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Sample records for calmodulin link brain-derived

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 activity in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanquet, P R; Lamour, Y

    1997-09-26

    Here we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates both the phosphorylation of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CaMK2) and its kinase activity in rat hippocampal slices. In addition, we find that: (i) the time course of BDNF action is not accompanied by a change in the spectrum of either alpha- and beta-subunits of CaMK2 detected by immunoblotting; (ii) both treatment of solubilized CaMK2 with alkaline phosphatase and treatment of immunoprecipitated CaMK2 with protein phosphatase 1 reverse phosphorylation and activation of the kinase; (iii) phospholipase C inhibitor D609 and intracellular Ca2+ chelation by 1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N",N',-tetracetic acid tetra(acetoxymethyl)ester or 8-(diethylamino)octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate but not omission of Ca2+ or Ca2+ chelation by EGTA, abolish the stimulatory effect of BDNF on phosphorylation and activation of CaMK2. These results strongly suggest that the conversion of CaMK2 into its active, autophosphorylated form, but not its concentration, is increased by BDNF via stimulation of phospholipase C and subsequent intracellular Ca2+ mobilization.

  2. Brain derived neurotrophic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchelmore, Cathy; Gede, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies are curre......Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin with important functions in neuronal development and neuroplasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in BDNF expression levels underlie a variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders. Indeed, BDNF therapies...

  3. High-flavonoid intake induces cognitive improvements linked to changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Two randomised, controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshatdoust, Sara; Saunders, Caroline; Castle, Sophie M.; Vauzour, David; Williams, Claire; Butler, Laurie; Lovegrove, Julie A.; Spencer, Jeremy P. E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent clinical studies have indicated the beneficial impact of dietary flavonoid intake on human cognitive performance. Although the mechanisms that mediate such improvements are currently unclear, animal and human trial data suggest that changes in neurotrophin expression, and related signalling apparatus, may be involved. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the link between changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and changes in human cognitive performance following flavonoid intake. METHODS: The relationship between serum levels of BDNF and age, gender, BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure and cognition at baseline, and following flavonoid intake, was investigated in two distinct randomised, controlled clinical trials. Trial 1 was conducted in men and women (aged 26–70 y; consuming an average of 3 portions of fruit and vegetables per day) and delivered high-flavonoid (>15 mg/100 g) or low-flavonoid (flavanol cocoa drink (494 mg total flavanols) and a low-flavanol cocoa drink (23 mg total flavanols) for 12 weeks. RESULTS: Serum BDNF levels increased linearly to the age of 65, after which BDNF levels were found to decrease markedly. All other physiological and anthropometric measurements proved to not be significantly associated with serum BDNF levels (p > 0.05), although higher levels in males compared to females almost achieved significance (p = 0.056). At baseline, higher serum BDNF levels were associated with significantly better global cognition scores, relative to individuals with lower serum levels. In addition, following intervention for 18 weeks, high-flavonoid, but not low-flavonoid, fruit and vegetable intake induced significant improvements in cognitive performance and increases in serum BDNF levels (p = Flavanol intervention for 12 weeks also resulted in significant increases in serum BDNF (p = flavanols were paralleled by concurrent changes in serum BDNF levels, suggesting a role for BDNF in

  4. Development of a novel photoreactive calmodulin derivative: Cross-linking of purified adenylate cyclase from bovine brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.K.; Lawton, R.G.; Gnegy, M.E. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1989-07-11

    A novel photoreactive calmodulin (CaM) derivative was developed and used to label the purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex. {sup 125}I-CaM was conjugated with the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent p-nitrophenyl 3-diazopyruvate (DAPpNP). Spectral data indicated that diazopyruvoyl (DAP) groups were incorporated into the CaM molecule. Iodo-CaM-DAPs behaved like native CaM with respect to (1) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and (2) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP photochemically cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a manner that was both Ca{sup 2+} dependent and CaM specific. Photolysis of forskolin-agarose-purified adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex with {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP produced a single cross-linked product which migrates on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 140,000.

  5. Development of a novel photoreactive calmodulin derivative: cross-linking of purified adenylate cyclase from bovine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, J K; Lawton, R G; Gnegy, M E

    1989-07-11

    A novel photoreactive calmodulin (CaM) derivative was developed and used to label the purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex. 125I-CaM was conjugated with the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent p-nitrophenyl 3-diazopyruvate (DAPpNP). Spectral data indicated that diazopyruvoyl (DAP) groups were incorporated into the CaM molecule. Iodo-CaM-DAPs behaved like native CaM with respect to (1) Ca2+-dependent enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and (2) Ca2+-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. 125I-CaM-DAP photochemically cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a manner that was both Ca2+ dependent and CaM specific. Photolysis of forskolin-agarose-purified adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex with 125I-CaM-DAP produced a single cross-linked product which migrates on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 140,000.

  6. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürstenbinder, Katharina; Möller, Birgit; Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-03-01

    Calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca 2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca 2+ -CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca 2+ -dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca 2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. The IQD Family of Calmodulin-Binding Proteins Links Calcium Signaling to Microtubules, Membrane Subdomains, and the Nucleus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plötner, Romina; Stamm, Gina; Hause, Gerd; Mitra, Dipannita; Abel, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling and dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton are essential processes for the coordination and control of plant cell shape and cell growth. Calmodulin (CaM) and closely related calmodulin-like (CML) polypeptides are principal sensors of Ca2+ signals. CaM/CMLs decode and relay information encrypted by the second messenger via differential interactions with a wide spectrum of targets to modulate their diverse biochemical activities. The plant-specific IQ67 DOMAIN (IQD) family emerged as possibly the largest class of CaM-interacting proteins with undefined molecular functions and biological roles. Here, we show that the 33 members of the IQD family in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) differentially localize, using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged proteins, to multiple and distinct subcellular sites, including microtubule (MT) arrays, plasma membrane subdomains, and nuclear compartments. Intriguingly, the various IQD-specific localization patterns coincide with the subcellular patterns of IQD-dependent recruitment of CaM, suggesting that the diverse IQD members sequester Ca2+-CaM signaling modules to specific subcellular sites for precise regulation of Ca2+-dependent processes. Because MT localization is a hallmark of most IQD family members, we quantitatively analyzed GFP-labeled MT arrays in Nicotiana benthamiana cells transiently expressing GFP-IQD fusions and observed IQD-specific MT patterns, which point to a role of IQDs in MT organization and dynamics. Indeed, stable overexpression of select IQD proteins in Arabidopsis altered cellular MT orientation, cell shape, and organ morphology. Because IQDs share biochemical properties with scaffold proteins, we propose that IQD families provide an assortment of platform proteins for integrating CaM-dependent Ca2+ signaling at multiple cellular sites to regulate cell function, shape, and growth. PMID:28115582

  8. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  9. Measurements of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Klein, Anders Bue; Vinberg, Maj

    2007-01-01

    Although numerous studies have dealt with changes in blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), methodological issues about BDNF measurements have only been incompletely resolved. We validated BDNF ELISA with respect to accuracy, reproducibility and the effect of storage and repeated freezing...

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in megakaryocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Chacon Fernandez, Pedro; Sauberli, Katharina; Colzani, Maria; Moreau, Thomas; Ghevaert, Cedric; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has thus far been examined in neurons where it is expressed at very low levels, in an activity-dependent fashion. In humans, BDNF has long been known to accumulate in circulating platelets, at levels far higher than in the brain. During the process of blood coagulation, BDNF is released from platelets, which has led to its extensive use as a readily accessible biomarker, under the assumption that serum levels may somehow ...

  11. The Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Personality

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Montag

    2014-01-01

    The study of the biological basis of personality is a timely research endeavor, with the aim of deepening our understanding of human nature. In recent years, a growing body of research has investigated the role of the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the context of individual differences across human beings, with a focus on personality traits. A large number of different approaches have been chosen to illuminate the role of BDNF for personality, ranging from the measurement of BDNF...

  12. Human obesity associated with an intronic SNP in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 ...

  13. The Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Montag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the biological basis of personality is a timely research endeavor, with the aim of deepening our understanding of human nature. In recent years, a growing body of research has investigated the role of the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the context of individual differences across human beings, with a focus on personality traits. A large number of different approaches have been chosen to illuminate the role of BDNF for personality, ranging from the measurement of BDNF in the serum/plasma to molecular genetics to (genetic brain imaging. The present review provides the reader with an overview of the current state of affairs in the context of BDNF and personality.

  14. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Megakaryocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Fernández, Pedro; Säuberli, Katharina; Colzani, Maria; Moreau, Thomas; Ghevaert, Cedric; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2016-05-06

    The biosynthesis of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has thus far been examined in neurons where it is expressed at very low levels, in an activity-dependent fashion. In humans, BDNF has long been known to accumulate in circulating platelets, at levels far higher than in the brain. During the process of blood coagulation, BDNF is released from platelets, which has led to its extensive use as a readily accessible biomarker, under the assumption that serum levels may somehow reflect brain levels. To identify the cellular origin of BDNF in platelets, we established primary cultures of megakaryocytes, the progenitors of platelets, and we found that human and rat megakaryocytes express the BDNF gene. Surprisingly, the pattern of mRNA transcripts is similar to neurons. In the presence of thapsigargin and external calcium, the levels of the mRNA species leading to efficient BDNF translation rapidly increase. Under these conditions, pro-BDNF, the obligatory precursor of biologically active BDNF, becomes readily detectable. Megakaryocytes store BDNF in α-granules, with more than 80% of them also containing platelet factor 4. By contrast, BDNF is undetectable in mouse megakaryocytes, in line with the absence of BDNF in mouse serum. These findings suggest that alterations of BDNF levels in human serum as reported in studies dealing with depression or physical exercise may primarily reflect changes occurring in megakaryocytes and platelets, including the ability of the latter to retain and release BDNF. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Neuronal survival induced by neurotrophins requires calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Joaquim; Espinet, Carme; Soler, Rosa M.; Dolcet, Xavier; Yuste, Víctor J.; Encinas, Mario; Iglesias, Montserrat; Rocamora, Nativitat; Comella, Joan X.

    2001-01-01

    It has been reported that phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) and its downstream target, protein kinase B (PKB), play a central role in the signaling of cell survival triggered by neurotrophins (NTs). In this report, we have analyzed the involvement of Ca2+ and calmodulin (CaM) in the activation of the PKB induced by NTs. We have found that reduction of intracellular Ca2+ concentration or functional blockade of CaM abolished NGF-induced activation of PKB in PC12 cells. Similar results were obtained in cultures of chicken spinal cord motoneurons treated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Moreover, CaM inhibition prevented the cell survival triggered by NGF or BDNF. This effect was counteracted by the transient expression of constitutive active forms of the PKB, indicating that CaM regulates NT-induced cell survival through the activation of the PKB. We have investigated the mechanisms whereby CaM regulates the activation of the PKB, and we have found that CaM was necessary for the proper generation and/or accumulation of the products of the PI 3-kinase in intact cells. PMID:11489918

  16. A link of Ca2+ to cAMP oscillations in Dictyostelium: the calmodulin antagonist W-7 potentiates cAMP relay and transiently inhibits the acidic Ca2+-store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malchow Dieter

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During early differentiation of Dictyostelium the attractant cAMP is released periodically to induce aggregation of the cells. Here we pursue the question whether pulsatile cAMP signaling is coupled to a basic Ca2+-oscillation. Results We found that the calmodulin antagonist W-7 transiently enhanced cAMP spikes. We show that W-7 acts on an acidic Ca2+-store: it abolished ATP-dependent vesicular acidification, inhibited V-type H+ATPase activity more potently than the weaker antagonist W-5 and caused vesicular Ca2+-leakage. Concanamycin A, an inhibitor of the V-type H+-pump, blocked the Ca2+-leakage elicited by W-7 as well as cAMP-oscillations in the presence of W-7. Concanamycin A caused an increase of the cytosolic Ca2+-concentration whereas W-7 did not. In case of the latter, Ca2+ was secreted by the cells. In accord with our hypothesis that the link from Ca2+ to cAMP synthesis is mediated by a Ca2+-dependent phospholipase C we found that W-7 was not active in the phospholipase C knockout mutant. Conclusion We conclude that the potentiation of cAMP relay by W-7 is due to a transient inhibition of the acidic Ca2+-store. The inhibition of the proton pump by W-7 causes a leakage of Ca2+ that indirectly stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity via phospholipase C.

  17. Elevated levels of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor in rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2014-01-01

    Impaired neuroplasticity may be implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, involving peripheral alterations of the neurotrophins brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3). Evidence is limited by methodological issues and is based primarily on case-control desi......Impaired neuroplasticity may be implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, involving peripheral alterations of the neurotrophins brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3). Evidence is limited by methodological issues and is based primarily on case...... were measured in 37 rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients and in 40 age- and gender matched healthy control subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In a longitudinal design, repeated measurements of BDNF and NT-3 were evaluated in various affective states in bipolar disorder...

  18. Genetic moderation of child maltreatment effects on depression and internalizing symptoms by serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter (NET), and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) genes in African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

    2014-11-01

    Genetic moderation of the effects of child maltreatment on depression and internalizing symptoms was investigated in a sample of low-income maltreated and nonmaltreated African American children (N = 1,096). Lifetime child maltreatment experiences were independently coded from Child Protective Services records and maternal report. Child depression and internalizing problems were assessed in the context of a summer research camp by self-report on the Children's Depression Inventory and adult counselor report on the Teacher Report Form. DNA was obtained from buccal cell or saliva samples and genotyped for polymorphisms of the following genes: serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), norepinephrine transporter, and corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1. Analyses of covariance with age and gender as covariates were conducted, with maltreatment status and respective polymorphism as main effects and their Gene × Environment (G × E) interactions. Maltreatment consistently was associated with higher Children's Depression Inventory and Teacher Report Form symptoms. The results for child self-report symptoms indicated a G × E interaction for BDNF and maltreatment. In addition, BDNF and triallelic 5-HTTLPR interacted with child maltreatment in a G × G × E interaction. Analyses for counselor report of child anxiety/depression symptoms on the Teacher Report Form indicated moderation of child maltreatment effects by triallelic 5-HTTLPR. These effects were elaborated based on variation in developmental timing of maltreatment experiences. Norepinephrine transporter was found to further moderate the G × E interaction of 5-HTTLPR and maltreatment status, revealing a G × G × E interaction. This G × G × E was extended by consideration of variation in maltreatment subtype experiences. Finally, G × G × E effects were observed for the co-action of BDNF and the corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: role in depression and suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Dwivedi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Yogesh DwivediPsychiatric Institute, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: Depression and suicidal behavior have recently been shown to be associated with disturbances in structural and synaptic plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, one of the major neurotrophic factors, plays an important role in the maintenance and survival of neurons and in synaptic plasticity. Several lines of evidence suggest that BDNF is involved in depression, such that the expression of BDNF is decreased in depressed patients. In addition, antidepressants up-regulate the expression of BDNF. This has led to the proposal of the “neurotrophin hypothesis of depression”. Increasing evidence demonstrates that suicidal behavior is also associated with lower expression of BDNF, which may be independent from depression. Recent genetic studies also support a link of BDNF to depression/suicidal behavior. Not only BDNF, but abnormalities in its cognate receptor tropomycin receptor kinase B (TrkB and its splice variant (TrkB.T1 have also been reported in depressed/suicidal patients. It has been suggested that epigenetic modulation of the Bdnf and Trkb genes may contribute to their altered expression and functioning. More recently, impairment in the functioning of pan75 neurotrophin receptor has been reported in suicide brain specimens. pan75 neurotrophin receptor is a low-affinity neurotrophin receptor that, when expressed in conjunction with low availability of neurotropins/Trks, induces apoptosis. Overall, these studies suggest the possibility that BDNF and its mediated signaling may participate in the pathophysiology of depression and suicidal behavior. This review focuses on the critical evidence demonstrating the involvement of BDNF in depression and suicide.Keywords: BDNF, neurotrophins, p75NTR, Trk receptor, depression, antidepressants, suicide, genetics, epigenetics

  20. Phencyclidine rapidly decreases neuronal mRNA of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katanuma, Yusuke; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Adachi, Naoki; Yamamoto, Noriko; Ooshima, Yoshiko; Odaka, Haruki; Inoue, Takafumi; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of neurotrophin family, has been implicated in psychiatric diseases including schizophrenia. However, detailed mechanisms of its reduction in patients with schizophrenia remain unclear. Here, using cultured cortical neurons, we monitored BDNF mRNA levels following acute application of phencyclidine [PCP; an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker], which is known to produce schizophrenia-like symptoms. We found that PCP rapidly caused a reduction in total amount of BDNF transcripts without effect on cell viability, while mRNA levels of nerve growth factor was intact. Actinomycin-D (ActD), an RNA synthesis inhibitor, decreased total BDNF mRNA levels similar to PCP, and coapplication of ActD with PCP did not show further reduction in BDNF mRNA compared with solo application of each drug. Among BDNF exons I, IV, and VI, the exon IV, which is positively regulated by neuronal activity, was highly sensitive to PCP. Furthermore, PCP inactivated cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB; a regulator of transcriptional activity of exon IV). The inactivation of CREB was also achieved by an inhibitor for Ca(2+) /calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), although coapplication with PCP induced no further inhibition on the CREB activity. It is possible that PCP decreases BDNF transcription via blocking the NMDA receptor/CaMKII/CREB signaling. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Edaravone Enhances Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Production in the Ischemic Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Okuyama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Edaravone, a clinical drug used to treat strokes, protects against neuronal cell death and memory loss in the ischemic brains of animal models through its antioxidant activity. In the present study, we subcutaneously administrated edaravone to mice (3 mg/kg/day for three days immediately after bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, and revealed through an immunohistochemical analysis that edaravone (1 accelerated increases in the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus; (2 increased the number of doublecortin-positive neuronal precursor cells in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone; and (3 suppressed the ischemia-induced inactivation of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus. We also revealed through a Western blotting analysis that edaravone (4 induced the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding (CREB, a transcription factor that regulates BDNF gene expression; and (5 induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, an upstream signal factor of CREB. These results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of edaravone following brain ischemia were mediated not only by the elimination of oxidative stress, but also by the induction of BDNF production.

  2. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    The transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, ...

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in asthmatic children | Salama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates the cross-talk between the immune and nervous systems which may play an important role in asthma pathophysiology. Objective: This study was aimed to investigate the relation between BDNF and asthma exacerbation and severity, and to study its possible ...

  4. Possible involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in the development of various non-neuronal tissues, as the reproductive system. BDNF transcript and protein has been detected in testis and sperms. The present work aimed to assess the possible involvement of BDNF mRNA expression in sperm functions, hormonal ...

  5. Determinants of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, B.A.A.; Molendijk, M.L.; Penninx, B.J.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Kenis, G.; Prickaerts, J.; Elzinga, B.M.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) belongs to the neurotrophin family of growth factors and affects the survival and plasticity of neurons in the adult central nervous system. The high correlation between cortical and serum BDNF levels has led to many human studies on BDNF levels

  6. Determinants of serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, B. A. A.; Molendijk, M. L.; Penninx, B. J. W. H.; Buitelaar, J. K.; Kenis, G.; Prickaerts, J.; Elzinga, B. M.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) belongs to the neurotrophin family of growth factors and affects the survival and plasticity of neurons in the adult central nervous system. The high correlation between cortical and serum BDNF levels has led to many human studies on BDNF levels

  7. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, CREB and BDNF have emerged as molecules that may play an important role in modulating mood.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in asthmatic children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Neurotrophins represent candidate molecules regulating and controlling this cross-talk between the immune and nervous system3. Neurotrophins are a family of peptides that promote survival, growth and differentiation of neurons. They include; nerve growth factor (NGF), brain- derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and.

  9. Gray Matter Volume in Adolescent Anxiety: An Impact of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val[superscript 66]Met Polymorphism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sven C.; Aouidad, Aveline; Gorodetsky, Elena; Goldman, David; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Minimal research links anxiety disorders in adolescents to regional gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities and their modulation by genetic factors. Prior research suggests that a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) Val[superscript 66]Met polymorphism may modulate such brain morphometry profiles. Method: Using voxel-based…

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, K. S.; Nielsen, A. R.; Krogh-Madsen, R.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis  Decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and depression. These disorders are associated with type 2 diabetes, and animal models suggest that BDNF plays a role in insulin resistance. We therefore...... explored whether BDNF plays a role in human glucose metabolism. Subjects and methods  We included (Study 1) 233 humans divided into four groups depending on presence or absence of type 2 diabetes and presence or absence of obesity; and (Study 2) seven healthy volunteers who underwent both a hyperglycaemic...... and a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Results  Plasma levels of BDNF in Study 1 were decreased in humans with type 2 diabetes independently of obesity. Plasma BDNF was inversely associated with fasting plasma glucose, but not with insulin. No association was found between the BDNF G196A (Val66Met) polymorphism...

  11. Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, K; Vinberg, M; Kessing, L V

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker related to disease activity and neuroprogression in bipolar disorder, speculated to mirror alterations in brain expression of BDNF. The research area is rapidly evolving; however, recent...... investigations have yielded conflicting results with substantial variation in outcomes, highlighting the need to critically assess the state of current evidence. The aims of the study were to investigate differences in peripheral blood BDNF concentrations between bipolar disorder patients and healthy control......-November 2014) and PsycINFO (1806-November 2014), and 35 studies comprising a total of 3798 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The results indicated that crude peripheral blood BDNF levels may be lower in bipolar disorder patients overall (Hedges' g=-0.28, 95% CI: -0.51 to -0.04, P=0...

  12. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Alleviates Carbon Monoxide Poisoning-Induced Delayed Memory Impairment by Preserving Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Dependent Hippocampal Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Chung; Yang, San-Nan; Wu, Chih-Wei J; Chen, Lee-Wei; Chan, Julie Y H

    2016-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that hyperbaric oxygen therapy ameliorates delayed cognitive impairment after acute carbon monoxide poisoning by promoting neurogenesis through upregulating the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus. Laboratory animal experiments. University/Medical center research laboratory. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were divided into five groups: (1) non-carbon monoxide-treated control, (2) acute carbon monoxide poisoning, (3) acute carbon monoxide poisoning followed by 7-day hyperbaric oxygen treatment, (4) carbon monoxide + hyperbaric oxygen with additional intracerebroventricular infusion of Fc fragment of tyrosine kinase receptor B protein (TrkB-Fc) chimera, and (5) acute carbon monoxide poisoning followed by intracerebroventricular infusion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning was achieved by exposing the rats to carbon monoxide at 2,500 ppm for 40 minutes, followed by 3,000 ppm for 20 minutes. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (at 2.5 atmospheres absolute with 100% oxygen for 60 min) was conducted during the first 7 days after carbon monoxide poisoning. Recombinant human TrkB-Fc chimera or brain-derived neurotrophic factor was infused into the lateral ventricle via the implanted osmotic minipump. For labeling of mitotic cells in the hippocampus, bromodeoxyuridine was injected into the peritoneal cavity. Distribution of bromodeoxyuridine and two additional adult neurogenesis markers, Ki-67 and doublecortin, in the hippocampus was evaluated by immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence staining. Tissue level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cognitive behavior was evaluated by the use of eight-arm radial maze. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning significantly suppressed adult hippocampal neurogenesis evident by the reduction in number of bromodeoxyuridine-positive, Ki-67⁺, and doublecortin⁺ cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. This

  13. Altered Acoustic Startle Reflex, Prepulse Inhibition, and Peripheral Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Morphine Self-Administered Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bong Hyo; Park, Thomas Y; Lin, Erica; Li, He; Yang, Chae Ha; Choi, Kwang H

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies suggested that opiate withdrawal may increase anxiety and disrupt brain-derived neurotrophic factor function, but the effects of i.v. morphine self-administration on these measures remain unclear. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with a catheter in the jugular vein. After 1 week of recovery, the animals were allowed to self-administer either i.v. morphine (0.5 mg/kg per infusion, 4 h/d) or saline in the operant conditioning chambers. The acoustic startle reflex and prepulse inhibition were measured at a baseline and on self-administration days 1, 3, 5, and 7 (1- and 3-hour withdrawal). Blood samples were collected on self-administration days 3, 5, and 7 from separate cohorts of animals, and the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and corticosterone were assayed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Compared with the saline group, the morphine self-administration group showed hyper-locomotor activity and reduced defecation during the self-administration. The morphine self-administration increased acoustic startle reflex at 1-hour but not 3-hour withdrawal from morphine and disrupted prepulse inhibition at 3-hour but not 1-hour withdrawal. The blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were decreased in the morphine self-administration group at self-administration days 3 and 5, while the corticosterone levels remained unchanged throughout the study. The current findings suggest that spontaneous withdrawal from i.v. morphine self-administration may have transient effects on acoustic startle, sensorimotor gating, and peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, and these changes may contribute to the adverse effects of opiate withdrawal.

  14. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Avila, Jesus, E-mail: javila@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular ' Severo Ochoa' , CSIC/UAM, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  15. Isolation and purification of calmodulin from the shrimp, Crangon crangon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, R H; Pipkorn, R; Willig, A; Jaros, P P

    1992-01-01

    Calmodulin was isolated and purified from shrimp abdominal muscle by heat precipitation, ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. The purified calmodulin was homogeneous when evaluated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A still remaining contaminant was eliminated by high performance liquid chromatography on a phenyl column. The biological and physicochemical properties of shrimp calmodulin such as amino acid composition, molecular weight and the ability to activate calmodulin-deficient bovine heart phosphodiesterase were compared to those of other invertebrate calmodulins.

  16. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jôice Dias Corrêa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a member of the neurotrophic factor family. Outside the nervous system, BDNF has been shown to be expressed in various nonneural tissues, such as periodontal ligament, dental pulp, and odontoblasts. Although a role for BDNF in periodontal regeneration has been suggested, a function for BDNF in periodontal disease has not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the BDNF levels in periodontal tissues of patients with chronic periodontitis (CP and periodontally healthy controls (HC. All subjects were genotyped for the rs4923463 and rs6265 BDNF polymorphisms. Periodontal tissues were collected for ELISA, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and microscopic analysis from 28 CP patients and 29 HC subjects. BDNF levels were increased in CP patients compared to HC subjects. A negative correlation was observed when analyzing concentration of BDNF and IL-10 in inflamed periodontium. No differences in frequencies of BDNF genotypes between CP and HC subjects were observed. However, BDNF genotype GG was associated with increased levels of BDNF, TNF-α, and CXCL10 in CP patients. In conclusion, BDNF seems to be associated with periodontal disease process, but the specific role of BDNF still needs to be clarified.

  17. Analysis of transcriptional initiation and translatability of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNAs in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmusk, T; Persson, H; Metsis, M

    1994-08-15

    The rat brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene consists of four 5' exons linked to separate promoters and one 3' exon encoding the prepro-BDNF protein. In the present study, using RNase protection analysis, we show that the same major transcription initiation sites are used for each BDNF exon mRNA in different brain regions and that in addition to hippocampus and cerebral cortex, kainate differentially induces the expression of BDNF exon mRNAs in thalamus, cerebellum and striatum. The 4.2 kb transcripts, are less enriched in the polysomal fraction of rat brain than the shorter 1.6 kb transcripts suggesting their translational discrimination.

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor of the cerebral microvasculature: a forgotten and nitric oxide-dependent contributor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, A; Prigent-Tessier, A; Quirié, A; Bertrand, N; Savary, S; Gondcaille, C; Garnier, P; Demougeot, C; Marie, C

    2017-04-01

    Evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin largely involved in cognition, is expressed by cerebral endothelial cells led us to explore in rats the contribution of the cerebral microvasculature to BDNF found in brain tissue and the link between cerebrovascular nitric oxide (NO) and BDNF production. Brain BDNF protein levels were measured before and after in situ removal of the cerebral endothelium that was achieved by brain perfusion with a 0.2% CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulphonate) solution. BDNF protein and mRNA levels as well as levels of endothelial NO synthase phosphorylated at serine 1177 (P-eNOS ser1177 ) were measured in cerebral microvessel-enriched fractions. These fractions were also exposed to glycerol trinitrate. Hypertension (spontaneously hypertensive rats) and physical exercise training were used as experimental approaches to modulate cerebrovascular endothelial NO production. CHAPS perfusion resulted in a marked decrease in brain BDNF levels. Hypertension decreased and exercise increased P-eNOS ser1177 and BDNF protein levels. However, BDNF mRNA levels that were increased by exercise did not change after hypertension. Finally, in vitro exposure of cerebral microvessel-enriched fractions to glycerol trinitrate enhanced BDNF production. These data reveal that BDNF levels measured in brain homogenates correspond for a large part to BDNF present in cerebral endothelial cells and that cerebrovascular BDNF production is dependent on cerebrovascular endothelial eNOS activity. They provide a paradigm shift in the cellular source of brain BDNF and suggest a new approach to improve our understanding of the link between endothelial function and cognition. © 2016 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-({sup 125}I)-CaM-diazopyruvamide ({sup 125}I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca{sup 2+}-enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000.

  20. Repeated forced swimming impairs prepulse inhibition and alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor and astroglial parameters in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila Boque; Müller, Liz Girardi; Viana, Alice Fialho; Hertzfeldt, Vivian; Lunardi, Paula Santana; Zanotto, Caroline; Nardin, Patrícia; Ravazzolo, Ana Paula; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate perturbations and altered neurotrophin levels have been strongly associated with the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Environmental stress is a risk factor for mood disorders, disrupting glutamatergic activity in astrocytes in addition to cognitive behaviours. Despite the negative impact of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders on public health, the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress has yet to be fully elucidated. Exposure to repeated swimming has proven useful for evaluating the loss of cognitive function after pharmacological and behavioural interventions, but its effect on glutamate function has yet to be fully explored. In the present study, rats previously exposed to repeated forced swimming were evaluated using the novel object recognition test, object location test and prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. In addition, quantification of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein levels, glutamate uptake, glutathione, S100B, GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and calmodulin were evaluated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after various swimming time points. We found that swimming stress selectively impaired PPI but did not affect memory recognition. Swimming stress altered the frontal cortical and hippocampal BDNF expression and the activity of hippocampal astrocytes by reducing hippocampal glutamate uptake and enhancing glutathione content in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data support the assumption that astrocytes may regulate the activity of brain structures related to cognition in a manner that alters complex behaviours. Moreover, they provide new insight regarding the dynamics immediately after an aversive experience, such as after behavioural despair induction, and suggest that forced swimming can be employed to study altered glutamatergic activity and PPI disruption in rodents. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Cell type-specific regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in states of allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groneberg, D A; Fischer, T C; Peckenschneider, N; Noga, O; Dinh, Q T; Welte, T; Welker, P

    2007-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a molecule influencing neuronal proliferation and differentiation. In states of allergy, it may orchestrate inflammatory changes by linking the immune system with the nervous system. Because the precise regulation of gene transcription in mast cells MCs is not clear, the present studies assessed the gene regulation of BDNF in this inflammatory cell type. Transcriptional expression of BDNF in human skin was studied in isolated cells using RT-PCR. In situ lesional MC BDNF protein expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and related to the differential staining of MCs and functional effects of BDNF on HaCaT keratinocytes. BDNF mRNA expression was found in isolated human skin MCs, keratinocytes, and fibroblasts. Also, low levels were found in endothelial cells and melanocytes. BDNF protein expression was found in situ in lesional and non-lesional MCs. A significantly decreased expression of BDNF protein was found in atopic dermatitis lesional MCs when compared with control MC expression. Functional in vitro experiments demonstrated that a decrease in BDNF stimulation led to increased secretion rates for stem cell factor and IL-8 in HaCaT keratinocytes. The demonstration of a decreased level of BDNF gene transcription in lesional MCs points to a differential regulation of MC-released neutrotrophins in cutaneous allergic inflammation. Topically administered neurotrophin receptor-modulating compounds should be receptor target specific and not universally acting in diseases such as atopic dermatitis or allergic asthma.

  2. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on sperm quality of normozoospermic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Hassan; Khanlarkhani, Neda; Sobhani, Aligholi; Najafi, Atefeh; Amidi, Fardin

    2017-07-05

    The neurotrophin family of proteins and their receptors act as important proliferative and pro-survival factors in differentiation of nerve cells and are thought to play key roles in the development of reproductive tissues and normal function of spermatozoa. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) on the sperm viability and motility, lipid peroxidation (LPO), mitochondrial activity and concentration of leptin, nitric oxide (NO) and insulin in normozoospermic men. Semen samples from 20 normozoospermic men were divided into three groups: (i) control, (ii) BDNF and (iii) BDNF + K252a. BDNF and K252a were added in the dose of 0.133 and 0.1 nM, respectively. Viability was assessed by eosin-nigrosin staining technique, and motility was observed by microscopy. NO concentration and mitochondrial activity were measured with flow cytometry, and LPO was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Results showed that exogenous BDNF at 0.133 nM could significantly (p < 0.05) influence viability, motility, NO concentration, mitochondrial activity and LPO content. Secretions of insulin and leptin by human sperm were increased in cells exposed to the exogenous BDNF, whereas viability, mitochondrial activity and insulin and leptin secretions were decreased in cells exposed to the K252.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plasma concentration in patients diagnosed with premature ovarian insufficiency (POI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzyk, Adam; Filipowicz, Dorota; Podfigurna, Agnieszka; Ptas, Paula; Piestrzynska, Malgorzata; Smolarczyk, Roman; Genazzani, Andrea R; Meczekalski, Blazej

    2017-05-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is defined as a cessation of function of ovaries in women younger than 40 years old. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a protein critically involved in neuronal growth and metabolism. BDNF also has been shown to be important regulator of oocyte maturation. Recent data show that BDNF can be potentially involved in POI pathology. The aim of the study was to assess the BDNF plasma concentrations in patients diagnosed with idiopathic POI. 23 women diagnosed with POI (age 31 ± 7 years) and 18 (age 31 ± 3) controls were included to the study, matched according to age and body mass index. The BDNF concentrations were measured using competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Hormonal and metabolic parameters were measured in all individuals, in controls in late follicular phase. The POI group demonstrated lower mean plasma concentrations of BDNF (429.25 ± 65.52 pg/ml) in comparison to healthy controls (479.75 ± 34.75 pg/ml, p = 0.0345). The BDNF plasma concentration correlated negatively (R = -0.79, p BDNF and progesterone in controls. In conclusion, POI patients show significantly lower BDNF plasma concentration and it correlates with the duration of amenorrhea. This observation brings important potential insights to the pathology of POI.

  4. The effect of physical activity on the brain derived neurotrophic factor: from animal to human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, J A; Pilc, A

    2010-10-01

    It is well documented that physical activity can induce a number of various stimuli which are able to enhance the strength and endurance performance of muscles. Moreover, regular physical activity can preserve or delay the appearance of several metabolic disorders in the human body. Physical exercise is also known to enhance the mood and cognitive functions of active people, although the physiological backgrounds of these effects remain unclear. In recent years, since the pioneering study in the past showed that physical activity increases the expression of the brain derived neurothophic factor (BDNF) in the rat brain, a number of studies were undertaken in order to establish the link between that neurothrophin and post-exercise enhancement of mood and cognitive functions in humans. It was recently demonstrated that physical exercise can increase plasma and/or serum BDNF concentration in humans. It was also reported that physical exercise or electrical stimulation can increase the BDNF expression in the skeletal muscles. In the present review, we report the current state of research concerning the effect of a single bout of exercise and training on the BDNF expression in the brain, in both the working muscles as well as on its concentrations in the blood. We have concluded that there may be potential benefits of the exercise-induced enhancement of the BDNF expression and release in the brain as well as in the peripheral tissues, resulting in the improvement of the functioning of the body, although this effect, especially in humans, requires more research.

  5. [Construction and expression of recombinant adeno-associated virus expressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiming; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Feng; Wei, Fang; Chen, Xiafang; Wu, Xiaobing; Huang, Qian

    2008-02-01

    A fusion gene called Ig-BDNF, in which brain-derived neurotrophic factor cDNA fused to the 3' end of signal peptide of Ig coding sequence, was constructed by PCR, digested and subcloned into shuttle plasmid pSNAV to obtain a recombinant plasmid pSNAV-Ig-BDNF. Then the plasmid encoding fusion protein was transfected into 293 cell lines and the stably transfected clones were selected with neomycin. AAV1 containing Ig-BDNF fusion gene vectors were obtained by super-infection by Herpes virus. The resultant adeno-associated virus vectors AAV-Ig-BDNF were confirmed by PCR, Western blotting and a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) after infection of 293 cell lines. The results indicated that AAV-Ig-BDNF contained the target gene, and infected cells and produced the fusion protein into the supernatant. The content of BDNF in medium per 5x104 cells over a 24 h incubation period reached 1000 pg/mL. With the help of non-replicative adenovirus during AAV-Ig-BDNF infection, the expression of BDNF increased 7-8 fold, and the enhancement of BDNF gene expression was observed in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggested that a functional AAV-Ig-BDNF was successfully constructed and it offers basis for further study for gene therapy of neural degeneration diseases.

  6. Human Obesity Associated with an Intronic SNP in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyang Mou

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 BDNF SNPs. We observed that the minor C allele of rs12291063 is associated with lower human ventromedial hypothalamic BDNF expression (p < 0.001 and greater adiposity in both adult and pediatric cohorts (p values < 0.05. We further demonstrated that the major T allele for rs12291063 possesses a binding capacity for the transcriptional regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0B, knockdown of which disrupts transactivation by the T allele. Binding and transactivation functions are both disrupted by substituting C for T. These findings provide a rationale for BDNF augmentation as a targeted treatment for obesity in individuals who have the rs12291063 CC genotype.

