D.; Mangold, N.; Ehlmann, B.; Lanza, N.; Harri, A.-M.; Anderson, R.; Rampe, E.; McConnochie, T.H.; Pinet, P.; Blaney, D.; Léveillé, R.; Archer, D.; Barraclough, B.; Bender, S.; Blake, D.; Blank, J.G.; Bridges, N.; Clark, B.C.; DeFlores, L.; Delapp, D.; Dromart, G.; Dyar, M.D.; Fisk, M.; Gondet, B.; Grotzinger, J.; Herkenhoff, K.; Johnson, J.; Lacour, J.-L.; Langevin, Y.; Leshin, L.; Lewin, E.; Madsen, M.B.; Melikechi, N.; Mezzacappa, A.; Mischna, M.A.; Moores, J.E.; Newsom, H.; Ollila, A.; Perez, R.; Renno, N.; Sirven, J.-B.; Tokar, R.; De La Torre, M.; D'Uston, L.; Vaniman, D.; Yingst, A.; MSL Science Team, the

    2013-01-01

    The ChemCam instrument, which provides insight into martian soil chemistry at the submillimeter scale, identified two principal soil types along the Curiosity rover traverse: a fine-grained mafic type and a locally derived, coarse-grained felsic type. The mafic soil component is representative of

  8. Mapping the Protein Fold Universe Using the CamTube Force Field in Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukic, Predrag; Kannan, Arvind; Dijkstra, Maurits J J; Abeln, Sanne; Camilloni, Carlo; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently shown that the coarse-graining of the structures of polypeptide chains as self-avoiding tubes can provide an effective representation of the conformational space of proteins. In order to fully exploit the opportunities offered by such a 'tube model' approach, we present here a strategy to combine it with molecular dynamics simulations. This strategy is based on the incorporation of the 'CamTube' force field into the Gromacs molecular dynamics package. By considering the case of a 60-residue polyvaline chain, we show that CamTube molecular dynamics simulations can comprehensively explore the conformational space of proteins. We obtain this result by a 20 μs metadynamics simulation of the polyvaline chain that recapitulates the currently known protein fold universe. We further show that, if residue-specific interaction potentials are added to the CamTube force field, it is possible to fold a protein into a topology close to that of its native state. These results illustrate how the CamTube force field can be used to explore efficiently the universe of protein folds with good accuracy and very limited computational cost.

  9. Motorized CPM/CAM physiotherapy device with sliding-mode Fuzzy Neural Network control loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hung-Jung; Chen, Tien-Chi

    2009-11-01

    Continuous passive motion (CPM) and controllable active motion (CAM) physiotherapy devices promote rehabilitation of damaged joints. This paper presents a computerized CPM/CAM system that obviates the need for mechanical resistance devices such as springs. The system is controlled by a computer which performs sliding-mode Fuzzy Neural Network (FNN) calculations online. CAM-type resistance force is generated by the active performance of an electric motor which is controlled so as to oppose the motion of the patient's leg. A force sensor under the patient's foot on the device pedal provides data for feedback in a sliding-mode FNN control loop built around the motor. Via an active impedance control feedback system, the controller drives the motor to behave similarly to a damped spring by generating and controlling the amplitude and direction of the pedal force in relation to the patient's leg. Experiments demonstrate the high sensitivity and speed of the device. The PC-based feedback nature of the control loop means that sophisticated auto-adaptable CPM/CAM custom-designed physiotherapy becomes possible. The computer base also allows extensive data recording, data analysis and network-connected remote patient monitoring.

  10. Unique CAD/CAM three-quarter crown restoration of a central incisor: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Marvin B; Siegel, Sharon C; Rezakani, Niloufar

    2013-07-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) dentistry has been in use for more than 2 decades. Recent improvements in this technology have made CAD/CAM restorations a viable alternative for routine dental care. This technology is being taught in dental schools to prepare students for contemporary dental practice and is particularly useful in unique restorative situations that allow conservation of tooth structure. This case report describes the restoration of a central incisor that was previously restored with an unesthetic three-quarter gold crown. The tooth exhibited recurrent caries and an unaffected labial wall of supported enamel. A CAD/CAM three-quarter crown was planned to conserve tooth structure. After preparation, the tooth was scanned for a CAD/CAM crown in order to fabricate a ceramic restoration, which was then milled and bonded, producing an esthetic result. Typically, in cases of esthetic enhancement, a labial laminate restoration is fabricated, but in this situation, a different approach was necessary to make a design for the lingual surface of an anterior tooth.

  11. The prevalence, patterns of usage and people's attitude towards complementary and alternative medicine (CAM among the Indian community in Chatsworth, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raidoo Deshandra M

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine, among the Indian community of Chatsworth, South Africa, the prevalence and utilisation patterns of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, attitudes associated with CAM use and communication patterns of CAM users with their primary care doctors. Methods Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted in Chatsworth, a suburb of Durban in which South Africans of Indian origin predominantly reside. Participants were 200 randomly selected adult English-speaking Indian residents. Results The prevalence of CAM usage for period 2000/2001 was 38.5% (95% confidence interval 31.7% to 45.6%. Spiritual healing and herbal/natural medicines, including vitamins were the most common types of CAM used, accounting for 42.8% and 48.1% respectively of overall CAM usage. People used CAM to treat conditions including diabetes mellitus, headaches, arthritis and joint pains, stress, skin disorders, backaches, hypertension and nasal disorders. Half of the CAM users used allopathic medicines concurrently. The cost of CAM utilization over this 1-year period, incurred by 80.5% of users for the duration of therapy for their most troublesome condition was below R500 (approximately US$50. Age, sex, marital status, religion, level of education and income were shown not to influence the use of CAM. Greater than half (51.9% of CAM users did so either upon the advice of someone they knew, or after noticing a CAM advertisement in the local press. Seventy-nine percent of CAM users indicated that they had positive outcomes with their treatments. Fifty four percent of CAM users (excluding those using spiritual healing only failed to inform their doctors that they used CAM. The main reason given by half of this group was that informing their doctors did not seem necessary. Conclusion The prevalence of CAM in Chatsworth is similar to findings in other parts of the world. Although CAM was used to treat many different

  12. Excitatory Synaptic Drive and Feedforward Inhibition in the Hippocampal CA3 Circuit Are Regulated by SynCAM 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kellie A; Ribic, Adema; Laage Gaupp, Fabian M; Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; Dulla, Chris G; Hyder, Fahmeed; Biederer, Thomas

    2016-07-13

    Select adhesion proteins control the development of synapses and modulate their structural and functional properties. Despite these important roles, the extent to which different synapse-organizing mechanisms act across brain regions to establish connectivity and regulate network properties is incompletely understood. Further, their functional roles in different neuronal populations remain to be defined. Here, we applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a modality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to map connectivity changes in knock-out (KO) mice lacking the synaptogenic cell adhesion protein SynCAM 1. This identified reduced fractional anisotropy in the hippocampal CA3 area in absence of SynCAM 1. In agreement, mossy fiber refinement in CA3 was impaired in SynCAM 1 KO mice. Mossy fibers make excitatory inputs onto postsynaptic specializations of CA3 pyramidal neurons termed thorny excrescences and these structures were smaller in the absence of SynCAM 1. However, the most prevalent targets of mossy fibers are GABAergic interneurons and SynCAM 1 loss unexpectedly reduced the number of excitatory terminals onto parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in CA3. SynCAM 1 KO mice additionally exhibited lower postsynaptic GluA1 expression in these PV-positive interneurons. These synaptic imbalances in SynCAM 1 KO mice resulted in CA3 disinhibition, in agreement with reduced feedforward inhibition in this network in the absence of SynCAM 1-dependent excitatory drive onto interneurons. In turn, mice lacking SynCAM 1 were impaired in memory tasks involving CA3. Our results support that SynCAM 1 modulates excitatory mossy fiber inputs onto both interneurons and principal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 area to balance network excitability. This study advances our understanding of synapse-organizing mechanisms on two levels. First, the data support that synaptogenic proteins guide connectivity and can function in distinct brain regions even if they are expressed broadly

  13. Does complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use reduce negative life impact of headaches for chronic migraineurs? A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jieun; Bhowmick, Amrita; Wachholtz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Chronic migraine is a disabling condition that impacts multiple aspects of migraineurs' lives. Although pharmacological treatments can help to treat the pain associated with migraine headache, chronic migraineurs often experience side-effects of pharmacological treatments. Those experiences may contribute to the observed growth in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among migraineurs. Relatively little is known about the patterns of CAM treatment and the characteristics of chronic migraineurs. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to investigate the characteristics of chronic migraineurs who use CAM treatment and the relationship among satisfaction with current CAM use, negative life impact, migraine outcomes, and psychiatric comorbidities among chronic migraineurs. 2907 participants were recruited from a well-known online migraine headache resource. All participants were US adults aged 18 years or older. Migraineurs are referred to this website through various routes (e.g., referral from healthcare providers, internet search, obtaining information from research papers, personal invitation from other users, and information shared on social media etc.). Participants completed a 30-min self-report-survey in the spring of 2014. Almost half of the participants reported that they are currently using more than three different CAM treatments even though the majority of the participants reported neutral or dissatisfied with their current CAM treatment. Chronic migraineurs who use CAM treatments were more likely to experience prolonged or frequent migraine headaches (p = .018, η(2) = .0021), and experience greater negative life impact from their headaches (p = .000, η(2) = .0172) compared to non-CAM users. CAM treatment satisfaction was inversely related to the number of psychiatric comorbidities, frequency of migraines, and number of migraine symptoms (p's < .05). However, CAM treatment satisfaction was more strongly correlated with

  14. Two-body wear rate of CAD/CAM resin blocks and their enamel antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Özcan, Mutlu; Trottmann, Albert; Schmutz, Felix; Roos, Malgorzata; Hämmerle, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resins exhibit good mechanical properties and can be used as long-term restorations. The wear rate of such resins and their enamel antagonists is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test and compare the 2-body wear rate of CAD/CAM resin blocks. Wear specimens (N=42, n=6) were made from 5 CAD/CAM resins: ZENO PMMA (ZP), artBloc Temp (AT), Telio CAD (TC), Blanc High-class (HC), CAD-Temp (CT); 1 manually polymerized resin: Integral esthetic press (negative control group, IEP); and 1 glass-ceramic: VITA Mark II (positive control group, VM2). The specimens for the wear resistance were aged in a thermomechanical loading machine (49 N, 1.67 Hz, 5/50°C) with human enamel antagonists. The material loss of all specimens before, during, and after aging was evaluated with a 3DS profilometer. The measured material loss data of all tested groups were statistically evaluated with linear mixed model analysis (a=.05). Manually polymerized resin showed significantly higher material wear (P<.001) than all other tested groups. Glass-ceramic showed significantly lower wear values (P<.001) than CAD/CAM resins ZP, AT, HC, CT, and IES. CAD/CAM resin TC was not significantly different from the positive control group. Glass-ceramic showed the highest enamel wear values (P<.001) of all tested resins. No differences were found in the enamel wear among all resins. The glass-ceramic group showed damage in the form of cracks on the worn enamel surface in 50% of specimens. CAD/CAM resins showed lower wear rates than those conventionally polymerized. Only one CAD/CAM resin, TC, presented material wear values comparable with glass-ceramic. The tested glass-ceramic developed cracks in the enamel antagonist and showed the highest enamel wear values of all other tested groups. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS: rationale, design, and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waslick Bruce D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To present the design, methods, and rationale of the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Study (CAMS, a recently completed federally-funded, multi-site, randomized placebo-controlled trial that examined the relative efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT, sertraline (SRT, and their combination (COMB against pill placebo (PBO for the treatment of separation anxiety disorder (SAD, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD and social phobia (SoP in children and adolescents. Methods Following a brief review of the acute outcomes of the CAMS trial, as well as the psychosocial and pharmacologic treatment literature for pediatric anxiety disorders, the design and methods of the CAMS trial are described. Results CAMS was a six-year, six-site, randomized controlled trial. Four hundred eighty-eight (N = 488 children and adolescents (ages 7-17 years with DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of SAD, GAD, or SoP were randomly assigned to one of four treatment conditions: CBT, SRT, COMB, or PBO. Assessments of anxiety symptoms, safety, and functional outcomes, as well as putative mediators and moderators of treatment response were completed in a multi-measure, multi-informant fashion. Manual-based therapies, trained clinicians and independent evaluators were used to ensure treatment and assessment fidelity. A multi-layered administrative structure with representation from all sites facilitated cross-site coordination of the entire trial, study protocols and quality assurance. Conclusions CAMS offers a model for clinical trials methods applicable to psychosocial and psychopharmacological comparative treatment trials by using state-of-the-art methods and rigorous cross-site quality controls. CAMS also provided a large-scale examination of the relative and combined efficacy and safety of the best evidenced-based psychosocial (CBT and pharmacologic (SSRI treatments to date for the most commonly occurring pediatric anxiety disorders. Primary and secondary results

  16. From Artisanal to CAD-CAM Blocks: State of the Art of Indirect Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, A K; Dupont, N M; Oudkerk, J C; Dewael, T Y; Sadoun, M J

    2016-05-01

    Indirect composites have been undergoing an impressive evolution over the last few years. Specifically, recent developments in computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks have been associated with new polymerization modes, innovative microstructures, and different compositions. All these recent breakthroughs have introduced important gaps among the properties of the different materials. This critical state-of-the-art review analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of the different varieties of CAD-CAM composite materials, especially as compared with direct and artisanal indirect composites. Indeed, new polymerization modes used for CAD-CAM blocks-especially high temperature (HT) and, most of all, high temperature-high pressure (HT-HP)-are shown to significantly increase the degree of conversion in comparison with light-cured composites. Industrial processes also allow for the augmentation of the filler content and for the realization of more homogeneous structures with fewer flaws. In addition, due to their increased degree of conversion and their different monomer composition, some CAD-CAM blocks are more advantageous in terms of toxicity and monomer release. Finally, materials with a polymer-infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) microstructure exhibit higher flexural strength and a more favorable elasticity modulus than materials with a dispersed filler microstructure. Consequently, some high-performance composite CAD-CAM blocks-particularly experimental PICNs-can now rival glass-ceramics, such as lithium-disilicate glass-ceramics, for use as bonded partial restorations and crowns on natural teeth and implants. Being able to be manufactured in very low thicknesses, they offer the possibility of developing innovative minimally invasive treatment strategies, such as "no prep" treatment of worn dentition. Current issues are related to the study of bonding and wear properties of the different varieties of CAD-CAM composites. There is also a crucial

  17. Color change of CAD-CAM materials and composite resin cements after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdal, Isil; Atay, Ayse; Eichberger, Marlis; Cal, Ebru; Üsümez, Aslihan; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2018-04-24

    The color of resin cements and computer-aided-design and computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD-CAM) restorations may change with aging. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of thermocycling on the color of CAD-CAM materials with underlying resin cement. Seven different CAD-CAM materials, composite resins and glass-ceramics were cut into 0.7-mm and 1.2-mm thicknesses (n=10) and cemented with a dual-polymerizing resin cement, a light-polymerizing resin cement, and a preheated composite resin (N=420). Color values were measured by using spectrophotometry. Specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5°C and 55°C; 5000 cycles). The measured color difference (ΔE) data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics. Normality of data distribution was tested by using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Three-way and 1-way ANOVA followed by the Scheffé post-hoc test and unpaired 2-sample Student t test were computed to determine the significant differences among the tested parameters (α=.05). ΔE values were significantly influenced by the CAD-CAM material (η p 2 =0.85, Pcement (η P 2 =0.03, P=.003) but were not influenced by thickness (P=.179). Significant interactions were present among thickness, cement, and CAD-CAM materials (Pcement showed significantly lower ΔE values than the preheated composite resin (P=.003). Restoration materials and composite resin cement types used for cementation influence the amount of color change due to aging. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. APPLICATION OF 3D DIGITAL SCANNING AND CAD/CAM SYSTEMS FOR ZIRCONIA INDIRECT RESTORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariela Tsanova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Object: To study the CAD/CAM systems’ possibilities for manufacturing Zirconia indirect restorations for restoring vital, vastly devastated teeth. Material and methods: Five patients with vital, heavily destroyed molars were included in the clinical study. The teeth were prepared according to requirements for Zirconia restorations. The impressions were taken with 3D intraoral scanner. The acquired data is transmitted electronically for designing the future restoration by the CAD software. After designing, the restoration is milled by the CAM module and sintered, according to a specially projected programme in accordance with the manufacturing demands. After clinical check-up, the restorations are glazed, air-blasted and cemented. Results: Setting up an individual protocol for working with CAD/CAM systems for restoring vital, severely devastated teeth with Zirconia indirect restorations. A research is made on 3D digital scanning, occlusal and proximal modeling, virtual articulation, analyzing the incline of the cavity walls, the thickness of the restoration and the possibilities for restoring the anatomy of the tooth according to patient’s individual characteristics of the teeth’s arch. Conclusion: The scanning and design process should be evaluated with the same quality control as when using traditional methods. The CAD software requires excellent preparation of the tooth cavity and digital scanning. This is the reason why these systems require a thorough understanding of CAD/CAM calibration and parameters of the product to be clinically acceptable. Once understood, CAD/CAM dentistry can create detailed and accurate restorations that function and perform with great success and longevity.

  19. Discoloration of various CAD/CAM blocks after immersion in coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasipin Lauvahutanon

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated color differences (ΔEs and translucency parameter changes (ΔTPs of various computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM blocks after immersion in coffee. Materials and Methods Eight CAD/CAM blocks and four restorative composite resins were evaluated. The CIE L*a*b* values of 2.0 mm thick disk-shaped specimens were measured using the spectrophotometer on white and black backgrounds (n = 6. The ΔEs and ΔTPs of one day, one week, and one month immersion in coffee or water were calculated. The values of each material were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons (α = 0.05. The ΔEs after prophylaxis paste polishing of 1 month coffee immersion specimens, water sorption and solubility were also evaluated. Results After one month in coffee, ΔEs of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks and restorative composites ranged from 1.6 to 3.7 and from 2.1 to 7.9, respectively, and ΔTPs decreased. The ANOVA of ΔEs and ΔTPs revealed significant differences in two main factors, immersion periods and media, and their interaction except for ΔEs of TEL (Telio CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent. The ΔEs significantly decreased after prophylaxis polishing except GRA (Gradia Block, GC. There was no significant correlation between ΔEs and water sorption or solubility in water. Conclusions The ΔEs of CAD/CAM blocks after immersion in coffee varied among products and were comparable to those of restorative composite resins. The discoloration of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks could be effectively removed with prophylaxis paste polishing, while that of some restorative composites could not be removed.

  20. Marginal and internal fit of nano-composite CAD/CAM restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Hyun Park

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of nano-composite CAD-CAM restorations. Materials and Methods A full veneer crown and an mesio-occluso-distal (MOD inlay cavity, which were prepared on extracted human molars, were used as templates of epoxy resin replicas. The prepared teeth were scanned and CAD-CAM restorations were milled using Lava Ultimate (LU and experimental nano-composite CAD/CAM blocks (EB under the same milling parameters. To assess the marginal and internal fit, the restorations were cemented to replicas and were embedded in an acrylic mold for sectioning at 0.5 mm intervals. The measured gap data were pooled according to the block types and measuring points for statistical analysis. Results Both the block type and measuring point significantly affected gap values, and their interaction was significant (p = 0.000. In crowns and inlays made from the two blocks, gap values were significantly larger in the occlusal area than in the axial area, while gap values in the marginal area were smallest (p < 0.001. Among the blocks, the restorations milled from EB had a significantly larger gap at all measuring points than those milled from LU (p = 0.000. Conclusions The marginal and internal gaps of the two nano-composite CAD/CAM blocks differed according to the measuring points. Among the internal area of the two nano-composite CAD/CAM restorations, occlusal gap data were significantly larger than axial gap data. The EB crowns and inlays had significantly larger gaps than LU restorations.

  1. Radiographic Prevalence of Dysplasia, Cam, and Pincer Deformities in Elite Ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Gerrie, Brayden J; Varner, Kevin E; Lintner, David M; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    The demands of hip strength and motion in ballet are high. Hip disorders, such as cam and pincer deformities or dysplasia, may affect dance performance. However, the prevalence of these radiographic findings is unknown. To determine the prevalence of radiographic cam and pincer deformities, borderline dysplasia, and dysplasia in a professional ballet company. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. An institutional review board-approved cross-sectional investigation of a professional ballet company was undertaken. Male and female adult dancers were eligible for inclusion. Four plain radiographs were obtained (standing anteroposterior pelvis, bilateral false profile, and supine Dunn 45°) and verified for adequacy. Cam and pincer deformities, dysplasia, borderline dysplasia, and osteoarthritis were defined. All plain radiographic parameters were measured and analyzed on available radiographs. Student t test, chi-square test (and Fisher exact test), and Spearman correlation analyses were performed to compare sexes, groups, and the effect of select radiographic criteria. A total of 47 dancers were analyzed (21 males, 26 females; mean age (±SD), 23.8 ± 5.4 years). Cam deformity was identified in 25.5% (24/94) of hips and 31.9% (15/47) of subjects, with a significantly greater prevalence in male dancers than females (48% hips and 57% subjects vs 8% hips and 12% subjects; P ballet company, a high prevalence of radiographic abnormalities was found, including cam and pincer deformity and dysplasia. The results also revealed several sex-related differences of these abnormalities in this unique population. The long-term implications of these findings in this group of elite athletes remain unknown, and this issue warrants future investigation. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Science of active galactic nuclei with the GTC and CanariCam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Nancy A.; Packham, Christopher C.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Aretxaga, Itziar; Colina, Luis; Díaz-Santos, Tanio; Elitzur, Moshe; Mason, Rachel E.; Perlman, Eric S.; Radomski, James T.; Roche, Patrick F.; Rodríguez Espinosa, José Miguel; Young, Stuart; Telesco, Charles M.

    2008-07-01

    CanariCam is the facility mid-infrared (MIR) instrument for the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), a 10.4m telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos on La Palma. One of the science drivers for CanariCam is the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN). We will exploit the instrument's high sensitivity in imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry modes to answer fundamental questions of AGN and their host galaxies. Dust in the nucleus of an active galaxy reprocesses the intrinsic radiation of the central engine to emerge in the MIR. Current work demonstrates that the hot dust immediately associated with the AGN, which blocks direct views of the AGN from some lines of sight, is confined to small (parsec) scales. Thus, high spatial resolution is essential to probe the "torus" of unified AGN models separate from the host galaxy. CanariCam provides a 0.08" pixel scale for Nyquist sampling the diffraction-limited point spread function at 8μm, and narrow (0.2") spectroscopy slits (with R=120-1300). New observations with the GTC/CanariCam will provide key constraints on the physical conditions in the clumpy torus, and we will sensitively determine AGN obscuration as a function of nuclear activity. We will therefore address the fueling process and its relationship to the torus, the interaction with the host galaxy, and dust chemistry. These data will be essential preparation for the next generation of telescopes that will observe the distant universe directly to explore galaxy and black hole formation and evolution, and the GTC/CanariCam system uniquely provides multiple modes to probe AGN.

  3. Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S. K.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-01-01

    Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5°C to -40°C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

  4. Concurrent Complementary and Alternative Medicine CAM and Conventional Rehabilitation Therapy in the Management of Children with Developmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Yeon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the concurrent use of conventional rehabilitations and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies for the long-term management of children with developmental disorders (DDs. Methods. The parents or caregivers of 533 children with DDs (age range, 1–19 years who visited the rehabilitation centers were surveyed using in depth face-to-face interviews. Results. Of the 533 patients enrolled, 520 completed the questionnaire (97% response rate. A total of 292 (56% children were receiving multiple therapies, more than two conventional rehabilitations and CAM, at the time of the interview. A total of 249 (48% children reported lifetime CAM use, 23% used CAM at the time of the interview, and 62% of the patients planned to use CAM therapy in the future. Conventional rehabilitation therapies used at the time of the interview included physical therapy (30%, speech therapy (28%, and occupational therapy (19%, and the CAM therapies included herbal medicine (5% and acupuncture or moxibustion (3%. The respondents indicated that in the future they planned to use acupuncture or moxibustion (57%, occupational therapy (18%, cognitive behavioral therapy (16%, speech therapy (10%, and physical therapy (8%. Conclusion. Concurrent management as conventional rehabilitations and CAM therapies is widely used by children with DDs.

  5. Adherence of Candida to complete denture surfaces in vitro: A comparison of conventional and CAD/CAM complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Afnan F; Al-Mejrad, Lamya A; Albarrag, Ahmed M

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the adhesion of Candida albicans to the surfaces of CAD/CAM and conventionally fabricated complete denture bases. Twenty discs of acrylic resin poly (methyl methacrylate) were fabricated with CAD/CAM and conventional procedures (heat-polymerized acrylic resin). The specimens were divided into two groups: 10 discs were fabricated using the CAD/CAM procedure (Wieland Digital Denture Ivoclar Vivadent), and 10 discs were fabricated using a conventional flasking and pressure-pack technique. Candida colonization was performed on all the specimens using four Candida albicans isolates. The difference in Candida albicans adhesion on the discs was evaluated. The number of adherent yeast cells was calculated by the colony-forming units (CFU) and by Fluorescence microscopy. There was a significant difference in the adhesion of Candida albicans to the complete denture bases created with CAD/CAM and the adhesion to those created with the conventional procedure. The CAD/CAM denture bases exhibited less adhesion of Candida albicans than did the denture bases created with the conventional procedure ( P CAD/CAM procedure for fabricating complete dentures showed promising potential for reducing the adherence of Candida to the denture base surface. Clinical Implications. Complete dentures made with the CAD/CAM procedure might decrease the incidence of denture stomatitis compared with conventional dentures.