  7. Circulating levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor correlate with disease severity in the intrinsic type of atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raap, U; Werfel, T; Goltz, C; Deneka, N; Langer, K; Bruder, M; Kapp, A; Schmid-Ott, G; Wedi, B

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies have shed light on the complex regulation of genetic, environmental, immunologic and pharmacologic factors, which contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). However, it is still unclear to which extent neuroimmune mediators have a role in AD. To assess peripheral neurotrophin levels and their correlation with scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) scores in both the intrinsic and extrinsic types of AD compared with patients with psoriasis and nonatopic healthy subjects. Levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) were assessed in peripheral blood with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Based on IgE-mediated sensitization, AD was divided into the extrinsic and intrinsic type. Severity of AD was assessed with SCORAD score and with psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) in patients with psoriasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and NGF were detectable in all the subjects studied. However, the levels of both neurotrophins were significantly higher in patients with extrinsic and intrinsic types of AD compared with patients with psoriasis and nonatopic healthy subjects (NGF: P neurotrophin action in chronic inflammatory skin.

  8. Complete spinal cord injury (SCI) transforms how brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects nociceptive sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yung-Jen; Lee, Kuan H; Grau, James W

    2017-02-01

    Noxious stimulation can induce a lasting increase in neural excitability within the spinal cord (central sensitization) that can promote pain and disrupt adaptive function (maladaptive plasticity). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to regulate the development of plasticity and has been shown to impact the development of spinally-mediated central sensitization. The latter effect has been linked to an alteration in GABA-dependent inhibition. Prior studies have shown that, in spinally transected rats, exposure to regular (fixed spaced) stimulation can counter the development of maladaptive plasticity and have linked this effect to an up-regulation of BDNF. Here it is shown that application of the irritant capsaicin to one hind paw induces enhanced mechanical reactivity (EMR) after spinal cord injury (SCI) and that the induction of this effect is blocked by pretreatment with fixed spaced shock. This protective effect was eliminated if rats were pretreated with the BDNF sequestering antibody TrkB-IgG. Intrathecal (i.t.) application of BDNF prevented, but did not reverse, capsaicin-induced EMR. BDNF also attenuated cellular indices (ERK and pERK expression) of central sensitization after SCI. In uninjured rats, i.t. BDNF enhanced, rather than attenuated, capsaicin-induced EMR and ERK/pERK expression. These opposing effects were related to a transformation in GABA function. In uninjured rats, BDNF reduced membrane-bound KCC2 and the inhibitory effect of the GABA A agonist muscimol. After SCI, BDNF increased KCC2 expression, which would help restore GABAergic inhibition. The results suggest that SCI transforms how BDNF affects GABA function and imply that the clinical usefulness of BDNF will depend upon the extent of fiber sparing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between Sonic hedgehog protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and oxidative stress in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2012-02-01

    The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is not well known but oxidative stress has been suggested to play a pathological role. We report here that the serum levels of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) might be linked to oxidative stress in ASD. By using the whole blood or polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we demonstrated that autistic children produced a significantly higher level of oxygen free radicals (OFR). In addition, we found significantly higher levels of serum SHH protein in children with mild as well as severe form of autism. We also found that the serum level of BDNF was significantly reduced in autistic children with mild form of the disorder but not with severe form of the disorder. Our findings are the first to report a correlation between SHH, BDNF and OFR in autistic children, suggesting a pathological role of oxidative stress and SHH in autism spectrum disorders.

  10. EGR3 Immediate Early Gene and the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Pfaffenseller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BD is a severe psychiatric illness with a consistent genetic influence, involving complex interactions between numerous genes and environmental factors. Immediate early genes (IEGs are activated in the brain in response to environmental stimuli, such as stress. The potential to translate environmental stimuli into long-term changes in brain has led to increased interest in a potential role for these genes influencing risk for psychiatric disorders. Our recent finding using network-based approach has shown that the regulatory unit of early growth response gene 3 (EGR3 of IEGs family was robustly repressed in postmortem prefrontal cortex of BD patients. As a central transcription factor, EGR3 regulates an array of target genes that mediate critical neurobiological processes such as synaptic plasticity, memory and cognition. Considering that EGR3 expression is induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF that has been consistently related to BD pathophysiology, we suggest a link between BDNF and EGR3 and their potential role in BD. A growing body of data from our group and others has shown that peripheral BDNF levels are reduced during mood episodes and also with illness progression. In this same vein, BDNF has been proposed as an important growth factor in the impaired cellular resilience related to BD. Taken together with the fact that EGR3 regulates the expression of the neurotrophin receptor p75NTR and may also indirectly induce BDNF expression, here we propose a feed-forward gene regulatory network involving EGR3 and BDNF and its potential role in BD.

  11. Study of brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene transgenic neural stem cells in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue-mei; Yuan, Hui-ping; Wu, Dong-lai; Zhou, Xin-rong; Sun, Da-wei; Li, Hong-yi; Shao, Zheng-bo

    2009-07-20

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) transplantation and gene therapy have been widely investigated for treating the cerebullar and myelonic injuries, however, studies on the ophthalmology are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and differentiation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene transgenic NSCs transplanted into the normal rat retinas. NSCs were cultured and purified in vitro and infected with recombinant retrovirus pLXSN-BDNF and pLXSN respectively, to obtain the BDNF overexpressed NSCs (BDNF-NSCs) and control cells (p-NSCs). The expression of BDNF genes in two transgenic NSCs and untreated NSCs were measured by fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). BDNF-NSCs and NSCs were infected with adeno-associated viruses-enhanced green fluorescent protein (AAV-EGFP) to track them in vivo and served as donor cells for transplantation into the subretinal space of normal rat retinas, phosphated buffer solution (PBS) served as pseudo transplantation for a negative control. Survival, migration, and differentiation of donor cells in host retinas were observed and analyzed with Heidelberg retina angiograph (HRA) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. NSCs were purified successfully by limiting dilution assay. The expression of BDNF gene in BDNF-NSCs was the highest among three groups both at mRNA level tested by FQ-PCR (P neuron more efficiently compared with the control NSCs 2 months after transplantation. The seed cells of NSCs highly secreting BDNF were established. BDNF can promote NSCs to migrate and differentiate into neural cells in the normal host retinas.

  12. Dynamic plasticity: the role of glucocorticoids, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and other trophic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J D; Milner, T A; McEwen, B S

    2013-06-03

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secreted protein that has been linked to numerous aspects of plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS). Stress-induced remodeling of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala is coincident with changes in the levels of BDNF, which has been shown to act as a trophic factor facilitating the survival of existing and newly born neurons. Initially, hippocampal atrophy after chronic stress was associated with reduced BDNF, leading to the hypothesis that stress-related learning deficits resulted from suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis. However, recent evidence suggests that BDNF also plays a rapid and essential role in regulating synaptic plasticity, providing another mechanism through which BDNF can modulate learning and memory after a stressful event. Numerous reports have shown BDNF levels are highly dynamic in response to stress, and not only vary across brain regions but also fluctuate rapidly, both immediately after a stressor and over the course of a chronic stress paradigm. Yet, BDNF alone is not sufficient to effect many of the changes observed after stress. Glucocorticoids and other molecules have been shown to act in conjunction with BDNF to facilitate both the morphological and molecular changes that occur, particularly changes in spine density and gene expression. This review briefly summarizes the evidence supporting BDNF's role as a trophic factor modulating neuronal survival, and will primarily focus on the interactions between BDNF and other systems within the brain to facilitate synaptic plasticity. This growing body of evidence suggests a more nuanced role for BDNF in stress-related learning and memory, where it acts primarily as a facilitator of plasticity and is dependent upon the coactivation of glucocorticoids and other factors as the determinants of the final cellular response. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Emotional fronto-cingulate cortex activation and brain derived neurotrophic factor polymorphism in premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comasco, Erika; Hahn, Andreas; Ganger, Sebastian; Gingnell, Malin; Bannbers, Elin; Oreland, Lars; Wikström, Johan; Epperson, C Neill; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2014-09-01

    Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is the prototypical sex-specific disorder in which symptom onset and offset require a particular hormonal milieu and for which there is moderate heritability. The present study investigated brain emotion processing in PMDD and healthy controls, as well as functional polymorphisms in two candidate genes for PMDD, the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The 5-HTT linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms were genotyped in 31 patients with PMDD and 31 healthy controls. A subset of 16 patients and 15 controls participated in two functional magnetic resonance imaging-sessions performing an emotion processing task; once in the mid-follicular, and once in the late luteal phase which corresponds with maximum severity of mood symptoms. Genotypes were not directly associated with PMDD. A main effect of group was found in the whole brain analysis, with patients having lower activation of the pre-genual anterior cingulate and ventro-medial prefrontal cortex, independent of menstrual cycle phase. Post-hoc functional ROI analyses in the fronto-cingulate cluster showed no effect of 5-HTTLPR genotype but a genotype-by-group-by-phase interaction effect of BDNF Val66Met. Women with PMDD who were carriers of the Met-allele had lower fronto-cingulate cortex activation in the luteal phase compared to Met-allele carrying controls. The results provide suggestive evidence of impaired emotion-induced fronto-cingulate cortex activation in PMDD patients. Although limited by a small sample, the potential influence of BDNF Val66Met in PMDD is in line with preclinical findings. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Placental and cord blood brain derived neurotrophic factor levels are decreased in nondiabetic macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qian-Ying; Zhang, Heng-Xin; Wang, Chen-Chen; Sun, Hao; Sun, Shu-Qiang; Wang, Yu-Huan; Yan, Hong-Tao; Yang, Xin-Jun

    2017-08-01

    To measure levels of placental brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression and umbilical cord blood BDNF in neonates with nondiabetic macrosomia and determine associations between these levels and macrosomia. This case-control study included 58 nondiabetic macrosomic and 59 normal birth weight mother-infant pairs. Data were collected from interviews and our hospital's database. BDNF gene expression was quantified in placental tissues using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (n = 117). Umbilical cord blood BDNF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (n = 90). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between BDNF levels and macrosomia. Placental BDNF gene expression (P = 0.026) and cord blood BDNF (P = 0.008) were lower in neonates with nondiabetic macrosomia than in normal birth weight controls. Cord blood BDNF was significantly lower in vaginally delivered macrosomic neonates than vaginally delivered controls (P = 0.014), but cord BDNF did not differ between vaginal and cesarean section delivery modes in macrosomic neonates. Cord blood BDNF was positively associated with gestational age in control neonates (r = 0.496, P macrosomia (adjusted odds ratio 0.992; 95% confidence interval 0.986-0.998). Both placental BDNF gene expression and cord blood BDNF were downregulated in neonates with nondiabetic macrosomia compared with normal birth weight neonates. Cord BDNF may partly derive from BDNF secreted by the placenta. Higher cord plasma BDNF levels protected against nondiabetic macrosomia.

  15. Melatonin Promotes Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Expression and Anti-Apoptotic Effects in Neonatal Hemolytic Hyperbilirubinemia via a Phospholipase (PLC)-Mediated Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Peng, Mei; Wei, Hong

    2017-12-16

    BACKGROUND Melatonin therapy shows positive effects on neuroprotective factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and neuronal apoptosis in neonatal hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia. We hypothesized that melatonin promotes BDNF expression and anti-apoptotic effects in neonatal hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia through a phospholipase (PLC)-mediated mechanism. MATERIAL AND METHODS A phenylhydrazine hydrochloride (PHZ)-induced neonatal hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia model was constructed in neonatal rats. Four experimental groups - a control group (n=30), a PHZ group (n=30), a PHZ + melatonin group (n=30), and a PHZ + melatonin+U73122 (a PLC inhibitor) group (n=30) - were constructed. Trunk blood was assayed for serum hemoglobin, hematocrit, total and direct bilirubin, BDNF, S100B, and tau protein levels. Brain tissue levels of neuronal apoptosis, BDNF expression, PLC activity, IP3 content, phospho- and total Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV (CaMKIV) expression, and phospho- and total cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) expression were also assayed. RESULTS PHZ-induced hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia was validated by significantly decreased serum hemoglobin and hematocrit as well as significantly increased total and direct serum bilirubin (pPLC/IP3/Ca2+ pathway activation while increasing neuronal apoptosis levels (pPLC inhibitor U73122 largely abolished the positive effects of melatonin on PLC/IP3/Ca2+ pathway activation, downstream BDNF levels, and neuronal apoptosis (pPLC-mediated mechanism.

  16. Reduced serum levels of oestradiol and brain derived neurotrophic factor in both diabetic women and HFD-feeding female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Shan-Wen; Khandekar, Neeta; Tong, Shi-Fei; Yang, He-Qin; Wang, Wan-Ru; Huang, Xu-Feng; Song, Zhi-Yuan; Lin, Shu

    2017-04-01

    The estrogen levels in the pre and post menstrual phases interact with brain-derived neurotrophic factor in a complex manner, which influences the overall state of the body. To study the role of oestradiol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in modulating obesity related type 2 diabetes and the interactions between two factors, we enrolled 15 diabetic premenopausal women and 15 diabetic postmenopausal women respectively, the same number of healthy pre and postmenopausal women were recruited as two control groups. The fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipids, estrogen, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were measured through clinical tests. Additionally, we set up obese female mouse model to mimic human trial stated above, to verify the relationship between estrogen and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Our findings revealed that there is a moderately positive correlation between brain-derived neurotrophic factor and oestradiol in females, and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor may worsen impaired insulin function. The results further confirmed that high fat diet-fed mice which exhibited impaired glucose tolerance, showed lower levels of oestradiol and decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in the ventromedial hypothalamus. The level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduced on condition that the level of oestradiol is sufficiently low, such as women in postmenopausal period, which aggravates diabetes through feeding-related pathways. Increasing the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor may help to alleviate the progression of the disease in postmenopausal women with diabetes.

  17. Calmodulin kinase is a molecular switch for cardiac excitation –contraction coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yuejin; Colbran, Roger J.; Anderson, Mark E.

    2001-01-01

    Signaling between cell membrane-bound L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCC) and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels (RyR) on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores grades excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) in striated muscle. A physical connection regulates LTCC and RyR in skeletal muscle, but the molecular mechanism for coordinating LTCC and RyR in cardiomyocytes, where this physical link is absent, is unknown. Calmodulin kinase (CaMK) has characteristics suitable for a...

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and early-life stress: Multifaceted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neural development and plasticity. Longtermchanges in the BDNF pathway are associated with childhood adversity and adult depression symptoms.Initially, stress-induced decreases in the BDNF pathway were found in some studies, but subsequent ...

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and addiction: Pathological versus therapeutic effects on drug seeking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barker, J.M.; Taylor, J.R.; de Vries, T.J.; Peters, J.

    2015-01-01

    Many abused drugs lead to changes in endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in neural circuits responsible for addictive behaviors. BDNF is a known molecular mediator of memory consolidation processes, evident at both behavioral and neurophysiological levels. Specific neural

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  1. Gender specific associations of serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, M.L.; Bus, B.A.A.; Spinhoven, P.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Prickaerts, J.; Voshaar, R.C.O.; Elzinga, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Whereas animal models indicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in anxiety-related behaviour, little is known about BDNF in patients with an anxiety disorder. We tested the hypothesis that serum BDNF levels are low in patients with an anxiety disorder as

  2. Decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the remitted state of unipolar depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob; Knorr, U; Bennike, B

    2012-01-01

    Decreased levels of peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been associated with depression. It is uncertain whether abnormally low levels of BDNF in blood are present beyond the depressive state and whether levels of BDNF are associated with the course of clinical illness....

  3. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Autism: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Altered blood BDNF levels have been frequently identified in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There are however wide discrepancies in the evidence. Therefore, we performed the present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at…

  4. Circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor has diagnostic and prognostic value in traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.K. Korley (Frederick K.); R. Diaz-Arrastia (Ramon); A.H.B. Wu (Alan H. B.); J.K. Yue (John); G. Manley (Geoffrey); H.I. Sair (Haris I.); J.E. van Eyk (Jennifer); A.D. Everett (Allen D.); D. Okonkwo (David); A.B. Valadka (Alex); W.A. Gordon (Wayne A.); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); P. Mukherjee (Pratik); E.L. Yuh (Esther); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); A.M. Puccio (Ava); D.M. Schnyer (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBrain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and regeneration. We investigated the diagnostic and prognostic values of serum BDNF in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examined serum BDNF in two independent cohorts of TBI cases presenting to the emergency

  5. Calmodulin Is a Functional Regulator of Cav1.4 L-type Ca2+ Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessmeier, Kristina; Cuny, Hartmut; Rötzer, Katrin; Griesbeck, Oliver; Harz, Hartmann; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Cav1.4 channels are unique among the high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel family because they completely lack Ca2+-dependent inactivation and display very slow voltage-dependent inactivation. Both properties are of crucial importance in ribbon synapses of retinal photoreceptors and bipolar cells, where sustained Ca2+ influx through Cav1.4 channels is required to couple slow graded changes of the membrane potential with tonic glutamate release. Loss of Cav1.4 function causes severe impairment of retinal circuitry function and has been linked to night blindness in humans and mice. Recently, an inhibitory domain (ICDI: inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation) in the C-terminal tail of Cav1.4 has been discovered that eliminates Ca2+-dependent inactivation by binding to upstream regulatory motifs within the proximal C terminus. The mechanism underlying the action of ICDI is unclear. It was proposed that ICDI competitively displaces the Ca2+ sensor calmodulin. Alternatively, the ICDI domain and calmodulin may bind to different portions of the C terminus and act independently of each other. In the present study, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments with genetically engineered cyan fluorescent protein variants to address this issue. Our data indicate that calmodulin is preassociated with the C terminus of Cav1.4 but may be tethered in a different steric orientation as compared with other Ca2+ channels. We also find that calmodulin is important for Cav1.4 function because it increases current density and slows down voltage-dependent inactivation. Our data show that the ICDI domain selectively abolishes Ca2+-dependent inactivation, whereas it does not interfere with other calmodulin effects. PMID:19717559

  6. Calmodulin is a functional regulator of Cav1.4 L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griessmeier, Kristina; Cuny, Hartmut; Rötzer, Katrin; Griesbeck, Oliver; Harz, Hartmann; Biel, Martin; Wahl-Schott, Christian

    2009-10-23

    Cav1.4 channels are unique among the high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel family because they completely lack Ca2+-dependent inactivation and display very slow voltage-dependent inactivation. Both properties are of crucial importance in ribbon synapses of retinal photoreceptors and bipolar cells, where sustained Ca2+ influx through Cav1.4 channels is required to couple slow graded changes of the membrane potential with tonic glutamate release. Loss of Cav1.4 function causes severe impairment of retinal circuitry function and has been linked to night blindness in humans and mice. Recently, an inhibitory domain (ICDI: inhibitor of Ca2+-dependent inactivation) in the C-terminal tail of Cav1.4 has been discovered that eliminates Ca2+-dependent inactivation by binding to upstream regulatory motifs within the proximal C terminus. The mechanism underlying the action of ICDI is unclear. It was proposed that ICDI competitively displaces the Ca2+ sensor calmodulin. Alternatively, the ICDI domain and calmodulin may bind to different portions of the C terminus and act independently of each other. In the present study, we used fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments with genetically engineered cyan fluorescent protein variants to address this issue. Our data indicate that calmodulin is preassociated with the C terminus of Cav1.4 but may be tethered in a different steric orientation as compared with other Ca2+ channels. We also find that calmodulin is important for Cav1.4 function because it increases current density and slows down voltage-dependent inactivation. Our data show that the ICDI domain selectively abolishes Ca2+-dependent inactivation, whereas it does not interfere with other calmodulin effects.

  7. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Conformational Change of Immobilized Calmodulin

    OpenAIRE

    Trajkovic, Sanja; Zhang, Xiaoning; Daunert, Sylvia; Cai, Yuguang

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining the biological functionality of immobilized proteins is the key to the success of numerous protein-based biomedical devices. To that end, we studied conformational change of calmodulin (CaM) immobilized on chemical patterns. 1-cysteine mutated calmodulin was immobilized on a mercapto-terminated surface through the cysteine-Hg-mercapto coupling. Utilizing Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), the average height of the immobilized calmodulin was determined to be 1.87 ± 0.19 nm. After incub...

  8. Phenothiazine-binding and attachment sites of CAPP1-calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, D L; Klee, C B

    1989-05-02

    In the presence of Ca2+ norchlorpromazine isothiocyanate forms a monocovalent complex with calmodulin: CAPP1-calmodulin (Newton et al, 1983). Trypsin digestion of [3H]CAPP1-calmodulin yields as the major radioactive peptide N epsilon-CAPP-Lys-Met-Lys, corresponding to residues 75-77 of calmodulin. Stoichiometric amounts of all other expected tryptic peptides are also found, indicating that norchlorpromazine isothiocyanate selectively acylates Lys 75. A second molecule of CAPP-NCS can react, albeit slowly, with calmodulin to form CAPP2-calmodulin. Fragments 38-74 and 127-148 are completely missing from the trypsin digests of CAPP2-calmodulin without deliberate exposure to UV irradiation. Possibly the lengthy preparation of CAPP2-calmodulin favors photolysis, caused by room lights, of the putative CAPP-binding domains located in these two peptides. Lys 148, the sole lysyl residue in fragment 127-148, is a probable site of attachment of the second molecule of CAPP. UV irradiation of CAPP1-calmodulin, followed by digestion with trypsin, results in the selective loss of 50% each of peptides containing residues 38-74 and 127-148, suggesting that these peptides contain the hydrophobic amino acids that form the phenothiazine-binding sites. The loss of peptides encompassing residues 38-74 and 127-148, located in the amino and carboxyl halves of calmodulin, respectively, suggests that the hydrophobic rings of CAPP can bind at either one of the two phenothiazine sites. Computer modeling of CAPP1-calmodulin with the X-ray coordinates of calmodulin (Babu et al., 1986) indicates that CAPP attached to Lys 75 cannot interact with the carboxyl-terminal phenothiazine-binding site.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Exploring Serum Levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Nerve Growth Factor Across Glaucoma Stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Oddone

    Full Text Available To investigate the serum levels of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and Nerve Growth Factor (NGF in patients affected by primary open angle glaucoma with a wide spectrum of disease severity compared to healthy controls and to explore their relationship with morphological and functional glaucoma parameters.45 patients affected by glaucoma at different stages and 15 age-matched healthy control subjects underwent visual field testing, peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness measurement using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography and blood collection for both neurotrophins detection by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Statistical analysis and association between biostrumental and biochemical data were investigated.Serum levels of BDNF in glaucoma patients were significantly lower than those measured in healthy controls (261.2±75.0 pg/ml vs 313.6±79.6 pg/ml, p = 0.03. Subgroups analysis showed that serum levels of BDNF were significantly lower in early (253.8±40.7 pg/ml, p = 0.019 and moderate glaucoma (231.3±54.3 pg/ml, p = 0.04 but not in advanced glaucoma (296.2±103.1 pg/ml, p = 0.06 compared to healthy controls. Serum levels of NGF in glaucoma patients were significantly lower than those measured in the healthy controls (4.1±1 pg/mL vs 5.5±1.2 pg/mL, p = 0.01. Subgroups analysis showed that serum levels of NGF were significantly lower in early (3.5±0.9 pg/mL, p = 0.0008 and moderate glaucoma (3.8±0.7 pg/ml, p<0.0001 but not in advanced glaucoma (5.0±0.7 pg/ml, p = 0.32 compared to healthy controls. BDNF serum levels were not related to age, visual field mean deviation or retinal nerve fibre layer thickness either in glaucoma or in controls while NGF levels were significantly related to visual field mean deviation in the glaucoma group (r2 = 0.26, p = 0.004.BDNF and NGF serum levels are reduced in the early and moderate glaucoma stages, suggesting the possibility that both factors could be further investigated

  10. Calmodulin affects sensitization of Drosophila melanogaster odorant receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha eMukunda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Flying insects have developed a remarkably sensitive olfactory system to detect faint and turbulent odor traces. This ability is linked to the olfactory receptors class of odorant receptors (ORs, occurring exclusively in winged insects. ORs form heteromeric complexes of an odorant specific receptor protein (OrX and a highly conserved co-receptor protein (Orco. The ORs form ligand gated ion channels that are tuned by intracellular signaling systems. Repetitive subthreshold odor stimulation of olfactory sensory neurons sensitizes insect ORs. This OR sensitization process requires Orco activity. In the present study we first asked whether OR sensitization can be monitored with heterologously expressed OR proteins. Using electrophysiological and calcium imaging methods we demonstrate that D. melanogaster OR proteins expressed in CHO cells show sensitization upon repeated weak stimulation. This was found for OR channels formed by Orco as well as by Or22a or Or56a and Orco. Moreover, we show that inhibition of calmodulin (CaM action on OR proteins, expressed in CHO cells, abolishes any sensitization. Finally, we investigated the sensitization phenomenon using an ex vivo preparation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs expressing Or22a inside the fly’s antenna. Using calcium imaging, we observed sensitization in the dendrites as well as in the soma. Inhibition of calmodulin with W7 disrupted the sensitization within the outer dendritic shaft, whereas the sensitization remained in the other OSN compartments. Taken together, our results suggest that CaM action is involved in sensitizing the OR complex and that this mechanisms accounts for the sensitization in the outer dendrites, whereas further mechanisms contribute to the sensitization observed in the other OSN compartments. The use of heterologously expressed OR proteins appears to be suitable for further investigations on the mechanistic basis of OR sensitization, while investigations on native

  11. Selective carboxyl methylation of structurally altered calmodulins in Xenopus oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrosiers, R.R.; Romanik, E.A.; O' Connor, C.M. (Worcester Foundation for Experimental Biology, Shrewsbury, MA (USA))

    1990-12-05

    The eucaryotic protein carboxyl methyltransferase specifically modifies atypical D-aspartyl and L-isoaspartyl residues which are generated spontaneously as proteins age. The selectivity of the enzyme for altered proteins in intact cells was explored by co-injecting Xenopus laevis oocytes with S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-3H)methionine and structurally altered calmodulins generated during a 14-day preincubation in vitro. Control experiments indicated that the oocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase was not saturated with endogenous substrates, since protein carboxyl methylation rates could be stimulated up to 8-fold by increasing concentrations of injected calmodulin. The oocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase showed strong selectivities for bovine brain and bacterially synthesized calmodulins which had been preincubated in the presence of 1 mM EDTA relative to calmodulins which had been preincubated with 1 mM CaCl2. Radioactive methyl groups were incorporated into base-stable linkages with recombinant calmodulin as well as into carboxyl methyl esters following its microinjection into oocytes. This base-stable radioactivity most likely represents the trimethylation of lysine 115, a highly conserved post-translational modification which is present in bovine and Xenopus but not in bacterially synthesized calmodulin. Endogenous oocyte calmodulin incorporates radioactivity into both carboxyl methyl esters and into base-stable linkages following microinjection of oocytes with S-adenosyl-(methyl-3H)methionine alone. The rate of oocyte calmodulin carboxyl methylation in injected oocytes is calculated to be similar to that of lysine 115 trimethylation, suggesting that the rate of calmodulin carboxyl methylation is similar to that of calmodulin synthesis. At steady state, oocyte calmodulin contains approximately 0.0002 esters/mol of protein, which turn over rapidly.

  12. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and stability of depressive symptoms in coronary heart disease patients: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Stella L; Tschorn, Mira; Arolt, Volker; Beer, Katja; Brandt, Julia; Grosse, Laura; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline; Rieckmann, Nina; Waltenberger, Johannes; Warnke, Katharina; Hellweg, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and promotes the survival of various cell types in the brain and the coronary system. Moreover, BDNF is associated with both coronary heart disease (CHD) and depression. The current study aims to investigate whether serum BDNF levels are associated with the course of depressive symptoms in CHD patients. At baseline, N=225 CHD patients were enrolled while hospitalized. Of these, N=190 (84%) could be followed up 6 months later. Depressive symptoms were assessed both at baseline and at the 6-months follow-up using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Serum BDNF concentrations were measured using fluorometric Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Logistic regression models showed that lower BDNF levels were associated with persistent depressive symptoms, even after adjustment for age, sex, smoking and potential medical confounders. The incidence of depressive symptoms was not related to lower BDNF levels. However, somatic comorbidity (as measured by the Charlson Comorbidity Index) was significantly associated with the incidence of depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest a role of BDNF in the link between CHD and depressive symptoms. Particularly, low serum BDNF levels could be considered as a valuable biomarker for the persistence of depressive symptoms among depressed CHD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of regular aerobic exercise on urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor in children

    OpenAIRE

    Yunita Fediani; Masayu Rita Dewi; Muhammad Irfannuddin; Masagus Irsan Saleh; Safri Dhaini

    2014-01-01

    Background Nervous system development in early life influences the quality of cognitive ability during adulthood. Neuronal development and neurogenesis are highly influenced by neurotrophins. The most active neurotrophin is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Physical activity has a positive effect on cognitive function. However, few experimental studies have been done on children to assess the effect of aerobic regular exercise on BDNF levels. Objective To asses...

  14. The effect of regular aerobic exercise on urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor in children

    OpenAIRE

    Yunita Fediani; Masayu Rita Dewi; Muhammad Irfannuddin; Masagus Irsan Saleh; Safri Dhaini

    2014-01-01

    Background Nervous system development in early life influences the quality of cognitive ability during adulthood. Neuronal development and neurogenesis are highly influenced by neurotrophins. The most active neurotrophin is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Physical activity has a positive effect on cognitive function. However, few experimental studies have been done on children to assess the effect of aerobic regular exercise on BDNF levels. Objective To assess the effect of regu...

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects against tau-related neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, S-S; Shen, L-L; C. Zhu; Bu, X-L; Liu, Y-H; Liu, C-H; Yao, X-Q; Zhang, L-L; Zhou, H-D; Walker, D. G.; J. Tan; G?tz, J; Zhou, X-F; Wang, Y-J

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is characterized with the formation of neuritic plaques consisting of amyloid-beta (A?) and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. A growing body of evidence indicates a potential protective effect of BDNF against A?-induced neurotoxicity in AD mouse models. However, the direct therapeutic effect of BDNF supplement on tauopathy ...

  16. Secretion of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor in co-culture of four cell types in cerebrospinal fluid-containing medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sanjiang; Zhuang, Minghua; Wu, Rui

    2012-12-25

    The present study co-cultured human embryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, human Schwann cells, human amniotic epithelial cells and human vascular endothelial cells in complete culture medium-containing cerebrospinal fluid. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor secretion in the supernatant of co-cultured cells. Results showed that the number of all cell types reached a peak at 7-10 days, and the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor peaked at 9 days. Levels of secreted nerve growth factor were four-fold higher than brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which was three-fold higher than glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Increasing concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (10%, 20% and 30%) in the growth medium caused a decrease of neurotrophic factor secretion. Results indicated co-culture of human embryonic olfactory ensheathing cells, human Schwann cells, human amniotic epithelial cells and human vascular endothelial cells improved the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The reduction of cerebrospinal fluid extravasation at the transplant site after spinal cord injury is beneficial for the survival and secretion of neurotrophic factors from transplanted cells.

  17. Ultrasound Enhances the Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocyte Through Activation of TrkB-Akt and Calcium-CaMK Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lai, Yi-Long; Chen, Bo-Lin; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2017-06-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation has been shown to increase the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in astrocytes of an in vitro model and rat brains of an in vivo model; however, their molecular mechanisms are still not well clarified. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of BDNF enhancement by LIPUS in rat cerebral cortex astrocytes. After LIPUS stimulation in astrocytes, the protein and mRNA expressions were measured by western blot and RT-PCR, respectively. The concentration of intracellular calcium was determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that LIPUS enhanced the phosphorylation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and Akt but had no effect on Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Additionally, LIPUS increased the intracellular concentration of calcium and enhanced the protein levels of calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK) II and CaMKIV. LIPUS also activated the phosphorylation of NF-κB-p65 but did not promote the activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Taken together, our results suggest that LIPUS stimulation upregulates BDNF production in astrocytes through the activation of NF-κB via the TrkB/PI3K/Akt and calcium/CaMK signaling pathways. BDNF has emerged as a major molecular player in the regulation of neural circuit development and function. Therefore, LIPUS stimulation may play a crucial and beneficial role in neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Is serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor related to craving for or use of alcohol, cocaine, or methamphetamine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, Craig; Nejtek, Vicki A; Underwood, Wendy A; Singh, Meharvan; Patel, Gauravkumar; Gangwani, Pooja; Forster, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Background Data suggests that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) plays a neuroadaptive role in addiction. Whether serum BDNF levels are different in alcohol or psychostimulants as a function of craving is unknown. Here, we examined craving and serum BDNF levels in persons with alcohol versus psychostimulant dependence. Our goals were to explore BDNF as an objective biomarker for 1) craving 2) abstinence, and 3) years of chronic substance use. Methods An exploratory, cross-sectional study was designed. Men and women between 20–65 years old with alcohol, cocaine, or methamphetamine dependence were eligible. A craving questionnaire was used to measure alcohol, cocaine and methamphetamine cravings. Serum levels of BDNF were measured using enzyme linked immunoassay. Analysis of variance, chi-square, and correlations were performed using a 95% confidence interval and a significance level of P methamphetamine dependent subjects. There were no significant influences of race, gender, psychiatric disorder or psychotropic medication on serum BDNF levels. We found that among psychostimulant users BDNF levels were significantly higher in men than in women when the number of abstinent days was statistically controlled. Further, a significant correlation between serum BDNF levels and the number of abstinent days since last psychostimulant use was found. Conclusion These data suggest that BDNF may be a biomarker of abstinence in psychostimulant dependent subjects and inform clinicians about treatment initiatives. The results are interpreted with caution due to small sample size and lack of a control group. PMID:21792305

  19. Music exposure differentially alters the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-12-18

    It has been reported that music may have physiological effects on blood pressure, cardiac heartbeat, respiration, and improve mood state in people affected by anxiety, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, the physiological bases of these phenomena are not clear. Hypothalamus is a brain region involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hypothalamic functions are also influenced by the presence of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), which are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music exposure in mice on hypothalamic levels of BDNF and NGF. We exposed young adult mice to slow rhythm music (6h per day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 dB) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment mice were sacrificed and BDNF and NGF levels in the hypothalamus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that music exposure significantly enhanced BDNF levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we observed that music-exposed mice had decreased NGF hypothalamic levels. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music in mice can influence neurotrophin production in the hypothalamus. Our findings also suggest that physiological effects of music might be in part mediated by modulation of neurotrophins.

  20. Serum concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients diagnosed with gender dysphoria undergoing sex reassignment surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko A. Schneider

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Transsexualism (ICD-10 is a condition characterized by a strong and persistent dissociation with one's assigned gender. Sex reassignment surgery (SRS and hormone therapy provide a means of allowing transsexual individuals to feel more congruent with their gender and have played a major role in treatment over the past 70 years. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF appears to play a key role in recovery from acute surgical trauma and environmentally mediated vulnerability to psychopathology. We hypothesize that BDNF may be a biomarker of alleviation of gender incongruence suffering. Objectives: To measure preoperative and postoperative serum BDNF levels in transsexual individuals as a biomarker of alleviation of stress related to gender incongruence after SRS. Methods: Thirty-two male-to-female transsexual people who underwent both surgery and hormonal treatment were selected from our initial sample. BDNF serum levels were assessed before and after SRS with sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The time elapsed between the pre-SRS and post-SRS blood collections was also measured. Results: No significant difference was found in pre-SRS or post-SRS BDNF levels or with relation to the time elapsed after SRS when BDNF levels were measured. Conclusion: Alleviation of the suffering related to gender incongruence after SRS cannot be assessed by BDNF alone. Surgical solutions may not provide a quick fix for psychological distress associated with transsexualism and SRS may serve as one step toward, rather than as the conclusion of, construction of a person's gender identity.

  1. Salivary glands as the source of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor in stressed rats engaged in biting behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruta, Juri; Kondo, Yusuke; Sato, Chikatoshi; Shiiki, Naoto; Tsukinoki, Keiichi; Sato, Sadao

    2010-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is crucial for the survival and differentiation of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Recently, BDNF has been reported to exert broader biological activity on non-neural cells. A previous study examined the effect of immobilization stress on BDNF and its receptor tyrosine receptor kinase B in male rat submandibular glands. In the present study, we found that the rat submandibular gland is the major source of plasma BDNF during acute immobilization stress. Biting modulates the mRNA and protein levels of BDNF in the rat hippocampus, so we also investigated whether the plasma BDNF concentration is influenced by biting. Two hours of acute immobilization stress significantly increased the amount of BDNF mRNA within the rat submandibular glands. Moreover, allowing biting behavior for the second half of the 2-h stress exposure significantly increased the amount of salivary gland BDNF mRNA relative to stress alone. Similar results were found with plasma BDNF concentrations under the same conditions. We confirmed that biting during stress attenuates the increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone concentrations, but this was not dependent on the submandibular glands. Increased BDNF, mRNA and protein expressions were observed in salivary duct cells as a result of immobilization stress and biting behavior, as demonstrated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Taken together, the findings indicate that the submandibular glands evidently contribute to the increase in plasma BDNF upon biting.

  2. Correlation Between Hedgehog (Hh) Protein Family and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halepoto, Dost Muhammad; Bashir, Shahid; Zeina, Rana; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2015-12-01

    To determine the correlation of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Indian Hedgehog (IHH), and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). An observational, comparative study. Autism Research and Treatment Center, Al-Amodi Autism Research Chair, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from October 2011 to May 2012. Serum levels of SHH, IHH and BDNF were determined in recently diagnosed autistic patients and age-matched healthy children (n=25), using the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) was used for the assessment of autistic severity. Spearman correlation co-efficient 'r' was determined. The serum levels of IHH and SHH were significantly higher in autistic subjects than those of control subjects. There was significant correlation between age and IHH (r = 0.176, p = 0.03), BDNF and severe IHH (r = 0.1763, p = 0.003), and severe BDNF and severe SHH (r = 0.143, p BDNF and the CARS score, age or gender. The findings support a correlation between SHH, IHH and BDNF in autistic children, suggesting their pathological role in autism.

  3. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene Val66Met polymorphism affects memory performance in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Lucas A de; De Nardi, Tatiana; Levandowski, Mateus L; Tractenberg, Saulo G; Kommers-Molina, Julia; Wieck, Andrea; Irigaray, Tatiana Q; Silva, Irênio G da; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    Memory impairment is an important contributor to the reduction in quality of life experienced by older adults, and genetic risk factors seem to contribute to variance in age-related cognitive decline. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important nerve growth factor linked with development and neural plasticity. The Val66Met polymorphism in the BDNF gene has been associated with impaired episodic memory in adults, but whether this functional variant plays a role in cognitive aging remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism on memory performance in a sample of elderly adults. Eighty-seven subjects aged > 55 years were recruited using a community-based convenience sampling strategy in Porto Alegre, Brazil. The logical memory subset of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised was used to assess immediate verbal recall (IVR), delayed verbal recall (DVR), and memory retention rate. BDNF Met allele carriers had lower DVR scores (p = 0.004) and a decline in memory retention (p = 0.017) when compared to Val/Val homozygotes. However, we found no significant differences in IVR between the two groups (p = 0.088). These results support the hypothesis of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism as a risk factor associated with cognitive impairment, corroborating previous findings in young and older adults.

  4. Exercise in the Early Stage after Stroke Enhances Hippocampal Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression and Memory Function Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himi, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Hisashi; Okabe, Naohiko; Nakamura, Emi; Shiromoto, Takashi; Narita, Kazuhiko; Koga, Tomoshige; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    Exercise in the early stage after stroke onset has been shown to facilitate the recovery from physical dysfunction. However, the mechanism of recovery has not been clarified. In this study, the effect of exercise on spatial memory function recovery in the early stage was shown, and the mechanism of recovery was discussed using a rat model of brain embolism. Intra-arterial microsphere (MS) injection induced small emboli in the rat brain. Treadmill exercise was started at 24 hours (early group) or 8 days (late group) after MS injection. The non-exercise (NE) and sham-operated groups were included as controls. Memory function was evaluated by the Morris water maze test, and hippocampal levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To further investigate the effect of BDNF on memory function, BDNF was continuously infused into the hippocampus via implantable osmotic pumps in the early or late stage after stroke. Memory function significantly improved only in the early group compared with the late and the NE groups, although hippocampal BDNF concentrations were temporarily elevated after exercise in both the early and the late groups. Rats infused with BDNF in the early stage exhibited significant memory function recovery; however, rats that received BDNF infusion in the late stage showed no improvement. Exercise elevates hippocampal BDNF levels in the early stage after cerebral embolism, and this event facilitates memory function recovery. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cognitive functions in alcohol-dependent patients: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Changwoo; Bae, Hwallip; Won, Sung-Doo; Roh, Sungwon; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2015-01-01

    As a neurotoxic substance, alcohol can induce neurodegenesis in the brain. Alcohol-dependent patients' cognitive functioning can be affected by chronic alcohol use. In addition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to reflect the status of neuroadaptive changes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cognitive functions and BDNF in alcohol-dependent patients. The subjects were 39 alcohol-dependent patients. BDNF was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. We examined clinical features and administered the Korean version of Alcohol Dependence Scale. We also used the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) to measure cognitive functioning. Then, we determined the relationships between BDNF and various parts of the CERAD. The performance of alcohol-dependent patients proved stable in most parts of the CERAD. Within the different parts of the CERAD, only Trail Making Test B correlated with BDNF. Trail Making Test specifically assesses executive functions. BDNF might play an important role in the detection of neurocognitive function among individuals with alcohol dependence.

  6. Global deprivation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the CNS reveals an area-specific requirement for dendritic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauskolb, Stefanie; Zagrebelsky, Marta; Dreznjak, Anita; Deogracias, Rubén; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Wiese, Stefan; Erne, Beat; Sendtner, Michael; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Korte, Martin; Barde, Yves-Alain

    2010-02-03

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is linked with an increasing number of conditions causing brain dysfunction, its role in the postnatal CNS has remained difficult to assess. This is because the bdnf-null mutation causes the death of the animals before BDNF levels have reached adult levels. In addition, the anterograde axonal transport of BDNF complicates the interpretation of area-specific gene deletion. The present study describes the generation of a new conditional mouse mutant essentially lacking BDNF throughout the CNS. It shows that BDNF is not essential for prolonged postnatal survival, but that the behavior of such mutant animals is markedly altered. It also reveals that BDNF is not a major survival factor for most CNS neurons and for myelination of their axons. However, it is required for the postnatal growth of the striatum, and single-cell analyses revealed a marked decreased in dendritic complexity and spine density. In contrast, BDNF is dispensable for the growth of the hippocampus and only minimal changes were observed in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in mutant animals. Spine density remained unchanged, whereas the proportion of the mushroom-type spine was moderately decreased. In line with these in vivo observations, we found that BDNF markedly promotes the growth of cultured striatal neurons and of their dendrites, but not of those of hippocampal neurons, suggesting that the differential responsiveness to BDNF is part of a neuron-intrinsic program.

  7. Investigating the neurobiology of music: brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation in the hippocampus of young adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelucci, Francesco; Fiore, Marco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-09-01

    It has been shown that music might be able to improve mood state in people affected by psychiatric disorders, ameliorate cognitive deficits in people with dementia and increase motor coordination in Parkinson patients. Robust experimental evidence explaining the central effects of music, however, is missing. This study was designed to investigate the effect of music on brain neurotrophin production and behavior in the mouse. We exposed young adult mice to music with a slow rhythm (6 h/day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 db) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, mice were tested for passive avoidance learning and then killed for analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in selected brain regions. We found that music-exposed mice showed increased BDNF, but not nerve growth factor in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we observed that music exposure significantly enhanced learning performance, as measured by the passive avoidance test. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music can modulate the activity of the hippocampus by influencing BDNF production. Our findings also suggest that music exposure might be of help in several central nervous system pathologies.

  8. Serum concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients diagnosed with gender dysphoria undergoing sex reassignment surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Maiko A; Andreazza, Tahiana; Fontanari, Anna Martha V; Costa, Angelo B; Silva, Dhiordan C da; Aguiar, Bianca W de; Massuda, Raffael; Pedrini, Mariana; Gama, Clarissa S; Schwarz, Karine; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia; Lobato, Maria Ines R

    2017-01-01

    Transsexualism (ICD-10) is a condition characterized by a strong and persistent dissociation with one's assigned gender. Sex reassignment surgery (SRS) and hormone therapy provide a means of allowing transsexual individuals to feel more congruent with their gender and have played a major role in treatment over the past 70 years. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to play a key role in recovery from acute surgical trauma and environmentally mediated vulnerability to psychopathology. We hypothesize that BDNF may be a biomarker of alleviation of gender incongruence suffering. To measure preoperative and postoperative serum BDNF levels in transsexual individuals as a biomarker of alleviation of stress related to gender incongruence after SRS. Thirty-two male-to-female transsexual people who underwent both surgery and hormonal treatment were selected from our initial sample. BDNF serum levels were assessed before and after SRS with sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The time elapsed between the pre-SRS and post-SRS blood collections was also measured. No significant difference was found in pre-SRS or post-SRS BDNF levels or with relation to the time elapsed after SRS when BDNF levels were measured. Alleviation of the suffering related to gender incongruence after SRS cannot be assessed by BDNF alone. Surgical solutions may not provide a quick fix for psychological distress associated with transsexualism and SRS may serve as one step toward, rather than as the conclusion of, construction of a person's gender identity.

  9. Nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and the chronobiology of mood: a new insight into the "neurotrophic hypothesis"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirassa P

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Paola Tirassa,1 Adele Quartini,2 Angela Iannitelli2–4 1National Research Council (CNR, Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology (IBCN, 2Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Faculty of Pharmacy and Medicine – "Sapienza" University of Rome, 3Italian Psychoanalytical Society (SPI, Rome, Italy; 4International Psychoanalytical Association (IPA, London, UKAbstract: The light information pathways and their relationship with the body rhythms have generated a new insight into the neurobiology and the neurobehavioral sciences, as well as into the clinical approaches to human diseases associated with disruption of circadian cycles. Light-based strategies and/or drugs acting on the circadian rhythms have widely been used in psychiatric patients characterized by mood-related disorders, but the timing and dosage use of the various treatments, although based on international guidelines, are mainly dependent on the psychiatric experiences. Further, many efforts have been made to identify biomarkers able to disclose the circadian-related aspect of diseases, and therefore serve as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic tools in clinic to assess the different mood-related symptoms, including pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, loss of interest or pleasure, appetite, psychomotor changes, and cognitive impairments. Among the endogenous factors suggested to be involved in mood regulation, the neurotrophins, nerve growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor show anatomical and functional link with the circadian system and mediate some of light-induced effects in brain. In addition, in humans, both nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor have showed a daily rhythm, which correlate with the morningness–eveningness dimensions, and are influenced by light, suggesting their potential role as biomarkers for chronotypes and/or chronotherapy. The evidences of the relationship between the diverse mood-related disorders

  10. Human calmodulin methyltransferase: expression, activity on calmodulin, and Hsp90 dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Magen

    Full Text Available Deletion of the first exon of calmodulin-lysine N-methyltransferase (CaM KMT, previously C2orf34 has been reported in two multigene deletion syndromes, but additional studies on the gene have not been reported. Here we show that in the cells from 2p21 deletion patients the loss of CaM KMT expression results in accumulation of hypomethylated calmodulin compared to normal controls, suggesting that CaM KMT is essential for calmodulin methylation and there are no compensatory mechanisms for CaM methylation in humans. We have further studied the expression of this gene at the transcript and protein levels. We have identified 2 additional transcripts in cells of the 2p21 deletion syndrome patients that start from alternative exons positioned outside the deletion region. One of them starts in the 2(nd known exon, the other in a novel exon. The transcript starting from the novel exon was also identified in a variety of tissues from normal individuals. These new transcripts are not expected to produce proteins. Immunofluorescent localization of tagged CaM KMT in HeLa cells indicates that it is present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells whereas the short isoform is localized to the Golgi apparatus. Using Western blot analysis we show that the CaM KMT protein is broadly expressed in mouse tissues. Finally we demonstrate that the CaM KMT interacts with the middle portion of the Hsp90 molecular chaperon and is probably a client protein since it is degraded upon treatment of cells with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin. These findings suggest that the CaM KMT is the major, possibly the single, methyltransferase of calmodulin in human cells with a wide tissue distribution and is a novel Hsp90 client protein. Thus our data provides basic information for a gene potentially contributing to the patient phenotype of two contiguous gene deletion syndromes.

  11. Effect of Training Exercise on Urinary Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels and Cognitive Performances in Overweight and Obese Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Angelo; Buratta, Livia; Pippi, Roberto; Aiello, Cristina; Ranucci, Claudia; Reginato, Elisa; Santangelo, Valerio; DeFeo, Pierpaolo; Mazzeschi, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Exercise-mediated, brain-derived neurotrophic factor induction benefits health and cognitive functions. The multifaceted interplay between physical activity, urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive functioning has been largely neglected in previous literature. In this pilot study, two bouts of training exercise (65% and 70% of heart rate reserve) influenced urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive performances in 12 overweight and obese participants. Percent heart rate reserve, expenditure energy, brain-derived neurotrophic factor urinary levels and cognitive performances were measured before and after the exercise. No significant variations in energy expenditure were observed, while differences of heart rate reserve between two groups were maintained. Both bouts of training exercise induced a similar reduction in urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Only visuo-spatial working memory capacity at 65% of heart rate reserve showed a significant increase. These findings indicate a consistent effect of training exercise on urinary brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and cognitive factors in overweight and obese participants.

  12. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on dopaminergic function and motor behavior during aging

    OpenAIRE

    Boger, Heather A.; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Samuvel, Devadoss J.; Saylor, Alicia J.; Bender, Tara S.; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Fortress, Ashley M.; Zaman, Vandana; Huang, Peng; Middaugh, Lawrence D.; Randall, Patrick K.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.; Rohrer, Baerbel; Helke, Kristi L.; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical in synaptic plasticity and in the survival and function of midbrain dopamine neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of a partial genetic deletion of BDNF on motor function and dopamine (DA) neurotransmitter measures by comparing (Bdnf+/−) with wildtype mice (WT) at different ages. Bdnf+/ and WT mice had similar body weights until 12 months of age; however, at 21 months, Bdnf+/− mice were significantly heavier than WT mice. H...

  13. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Overexpression Induces Precocious Critical Period in Mouse Visual Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Hanover, Jessica L.; Huang, Z. Josh; Tonegawa, Susumu; Stryker, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a candidate molecule for regulating activity-dependent synaptic plasticity on the grounds of its expression pattern in developing visual cortex and that of its receptor, trkB (Castrén et al., 1992; Bozzi et al., 1995; Schoups et al., 1995; Cabelli et al., 1996), as well as the modulation of these patterns by activity (Castrén et al., 1992; Bozzi et al., 1995; Schoups et al., 1995). Infusing trkB ligands or their neutralizing agents, the trkB-IgG fus...

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, impaired glucose metabolism, and bipolar disorder course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Santos, Camila M; Rizzo, Lucas B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in bipolar disorder (BD). However, current evidence is limited and results have been highly heterogeneous. This study aimed to assess the moderating effect of impaired glucose metabolism...... mellitus. Information related to current and past psychiatric/medical history, as well as prescription of pharmacological treatments was also captured. RESULTS: Individuals with BD had lower levels of BDNF, relative to healthy controls, after adjustment for age, gender, current medications, smoking...

  15. Cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and C-reactive protein in bipolar I disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne Sophie; Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and inflammatory markers may reflect key pathophysiological mechanisms in bipolar disorder in relation to disease activity and neuroprogression. AIMS: To investigate whether neutrophins and inflammatory marker vary with mood......% (95% CI: 17-66%, p=0.006) when compared with hypomanic/manic states after adjustment. BDNF and the other inflammatory markers did not vary according to affective state in adjusted mixed models. LIMITATIONS: Patients were all medicated, specifically with high doses of atypical antipsychotics during...

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) translation in dendrites

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Vera Lúcia Margarido

    2010-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Biologia Celular e Molecular apresentada ao Departamento de Ciências da Vida da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra A especificidade espacial e temporal subjacente à diversidade de processos de plasticidade sináptica que ocorrem no sistema nervoso central está profundamente relacionada com a disponibilidade da proteína brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) em domínios sub-celulares distintos, especialmente na área pós-sinápti...

  17. Association Between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Genotype and Upper Extremity Motor Outcome After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jungsoo; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-06-01

    The identification of intrinsic factors for predicting upper extremity motor outcome could aid the design of individualized treatment plans in stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors, including intrinsic genetic factors, for upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke. A total of 97 patients with subacute stroke were enrolled. Upper limb motor impairment was scored according to the upper limb of Fugl-Meyer assessment score at 3 months after stroke. The prediction of upper extremity motor outcome at 3 months was modeled using various factors that could potentially influence this impairment, including patient characteristics, baseline upper extremity motor impairment, functional and structural integrity of the corticospinal tract, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models were used to identify the significance of each factor. The independent predictors of motor outcome at 3 months were baseline upper extremity motor impairment, age, stroke type, and corticospinal tract functional integrity in all stroke patients. However, in the group with severe motor impairment at baseline (upper limb score of Fugl-Meyer assessment derived neurotrophic factor genotype was also an independent predictor of upper extremity motor outcome 3 months after stroke. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype may be a potentially useful predictor of upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke with severe baseline motor involvement. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Conformational Change of Immobilized Calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovic, Sanja; Zhang, Xiaoning; Daunert, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining the biological functionality of immobilized proteins is the key to the success of numerous protein-based biomedical devices. To that end, we studied conformational change of calmodulin (CaM) immobilized on chemical patterns. 1-cysteine mutated calmodulin was immobilized on a mercapto-terminated surface through the cysteine-Hg-mercapto coupling. Utilizing Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), the average height of the immobilized calmodulin was determined to be 1.87 ± 0.19 nm. After incubation in EGTA solution, the average height of protein changed to 2.26 ± 0.21 nm, indicating conformational change of CaM to Apo-CaM. The immobilized CaM also demonstrated conformational change upon the reaction with known calmodulin antagonist chlorpromazine (CPZ). After incubation in CPZ solution, the average height of CPZ-bound CaM increased to 2.32 ± 0.20 nm, demonstrating the immobilized CaM still has the similar response as in bulk solution. These results show that immobilization of calmodulin on a solid support does not interfere with the ability of the protein to bind calcium and calmodulin antagonists. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of employing AFM to probe and understand protein conformational changes. PMID:21766850

  19. Alteration of the irisin–brain-derived neurotrophic factor axis contributes to disturbance of mood in COPD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Csaba; Pak, Krisztian; Erdei, Tamas; Juhasz, Bela; Seres, Ildiko; Szentpéteri, Anita; Kardos, Laszlo; Szilasi, Maria; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Zsuga, Judit

    2017-01-01

    COPD is accompanied by limited physical activity, worse quality of life, and increased prevalence of depression. A possible link between COPD and depression may be irisin, a myokine, expression of which in the skeletal muscle and brain positively correlates with physical activity. Irisin enhances the synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin involved in reward-related processes. Thus, we hypothesized that mood disturbances accompanying COPD are reflected by the changes in the irisin–BDNF axis. Case history, routine laboratory parameters, serum irisin and BDNF levels, pulmonary function, and disease-specific quality of life, measured by St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), were determined in a cohort of COPD patients (n=74). Simple and then multiple linear regression were used to evaluate the data. We found that mood disturbances are associated with lower serum irisin levels (SGRQ’s Impacts score and reciprocal of irisin showed a strong positive association; β: 419.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 204.31, 635.63; P<0.001). This association was even stronger among patients in the lower 50% of BDNF levels (β: 434.11; 95% CI: 166.17, 702.05; P=0.002), while it became weaker for patients in the higher 50% of BDNF concentrations (β: 373.49; 95% CI: −74.91, 821.88; P=0.1). These results suggest that irisin exerts beneficial effect on mood in COPD patients, possibly by inducing the expression of BDNF in brain areas associated with reward-related processes involved in by depression. Future interventional studies targeting the irisin–BDNF axis (eg, endurance training) are needed to further support this notion. PMID:28744117

  20. Alteration of the irisin-brain-derived neurotrophic factor axis contributes to disturbance of mood in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Csaba; Pak, Krisztian; Erdei, Tamas; Juhasz, Bela; Seres, Ildiko; Szentpéteri, Anita; Kardos, Laszlo; Szilasi, Maria; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Zsuga, Judit

    2017-01-01

    COPD is accompanied by limited physical activity, worse quality of life, and increased prevalence of depression. A possible link between COPD and depression may be irisin, a myokine, expression of which in the skeletal muscle and brain positively correlates with physical activity. Irisin enhances the synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin involved in reward-related processes. Thus, we hypothesized that mood disturbances accompanying COPD are reflected by the changes in the irisin-BDNF axis. Case history, routine laboratory parameters, serum irisin and BDNF levels, pulmonary function, and disease-specific quality of life, measured by St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), were determined in a cohort of COPD patients (n=74). Simple and then multiple linear regression were used to evaluate the data. We found that mood disturbances are associated with lower serum irisin levels (SGRQ's Impacts score and reciprocal of irisin showed a strong positive association; β: 419.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 204.31, 635.63; P <0.001). This association was even stronger among patients in the lower 50% of BDNF levels (β: 434.11; 95% CI: 166.17, 702.05; P =0.002), while it became weaker for patients in the higher 50% of BDNF concentrations (β: 373.49; 95% CI: -74.91, 821.88; P =0.1). These results suggest that irisin exerts beneficial effect on mood in COPD patients, possibly by inducing the expression of BDNF in brain areas associated with reward-related processes involved in by depression. Future interventional studies targeting the irisin-BDNF axis (eg, endurance training) are needed to further support this notion.

  1. Is serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor related to craving for or use of alcohol, cocaine, or methamphetamine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangwani P

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Craig Hilburn, Vicki A Nejtek, Wendy A Underwood, Meharvan Singh, Gauravkumar Patel, Pooja Gangwani, Michael J ForsterUniversity of North Texas Health Science Center at Fort Worth, TX, USABackground: Data suggests that brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF plays a neuroadaptive role in addiction. Whether serum BDNF levels are different in alcohol or psychostimulants as a function of craving is unknown. Here, we examined craving and serum BDNF levels in persons with alcohol versus psychostimulant dependence. Our goals were to explore BDNF as an objective biomarker for 1 craving 2 abstinence, and 3 years of chronic substance use.Methods: An exploratory, cross-sectional study was designed. Men and women between 20–65 years old with alcohol, cocaine, or methamphetamine dependence were eligible. A craving questionnaire was used to measure alcohol, cocaine and methamphetamine cravings. Serum levels of BDNF were measured using enzyme linked immunoassay. Analysis of variance, chi-square, and correlations were performed using a 95% confidence interval and a significance level of P < 0.05.Results: We found a significant difference in the mean craving score among alcohol, cocaine and methamphetamine dependent subjects. There were no significant influences of race, gender, psychiatric disorder or psychotropic medication on serum BDNF levels. We found that among psychostimulant users BDNF levels were significantly higher in men than in women when the number of abstinent days was statistically controlled. Further, a significant correlation between serum BDNF levels and the number of abstinent days since last psychostimulant use was found.Conclusion: These data suggest that BDNF may be a biomarker of abstinence in psychostimulant dependent subjects and inform clinicians about treatment initiatives. The results are interpreted with caution due to small sample size and lack of a control group.Keywords: BDNF, alcohol, cocaine, methamphetamine, craving

  2. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) across pregnancy and postpartum: Associations with race, depressive symptoms, and low birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Lisa M; Mitchell, Amanda M; Gillespie, Shannon L; Palettas, Marilly

    2016-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated as a causal factor in major depression and is critical to placental development during pregnancy. Longitudinal data on BDNF across the perinatal period are lacking. These data are of interest given the potential implications for maternal mood and fetal growth, particularly among Black women who show ∼2-fold greater risk for delivering low birth weight infants. Serum BDNF, serum cortisol, and depressive symptoms (per CES-D) were assessed during each trimester and 4-11 weeks postpartum among 139 women (77 Black, 62 White). Low birth weight (BDNF declined considerably from 1st through 3rd trimesters (ps≤0.008) and subsequently increased at postpartum (pBDNF during the 1st trimester, 2nd trimester, and postpartum (ps≤0.032) as well as lower serum cortisol during the 2nd and 3rd trimester (ps≤0.01). Higher serum cortisol was concurrently associated with lower serum BDNF in the 2nd trimester only (pBDNF at both the 2nd and 3rd trimester was negatively associated with 3rd trimester depressive symptoms (ps≤0.02). In addition, women delivering low versus healthy weight infants showed significantly lower serum BDNF in the 3rd trimester (p=0.004). Women delivering low versus healthy weight infants did not differ in depressive symptoms at any time point during pregnancy (ps≥0.34). Serum BDNF declines considerably across pregnancy in Black and White women, with overall higher levels in Blacks. Lower serum BDNF in late pregnancy corresponds with higher depressive symptoms and risk for low birth weight in Black and White women. However, the predictive value of serum BDNF in pregnancy is specific to within-race comparisons. Potential links between racial differences in serum BDNF and differential pregnancy-related cortisol adaptation require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations in pregnant women with post-traumatic stress disorder and comorbid depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Gelaye, Bizu; Zhong, Qiuyue; Rondon, Marta B; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2016-12-01

    There is accumulating evidence for the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of depression. However, the role of BDNF in the pathophysiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains controversial, and no study has assessed BDNF concentrations among pregnant women with PTSD. We examined early-pregnancy BDNF concentrations among women with PTSD with and without depression. A total of 2928 women attending prenatal care clinics in Lima, Peru, were recruited. Antepartum PTSD and depression were evaluated using PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scales, respectively. BDNF concentrations were measured in a subset of the cohort (N = 944) using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI). Antepartum PTSD (37.4 %) and depression (27.6 %) were prevalent in this cohort of low-income pregnant Peruvian women. Approximately 19.9 % of participants had comorbid PTSD-depression. Median serum BDNF concentrations were lower among women with comorbid PTSD-depression as compared with women without either condition (median [interquartile range], 20.44 [16.97-24.30] vs. 21.35 [17.33-26.01] ng/ml; P = 0.06). Compared to the referent group (those without PTSD and depression), women with comorbid PTSD-depression were 1.52-fold more likely to have low (BDNF concentrations (OR = 1.52; 95 % CI 1.00-2.31). We observed no evidence of reduced BDNF concentrations among women with isolated PTSD. BDNF concentrations in early pregnancy were only minimally and non-significantly reduced among women with antepartum PTSD. Reductions in BDNF concentrations were more pronounced among women with comorbid PTSD-depression.

  4. Evidence of associations between brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum levels and gene polymorphisms with tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskunoglu, Aysun; Orenay-Boyacioglu, Seda; Deveci, Artuner; Bayam, Mustafa; Onur, Ece; Onan, Arzu; Cam, Fethi S

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene polymorphisms are associated with abnormalities in regulation of BDNF secretion. Studies also linked BDNF polymorphisms with changes in brainstem auditory-evoked response test results. Furthermore, BDNF levels are reduced in tinnitus, psychiatric disorders, depression, dysthymic disorder that may be associated with stress, conversion disorder, and suicide attempts due to crises of life. For this purpose, we investigated whether there is any role of BDNF changes in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. In this study, we examined the possible effects of BDNF variants in individuals diagnosed with tinnitus for more than 3 months. Fifty-two tinnitus subjects between the ages of 18 and 55, and 42 years healthy control subjects in the same age group, who were free of any otorhinolaryngology and systemic disease, were selected for examination. The intensity of tinnitus and depression was measured using the tinnitus handicap inventory, and the differential diagnosis of psychiatric diagnoses made using the Structured Clinical Interview for Fourth Edition of Mental Disorders. BDNF gene polymorphism was analyzed in the genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) samples extracted from the venous blood, and the serum levels of BDNF were measured. One-way analysis of variance and Chi-squared tests were applied. Serum BDNF level was found lower in the tinnitus patients than controls, and it appeared that there is no correlation between BDNF gene polymorphism and tinnitus. This study suggests neurotrophic factors such as BDNF may have a role in tinnitus etiology. Future studies with larger sample size may be required to further confirm our results.

  5. Connections of the Mouse Orbitofrontal Cortex and Regulation of Goal-Directed Action Selection by Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kelsey S; Yamin, John A; Rainnie, Donald G; Ressler, Kerry J; Gourley, Shannon L

    2017-02-15

    Distinguishing between actions that are more likely or less likely to be rewarded is a critical aspect of goal-directed decision making. However, neuroanatomic and molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. We used anterograde tracing, viral-mediated gene silencing, functional disconnection strategies, pharmacologic rescue, and designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) to determine the anatomic and functional connectivity between the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the amygdala in mice. In particular, we knocked down brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) bilaterally in the OFC or generated an OFC-amygdala "disconnection" by pairing unilateral OFC Bdnf knockdown with lesions of the contralateral amygdala. We characterized decision-making strategies using a task in which mice selected actions based on the likelihood that they would be reinforced. Additionally, we assessed the effects of DREADD-mediated OFC inhibition on the consolidation of action-outcome conditioning. As in other species, the OFC projects to the basolateral amygdala and dorsal striatum in mice. Bilateral Bdnf knockdown within the ventrolateral OFC and unilateral Bdnf knockdown accompanied by lesions of the contralateral amygdala impede goal-directed response selection, implicating BDNF-expressing OFC projection neurons in selecting actions based on their consequences. The tyrosine receptor kinase B agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone rescues action selection and increases dendritic spine density on excitatory neurons in the OFC. Rho-kinase inhibition also rescues goal-directed response strategies, linking neural remodeling with outcome-based decision making. Finally, DREADD-mediated OFC inhibition weakens new action-outcome memory. Activity-dependent and BDNF-dependent neuroplasticity within the OFC coordinate outcome-based decision making through interactions with the amygdala. These interactions break reward-seeking habits, a putative factor in multiple psychopathologies

  6. Protecting Neural Structures and Cognitive Function During Prolonged Space Flight by Targeting the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Molecular Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M. A.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main activity-dependent neurotrophin in the human nervous system. BDNF is implicated in production of new neurons from dentate gyrus stem cells (hippocampal neurogenesis), synapse formation, sprouting of new axons, growth of new axons, sprouting of new dendrites, and neuron survival. Alterations in the amount or activity of BDNF can produce significant detrimental changes to cortical function and synaptic transmission in the human brain. This can result in glial and neuronal dysfunction, which may contribute to a range of clinical conditions, spanning a number of learning, behavioral, and neurological disorders. There is an extensive body of work surrounding the BDNF molecular network, including BDNF gene polymorphisms, methylated BDNF gene promoters, multiple gene transcripts, varied BDNF functional proteins, and different BDNF receptors (whose activation differentially drive the neuron to neurogenesis or apoptosis). BDNF is also closely linked to mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1alpha, which can influence brain and muscle metabolic efficiency. BDNF AS A HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT COUNTERMEASURE TARGET Earth-based studies reveal that BDNF is negatively impacted by many of the conditions encountered in the space environment, including oxidative stress, radiation, psychological stressors, sleep deprivation, and many others. A growing body of work suggests that the BDNF network is responsive to a range of diet, nutrition, exercise, drug, and other types of influences. This section explores the BDNF network in the context of 1) protecting the brain and nervous system in the space environment, 2) optimizing neurobehavioral performance in space, and 3) reducing the residual effects of space flight on the nervous system on return to Earth

  7. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Mediated Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Induced-Neurotoxicity via Epigenetics Regulation in SK-N-SH Cells

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    Xin-Xin Guo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, a new kind of persistent organic pollutant, is widely distributed in the environment and exists in various organisms, where it is also a neurotoxic compound. However, the potential mechanism of its neurotoxicity is still unclear. To examine the role of epigenetics in the neurotoxicity induced by PFOS, SK-N-SH cells were treated with different concentrations of PFOS or control medium (0.1% DMSO for 48 h. The mRNA levels of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs and Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, microRNA-16, microRNA-22, and microRNA-30a-5p were detected by Quantitative PCR (QPCR. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA was used to measure the protein levels of BDNF, and a western blot was applied to analyze the protein levels of DNMTs. Bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP was used to detect the methylation status of the BDNF promoter I and IV. Results of MTT assays indicated that treatment with PFOS could lead to a significant decrease of cell viability, and the treated cells became shrunk. In addition, PFOS exposure decreased the expression of BDNF at mRNA and protein levels, increased the expression of microRNA-16, microRNA-22, microRNA-30a-5p, and decreased the expression of DNMT1 at mRNA and protein levels, but increased the expression of DNMT3b at mRNA and protein levels. Our results also demonstrate that PFOS exposure changes the methylation status of BDNF promoter I and IV. The findings of the present study suggest that methylation regulation of BDNF gene promoter and increases of BDNF-related-microRNA might underlie the mechanisms of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Photoreceptor protection by iris pigment epithelial transplantation transduced with AAV-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Masayoshi; Abe, Toshiaki; Sugano, Eriko; Yoshioka, Yuki; Saigo, Yoko; Tomita, Hiroshi; Wakusawa, Ryosuke; Tamai, Makoto

    2004-10-01

    To determine whether subretinal transplantation of iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells transduced with the adeno-associated virus (AAV2)-mediated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene can protect photoreceptors against phototoxicity. The BDNF gene was inserted into AAV2 (AAV2-BDNF), and the recombinant AAV2 was transduced into rat IPE (AAV2-BDNF-IPE) cells at various multiplicities of infection (MOI). The concentrations of AAV capsids and BDNF were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The AAV2-BDNF-IPE cells were transplanted into the subretinal space of rats, and the rats were placed under constant light on days 1 and 90 after the transplantation. The thickness of the outer nuclear layer was measured in histologic sections and compared to that of control sections. The expression of beta-galactosidase (LacZ) in the subretinal space was confirmed by LacZ staining after AAV2-LacZ-IPE transplantation. BDNF gene expression after transplantation was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Transduction efficiency increased with successive days in culture and increased with higher MOI in vitro. The expression of the BDNF gene in the subretinal space was higher in AAV-BDNF-IPE than with AAV2-LacZ-IPE or with IPE-only transplantation. LacZ expression was observed in the subretinal space 7 and 90 days after transplantation. A statistically significant photoreceptor protection was observed on days 1 and 90 in eyes receiving the AAV2-BDNF-IPE transplant, in both the superior transplant site and the inferior hemispheres which did not receive the transplant. Transplantation of AAV2-BDNF-IPE cells may be an alternative method of delivering neurotrophic factors to the lesion.

  9. Downregulated Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Pathophysiology of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, Tapan; Kotwani, Anita

    2017-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of neurotrophin growth factor family, physiologically mediates induction of neurogenesis and neuronal differentiation, promotes neuronal growth and survival and maintains synaptic plasticity and neuronal interconnections. Unlike the central nervous system, its secretion in the peripheral nervous system occurs in an activity-dependent manner. BDNF improves neuronal mortality, growth, differentiation and maintenance. It also provides neuroprotection against several noxious stimuli, thereby preventing neuronal damage during pathologic conditions. However, in diabetic retinopathy (a neuromicrovascular disorder involving immense neuronal degeneration), BDNF fails to provide enough neuroprotection against oxidative stress-induced retinal neuronal apoptosis. This review describes the prime reasons for the downregulation of BDNF-mediated neuroprotective actions during hyperglycemia, which renders retinal neurons vulnerable to damaging stimuli, leading to diabetic retinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence for a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from the brain during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Brassard, Patrice; Adser, Helle

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an important role in regulating maintenance, growth and survival of neurons. However, the main source of circulating BDNF in response to exercise is unknown. To identify whether the brain is a source of BDNF during exercise, eight volunteers rowed for 4...... h while simultaneous blood samples were obtained from the radial artery and the internal jugular vein. To further identify putative cerebral region(s) responsible for BDNF release, mouse brains were dissected and analysed for BDNF mRNA expression following treadmill exercise. In humans, a BDNF...... release from the brain was observed at rest (P BDNF, while that contribution decreased following 1 h of recovery. In mice, exercise induced a three...

  11. [BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (BDNF): NEUROBIOLOGY AND MARKER VALUE IN NEUROPSYCHIATRY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levada, O A; Cherednichenko, N V

    2015-01-01

    In this review current publications about neurobiology and marker value of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in neuropsychiatry are analyzed. It is shown that BDNF is an important member of the family of neurotrophins which widely represented in various structures of the CNS. In prenatal period BDNF is involved in all stages of neuronal networks formation, and in the postnatal period its main role is maintaining the normal brain architectonics, involvement in the processes of neurogenesis and realization of neuroprotective functions. BDNF plays an important role in learning and memory organization, food and motor behavior. BDNF brain expression decreases with age, as well as in degenerative and vascular dementias, affective, anxiety, and behavioral disorders. The reducing of BDNF serum, level reflects the decreasing of its cerebral expression and could be used as a neurobiological marker of these pathological processes but the rising of its concentration could indicate the therapy effectiveness.

  12. Sex differences in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling: Functions and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yi-Chao; Wang, Shao-Ran; Xu, Xiao-Hong

    2017-01-02

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates diverse processes such as neuronal survival, differentiation, and plasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that molecular events that direct sexual differentiation of the brain interact with BDNF signaling pathways. This Mini-Review first examines potential hormonal and epigenetic mechanisms through which sex influences BDNF signaling. We then examine how sex-specific regulation of BDNF signaling supports the development and function of sexually dimorphic neural circuits that underlie male-specific genital reflexes in rats and song production in birds. Finally, we discuss the implications of sex differences in BDNF signaling for gender-biased presentation of neurological and psychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Although this Mini-Review focuses on BDNF, we try to convey the general message that sex influences brain functions in complex ways and underscore the requirement for and challenge of expanding research on sex differences in neuroscience. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Actions of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Glucocorticoid Stress in Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Numakawa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Altered neurogenesis is suggested to be involved in the onset of brain diseases, including mental disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Neurotrophic factors are well known for their positive effects on the proliferation/differentiation of both embryonic and adult neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs. Especially, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been extensively investigated because of its roles in the differentiation/maturation of NSCs/NPCs. On the other hand, recent evidence indicates a negative impact of the stress hormone glucocorticoids (GCs on the cell fate of NSCs/NPCs, which is also related to the pathophysiology of brain diseases, such as depression and autism spectrum disorder. Furthermore, studies including ours have demonstrated functional interactions between neurotrophic factors and GCs in neural events, including neurogenesis. In this review, we show and discuss relationships among the behaviors of NSCs/NPCs, BDNF, and GCs.