  6. CAD-CAM plates versus conventional fixation plates for primary mandibular reconstruction: A biomechanical in vitro analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendenbach, Carsten; Sellenschloh, Kay; Gerbig, Lucca; Morlock, Michael M; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Smeets, Ralf; Heiland, Max; Huber, Gerd; Hanken, Henning

    2017-11-01

    CAD/CAM reconstruction plates have become a viable option for mandible reconstruction. The aim of this study was to determine whether CAD/CAM plates provide higher fatigue strength compared with conventional fixation systems. 1.0 mm miniplates, 2.0 mm conventional locking plates (DePuy Synthes, Umkirch, Germany), and 2.0 mm CAD/CAM plates (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium/DePuy Synthes) were used to reconstruct a polyurethane mandible model (Synbone, Malans, CH) with cortical and cancellous bone equivalents. Mastication was simulated via cyclic dynamic testing using a universal testing machine (MTS, Bionix, Eden Prairie, MN, USA) until material failure reached a rate of 1 Hz with increasing loads on the left side. No significant difference was found between the groups until a load of 300 N. At higher loads, vertical displacement differed increasingly, with a poorer performance of miniplates (p = 0.04). Plate breakage occurred in miniplates and conventional locking plates. Screw breakage was recorded as the primary failure mechanism in CAD/CAM plates. Stiffness was significantly higher with the CAD/CAM plates (p = 0.04). CAD/CAM plates and reconstruction plates provide higher fatigue strength than miniplates, and stiffness is highest in CAD/CAM systems. All tested fixation methods seem sufficiently stable for mandible reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Astrocyte-specific disruption of SynCAM1 signaling results in ADHD-like behavioral manifestations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ursula S Sandau

    Full Text Available SynCAM1 is an adhesion molecule involved in synaptic differentiation and organization. SynCAM1 is also expressed in astroglial cells where it mediates astrocyte-to astrocyte and glial-neuronal adhesive communication. In astrocytes, SynCAM1 is functionally linked to erbB4 receptors, which are involved in the control of both neuronal/glial development and mature neuronal and glial function. Here we report that mice carrying a dominant-negative form of SynCAM1 specifically targeted to astrocytes (termed GFAP-DNSynCAM1 mice exhibit disrupted diurnal locomotor activity with enhanced and more frequent episodes of activity than control littermates during the day (when the animals are normally sleeping accompanied by shorter periods of rest. GFAP-DNSynCAM1 mice also display high levels of basal activity in the dark period (the rodent's awake/active time that are attenuated by the psychostimulant D,L-amphetamine, and reduced anxiety levels in response to both avoidable and unavoidable provoking stimuli. These results indicate that disruption of SynCAM1-dependent astroglial function results in behavioral abnormalities similar to those described in animals model of attention-deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD, and suggest a hitherto unappreciated contribution of glial cells to the pathophysiology of this disorder.

  8. The effect of nitrogen availability and water conditions on competition between a facultative CAM plant and an invasive grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kailiang; D'Odorico, Paolo; Carr, David E; Personius, Ashden; Collins, Scott L

    2017-10-01

    Plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) are increasing their abundance in drylands worldwide. The drivers and mechanisms underlying the increased dominance of CAM plants and CAM expression (i.e., nocturnal carboxylation) in facultative CAM plants, however, remain poorly understood. We investigated how nutrient and water availability affected competition between Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (a model facultative CAM species) and the invasive C 3 grass Bromus mollis that co-occur in California's coastal grasslands. Specifically we investigated the extent to which water stress, nutrients, and competition affect nocturnal carboxylation in M. crystallinum . High nutrient and low water conditions favored M. crystallinum over B. mollis , in contrast to high water conditions. While low water conditions induced nocturnal carboxylation in 9-week-old individuals of M. crystallinum , in these low water treatments, a 66% reduction in nutrient applied over the entire experiment did not further enhance nocturnal carboxylation. In high water conditions M. crystallinum both alone and in association with B. mollis did not perform nocturnal carboxylation, regardless of the nutrient levels. Thus, nocturnal carboxylation in M. crystallinum was restricted by strong competition with B. mollis in high water conditions. This study provides empirical evidence of the competitive advantage of facultative CAM plants over grasses in drought conditions and of the restricted ability of M. crystallinum to use their photosynthetic plasticity (i.e., ability to switch to CAM behavior) to compete with grasses in well-watered conditions. We suggest that a high drought tolerance could explain the increased dominance of facultative CAM plants in a future environment with increased drought and nitrogen deposition, while the potential of facultative CAM plants such as M. crystallinum to expand to wet environments is expected to be limited.

  9. Efficacy, tolerability, and safety of non-pharmacological therapies for chronic pain: An umbrella review on various CAM approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houzé, Bérengère; El-Khatib, Héjar; Arbour, Caroline

    2017-10-03

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies may be used as a non-pharmacological approach to chronic pain management. While hundreds of trials about individual CAM modality have been conducted, a comprehensive overview of their results is currently lacking for pain clinicians and researchers. This umbrella review synthesized the quality of meta-analytic evidence supporting the efficacy, tolerability and safety of CAM therapies for the management of chronic pain. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CENTRAL were searched from October 1991 to November 2016. Reviews of clinical trials (randomized and non-randomized) with meta-analysis investigating the utility of any CAM modality for chronic pain were eligible. Pain relief post-intervention was the main outcome and secondary outcomes included patients' adherence and incidence of adverse effects during CAM protocol. Twenty-six reviews (207 clinical trials, >12,000 participants) about 18 CAM modalities, falling under natural products, mind and body practices or other complementary health approaches were included. Inhaled cannabis, graded motor imagery, and Compound Kushen injection (a form of Chinese medicine) were found the most efficient (with moderate-to-high effect sizes and low heterogeneity) and tolerable (≥80% of adherence to study protocols) for chronic pain relief. When reported, adverse effects related to these CAM were minor. Although several CAM were found effective for chronic pain relief, it remains unclear when these modalities are a reasonable choice against or in conjunction with mainstream treatments. In that sense, future research with a clear emphasis on concurrent evaluation of CAM overall efficacy and patient adherence/tolerance is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gamma Ray Imaging System (GRIS) GammaCam trademark. Final report, January 3, 1994 - May 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activities undertaken during the development of the Gamma Ray Imaging System (GRIS) program now referred to as the GammaCam trademark. The purpose of this program is to develop a 2-dimensional imaging system for gamma-ray energy scenes that may be present in nuclear power plants. The report summarizes the overall accomplishments of the program and the most recent GammaCam measurements made at LANL and Estonia. The GammaCam is currently available for sale from AIL Systems as an off-the-shelf instrument

  11. Three-Dimensional Digital Evaluation of the Fit of Endocrowns Fabricated from Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Valcanaia, Andre; Neiva, Gisele; Mehl, Albert; Fasbinder, Dennis

    2018-03-06

    A wide variety of CAD/CAM materials are available for single-tooth restorations. CAD/CAM material characteristics are different and may influence CAM fabrication accuracy. There is no study investigating the influence of different CAD/CAM materials on the final fit of the restoration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fit of endocrowns fabricated from different CAD/CAM materials using a new 3D evaluation method with an intraoral scanning system. The null hypothesis was that there are no significant differences for the fitting accuracy of different CAD/CAM materials. Preparation for an endocrown was performed on a maxillary right first molar on a typodont, and restorations were fabricated with a chairside CAD/CAM system (CEREC Omnicam, MCXL). Three groups using three different CAD/CAM materials were established (each n = 10): zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (Celtra Duo; CD), leucite-reinforced silicate ceramic (Empress CAD; EM), resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate; LU). A 3D digital measurement technique (OraCheck, Cyfex AG) using an intraoral scanner (CEREC Omnicam) was used to measure the difference in fit between the three materials for a master endocrown preparation. The preparation scan and the endocrown fit scan were matched with special difference analysis software OraCheck. Three areas were selected for fitting accuracy measurements: margin (MA), axial (AX), occlusal (OC). Statistical analysis was performed using 80% percentile, one-way ANOVA, and post-hoc Scheffé test. Significance level was set to p = 0.05. Results varied from best 88.9 ± 7.7 μm for marginal fit of resin nanoceramic restorations (LU_MA) to worst 182.3 ± 24.0 μm for occlusal fit of zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate restorations (CD_OC). Statistically significant differences were found both within and among the test groups. Group CD performed statistically significantly different from group LU for marginal fit (MA) and axial fit (AX) (p 0.05). Deviation pattern for

  12. Using CAD/CAM-systems for process optimization during laser beam cutting and surface treatment. CAD/CAM-gestuetzte Prozessauslegung beim Laserstrahlschneiden und -oberflaechenveredeln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, W.; Trasser, F.J.; Wetzels, W. (Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Produktionstechnologie, IPT, Aachen (Germany))

    1991-02-01

    Using technological modules in modern CAD/CAM-systems provides an efficient use of the available know-how. On the one hand, companies can save their know-how, on the other hand they can improve manufacturing quality as well as increase the productivity. Especially laser beam cutting allows an automatic process control - orientated on geometry aspects. Similar results can be shown for laser surface treatment as well, although up to now reducing of the programming time is the main task of technological modules for this application, including special algorithms for CNC-controlled rotation/swiveling of powder-nozzles and adjustment of the powder flow rate.

  13. In God and CAM we trust. Religious faith and use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in a nationwide cohort of women treated for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Christina Gundgaard; Christensen, Søren; Jensen, Anders Bonde; Zachariae, Robert

    2013-09-01

    Turning to faith in God or a higher spiritual power is a common way of coping with life-threatening disease such as cancer. Little, however, is known about religious faith among cancer patients in secular societies. The present study aimed at exploring the prevalence of religious faith among Danish breast cancer patients and at identifying whether socio-demographic, pre-cancer health status, clinical, and health behavior characteristics, including their use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), were associated with their degree of faith. Information on faith in God or a higher spiritual power and use of CAM was provided by a nationwide sample of 3,128 recurrence-free Danish women who had received surgery for early-stage breast cancer 15-16 months earlier. Socio-demographic, clinical, and health status variables were obtained from national longitudinal registries, and health behaviors had been assessed at 3-4 months post-surgery. Of the women, 47.3% reported a high degree of faith (unambiguous believers), 35.9% some degree of faith (ambiguous believers), while the remaining 16.8% were non-believers. Unambiguous believers were more likely than ambiguous believers to experience their faith as having a positive impact on their disease and their disease-related quality-of-life. When compared to non-believers, unambiguous believers were also older, had poorer physical function, and were more frequent users of CAM, and more inclined to believe that their use of CAM would have a beneficial influence on their cancer. Disease- and treatment-related variables were unrelated to faith. While overall religious faith appears equally prevalent among Danish and US breast cancer patients, the majority of Danish breast cancer patients experienced ambiguous faith, whereas the majority of US patients have been found to express unambiguous faith. Our results suggest that future studies may benefit from exploring the role of faith for health behaviors, adherence to

  14. Assessment of reliability of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Nuno Marques; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Flinn, Brian D; Zheng, Cheng; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2016-08-01

    Information is lacking about the fatigue resistance of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) tooth-colored implant custom abutment materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the reliability of different types of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments. Zirconia (Lava Plus), lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD), and resin-based composite (Lava Ultimate) abutments were fabricated using CAD-CAM technology and bonded to machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy inserts for conical connection implants (NobelReplace Conical Connection RP 4.3×10 mm; Nobel Biocare). Three groups (n=19) were assessed: group ZR, CAD-CAM zirconia/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; group RC, CAD-CAM resin-based composite/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; and group LD, CAD-CAM lithium disilicate/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments. Fifty-seven implant abutments were secured to implants and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin according to ISO standard 14801. Static failure load (n=5) and fatigue failure load (n=14) were tested. Weibull cumulative damage analysis was used to calculate step-stress reliability at 150-N and 200-N loads with 2-sided 90% confidence limits. Representative fractured specimens were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to observe fracture patterns. Weibull plots revealed β values of 2.59 for group ZR, 0.30 for group RC, and 0.58 for group LD, indicating a wear-out or cumulative fatigue pattern for group ZR and load as the failure accelerating factor for groups RC and LD. Fractographic observation disclosed that failures initiated in the interproximal area where the lingual tensile stresses meet the compressive facial stresses for the early failure specimens. Plastic deformation of titanium inserts with fracture was observed for zirconia abutments in fatigue resistance testing. Significantly higher reliability was found in group ZR, and no significant differences in reliability were

  15. Marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM onlays: Influence of preparation design and impression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Neto, Constantino Fernandes; Rubo, José H; Santos, Gildo Coelho; Moraes Coelho Santos, Maria Jacinta