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor prevents dendritic retraction of adult mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binley, Kate E; Ng, Wai S; Barde, Yves-Alain; Song, Bing; Morgan, James E

    2016-08-01

    We used cultured adult mouse retinae as a model system to follow and quantify the retraction of dendrites using diolistic labelling of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) following explantation. Cell death was monitored in parallel by nuclear staining as 'labelling' with RGC and apoptotic markers was inconsistent and exceedingly difficult to quantify reliably. Nuclear staining allowed us to delineate a lengthy time window during which dendrite retraction can be monitored in the absence of RGC death. The addition of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) produced a marked reduction in dendritic degeneration, even when application was delayed for 3 days after retinal explantation. These results suggest that the delayed addition of trophic factors may be functionally beneficial before the loss of cell bodies in the course of conditions such as glaucoma. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Serum concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with gender identity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanari, Anna-Martha V; Andreazza, Tahiana; Costa, Ângelo B; Salvador, Jaqueline; Koff, Walter J; Aguiar, Bianca; Ferrari, Pamela; Massuda, Raffael; Pedrini, Mariana; Silveira, Esalba; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo S; Gama, Clarissa S; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia; Kapczinski, Flavio; Lobato, Maria Ines R

    2013-10-01

    Gender Identity Disorder (GID) is characterized by a strong and persistent cross-gender identification that affects different aspects of behavior. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity. Altered BDNF-signaling is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disordersand is related to traumatic life events. To examine serum BDNF levels, we compared one group of DSM-IV GID patients (n = 45) and one healthy control group (n = 66). Serum BDNF levels were significantly decreased in GID patients (p = 0.013). This data support the hypothesis that the reduction found in serum BDNF levels in GID patients may be related to the psychological abuse that transsexuals are exposed during their life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid control of male typical behaviors by brain-derived estrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornil, Charlotte A.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Beside their genomic mode of action, estrogens also activate a variety of cellular signaling pathways through non-genomic mechanisms. Until recently, little was known regarding the functional significance of such actions in males and the mechanism that control local estrogen concentration with a spatial and time resolution compatible with these non-genomic actions had rarely been examined. Here, we review evidence that estrogens rapidly modulate a variety of behaviors in male vertebrates. Then, we present in vitro work supporting the existence of a control mechanism of local brain estrogen synthesis by aromatase along with in vivo evidence that rapid changes in aromatase activity also occur in a region-specific manner in response to changes in the social or environmental context. Finally, we suggest that the brain estrogen provision may also play a significant role in females. Together these data bolster the hypothesis that brain-derived estrogens should be considered as neuromodulators. PMID:22983088

  17. The effects of physical activity and exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, T; Larsen, K T; Ried-Larsen, M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the effects of physical activity and exercise on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in healthy humans. Experimental and observational studies were identified from PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and SPORT Discus. A total of 32 articles...... met the inclusion criteria. Evidence from experimental studies suggested that peripheral BDNF concentrations were elevated by acute and chronic aerobic exercise. The majority of the studies suggested that strength training had no influence on peripheral BDNF. The results from most observational...... studies suggested an inverse relationship between the peripheral BDNF level and habitual physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness. More research is needed to confirm the findings from the observational studies....

  18. Characterization and functional analysis of Calmodulin and Calmodulin-like genes in Fragaria vesca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal messenger that is involved in the modulation of diverse developmental and adaptive processes in response to various stimuli. Calmodulin (CaM and calmodulin-like (CML proteins are major calcium sensors in all eukaryotes, and they have been extensively investigated for many years in plants and animals. However, little is known about CaMs and CMLs in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca. In this study, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the strawberry genome and identified 4 CaM and 36 CML genes. Bioinformatics analyses, including gene structure, phylogenetic tree, synteny and three-dimensional model assessments, revealed the conservation and divergence of FvCaMs and FvCMLs, thus providing insight regarding their functions. In addition, the transcript abundance of four FvCaM genes and the four most related FvCML genes were examined in different tissues and in response to multiple stress and hormone treatments. Moreover, we investigated the subcellular localization of several FvCaMs and FvCMLs, revealing their potential interactions based on the localizations and potential functions. Furthermore, overexpression of five FvCaM and FvCML genes could not induce a hypersensitive response, but four of the five genes could increase resistance to Agrobacterium tumefaciens in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. This study provides evidence for the biological roles of FvCaM and CML genes, and the results lay the foundation for future functional studies of these genes.

  19. 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-Heptamethoxyflavone Ameliorates Depressive-Like Behavior and Hippocampal Neurochemical Changes in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stressed Mice by Regulating the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: Requirement for ERK Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamoto, Atsushi; Okuyama, Satoshi; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Morio; Yamada, Takashi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Mitsunari

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that the subcutaneous administration of 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF), a citrus polymethoxyflavone, attenuated depressive-like behavior and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of a corticosterone-induced depression-like mouse model. We herein demonstrated that (1) HMF was detectable in the brain 10 and 30 min after its oral administration, (2) orally administered HMF improved chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced pathological conditions, including body weight loss and depressive-like behavior, and CUMS-induced neurochemical changes, such as reduction in BDNF expression, decrease in neurogenesis, and decreased level of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus, and (3) these effects of HMF were inhibited by the pre-administration of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that orally administered HMF is beneficial for the upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2)/MAP system, which may account for its antidepression effects. PMID:29023414

  20. 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-Heptamethoxyflavone, a Citrus Flavonoid, Ameliorates Corticosterone-Induced Depression-like Behavior and Restores Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression, Neurogenesis, and Neuroplasticity in the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Sawamoto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the citrus flavonoid 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus of a transient global ischemia mouse model. Since the BDNF hypothesis of depression postulates that a reduction in BDNF is directly involved in the pathophysiology of depression, we evaluated the anti-depressive effects of HMF in mice with subcutaneously administered corticosterone at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day for 25 days. We demonstrated that the HMF treatment ameliorated (1 corticosterone-induced body weight loss, (2 corticosterone-induced depression-like behavior, and (3 corticosterone-induced reductions in BDNF production in the hippocampus. We also showed that the HMF treatment restored (4 corticosterone-induced reductions in neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus subgranular zone and (5 corticosterone-induced reductions in the expression levels of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2. These results suggest that HMF exerts its effects as an anti-depressant drug by inducing the expression of BDNF.

  1. 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-Heptamethoxyflavone Ameliorates Depressive-Like Behavior and Hippocampal Neurochemical Changes in Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stressed Mice by Regulating the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor: Requirement for ERK Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Sawamoto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the subcutaneous administration of 3,5,6,7,8,3′,4′-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF, a citrus polymethoxyflavone, attenuated depressive-like behavior and increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus of a corticosterone-induced depression-like mouse model. We herein demonstrated that (1 HMF was detectable in the brain 10 and 30 min after its oral administration, (2 orally administered HMF improved chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS-induced pathological conditions, including body weight loss and depressive-like behavior, and CUMS-induced neurochemical changes, such as reduction in BDNF expression, decrease in neurogenesis, and decreased level of phosphorylated calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the hippocampus, and (3 these effects of HMF were inhibited by the pre-administration of U0126, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase inhibitor. These results suggest that orally administered HMF is beneficial for the upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2/MAP system, which may account for its antidepression effects.

  2. Isolation and characterization of calmodulin from spinach leaves and in vitro translation mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Van Eldik, Linda J; Grossman, Arthur R.; Iverson, David B.; Watterson, D Martin

    1980-01-01

    Calmodulin, a multifunctional calcium-modulated protein, has been isolated from spinach leaf tissue and from spinach leaf messenger RNA translation products. The translation protein and the spinach leaf protein have been partially characterized and compared to vertebrate calmodulins. Spinach leaf calmodulin will quantitatively activate bovine brain phosphodiesterase and will undergo a calcium-dependent shift in electrophoretic mobility similar to that of bovine brain calmodulin. In the presen...

  3. Calmodulin-mediated reversible immobilization of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G; Schauer-Vukasinovic, Vesna; Gregory, Kalvin J; Schrift, G; Deo, Sapna

    2007-07-01

    This work demonstrates the use of the protein calmodulin, CaM, as an affinity tag for the reversible immobilization of enzymes on surfaces. Our strategy takes advantage of the of the reversible, calcium-mediated binding of CaM to its ligand phenothiazine and of the ability to produce fusion proteins between CaM and a variety of enzymes to reversibly immobilize enzymes in an oriented fashion to different surfaces. Specifically, we employed two different enzymes, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and beta-lactamase and two different solid supports, a silica surface and cellulose membrane modified by covalently attaching a phenothiazine ligand, to demonstrate the versatility of our immobilization method. Fusion proteins between CaM-OPH and CaM-beta-lactamase were prepared by using genetic engineering strategies to introduce the calmodulin tail at the N-terminus of each of the two enzymes. In the presence of Ca(2+), CaM adopts a conformation that favors interaction between hydrophobic pockets in CaM and phenothiazine, while in the presence of a Ca(2+)-chelating agent such as EGTA, the interaction between CaM and phenothiazine is disrupted, thus allowing for removal of the CaM-fusion protein from the surface under mild conditions. CaM also acts as a spacer molecule, orienting the enzyme away from the surface and toward the solution, which minimizes enzyme interactions with the immobilization surface. Since the method is based on the highly selective binding of CaM to its phenothiazine ligand, and this is covalently immobilized on the surface, the method does not suffer from ligand leaching nor from interference from other proteins present in the cell extract. An additional advantage lies in that the support can be regenerated by passing through EGTA, and then reused for the immobilization of the same or, if desired, a different enzyme. Using a fusion protein approach for immobilization purposes avoids the use of harsh conditions in the immobilization and/or regeneration

  4. Structural Consequences of Calmodulin EF Hand Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michael; Taiakina, Valentina; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, J Guy

    2017-02-21

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding protein that serves as a control element for many enzymes. It consists of two globular domains, each containing two EF hand pairs capable of binding Ca(2+), joined by a flexible central linker region. CaM is able to bind and activate its target proteins in the Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-deplete forms. To study the Ca(2+)-dependent/independent properties of binding and activation of target proteins by CaM, CaM constructs with Ca(2+)-binding disrupting mutations of Asp to Ala at position one of each EF hand have been used. These CaM mutant proteins are deficient in binding Ca(2+) in either the N-lobe EF hands (CaM12), C-lobe EF hands (CaM34), or all four EF hands (CaM1234). To investigate potential structural changes these mutations may cause, we performed detailed NMR studies of CaM12, CaM34, and CaM1234 including determining the solution structure of CaM1234. We then investigated if these CaM mutants affected the interaction of CaM with a target protein known to interact with apoCaM by determining the solution structure of CaM34 bound to the iNOS CaM binding domain peptide. The structures provide direct structural evidence of changes that are present in these Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants and show these mutations increase the hydrophobic exposed surface and decrease the electronegative surface potential throughout each lobe of CaM. These Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants may not be a true representation of apoCaM and may not allow for native-like interactions of apoCaM with its target proteins.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) -TrKB signaling modulates cancer-endothelial cells interaction and affects the outcomes of triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Hsu, Chih-Yi; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    There is good evidence that the tumor microenvironment plays an important role in cancer metastasis and progression. Our previous studies have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in the process of metastasis and in the migration of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of BDNF on the tumor cell microenvironment, namely, the cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction of TNBC cells. We conducted oligoneucleotide microarray analysis of potential biomarkers that are able to differentiate recurrent TNBC from non-recurrent TNBC. The MDA-MB-231 and human endothelial HUVEC lines were used for this study and our approaches included functional studies, such as migration assay, as well as Western blot and real-time PCR analysis of migration and angiogenic signaling. In addition, we analyzed the survival outcome of TNBC breast cancer patients according to their expression level of BDNF using clinical samples. The results demonstrated that BDNF was able to bring about autocrinal (MDA-MB-231) and paracrinal (HUVECs) regulation of BDNF-TrkB gene expression and this affected cell migratory activity. The BDNF-induced migratory activity was blocked by inhibitors of ERK, PI3K and TrkB when MDA-MB-231 cells were examined, but only an inhibitor of ERK blocked this activity when HUVEC cells were used. Furthermore, decreased migratory activity was found for △BDNF and △TrkB cell lines. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) of MDA-MB-231 cells showed that BDNF is a key factor that is able to regulate a network made up of metalloproteases and calmodulin. Protein expression levels in a tissue array of tumor slices were found to be correlated with patient prognosis and the results showed that there was significant correlation of TrkB expression, but not of BDNF. expressionwith patient DFS and OS. Our study demonstrates that up-regulation of the BDNF signaling pathway seems tobe involved in the mechanism associated with early recurrence in

  6. Mutations in calmodulin cause ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Sondergaard, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    a substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe......Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a devastating inherited disorder characterized by episodic syncope and/or sudden cardiac arrest during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. Although rare, CPVT is suspected to cause...... calmodulin-binding-domain peptide at low calcium concentrations. We conclude that calmodulin mutations can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia and that the calmodulin genes are candidates for genetic screening of individual cases and families with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and unexplained sudden cardiac...

  7. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Effects of Treatment and Clinical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N.; Rizavi, Hooriyah S.; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2008-01-01

    The study determines the gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the lymphocytes of subjects with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) before and during treatment with mood stabilizers and in drug-free normal control subjects. Results indicate the potential of BDNF levels as a biomarker for PBD and as a treatment predictor and…

  8. Association between serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and plasma interleukin-6 in major depressive disorder with melancholic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patas, K.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Bus, B.A.A.; Vogelzangs, N.; Molendijk, M.L.; Elzinga, B.M.; Bosker, F.J.; Voshaar, R.C.O.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory processes as well as attenuation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) availability are involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Although it is generally presumed that these two systems interact negatively in the brain, preclinical and human in vitro

  9. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism, human memory, and synaptic neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Yvette N; McKay, Nicole S; Thompson, Christopher S; Hamm, Jeffrey P; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Some people have much better memory than others, and there is compelling evidence that a considerable proportion of this variation in memory ability is genetically inherited. A form of synaptic plasticity known as long-term potentiation (LTP) is the principal candidate mechanism underlying memory formation in neural circuits, and it might be expected, therefore, that a genetic influence on the degree of LTP might in turn influence memory abilities. Of the genetic variations thought to significantly influence mnemonic ability in humans, the most likely to have its effect via LTP is a single nucleotide polymorphism affecting brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF (Val66Met)]. However, although it is likely that BDNF influences memory via a modulation of acute plasticity (i.e., LTP), BDNF also has considerable influence on structural development of neural systems. Thus, the influence of BDNF (Val66Met) on mnemonic performance via influences of brain structure as well as function must also be considered. In this brief review, we will describe the phenomenon of LTP and its study in non-human animals. We will discuss the relatively recent attempts to translate this work to studies in humans. We will describe how this has enabled investigation of the effect of the BDNF polymorphism on LTP, on brain structure, and on memory performance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Differential activation of dendritic cells by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, O; Peiser, M; Altenähr, M; Knieling, H; Wanner, R; Hanf, G; Grosse, R; Suttorp, N

    2007-11-01

    Neurotrophins are involved in inflammatory reactions influencing several cells in health and disease including allergy and asthma. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in the induction of inflammatory processes with an increasing role in allergic diseases as well. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of neurotrophins on DC function. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells were generated from allergic and non-allergic donors. Neurotrophin receptors were demonstrated by western blotting, flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Activation of small GTPases was evaluated by pull-down assays. DCs were incubated with nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and supernatants were collected for measurement of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta. Receptor proteins were detectable by western blot, fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis and fluorescence microscopy. Signalling after neurotrophin stimulation occurred in a ligand-specific pattern. NGF led to decreased RhoA and increased Rac activation, while BDNF affected RhoA and Rac activity in a reciprocal fashion. Cells of allergics released a significantly increased amount of IL-6, while for healthy subjects a significantly higher amount of IL-10 was found. These data indicate that DCs are activated by the neurotrophins NGF and BDNF by different pathways in a receptor-dependant manner. These cells then may initiate inflammatory responses based on allergic sensitization releasing preferred cytokines inducing tolerance or a T-helper type 2 response.

  12. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway, life stress, and chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generaal, Ellen; Milaneschi, Yuri; Jansen, Rick; Elzinga, Bernet M; Dekker, Joost; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) disturbances and life stress, both independently and in interaction, have been hypothesized to induce chronic pain. We examined whether (a) the BDNF pathway (val(66)met genotype, gene expression, and serum levels), (b) early and recent life stress, and (c) their interaction are associated with the presence and severity of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain. Cross-sectional data are from 1646 subjects of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. The presence and severity of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain were determined using the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG) questionnaire. The BDNF val(66)met polymorphism, BDNF gene expression, and BDNF serum levels were measured. Early life stress before the age of 16 was assessed by calculating a childhood trauma index using the Childhood Trauma Interview. Recent life stress was assessed as the number of recent adverse life events using the List of Threatening Events Questionnaire. Compared to val(66)val, BDNF met carriers more often had chronic pain, whereas no differences were found for BDNF gene expression and serum levels. Higher levels of early and recent stress were both associated with the presence and severity of chronic pain (p impact of BDNF on chronic pain, it seems an independent factor in the onset and persistence of chronic pain. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Ketamine induces brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression via phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 5 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Miyeon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Min Hyeop; Kim, Yong-Seok; Son, Hyeon

    2017-08-05

    Ketamine shows promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of depression. The increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been associated with the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine, but the mechanism of BDNF induction is not well understood. In the current study, we demonstrate that the treatment of rats with ketamine results in the dose-dependent rapid upregulation of Bdnf promoter IV activity and expression of Bdnf exon IV mRNAs in rat hippocampal neurons. Transfection of histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5) into rat hippocampal neurons similarly induces Bdnf mRNA expression in response to ketamine, whereas transfection of a HDAC5 phosphorylation-defective mutant (Ser259 and Ser498 replaced by Ala259 and Ala498), results in the suppression of ketamine-mediated BDNF promoter IV transcriptional activity. Viral-mediated hippocampal knockdown of HDAC5 induces Bdnf mRNA and protein expression, and blocks the enhancing effects of ketamine on BDNF expression in both unstressed and stressed rats, and thereby providing evidence for the role of HDAC5 in the regulation of Bdnf expression. Taken together, our findings implicate HDAC5 in the ketamine-induced transcriptional regulation of Bdnf, and suggest that the phosphorylation of HDAC5 regulates the therapeutic actions of ketamine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on hepatocyte metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Yoni; Chapnik, Nava; Froy, Oren

    2017-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays crucial roles in the development, maintenance, plasticity and homeostasis of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Perturbing BDNF signaling in mouse brain results in hyperphagia, obesity, hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. Currently, little is known whether BDNF affects liver tissue directly. Our aim was to determine the metabolic signaling pathways activated after BDNF treatment in hepatocytes. Unlike its effect in the brain, BDNF did not lead to activation of the liver AKT pathway. However, AMP protein activated kinase (AMPK) was ∼3 times more active and fatty acid synthase (FAS) ∼2-fold less active, suggesting increased fatty acid oxidation and reduced fatty acid synthesis. In addition, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) was ∼3.5-fold less active together with its output the gluconeogenic transcript phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck), suggesting reduced gluconeogenesis. The levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3b (GSK3b) was ∼3-fold higher suggesting increased glycogen synthesis. In parallel, the expression levels of the clock genes Bmal1 and Cry1, whose protein products play also a metabolic role, were ∼2-fold increased and decreased, respectively. In conclusion, BDNF binding to hepatocytes leads to activation of catabolic pathways, such as fatty acid oxidation. In parallel gluconeogenesis is inhibited, while glycogen storage is triggered. This metabolic state mimics that of after breakfast, in which the liver continues to oxidize fat, stops gluconeogenesis and replenishes glycogen stores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and gray matter volume in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, S; Aggio, V; Hoogenboezem, T A; Ambrée, O; de Wit, H; Wijkhuijs, A J M; Locatelli, C; Colombo, C; Arolt, V; Drexhage, H A; Benedetti, F

    2017-02-01

    Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a severe psychiatric condition characterized by grey matter (GM) volumes reduction. Neurotrophic factors have been suggested to play a role in the neuroprogressive changes during the illness course. In particular peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker related to disease activity and neuroprogression in BD. The aim of our study was to investigate if serum levels of BDNF are associated with GM volumes in BD patients and healthy controls (HC). We studied 36 inpatients affected by a major depressive episode in course of BD type I and 17 HC. Analysis of variance was performed to investigate the effect of diagnosis on GM volumes in the whole brain. Threshold for significance was PBDNF levels compared with HC. Reduced GM volumes in BD patients compared to HC were observed in several brain areas, encompassing the caudate head, superior temporal gyrus, insula, fusiform gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex. The interaction analysis between BDNF levels and diagnosis showed a significant effect in the middle frontal gyrus. HC reported higher BDNF levels associated with higher GM volumes, whereas no association between BDNF and GM volumes was observed in BD. Our study seems to suggest that although the production of BDNF is increased in BD possibly to prevent and repair neural damage, its effects could be hampered by underlying neuroinflammatory processes interfering with the neurodevelopmental role of BDNF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Alzheimer's Disease: Risk, Mechanisms, and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing-Hui; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a neurotrophic support on neuron of central nervous system (CNS) and is a key molecule in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and memory storage in hippocampus. However, changes of BDNF level and expression have been reported in the CNS as well as blood of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in the last decade, which indicates a potential role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of AD. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the latest progress in the field of BDNF and its biological roles in AD pathogenesis. We will discuss the interaction between BDNF and amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, the effect of BDNF on synaptic repair in AD, and the association between BDNF polymorphism and AD risk. The most important is, enlightening the detailed biological ability and complicated mechanisms of action of BDNF in the context of AD would provide a future BDNF-related remedy for AD, such as increment in the production or release of endogenous BDNF by some drugs or BDNF mimics.

  17. The Effects of Acute Exercise on Memory and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etnier, Jennifer L; Wideman, Laurie; Labban, Jeffrey D; Piepmeier, Aaron T; Pendleton, Daniel M; Dvorak, Kelly K; Becofsky, Katie

    2016-08-01

    Acute exercise benefits cognition, and some evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in this effect. The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between exercise intensity, memory, and BDNF. Young adults completed 3 exercise sessions at different intensities relative to ventilator threshold (Vt) (VO 2max , Vt - 20%, Vt + 20%). For each session, participants exercised for approximately 30 min. Following exercise, they performed the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) to assess short-term memory, learning, and long-term memory recall. Twenty-four hours later, they completed the RAVLT recognition trial, which provided another measure of long-term memory. Blood was drawn before exercise, immediately postexercise, and after the 30-min recall test. Results indicated that long-term memory as assessed after the 24-hr delay differed as a function of exercise intensity with the largest benefits observed following maximal intensity exercise. BDNF data showed a significant increase in response to exercise; however, there were no differences relative to exercise intensity and there were no significant associations between BDNF and memory. Future research is warranted so that we can better understand how to use exercise to benefit cognitive performance.

  18. Effect of different anesthesia techniques on the serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, A B; Demirel, I; Erhan, O L; Firdolas, F; Ustundag, B

    2015-10-01

    Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels are associated with neurotransmission and cognitive functions. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of general anesthesia on BDNF levels. It was also to reveal whether this effect had a relationship with the surgical stress response or not. The study included 50 male patients, age 20-40, who were scheduled to have inguinoscrotal surgery, and who were in the ASA I-II risk group. The patients were divided into two groups according to the anesthesia techniques used: general (GA) and spinal (SA). In order to measure serum BDNF, cortisol, insulin and glucose levels, blood samples were taken at four different times: before and after anesthesia, end of the surgery, and before transferal from the recovery room. Serum BDNF levels were significantly low (p BDNF and the stress hormones. Our findings suggested that general anesthetics had an effect on serum BDNF levels independent of the stress response. In future, BDNF could be used as biochemical parameters of anesthesia levels, but studies with a greater scope should be carried out to present the relationship between anesthesia and neurotrophins.

  19. Gene Transfer of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Prevents Neurodegeneration Triggered by FXN Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsu-Jiménez, Yurika; Loría, Frida; Corona, Juan Carlos; Díaz-Nido, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is a predominantly neurodegenerative disease caused by recessive mutations that produce a deficiency of frataxin (FXN). Here, we have used a herpesviral amplicon vector carrying a gene encoding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to drive its overexpression in neuronal cells and test for its effect on FXN-deficient neurons both in culture and in the mouse cerebellum in vivo. Gene transfer of BDNF to primary cultures of mouse neurons prevents the apoptosis which is triggered by the knockdown of FXN gene expression. This neuroprotective effect of BDNF is also observed in vivo in a viral vector-based knockdown mouse cerebellar model. The injection of a lentiviral vector carrying a minigene encoding for a FXN-specific short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) into the mouse cerebellar cortex triggers a FXN deficit which is accompanied by significant apoptosis of granule neurons as well as loss of calbindin in Purkinje cells. These pathological changes are accompanied by a loss of motor coordination of mice as assayed by the rota-rod test. Coinjection of a herpesviral vector encoding for BDNF efficiently prevents both the development of cerebellar neuropathology and the ataxic phenotype. These data demonstrate the potential therapeutic usefulness of neurotrophins like BDNF to protect FXN-deficient neurons from degeneration.

  20. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects against tau-related neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, S-S; Shen, L-L; Zhu, C; Bu, X-L; Liu, Y-H; Liu, C-H; Yao, X-Q; Zhang, L-L; Zhou, H-D; Walker, D G; Tan, J; Götz, J; Zhou, X-F; Wang, Y-J

    2016-01-01

    Reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is characterized with the formation of neuritic plaques consisting of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. A growing body of evidence indicates a potential protective effect of BDNF against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in AD mouse models. However, the direct therapeutic effect of BDNF supplement on tauopathy in AD remains to be established. Here, we found that the BDNF level was reduced in the serum and brain of AD patients and P301L transgenic mice (a mouse model of tauopathy). Intralateral ventricle injection of adeno-associated virus carrying the gene encoding human BDNF (AAV-BDNF) achieved stable expression of BDNF gene and restored the BDNF level in the brains of P301L mice. Restoration of the BDNF level attenuated behavioral deficits, prevented neuron loss, alleviated synaptic degeneration and reduced neuronal abnormality, but did not affect tau hyperphosphorylation level in the brains of P301L mice. Long-term expression of AAV-BDNF in the brain was well tolerated by the mice. These findings suggest that the gene delivery of BDNF is a promising treatment for tau-related neurodegeneration for AD and other neurodegenerative disorders with tauopathy. PMID:27701410

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met genotype modulates amygdala habituation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Rodriguez, M Mercedes; New, Antonia S; Goldstein, Kim E; Rosell, Daniel; Yuan, Qiaoping; Zhou, Zhifeng; Hodgkinson, Colin; Goldman, David; Siever, Larry J; Hazlett, Erin A

    2017-05-30

    A deficit in amygdala habituation to repeated emotional stimuli may be an endophenotype of disorders characterized by emotion dysregulation, such as borderline personality disorder (BPD). Amygdala reactivity to emotional stimuli is genetically modulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) variants. Whether amygdala habituation itself is also modulated by BDNF genotypes remains unknown. We used imaging-genetics to examine the effect of BDNF Val66Met genotypes on amygdala habituation to repeated emotional stimuli. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 57 subjects (19 BPD patients, 18 patients with schizotypal personality disorder [SPD] and 20 healthy controls [HC]) during a task involving viewing of unpleasant, neutral, and pleasant pictures, each presented twice to measure habituation. Amygdala responses across genotypes (Val66Met SNP Met allele-carriers vs. Non-Met carriers) and diagnoses (HC, BPD, SPD) were examined with ANOVA. The BDNF 66Met allele was significantly associated with a deficit in amygdala habituation, particularly for emotional pictures. The association of the 66Met allele with a deficit in habituation to unpleasant emotional pictures remained significant in the subsample of BPD patients. Using imaging-genetics, we found preliminary evidence that deficient amygdala habituation may be modulated by BDNF genotype. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Post-traumatic stress disorder risk and brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Xian-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which regulates neuronal survival, growth differentiation, and synapse formation, is known to be associated with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the molecular mechanism for those mental disorders remains unknown. Studies have shown that BDNF is associated with PTSD risk and exaggerated startle reaction (a major arousal manifestation of PTSD) in United States military service members who were deployed during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The frequency of the Met/Met in BDNF gene was greater among those with PTSD than those without PTSD. Among individuals who experienced fewer lifetime stressful events, the Met carriers have significantly higher total and startle scores on the PTSD Checklist than the Val/Val carriers. In addition, subjects with PTSD showed higher levels of BDNF in their peripheral blood plasma than the non-probable-PTSD controls. Increased BDNF levels and startle response were observed in both blood plasma and brain hippocampus by inescapable tail shock in rats. In this paper, we reviewed these data to discuss BDNF as a potential biomarker for PTSD risk and its possible roles in the onset of PTSD. PMID:27014593

  4. Resilience to chronic stress is mediated by hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taliaz, Dekel; Loya, Assaf; Gersner, Roman; Haramati, Sharon; Chen, Alon; Zangen, Abraham

    2011-03-23

    Chronic stress is a trigger for several psychiatric disorders, including depression; however, critical individual differences in resilience to both the behavioral and the neurochemical effects of stress have been reported. A prominent mechanism by which the brain reacts to acute and chronic stress is activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which is inhibited by the hippocampus via a polysynaptic circuit. Alterations in secretion of stress hormones and levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus were implicated in depression and the effects of antidepressant medications. However, the potential role of hippocampal BDNF in behavioral resilience to chronic stress and in the regulation of the HPA axis has not been evaluated. In the present study, Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to 4 weeks of chronic mild stress (CMS) to induce depressive-like behaviors after lentiviral vectors were used to induce localized BDNF overexpression or knockdown in the hippocampus. The behavioral outcome was measured during 3 weeks after the CMS procedure, then plasma samples were taken for measurements of corticosterone levels, and finally hippocampal tissue was taken for BDNF measurements. We found that hippocampal BDNF expression plays a critical role in resilience to chronic stress and that reduction of hippocampal BDNF expression in young, but not adult, rats induces prolonged elevations in corticosterone secretion. The present study describes a mechanism for individual differences in responses to chronic stress and implicates hippocampal BDNF in the development of neural circuits that control adequate stress adaptations.

  5. The Effect of Maternal Hypothyroidism on Fetal Umbilical Cord Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüsnü Alptekin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is the most important neurotrophin, which helps the differen­tiation and growth of central and peripheral neurons, and facilitates synaptic transmission. In this study we aimed to investigate fetal cord BDNF levels of infants born from subclinical and clinical maternal hypothyroidism. Methods: This study was conducted on a total of 67 preg­nant women who were followed up in Obstetrics and Gy­necology outpatient clinics, 27 with maternal hypothyroid­ism and 40 age-parity matched healthy pregnants without hypothyroidism. Immediately after vaginal or cesarean delivery fetal cord blood samples were taken from these patients and BDNF levels were measured. Results: BDNF levels of infants born from pregnants with maternal hypothyroidism were significantly lower than the control group (23.3 ± 17.4 ng/dl and 50.7 ± 28.3 ng/dl respectively; p<0.001. In multiple linear regression analysis, while BDNF level was related with maternal hy­pothyroidism and infant sex, it was not associated with mode of delivery, maternal age, total weight gain during pregnancy, gestational age at birth, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels and other neonatal data. Conclusion: This study showed that fetal cord BDNF lev­els significantly decreased in infants of the pregnants with hypothyroidism.

  6. Elevated expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor facilitates visual imprinting in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keiko; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Suzuki, Shingo; Nakamori, Tomoharu; Sugiyama, Hayato; Kanamatsu, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2012-12-01

    With the aim of elucidating the neural mechanisms of early learning, we studied the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in visual imprinting in birds. The telencephalic neural circuit connecting the visual Wulst and intermediate medial mesopallium is critical for imprinting, and the core region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDCo), situated at the center of this circuit, has a key role in regulating the activity of the circuit. We found that the number of BDNF mRNA-positive cells in the HDCo was elevated during the critical period, particularly at its onset, on the day of hatching (P0). After imprinting training on P1, BDNF mRNA-positive cells in the HDCo increased in number, and tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkB was observed. BDNF infusion into the HDCo at P1 induced imprinting, even with a weak training protocol that does not normally induce imprinting. In contrast, K252a, an antagonist of Trk, inhibited imprinting. Injection of BDNF at P7, after the critical period, did not elicit imprinting. These results suggest that BDNF promotes the induction of imprinting through TrkB exclusively during the critical period. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. A critical threshold of rehabilitation involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for poststroke recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, Crystal L; Keough, Michael B; Granter-Button, Shirley; Chernenko, Garry A; Butt, Stephanie; Corbett, Dale

    2011-10-01

    Enriched rehabilitation (ER; environmental enrichment plus skilled reaching) improves recovery after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in rats. Fundamental issues such as whether ER is effective in other models, optimal rehabilitation intensity, and underlying recovery mechanisms have not been fully assessed. The authors tested whether the efficacy of ER varies with ischemia model and assessed the importance of rehabilitation intensity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in recovery. Rats in experiment 1 received 8 weeks of ER or remained in standard housing. Functional outcome was assessed with the staircase and cylinder tasks. Surprisingly, ER provided no functional benefit in any model. In this experiment, ER was delivered during the light phase, whereas other studies delivered ER in the dark phase of the light cycle. It was hypothesized that in the light, rats engaged in less rehabilitation or alternatively that BDNF was lower. Experiment 2 tested these hypotheses. Following MCAo, rats received ER in either the light or dark phase of the light cycle. Functional outcome was assessed and BDNF levels were measured in the motor cortex and hippocampus. Recovery was accompanied by increased BDNF. This occurred only in rats that received ER in the dark and these animals reached more than those in the light condition. Data suggest that there is a critical threshold of rehabilitation, below which recovery will not occur, and that BDNF mediates functional recovery. The use of intensive rehabilitation therapies for stroke patients is strongly supported.

  8. [Polymorphism of brain derived neurotrophic factor and recovery of functions after ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepert, J; Heller, A; Behnisch, G; Schoenfeld, A

    2015-10-01

    After ischemic stroke, many factors influence the restitution of functions. In particular they include the patient age, the initial stroke severity and the presence of cognitive and neuropsychological deficits. In this study we investigated whether a polymorphism in the gene encoding for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) influences improvements of motor functions and everyday activities. Patients with subacute ischemic stroke (n = 67) were examined at the beginning of an inpatient neurological rehabilitation, after 4 weeks of treatment and after 6 months. The Barthel index (BI) and the Rivermead motor assessment (RMA) were used to measure motor functions and everyday activities. Patients were allocated to three groups (valine [Val]/valine, val/methionine [Met] and Met/Met) depending on the BDNF polymorphism at codon 66. The 3 groups (Val/Val, n = 34 patients, Val/Met, n = 26 and Met/Met, n = 7) showed significant improvements in BI and RMA after 4 weeks and after 6 months as compared to the preceding measurements. The BI and RMA were positively correlated. The three groups did not differ with respect to the extent of improvement. After ischemic stroke, motor functions and everyday activities improved continuously over a period of at least 6 months. The BDNF polymorphism did not influence this development.

  9. AMPA receptor-induced local brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling mediates motor recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Andrew N; Overman, Justine J; Zhong, Sheng; Mueller, Rudolf; Lynch, Gary; Carmichael, S Thomas

    2011-03-09

    Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability. Recovery after stroke shares similar molecular and cellular properties with learning and memory. A main component of learning-induced plasticity involves signaling through AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We systematically tested the role of AMPAR function in motor recovery in a mouse model of focal stroke. AMPAR function controls functional recovery beginning 5 d after the stroke. Positive allosteric modulators of AMPARs enhance recovery of limb control when administered after a delay from the stroke. Conversely, AMPAR antagonists impair motor recovery. The contributions of AMPARs to recovery are mediated by release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in periinfarct cortex, as blocking local BDNF function in periinfarct cortex blocks AMPAR-mediated recovery and prevents the normal pattern of motor recovery. In contrast to a delayed AMPAR role in motor recovery, early administration of AMPAR agonists after stroke increases stroke damage. These findings indicate that the role of glutamate signaling through the AMPAR changes over time in stroke: early potentiation of AMPAR signaling worsens stroke damage, whereas later potentiation of the same signaling system improves functional recovery.

  10. Aerobic exercises enhance cognitive functions and brain derived neurotrophic factor in ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tamawy, Mohamed S; Abd-Allah, Foad; Ahmed, Sandra M; Darwish, Moshera H; Khalifa, Heba A

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of functional impairments. High percentage of these patients will experience some degree of cognitive affection, ranging from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. Demonstrate the role of aerobic exercises enhancing cognitive functions and its effect on Brain Derived Neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in post-ischemic stroke patients in the territory of anterior circulation. We included thirty Egyptian ischemic stroke patients in the territory of anterior circulation. They were divided into 2 groups; group 1 (G1) were subjected to physiotherapy program without aerobic exercises and group 2 (G2) were subjected to the same previous program followed by aerobic exercises. Both groups were subjected to pre- and post-treatment Addenbrookes's Cognitive Examination- Revised (ACER) and serum level of BDNF. Our results showed a significant improvement in ACER score in G2 compared to G1 post-treatment (p = 0.017). BDNF serum level significantly increased in G2 post-treatment compared to pre-treatment (p = 0.001) and compared to G1 group (p = 0.0458). ACER improvement was positively correlated to increase in serum level of BDNF (r = 0.53, p = 0.044). Aerobic exercises improve cognitive functions of ischemic stroke patients. This improvement is related to the increase in serum level of BDNF.

  11. Sex differences in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi Bun; Ye, Keqiang

    2017-01-02

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family that plays a critical role in numerous neuronal activities. Recent studies have indicated that some functions or action mechanisms of BDNF vary in a sex-dependent manner. In particular, BDNF content in some brain parts and the tendency to develop BDNF deficiency-related diseases such as depression are greater in female animals. With the support of relevant studies, it has been suggested that sex hormones or steroids can modulate the activities of BDNF, which may account for its functional discrepancy in different sexes. Indeed, the cross-talk between BDNF and sex steroids has been detected for decades, and some sex steroids, such as estrogen, have a positive regulatory effect on BDNF expression and signaling. Thus, the sex of animal models that are used in studying the functions of BDNF is critical. This Mini-Review summarizes our current findings on the differences in expression, signaling, and functions of BDNF between sexes. We also discuss the potential mechanisms for mediating these differential responses, with a specific emphasis on sex steroids. By presenting and discussing these findings, we seek to encourage researchers to take sex influences into consideration when designing experiments, interpreting results, and drawing conclusions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Maternal separation produces alterations of forebrain brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in differently aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong eWang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Early postnatal maternal separation (MS can play an important role in the development of psychopathologies during ontogeny. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day [PND] 1–21 on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, the nucleus accumbens (NAc and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21, adolescent (PND 35 and young adult (PND 56 Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased BDNF in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG of adolescent rats as well as in the DG of young adult rats. However, the expression of BDNF in the mPFC in the young adult rats was decreased by MS. Additionally, in the hippocampus, there was decreased BDNF expression with age in both the MS and socially reared rats. However, in the mPFC, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the socially reared rats; nevertheless, the BDNF expression was significantly decreased in the MS young adult rats. In the NAc, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the male NMS rats, and the young adult female MS rats had less BDNF expression than the adolescent female MS rats. The

  13. More inflammation but less brain-derived neurotrophic factor in antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Hu, Ming-Chuan; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Lin, Shih-Hsien; Li, Chia-Ling; Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Po See; Chen, Shih-Heng; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2017-11-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is highly comorbid with substance use disorders (SUDs). We hypothesize that chronic neuroinflammation and the loss of neurotrophic factors prompts the pathogenesis of both disorders. We used ELISA to measure plasma levels of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], C-reactive protein [CRP]) and anti-inflammatory factors (transforming growth factor-β1 [TGF-β1] and interleukin-10 [IL-10]), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in male patients with ASPD (n=74), SUDs (n=168), ASPD comorbid with SUDs (ASPD+SUDs) (n=438), and Healthy Controls (HCs) (n=81). A multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) controlled for possible confounders was used to compare cytokines and BDNF levels between groups. The results of MANCOVA adjusted for age showed a significant (pdisorder (OUD) and other SUDs groups showed that the IL-10 levels were specifically higher in OUD and ASPD±OUD groups than other SUDs (P≤0.001). We conclude that uncontrolled inflammation and losing neurotrophic factors, with or without comorbid SUDs, underlies ASPD. IL-10 expression might be more specifically associated with OUD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The correlation between perceived social support, cortisol and brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Doy Yung; Chang, Wei Hung; Chi, Mei Hung; Tsai, Hsin Chun; Yang, Yen Kuang; Chen, Po See

    2016-05-30

    In this study, the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in stress resilience was investigated. With a focus on healthy subjects, we explored whether plasma BDNF levels are correlated with the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) and subjectively perceived social support status. Moreover, we examined the possible interacting effect of DST status and perceived social support on BDNF levels. Seventy-two healthy volunteers, 44 females and 28 males, were recruited from the community and completed the perceived routine support subscale of Measurement of Support Function (PRS_MSF) questionnaire. Plasma BDNF levels and DST suppression rate with the low dose DST were measured. There was a significant positive correlation between BDNF and DST suppression rate in the female subjects. This was also true for the plasma BDNF levels and PRS_MSF in the female subjects. The positive correlation between BDNF and PRS_MSF was significant only in female subjects with low DST suppression rates. Plasma BDNF levels were associated with stress resilience in a sex-specific manner. Subjects' belief in social support might buffer the biological stress reactions. Differences in social perception and the biological stress response between men and women merits further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and mental disorders in imprisoned women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata M. Dotta-Panichi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Mental disorders and early trauma are highly prevalent in female inmates. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays an important role in learning, memory processes, and mood regulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum BDNF levels and mental disorders among imprisoned women as compared with age- and education-matched controls.Methods:A consecutively recruited sample of 18 female prisoners with mental disorders was assessed for sociodemographic, criminal, and clinical variables using standardized instruments, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus (MINI Plus, and serum BDNF levels.Results:High rates of childhood sexual abuse and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD were found in the group of forensic patients. Serum BDNF levels in the forensic group did not differ from those of healthy controls, and were significantly higher when compared with those of women with mental disorders hospitalized in a general hospital.Conclusion:Elevated serum BDNF levels were found in imprisoned women. The results of this study may suggest neurobiological mechanisms similar to those seen in previous clinical and preclinical studies showing the involvement of BDNF in the pathophysiology of PTSD.

  16. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Autism: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Rezaei, Nima

    2017-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Altered blood BDNF levels have been frequently identified in people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There are however wide discrepancies in the evidence. Therefore, we performed the present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at qualitative and quantitative synthesis of studies that measured blood BDNF levels in ASD and control subjects. Observational studies were identified through electronic database searching and also hand-searching of reference lists of relevant articles. A total of 183 papers were initially identified for review and eventually twenty studies were included in the meta-analysis. A meta-analysis of blood BDNF in 887 patients with ASD and 901 control subjects demonstrated significantly higher BDNF levels in ASD compared to controls with the SMD of 0.47 (95% CI 0.07-0.86, p = 0.02). In addition subgroup meta-analyses were performed based on the BDNF specimen. The present meta-analysis study led to conclusion that BDNF might play role in autism initiation/ propagation and therefore it can be considered as a possible biomarker of ASD.

  17. Role of Hypoxia-Induced Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hartman

    Full Text Available Hypoxia effects on pulmonary artery structure and function are key to diseases such as pulmonary hypertension. Recent studies suggest that growth factors called neurotrophins, particularly brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, can influence lung structure and function, and their role in the pulmonary artery warrants further investigation. In this study, we examined the effect of hypoxia on BDNF in humans, and the influence of hypoxia-enhanced BDNF expression and signaling in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs.48h of 1% hypoxia enhanced BDNF and TrkB expression, as well as release of BDNF. In arteries of patients with pulmonary hypertension, BDNF expression and release was higher at baseline. In isolated PASMCs, hypoxia-induced BDNF increased intracellular Ca2+ responses to serotonin: an effect altered by HIF1α inhibition or by neutralization of extracellular BDNF via chimeric TrkB-Fc. Enhanced BDNF/TrkB signaling increased PASMC survival and proliferation, and decreased apoptosis following hypoxia.Enhanced expression and signaling of the BDNF-TrkB system in PASMCs is a potential mechanism by which hypoxia can promote changes in pulmonary artery structure and function. Accordingly, the BDNF-TrkB system could be a key player in the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular diseases, and thus a potential target for therapy.

  18. Selective loss of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the dentate gyrus attenuates antidepressant efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Megumi; Barrot, Michel; Autry, Anita E; Theobald, David; Monteggia, Lisa M

    2008-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in neural plasticity in the adult nervous system and has been suggested as a target gene for antidepressant treatment. The neurotrophic hypothesis of depression suggests that loss of BDNF from the hippocampus contributes to an increased vulnerability for depression, whereas upregulation of BDNF in the hippocampus is suggested to mediate antidepressant efficacy. We have used a viral-mediated gene transfer approach to assess the role of BDNF in subregions of the hippocampus in a broad array of behavioral paradigms, including depression-like behavior and antidepressant responses. We have combined the adeno-associated virus (AAV) with the Cre/loxP site-specific recombination system to induce the knockout of BDNF selectively in either the CA1 or dentate gyrus (DG) subregions of the hippocampus. We show that the loss of BDNF in either the CA1 or the DG of the hippocampus does not alter locomotor activity, anxiety-like behavior, fear conditioning, or depression-related behaviors. However, the selective loss of BDNF in the DG but not the CA1 region attenuates the actions of desipramine and citalopram in the forced swim test. These data suggest that the loss of hippocampal BDNF per se is not sufficient to mediate depression-like behavior. However, these results support the view that BDNF in the DG might be essential in mediating the therapeutic effect of antidepressants.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects against tau-related neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, S-S; Shen, L-L; Zhu, C; Bu, X-L; Liu, Y-H; Liu, C-H; Yao, X-Q; Zhang, L-L; Zhou, H-D; Walker, D G; Tan, J; Götz, J; Zhou, X-F; Wang, Y-J

    2016-10-04

    Reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is characterized with the formation of neuritic plaques consisting of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. A growing body of evidence indicates a potential protective effect of BDNF against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in AD mouse models. However, the direct therapeutic effect of BDNF supplement on tauopathy in AD remains to be established. Here, we found that the BDNF level was reduced in the serum and brain of AD patients and P301L transgenic mice (a mouse model of tauopathy). Intralateral ventricle injection of adeno-associated virus carrying the gene encoding human BDNF (AAV-BDNF) achieved stable expression of BDNF gene and restored the BDNF level in the brains of P301L mice. Restoration of the BDNF level attenuated behavioral deficits, prevented neuron loss, alleviated synaptic degeneration and reduced neuronal abnormality, but did not affect tau hyperphosphorylation level in the brains of P301L mice. Long-term expression of AAV-BDNF in the brain was well tolerated by the mice. These findings suggest that the gene delivery of BDNF is a promising treatment for tau-related neurodegeneration for AD and other neurodegenerative disorders with tauopathy.

  20. Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Different Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariacarla Ventriglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent evidence indicates the involvement of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson’s disease (PD. In the present study, we compared serum BDNF in 624 subjects: 266 patients affected by AD, 28 by frontotemporal dementia (FTD, 40 by Lewy body dementia (LBD, 91 by vascular dementia (VAD, 30 by PD, and 169 controls. Our results evidenced lower BDNF serum levels in AD, FTD, LBD, and VAD patients (P<0.001 and a higher BDNF concentration in patients affected by PD (P=0.045. Analyses of effects of pharmacological treatments suggested significantly higher BDNF serum levels in patients taking mood stabilizers/antiepileptics (P=0.009 and L-DOPA (P<0.001 and significant reductions in patients taking benzodiazepines (P=0.020. In conclusion, our results support the role of BDNF alterations in neurodegenerative mechanisms common to different forms of neurological disorders and underline the importance of including drug treatment in the analyses to avoid confounding effects.

  1. The Impact of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene on Trauma and Spatial Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica K; McDougall, Siné; Thomas, Sarah; Wiener, Jan

    2017-11-27

    The influence of genes and the environment on the development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) continues to motivate neuropsychological research, with one consistent focus being the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene, given its impact on the integrity of the hippocampal memory system. Research into human navigation also considers the BDNF gene in relation to hippocampal dependent spatial processing. This speculative paper brings together trauma and spatial processing for the first time and presents exploratory research into their interactions with BDNF. We propose that quantifying the impact of BDNF on trauma and spatial processing is critical and may well explain individual differences in clinical trauma treatment outcomes and in navigation performance. Research has already shown that the BDNF gene influences PTSD severity and prevalence as well as navigation behaviour. However, more data are required to demonstrate the precise hippocampal dependent processing mechanisms behind these influences in different populations and environmental conditions. This paper provides insight from recent studies and calls for further research into the relationship between allocentric processing, trauma processing and BDNF. We argue that research into these neural mechanisms could transform PTSD clinical practice and professional support for individuals in trauma-exposing occupations such as emergency response, law enforcement and the military.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor into adult neocortex strengthens a taste aversion memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F; Escobar, Martha L

    2016-01-15

    Nowadays, it is known that brain derived neurotrophic-factor (BDNF) is a protein critically involved in regulating long-term memory related mechanisms. Previous studies from our group in the insular cortex (IC), a brain structure of the temporal lobe implicated in acquisition, consolidation and retention of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), demonstrated that BDNF is essential for CTA consolidation. Recent studies show that BDNF-TrkB signaling is able to mediate the enhancement of memory. However, whether BDNF into neocortex is able to enhance aversive memories remains unexplored. In the present work, we administrated BDNF in a concentration capable of inducing in vivo neocortical LTP, into the IC immediately after CTA acquisition in two different conditions: a "strong-CTA" induced by 0.2M lithium chloride i.p. as unconditioned stimulus, and a "weak-CTA" induced by 0.1M lithium chloride i.p. Our results show that infusion of BDNF into the IC converts a weak CTA into a strong one, in a TrkB receptor-dependent manner. The present data suggest that BDNF into the adult insular cortex is sufficient to increase an aversive memory-trace. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promoter methylation and cortical thickness in recurrent major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Kyoung-Sae; Won, Eunsoo; Kang, June; Chang, Hun Soo; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Yong-Ku; Lee, Min-Soo; Joe, Sook-Haeng; Kim, Hyun; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2016-02-15

    Recent studies have reported that methylation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene promoter is associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to investigate the association between cortical thickness and methylation of BDNF promoters as well as serum BDNF levels in MDD. The participants consisted of 65 patients with recurrent MDD and 65 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Methylation of BDNF promoters and cortical thickness were compared between the groups. The right medial orbitofrontal, right lingual, right lateral occipital, left lateral orbitofrontal, left pars triangularis, and left lingual cortices were thinner in patients with MDD than in healthy controls. Among the MDD group, right pericalcarine, right medical orbitofrontal, right rostral middle frontal, right postcentral, right inferior temporal, right cuneus, right precuneus, left frontal pole, left superior frontal, left superior temporal, left rostral middle frontal and left lingual cortices had inverse correlations with methylation of BDNF promoters. Higher levels of BDNF promoter methylation may be closely associated with the reduced cortical thickness among patients with MDD. Serum BDNF levels were significantly lower in MDD, and showed an inverse relationship with BDNF methylation only in healthy controls. Particularly the prefrontal and occipital cortices seem to indicate key regions in which BDNF methylation has a significant effect on structure.

  4. Effect of Oxcarbazepine on Serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Bipolar Mania: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; Mishra, Biswa Ranjan; Jowhar, Jaseem; Mohapatra, Debadatta; Parida, Sansita; Bisoi, Debasis

    2017-05-31

    In bipolar disorder, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level decreases leading to dysfunctions of critical neurotrophic, cellular plasticity and neuroprotective processes. The present study was conducted to evaluate the change in serum BDNF level with oxcarbazepine monotherapy in bipolar mania. The present study is a prospective, interventional, open label clinical study conducted on 25 patients of bipolar mania and 25 healthy controls. Detailed history, clinical evaluation including Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) scoring and serum BDNF were assessed at baseline for all 50 subjects. The bipolar patients were prescribed tablet oxcarbazepine and followed up after 4 weeks for clinical evaluation and re-estimation of serum BDNF and YMRS scoring. The serum BDNF level in bipolar manic patients were compared with healthy controls at baseline and results revealed that there is a significant reduction (p=0.002) in serum BDNF level in bipolar patients. At follow-up after 4 weeks, the mean change in serum BDNF in bipolar group who were on oxcarbazepine monotherapy was found statistically significant (p=0.02) in comparison to healthy controls. In bipolar group, the YMRS score and serum BDNF at baseline have an inverse relation(r=-0.59) whereas change of the YMRS score had a positive correlation (r=0.67) with the change of serum BDNF over 4 weeks. In bipolar mania serum BDNF level is low and it is found to be increased with short term monotherapy with oxcarbazepine.

  5. The Pattern of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in the Hippocampus of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Salehi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sThe aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of regular exercise in preventing diabetes complication in the hippocampus of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rat.Materials and MethodsA total of 48 male wistar rats were divided into four groups (control, control exercise, diabetic and diabetic exercise. Diabetes was induced by injection of single dose of STZ. Exercise was performed for one hr every day, over a period of 8 weeks. The antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPX, CAT and GR and oxidant indexes with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF protein and its mRNA and apoptosis were measured in hippocampus of rats. ResultsA significant decrease in antioxidant enzymes activities and increased malondialdehyde (MDA level were observed in diabetic rats (P= 0.004. In response to exercise, antioxidant enzymes activities increased (P= 0.004. In contrast, MDA level decreased in diabetic rats (P= 0.004. Induction of diabetes caused an increase of BDNF protein and its mRNA expression. In response to exercise, BDNF protein and its mRNA expression reduced in hippocampus of diabetic rats. ConclusionDiabetes induced oxidative stress and increased BDNF gene expression. Exercise ameliorated oxidative stress and decreased BDNF gene expression.

  6. Calmodulin kinase is a molecular switch for cardiac excitation –contraction coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Colbran, Roger J.; Anderson, Mark E.

    2001-01-01

    Signaling between cell membrane-bound L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCC) and ryanodine receptor Ca2+ release channels (RyR) on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) stores grades excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) in striated muscle. A physical connection regulates LTCC and RyR in skeletal muscle, but the molecular mechanism for coordinating LTCC and RyR in cardiomyocytes, where this physical link is absent, is unknown. Calmodulin kinase (CaMK) has characteristics suitable for an ECC coordinating molecule: it is activated by Ca2+/calmodulin, it regulates LTCC and RyR, and it is enriched in the vicinity of LTCC and RyR. Intact cardiomyocytes were studied under conditions where CaMK activity could be controlled independently of intracellular Ca2+ by using an engineered Ca2+-independent form of CaMK and a highly specific CaMK inhibitory peptide. CaMK reciprocally enhanced L-type Ca2+ current and reduced release of Ca2+ from the SR while increasing SR Ca2+ content. These findings support the hypothesis that CaMK is required to functionally couple LTCC and RyR during cardiac ECC. PMID:11226334

  7. dependent/calmodulin- stimulated protein kinase from moss ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    lin-dependent protein kinase homolog; Planta 203 S91–. S97. Lu Y-T, Hidaka H and Feldman L J 1996 Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism; Planta. 199 18–24. Mitra D and Johri M M 2000 Enhanced expression of a cal-.

  8. An active form of calcium and calmodulin dependant protein kinase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The DMI3 gene of the model legume Medicago truncatula encodes a calcium and calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) involved in the signalling pathways leading to the establishment of both mycorrhizal and rhizobial root symbiosis. The removal of the auto-inhibitory domain that negatively regulates the kinase ...

  9. Involvement of calcium and calmodulin signaling in adaptation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heat stress is a common form of stress suffered by plants. Therefore, plants have evolved mechanisms to cope with the problems caused by high temperatures. In this study, the involvement of calcium ion and calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM) in the protection against heat stress-induced oxidative damage in tomato (Solanum ...

  10. Alteration of the irisin–brain-derived neurotrophic factor axis contributes to disturbance of mood in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papp C

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Csaba Papp,1 Krisztian Pak,2 Tamas Erdei,2 Bela Juhasz,2 Ildiko Seres,3 Anita Szentpéteri,3 Laszlo Kardos,4 Maria Szilasi,5 Rudolf Gesztelyi,2 Judit Zsuga1 1Department of Health Systems Management and Quality Management for Health Care, Faculty of Public Health, 2Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, 4Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Infectious Diseases and Allergology, Kenezy Gyula Teaching County Hospital and Outpatient Clinic, 5Department of Pulmonology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Debrecen, Hungary Abstract: COPD is accompanied by limited physical activity, worse quality of life, and increased prevalence of depression. A possible link between COPD and depression may be irisin, a myokine, expression of which in the skeletal muscle and brain positively correlates with physical activity. Irisin enhances the synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a neurotrophin involved in reward-related processes. Thus, we hypothesized that mood disturbances accompanying COPD are reflected by the changes in the irisin–BDNF axis. Case history, routine laboratory parameters, serum irisin and BDNF levels, pulmonary function, and disease-specific quality of life, measured by St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ, were determined in a cohort of COPD patients (n=74. Simple and then multiple linear regression were used to evaluate the data. We found that mood disturbances are associated with lower serum irisin levels (SGRQ’s Impacts score and reciprocal of irisin showed a strong positive association; β: 419.97; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 204.31, 635.63; P<0.001. This association was even stronger among patients in the lower 50% of BDNF levels (β: 434.11; 95% CI: 166.17, 702.05; P=0.002, while it became weaker for patients in the higher 50% of BDNF concentrations (β: 373.49; 95% CI: -74.91, 821.88; P=0

  11. Regulation of fear extinction by long-term depression: The roles of endocannabinoids and brain derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Maxwell R; Arnold, Jonathon; Hatton, Sean N; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2017-02-15

    The extinction of a conditioned fear response is of great interest in the search for a means of ameliorating adverse neurobiological changes resulting from stress. The discovery that endocannibinoid (EC) levels are inversely related to the extent of such stress, and that the amygdala is a primary site mediating stress, suggests that ECs in this brain region might play a major role in extinction. Supporting this are the observations that the basolateral complex of the amygdala shows an increase in ECs only during extinction and that early clinical trials indicate that cannabinoid-like agents, when taken orally by patients suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), reduce insomnia and nightmares. In order to optimize the potential of these agents to ameliorate symptoms of PTSD four important questions need to be answered: first, what is the identity of the cells that release ECs in the amygdala during extinction; second, what are their sites of action; third, what roles do the ECs play in the alleviation of long- depression (LTD), a process central to extinction; and finally, to what extent does brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) facilitate the release of ECs? A review of the relevant literature is presented in an attempt to answer these questions. It is suggested that the principal cell involved in EC synthesis and release during extinction is the so-called excitatory extinction neuron in the basal nucleus of the amygdala. Furthermore that the main site of action of the ECs is the adjacent calcitonin gene-related peptide inhibitory interneurons, whose normal role of blocking the excitatory neurons is greatly diminished. The molecular pathways leading (during extinction trials) to the synthesis and release of ECs from synaptic spines of extinction neurons, that is potentiated by BDNF, are also delineated in this review. Finally, consideration is given to how the autocrine action of BDNF, linked to the release of ECs, can lead to the sustained release

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates immune reaction in mice with peripheral nerve xenotransplantation

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    Yu X

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xin Yu,1 Laijin Lu,1 Zhigang Liu,1 Teng Yang,2 Xu Gong,1 Yubo Ning,3 Yanfang Jiang4 1Department of Hand Surgery, 2Department of Orthopedics, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 3Department of Orthopedics, Ningshi Orthopedics Hospital of Tonghua, Tonghua, 4Department of Central Laboratory, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been demonstrated to play an important role in survival, differentiation, and neurite outgrowth for many types of neurons. This study was designed to identify the role of BDNF during peripheral nerve xenotransplantation. Materials and methods: A peripheral nerve xenotransplantation from rats to mice was performed. Intracellular cytokines were stained for natural killer (NK cells, natural killer T (NKT cells, T cells, and B cells and analyzed by flow cytometry in the spleen of the recipient mouse. Serum levels of related cytokines were quantified by cytometric bead array. Results: Splenic NK cells significantly increased in the xenotransplanted mice (8.47±0.88×107 cells/mL compared to that in the control mice (4.66±0.78×107 cells/mL, P=0.0003, which significantly reduced in the presence of BDNF (4.85±0.87×107 cells/mL, P=0.0004. In contrast, splenic NKT cell number was significantly increased in the mice with xenotransplantation plus BDNF (XT + BDNF compared to that of control group or of mice receiving xenotransplantation only (XT only. Furthermore, the number of CD3+ T cells, CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD3+CD4- T cells, interferon-γ-producing CD3+CD4+ T cells, and interleukin (IL-17-producing CD3+CD4+ T cells, as well as CD3-CD19+ B cells, was significantly higher in the spleen of XT only mice compared to the control mice (P<0.05, which was significantly reduced by BDNF (P<0.05. The number of IL-4-producing CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells was significantly higher in the spleen of XT + BDNF

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor preserves intestinal mucosal barrier function and alters gut microbiota in mice

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    Chen Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal mucosal barrier (IMB enables the intestine to provide adequate containment of luminal microorganisms and molecules while preserving the ability to absorb nutrients. In this study, we explored the effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF on IMB function and gut microbiota in mice. BDNF gene knock-out mice (the BDNF+/− group and wild-type mice (the BDNF+/+ group were selected. The gut microbiota of these mice was analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE assay. The ultrastructure of the ileum and the colonic epithelium obtained from decapitated mice were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The protein expression of epithelial tight junction proteins, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 and occludin was detected by immunohistochemistry staining. The protein expression of claudin-1 and claudin-2 was determined by Western blotting. The DGGE band patterns of gut microbiota in the BDNF+/− group were significantly different from that in the BDNF+/+ group, which indicated that the BDNF expression alters the gut microbiota in mice. Compared with the BDNF+/+ group, the BDNF+/− group presented no significant difference in the ultrastructure of ileal epithelium; however, a significant difference was observed in the colonic epithelial barrier, manifested by decreased microvilli, widening intercellular space and bacterial invasion. Compared with the BDNF+/+ group, the expression of ZO-1 and occludin in the BDNF+/− group was significantly decreased. The expression of claudin-1 in the BDNF+/− group was significantly reduced, while the expression of claudin-2 was elevated. These findings indicate that BDNF preserves IMB function and modulates gut microbiota in mice.

  14. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator enhances microparticle release from mouse brain-derived endothelial cells through plasmin.

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    Garraud, Marie; Khacef, Kahina; Vion, Anne-Clémence; Leconte, Claire; Yin, Min; Renard, Jean-Marie; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Boulanger, Chantal M; Margaill, Isabelle; Beray-Berthat, Virginie

    2016-11-15

    Thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is currently the only approved pharmacological strategy for acute ischemic stroke. However, rt-PA exhibits vascular toxicity mainly due to endothelial damage. To investigate the mechanisms underlying rt-PA-induced endothelial alterations, we assessed the role of rt-PA in the generation of endothelial microparticles (EMPs), emerging biological markers and effectors of endothelial dysfunction. The mouse brain-derived endothelial cell line bEnd.3 was used. Cells were treated with rt-PA at 20, 40 or 80μg/ml for 15 or 24h, and EMPs were quantified in the culture media using Annexin-V staining coupled with flow cytometry. Rt-PA enhanced EMP release from bEnd.3 cells with a maximal increase at the 40μg/ml dose for 24h (+78% compared to controls). Using tranexamic acid and aprotinin we demonstrated that plasmin is responsible for rt-PA-induced EMP release. The p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitor PJ34 also reduced rt-PA-induced EMP production, suggesting that p38 MAPK and PARP are downstream intracellular effectors of rt-PA/plasmin. Rt-PA also altered through plasmin the morphology and the confluence of bEnd.3 cells. By contrast, these changes did not implicate p38 MAPK and PARP. This study demonstrates that rt-PA induces the production of microparticles by cerebral endothelial cells, through plasmin, p38 MAPK and PARP pathways. Determining the phenotype of these EMPs to clarify their role on the endothelium in ischemic conditions could thus be of particular interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ethanol alters cell fate of fetal human brain-derived stem and progenitor cells.

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    Vangipuram, Sharada D; Lyman, William D

    2010-09-01

    Prenatal ethanol (ETOH) exposure can lead to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). We previously showed that ETOH alters cell adhesion molecule gene expression and increases neurosphere size in fetal brain-derived neural stem cells (NSC). Here, our aim was to determine the effect of ETOH on the cell fate of NSC, premature glial-committed precursor cells (GCP), and premature neuron-committed progenitor cells (NCP). NSC, GCP, and NCP were isolated from normal second-trimester fetal human brains (n = 3) by positive selection using magnetic microbeads labeled with antibodies to CD133 (NSC), A2B5 (GCP), or PSA-NCAM (NCP). As a result of the small percentage in each brain, NSC were cultured in mitogenic media for 72 hours to produce neurospheres. The neurospheres from NSC and primary isolates of GCP and NCP were used for all experiments. Equal numbers of the 3 cell types were treated either with mitogenic media or with differentiating media, each containing 0 or 100 mM ETOH, for 120 hours. Expression of Map2a, GFAP, and O4 was determined by immunoflourescence microscopy and western blot analysis. Fluorescence intensities were quantified using Metamorph software by Molecular Devices, and the bands of western blots were quantified using densitometry. ETOH in mitogenic media promoted formation of neurospheres by NSC, GCP, and NCP. Under control conditions, GCP attached and differentiated, NSC and NCP formed neurospheres that were significantly smaller in size than those in ETOH. Under differentiating conditions, Map2a expression increased significantly in NSC and GCP and reduced significantly in NCP, and GFAP expression reduced significantly in GCP and NCP, and Gal-C expression reduced significantly in all 3 cell types in the presence of ETOH compared to controls. This study shows that ETOH alters the cell fate of neuronal stem and progenitor cells. These alterations could contribute to the mechanism for the abnormal brain development in FASD.

  16. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene Val66Met polymorphism with primary dysmenorrhea.

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    Lin-Chien Lee

    Full Text Available Primary dysmenorrhea (PDM, the most prevalent menstrual cycle-related problem in women of reproductive age, is associated with negative moods. Whether the menstrual pain and negative moods have a genetic basis remains unknown. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a key role in the production of central sensitization and contributes to chronic pain conditions. BDNF has also been implicated in stress-related mood disorders. We screened and genotyped the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265 in 99 Taiwanese (Asian PDMs (20-30 years old and 101 age-matched healthy female controls. We found that there was a significantly higher frequency of the Met allele of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in the PDM group. Furthermore, BDNF Met/Met homozygosity had a significantly stronger association with PDM compared with Val carrier status. Subsequent behavioral/hormonal assessments of sub-groups (PDMs = 78, controls = 81; eligible for longitudinal multimodal neuroimaging battery studies revealed that the BDNF Met/Met homozygous PDMs exhibited a higher menstrual pain score (sensory dimension and a more anxious mood than the Val carrier PDMs during the menstrual phase. Although preliminary, our study suggests that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is associated with PDM in Taiwanese (Asian people, and BDNF Met/Met homozygosity may be associated with an increased risk of PDM. Our data also suggest the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism as a possible regulator of menstrual pain and pain-related emotions in PDM. Absence of thermal hypersensitivity may connote an ethnic attribution. The presentation of our findings calls for further genetic and neuroscientific investigations of PDM.

  17. Effect of Intensive Training on Mood With No Effect on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor.

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    Piacentini, Maria Francesca; Witard, Oliver C; Tonoli, Cajsa; Jackman, Sarah R; Turner, James E; Kies, Arie K; Jeukendrup, Asker E; Tipton, Kevin D; Meeusen, Romain

    2016-09-01

    Monitoring mood state is a useful tool for avoiding nonfunctional overreaching. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in stress-related mood disorders. To investigate the impact of intensified training-induced mood disturbance on plasma BDNF concentrations at rest and in response to exercise. Eight cyclists performed 1 wk of normal (NT), 1 wk of intensified (INT), and 1 wk of recovery (REC) training. Fasted blood samples were collected before and after exercise on day 7 of each training week and analyzed for plasma BDNF and cortisol concentrations. A 24-item Profile of Mood State questionnaire was administered on day 7 of each training week, and global mood score (GMS) was calculated. Time-trial performance was impaired during INT (P = .01) and REC (P = .02) compared with NT. Basal plasma cortisol (NT = 153 ± 16 ng/mL, INT = 130 ± 11 ng/mL, REC = 150 ± 14 ng/ml) and BDNF (NT = 484 ± 122 pg/mL, INT = 488 ± 122 pg/mL, REC = 383 ± 56 pg/mL) concentrations were similar between training conditions. Likewise, similar exercise-induced increases in cortisol and BDNF concentrations were observed between training conditions. GMS was 32% greater during INT vs NT (P < .001). Consistent with a state of functional overreaching (FOR), impairments in performance and mood state with INT were restored after 1 wk of REC. These results support evidence for mood changes before plasma BDNF concentrations as a biochemical marker of FOR and that cortisol is not a useful marker for predicting FOR.

  18. Use of Brevibacillus choshinensis for the production of biologically active brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

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    Angart, Phillip A; Carlson, Rebecca J; Thorwall, Sarah; Patrick Walton, S

    2017-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family critical for neuronal cell survival and differentiation, with therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurological disorders and spinal cord injuries. The production of recombinant, bioactive BDNF is not practical in most traditional microbial expression systems because of the inability of the host to correctly form the characteristic cystine-knot fold of BDNF. Here, we investigated Brevibacillus choshinensis as a suitable expression host for bioactive BDNF expression, evaluating the effects of medium type (2SY and TM), temperature (25 and 30 °C), and culture time (48-120 h). Maximal BDNF bioactivity (per unit mass) was observed in cultures grown in 2SY medium at extended times (96 h at 30 °C or >72 h at 25 °C), with resulting bioactivity comparable to that of a commercially available BDNF. For cultures grown in 2SY medium at 25 °C for 72 h, the condition that led to the greatest quantity of biologically active protein in the shortest culture time, we recovered 264 μg/L of BDNF. As with other microbial expression systems, BDNF aggregates did form in all culture conditions, indicating that while we were able to recover biologically active BDNF, further optimization of the expression system could yield still greater quantities of bioactive protein. This study provides confirmation that B. choshinensis is capable of producing biologically active BDNF and that further optimization of culture conditions could prove valuable in increasing BDNF yields.

  19. Determinants of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in umbilical cord and maternal serum.

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    Flöck, A; Weber, S K; Ferrari, N; Fietz, C; Graf, C; Fimmers, R; Gembruch, U; Merz, W M

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a fundamental role in brain development; additionally, it is involved in various aspects of cerebral function, including neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. Involvement of BDNF in parturition has not been investigated. The aim of our study was to analyze determinants of umbilical cord BDNF (UC-BDNF) concentrations of healthy, term newborns and their respective mothers. This cross-sectional prospective study was performed at a tertiary referral center. Maternal venous blood samples were taken on admission to labor ward; newborn venous blood samples were drawn from the umbilical cord (UC), before delivery of the placenta. Analysis was performed with a commercially available immunoassay. Univariate analyses and stepwise multivariate regression models were applied. 120 patients were recruited. UC-BDNF levels were lower than maternal serum concentrations (median 641 ng/mL, IQR 506 vs. median 780 ng/mL, IQR 602). Correlation between UC- and maternal BDNF was low (R=0.251, p=0.01). In univariate analysis, mode of delivery (MoD), gestational age (GA), body mass index at delivery, and gestational diabetes were determinants of UC-BDNF (MoD and smoking for maternal BDNF, respectively). Stepwise multivariate regression analysis revealed a model with MoD and GA as determinants for UC-BDNF (MoD for maternal BDNF). MoD and GA at delivery are determinants of circulating BDNF in the mother and newborn. We hypothesize that BDNF, like other neuroendocrine factors, is involved in the neuroendocrine cascade of delivery. Timing and mode of delivery may exert BDNF-induced effects on the cerebral function of newborns and their mothers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Glucocorticoid receptor represses brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neuron-like cells.

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    Chen, Hui; Lombès, Marc; Le Menuet, Damien

    2017-04-12

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in many functions such as neuronal growth, survival, synaptic plasticity and memorization. Altered expression levels are associated with many pathological situations such as depression, epilepsy, Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is also crucial for neuron functions, via binding of glucocorticoid hormones (GCs). GR actions largely overlap those of BDNF. It has been proposed that GR could be a regulator of BDNF expression, however the molecular mechanisms involved have not been clearly defined yet. Herein, we analyzed the effect of a GC agonist dexamethasone (DEX) on BDNF expression in mouse neuronal primary cultures and in the newly characterized, mouse hippocampal BZ cell line established by targeted oncogenesis. Mouse Bdnf gene exhibits a complex genomic structure with 8 untranslated exons (I to VIII) splicing onto one common and unique coding exon IX. We found that DEX significantly downregulated total BDNF mRNA expression by around 30%. Expression of the highly expressed exon IV and VI containing transcripts was also reduced by DEX. The GR antagonist RU486 abolished this effect, which is consistent with specific GR-mediated action. Transient transfection assays allowed us to define a short 275 bp region within exon IV promoter responsible for GR-mediated Bdnf repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated GR recruitment onto this fragment, through unidentified transcription factor tethering. Altogether, GR downregulates Bdnf expression through direct binding to Bdnf regulatory sequences. These findings bring new insights into the crosstalk between GR and BDNF signaling pathways both playing a major role in physiology and pathology of the central nervous system.

  1. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in childhood.

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    Bryn, V; Halvorsen, B; Ueland, T; Isaksen, J; Kolkova, K; Ravn, K; Skjeldal, O H

    2015-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors are essential regulators of neuronal maturation including synaptic synthesis. Among those, Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been in particular focus in the understanding of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The aim of our study was to investigate whether BNDF could be used as diagnostic/biological marker for ASD. For this purpose we examined the plasma levels of BDNF and the precursors pro- BDNF in patients with ASD and compared it with non-autistic controls; determined whether there was a correlation between the BDNF and proBDNF levels and clinical severity. We also investigated the coding region of BDNF identify for well-variations which could be associated to ASD. The 65 ASD patients (51 boys) were enrolled from a recent completed epidemiological survey covering two counties (Oppland and Hedmark) in Norway. The mean age of the total number of children who participated in this study was 11,7 years. 30 non-autistic children were included as controls, 14 boys and 16 girls. The mean age was 11.3 years. Exclusion criteria for control group were individuals suffering from either neurological, endocrine, or immune insuffiency. Patients with ASD were characterized by moderately but significantly elevated plasma levels of BDNF compared to matched controls. No differences were observed in the proBDNF level between patients and controls. Within the ASD group, children with intellectual disability demonstrated increased BDNF, but not proBDNF levels, while the presence of ADHD had no impact on circulating proBDNF or BDNF. No further associations between plasma proBDNF or BDNF and other clinical demographics were observed. Copyright © 2015 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Decreased plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in institutionalized elderly with depressive disorder.