    2018-03-15

    Factors that may affect the marginal adaptation of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) restorations include preparation design, impression technique, and CAD-CAM system. The influence of impression technique and preparation design on CAD-CAM partial coverage restorations has not been fully addressed. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of direct and indirect digital impression techniques and 2 preparation designs on the marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM onlays. Two mesio-occlusal buccal onlay preparations with reduction of the mesiobuccal cusp were made: conventional preparation (CP) with a 1.2-mm modified shoulder margin and modified preparation (MP) flat cuspal reduction without shoulder. Virtual models were generated from each preparation by using a digital scanner (BlueCam; Dentsply Sirona) from the plastic teeth (direct digital impression) or from the stone dies (indirect digital impression). Onlays were designed using a CAD-CAM system (CEREC 4.0; Dentsply Sirona), and nanoceramic resin blocks (Lava Ultimate Restorative; 3M ESPE) were milled using the CEREC MCX milling machine. Marginal discrepancy was evaluated using an optical stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification in 18 locations distributed along the margins of the preparation. The data were analyzed by using 3-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). CP presented a statistically significant reduced average marginal adaptation (59 ±50 μm) than did MP (69 ±58 μm) (Pmarginal discrepancy in the mesial and buccal locations of MP when compared with CP. Regarding impression techniques, the buccal location presented the smallest average marginal discrepancy in restorations fabricated with indirect impression when compared with direct impression (42 ±33 μm and 60 ±39 μm) (Pmargin presented improved marginal adaptation compared with modified preparation with flat cuspal reduction. Direct and indirect digital impression techniques produced

  16. JunoCam Images of Jupiter: Science from an Outreach Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C. J.; Orton, G. S.; Caplinger, M. A.; Ravine, M. A.; Rogers, J.; Eichstädt, G.; Jensen, E.; Bolton, S. J.; Momary, T.; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2017-12-01

    The Juno mission to Jupiter carries a visible imager on its payload primarily for outreach, and also very useful for jovian atmospheric science. Lacking a formal imaging science team, members of the public have volunteered to process JunoCam images. Lightly processed and raw JunoCam data are posted on the JunoCam webpage at https://missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing. Citizen scientists download these images and upload their processed contributions. JunoCam images through broadband red, green and blue filters and a narrowband methane filter centered at 889 nm mounted directly on the detector. JunoCam is a push-frame imager with a 58 deg wide field of view covering a 1600 pixel width, and builds the second dimension of the image as the spacecraft rotates. This design enables capture of the entire pole of Jupiter in a single image at low emission angle when Juno is 1 hour from perijove (closest approach). At perijove the wide field of view images are high-resolution while still capturing entire storms, e.g. the Great Red Spot. Juno's unique polar orbit yields polar perspectives unavailable to earth-based observers or most previous spacecraft. The first discovery was that the familiar belt-zone structure gives way to more chaotic storms, with cyclones grouped around both the north and south poles [1, 2]. Recent time-lapse sequences have enabled measurement of the rotation rates and wind speeds of these circumpolar cyclones [3]. Other topics are being investigated with substantial, in many cases essential, contributions from citizen scientists. These include correlating the high resolution JunoCam images to storms and disruptions of the belts and zones tracked throughout the historical record. A phase function for Jupiter is being developed empirically to allow image brightness to be flattened from the subsolar point to the terminator. We are studying high hazes and the stratigraphy of the upper atmosphere, utilizing the methane filter, structures illuminated

  17. Comparison of Fit of Dentures Fabricated by Traditional Techniques Versus CAD/CAM Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, J Bryan; Ramos, Van; Dickinson, Douglas P

    2017-11-14

    To compare the shrinkage of denture bases fabricated by three methods: CAD/CAM, compression molding, and injection molding. The effect of arch form and palate depth was also tested. Nine titanium casts, representing combinations of tapered, ovoid, and square arch forms and shallow, medium, and deep palate depths, were fabricated using electron beam melting (EBM) technology. For each base fabrication method, three poly(vinyl siloxane) impressions were made from each cast, 27 dentures for each method. Compression-molded dentures were fabricated using Lucitone 199 poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), and injection molded dentures with Ivobase's Hybrid Pink PMMA. For CAD/CAM, denture bases were designed and milled by Avadent using their Light PMMA. To quantify the space between the denture and the master cast, silicone duplicating material was placed in the intaglio of the dentures, the titanium master cast was seated under pressure, and the silicone was then trimmed and recovered. Three silicone measurements per denture were recorded, for a total of 243 measurements. Each silicone measurement was weighed and adjusted to the surface area of the respective arch, giving an average and standard deviation for each denture. Comparison of manufacturing methods showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0001). Using a ratio of the means, compression molding had on average 41% to 47% more space than injection molding and CAD/CAM. Comparison of arch/palate forms showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.023), with shallow palate forms having more space with compression molding. The ovoid shallow form showed CAD/CAM and compression molding had more space than injection molding. Overall, injection molding and CAD/CAM fabrication methods produced equally well-fitting dentures, with both having a better fit than compression molding. Shallow palates appear to be more affected by shrinkage than medium or deep palates. Shallow ovoid arch forms appear to benefit from

  18. Sulfur Geochemical Analysis and Interpretation with ChemCam on the Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, S. M.; Anderson, R. B.; Frydenvang, J.; Forni, O.; Newsom, H. E.; Blaney, D. L.; Maurice, S.; Wiens, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Curiosity rover has encountered many forms of sulfur including calcium sulfate veins [1], hydrated Mg sulfates, and Fe sulfates along the traverse through Gale crater. A new SO3 calibration model for the remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique used by the ChemCam instrument enables improved quantitative analysis of SO3, which has not been previously reported by ChemCam on a routine or quantitative basis. In this paper, the details of this new LIBS calibration model will be described and applied to many disparate Mars targets. Among them, Mavor contains a calcium sulfate vein surrounded by bedrock. In contrast, Jake M. is a float rock, Wernecke is a bedrock, Cumberland and Windjana are drill targets. In 2015 the ChemCam instrument team completed a re-calibration of major elements based on a significantly expanded set of >500 geochemical standards using the ChemCam testbed at Los Alamos National Laboratory [2]. In addition to these standards, the SO3 compositional range was recently extended with a series of doped samples containing various mixtures of Ca- and Mg-sulfate with basalt BHVO2. Spectra from these standards were processed per [4]. Calibration and Mars spectra were converted to peak-area-summed LIBS spectra that enables the SO3 calibration. These peak-area spectra were used to generate three overlapping partial least squares (PLS1) calibration sub-models as described by Anderson et al. [3, 5]. ChemCam analysis of Mavor involved a 3x3 raster in which locations 5 and 6 primarily probed Ca-sulfate material. The new ChemCam SO3 compositions for Mavor 5 and Mavor 6 are 48.6±1.2 and 50.3±1.2 wt% SO3, respectively. The LIBS spectra also recorded the presence of other elements that are likely responsible for the departure from pure Ca-sulfate chemistry. On the low-abundance side, the remaining 7 Mavor locations, Jake M., Cumberland, Windjana, and Wernecke all contain much lower SO3, between 1.4±0.5 wt% and 2.3±0.3 wt% SO3. [1] Nachon et

  19. Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by parents in their children and adolescents with epilepsy - Prevelance, predictors and parents' assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Nicole; Neininger, Martina P; Bernhard, Matthias K; Syrbe, Steffen; Nickel, Petra; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Kiess, Wieland; Bertsche, Thilo; Bertsche, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is popular. Parents of children suffering from epilepsy may also consider administering CAM to their children. Systematic data about frequency of and motivations for CAM use, however, are scarce. In a university hospital's neuropaediatric department parents of patients aged 0-18 years suffering from epilepsy were consecutively invited to take part in a structured interview during 4 months in 2014. Of the invited parents, 164/165 (99%) agreed to participate. From those, 21/164 (13%) stated that they used CAM in their child. The highest independent predictive value of CAM use was the occurrence of adverse drug events (ADE) of anticonvulsants as judged by parents. Patients affected by ADE had a 5.6 higher chance of receiving CAM compared to patients without ADE. Most commonly used were homeopathy (14/21, 67%) and osteopathy (12/21, 57%). The internet was the most frequently used source of information (14/21, 67%). Of the parents, 10/21 (48%) described positive effects of CAM on seizure frequency, 12/21 (57%) on general condition of their child, and 20/21 (95%) wished to continue CAM for epilepsy therapy. From the non-users of CAM, 91/143 (66%) expressed the desire to learn more about CAM for epilepsy therapy. Our study was performed in a university hospital in a large urban city in Eastern Germany. CAM user rates can differ in other parts of Germany and Europe, in other institutions and for chronic diseases other than epilepsy. The main reason for CAM use was the occurrence of ADE of anticonvulsants. More than half of the parents saw a benefit of CAM for their children. Almost all parents wished to continue CAM use, even those who did not see concrete positive effects. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diversidade de bromeliáceas epífitas na Área de Proteção Ambiental Ilha do Combu, Belém, Pará, Brasil Diversity of epiphytic bromeliads in the environmental protection area of Combu Island, Belém, Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Costa Quaresma

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Informações sobre a diversidade no nível de espécie oferecem subsídios importantes para o desenvolvimento sustentável e a conservação biológica. Neste contexto, estudos com Bromeliaceae merecem destaque, especialmente porque o grupo é importante ecologicamente, mas ainda pouco conhecido na Região Norte. Neste trabalho, foram demarcadas duas parcelas de 100 m x 100 m em uma floresta de várzea localizada na Área de Proteção Ambiental Ilha do Combu, em Belém, Estado do Pará. Cada parcela foi subdividida em oito parcelas de 50 m x 50 m, tendo todas as espécies e espécimes de bromeliáceas epífitas registradas e quantificadas. A diversidade do grupo foi calculada utilizando o índice de Shannon-Wiener. Foram registrados 1.339 indivíduos pertencentes a oito espécies e quatro gêneros. Tillandsia e Aechmea apresentaram maior riqueza. A diversidade de espécies na área foi de H= 1,10, apresentando dominância acentuada de muitos indivíduos em poucas espécies.Information about diversity at the species level offers data for sustainable development and biological conservation. In this context, studies about Bromeliaceae are noteworthy, especially because this group is ecologically important and poorly known in the North Region of Brazil. In this study, two grids (100 m x 100 m were delineated in a floodplain forest in the environmental protection area of Combu Island, Belém, Pará, Brazil. The grids were subdivided into eight grids of 50 m x 50 m, and all species and individuals of epiphytic Bromeliaceae were recorded and quantified. The diversity was calculated using the Shannon-Wiener index. A total of 1,339 individuals, belonging to eight species and four genera were recorded. Tillandsia and Aechmea presented the greatest richness. The diversity of species was H= 1.10, presenting sharp dominance of many individuals of few species.

  1. Phytochrome-mediated responses of cells and protoplasts of green calli obtained from the leaves of a CAM plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mricha, A; Brulfert, J; Pierre, J N; Queiroz, O

    1990-04-01

    Green callus obtained from leaves of the CAM-inducible plant Kalanchoe blossfeldiana cv. Montezuma has previously been shown to perform C3-type photosynthesis under 16-h days and to shift to crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) under 9-h days. The utilization of photoperiodic regimes (i.e. night interruptions by 30 min red light) established that CAM induction in the callus was under the control of phytochrome, as shown by measurements of CAM criteria: phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity and malic acid pools. Short-term responsiveness of the callus cells to phytochrome modulations by monochromatic radiations was also established by the rapid changes observed in the diameter of the callus-derived protoplasts. These results provide further evidence that whole plant correlations are not necessary for phytochrome operativity.

  2. Influence of Different CAM Strategies on the Fit of Partial Crown Restorations: A Digital Three-dimensional Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, M; Valcanaia, A; Neiva, G; Mehl, A; Fasbinder, D

    2018-04-09

    CAM fabrication is an important step within the CAD/CAM process. The internal fit of restorations is influenced by the accuracy of the subtractive CAM procedure. Little is known about how CAM strategies might influence the fit of CAD/CAM fabricated restorations. The aim of this study was to three-dimensionally evaluate the fit of CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic partial crowns fabricated with three different CAM strategies. The null hypothesis was that different CAM strategies did not influence the fitting accuracy of CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic partial crowns. Preparation for a partial crown was performed on a maxillary right first molar on a typodont. A chairside CAD/CAM system with the intraoral scanning device CEREC Omnicam (Dentsply Sirona, York, PA, USA) and the 3+1 axis milling unit CEREC MCXL was used. There were three groups with different CAM strategies: step bur 12 (12), step bur 12S (12S), and two step-mode (12TWO). The zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic Celtra Duo (Dentsply Sirona) was used as the CAD/CAM material. A new 3D method for evaluating the fit was applied, consisting of the quadrant scan with the intraoral scanning device CEREC Omnicam. The scan of the PVS material adherent to the preparation and the preparation scan were matched, and the difference analysis was performed with special software OraCheck (Cyfex AG, Zurich, Switzerland). Three areas were selected for analysis: margin (MA), axial (AX), and occlusal (OC). Statistical analysis was performed using 80% percentile, one-way ANOVA, and the post hoc Scheffé test with α=0.05. Statistically significant differences were found both within and between the test groups. The aspect axial fit results varied from 90.5 ± 20.1 μm for the two-step milling mode (12TWO_AX) to 122.8 ± 12.2 μm for the milling with step bur 12S (12S_AX). The worst result in all groups was found for the aspect occlusal fit with the highest

  3. A scoping review of research on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the mass media: looking back, moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Laura C; Strudsholm, Tina