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    Chu, Chin-Liang; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Lin, Yu-Te; Pan, Chih-Chuan; Lu, Ti; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chow, Philip C

    2012-06-01

    To compare the differences in plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels among institutionalized ethnic Chinese elderly participants with major depression, those with subclinical depression, and a nondepressed control group. A cross-sectional study. The veterans' home in southern Taiwan. One hundred sixty-seven residents. Questionnaires including the Minimum Data Set Nursing Home 2.1, Chinese-language version, and the short-form Geriatric Depression Scale, Chinese-language version. Depressive disorder was diagnosed by a well-trained psychiatrist using DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, text revision) criteria. We measured plasma BDNF levels in the following 3 groups: nondepressive subjects (n = 122), subclinically depressive subjects (n = 33), and subjects with major depression (n = 12). Plasma BDNF was assayed using the sandwich ELISA method. We noted a significantly negative association between age and plasma BDNF in the regression model. There was no significant correlation between BDNF plasma levels and body weight or platelet counts. We found that plasma BDNF was significantly lower in the major depressive group (mean, 115.1 pg/mL; SD, 57.2) than in the nondepressive group (mean, 548.8 pg/mL; SD, 370.6; P depressive group (mean, 231.8 pg/mL; SD, 92.4; P depressive disorder but also in those with subclinical depression. This makes the plasma BDNF level a potential biological marker for clinical or subclinical depression. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of brain derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

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    Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Stoner, Kirsten E; Grossbach, Andrew J; Viljoen, Stephanus V; McHenry, Colleen L; Petrie, Michael A; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Grosland, Nicole M; Shields, Richard K; Howard, Matthew A

    2016-02-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the leading cause of spinal cord related disability in the elderly. It results from degenerative narrowing of the spinal canal, which causes spinal cord compression. This leads to gait instability, loss of dexterity, weakness, numbness and urinary dysfunction. There has been indirect data that implicates a genetic component to CSM. Such a finding may contribute to the variety in presentation and outcome in this patient population. The Val66Met polymorphism, a mutation in the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, has been implicated in a number of brain and psychological conditions, and here we investigate its role in CSM. Ten subjects diagnosed with CSM were enrolled in this prospective study. Baseline clinical evaluation using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale, Nurick and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were collected. Each subject underwent objective testing with gait kinematics, as well as hand functioning using the Purdue Peg Board. Blood samples were analyzed for the BDNF Val66Met mutation. The prevalence of the Val66Met mutation in this study was 60% amongst CSM patients compared to 32% in the general population. Individuals with abnormal Met allele had worse baseline mJOA and Nurick scores. Moreover, baseline gait kinematics and hand functioning testing were worse compared to their wild type counterpart. BDNF Val66Met mutation has a higher prevalence in CSM compared to the general population. Those with BDNF mutation have a worse clinical presentation compared to the wild type counterpart. These findings suggest implication of the BDNF mutation in the development and severity of CSM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlation between Nerve Growth Factor (NGF with Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF in Ischemic Stroke Patient

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    Joko Widodo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a family of polypeptides that play critical role during neuronal development, appear to mediate protective role on neurorepair in ischemic stroke. Naturally in adult brain neurorepair process consist of: angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and neuronal plasticity, it can also be stimulated by endogenous neurorepair. In this study we observed correlation between NGF and BDNF ischemic stroke patient’s onset: 7-30 and over 30 days. Methods: This is cross sectional study on 46 subjects aged 38 – 74 years old with ischemic stroke from The Indonesian Central Hospital of Army Gatot Subroto Jakarta. Diagnosis of ischemic stroke was made using clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI by neurologist. Subjects were divided into 2 groups based on stroke onset: 7 – 30 days (Group A: 19 subjects and > 30 days (Group B: 27 Subjects. Serum NGF levels were measured with ELISA method and BDNF levels were measured using multiplex method with Luminex Magpix. Results: Levels of NGF and BDNF were significantly different between onset group A and B (NGF p= 0.022, and BDNF p=0.008, with mean levels NGF in group A higher than group B, indicating that BDNF levels is lower in group A than group B. There was no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF levels in all groups. Conclusion: The variations in neurotrophic factor levels reflect an endogenous attempt at neuroprotection against biochemical and molecular changes after ischemic stroke. NGF represents an early marker of brain injury while BDNF recovery is most prominent during the first 14 days after onsite but continuous for more than 30 days. There is no significant correlation between NGF and BDNF in each group.  

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor controls cannabinoid CB1 receptor function in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Chiara, Valentina; Angelucci, Francesco; Rossi, Silvia; Musella, Alessandra; Cavasinni, Francesca; Cantarella, Cristina; Mataluni, Giorgia; Sacchetti, Lucia; Napolitano, Francesco; Castelli, Maura; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Maccarrone, Mauro; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2010-06-16

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in emotional processes suggests an interaction with the endocannabinoid system. Here, we addressed the functional interplay between BDNF and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1)Rs) in the striatum, a brain area in which both BDNF and CB(1)s play a role in the emotional consequences of stress and of rewarding experiences. BDNF potently inhibited CB(1)R function in the striatum, through a mechanism mediated by altered cholesterol metabolism and membrane lipid raft function. The effect of BDNF was restricted to CB(1)Rs controlling GABA-mediated IPSCs (CB(1)R(GABA)), whereas CB(1)Rs modulating glutamate transmission and GABA(B) receptors were not affected. The action of BDNF on CB(1)R(GABA) function was tyrosine kinase dependent and was complete even after receptor sensitization with cocaine or environmental manipulations activating the dopamine (DA)-dependent reward system. In mice lacking one copy of the BDNF gene (BDNF(+/-)), CB(1)R(GABA) responses were potentiated and were preserved from the action of haloperidol, a DA D(2) receptor (D(2)R) antagonist able to fully abolish CB(1)R(GABA) function in rewarded animals. Haloperidol also enhanced BDNF levels in the striatum, suggesting that this neurotrophin may act as a downstream effector of D(2)Rs in the modulation of cannabinoid signaling. Accordingly, 5 d cocaine exposure both reduced striatal BDNF levels and increased CB(1)R(GABA) activity, through a mechanism dependent on D(2)Rs. The present study identifies a novel mechanism of CB(1)R regulation mediated by BDNF and cholesterol metabolism and provides some evidence that DA D(2)R-dependent modulation of striatal CB(1)R activity is mediated by this neurotrophin.

  6. Exercise increases serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerling, A; Kück, M; Tegtbur, U; Grams, L; Weber-Spickschen, S; Hanke, A; Stubbs, B; Kahl, K G

    2017-06-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Existing data on exercise treatment in people with MDD are inconsistent concerning the effect of exercise on BDNF pointing either to increased or unaltered BDNF concentrations. However, studies in non-depressed persons demonstrated a significant effect on resting peripheral BDNF concentrations in aerobic training interventions. Given the lack of clarity mentioned above, the current study aimed at examining the effect of adjunctive exercise on serum BDNF levels in guideline based treated patients with MDD. 42 depressed inpatients were included, and randomized either to a 6 week structured and supervised exercise intervention plus treatment as usual (EXERCISE, n=22), or to treatment as usual (TAU, n=20). BDNF serum concentrations were assessed before and after the intervention in both study groups with established immunoassays. Serum BDNF slightly decreased in the TAU group, whilst there was an increase in BDNF levels in the exercise group. There was a significant time x group effect concerning sBDNF (p=0.030) with repeated ANOVA measures with age and BMI as covariates, suggesting an increase in BDNF concentrations in the EXERCISE group compared to TAU. Though there was no statistic difference in the antidepressant medication between EXERCISE and TAU potential interactions between exercise and medication on the effects of exercise in BDNF cannot be excluded. Gender was not considered as a covariate in ANOVA due to the small number of objects. Exercise training given as adjunct to standard guideline based treatment appears to have additional effects on BDNF serum concentrations in people with MDD. Our results add further evidence to the beneficial effects of exercise in the treatment of MDD. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in hair to study stress responses: A pilot investigation.

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    Harb, H; González-de-la-Vara, M; Thalheimer, L; Klein, U; Renz, H; Rose, M; Kruse, J; Potaczek, D P; Peters, E M J

    2017-12-01

    To study pathogenic stress-effects in health and disease, it is paramount to define easy access parameters for non-invasive analysis of biological change in response to stress. Hair samples successfully provide this access for the study of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) changes. In this study, we assess the hair expression and corresponding epigenetic changes of a neurotrophin essential for autonomic nervous system function and mental health: brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In three independent studies in healthy academic volunteers (study I: German students, N=36; study II, German academic population sample, N=28; study III: Mexican students, N=115), BDNF protein expression or BDNF gene (BDNF) histone acetylation was determined. Simultaneously, mental distress and distress-associated somatic complaints were assessed by self-report. In study I, we found a negative correlation between hair-BDNF protein level and hair-cortisol as well as between hair-BDNF and somatic complaints, while hair-cortisol correlated positively with mental distress. In study II, we found a negative correlation between H4 histone acetylation at the BDNF gene P4-promoter and somatic complaints. Regression analysis confirmed confounder stability of associations in both studies. In study III, we confirmed study I and found lower hair-BDNF protein level in volunteers with high somatic complaints, who also reported higher mental distress during the end of term exams. The results indicate that BDNF protein levels can be detected in clipped hair and are associated with somatic complaints and stress in life. In addition, we concluded that plucked hair can provide material for the study of epigenetic changes in stress-affected tissues. These tools can prove valuable for future studies on distress, both under experimental and field conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Overexpression Induces Precocious Critical Period in Mouse Visual Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanover, Jessica L.; Huang, Z. Josh; Tonegawa, Susumu; Stryker, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a candidate molecule for regulating activity-dependent synaptic plasticity on the grounds of its expression pattern in developing visual cortex and that of its receptor, trkB (Castrén et al., 1992; Bozzi et al., 1995; Schoups et al., 1995; Cabelli et al., 1996), as well as the modulation of these patterns by activity (Castrén et al., 1992; Bozzi et al., 1995; Schoups et al., 1995). Infusing trkB ligands or their neutralizing agents, the trkB-IgG fusion proteins, into visual cortex alters the development and plasticity of ocular dominance columns (Cabelli et al., 1995; Riddle et al., 1995; Galuske et al., 1996; Gillespie et al., 1996; Cabelli et al., 1997). To test further the physiological role of BDNF, we studied a transgenic mouse that expresses elevated levels of BDNF in primary visual cortex (V1) postnatally (Huang et al., 1999). We found that unlike the infusion experiments, excess BDNF expressed in mouse visual cortex did not block ocular dominance plasticity. Instead, single neurons in V1 of the BDNF transgenic mice were as susceptible to the effects of monocular deprivation (MD) as neurons in wild-type mice, but only during a precocious critical period. At a time when V1 in the wild-type mouse responded maximally to a 4 d MD with a reduction in its response to deprived eye visual stimulation, the transgenic mouse V1 had already passed the peak of its precocious critical period and no longer responded maximally. This finding suggests a role for BDNF in promoting the postnatal maturation of cortical circuitry. PMID:10559430

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus increases energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanfeng; Bomberg, Eric; Billington, Charles J; Levine, Allen S; Kotz, Catherine M

    2010-06-08

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) decreases food intake and body weight, but few central sites of action have been identified for its effect on energy expenditure. The hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMH) is important in regulating energy metabolism. Our previous work indicated that BDNF in the VMH reduced food intake. The purposes of the study were to determine: 1) if BDNF in the VMH increases energy expenditure (EE); 2) if BDNF-enhanced thermogenesis results from increased spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and resting metabolic rate (RMR); and 3) if VMH BDNF thermogenic effects are mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue (BAT). BDNF (0.5 microg) was injected into the VMH of male Sprague-Dawley rats and oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food intake and SPA were measured for 24h in an indirect calorimeter. Animals were sacrificed 4h after BDNF injection, and BAT UCP1 gene expression was measured with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. BDNF significantly decreased food and water intake, and body weight gain. Heat production and RMR were significantly elevated for 9h immediately after BDNF injection. BDNF increased SPA and EE during SPA (aEE) within 9h after injection although BDNF had no effect on 0-24h SPA and aEE. BDNF did not induce a significant increase in BAT UCP1 expression. In conclusion, VMH BDNF reduces body weight by decreasing food intake and increasing EE consequent to increased SPA and RMR, suggesting that the VMH is an important site of BDNF action to influence energy balance. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, impaired glucose metabolism, and bipolar disorder course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Rodrigo B; Santos, Camila M; Rizzo, Lucas B; Asevedo, Elson; Cunha, Graccielle R; Noto, Mariane N; Pedrini, Mariana; Zeni-Graiff, Maiara; Cordeiro, Quirino; Vinberg, Maj; Kapczinski, Flavio; McIntyre, Roger S; Brietzke, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker in bipolar disorder (BD). However, current evidence is limited and results have been highly heterogeneous. This study aimed to assess the moderating effect of impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) on plasma levels of BDNF in individuals with BD, and on the relationship between BDNF and variables of illness course. We measured and compared the plasma levels of BDNF in individuals with BD (n=57) and healthy controls (n=26). IGM was operationalized as pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Information related to current and past psychiatric/medical history, as well as prescription of pharmacological treatments was also captured. Individuals with BD had lower levels of BDNF, relative to healthy controls, after adjustment for age, gender, current medications, smoking, alcohol use, and IGM (P=.046). There was no effect of IGM (P=.860) and no interaction between BD diagnosis and IGM (P=.893). Peripheral BDNF levels were positively correlated with lifetime depressive episodes (P<.001), psychiatric hospitalizations (P=.001) and suicide attempts (P=.021). IGM moderated the association between BDNF and the number of previous mood episodes (P<.001), wherein there was a positive correlation in euglycemic participants and a negative correlation in individuals with IGM. BD is independently associated with lower levels of BDNF; IGM may modify the relationship between BDNF and BD course, suggesting an interactive effect of BDNF with metabolic status on illness progression. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Theobromine up-regulates cerebral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and facilitates motor learning in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Mitsugu; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Katakura, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Tanigami, Hayate; Yachie, Akihiro; Ohno-Shosaku, Takako; Shido, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Theobromine, which is a caffeine derivative, is the primary methylxanthine produced by Theobroma cacao. Theobromine works as a phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). cAMP activates the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), which is involved in a large variety of brain processes, including the induction of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF supports cell survival and neuronal functions, including learning and memory. Thus, cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways play an important role in learning and memory. Here, we investigated whether orally administered theobromine could act as a PDE inhibitor centrally and affect cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways and learning behavior in mice. The mice were divided into two groups. The control group (CN) was fed a normal diet, whereas the theobromine group (TB) was fed a diet supplemented with 0.05% theobromine for 30 days. We measured the levels of theobromine, phosphorylated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (p-VASP), phosphorylated CREB (p-CREB), and BDNF in the brain. p-VASP was used as an index of cAMP increases. Moreover, we analyzed the performance of the mice on a three-lever motor learning task. Theobromine was detectable in the brains of TB mice. The brain levels of p-VASP, p-CREB, and BDNF were higher in the TB mice compared with those in the CN mice. In addition, the TB mice performed better on the three-lever task than the CN mice did. These results strongly suggested that orally administered theobromine acted as a PDE inhibitor in the brain, and it augmented the cAMP/CREB/BDNF pathways and motor learning in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlates of early pregnancy serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in a Peruvian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Levey, Elizabeth; Gelaye, Bizu; Zhong, Qiu-Yue; Rondon, Marta B; Sanchez, Sixto E; Williams, Michelle A

    2017-07-27

    Knowledge about factors that influence serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations during early pregnancy is lacking. The aim of the study is to examine the correlates of early pregnancy serum BDNF concentrations. A total of 982 women attending prenatal care clinics in Lima, Peru, were recruited in early pregnancy. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to evaluate the relation between BDNF concentrations and continuous covariates. Analysis of variance and generalized linear models were used to compare the unadjusted and adjusted BDNF concentrations according to categorical variables. Multivariable linear regression models were applied to determine the factors that influence early pregnancy serum BDNF concentrations. In bivariate analysis, early pregnancy serum BDNF concentrations were positively associated with maternal age (r = 0.16, P early pregnancy body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.17, P age at sample collection (r = -0.21, P age (β = 0.11, P = 0.001), early pregnancy BMI (β = 1.58, P age at blood collection (β = -0.33, P early pregnancy serum BDNF concentrations. Participants with moderate antepartum depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) score ≥ 10) had lower serum BDNF concentrations compared with participants with no/mild antepartum depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score age, early pregnancy BMI, gestational age, and the presence of moderate antepartum depressive symptoms were statistically significantly associated with early pregnancy serum BDNF concentrations in low-income Peruvian women. Biological changes of CRP during pregnancy may affect serum BDNF concentrations.

  13. Hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression following treatment with reboxetine, citalopram, and physical exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Neustadt, Amelia A; Alejandre, Hilda; Garcia, Celithelma; Ivy, Autumn S; Chen, Michael J

    2004-12-01

    The antidepressants, reboxetine and citalopram, were used in conjunction with voluntary physical exercise (wheel running) in order to assess the contribution of noradrenergic and serotonergic activation to enhancements in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression resulting from antidepressant treatment and exercise. Reboxetine (40 mg/kg/day), citalopram (10 mg/kg/day), voluntary physical activity, and the combination of antidepressants with exercise were applied to rats for a range of treatment intervals (2 to 14 days). Hippocampal BDNF transcription levels (full-length BDNF, as well as exons I-IV) were then assessed via in situ hybridization. Reboxetine treatment led to a rapid (evident at 2 days) enhancement in BDNF transcription in several hippocampal regions. This increase was also observed when reboxetine treatment was combined with voluntary physical activity for 2 weeks. Treatment with citalopram led to an increase in BDNF mRNA in only one hippocampal region (CA2) after short-term (2 days) treatment, and when combined with exercise, increased BDNF mRNA in the CA4 and dentate gyrus after 2 weeks. As reported in previous studies, voluntary physical activity enhanced BDNF transcription in several hippocampal areas, both on its own and in combination with antidepressant treatments. Examination of the levels of individual BDNF transcript variants influenced by each of these antidepressants revealed distinct patterns of expression in response to the various treatments, and showed that exercise-plus-antidepressant produced significant changes where antidepressant alone failed. Overall, treatment with the norephinephrine-selective antidepressant, reboxetine, in combination with exercise, led to both rapid and sustained increases in hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression. The serotonergic agent, citalopram, appeared to require longer treatment intervals in order to influence BDNF expression positively.

  14. Acute aerobic exercise increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in elderly with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Flávia Gomes de Melo; Vital, Thays Martins; Stein, Angelica Miki; Arantes, Franciel José; Rueda, André Veloso; Camarini, Rosana; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decreased BDNF levels may constitute a lack of trophic support and contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. The benefits of acute and chronic physical exercise on BDNF levels are well-documented in humans, however, exercise effects on BDNF levels have not been analyzed in older adults with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on BDNF levels in older adults with AD and to verify associations among BDNF levels, aerobic fitness, and level of physical activity. Using a controlled design, twenty-one patients with AD (76.3 ± 6.2 years) and eighteen healthy older adults (74.6 ± 4.7 years) completed an acute aerobic exercise. The outcomes included measures of BDNF plasma levels, aerobic fitness (treadmill grade, time to exhaustion, VO2, and maximal lactate) and level of physical activity (Baecke Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly). The independent t-test shows differences between groups with respect to the BDNF plasma levels at baseline (p = 0.04; t = 4.53; df = 37). In two-way ANOVA, a significant effect of time was found (p = 0.001; F = 13.63; df = 37), the aerobic exercise significantly increased BDNF plasma levels in AD patients and healthy controls. A significant correlation (p = 0.04; r = 0.33) was found between BDNF levels and the level of physical activity. The results of our study suggest that aerobic exercise increases BDNF plasma levels in patients with AD and healthy controls. In addition to that, BDNF levels had association with level of physical activity.

  15. Involvement of Endogenous Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naert, G; Zussy, C; Tran Van Ba, C; Chevallier, N; Tang, Y-P; Maurice, T; Givalois, L

    2015-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to be highly involved in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis regulation during adulthood, playing an important role in homeostasis maintenance. The present study aimed to determine the involvement of BDNF in HPA axis activity under basal and stress conditions via partial inhibition of this endogenous neurotrophin. Experiments were conducted in rats and mice with two complementary approaches: (i) BDNF knockdown with stereotaxic delivery of BDNF-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the lateral ventricle of adult male rats and (ii) genetically induced knockdown (KD) of BDNF expression specifically in the central nervous system during the first ontogenesis in mice (KD mice). Delivery of siRNA in the rat brain decreased BDNF levels in the hippocampus (-31%) and hypothalamus (-35%) but not in the amygdala, frontal cortex and pituitary. In addition, siRNA induced no change of the basal HPA axis activity. BDNF siRNA rats exhibited decreased BDNF levels and concomitant altered adrenocortoctrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to restraint stress, suggesting the involvement of BDNF in the HPA axis adaptive response to stress. In KD mice, BDNF levels in the hippocampus and hypothalamus were decreased by 20% in heterozygous and by 60% in homozygous animals compared to wild-type littermates. Although, in heterozygous KD mice, no significant change was observed in the basal levels of plasma ACTH and corticosterone, both hormones were significantly increased in homozygous KD mice, demonstrating that robust cerebral BDNF inhibition (60%) is necessary to affect basal HPA axis activity. All of these results in both rats and mice demonstrate the involvement and importance of a robust endogenous pool of BDNF in basal HPA axis regulation and the pivotal function of de novo BDNF synthesis in the establishment of an adapted response to stress. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  16. Role of exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in the regulation of energy homeostasis in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Pedersen, Maria; Krabbe, Karen S

    2009-01-01

    identifies BDNF as a player not only in central metabolism, but also in regulating energy metabolism in peripheral organs. Low levels of BDNF are found in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and major depression. In addition, BDNF levels are low in obesity...... and independently so in patients with type 2 diabetes. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is expressed in non-neurogenic tissues, including skeletal muscle, and exercise increases BDNF levels not only in the brain and in plasma, but in skeletal muscle as well. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein...... expression was increased in muscle cells that were electrically stimulated, and BDNF increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase-beta (ACCbeta) and enhanced fatty oxidation both in vitro and ex vivo. These data identify BDNF as a contraction...

  17. Molecular and biochemical characterization of calmodulin from Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Zhong, Xiuqin; Song, Xingju; Gu, Xiaobin; Lai, Weiming; Xie, Yue; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2017-12-04

    Echinococcus granulosus is a harmful cestode parasite that causes cystic echinococcosis in humans as well as various livestock species and wild animals. Calmodulin (CaM), a Ca 2+ sensor protein, is widely expressed in eukaryotes and mediates a variety of cellular signaling activities. In the present study, the cDNA encoding CaM in Echinococcus granulosus (rEgCaM) was successfully cloned and the molecular and biochemical characterizations carried out. The antigenicity and immunoreactivity of rEgCaM was detected and the preliminary enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based serodiagnostic potential of EgCaM was assessed. The locations of this protein in the adult worm and larval stage, and the mRNA expression in different states of E. granulosus protoscoleces (PSCs) were defined clearly. Moreover, the Ca 2+ -binding properties of EgCaM were measured. rEgCaM is a highly conserved calcium-binding protein, consisting of 149 amino acids. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that rEgCaM could be identified using E. granulosus infected sheep serum. The use of rEgCaM as an antigen was evaluated by indirect ELISA which exhibited a high sensitivity (90.3%), but low specificity (47.1%). rEgCaM was ubiquitously expressed in protoscoleces and adults of E. granulosus, as well as in the germinal layer of the cyst wall. The mRNA expression level of rEgCaM was increased from the start of H 2 O 2 exposure and then gradually decreased because of the increased apoptosis of PSCs. In electrophoretic mobility tests and 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid assays, rEgCaM showed a typical characteristic of a calcium-binding protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report on CaM from E. granulosus and rEgCaM is likely to be involved in some important biological function of E. granulosus as a calcium-binding protein.

  18. Lack of association between brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism and aggressive behavior in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xuan; Dong, Zai-Quan; Tian, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Li-Na; Gu, Yan; Hu, Ze-Qing; Zhang, Xiao

    2014-01-30

    We investigated the association of the Val66Met gene polymorphism in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene with aggressive behavior among Southern Han Chinese schizophrenia patients. We used polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism to determine the genotypes and the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) to measure aggressive behavior. No significant differences in genotype or allele distribution of Val66Met were identified between aggressive and non-aggressive schizophrenia patients. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to neuronal dysfunction in a model of allergic airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Armin; Lommatzsch, Marek; Neuhaus-Steinmetz, Ulrich; Quarcoo, David; Glaab, Thomas; McGregor, Gerard P; Fischer, Axel; Renz, Harald

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a candidate molecule for mediating functional neuronal changes in allergic bronchial asthma. Recently, enhanced production of BDNF during allergic airway inflammation caused by infiltrating T-cells and macrophages as well as by resident airway epithelial cells has been described. It was the aim of this study to investigate the effect of enhanced BDNF levels on lung function and airway inflammation in a mouse model of allergic inflammation.Ovalbumin-...

  20. Thyroxin treatment protects against white matter injury in the immature brain via brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Pi-Lien; Huang, Chao-Ching; Huang, Hsiu-Mei; Tu, Dom-Gene; Chang, Ying-Chao

    2013-08-01

    Low level of thyroid hormone is a strong independent risk factor for white matter (WM) injury, a major cause of cerebral palsy, in preterm infants. Thyroxin upregulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor during development. We hypothesized that thyroxin protected against preoligodendrocyte apoptosis and WM injury in the immature brain via upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Postpartum (P) day-7 male rat pups were exposed to hypoxic ischemia (HI) and intraperitoneally injected with thyroxin (T4; 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg) or normal saline immediately after HI at P9 and P11. WM damage was analyzed for myelin formation, axonal injury, astrogliosis, and preoligodendrocyte apoptosis. Neurotrophic factor expression was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Neuromotor functions were measured using open-field locomotion (P11 and P21), inclined plane climbing (P11), and beam walking (P21). Intracerebroventricular injection of TrkB-Fc or systemic administration of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone was performed. On P11, the HI group had significantly lower blood T4 levels than the controls. The HI group showed ventriculomegaly and marked reduction of myelin basic protein immunoreactivities in the WM. T4 (1 mg/kg) treatment after HI markedly attenuated axonal injury, astrocytosis, and microgliosis, and increased preoligodendrocyte survival. In addition, T4 treatment significantly increased myelination and selectively upregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the WM, and improved neuromotor deficits after HI. The protective effect of T4 on WM myelination and neuromotor performance after HI was significantly attenuated by TrkB-Fc. Systemic 7,8-dihydroxyflavone treatment ameliorated hypomyelination after HI injury. T4 protects against WM injury at both pathological and functional levels via upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-TrkB signaling in the immature brain.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates hippocampal synaptic transmission by increasing N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor activity

    OpenAIRE

    Levine, Eric S; Crozier, Robert A.; Black, Ira B.; Plummer, Mark R.

    1998-01-01

    Neurotrophins (NTs) have recently been found to regulate synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Whole-cell and single-channel recordings from cultured hippocampal neurons revealed a mechanism responsible for enhanced synaptic strength. Specifically, brain-derived neurotrophic factor augmented glutamate-evoked, but not acetylcholine-evoked, currents 3-fold and increased N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor open probability. Activation of trkB NT receptors was critical, as glutamate curr...

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rapidly enhances phosphorylation of the postsynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 1

    OpenAIRE

    Suen, Piin-Chau; Wu, Kuo; Levine, Eric S; Mount, Howard T. J.; Xu, Jia-Ling; LIN, SIANG-YO; Black, Ira B.

    1997-01-01

    Although neurotrophins have traditionally been regarded as neuronal survival factors, recent work has suggested a role for these factors in synaptic plasticity. In particular, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) rapidly enhances synaptic transmission in hippocampal neurons through trkB receptor stimulation and postsynaptic phosphorylation mechanisms. Activation of trkB also modulates hippocampal long-term potentiation, in which postsynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptors play a...

  3. Corallocins A-C, Nerve Growth and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inducing Metabolites from the Mushroom Hericium coralloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittstein, Kathrin; Rascher, Monique; Rupcic, Zeljka; Löwen, Eduard; Winter, Barbara; Köster, Reinhard W; Stadler, Marc

    2016-09-23

    Three new natural products, corallocins A-C (1-3), along with two known compounds were isolated from the mushroom Hericium coralloides. Their benzofuranone and isoindolinone structures were elucidated by spectral methods. All corallocins induced nerve growth factor and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in human 1321N1 astrocytes. Furthermore, corallocin B showed antiproliferative activity against HUVEC and human cancer cell lines MCF-7 and KB-3-1.

  4. Multimodal physical activity increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and improves cognition in institutionalized older women

    OpenAIRE

    Vedovelli, Kelem; Giacobbo, Bruno Lima; Corrêa, Márcio Silveira; Wieck, Andréa; Argimon, Irani Iracema de Lima; Bromberg, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity has been proposed as a promising intervention to improve cognition and decrease the risk of dementia in older adults. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to mediate, at least partially, these effects of exercise. However, intervention studies of the effects of multimodal exercises on cognition and BDNF levels are scarce and composed by small samples. Thus, the generalization of the conclusions of these studies depends on the reproducibility of the results. In or...

  5. Differential effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 on hindlimb function in paraplegic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, Vanessa S.; Park, Jihye; Gage, Fred H.; Mendell, Lorne M.

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of viral administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on locomotor recovery in adult rats with complete thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection injuries, in order to determine the effect of chronic neurotrophin expression on spinal plasticity. At the time of injury, BDNF, NT-3 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) (control) was delivered to the lesion via adeno-associated virus (AAV) constructs. AAV–BDNF was significantly more effectiv...

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor can act as a pronecrotic factor through transcriptional and translational activation of NADPH oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sun H.; Won, Seok J.; Sohn, Seonghyang; Hyuk J. Kwon; Jee Y Lee; Park, Jong H.; Gwag, Byoung J.

    2002-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that neurotrophins (NTs) potentiate or cause neuronal injury under various pathological conditions. Since NTs enhance survival and differentiation of cultured neurons in serum or defined media containing antioxidants, we set out experiments to delineate the patterns and underlying mechanisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)–induced neuronal injury in mixed cortical cell cultures containing glia and neurons in serum-free media without antioxidants, ...

  7. Inflammation stimulates thrombopoietin (Tpo) expression in rat brain-derived microvascular endothelial cells, but suppresses Tpo in astrocytes and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Freyer, Dorette; Rung, Olga; Im, Ae-Rie; Hoffmann, Olaf; Dame, Christof

    2010-07-01

    Thrombopoietin (Tpo) and its receptor (c-Mpl; TpoR), which primary regulate megakaryopoiesis and platelet production, are also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). Increased Tpo concentrations are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some patients with bacterial or viral meningitis. Since previous data implicated a proapoptotic role of Tpo on newly generated neuronal cells, we herein elucidated the regulation of Tpo in primary rat neurons (e17), astrocytes, and microglia (p0-p3), as well as in brain-derived vascular endothelial cells of 3-week-old rats after exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LPS inhibited Tpo gene expression in astrocytes and microglia, but not in neurons, most likely due to absence of Toll-like receptor 4 in neurons. While Tpo mRNA expression recovered in astrocytes after 24 h, it remained suppressed in microglia. Furthermore, we detected Tpo mRNA expression in primary brain-derived vascular endothelial cells, which also express the TpoR. In these cells, LPS significantly up-regulated Tpo mRNA expression. TpoR mRNA and protein expression remained constitutive in all cell types. Thus, our data provide evidence for a cell-type-specific modulation of Tpo mRNA expression by inflammation in brain-derived cells. Transient down-regulation of Tpo expression in astrocytes and microglia may limit Tpo-induced neuronal cell death in inflammatory brain disorders.

  8. Decreased serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in schizophrenic patients with deficit syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akyol ES

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Esra Soydas Akyol,1 Yakup Albayrak,2 Murat Beyazyüz,3 Nurkan Aksoy,4 Murat Kuloglu,5 Kenji Hashimoto6 1Deparment of Psychiatry, Yenimahalle Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Namik Kemal University, Tekirdag, Turkey; 3Department of Psychiatry, Biga State Hospital, Çanakkale, Turkey; 4Department of Biochemistry, Yenimahalle Education and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey; 5Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Akdeniz University, Antalya, Turkey; 6Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Chiba University Center for Forensic Mental Health, Chiba, Japan Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a well-established neurotrophin that plays a role in the pathophysiology of numerous psychiatric disorders. Many studies have investigated the serum BDNF levels in patients with schizophrenia. However, there are restricted data in the literature that compare the serum BDNF levels in patients with deficit and nondeficit syndromes. In this study, we aimed to compare the serum BDNF levels between schizophrenic patients with deficit or nondeficit syndrome and healthy controls.Methods: After fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 58 patients with schizophrenia and 36 healthy controls were included in the study. The patients were grouped as deficit syndrome (N=23 and nondeficit syndrome (N=35 according to the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome. Three groups were compared in terms of the sociodemographic and clinical variants and serum BDNF levels.Results: The groups were similar in terms of age, sex, body mass index, and smoking status. The serum BDNF levels in patients with deficit syndrome were significantly lower than those in healthy controls. In contrast, the serum BDNF levels in patients with nondeficit syndrome were similar to those in healthy controls.Conclusion: This study suggests that decreased BDNF levels may play a role in the pathophysio­logy of schizophrenic

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression predicts adverse pathological & clinical outcomes in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokbel Kefah

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has established physiological roles in the development and function of the vertebrate nervous system. BDNF has also been implicated in several human malignancies, including breast cancer (BC. However, the precise biological role of BDNF and its utility as a novel biomarker have yet to be determined. The objective of this study was to determine the mRNA and protein expression of BDNF in a cohort of women with BC. Expression levels were compared with normal background tissues and evaluated against established pathological parameters and clinical outcome over a 10 year follow-up period. Methods BC tissues (n = 127 and normal tissues (n = 33 underwent RNA extraction and reverse transcription, BDNF transcript levels were determined using real-time quantitative PCR. BDNF protein expression in mammary tissues was assessed with standard immuno-histochemical methodology. Expression levels were analyzed against tumour size, grade, nodal involvement, TNM stage, Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI and clinical outcome over a 10 year follow-up period. Results Immuno-histochemical staining revealed substantially greater BDNF expression within neoplastic cells, compared to normal mammary epithelial cells. Significantly higher mRNA transcript levels were found in the BC specimens compared to background tissues (p = 0.007. The expression of BDNF mRNA was demonstrated to increase with increasing NPI; NPI-1 vs. NPI-2 (p = 0.009. Increased BDNF transcript levels were found to be significantly associated with nodal positivity (p = 0.047. Compared to patients who remained disease free, higher BDNF expression was significantly associated with local recurrence (LR (p = 0.0014, death from BC (p = 0.018 and poor prognosis overall (p = 0.013. After a median follow up of 10 years, higher BDNF expression levels were significantly associated with reduced overall survival (OS (106 vs. 136 months, p = 0.006. BDNF

  10. Investigation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variants in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Heidi G; Maher, Bridget H; Rodriguez-Acevedo, Astrid J; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2014-01-01

    A number of observations have suggested that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in migraine pathophysiology. This study investigates whether variants in the BDNF gene are associated with migraine in an Australian case-control population. BDNF has an important role in neural growth, development, and survival in the central nervous system and is an important modulator of central and peripheral pain responses. Variants in BDNF, in particular the functional Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265), have been found to be associated with a number of psychiatric disorders, cognitive function, and obesity. As BDNF has been found to be differentially expressed in a number of aspects related to migraine, we tested for association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in BDNF and migraine. Five SNPs in the BDNF locus (rs1519480, rs6265, rs712507, rs2049046, and rs12273363) were genotyped initially in a cohort of 277 migraine cases, including 172 diagnosed with migraine with aura (MA) and 105 with migraine without aura (MO), and 277 age- and sex-matched controls. Three of these SNPs (rs6265, rs2049046, and rs12273363) were subsequently genotyped in a second cohort of 580 migraineurs, including 473 diagnosed with MA and 105 with MO, and 580 matched controls. BDNF SNPs rs1519480, rs6265, rs712507, and rs12273363 were not significantly associated with migraine. However, rs2049046 showed a significant association with migraine, and in particular, MA in the first cohort. In the second cohort, although an increase in the rs2049046 T-allele frequency was observed in migraine cases, and in both MA and MO subgroups, it was not significantly different from controls. Analysis of data combined from both cohorts for rs2049046 showed significant differences in the genotypic and allelic distributions for this marker in both migraine and the MA subgroup. This study confirmed previous studies that the functional BDNF SNP rs6265 (Val66Met) is not associated with migraine

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype impacts the prenatal cocaine-induced mouse phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Zeeba D; Lourenco, Frederico; Byrne, Maureen E; Katzman, Aaron; Lee, Francis; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Kosofsky, Barry E

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure leads to persistent alterations in the growth factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), particularly in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus, brain regions important in cognitive functioning. BDNF plays an important role in the strengthening of existing synaptic connections as well as in the formation of new contacts during learning. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the BDNF gene (Val66Met), leading to a Met substitution for Val at codon 66 in the prodomain, is common in human populations, with an allele frequency of 20-30% in Caucasians. To study the interaction between prenatal cocaine exposure and BDNF, we have utilized a line of BDNF Val66Met transgenic mice on a Swiss Webster background in which BDNF(Met) is endogenously expressed. Examination of baseline levels of mature BDNF protein in the mPFC of prenatally cocaine-treated wild-type (Val66Val) and Val66Met mice revealed significantly lower levels compared to prenatally saline-treated mice. In contrast, in the hippocampus of prenatally saline- and cocaine-treated adult Val66Met mice, there were significantly lower levels of mature BDNF protein compared to Val66Val mice. In extinction of a conditioned fear, we found that prenatally cocaine-treated Val66Met mice had a deficit in recall of extinction. Examination of mature BDNF protein levels immediately after the test for extinction recall revealed lower levels in the mPFC of prenatally cocaine-treated Val66Met mice compared to saline-treated mice. However, 2 h after the extinction test, there was increased BDNF exons I, IV, and IX mRNA expression in the prelimbic cortex of the mPFC in the prenatally cocaine-treated BDNF Val66Met mice compared to prenatally saline-treated mice. Taken together, our results suggest the possibility that prenatal cocaine-induced constitutive alterations in BDNF mRNA and protein expression in the mPFC differentially poises animals for alterations in behaviorally induced gene

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor ameliorates brain stem cardiovascular dysregulation during experimental temporal lobe status epilepticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yi Tsai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Status epilepticus (SE is an acute, prolonged epileptic crisis with a mortality rate of 20-30%; the underlying mechanism is not completely understood. We assessed the hypothesis that brain stem cardiovascular dysregulation occurs during SE because of oxidative stress in rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM, a key nucleus of the baroreflex loop; to be ameliorated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF via an antioxidant action. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a clinically relevant experimental model of temporal lobe SE (TLSE using Sprague-Dawley rats, sustained hippocampal seizure activity was accompanied by progressive hypotension that was preceded by a reduction in baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone; heart rate and baroreflex-mediated cardiac responses remained unaltered. Biochemical experiments further showed concurrent augmentation of superoxide anion, phosphorylated p47(phox subunit of NADPH oxidase and mRNA or protein levels of BDNF, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB, angiotensin AT1 receptor subtype (AT1R, nitric oxide synthase II (NOS II or peroxynitrite in RVLM. Whereas pretreatment by microinjection bilaterally into RVLM of a superoxide dismutase mimetic (tempol, a specific antagonist of NADPH oxidase (apocynin or an AT1R antagonist (losartan blunted significantly the augmented superoxide anion or phosphorylated p47(phox subunit in RVLM, hypotension and the reduced baroreflex-mediated sympathetic vasomotor tone during experimental TLSE, pretreatment with a recombinant human TrkB-Fc fusion protein or an antisense bdnf oligonucleotide significantly potentiated all those events, alongside peroxynitrite. However, none of the pretreatments affected the insignificant changes in heart rate and baroreflex-mediated cardiac responses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that formation of peroxynitrite by a reaction between superoxide anion generated by NADPH oxidase in RVLM on activation by AT1R and NOS II

  13. The P2X(7) receptor-mediated phospholipase D activation is regulated by both PKC-dependent and PKC-independent pathways in a rat brain-derived Type-2 astrocyte cell line, RBA-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Amos C; Sun, Synthia H

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of the P2X(7) receptor (P2X(7)R)-mediated phospholipase D (PLD) activation in a rat brain-derived Type-2 astrocyte cell line, RBA-2. A time course study revealed that activation of P2X(7)R resulted in a choline and not phosphorylcholine formation, suggesting that activation of P2X(7)R is associated with the phosphatidylcholine-PLD (PC-PLD) in these cells. GF 109203X, a selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, partially inhibited the P2X(7)R-mediated PLD activation, while blocking the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated PLD activity. In addition, PMA synergistically activated the P2X(7)R-mediated PLD activity. Furthermore, genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked the P2X(7)R-activated PLD, while KN62, a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor, was less effective, whereas the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD98059 was ineffective. No additive inhibitory effects were found by simultaneous treatment of GF 109203X and KN62 on P2X(7)R-activated PLD. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both PKC-dependent and PKC-independent signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of P2X(7)R-mediated PLD activation. Additionally, CaMKII may participate in the PKC-dependent pathway, and tyrosine kinase may play a pivotal role on both PKC-dependent and PKC-independent pathways in the P2X(7)R-mediated PLD activation in RBA-2 cells.