    2008-07-19

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has become more common in Western developed countries in recent years, as has media reporting on CAM and related issues. Correspondingly, media reports are a primary information source regarding decisions to use CAM. Research on CAM related media reports is becoming increasingly relevant and important; however, identifying key concepts to guide future research is problematic due to the dispersed nature of completed research in this field. A scoping review was conducted to: 1) determine the amount, focus and nature of research on CAM and the mass media; and 2) summarize and disseminate related research results. The main phases were: 1) searching for relevant studies; 2) selecting studies based on pre-defined inclusion criteria; 3) extracting data; and 4) collating, summarizing and reporting the results. Of 4,454 studies identified through various search strategies, 16 were relevant to our objectives and included in a final sample. CAM and media research has focused primarily on print media coverage of a range of CAM therapies, although only a few studies articulated differences within the range of therapies surveyed. Research has been developed through a variety of disciplinary perspectives, with a focus on representation research. The research reviewed suggests that journalists draw on a range of sources to prepare media reports, although most commonly they cite conventional (versus CAM) sources and personal anecdotes. The tone of media reports appears generally positive, which may be related to a lack of reporting on issues related to risk and safety. Finally, a variety of discourses within media representations of CAM are apparent that each appeal to a specific audience through resonance with their specific concerns. Research on CAM and the mass media spans multiple disciplines and strategies of inquiry; however, despite the diversity in approach, it is clear that issues related to production and reception

  4. El pastor Quijótiz by Camón Aznar and Unamuno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Fernández Rivera

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In El pastor Quijótiz (1969, Camón Aznar resorted to the antagonism ideal vs. reality, characteristic of many recreations of Cervantes’ masterpiece, to explore the problem he had in combining the ideas of his freethinking youth with his later role as an active intellectual under Franco.  El pastor Quijótiz is an attempt at saving the liberal intellectuals’ utopianism of the early 20th century by transforming it into a form of private spirituality that serves as a comforter in the face of the surrounding social injustice. Camón Aznar builds upon the figure of the rebellious Don Quixote created by Unamuno, who he had admired in his youth. However, he changes the figure by adding a resigned victimization of Stoic- Christian origin.

  5. Diagenetic Features Analyzed by ChemCam/Curiosity at Pahrump Hills, Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachon, M.; Mangold, N.; Cousin, A.; Forni, O.; Anderson, R. B.; Blank, J. G.; Calef, F.; Clegg, S.; Fabre, C.; Fisk, M.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover, the ChemCam instrument consists of : (1) a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) for elemental analysis of targets and (2) a Remote Micro Imager (RMI), which provides imaging context for the LIBS. The LIBS/ChemCam performs analysis typically of spot sizes 350-550 micrometers in diameter, up to 7 meters from the rover. Within Gale crater, Curiosity traveled from Bradbury Landing toward the base of Mount Sharp, reaching Pahrump Hills outcrop circa sol 750. This region, as seen from orbit, represents the first exposures of lower Mount Sharp. In this abstract we focus on two types of features present within the Pahrump Hills outcrop: concretion features and light-toned veins.

  6. The methodology of choice Cam-Clay model parameters for loess subsoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepelski, Krzysztof; Błazik-Borowa, Ewa

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with the calibration method of FEM subsoil model described by the constitutive Cam-Clay model. The four-storey residential building and solid substrate are modelled. Identification of the substrate is made using research drilling, CPT static tests, DMT Marchetti dilatometer, and laboratory tests. Latter are performed on the intact soil specimens which are taken from the wide planning trench at the depth of foundation. The real building settlements was measured as the vertical displacement of benchmarks. These measurements were carried out periodically during the erection of the building and its operation. Initially, the Cam Clay model parameters were determined on the basis of the laboratory tests, and later, they were corrected by taking into consideration numerical analyses results (whole building and its parts) and real building settlements.

  7. Cultural competency, autonomy, and spiritual conflicts related to Reiki/CAM therapies: Should patients be informed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvonio, Maria Marra

    2014-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) such as Reiki is on the rise in healthcare centers. Reiki is associated with a spirituality that conflicts with some belief systems. Catholic healthcare facilities are restricted from offering this therapy because it conflicts with the teachings of the Catholic Church. However, hospitals are offering it without disclosing the spiritual aspects of it to patients. This article will address the ethical concerns and possible legal implications associated with the present process of offering Reiki. It will address these concerns based on the Joint Commission's Standard of Cultural Competency and the ethical principles of autonomy and informed consent. A proposal will also be introduced identifying specific information which Reiki/CAM practitioners should offer to their patients out of respect of their autonomy as well as their cultural, spiritual, and religious beliefs. PMID:24899738

  8. La digestion chez les camélidés ; comparaison avec les ruminants

    OpenAIRE

    Jouany, J Pierre

    2000-01-01

    Les études sur la digestion et le métabolisme des camélidés ont bénéficié au cours des quinze dernières années des progrès techniques et méthodologiques issus des travaux conduits chez les ruminants. On dispose aujourd’hui d’éléments scientifiques fiables qui permettent de comparer les aptitudes digestives et métaboliques respectives de ces deux types d’animaux. L’anatomie des pré-estomacs ainsi que le comportement alimentaire des animaux sont très différents entre camélidés et ruminants. De ...

  9. Validation of a Criterion for Cam Mechanisms Optimization Using Constraints upon Cam’s Curvature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Alaci

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For the mechanism with rotating cam and knife-edge follower, an optimization criterion by means of imposed constraints upon cam’s curvature is expressed in a special coordinate system. Thus, stating the optimization criterion in the coordinate system defined by the mechanisms constructive parameters -eccentricity and minimum follower’s stroke, a contour is obtained for any position of the mechanism. The optimization criterion assumes establishing the position of the characteristic point of the mechanism with respect to this contour. Fulfillment of optimization criterion assumes that the characteristic point is positioned in the same manner with respect to all contours. The optimization criterion is simplified when considering the envelope of the contours. The method is exemplified using two mechanisms, with the cams priori satisfying the criterion.

  10. Modeling the corrosion of high-level waste containers: CAM-CRM interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J.C.; Bedrossian, P.J.; McCright, R.D.

    1998-06-01

    A key component of the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) being designed for containment of spent-fuel and high-level waste at the proposed geological respository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada is a two-layer canister. In this particular design, the inner barrier is made of a corrosion resistant material (CRM) such as Alloy 825, 625 or C-22, while the outer barrier is made of a corrosion-allowance material (CAM) such as A516 or Monel 400. At the present time, Alloy C-22 and A516 are favored. This publication addresses the development of models to account for corrosion of Alloy C-22 surfaces exposed directly to the Near Field Environmental (NFE), as well as to the exacerbated conditions in the CAM-CRM crevice

  11. IPAD 2: Advances in Distributed Data Base Management for CAD/CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, S. W. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) Project objective is to improve engineering productivity through better use of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. The focus is on development of technology and associated software for integrated company-wide management of engineering information. The objectives of this conference are as follows: to provide a greater awareness of the critical need by U.S. industry for advancements in distributed CAD/CAM data management capability; to present industry experiences and current and planned research in distributed data base management; and to summarize IPAD data management contributions and their impact on U.S. industry and computer hardware and software vendors.

  12. Sex Differences in Patients With CAM Deformities With Femoroacetabular Impingement: 3-Dimensional Computed Tomographic Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanke, Adam B; Khair, M Michael; Stanley, Robert; Walton, David; Lee, Simon; Bush-Joseph, Charles A; Espinoza Orías, Alejandro; Espinosa Orias, Alejandro A; Inoue, Nozomu; Nho, Shane J

    2015-12-01

    To determine if significant differences exist between male and female CAM deformities using quantitative 3-dimensional (3D) volume and location analysis. Retrospective analysis of preoperative computed tomographic (CT) scans for 138 femurs (69 from male patients and 69 from female patients) diagnosed with impingement from November 2009 to November 2011 was completed. Those patients who presented with hip complaints and had a history, physical examination (limited range of motion, positive impingement signs), plain radiographs (anteroposterior pelvis, 90° Dunn view, false profile view), and magnetic resonance images consistent with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and in whom a minimum of 6 months of conservative therapy (oral anti-inflammatory agents, physical therapy, and activity modification) had failed were indicated for arthroscopic surgery and had a preoperative CT scan. Scans were segmented, converted to point cloud data, and analyzed with a custom-written computer program. Analysis included mean CAM height and volume, head radius, and femoral version. Differences were analyzed using an unpaired t test with significance set at P position ± the 2:51 o'clock position to the 3:28 o'clock position ± the 1:59 o'clock position, with an average span from the 3:06 o'clock position ± the 1:29 o'clock position (male patients, the 11:23 o'clock position ± the 0:46 o'clock position to the 3:05 o'clock position ± the 1:20 o'clock position; female patients, the 11:33 o'clock position ± the 0:37 o'clock position to the 2:27 o'clock position ± the 0:45 o'clock position). There were no differences in the posterior (P = .60) or anterior (P = .14) extent of CAM deformities. However, the span on the clock face of the CAM deformities varied when comparing men with women (male patients, the 3:43 o'clock position ± the 1:29 o'clock position; female patients, the 2:54 o'clock position ± the 1:09 o'clock position; P = .02). Our data show that female CAM deformities

  13. Tool application CAD / CAM for design and construction of a prototype of plastic injection mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Miyer Suárez Castrillón

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The study, development and production of injection molds comes with the implementation of CAD and CAM tools available on the market; using these tools, a prototype injection mold for thermoplastic materials was designed and built, based on a mold is injection in the laboratory of the University of Pamplona, in which a couple of modifications were made in order to experiment with its design. The prototype was manufactured through a 3D scan of the original mold to provide the CAD / CAM files with the simulated 3D printing technique for performing an experimental study with the prototype for adjusting temperature and pressure sensors and for coatings metallic materials for use in the injection molding process.

  14. Camønoen: A pilgrim trail conceived along a communitarian business model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meged, Jane Widtfeldt; Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative experiment of building an operative communitarian business model to leverage tourism in Southern Denmark. Coastal communities in Denmark have experienced a steady socioeconomic decline, which has further been aggravated by a stagnating tourism and agricultural...... sector. Within this context, coastal regions are attempting to harness the potentials of the emerging collaborative economy by experimenting with communitarian business models. Such is the case of a digitally facilitated pilgrim trail in Denmark, the Camøno, which was conceived in 2016 to mobilize sparse...... and loosely connected local resources to create value for tourists and citizens. The trail sustains over 200 small local actors and attracted over 75.000 visitors after less than a year of operation. Our paper explores the rapid success and consolidation of the Camøno trail by analyzing the performativity...

  15. Carbon isotope ratios of epidermal and mesophyll tissues from leaves of C3 and CAM plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishida, K.; Roksandic, Z.; Osmond, B.

    1981-01-01

    The δ 13 C values for epidermal and mesophyll tissues of two C 3 plants, Commelina communis and Tulipa gesneriana, and a CAM plant, Kalanchoē daigremontiana, were measured. The values for the tissues of both C 3 plants were similar. In young leaves of Kalanchoē, the epidermis and the mesophyll showed S 13 C values which were nearly identical, and similar to those found in C 3 plants. However, markedly more negative values for epidermal compared to mesophyll tissue, were obtained in the mature Kalanchoē leaf. This is consistent with the facts that the epidermis in a CAM leaf is formed when leaves engage in C 3 photosynthesis and that subsequent dark CO 2 fixation in guard cells or mesophyll cells makes only a small contribution to total epidermal carbon

  16. Utilizing optical coherence tomography for CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chityala, Ravishankar; Vidal, Carola; Jones, Robert

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has seen broad application in dentistry including early carious lesion detection and imaging defects in resin composite restorations. This study investigates expanding the clinical usefulness by investigating methods to use OCT for obtaining three-dimensional (3D) digital impressions, which can be integrated to CAD/CAM manufacturing of indirect restorations. 3D surface topography `before' and `after' a cavity preparation was acquired by an intraoral cross polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) system with a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) scanning mirror. Image registration and segmentation methods were used to digitally construct a replacement restoration that modeled the original surface morphology of a hydroxyapatite sample. After high resolution additive manufacturing (e.g. polymer 3D printing) of the replacement restoration, micro-CT imaging was performed to examine the marginal adaptation. This study establishes the protocol for further investigation of integrating OCT with CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations.

  17. ''VaneCAM'' - the third generation of camshaft adjustment systems; ''VaneCAM'' - Nockenwellenversteller der dritten Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, A. [Hydraulik-Ring GmbH, Nuertingen (Germany). Entwicklung Motorentechnik; Stephan, W. [Hydraulik-Ring GmbH, Nuertingen (Germany); Hannibal, W. [Fachhochschule Suedwestfalen, Iserlohn (Germany). Labor fuer Konstruktion und CAE-Anwendungen

    2002-04-01

    Continuously variable camphasers are now well established for modern spark-ignition engines in high-volume production. With the latest generation of camshaft adjustment systems using the vane-type actuator principle, it is possible to move rapidly and reliably through a large adjustment angle. The layout of these adjusting systems is very simple. The production costs are low in comparison to the first generation of camphasers using spur/helical gears to vary the valve timing. The new-generation systems are mechatronic, with the function depending on the coordination and tuning of hydraulic actuation and engine electronics. The term 'VaneCAM' is used for the continuously variable systems of this new generation supplied by Hydraulik-Ring in Nuertingen, Germany. (orig.) [German] Stufenlos wirkende Nockenwellenversteller haben sich an modernen Ottomotoren in den letzten Jahren in der Grossserie etabliert. Mit der neuesten Generation von Nockenwellenverstellern, die nach dem Schwenkmotor-Prinzip aufgebaut sind, lassen sich grosse Verdrehwinkel sehr schnell und betriebssicher verstellen. Der Aufbau dieser Versteller ist einfach, und die Herstellkosten sind gering im Vergleich zur ersten Generation von Verstellern. Bei den Systemen der neuen Generation handelt es sich um mechatronische Systeme, deren Funktion von dem Zusammenspiel und der Abstimmung von hydraulischer Ansteuerung und Motorelektronik abhaengt. Mit dem Begriff 'VaneCAM' werden die stufenlos wirkenden Systeme dieser neuen Generation von Hydraulik-Ring aus Nuertingen bezeichnet. (orig.)

  18. Cyp1a-dependent activation of xenobiotics in endothelial linings of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annas, A.; Brittebo, E.B.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activation of the heterocyclic amine 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity were examined in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of 15-day-old chicken and 18-day-old eider duck embryos. The embryos were pretreated with an Ah receptor agonist, i.e. β-naphthoflavone (BNF) or 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), or vehicle in ovo. BNF and PCB 126 induced EROD activity and covalent binding of [ 3 H]Trp-P-1 seven- to tenfold in the CAM of chicken embryos. In the CAM of eider duck embryos, which are known to be nonresponsive to coplanar PCBs, PCB 126 treatment had no effect on EROD activity or covalent binding of [ 3 H]Trp-P-1 whereas BNF treatment increased these activities five- and threefold, respectively. Light microscopic autoradiography was used to identify the cellular localization of covalent binding of [ 3 H]Trp-P-1 in the CAM. Preferential binding was observed in endothelial cells in intraepithelial capillaries in the chorionic epithelium and in blood vessels in the mesenchymal layer. The addition of the CYP1A inhibitor ellipticine abolished the covalent binding of [ 3 H]Trp-P-1 in the CAM of BNF- and PCB 126-treated chicken and eider duck embryos. The results suggest that CYP1A-dependent metabolic activity can be induced in blood vessel endothelia in the CAM of bird embryos following exposure to Ah receptor agonists and that the CAM may be a target tissue for CYP1A-activated environmental pollutants. Furthermore, the highly vascularized CAM could be used as a model for studies of Ah receptor-mediated alterations in the vasculature. (orig.)

  19. Cyp1a-dependent activation of xenobiotics in endothelial linings of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annas, A.; Brittebo, E.B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Toxicology; Brunstroem, B. [Dept. of Environmental Toxicology, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-08-01

    Metabolic activation of the heterocyclic amine 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1) and 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activity were examined in the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of 15-day-old chicken and 18-day-old eider duck embryos. The embryos were pretreated with an Ah receptor agonist, i.e. {beta}-naphthoflavone (BNF) or 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126), or vehicle in ovo. BNF and PCB 126 induced EROD activity and covalent binding of [{sup 3}H]Trp-P-1 seven- to tenfold in the CAM of chicken embryos. In the CAM of eider duck embryos, which are known to be nonresponsive to coplanar PCBs, PCB 126 treatment had no effect on EROD activity or covalent binding of [{sup 3}H]Trp-P-1 whereas BNF treatment increased these activities five- and threefold, respectively. Light microscopic autoradiography was used to identify the cellular localization of covalent binding of [{sup 3}H]Trp-P-1 in the CAM. Preferential binding was observed in endothelial cells in intraepithelial capillaries in the chorionic epithelium and in blood vessels in the mesenchymal layer. The addition of the CYP1A inhibitor ellipticine abolished the covalent binding of [{sup 3}H]Trp-P-1 in the CAM of BNF- and PCB 126-treated chicken and eider duck embryos. The results suggest that CYP1A-dependent metabolic activity can be induced in blood vessel endothelia in the CAM of bird embryos following exposure to Ah receptor agonists and that the CAM may be a target tissue for CYP1A-activated environmental pollutants. Furthermore, the highly vascularized CAM could be used as a model for studies of Ah receptor-mediated alterations in the vasculature. (orig.)

  20. Immunohistochemical expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in mucoepidermoid carcinoma compared to normal salivary gland tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Noura M; Salem, Hend M; Dahmoush, Heba M

    2017-07-01

    Mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) is the most common malignant salivary gland tumor which displays biological, histological and clinical diversity thus representing a challenge for its diagnosis and management. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a transmembrane glycoprotein identified as a tumor specific antigen due to its frequent overexpression in the majority of epithelial carcinomas and its correlation with prognosis. It is considered to be a promising biomarker used as a therapeutic target already in ongoing clinical trials. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pattern, cellular characterization and level of EpCAM expression in MEC and demonstrate its correlation with histologic grading which may benefit future clinical trials using EpCAM targeted therapy. 48 specimens (12 normal salivary gland tissue and 36 MEC) were collected and EpCAM membranous expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Total immunoscore (TIS) was evaluated, the term 'EpCAM overexpression' was given for tissues showing a total immunoscore >4. A highly significant difference was observed between TIS percent values in control and different grades of MEC (p<0.001). High grade MEC (HG-MEC) was the highest EpCAM expressor. In addition, EpCAM expression pattern differed among the different grades. EpCAM expression was detected in MEC, and its overexpression correlated with increasing the histological grade. The diffuse membranous expression in HG-MEC could be of diagnostic value in relation to the patchy expression observed in both low grade and intermediate grade MEC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening for retinopathy of prematurity-a comparison between binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy and RetCam 120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Parag

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the photographic screening for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP using RetCam 120 with binocular indirect ophthalmoscope (BIO, which is the current gold standard. Setting and Design: Prospective, comparative study. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 RetCam examinations were performed on 27 premature babies. They were stored in a separate file after deleting the identifying information. At the same visit using the BIO with scleral depression, an experienced vitreoretinal surgeon evaluated the fundus in detail. A masked examiner then evaluated the RetCam photographs for presence or absence of ROP, the stage and zone of the disease, and the presence or absence of plus disease. These data were then compared with the BIO findings to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values of the method. Results: ROP was detected in 63 of 87 examinations by BIO and in 56 of 87 RetCam examinations. Nine RetCam examinations were false-negative and two were false-positive. Sensitivity of RetCam was 85.71% (54/63 and specificity was 91.66% (22/24. The positive and negative predictive values were 96.43% and 70.97% respectively. Conclusion: Nine cases having ROP were missed by the RetCam. All these cases were either in zone 3 or the outer part of zone 2, which later regressed. These were missed mostly because of the restricted mobility of the camera head caused by its size and the barrier caused by the lid speculum arms. No case of threshold ROP was missed. RetCam may replace BIO for screening of ROP.

  2. Post-cam mechanics and tibiofemoral kinematics: a dynamic in vitro analysis of eight posterior-stabilized total knee designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnout, N; Vanlommel, L; Vanlommel, J; Luyckx, J P; Labey, L; Innocenti, B; Victor, J; Bellemans, J

    2015-11-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)-substituting total knee arthroplasty (TKA) designs were introduced to avoid paradoxical roll forward of the femur and to optimize knee kinematics. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate post-cam function and contact mechanics and relate it to knee kinematics during squatting in eight contemporary posterior-stabilized TKA designs. All prostheses were fixed on custom-designed metal fixtures and mounted in a knee rig and five sequential-loaded squats were performed between 30° and 130° of flexion. Contact pressure and contact area were measured using pressure-sensitive Tekscan sensors on the posterior face of the post. Kinematics was recorded with reflective markers and infrared light-capturing cameras. The post-cam mechanisms analyzed in this study are very variable in terms of design features. This leads to large variations in terms of the flexion angle at which the post and cam engage maximal contact force, contact pressure and contact area. We found that more functional post-cam mechanisms, which engage at lower flexion angle and have a similar behavior as normal PCL function, generally show more normal rollback and tibial rotation at the expense of higher contact forces and pressures. All designs show high contact forces. A positive correlation was found between contact force and initial contact angle. Post-cam contact mechanics and kinematics were documented in a standardized setting. Post-cam contact mechanics are correlated with post-cam function. Outcomes of this study can help to develop more functional designs in future. Nevertheless, a compromise will always be made between functional requirements and risk of failure. We assume that more normal knee kinematics leads to more patient satisfaction because of better mobility. Understanding of the post-cam mechanism, and knowing how this system really works, is maybe the clue in further development of new total knee designs.

  3. Cooverexpression of EpCAM and c-myc genes in malignant breast ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using SDS/PAGE and transferred to a nitrocellulose mem- brane in a condition of 100 V for 90 min at 4. ◦. C. Block- ing of membranes was done in blocking solution (5% nonfat milk powder, in TBST) at room temperature for 1 h followed by the incubation of membranes with the anti-EpCAM anti- body (5% nonfat milk powder, ...

  4. Alkali trace elements in Gale crater, Mars, with ChemCam: Calibration update and geological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payre, Valerie; Fabre, Cecile; Cousin, Agnes; Sautter, Violaine; Wiens, Roger Craig

    2017-01-01

    The Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) instrument onboard Curiosity can detect minor and trace elements such as lithium, strontium, rubidium, and barium. Their abundances can provide some insights about Mars' magmatic history and sedimentary processes. We focus on developing new quantitative models for these elements by using a new laboratory database (more than 400 samples) that displays diverse compositions that are more relevant for Gale crater than the previous ChemCam database. These models are based on univariate calibration curves. For each element, the best model is selected depending on the results obtained by using the ChemCam calibration targets onboard Curiosity. New quantifications of Li, Sr, Rb, and Ba in Gale samples have been obtained for the first 1000 Martian days. Comparing these data in alkaline and magnesian rocks with the felsic and mafic clasts from the Martian meteorite NWA7533—from approximately the same geologic period—we observe a similar behavior: Sr, Rb, and Ba are more concentrated in soluble- and incompatible-element-rich mineral phases (Si, Al, and alkali-rich). Correlations between these trace elements and potassium in materials analyzed by ChemCam reveal a strong affinity with K-bearing phases such as feldspars, K-phyllosilicates, and potentially micas in igneous and sedimentary rocks. However, lithium is found in comparable abundances in alkali-rich and magnesium-rich Gale rocks. This very soluble element can be associated with both alkali and Mg-Fe phases such as pyroxene and feldspar. Here, these observations of Li, Sr, Rb, and Ba mineralogical associations highlight their substitution with potassium and their incompatibility in magmatic melts.

  5. Roughness, surface energy, and superficial damages of CAD/CAM materials after surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Thomas; Preis, Verena; Behr, Michael; Rosentritt, Martin

    2018-02-05

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of surface pre-treatment on CAD/CAM materials including ceramics, zirconia, resin-infiltrated ceramic, and resin-based composite. Specimens were made of ten CAD/CAM materials (Celtra Duo, Degudent, D; Vita Suprinity, Vita, D; E.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL; E.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL; Vita Enamic, Vita, D; Cerasmart, GC, B; LAVA Ultimate, 3M, D; SHOFU Block HC, SHOFU, US; Grandio Blocs, VOCO, D; BRILLIANT Crios, Coltene, CH) and pretreated to represent clinical procedures (Hf 20 s/5%; phosphoric acid 20 s/37%; Monobond etch and prime (Ivoclar-Vivadent, FL); water-cooled diamond bur (80 μm; 4 μm); Al 2 O 3 -blasting (50 μm/1 bar, 50 μm/2 bar, 120 μm/1 bar, 120 μm/2 bar); untreated; manufacturer's instructions). SEM-analysis (Phenom, FEI, NL) of the surfaces was performed (magnifications ≤ 10,000×). Roughness values R a , R z (KJ 3D, Keyence, J), and surface energy SE (OCA15 plus, SCA20, DataPhysics, D) were determined (statistics: non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test/Kruskal-Wallis test for independent specimen, α = 0.05). Kruskal-Wallis revealed significant (p CAD/CAM materials require individual pre-treatment for optimized and protective surface activation. Cementation is a key factor for clinical success. Given the variety of available CAD/CAM materials, specific procedures are needed.

  6. Machining variability impacts on the strength of a 'chair-side' CAD-CAM ceramic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Addison, Owen

    2012-08-01

    To develop a novel methodology to generate specimens for bi-axial flexure strength (BFS) determination from a \\'chair-side\\' CAD-CAM feldspathic ceramic with surface defect integrals analogous to the clinical state. The hypotheses tested were: BFS and surface roughness (R(a)) are independent of machining variability introduced by the renewal or deterioration of form-grinding tools and that a post-machining annealing cycle would significantly modify BFS.