  14. Calcium/calmodulin and calmodulin kinase II stimulate hyperactivation in demembranated bovine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignotz, George G; Suarez, Susan S

    2005-09-01

    Hyperactivated motility is observed among sperm in the mammalian oviduct near the time of ovulation. It is characterized by high-amplitude, asymmetrical flagellar beating and assists sperm in penetrating the cumulus oophorus and zona pellucida. Elevated intracellular Ca2+ is required for the initiation of hyperactivated motility, suggesting that calmodulin (CALM) and Ca2+/CALM-stimulated pathways are involved. A demembranated sperm model was used to investigate the role of CALM in promoting hyperactivation. Ejaculated bovine sperm were demembranated and immobilized by brief exposure to Triton X-100. Motility was restored by addition of reactivation medium containing MgATP and Ca2+, and hyperactivation was observed as free Ca2+ was increased from 50 nM to 1 microM. However, when 2.5 mM Ca2+ was added to the demembranation medium to extract flagellar CALM, motility was not reactivated unless exogenous CALM was readded. The inclusion of anti-CALM IgG in the reactivation medium reduced the proportion hyperactivated in 1 microM Ca2+ to 5%. Neither control IgG, the CALM antagonist W-7, nor a peptide directed against the CALM-binding domain of myosin light chain kinase (MYLK2) inhibited hyperactivation. However, when sperm were reactivated in the presence of CALM kinase II (CAMK2) inhibiting peptides, hyperactivation was reduced by 75%. Furthermore, an inhibitor of CAMK2, KN-93, inhibited hyperactivation without impairing normal motility of intact sperm. CALM and CAMK2 were immunolocalized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. These results indicate that hyperactivation is stimulated by a Ca2+/CALM pathway involving CAMK2.

  15. Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration is a predictor of chronic kidney disease in patients with cardiovascular risk factors - Hyogo Sleep Cardio-Autonomic Atherosclerosis study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masafumi Kurajoh; Manabu Kadoya; Akiko Morimoto; Akio Miyoshi; Akinori Kanzaki; Miki Kakutani-Hatayama; Kae Hamamoto; Takuhito Shoji; Yuji Moriwaki; Tetsuya Yamamoto; Masaaki Inaba; Mitsuyoshi Namba; Hidenori Koyama

    2017-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to have protective effects against cardiovascular diseases and death through neural and non-neural pathways via tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling...

  16. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in major depressive disorder : state-trait issues, clinical features and pharmacological treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molendijk, M. L.; Bus, B. A. A.; Spinhoven, Ph; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Kenis, G.; Prickaerts, J.; Voshaar, R. C. Oude; Elzinga, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence supports 'the neurotrophin hypothesis of depression' in its prediction that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in depression. However, some key questions remain unanswered, including whether abnormalities in BDNF persist beyond the clinical state of depression,

  17. Genomics and evolutionary aspect of calcium signaling event in calmodulin and calmodulin-like proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep; Bae, Hanhong

    2017-02-03

    Ca2+ ion is a versatile second messenger that operate in a wide ranges of cellular processes that impact nearly every aspect of life. Ca2+ regulates gene expression and biotic and abiotic stress responses in organisms ranging from unicellular algae to multi-cellular higher plants through the cascades of calcium signaling processes. In this study, we deciphered the genomics and evolutionary aspects of calcium signaling event of calmodulin (CaM) and calmodulin like- (CML) proteins. We studied the CaM and CML gene family of 41 different species across the plant lineages. Genomic analysis showed that plant encodes more calmodulin like-protein than calmodulins. Further analyses showed, the majority of CMLs were intronless, while CaMs were intron rich. Multiple sequence alignment showed, the EF-hand domain of CaM contains four conserved D-x-D motifs, one in each EF-hand while CMLs contain only one D-x-D-x-D motif in the fourth EF-hand. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that, the CMLs were evolved earlier than CaM and later diversified. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that different CaM and CMLs genes were express differentially in different tissues in a spatio-temporal manner. In this study we provided in detailed genome-wide identifications and characterization of CaM and CML protein family, phylogenetic relationships, and domain structure. Expression study of CaM and CML genes were conducted in Glycine max and Phaseolus vulgaris. Our study provides a strong foundation for future functional research in CaM and CML gene family in plant kingdom.

  18. Comparing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor secretion of induced neurotrophic factor secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mostafavi, Fatemeh Sadat

    2013-08-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) may be equally beneficial in treating neurodegenerative diseases. However, ADSCs have practical advantages. In this study, we aimed to induce neurotrophic factors secreting cells in human ADSCs. Then, we compared the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) secretion in neurotrophic factors secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells. Isolated human ADSCs and BMSCs were induced to neurotrophic factor (NTF)-secreting cells. The levels of expression and secretion of BDNF and CTNF of induced cells were assessed using immunocytochemical, Real-Time polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The level of BDNF significantly increased in both the induced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) relative to ADSCs and the BMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, ELISA analysis showed that the release of BDNF in the induced BMSCs was almost twofold more than the induced ADSCs. Overall, NTF-secreting factor cells derived BMSCs and ADSCs could secret a range of different growth factors. Therefore, the variation in neurotrophic factors of different induced MSC populations suggest the possible beneficial effect of each specific kind of neurotrophic factor secreting cells for the treatment of a particular neurodegenerative disease. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  19. Association between Val66Met polymorphism of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) gene and a deficiency of colour vision in alcohol-dependent male patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serý, Omar; Sťastný, František; Zvolský, Petr; Hlinomazová, Zuzana; Balcar, Vladimir J

    2011-07-25

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a protein encoded, in humans, by BDNF gene on chromosome 11. BDNF protects adult neurons and promotes growth and differentiation during ontogenetic development but the nature and magnitude of its effects could be influenced by functional polymorphisms. The BDNF polymorphism Val66Met (rs6265) has been studied in the context of etiology of mental diseases including alcoholism. Alcoholism - a complex disorder known to be linked to several genes - has multiple manifestations, including sensory deficits such as those affecting vision. In the present study we examined a relationship between the Val66Met polymorphism, alcohol dependence and colour vision deficiency (CVD) in 167 alcohol-dependent men and 289 control male subjects. Statistical analysis revealed that almost half (about 48%) of the alcohol dependent men had a CVD. In addition we found that CVD was significantly associated (P=0.005) with the Val66Met polymorphism. The A allele containing 66Met promotes BDNF expression and this may protect humans against CVD induced by long-term excessive alcohol intake. The present findings indicate that alcohol-induced CVD does not depend solely on excessive alcohol consumption but is significantly influenced by genetic predisposition in the form of a specific BDNF polymorphism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A prospective, longitudinal study of platelet serotonin and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentrations in major depression: effects of vortioxetine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagud, Marina; Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Vuksan-Cusa, Bjanka; Maravic, Anja; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Mihaljevic Peles, Alma; Zivkovic, Maja; Kusevic, Zorana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-09-01

    Various antidepressants occupy brain serotonin transporter (SERT), decrease platelet serotonin (5-HT) concentration, and normalize reduced plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations in depressed patients. Vortioxetine is a recently introduced antidepressant with a multimodal mechanism of action. In addition to SERT inhibition, vortioxetine acts via different 5-HT receptors. To further elucidate its mechanism of action, we have investigated the effects of vortioxetine on platelet 5-HT and plasma BDNF concentrations in patients with major depression. Platelet 5-HT and plasma BDNF concentrations were determined in 44 healthy subjects at baseline and in 44 depressed patients before and after 4 weeks of treatment with vortioxetine (5-15 mg daily). Platelet 5-HT concentration was determined using the ortho-phthalaldehyde-enhanced fluorometric method, and plasma BDNF concentration using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Quantikine ELISA, R&D Systems). At baseline, platelet 5-HT concentrations did not differ between depressed and control subjects, but plasma BDNF values were lower (p = 0.011; ω = 0.80) in depressed patients than in healthy subjects. Vortioxetine treatment significantly (p vortioxetine shares some common effects with other antidepressants. This study is the first to show that, in addition to clinical improvement, 4 weeks of treatment with vortioxetine (5-15 mg daily), decreased platelet 5-HT and increased plasma BDNF concentrations in depressed patients.

  1. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and neurotrophin-3 levels in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgiç, Ayhan; Toker, Aysun; Işık, Ümit; Kılınç, İbrahim

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggested that neurotrophins are involved in the etiopathogenesis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study aimed to investigate whether there are differences in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and neurotrophin-3 (NTF3) levels between children with ADHD and healthy controls. A total of 110 treatment-naive children with the combined presentation of ADHD and 44 healthy controls aged 8-18 years were enrolled in this study. The severity of ADHD symptoms was determined by scores on the Conners' Parent Rating Scale-Revised Short and Conners' Teacher Rating Scale-Revised Short. The severity of depression and anxiety symptoms of the children were evaluated by the self-report inventories. Serum levels of neurotrophins were measured using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) revealed a significant main effect of groups in the levels of serum neurotrophins, an effect that was independent of age, sex, and the severity of the depression and anxiety. The analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) indicated that the mean serum GDNF and NTF3 levels of ADHD patients were significantly higher than that of controls. However, serum BDNF and NGF levels did not show any significant differences between groups. No correlations between the levels of serum neurotrophins and the severity of ADHD were observed. These results suggest that elevated serum GDNF and NTF3 levels may be related to ADHD in children.

  2. Effects of physical exercise on plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and depressive symptoms in elderly women--a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Daniele S; de Queiroz, Bárbara Z; Miranda, Aline S; Rocha, Natália P; Felício, Diogo C; Mateo, Elvis C; Favero, Michelle; Coelho, Fernanda M; Jesus-Moraleida, Fabianna; Gomes Pereira, Danielle A; Teixeira, Antonio L; Máximo Pereira, Leani S

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effect of 2 standardized exercise programs, muscle strength exercises (SE) and aerobic exercises (AE), on the plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and depressive symptoms in 451 elderly women. A randomized controlled trial. Belo Horizonte/MG-Brazil. Community-dwelling older women (N=451; age, 65-89y). The participants were divided into 2 groups: SE and AE. Both protocols lasted 10 weeks, and 30 sessions (1-h sessions) in total were performed 3 times a week under the direct supervision of physical therapists. Plasma levels of BDNF (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale). There was a significant difference for BDNF plasma levels between the SE and AE groups (P=.009). Post hoc analysis revealed a pre-post intervention difference in BDNF levels only for the SE group (P=.008). A statistically significant difference was found for the pre- and postintervention Geriatric Depression Scale scores in both groups (P=.001), showing that the effects of both exercise protocols were comparable regarding depressive symptoms (P=.185). The present findings have demonstrated the positive effect of muscle strengthening and aerobic intervention on depressive symptoms in community-dwelling elderly women. Interestingly, only SE significantly increased the plasma levels of BDNF in our sample. The positive effects of physical exercise on depressive symptoms in the elderly were not mediated by BDNF. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Long noncoding nature brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense is associated with poor prognosis and functional regulation in non-small cell lung caner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, MingJing; Xu, Zhonghua; Jiang, Kanqiu; Xu, Weihua; Chen, Yongbin; Xu, ZhongHeng

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the prognostic potential and functional regulation of human nature antisense, brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense, in non-small cell lung cancer. Non-small cell lung cancer carcinoma and adjacent non-carcinoma lung tissues were extracted from 151 patients. Their endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense expression levels were compared by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Clinical relevance between endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense expression level and patients' clinicopathological variances or overall survival was analyzed. The potential of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense being an independent prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer was also evaluated. In in vitro non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense was upregulated through forced overexpression. The effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense upregulation on non-small cell lung cancer in vitro survival, proliferation, and migration were evaluated by viability, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, and transwell assays. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense is lowly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer carcinoma tissues and further downregulated in late-stage carcinomas. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense downregulation was closely associated with non-small cell lung cancer patients' advanced tumor, lymph node, metastasis stage, and positive status of lymph node metastasis, and confirmed to be an independent prognostic factor for patients' poor overall survival. In non-small cell lung cancer A549 and H226 cell lines, forced overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense did not alter cancer cell viability but had significantly tumor suppressive effect in inhibiting in vitro non-small cell lung cancer proliferation and migration. Endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor antisense in

  4. Recombinant PrPSc shares structural features with brain-derived PrPSc: Insights from limited proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano, Alejandro M; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Younas, Neelam; Wang, Fei; R Elezgarai, Saioa; Bravo, Susana; Vázquez-Fernández, Ester; Rosa, Isaac; Eraña, Hasier; Gil, David; Veiga, Sonia; Vidal, Enric; Erickson-Beltran, Melissa L; Guitián, Esteban; Silva, Christopher J; Nonno, Romolo; Ma, Jiyan; Castilla, Joaquín; R Requena, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    Very solid evidence suggests that the core of full length PrPSc is a 4-rung β-solenoid, and that individual PrPSc subunits stack to form amyloid fibers. We recently used limited proteolysis to map the β-strands and connecting loops that make up the PrPSc solenoid. Using high resolution SDS-PAGE followed by epitope analysis, and mass spectrometry, we identified positions ~116/118, 133-134, 141, 152-153, 162, 169 and 179 (murine numbering) as Proteinase K (PK) cleavage sites in PrPSc. Such sites likely define loops and/or borders of β-strands, helping us to predict the threading of the β-solenoid. We have now extended this approach to recombinant PrPSc (recPrPSc). The term recPrPSc refers to bona fide recombinant prions prepared by PMCA, exhibiting infectivity with attack rates of ~100%. Limited proteolysis of mouse and bank vole recPrPSc species yielded N-terminally truncated PK-resistant fragments similar to those seen in brain-derived PrPSc, albeit with varying relative yields. Along with these fragments, doubly N- and C-terminally truncated fragments, in particular ~89/97-152, were detected in some recPrPSc preparations; similar fragments are characteristic of atypical strains of brain-derived PrPSc. Our results suggest a shared architecture of recPrPSc and brain PrPSc prions. The observed differences, in particular the distinct yields of specific PK-resistant fragments, are likely due to differences in threading which result in the specific biochemical characteristics of recPrPSc. Furthermore, recombinant PrPSc offers exciting opportunities for structural studies unachievable with brain-derived PrPSc.

  5. ROLE OF BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (BDNF IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF COGNTIVE DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Vladimirovna Gatskikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the heavy progressive vascular complications of type 2 diabetes is a central nervous system, manifesting cognitive dysfunction due to metabolic changes. Goal. Defining the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and methods. The study involved 83 patients with type 2 diabetes at the age of 40 - 70 years. Complex examination included clinical and laboratory examination, neuropsychological testing. To screen for cognitive impairment used the Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MOS test. To identify early markers of cognitive impairment was determined the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Results. The study found a negative correlation between the level of BDNF and the HbA1c (r = - 0,494, p = 0.01, fasting glucose (r = - 0,499, p = 0.01, and a positive relationship between the level of BDNF and cognitive function in patients with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion. In patients with type 2 diabetes revealed cognitive dysfunction in the form of reduced memory, attention, optical-dimensional activity that correlated with chronic hyperglycemia. The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the complex diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes. With an increase in HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes reduces the level of BDNF in the blood plasma, and a decline in cognitive function. Recommended use of BDNF as an additional marker of cognitive dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  6. Calmodulin-dependent and calmodulin-independent glutamate decarboxylases in apple fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobacher, Christopher P; Zarei, Adel; Liu, Jingyun; Clark, Shawn M; Bozzo, Gale G; Shelp, Barry J

    2013-09-28

    The ubiquitous, non-proteinaceous amino acid GABA (γ-aminobutyrate) accumulates in plants subjected to abiotic stresses such as chilling, O2 deficiency and elevated CO2. Recent evidence indicates that controlled atmosphere storage causes the accumulation of GABA in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) fruit, and now there is increasing interest in the biochemical mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon. Here, we investigated whether this phenomenon could be mediated via Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) activation of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity. GAD activity in cell-free extracts of apple fruit was stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM at physiological pH, but not at the acidic pH optimum. Based on bioinformatics analysis of the apple genome, three apple GAD genes were identified and their expression determined in various apple organs, including fruit. Like recombinant Arabidopsis GAD1, the activity and spectral properties of recombinant MdGAD1 and MdGAD2 were regulated by Ca(2+)/CaM at physiological pH and both enzymes possessed a highly conserved CaM-binding domain that was autoinhibitory. In contrast, the activity and spectral properties of recombinant MdGAD3 were not affected by Ca(2+)/CaM and they were much less sensitive to pH than MdGAD1, MdGAD2 and Arabidopsis GAD1; furthermore, the C-terminal region neither bound CaM nor functioned as an autoinhibitory domain. Plant GADs typically differ from microbial and animal GAD enzymes in possessing a C-terminal 30-50 amino acid residue CaM-binding domain. To date, rice GAD2 is the only exception to this generalization; notably, the C-terminal region of this enzyme still functions as an autoinhibitory domain. In the present study, apple fruit were found to contain two CaM-dependent GADs, as well as a novel CaM-independent GAD that does not possess a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain.

  7. Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factors in Taiwanese Patients with Drug-Naïve First-Episode Major Depressive Disorder: Effects of Antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, Yu-Jie; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factors are known to be related to the psychopathology of major depressive disorder. However, studies focusing on drug-naïve first-episode patients are still rare. Over a 6-year period, we examined the serum brain-derived neurotrophic factors levels in patients with first-episode drug-naïve major depressive disorder and compared them with sex-matched healthy controls. We also investigated the relationships between serum brain-derived neurotrophic factors levels, suicidal behavior, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores before and after a 4-week antidepressant treatment. The baseline serum brain-derived neurotrophic factors levels of 71 patients were significantly lower than those of the controls (P=.017), and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores in 71 patients did not correlate with brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were significantly lower in 13 suicidal major depressive disorder patients than in 58 nonsuicidal major depressive disorder patients (P=.038). Among 41 followed-up patients, there was no alteration in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factors levels after treatment with antidepressants (P=.126). In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of using pretreatment brain-derived neurotrophic factors to estimate the response to treatment, the area under the curve was 0.684. The most suitable cut-off point was 6.1 ng/mL (sensitivity=78.6%, specificity = 53.8%). Our data support the serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with drug-naïve first-episode major depressive disorder were lower than those in the healthy controls, and patients with pretreatment brain-derived neurotrophic factors >6.1 ng/mL were more likely to be responders. Although the relationship of our results to the mechanism of drug action and pathophysiology of depression remains unclear, the measure may have potential use as a predictor of response to treatment. In the future

  8. Calmodulin adopts an extended conformation when interacting with L-selectin in membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Deng

    Full Text Available Calmodulin, an intracellular calcium-binding protein, is thought to regulate ectodomain shedding of many membrane proteins, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained unclear. Basing on a solution structure of calcium-loaded calmodulin in complex with a L-selectin fragment that contains a portion of its transmembrane domain, Gifford et al. (University of Calgary recently suggested that calmodulin regulates L-selectin shedding by binding directly to a portion of the L-selectin transmembrane domain in a compact conformation. Using fluorescently labeled calmodulin, we show however that calmodulin adopts a distinctly different and much more extended conformation when it binds to the CLS peptide (i.e. the entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of L-selectin reconstituted in the phosphatidylcholine liposome with micromolar dissociation constant and in a calcium-independent manner. Calmodulin adopts a similarly extended conformation in a ternary complex with the N-terminal FERM domain of moesin and CLS reconstituted in the phospholipid liposome that mimics the native membrane environment. These results indicate that calmodulin does not bind directly to the transmembrane domain of L-selectin. Understanding the association of calmodulin with L-selectin helps to shed light on the mechanisms underlying regulation of ectodomain shedding.

  9. Calmodulin gene expression in response to mechanical wounding and Botrytis cinerea infection in tomato fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding the stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various physiological responses in plants. To determine the functional significance of calmodulin in fl...

  10. Minocycline up-regulates the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohong; Ma, Lili; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Shaoqiong; Zhu, Cansheng; Liu, Mei; Ma, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Dongliang; Liu, Yingying; Peng, Fuhua; Wang, Qing; Pi, Rongbiao

    2012-07-05

    Previous evidence demonstrated that minocycline could ameliorate clinical severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and exhibit several anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. However, few studies have been carried out to assess its effects on the expression of neurotrophins in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or multiple sclerosis. Here we investigated the alteration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the sera, cerebral cortex, and lumbar spinal cord of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis C57 BL/6 mice in vivo as well as the splenocytes culture supernatants in vitro after minocycline administration. Our results demonstrated that minocycline could up-regulate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor both in peripheral (sera and splenocytes culture supernatants) and target organs (cerebral cortex and lumber spinal cord) of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These data suggest that up-regulation of neurotrophins in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis may be a novel neuroprotective mechanism of minocycline. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Circulating Estradiol Regulates Brain-Derived Estradiol via Actions at GnRH Receptors to Impact Memory in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Britta S; Black, Katelyn L; Daniel, Jill M

    2016-01-01

    Systemic estradiol treatment enhances hippocampus-dependent memory in ovariectomized rats. Although these enhancements are traditionally thought to be due to circulating estradiol, recent data suggest these changes are brought on by hippocampus-derived estradiol, the synthesis of which depends on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) activity. The goal of the current work is to test the hypothesis that peripheral estradiol affects hippocampus-dependent memory through brain-derived estradiol regulated via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity. In the first experiment, intracerebroventricular infusion of letrozole, which prevents the synthesis of estradiol, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory in a radial-maze task. In the second experiment, hippocampal infusion of antide, a long-lasting GnRH receptor antagonist, blocked the ability of peripheral estradiol administration in ovariectomized rats to enhance hippocampus-dependent memory. In the third experiment, hippocampal infusion of GnRH enhanced hippocampus-dependent memory, the effects of which were blocked by letrozole infusion. Results indicate that peripheral estradiol-induced enhancement of cognition is mediated by brain-derived estradiol via hippocampal GnRH receptor activity.

  12. Modulation of myometrium mitochondrial membrane potential by calmodulin antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Shlykov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Influence of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was investigated using­ a flow cytometry method, confocal microscopy and fluorescent potential-sensitive probes TMRM and MTG. Influence of different concentrations of calmodulin antagonists on mitochondrial membrane potential was studied using flow cytometry method and a fraction of myometrium mitochondria of unpregnant rats. It was shown that 1-10 µМ calmidazolium gradually reduced mitochondria membrane potential. At the same time 10-100 µМ trifluope­razine influenced as follows: 10 µМ – increased polarization, while 100 µМ – caused almost complete depolarization of mitochondrial membranes. In experiments which were conducted with the use of confocal microscopy method and myometrium cells it was shown, that MTG addition to the incubation medium­ led to the appearance of fluorescence signal in a green range. Addition of the second probe (ТМRM resulted in the appearance of fluorescent signal in a red range. Mitochondrial membrane depolarization by 1µМ СССР or 10 mМ NaN3 was accompanied by the decline of “red” fluo­rescence intensity, “green” fluorescence was kept. The 10-15 minute incubation of myometrium cells in the presen­ce 10 µМ calmidazolium or 100 µМ trifluoperazine was accompanied by almost complete decrease of the TMRM fluorescent signal. Thus, with the use of potential-sensitive fluorescent probes TMRM and MTG it was shown, that calmodulin antagonists modulate mitochondrial membrane potential of myometrium cells.

  13. Identification of spectrin as a calmodulin-binding component in the pituitary gonadotrope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooge, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide which stimulates the release of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) from the pituitary. Ca{sup 2+} fulfills the requirements of a second messenger for this system. Inhibition of calmodulin will inhibit GnRH stimulated LH release. The aim of the present studies has been to identify the locus of action of calmodulin within the pituitary. By use of an {sup 125}I-calmodulin gel overlayer assay, five major Ca{sup 2+}-dependent {sup 125}I-calmodulin labelled components of subunit M{sub r} > 205,000; 200,000; 135,000; 60,000; and 52,000 have been identified. This labeling was found to be phenothiazine-sensitive. Ca{sup 2+}-independent binding that was observed appears to be due to hydrophobic interactions of calmodulin with acid-soluble proteins, principally histones. Subcellular fractionation revealed that the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent calmodulin-binding components are localized primarily in the cytosolic fraction. Separation of dispersed anterior pituitary cells through a linear Metrizamide gradient yielded gonadotrope-enriched fractions, which were found to contain all five {sup 125}I-calmodulin binding components corresponding to the major bands in the pituitary homogenate. The calmodulin-binding component levels do not appear to be differentially regulated by steroids. The calmodulin binding component with a M{sub r} > 205,000 has been identified as spectrin. Spectrin-like immunoreactivity and {sup 125}I-calmodulin-binding activity in pituitary tissue homogenates co-migrated in various percentage acrylamide gels with avian erythrocyte spectrin. Spectrin was detected in a gonadotrope-enriched fraction by immunoblotting, and confirmed in gonadotropes by indirect immunofluorescence of cultured pituitary cells in which spectrin- and LH-immunoreactivity co-localized.

  14. Biophysical analysis of the dynamics of calmodulin interactions with neurogranin and Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Christian; Talibov, Vladimir O; Danielson, U Helena

    2017-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) functions depend on interactions with CaM-binding proteins, regulated by Ca2+. Induced structural changes influence the affinity, kinetics, and specificities of the interactions. The dynamics of CaM interactions with neurogranin (Ng) and the CaM-binding region of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII290-309 ) have been studied using biophysical methods. These proteins have opposite Ca2+ dependencies for CaM binding. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor analysis confirmed that Ca2+ and CaM interact very rapidly, and with moderate affinity ( KDSPR=3μM). Calmodulin-CaMKII290-309 interactions were only detected in the presence of Ca2+, exhibiting fast kinetics and nanomolar affinity ( KDSPR=7.1nM). The CaM-Ng interaction had higher affinity under Ca2+-depleted ( KDSPR=480nM,k1=3.4×105M-1s-1 and k-1 = 1.6 × 10(-1) s(-1) ) than Ca2+-saturated conditions ( KDSPR=19μM). The IQ motif of Ng (Ng27-50 ) had similar affinity for CaM as Ng under Ca2+-saturated conditions ( KDSPR=14μM), but no interaction was seen under Ca2+-depleted conditions. Microscale thermophoresis using fluorescently labeled CaM confirmed the surface plasmon resonance results qualitatively, but estimated lower affinities for the Ng ( KDMST=890nM) and CaMKII290-309 ( KDMST=190nM) interactions. Although CaMKII290-309 showed expected interaction characteristics, they may be different for full-length CaMKII. The data for full-length Ng, but not Ng27-50 , agree with the current model on Ng regulation of Ca2+/CaM signaling. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Molecular Recognition Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Variants in doublecortin- and calmodulin kinase like 1, a gene up-regulated by BDNF, are associated with memory and general cognitive abilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Le Hellard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human memory and general cognitive abilities are complex functions of high heritability and wide variability in the population. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays an important role in mammalian memory formation. METHODOLOGY / PRINCIPAL FINDING: Based on the identification of genes markedly up-regulated during BDNF-induced synaptic consolidation in the hippocampus, we selected genetic variants that were tested in three independent samples, from Norway and Scotland, of adult individuals examined for cognitive abilities. In all samples, we show that markers in the doublecortin- and calmodulin kinase like 1 (DCLK1 gene, are significantly associated with general cognition (IQ scores and verbal memory function, resisting multiple testing. DCLK1 is a complex gene with multiple transcripts which vary in expression and function. We show that the short variants are all up-regulated after BDNF treatment in the rat hippocampus, and that they are expressed in the adult human brain (mostly in cortices and hippocampus. We demonstrate that several of the associated variants are located in potential alternative promoter- and cis-regulatory elements of the gene and that they affect BDNF-mediated expression of short DCLK1 transcripts in a reporter system. CONCLUSION: These data present DCLK1 as a functionally pertinent gene involved in human memory and cognitive functions.

  16. Molecular modeling of calmodulin: a comparison with crystallographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, J. J.; Rein, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods of side-chain placement on a modeled protein have been examined. Two molecular models of calmodulin were constructed that differ in the treatment of side chains prior to optimization of the molecule. A virtual bond analysis program developed by Purisima and Scheraga was used to determine the backbone conformation based on 2.2 angstroms resolution C alpha coordinates for the molecules. In the first model, side chains were initially constructed in an extended conformation. In the second model, a conformational grid search technique was employed. Calcium ions were treated explicitly during energy optimization using CHARMM. The models are compared to a recently published refined crystal structure of calmodulin. The results indicate that the initial choices for side-chains, but also significant effects on the main-chain conformation and supersecondary structure. The conformational differences are discussed. Analysis of these and other methods makes possible the formulation of a methodology for more appropriate side-chain placement in modeled proteins.

  17. Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Exocytosis and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acidergic Interneuron Synapse by the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene Dysbindin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qiang; Yang, Feng; Xiao, Yixin; Tan, Shawn; Husain, Nilofer; Ren, Ming; Hu, Zhonghua; Martinowich, Keri; Ng, Julia S; Kim, Paul J; Han, Weiping; Nagata, Koh-Ichi; Weinberger, Daniel R; Je, H Shawn

    2016-08-15

    Genetic variations in dystrobrevin binding protein 1 (DTNBP1 or dysbindin-1) have been implicated as risk factors in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The encoded protein dysbindin-1 functions in the regulation of synaptic activity and synapse development. Intriguingly, a loss of function mutation in Dtnbp1 in mice disrupted both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic transmission in the cerebral cortex; pyramidal neurons displayed enhanced excitability due to reductions in inhibitory synaptic inputs. However, the mechanism by which reduced dysbindin-1 activity causes inhibitory synaptic deficits remains unknown. We investigated the role of dysbindin-1 in the exocytosis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) from cortical excitatory neurons, organotypic brain slices, and acute slices from dysbindin-1 mutant mice and determined how this change in BDNF exocytosis transsynaptically affected the number of inhibitory synapses formed on excitatory neurons via whole-cell recordings, immunohistochemistry, and live-cell imaging using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. A decrease in dysbindin-1 reduces the exocytosis of BDNF from cortical excitatory neurons, and this reduction in BDNF exocytosis transsynaptically resulted in reduced inhibitory synapse numbers formed on excitatory neurons. Furthermore, application of exogenous BDNF rescued the inhibitory synaptic deficits caused by the reduced dysbindin-1 level in both cultured cortical neurons and slice cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate that these two genes linked to risk for schizophrenia (BDNF and dysbindin-1) function together to regulate interneuron development and cortical network activity. This evidence supports the investigation of the association between dysbindin-1 and BDNF in humans with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of Functional Polymorphisms from Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Serotonin-Related Genes with Depressive Symptoms after a Medical Stressor in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Kerri S.; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Ricci, William M.; Binder, Ellen F.; Rodebaugh, Thomas L.; Wendleton, Leah; Doré, Peter; Lenze, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in older adults after a disabling medical event and interfere with rehabilitation and recovery from the disability. This prospective study examined the role of genetic polymorphisms implicated in synaptic integrity and stress-associated depression as predictors of depressive symptoms after hip fracture. We recruited healthy comparisons from the community and participants with hip fracture after surgical fixation from Saint Louis, Missouri hospitals. We examined the valine (Val) to methionine (Met) polymorphism in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), serotonin 1A receptor (5HT1a-rs6295) polymorphism, and the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5HTTLPR) interaction with the rs25531 A to G single nucleotide polymorphism (5HTTLPR-rs25531) as predictors of depressive symptoms. We also examined whether depressive symptoms mediate the influence of BDNF genotype on functional recovery. Among 429 participants with hip fracture, BDNF Met/Met carriers developed significantly more depressive symptoms than Val/Val carriers during a four-week period after the fracture (p=.012). BDNF genotype also predicted functional recovery over the ensuing year, mediated by its effects on depressive symptoms (CI: 0.07-3.37). Unlike prior studies of stressful life events, the S′ 5HTTLPR-rs25531 variant did not predict higher levels of depressive symptoms; instead, we report an exploratory finding of an epistatic effect between BDNF and 5HTTLPR-rs25531 whereby the compounded effects of two LA alleles and BDNF Met/Met genotype elevate risk of depressive symptoms after hip fracture (p=.006). No differences between 5HT1a genotypes were found. Our findings suggest plasticity-related genetic factors contribute to the neural mechanisms of mental and functional well-being after a disabling medical stressor. PMID:25781924

  19. The Impact of Aerobic Exercise on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Neurocognition in Individuals With Schizophrenia: A Single-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimhy, David; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Bartels, Matthew N; Armstrong, Hilary F; Ballon, Jacob S; Khan, Samira; Chang, Rachel W; Hansen, Marie C; Ayanruoh, Lindsey; Lister, Amanda; Castrén, Eero; Smith, Edward E; Sloan, Richard P

    2015-07-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia display substantial neurocognitive deficits for which available treatments offer only limited benefits. Yet, findings from studies of animals, clinical and nonclinical populations have linked neurocognitive improvements to increases in aerobic fitness (AF) via aerobic exercise training (AE). Such improvements have been attributed to up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, the impact of AE on neurocognition, and the putative role of BDNF, have not been investigated in schizophrenia. Employing a proof-of-concept, single-blind, randomized clinical trial design, 33 individuals with schizophrenia were randomized to receive standard psychiatric treatment (n = 17; "treatment as usual"; TAU) or attend a 12-week AE program (n = 16) utilizing active-play video games (Xbox 360 Kinect) and traditional AE equipment. Participants completed assessments of AF (indexed by VO2 peak ml/kg/min), neurocognition (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery), and serum-BDNF before and after and 12-week period. Twenty-six participants (79%) completed the study. At follow-up, the AE participants improved their AF by 18.0% vs a -0.5% decline in the TAU group (P = .002) and improved their neurocognition by 15.1% vs -2.0% decline in the TAU group (P = .031). Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that enhancement in AF and increases in BDNF predicted 25.4% and 14.6% of the neurocognitive improvement variance, respectively. The results indicate AE is effective in enhancing neurocognitive functioning in people with schizophrenia and provide preliminary support for the impact of AE-related BDNF up-regulation on neurocognition in this population. Poor AF represents a modifiable risk factor for neurocognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia for which AE training offer a safe, nonstigmatizing, and side-effect-free intervention. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center

  20. Alterations in BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) and GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) serum levels in bipolar disorder: The role of lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Zeliha; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Ceylan, Deniz; Yalçın, Yaprak; Can, Güneş; Resmi, Halil; Akan, Pınar; Ergör, Gül; Aydemir, Omer; Cengisiz, Cengiz; Kerim, Doyuran

    2014-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been consistently reported to be decreased in mania or depression in bipolar disorders. Evidence suggests that Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has a role in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. Whether GDNF and BDNF act in the same way across different episodes in bipolar disorders is unclear. BDNF and GDNF serum levels were measured simultaneously by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in 96 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder according to DSM-IV (37 euthymic, 33 manic, 26 depressed) in comparison to 61 healthy volunteers. SCID- I and SCID-non patient version were used for clinical evaluation of the patients and healthy volunteers respectively. Correlations between the two trophic factor levels, and medication dose, duration and serum levels of lithium or valproate were studied across different episodes of illness. Patients had significantly lower BDNF levels during mania and depression compared to euthymic patients and healthy controls. GDNF levels were not distinctive. However GDNF/BDNF ratio was higher in manic state compared to euthymia and healthy controls. Significant negative correlation was observed between BDNF and GDNF levels in euthymic patients. While BDNF levels correlated positively, GDNF levels correlated negatively with lithium levels. Regression analysis confirmed that lithium levels predicted only GDNF levels positively in mania, and negatively in euthymia. Small sample size in different episodes and drug-free patients was the limitation of thestudy. Current data suggests that lithium exerts its therapeutic action by an inverse effect on BDNF and GDNF levels, possibly by up-regulating BDNF and down-regulating GDNF to achieve euthymia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypothyroidism in the adult rat causes incremental changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neuronal and astrocyte apoptosis, gliosis, and deterioration of postsynaptic density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Claudia; Eugenin, Eliseo; Aliaga, Esteban; Carreño, Leandro J; Bueno, Susan M; Gonzalez, Pablo A; Gayol, Silvina; Naranjo, David; Noches, Verónica; Marassi, Michelle P; Rosenthal, Doris; Jadue, Cindy; Ibarra, Paula; Keitel, Cecilia; Wohllk, Nelson; Court, Felipe; Kalergis, Alexis M; Riedel, Claudia A

    2012-09-01

    Adult hypothyroidism is a highly prevalent condition that impairs processes, such as learning and memory. Even though tetra-iodothyronine (T(4)) treatment can overcome the hypothyroidism in the majority of cases, it cannot fully recover the patient's learning capacity and memory. In this work, we analyzed the cellular and molecular changes in the adult brain occurring with the development of experimental hypothyroidism. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PTU) for 20 days to induce hypothyroidism. Neuronal and astrocyte apoptosis were analyzed in the hippocampus of control and hypothyroid adult rats by confocal microscopy. The content of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and in situ hybridization. The glutamatergic synapse and the postsynaptic density (PSD) were analyzed by electron microscopy. The content of PSD proteins like tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), p75, and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAr) were analyzed by immunoblot. We observed that the hippocampus of hypothyroid adult rats displayed increased apoptosis levels in neurons and astrocyte and reactive gliosis compared with controls. Moreover, we found that the amount of BDNF mRNA was higher in the hippocampus of hypothyroid rats and the content of TrkB, the receptor for BDNF, was reduced at the PSD of the CA3 region of hypothyroid rats, compared with controls. We also observed that the glutamatergic synapses from the stratum radiatum of CA3 from hypothyroid rats, contained thinner PSDs than control rats. This observation was in agreement with a reduced content of NMDAr subunits at the PSD in hypothyroid animals. Our data suggest that adult hypothyroidism affects the hippocampus by a mechanism that alters the composition of PSD, reduces neuronal and astrocyte survival, and alters the content of the signaling neurotrophic factors, such as BDNF.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits calcium channel activation, exocytosis, and endocytosis at a central nerve terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Xin-Sheng; He, Liming; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2015-03-18

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic function and plasticity and plays important roles in neuronal development, survival, and brain disorders. Despite such diverse and important roles, how BDNF, or more generally speaking, neurotrophins affect synapses, particularly nerve terminals, remains unclear. By measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance during depolarization at a large mammalian central nerve terminal, the rat calyx of Held, we report for the first time that BDNF slows down calcium channel activation, including P/Q-type channels, and inhibits exocytosis induced by brief depolarization or single action potentials, inhibits slow and rapid endocytosis, and inhibits vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool. These presynaptic mechanisms may contribute to the important roles of BDNF in regulating synapses and neuronal circuits and suggest that regulation of presynaptic calcium channels, exocytosis, and endocytosis are potential mechanisms by which neurotrophins achieve diverse neuronal functions. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354676-07$15.00/0.