  7. Alkali trace elements in Gale crater, Mars, with ChemCam: Calibration update and geological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payré, V.; Fabre, C.; Cousin, A.; Sautter, V.; Wiens, R. C.; Forni, O.; Gasnault, O.; Mangold, N.; Meslin, P.-Y.; Lasue, J.; Ollila, A.; Rapin, W.; Maurice, S.; Nachon, M.; Le Deit, L.; Lanza, N.; Clegg, S.

    2017-03-01

    The Chemistry Camera (ChemCam) instrument onboard Curiosity can detect minor and trace elements such as lithium, strontium, rubidium, and barium. Their abundances can provide some insights about Mars' magmatic history and sedimentary processes. We focus on developing new quantitative models for these elements by using a new laboratory database (more than 400 samples) that displays diverse compositions that are more relevant for Gale crater than the previous ChemCam database. These models are based on univariate calibration curves. For each element, the best model is selected depending on the results obtained by using the ChemCam calibration targets onboard Curiosity. New quantifications of Li, Sr, Rb, and Ba in Gale samples have been obtained for the first 1000 Martian days. Comparing these data in alkaline and magnesian rocks with the felsic and mafic clasts from the Martian meteorite NWA7533—from approximately the same geologic period—we observe a similar behavior: Sr, Rb, and Ba are more concentrated in soluble- and incompatible-element-rich mineral phases (Si, Al, and alkali-rich). Correlations between these trace elements and potassium in materials analyzed by ChemCam reveal a strong affinity with K-bearing phases such as feldspars, K-phyllosilicates, and potentially micas in igneous and sedimentary rocks. However, lithium is found in comparable abundances in alkali-rich and magnesium-rich Gale rocks. This very soluble element can be associated with both alkali and Mg-Fe phases such as pyroxene and feldspar. These observations of Li, Sr, Rb, and Ba mineralogical associations highlight their substitution with potassium and their incompatibility in magmatic melts.

  8. Synthetic biology as it relates to CAM photosynthesis: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaoli, Henrique C; Borland, Anne M; Tuskan, Gerald A; Cushman, John C; Yang, Xiaohan

    2014-07-01

    To meet future food and energy security needs, which are amplified by increasing population growth and reduced natural resource availability, metabolic engineering efforts have moved from manipulating single genes/proteins to introducing multiple genes and novel pathways to improve photosynthetic efficiency in a more comprehensive manner. Biochemical carbon-concentrating mechanisms such as crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM), which improves photosynthetic, water-use, and possibly nutrient-use efficiency, represent a strategic target for synthetic biology to engineer more productive C3 crops for a warmer and drier world. One key challenge for introducing multigene traits like CAM onto a background of C3 photosynthesis is to gain a better understanding of the dynamic spatial and temporal regulatory events that underpin photosynthetic metabolism. With the aid of systems and computational biology, vast amounts of experimental data encompassing transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics can be related in a network to create dynamic models. Such models can undergo simulations to discover key regulatory elements in metabolism and suggest strategic substitution or augmentation by synthetic components to improve photosynthetic performance and water-use efficiency in C3 crops. Another key challenge in the application of synthetic biology to photosynthesis research is to develop efficient systems for multigene assembly and stacking. Here, we review recent progress in computational modelling as applied to plant photosynthesis, with attention to the requirements for CAM, and recent advances in synthetic biology tool development. Lastly, we discuss possible options for multigene pathway construction in plants with an emphasis on CAM-into-C3 engineering. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A New 14C-AMS Facility at UFF- Niteroi, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Macario, K. D.; Anjos, R. M.; Linares, R.; Carvalho, C.; Queiroz, E.

    2010-01-01

    We report a new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility at the Physics Institute of Fluminense Federal University in Brazil, the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory - LACRON. The sample preparation laboratory is ready to perform chemical treatment through graphitization and the acquisition of a Single Stage Accelerator Mass Spectrometry System is in progress. LACRON will be the first independent laboratory to perform the 14 C-AMS technique not only in Brazil but in Latin America.

  10. A New 14C-AMS Facility at UFF- Niteroi, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, P. R. S.; Macario, K. D.; Anjos, R. M.; Linares, R.; Carvalho, C.; Queiroz, E.

    2010-08-01

    We report a new Accelerator Mass Spectrometry facility at the Physics Institute of Fluminense Federal University in Brazil, the Nuclear Chronology Laboratory—LACRON. The sample preparation laboratory is ready to perform chemical treatment through graphitization and the acquisition of a Single Stage Accelerator Mass Spectrometry System is in progress. LACRON will be the first independent laboratory to perform the 14C-AMS technique not only in Brazil but in Latin America.

  11. Motion and Stress Analysis of Cam System for Marine Diesel Engine 93 KW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dhani Setiawan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The developments of maritime sector in Indonesia shows increasing demand for ships. Especially ships with size of 30 GT has problem with low availability of the ship engine, which most of the ships still use non marine diesel engine as its main propulsion. The problem gives interest to make a step to improve by design marine diesel engine using reverse engineering method. Cam system of marine diesel engine design was needed to be calculate to select the material and the motion. The design of cam system needs study about the stress analysis in cam system to make sure the distribution of force and moment. The result of stress analysis was used to select material of components in cam system. The motion analysis result was used to be input data of stress analysis. The condition to obtain the stress of components was on maximum condition, its contain pressure, torque, rotation, and force. All component that calculated are camshaft, lifter (flat-tappet, push rod, rocker arm, spring, and valve. Each component was given two different materials and material selection was based on safety factor of each component. Material for camshaft and lifter were malleable cast iron, for push rod and rocker arm were mild steel, for spring was ASTM A231, for intake valve was steel JIS SUH3, and for exhaust valve was steel JIS SUH35. The result of motion analysis were angular velocity of camshaft with value was 2400 deg/sec, friction force between camshaft and lifter with maximum value was 125.393 N, and contact force between camshaft and lifter with maximum value was 845.307 N, and linear velocity of intake valve with maximum value was 696.573 mm/s, and linear velocity of exhaust valve was 463.734 mm/s.

  12. SOD activity in cam plant kalanchoe daigremontiana exposed to S02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Miszalski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Kalanchoe daigremontiana CAM plants exhibit very low sensitivity to the action of sulphite dioxide. Fumigation for a week with 3 ppm SO2 leads to an increase in the dismutation rate of the oxygen radical expressed in units of SOD activity and an increase in SOD activity itself. This strong increase disappears 100 h after fumigation. A transient increase in SOD activity represents an adaptation mechanism to oxidative stress caused by SO2.

  13. Case studies in therapeutic SenseCam use aimed at identity maintenance in early stage dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Piasek, Paulina

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of a medical cure for memory loss new technologies specialised in pervasive imaging are being incorporated into interventions for dementia. The practice of lifelogging is a digital capture of life experiences typically through mobile devices such as SenseCam. The lightweight wearable digital camera passively captures about 3,000 images a day. Lifelogging results in personal, recent prompts, potentially encouraging sharing of personal memories. This research investigated the i...

  14. In Vitro Characterization of Thermostable CAM Rubisco Activase Reveals a Rubisco Interacting Surface Loop1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivhare, Devendra

    2017-01-01

    To maintain metabolic flux through the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle in higher plants, dead-end inhibited complexes of Rubisco must constantly be engaged and remodeled by the molecular chaperone Rubisco activase (Rca). In C3 plants, the thermolability of Rca is responsible for the deactivation of Rubisco and reduction of photosynthesis at moderately elevated temperatures. We reasoned that crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants must possess thermostable Rca to support Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle flux during the day when stomata are closed. A comparative biochemical characterization of rice (Oryza sativa) and Agave tequilana Rca isoforms demonstrated that the CAM Rca isoforms are approximately10°C more thermostable than the C3 isoforms. Agave Rca also possessed a much higher in vitro biochemical activity, even at low assay temperatures. Mixtures of rice and agave Rca form functional hetero-oligomers in vitro, but only the rice isoforms denature at nonpermissive temperatures. The high thermostability and activity of agave Rca mapped to the N-terminal 244 residues. A Glu-217-Gln amino acid substitution was found to confer high Rca activity to rice Rca. Further mutational analysis suggested that Glu-217 restricts the flexibility of the α4-β4 surface loop that interacts with Rubisco via Lys-216. CAM plants thus promise to be a source of highly functional, thermostable Rca candidates for thermal fortification of crop photosynthesis. Careful characterization of their properties will likely reveal further protein-protein interaction motifs to enrich our mechanistic model of Rca function. PMID:28546437

  15. Evaluation of the effectiveness of training on a machine with a variable-cam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanik, Czesław; Staniszewski, Michał; Mastalerz, Andrzej; Karczewska, Magdalena; Lutosławska, Grażyna; Iwańska, Dagmara; Madej, Anna; Ostrowska, Elżbieta; Gwarek, Lucyna; Tkaczyk, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of the training of elbow flexors through the use of 2 machines, one of which was equipped with a disc plate of constant radius, the other one with a variable-cam having a radius adjustable to muscle strength. The experiment included 45 men divided into 3 equal groups: training group A (variable-cam), training group B (circle), and control group C. The training lasted for 8 weeks, 3 times a week. In order to control the effects, the values of peak torque and power of the flexor muscles of the elbow were isokinetically measured for the angular velocities of 30°/s and 60°/s. Also taken were anthropometric measurements of the arm and the creatine kinase (CK) activity in the blood plasma. As a result of the training, significant increases of biomechanical values were noted only in group A: power increased over 20%, the peak torque over 14%. After the training, significant increases of arm circumference in the relaxed position were noted in group A (17 mm), as well as in group B (11 mm). Also, some changes in CK activity were observed between Monday and Friday in a training week. On the basis of the experimental measurements, it may be ascertained that training elbow flexor muscles on a machine with a variable-cam is more efficient for increases in strength and power, as well as for some anthropometric parameters, than training on a machine with a disc plate.

  16. Plant state identification using fuzzy logic in the framework of computerized accident management support (CAMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, Claude

    1997-05-01

    CAMS (computerized accident management support) is a system that will provide assistance in case of accident in a nuclear power plant. In order to support the user in evaluating the plant state, it contains a state identification module. The state identification module provides high-level, qualitative information about the status of critical safety functions, about the availability of safety systems and about the occurrence of initiating events. This information is sent to the man-machine interface and to other CAMS modules. The state identification module is developed using a specific tool: GPS (Goal Processing System) which is based on the Goal Tree - Success Tree formalism. GPS is a tool designed to manage ''process related'' knowledge and aimed at process supervision via real-time acquisition of process variables. Fuzzy logic has been introduced in GPS in order to have smoother transitions between different states of critical safety functions and systems changes and to have a truth value associated to each piece of information provided to the user. The whole system has been tested, integrated with the rest of CAMS, on several accident scenarios. The test results are satisfactory. A brief comparison is made between the present work and previous related work at the HRP. (author)

  17. Femoroacetabular cam-type impingement: Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of radiographic views compared to radial MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domayer, S.E.; Ziebarth, K.; Chan, J.; Bixby, S.; Mamisch, T.C.; Kim, Y.J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively assess the diagnostic sensitivity of 45° Dunn view and cross-table lateral radiographs for the assessment of cam deformity by comparison with radial MRI. Materials and methods: 60 cases with radiographs (38 a–p and 45° Dunn views, 22 a–p and cross-table lateral views) and radial MRI were assessed. Alpha angle measurements were obtained both for radiographs and radial MRI. Statistics included frequency analysis, bivariate linear correlation analyses of MRI and radiograph measurements and cross-table analyses testing for the sensitivity and specificity of radiographs for the detection of an alpha angle larger than 55°. Results: 53.3% had the maximum alpha angle in the superior–anterior aspect of the femoral head–neck junction. Cam deformity was found in 45/60 cases (75%) in radial MRI. Pearson correlation demonstrated the Dunn view was most accurate for the superior–anterior aspect (.772, P < .001). The cross-table lateral views were best suited for the anterior–superior aspect (.511, P < .05). The sensitivity for cam deformity in the Dunn view was 96.4% vs. 70.6% in the cross-table lateral view. Conclusion: The 45° Dunn view can improve the first line of impingement diagnostics. Radial MRI however remains indispensable for pre-operative planning and the evaluation of symptomatic cases without obvious deformity.

  18. The effect of milling and postmilling procedures on the surface roughness of CAD/CAM materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Smidt, Laura Nunes; Fracasso, Lisiane Martins; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2017-11-12

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and analyze the surface topography of five different CAD/CAM ceramics and one CAD/CAM composite resin for CEREC after milling and postmilling procedures. Blocks of the ceramics Mark II, IPS Empress CAD, IPS e.max CAD, Suprinity and Enamic, and blocks of the composite resin Lava Ultimate were milled at CEREC MCXL. Ten flat samples of each material were obtained. The surface roughness (Ra) test was performed before and after milling, crystallization, polishing, and glaze when indicated, followed by SEM and AFM analysis. Data were submitted to one-way ANOVA with repeated measures and the Tukey HSD test (α = 0.05). The milling step significantly increased the roughness of all the tested materials (P CAD and Suprinity) were more suitable to roughness than the other tested materials (P CAD/CAM materials, that is, fully sintered, should be only hand polished. The glaze step can be suppressed resulting in time saving. However, the glaze step in soft-milling lithium disilicate is imperative. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. IOTA interferometer observations of the B[e] star/X-ray transient object CI Cam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thureau, N. D.; Traub, W.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Monnier, J. D.; Pedretti, E.; Berger, J.-P.; Schloerb, P.

    2005-12-01

    We present the results from an observing campaign on the star CI Cam carried out at the IOTA interferometer in November-December 2004 using the IONIC 3 telescope beam combiner in the H spectral band with projected baselines in the range 10-36m. CI Cam is a known B[e] star and X-ray transient source and has been intensively observed since its powerful X-ray, radio and optical outburst occurred in April 1998. Our visibility measurements put strong constraints on the nature of the source and we can rule out all existing SED models available in the literature. Our new results are in agreement with previous observations of CI Cam obtained with IOTA2 in the H and K' spectral bands in September-November 1998, indicating the infrared excess is long-lived and not directly associated with the outburst. We have explored new models that can better fit our observations. Additionally, we have measured small non-zero closure phases which are the signature of asymmetries in the brightness distribution function. Financial support for NDT is provided by the European Commission through a Marie Curie Outgoing International Fellowships MOIF-CT-2004-002990.

  20. Objective Tuning of Model Parameters in CAM5 Across Different Spatial Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Lucas, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Parameterizations of physical processes in climate models are highly dependent on the spatial and temporal resolution and must be tuned for each resolution under consideration. At high spatial resolutions, objective methods for parameter tuning are computationally prohibitive. Our work has focused on calibrating parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model 5 (CAM5) for three spatial resolutions: 1, 2, and 4 degrees. Using perturbed-parameter ensembles and uncertainty quantification methodology, we have identified input parameters that minimize discrepancies of energy fluxes simulated by CAM5 across the three resolutions and with respect to satellite observations. We are also beginning to exploit the parameter-resolution relationships to objectively tune parameters in a high-resolution version of CAM5 by leveraging cheaper, low-resolution simulations and statistical models. We will present our approach to multi-resolution climate model parameter tuning, as well as the key findings. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was supported from the DOE Office of Science through the Scientific Discovery Through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) project on Multiscale Methods for Accurate, Efficient, and Scale-Aware Models of the Earth System.

  1. Investigation of roughing machining simulation by using visual basic programming in NX CAM system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Mohamad, Mohamad; Nafis Osman Zahid, Muhammed

    2018-03-01

    This paper outlines a simulation study to investigate the characteristic of roughing machining simulation in 4th axis milling processes by utilizing visual basic programming in NX CAM systems. The selection and optimization of cutting orientation in rough milling operation is critical in 4th axis machining. The main purpose of roughing operation is to approximately shape the machined parts into finished form by removing the bulk of material from workpieces. In this paper, the simulations are executed by manipulating a set of different cutting orientation to generate estimated volume removed from the machine parts. The cutting orientation with high volume removal is denoted as an optimum value and chosen to execute a roughing operation. In order to run the simulation, customized software is developed to assist the routines. Operations build-up instructions in NX CAM interface are translated into programming codes via advanced tool available in the Visual Basic Studio. The codes is customized and equipped with decision making tools to run and control the simulations. It permits the integration with any independent program files to execute specific operations. This paper aims to discuss about the simulation program and identifies optimum cutting orientations for roughing processes. The output of this study will broaden up the simulation routines performed in NX CAM systems.

  2. Medical Ethnobotany in Europe: From Field Ethnography to a More Culturally Sensitive Evidence-Based CAM?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Quave

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available European folk medicine has a long and vibrant history, enriched with the various documented uses of local and imported plants and plant products that are often unique to specific cultures or environments. In this paper, we consider the medicoethnobotanical field studies conducted in Europe over the past two decades. We contend that these studies represent an important foundation for understanding local small-scale uses of CAM natural products and allow us to assess the potential for expansion of these into the global market. Moreover, we discuss how field studies of this nature can provide useful information to the allopathic medical community as they seek to reconcile existing and emerging CAM therapies with conventional biomedicine. This is of great importance not only for phytopharmacovigilance and managing risk of herb-drug interactions in mainstream patients that use CAM, but also for educating the medical community about ethnomedical systems and practices so that they can better serve growing migrant populations. Across Europe, the general status of this traditional medical knowledge is at risk due to acculturation trends and the urgency to document and conserve this knowledge is evident in the majority of the studies reviewed.

  3. Medical Ethnobotany in Europe: From Field Ethnography to a More Culturally Sensitive Evidence-Based CAM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quave, Cassandra L.; Pardo-de-Santayana, Manuel; Pieroni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    European folk medicine has a long and vibrant history, enriched with the various documented uses of local and imported plants and plant products that are often unique to specific cultures or environments. In this paper, we consider the medicoethnobotanical field studies conducted in Europe over the past two decades. We contend that these studies represent an important foundation for understanding local small-scale uses of CAM natural products and allow us to assess the potential for expansion of these into the global market. Moreover, we discuss how field studies of this nature can provide useful information to the allopathic medical community as they seek to reconcile existing and emerging CAM therapies with conventional biomedicine. This is of great importance not only for phytopharmacovigilance and managing risk of herb-drug interactions in mainstream patients that use CAM, but also for educating the medical community about ethnomedical systems and practices so that they can better serve growing migrant populations. Across Europe, the general status of this traditional medical knowledge is at risk due to acculturation trends and the urgency to document and conserve this knowledge is evident in the majority of the studies reviewed. PMID:22899952

  4. The development and nature of femoral head cam lesions following acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Onur; Foote, Julian; Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Datta, Gorav; Bircher, Martin D

    2014-01-01

    The aim of acetabular fracture fixation is to restore joint congruity with restoration of the articular surface. Poor outcomes are seen where this has not been achieved. Letournel reported a collarette osteophyte seen postoperatively in a proportion of patients, which he suggested was an early precursor to the development of osteoarthritis. This is a retrospective study of patients treated at a tertiary referral unit who developed this lesion. The triangular index was measured in 48 of these patients and then correlated with their clinical findings, Oxford Hip Score and the presence of osteoarthritis. Length of follow-up, fracture classification, and joint congruency were also recorded. Results showed a statistically significant relationship between cam lesion size and the development of osteoarthritis (P = 0.008), cam lesion size and length of follow-up (P = 0.01), and between groin pain and postoperative joint congruency (LR = 0.035). These findings suggest that the appearance of a cam lesion is a poor long-term prognostic marker for the development of osteoarthritis in patients with an acetabular fracture.

  5. CAD/CAM glass ceramics for single-tooth implant crowns: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Kvanç; Cavusoglu, Yeliz; Sagirkaya, Elcin; Aybar, Buket; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the load distribution of CAD/CAM mono-ceramic crowns supported with single-tooth implants in functional area. A 3-dimensional numerical model of a soft tissue-level implant was constructed with cement-retained abutment to support glass ceramic machinable crown. Implant-abutment complex and the retained crown were embedded in a Ø 1.5 × 1.5 cm geometric matrix for evaluation of mechanical behavior of mono-ceramic CAD/CAM aluminosilicate and leucite glass crown materials. Laterally positioned axial load of 300 N was applied on the crowns. Resulting principal stresses in the mono-ceramic crowns were evaluated in relation to different glass ceramic materials. The highest compressive stresses were observed at the cervical region of the buccal aspect of the crowns and were 89.98 and 89.99 MPa, for aluminosilicate and leucite glass ceramics, respectively. The highest tensile stresses were observed at the collar of the lingual part of the crowns and were 24.54 and 25.39 MPa, respectively. Stresses induced upon 300 N static loading of CAD/CAM aluminosalicate and leucite glass ceramics are below the compressive strength of the materials. Impact loads may actuate the progress to end failure of mono-ceramic crowns supported by metallic implant abutments.

  6. A CNES remote operations center for the MSL ChemCam instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lafaille, Vivian [CNES; Lorgny, Eric [CNES; Baroukh, Julien [CNES; Gaboriaud, Alain [CNES; Saccoccio, Muriel [CNES; Perez, Rene [CNES; Gasnault, Olivier [CNRS/CESR; Maurice, Sylvestre [CNRS/CESR; Blaney, Diana [JPL

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, a CNES remote operations center in Toulouse will be involved in the tactical operations of a Martian rover in order to operate the ChemCam science instrument in the framework of the NASA MSL (Mars Science Laboratory) mission in 2012. CNES/CESR and LANL have developed and delivered to JPL the ChemCam (Chemistry Camera) instrument located on the top of mast and in the body of the rover. This instrument incorporates a Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) and a Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) for determining elemental compositions of rock targets or soil samples at remote distances from the rover (2-7 m). An agreement has been achieved for operating ChemCam, alternatively, from Toulouse (FR) and Los Alamos (NM, USA), through the JPL ground data system in Pasadena (CA, USA) for a complete Martian year (2 years on Earth). After a brief overview of the MSL mission, this paper presents the instrument, the mission operational system and JPL organization requirements for the scientific investigators (PI and Co-Is). This paper emphasizes innovations applied on the ground segment components and on the operational approach to satisfy the requirements and constraints due to these shared and distributed operations over the world.

  7. Color stability of CAD/CAM Zirconia ceramics following exposure to acidic and staining drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Marco; Cavallo, Marco; Miegge, Matteo; Dagna, Alberto; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the color stability of CAD/CAM Zirconia ceramics following exposure to acidic drink (Coca Cola) and after exposure to staining solution (coffee). Material and Methods All the samples were immersed in different staining solutions over a 28-day test period. A colorimetric evaluation according to the CIE L*a*b* system was performed by a blind trained operator at 7, 14, 21, 28 days of the staining process. Shapiro Wilk test and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA were applied to assess significant differences among restorative materials. Paired t-test was applied to test which CIE L*a*b* parameters significantly changed after immersion in staining solutions. Results One week immersion in acidic drink did not cause a perceivable discoloration for all restorative materials (ΔE < 3.3). Subsequent immersion in coffee affected color stability of all Zirconia samples, even if Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA found significant differences among the various restorative materials. Conclusions The ∆Es of CAD/CAM Zirconia ceramics after immersion in coffee varied among the products, but color integrity is not affected by contact with acidic drinks. Key words:CAD/CAM restorative materials, CIE Lab, Zirconia ceramics. PMID:29302281

  8. 3D-WOVEN FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE FOR CAD/CAM DENTAL APPLICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Richard; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-woven noncrimp fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) was tested for mechanical properties in the two principal directions of the main XY plane and compared to different Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Machining (CAD/CAM) Dental Materials. The Dental Materials included ceramic with Vitablock Mark II®, ProCAD®, InCeram® Spinel, InCeram® Alumina and InCeram® Zirconia in addition to a resin-based 3M Corp. Paradigm® particulate-filled composite. Alternate material controls included Coors 300 Alumina Ceramic and a tungsten carbide 22% cobalt cermet. The 3D-woven FRC was vacuum assisted resin transfer molding processed as a one-depth-thickness ~19-mm preform with a vinyl-ester resin and cut into blocks similar to the commercial CAD/CAM Dental Materials. Mechanical test samples prepared for a flexural three-point span length of 10.0 mm were sectioned for minimum-depth cuts to compare machinability and fracture resistance between groups. 3D-woven FRC improved mechanical properties with significant statistical differences over all CAD/CAM Dental Materials and Coors Alumina Ceramic for flexural strength (p<0.001), resilience (p<0.05), work of fracture (p<0.001), strain energy release (p<0.05), critical stress intensity factor (p<0.001) and strain (p<0.001).

  9. Usability of Calibrating Monitor for Soft Proof According to CIE CAM02 Colour Appearance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoljub Novakovic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Colour appearance models describe viewing conditions and enable simulating appearance of colours under different illuminants and illumination levels according to human perception. Since it is possible to predict how colour would look like when different illuminants are used, colour appearance models are incorporated in some monitor profiling software. Owing to these software, tone reproduction curve can be defined by taking into consideration viewing condition in which display is observed. In this work assessment of CIE CAM02 colour appearance model usage at calibrating LCD monitor for soft proof was tested in order to determine which tone reproduction curve enables better reproduction of colour. Luminance level was kept constant, whereas tone reproduction curves determined by gamma values and by parameters of CIE CAM02 model were varied. Testing was conducted in case where physical print reference is observed under illuminant which has colour temperature according to iso standard for soft-proofing (D50 and also for illuminants D65.  Based on the results of calibrations assessment, subjective and objective assessment of created profiles, as well as on the perceptual test carried out on human observers, differences in image display were defined and conclusions of the adequacy of CAM02 usage at monitor calibration for each of the viewing conditions reached.

  10. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yinglong [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  11. Effects of light intensity on the morphology and CAM photosynthesis of Vanilla planifolia Andrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Claudia Díez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanilla planifolia is a neotropical orchid, whose fruits produce the natural vanilla, a fundamental ingredient for the food and cosmetic industry. Because of its importance in the world market, it is cultivated in many tropical countries and recently its cultivation has started in Colombia. This species requires shade for its development; however, the optimal of light conditions are unknown. This work evaluates the effect of different light intensities on