  3. The association between serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Natascha Holbæk; Tarp, Jakob; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes pose a global health burden. Therefore, clarifying the pathology of these risk factors is essential. Previous studies have found positive and negative associations between one or more cardiovascular risk factors and brain......-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) probably due to diverse methodological approaches when analysing peripheral BDNF levels. Moreover, only a few studies have been performed in youth populations. Consequently, the main objective of this study was to examine the association between serum BDNF and a composite z......-score consisting of six cardiovascular risk factors. A secondary aim was to examine the associations between serum BDNF and each of the six risk factors. METHODS: Four hundred and forty-seven apparently healthy adolescents between 11-17 years of age participated in this cross-sectional study. Cardiorespiratory...

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nitric oxide synthase inhibitor protect the vestibular organ against gentamicin ototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumida, Masaya; Anniko, Matti

    2002-01-01

    In order to find a way to develop a new treatment for inner ear disorders, the effects of a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor [N-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME)] and a neurotrophin [brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)] were investigated. The effect of L-NAME and BDNF on gentamicin-induced vestibular hair cell damage was investigated by using the in vitro LIVE/DEAD system. Both L-NAME and BDNF individually reduced the vestibular hair cell damage caused by gentamicin but the combination of L-NAME and BDNF was more successful in preventing damage. It is therefore suggested that treatment with a combination of an NOS inhibitor and a neurotrophin will help us to treat inner ear disorders.

  5. Cross-sex hormone treatment in male-to-female transsexual persons reduces serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Johannes; Hellweg, Rainer; Van Caenegem, Eva; Briken, Peer; Stalla, Günter K; T'Sjoen, Guy; Auer, Matthias K

    2015-01-01

    Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are reduced in male-to-female transsexual persons (MtF) compared to male controls. It was hypothesized before that this might reflect either an involvement of BDNF in a biomechanism of transsexualism or to be the result of persistent social stress due to the condition. Here, we demonstrate that 12 month of cross-sex hormone treatment reduces serum BDNF levels in male-to-female transsexual persons independent of anthropometric measures. Participants were acquired through the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence (ENIGI). Reduced serum BDNF in MtF thus seems to be a result of hormonal treatment rather than a consequence or risk factor of transsexualism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Serum Levels and Hippocampal Volume in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia due to Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericksen Mielle Borba

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hippocampal atrophy is a recognized biomarker of Alzheimer disease (AD pathology. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF reduction has been associated with neurodegeneration. We aimed to evaluate BDNF serum levels and hippocampal volume in clinical AD (dementia and mild cognitive impairment [MCI]. Methods: Participants were 10 patients with MCI and 13 with dementia due to AD as well as 10 healthy controls. BDNF serum levels were determined by ELISA and volumetric measures with NeuroQuant®. Results: MCI and dementia patients presented lower BDNF serum levels than healthy participants; dementia patients presented a smaller hippocampal volume than MCI patients and healthy participants. Discussion: The findings support that the decrease in BDNF might start before the establishment of neuronal injury expressed by the hippocampal reduction.

  7. From Molecular to Nanotechnology Strategies for Delivery of Neurotrophins: Emphasis on Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Géral, Claire; Angelova, Angelina; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases represent a major public health problem, but beneficial clinical treatment with neurotrophic factors has not been established yet. The therapeutic use of neurotrophins has been restrained by their instability and rapid degradation in biological medium. A variety of strategies has been proposed for the administration of these leading therapeutic candidates, which are essential for the development, survival and function of human neurons. In this review, we describe the existing approaches for delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is the most abundant neurotrophin in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Biomimetic peptides of BDNF have emerged as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders. Polymer-based carriers have provided sustained neurotrophin delivery, whereas lipid-based particles have contributed also to potentiation of the BDNF action. Nanotechnology offers new possibilities for the design of vehicles for neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Recent developments in nanoscale carriers for encapsulation and transport of BDNF are highlighted. PMID:24300402

  8. Electroacupuncture enhances motor recovery performance with brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in rats with cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Wook; Chung, You Chul; Jung, Hee Chan; Park, Moon-Seo; Han, Young-Min; Chung, Yong-An; Maeng, Lee-So; Park, Sang-In; Lim, Jiyeon; Im, Woo-Seok; Chung, Jin Young; Kim, Minky; Mook, Inhee; Kim, Manho

    2012-09-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) is a traditional medicine in patients with post-stroke rehabilitation. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent growth factor involved in recovery following cerebral injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether EA increases BDNF levels and facilitates functional recovery. Occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was performed in rats (N=12) followed by reperfusion. EA was applied at the GV20 (Baihui) acupoint. Motor and sensory functions were monitored on the Garcia scale for 2 weeks. Expressions of BDNF and receptor tyrosine kinase B (trkB) were determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Improvement of Garcia scores, particularly in motor performance, were noted in the group with EA stimulation (precovery and stimulates BDNF/trkB expression in rats with cerebral ischaemia.

  9. Brain derived neurotrophic factor mediated learning, fear acquisition and extinction as targets for developing novel treatments for anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Soares de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anxiety and obsessive-compulsive related disorders are highly prevalent and disabling disorders for which there are still treatment gaps to be explored. Fear is a core symptom of these disorders and its learning is highly dependent on the activity of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Should BDNF-mediated fear learning be considered a target for the development of novel treatments for anxiety and obsessive-compulsive related disorders? We review the evidence that suggests that BDNF expression is necessary for the acquisition of conditioned fear, as well as for the recall of its extinction. We describe the findings related to fear learning and genetic/epigenetic manipulation of Bdnf expression in animals and BDNF allelic variants in humans. Later, we discuss how manipulation of BDNF levels represents a promising potential treatment target that may increase the benefits of therapies that extinguish previously conditioned fear.

  10. Chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced deficits in synaptic plasticity and neurocognitive functions: a role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Yung, Wing-ho

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is well known for its metabolic as well as neurobehavioral consequences. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major component of OSA. In recent years, substantial advances have been made in elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of chronic IH on neurocognitive functions, many of which are based on studies in animal models. A number of hypotheses have been put forward to explain chronic IH-induced neurological dysfunctions. Among these, the roles of oxidative stress and apoptosis-related neural injury are widely accepted. Here, focusing on results derived from animal studies, we highlight a possible role of reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in causing impairment in long-term synaptic plasticity and neurocognitive functions during chronic IH. The possible relationship between BDNF and previous findings on this subject will be elucidated.

  11. Antidiabetic Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Its Association with Inflammation in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceren Eyileten

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a neurotrophin, which plays an important role in the central nervous system, and systemic or peripheral inflammatory conditions, such as acute coronary syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. BDNF is also expressed in several nonneuronal tissues, and platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. Here, we reviewed the potential role of BDNF in platelet reactivity in T2DM and its association with selected inflammatory and platelet activation mediators. Besides that, we focused on adipocytokines such as leptin, resistin, and adiponectin which are considered to take part in inflammation and both lipid and glucose metabolism in diabetic patients as previous studies showed the relation between adipocytokines and BDNF. We also reviewed the evidences of the antidiabetic effect of BDNF and the association with circulating inflammatory cytokines in T2DM.

  12. Comparing sprint and endurance training on anxiety, depression and its relation with brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TaheriChadorneshin, Hossein; Cheragh-Birjandi, Sadegh; Ramezani, Saeed; Abtahi-Eivary, Seyed-Hosein

    2017-06-30

    Although the response of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to low intensity exercise training, but the effect of intensive exercise training is not clear. Also, there is insufficient information about relationship between BDNF and depression and anxiety following intensive exercise. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 6 weeks of intensive endurance training (ET) and sprint interval training (SIT) on brain BDNF and its relationship with anxiety and depression in Albino Wistar rats. Anxiety and depression of rats were measured by elevated plus maze (EPM) and tail suspension test (TST), respectively. All data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Pearson's correlation coefficient at Ptraining regimen, rather than intensive endurance training regimen, is highly potential to improve anxiety and depression through a greater increase in BDNF contents in brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of recombinant erythropoietin on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with affective disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Hoejman, Pernille

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The study aims to investigate the effect of repeated infusions of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) on plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with affective disorders. In total, 83 patients were recruited: 40 currently depressed patients with treatment......-resistant depression (TRD) (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 items (HDRS-17) score >17) (study 1) and 43 patients with bipolar disorder (BD) in partial remission (HDRS-17 and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) ≤ 14) (study 2). In both studies, patients were randomised to receive eight weekly EPO (Eprex; 40,000 IU......) or saline (0.9% NaCl) infusions in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel--group design. Plasma BDNF levels were measured at baseline and at weeks 5, 9 and at follow up, week 14. In contrast with our hypothesis, EPO down regulated plasma BDNF levels in patients with TRD (mean reduction at week 9 (95...

  14. ERK-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulation by hesperidin in mice exposed to chronic mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng-Fu; Chen, Shao-Mei; Chen, Xue-Mei; Mu, Rong-Hao; Wang, Shuang-Shuang; Geng, Di; Liu, Qing; Yi, Li-Tao

    2016-06-01

    A previous study found that the antidepressant-like effects of ethanolic extracts from Hemerocallis citrina are predominantly related to the flavonoid, hesperidin. The study herein aimed to explore the antidepressant-like mechanism of hesperidin in mice induced by chronic mild stress (CMS). The results indicated that hesperidin reversed the reduction of sucrose preference and the elevation of immobility time in mice induced by CMS. In addition, the increase in serum corticosterone levels and decrease in hippocampal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in CMS mice were also ameliorated by hesperidin treatment. In contrast, improvement by hesperidin was suppressed by pretreatment with ERK inhibitor SL327. Taken together, our findings confirmed the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin and indicated that hesperidin-induced BDNF up-regulation was mediated in an ERK-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of physical activity and exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor in healthy humans: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T; Larsen, K T; Ried-Larsen, M; Møller, N C; Andersen, L B

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the effects of physical activity and exercise on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in healthy humans. Experimental and observational studies were identified from PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and SPORT Discus. A total of 32 articles met the inclusion criteria. Evidence from experimental studies suggested that peripheral BDNF concentrations were elevated by acute and chronic aerobic exercise. The majority of the studies suggested that strength training had no influence on peripheral BDNF. The results from most observational studies suggested an inverse relationship between the peripheral BDNF level and habitual physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness. More research is needed to confirm the findings from the observational studies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Is a calmodulin-opiopeptide interaction related to the mechanism of opioid action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouet, D H; Williams, N; Yonehara, N

    1983-01-01

    The effect of several opioids: methadone, etorphine, beta-endorphin and D-ala2met enkephalin on Ca++/calmodulin stimulation of enzyme activities either in pure solution (cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase) or in striatal membranes (protein kinases in synaptic membranes) were compared to see if a direct opioid/calmodulin interaction could eliminate the stimulation of enzyme activity as part of the mechanism by which opioids alter ion flow and neurotransmitter release. In other experiments, in which endogenous phosphorylation of proteins in striatal synaptic membranes was altered by opioid treatments, the possibility of restoring protein kinase activity to normal levels in the membrane preparation by supplementation with calmodulin at optimal Ca++ concentration was examined. Some opioids (methadone and D-ala2met enkephalin) did not inhibit calmodulin-stimulated phosphodiesterase, which suggests that they were not able to bind to calmodulin. In addition, it was not possible to restore decreases in protein kinase activity to normal levels by adding calmodulin to the assay in the presence of optimal Ca++. We conclude that a direct binding of opioids to calmodulin is not a general mechanism of opioid action, although the binding may participate in the action of some neuropeptides, including beta-endorphin.

  17. Association study of a brain-derived neurotrophic factor polymorphism and short-term antidepressant response in major depressive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Cheng Huang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Eugene Lin1,7, Po See Chen2,6,7, Lung-Cheng Huang3,4, Sen-Yen Hsu51Vita Genomics, Inc., Wugu Shiang, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital and College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan; 3Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Taiwan; 4Graduate Institute of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; 5Department of Psychiatry, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan, Taiwan; 6Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Dou-liou Branch, Yunlin, Taiwan; 7These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Major depressive disorder (MDD is one of the most common mental disorders worldwide. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs can be used in clinical association studies to determine the contribution of genes to drug efficacy. A common SNP in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene, a methionine (Met substitution for valine (Val at codon 66 (Val66Met, is a candidate SNP for influencing antidepressant treatment outcome. In this study, our goal was to determine the relationship between the Val66Met polymorphism in the BDNF gene and the rapid antidepressant response to venlafaxine in a Taiwanese population with MDD. Overall, the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism was found not to be associated with short-term venlafaxine treatment outcome. However, the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism showed a trend to be associated with rapid venlafaxine treatment response in female patients. Future research with independent replication in large sample sizes is needed to confirm the role of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism identified in this study.Keywords: antidepressant response, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, major depressive disorder, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, single nucleotide polymorphisms

  18. Functional, genetic and bioinformatic characterization of a calcium/calmodulin kinase gene in Sporothrix schenckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-del Valle Nuri

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sporothrix schenckii is a pathogenic, dimorphic fungus, the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous lymphatic mycosis. Dimorphism in S. schenckii responds to second messengers such as cAMP and calcium, suggesting the possible involvement of a calcium/calmodulin kinase in its regulation. In this study we describe a novel calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase gene in S. schenckii, sscmk1, and the effects of inhibitors of calmodulin and calcium/calmodulin kinases on the yeast to mycelium transition and the yeast cell cycle. Results Using the PCR homology approach a new member of the calcium/calmodulin kinase family, SSCMK1, was identified in this fungus. The cDNA sequence of sscmk1 revealed an open reading frame of 1,221 nucleotides encoding a 407 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 45.6 kDa. The genomic sequence of sscmk1 revealed the same ORF interrupted by five introns. Bioinformatic analyses of SSCMK1 showed that this protein had the distinctive features that characterize a calcium/calmodulin protein kinase: a serine/threonine protein kinase domain and a calmodulin-binding domain. When compared to homologues from seven species of filamentous fungi, SSCMK1 showed substantial similarities, except for a large and highly variable region that encompasses positions 330 – 380 of the multiple sequence alignment. Inhibition studies using calmodulin inhibitor W-7, and calcium/calmodulin kinase inhibitors, KN-62 and lavendustin C, were found to inhibit budding by cells induced to re-enter the yeast cell cycle and to favor the yeast to mycelium transition. Conclusion This study constitutes the first evidence of the presence of a calcium/calmodulin kinase-encoding gene in S. schenckii and its possible involvement as an effector of dimorphism in this fungus. These results suggest that a calcium/calmodulin dependent signaling pathway could be involved in the regulation of dimorphism in this fungus

  19. Cation binding mode of fully oxidised calmodulin explained by the unfolding of the apostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafitte, Daniel; Tsvetkov, Philippe O; Devred, François; Toci, René; Barras, Frédéric; Briand, Claudette; Makarov, Alexander A; Haiech, Jacques

    2002-11-04

    Calmodulin is the most ubiquitous calcium binding protein. The protein is very sensitive to oxidation and this modification has pronounced effects on calmodulin function. In this work, we decided to fully oxidise calmodulin in order to study the consequences on cation binding, domain stability, and alpha helicity. Oxidation of methionines unfolds completely the apostate of the protein, which upon calcium binding recovers the major part of its secondary and tertiary structure. However, the unstructuring of the apostate results in a protein that binds calcium to any site in an independent manner, does not bind magnesium and does not possess auxiliary sites anymore.

  20. Molecular analysis of the erbB gene family calmodulin-binding and calmodulin-like domains in astrocytic gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Dolores; Bello, M Josefa; Alonso, M Eva; Gonzalez-Gomez, Pilar; Lomas, Jesus; Aminoso, Cinthia; Lopez-Marin, Isabel; Isla, Alberto; De Campos, Jose M; Vaquero, Jesus; Gutierrez, Manuel; Villalobo, Antonio; Rey, Juan A

    2004-11-01

    Primarily involved in cell proliferation and differentiation processes, the plasma membrane-bound ErbB tyrosine kinase receptor family is formed by four members: erbB1/EGFR, erbB2/HER2/Neu, erbB3/HER3 and erbB4/HER4. Calmodulin (CaM) is a Ca2+-binding protein involved in the regulation of multiple intracellular processes that binds directly to EGFR in the presence of Ca2+, inhibiting its tyrosine kinase activity. Two main regions in the receptor have been implicated in this relationship: the calmodulin-binding domain (CaM-BD) and the calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD); their sequences are highly conserved in other members of this family of receptors. The presence of mutations, amplification and/or overexpression and genomic rearrangement of these domains was investigated for all four erbB family genes in a series of 89 glial tumors, including 44 WHO grade IV glioblastomas, 21 WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytomas, and 24 WHO grade II astrocytomas. Gene alterations were only found in the regions of interest in EGFR. One glioblastoma showed an in frame tandem duplication of the intracellular region including CaM-LD (exons 18-25). CaM-BD gene overdose was evidenced in 18 tumors that showed EGFR amplification in other domains. Over-expression of CaM-BD and CaM-LD was detected in 6 and 17 cases, respectively, of the 19 tumors in which this study was performed. The other three genes coding for the ErbB receptors did not present point mutations, or rearrangements, and only a very low amplification rate was found for erbB2 (1 case) and erbB3 (4 cases). No overexpression of erbB2, erbB3 or erbB4 was detected. These findings suggest that EGFR is the main erbB gene family member non-randomly involved in malignant glioma development, and that the two domains under study, due to their high conservation and wide separation in the EGFR sequence, are good marker regions for evaluating EGFR/erbB1 gene amplification, as well as for analysing the presence of transcripts corresponding to

  1. Calcium-Sensitive MRI Contrast Agents Based on Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Calmodulin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tatjana Atanasijevic; Maxim Shusteff; Peter Fam; Alan Jasanoff

    2006-01-01

    We describe a family of calcium indicators for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), formed by combining a powerful iron oxide nanoparticle-based contrast mechanism with the versatile calciumsensing protein calmodulin and its targets...

  2. Photounbinding of calmodulin from a family of CaM binding peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G Neumüller

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that fluorescently labeled antibodies can be dissociated from their antigen by illumination with laser light. The mechanism responsible for the photounbinding effect, however, remains elusive. Here, we give important insights into the mechanism of photounbinding and show that the effect is not restricted to antibody/antigen binding.We present studies of the photounbinding of labeled calmodulin (CaM from a set of CaM-binding peptides with different affinities to CaM after one- and two-photon excitation. We found that the photounbinding effect becomes stronger with increasing binding affinity. Our observation that photounbinding can be influenced by using free radical scavengers, that it does not occur with either unlabeled protein or non-fluorescent quencher dyes, and that it becomes evident shortly after or with photobleaching suggest that photounbinding and photobleaching are closely linked.The experimental results exclude surface effects, or heating by laser irradiation as potential causes of photounbinding. Our data suggest that free radicals formed through photobleaching may cause a conformational change of the CaM which lowers their binding affinity with the peptide or its respective binding partner.

  3. Expression of calmodulin and calmodulin binding proteins in rat fibroblasts stably transfected with protein kinase C and oncogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Q; Wei, Y; Fischer, R

    1997-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms leading to elevated calmodulin (CaM) expression in cancer have not yet been discovered. We have quantitated the levels of transcripts derived from all three CaM genes in a variety of the same origin rat fibroblasts transformed with oncogenes in combination with gene for protein...... the most pronounced alterations. In contrast, CaM protein levels were increased in all these cell lines as determined by a radioimmunoassay. These results suggest that oncogenic up-regulation of CaM synthesis takes place posttranscriptionally. Several CaM binding proteins were found at different...... concentrations in the studied cell lines depending on the oncogenes used for transformation. However, CaM overexpression does not seem to affect the overall levels of CaM binding proteins....

  4. The role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met variant in the phenotypic expression of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katerberg, H.; Lochner, C.; Cath, D.C.; de Jonge, P.; Bochdanovits, Z.; Moolman-Smook, J.C.; Hemmings, S.M.J.; Carey, P.D.; Stein, D.J.; Sondervan, D.; den Boer, J.A.; van Balkom, A.J.L.M.; Polman, A.; Heutink, P.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the Va166Met variant of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene may play a role in the etiology of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). In this study, the role of the BDNF Va166Met variant in the etiology and the phenotypic expression of OCD is investigated.

  5. MicroRNA-1-associated effects of neuron-specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene deletion in dorsal root ganglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, Elena; Brandenburger, Timo; Santana-Varela, Sonia; Deenen, René; Köhrer, Karl; Bauer, Inge; Hermanns, Henning; Wood, John N.; Zhao, Jing; Werdehausen, Robert

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression in physiological as well as in pathological processes, including chronic pain. Whether deletion of a gene can affect expression of the miRNAs that associate with the deleted gene mRNA remains elusive. We investigated the effects of brain-derived

  6. The impact of childhood abuse and recent stress on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the moderating role of BDNF Val66Met

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga, B.M.; Molendijk, M.L.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Bus, B.A.A.; Prickaerts, J.; Spinhoven, P.; Penninx, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Recent findings show lowered brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in major depressive disorder (MDD). Exposure to stressful life events may (partly) underlie these BDNF reductions, but little is known about the effects of early or recent life stress on BDNF levels. Moreover,

  7. The impact of childhood abuse and recent stress on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the moderating role of BDNF Val(66)Met

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzinga, Bernet M.; Molendijk, Marc L.; Voshaar, Richard C. Oude; Bus, Boudewijn A. A.; Prickaerts, Jos; Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda J. W. H.

    Recent findings show lowered brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in major depressive disorder (MDD). Exposure to stressful life events may (partly) underlie these BDNF reductions, but little is known about the effects of early or recent life stress on BDNF levels. Moreover, the effects

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum basal levels is not affected by power training in mobility-limited older adults - A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars G; Nielsen, Martin KF; Simonsen, Casper

    2017-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potential important factor involved in neuroplasticity, and may be a mediator for eliciting adaptations in neuromuscular function and physical function in older individuals following physical training. As power training taxes the neural system to a very...... not appear to be a major mechanistic factor mediating neuroplasticity in mobility-limited older adults....

  9. Intraspinal Rewiring of the Corticospinal Tract Requires Target-Derived Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Compensates Lost Function after Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Hayano, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2012-01-01

    Brain injury that results in an initial behavioural deficit is frequently followed by spontaneous recovery. The intrinsic mechanism of this functional recovery has never been fully understood. Here, we show that reorganization of the corticospinal tract induced by target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor is crucial for spontaneous recovery…

  10. Supplementation with eicosapentaenoic omega-3 fatty acid does not influence serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in diabetes mellitus patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, Mariska; Pouwer, Francois; Assies, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are observed in both depressed and diabetes patients. Animal research has shown that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids increase BDNF levels. In this exploratory randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study in diabetes patients ...

  11. Differential expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts after pilocarpine-induced seizure-like activity is related to mode of Ca2+ entry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F R; Lauterborn, J; Zimmer, J

    2004-01-01

    Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression is Ca2+-dependent, yet little is known about the Ca2+ channel contributions that might direct selective expression of the multiple BDNF transcripts. Here, effects of pilocarpine-induced seizure activity on total BDNF expressio...

  12. Mechanistic Basis Of Calmodulin Mediated Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activation and Antiestrogen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    in the previous report, our goal was to produce ERa for our studies with native cysteine residues (i.e. not carboxymethylated , as is nearly...that includes the CaM binding region). We have now demonstrated that we can do so, and without carboxymethylation of the cys residues, so that the...Oxidation of Met144 and Met145 in calmodulin blocks calmodulin dependent activation of the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase, Biochemistry 42, 3231-3238

  13. A Novel Kinesin-Like Protein with a Calmodulin-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Takezawa, D.; Narasimhulu, S. B.; Reddy, A. S. N.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse developmental processes in plants through the action of calmodulin. A cDNA expression library from developing anthers of tobacco was screened with S-35-labeled calmodulin to isolate cDNAs encoding calmodulin-binding proteins. Among several clones isolated, a kinesin-like gene (TCK1) that encodes a calmodulin-binding kinesin-like protein was obtained. The TCK1 cDNA encodes a protein with 1265 amino acid residues. Its structural features are very similar to those of known kinesin heavy chains and kinesin-like proteins from plants and animals, with one distinct exception. Unlike other known kinesin-like proteins, TCK1 contains a calmodulin-binding domain which distinguishes it from all other known kinesin genes. Escherichia coli-expressed TCK1 binds calmodulin in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. In addition to the presence of a calmodulin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal, it also has a leucine zipper motif in the stalk region. The amino acid sequence at the carboxyl terminal of TCK1 has striking homology with the mechanochemical motor domain of kinesins. The motor domain has ATPase activity that is stimulated by microtubules. Southern blot analysis revealed that TCK1 is coded by a single gene. Expression studies indicated that TCKI is expressed in all of the tissues tested. Its expression is highest in the stigma and anther, especially during the early stages of anther development. Our results suggest that Ca(2+)/calmodulin may play an important role in the function of this microtubule-associated motor protein and may be involved in the regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  14. Effects of exercise training on brain-derived neurotrophic factor in skeletal muscle and heart of rats post myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heow Won; Ahmad, Monir; Wang, Hong-Wei; Leenen, Frans H H

    2017-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? Exercise training increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus, which depends on a myokine, fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5). Whether exercise training after myocardial infarction induces parallel increases in FNDC5 and BDNF expression in skeletal muscle and the heart has not yet been studied. What is the main finding and its importance? Exercise training after myocardial infarction increases BDNF protein in skeletal muscle and the non-infarct area of the LV without changes in FNDC5 protein, suggesting that BDNF is not regulated by FNDC5 in skeletal muscle and heart. An increase in cardiac BDNF may contribute to the improvement of cardiac function by exercise training. Exercise training after myocardial infarction (MI) attenuates progressive left ventricular (LV) remodelling and dysfunction, but the peripheral stimuli induced by exercise that trigger these beneficial effects are still unclear. We investigated as possible mediators fibronectin type III domain-containing protein 5 (FNDC5) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the skeletal muscle and heart. Male Wistar rats underwent either sham surgery or ligation of the left descending coronary artery, and surviving MI rats were allocated to either a sedentary (Sed-MI) or an exercise group (ExT-MI). Exercise training was done for 4 weeks on a motor-driven treadmill. At the end, LV function was evaluated, and FNDC5 and BDNF mRNA and protein were assessed in soleus muscle, quadriceps and non-, peri- and infarct areas of the LV. At 5 weeks post MI, FNDC5 mRNA was decreased in soleus muscle and all areas of the LV, but FNDC5 protein was increased in the soleus muscle and the infarct area. Mature BDNF (mBDNF) protein was decreased in the infarct area without a change in mRNA. Exercise training attenuated the decrease in ejection fraction and the increase in LV end-diastolic pressure post MI. Exercise training had no

  15. Atomic force microscopy study of the conformational change in immobilized calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajkovic, Sanja; Zhang, Xiaoning; Daunert, Sylvia; Cai, Yuguang

    2011-09-06

    Maintaining the biological functionality of immobilized proteins is the key to the success of numerous protein-based biomedical devices. To that end, we studied the conformational change in calmodulin (CaM) immobilized on chemical patterns. 1-Cysteine-mutated calmodulin was immobilized on a mercapto-terminated surface through cysteine-Hg-mercapto coupling. Utilizing atomic force microscopy (AFM), the average height of immobilized calmodulin was determined to be 1.87 ± 0.19 nm. After incubation in EGTA solution, the average height of the protein changed to 2.26 ± 0.21 nm, indicating the conformational change of CaM to Apo-CaM. Immobilized CaM also demonstrated a conformational change upon the reaction with known calmodulin antagonist chlorpromazine (CPZ). After incubation in CPZ solution, the average height of CPZ-bound CaM increased to 2.32 ± 0.20 nm, demonstrating that immobilized CaM has a similar response to that in bulk solution. These results show that the immobilization of calmodulin on a solid support does not interfere with the ability of the protein to bind calcium and calmodulin antagonists. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of employing AFM to probe and understand protein conformational changes. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  16. Differential calreticulin expression affects focal contacts via the calmodulin/CaMK II pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Eva; Papp, Sylvia; Opas, Michal

    2007-10-01

    Calreticulin is an ER calcium-storage protein, which influences gene expression and cell adhesion. In this study, we analysed the differences in adhesive properties of calreticulin under- and overexpressing fibroblasts in relation to the calmodulin- and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMK II)-dependent signalling pathways. Cells stably underexpressing calreticulin had elevated expression of calmodulin, activated CaMK II, activated ERK and activated c-src. Inhibition of calmodulin by W7, and CaMK II by KN-62, caused the otherwise weekly adhesive calreticulin underexpressing cells to behave like the overexpressing cells, via induction of increased cell spreading. Increased vinculin, activated paxillin, activated focal adhesion kinase and fibronectin levels were observed upon inhibition of either the calmodulin or the CaMK II signalling pathways, which was accompanied by an increase in cell spreading and focal contact formation. Both KN-62 and W7 treatment increased cell motility in underexpressing cells, but W7 treatment led to loss of directionality. Thus, both the calmodulin and CaMK II signalling pathways influence cellular spreading and motility, but subtle differences exist in their distal effects on motility effectors. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen inoculation triggered expression of all those genes, with SlCaM2 being the most responsive one to both treatments. Furthermore, all calmodulin genes were upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, two signaling molecules involved in plant immunity. In addition to SlCaM2, SlCaM1 was highly responsive to salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. However, SlCaM2 exhibited a more rapid and stronger response than SlCaM1. Overexpression of SlCaM2 in tomato fruit enhanced resistance to Botrytis-induced decay, whereas reducing its expression resulted in increased lesion development. These results indicate that calmodulin is a positive regulator of plant defense in fruit by activating defense pathways including salicylate- and jasmonate-signaling pathways, and SlCaM2 is the major calmodulin gene responsible for this event.

  18. AKAP150-mediated TRPV1 sensitization is disrupted by calcium/calmodulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Mark S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transient receptor potential vanilloid type1 (TRPV1 is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and is sensitive to phosphorylation. A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 (AKAP150 mediates phosphorylation of TRPV1 by Protein Kinases A and C, modulating channel activity. However, few studies have focused on the regulatory mechanisms that control AKAP150 association with TRPV1. In the present study, we identify a role for calcium/calmodulin in controlling AKAP150 association with, and sensitization of, TRPV1. Results In trigeminal neurons, intracellular accumulation of calcium reduced AKAP150 association with TRPV1 in a manner sensitive to calmodulin antagonism. This was also observed in transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells, providing a model for conducting molecular analysis of the association. In CHO cells, the deletion of the C-terminal calmodulin-binding site of TRPV1 resulted in greater association with AKAP150, and increased channel activity. Furthermore, the co-expression of wild-type calmodulin in CHOs significantly reduced TRPV1 association with AKAP150, as evidenced by total internal reflective fluorescence-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TIRF-FRET analysis and electrophysiology. Finally, dominant-negative calmodulin co-expression increased TRPV1 association with AKAP150 and increased basal and PKA-sensitized channel activity. Conclusions the results from these studies indicate that calcium/calmodulin interferes with the association of AKAP150 with TRPV1, potentially extending resensitization of the channel.

  19. Interval training-induced alleviation of rigidity and hypertonia in patients with Parkinson's disease is accompanied by increased basal serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusiak, Jarosław; Żeligowska, Ewa; Mencel, Joanna; Kisiel-Sajewicz, Katarzyna; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Jaskólski, Artur; Jaskólska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    To examine the effects of cycloergometric interval training on parkinsonian rigidity, relaxed biceps brachii muscle tone in affected upper extremities, and serum level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Case series, repeated-measures design, pilot study. Eleven patients with mild-to-moderate Parkinson's disease (Hoehn & Yahr scale 2.3 ± 0.72), recruited from a neurological clinic, underwent cycle training and were tested along with non-trained, healthy control subjects (n = 11) in a motor control laboratory. Patients underwent 8 weeks of interval training (3 × 1-h sessions weekly, consisting of a 10-min warm-up, 40 min of interval exercise, and 10-min cool-down) on a stationary cycloergometer. Parkinsonian rigidity (Unified Parkinson's Disease-Rating-Scale) in the upper extremity, resting biceps brachii muscle tone (myometric stiffness and frequency), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor level were measured 1-3 days before interval training cycle started and 6-10 days after the last training session. Training resulted in a decrease in rigidity (p = 0.048) and biceps brachii myometric muscle stiffness (p = 0.030) and frequency (p = 0.006), and an increase in the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (p = 0.035) relative to pre-training values. The increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor level correlated with improvements in parkinsonian rigidity (p = 0.025), biceps brachii myometric stiffness (p = 0.001) and frequency (p = 0.002). Training-induced alleviation of parkinsonian rigidity and muscle tone decrease may be associated with neuroplastic changes caused by a training-induced increase in the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling in the HVC is required for testosterone-induced song of female canaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Tessa E; Dittrich, Falk; Pieneman, Anton W; Jansen, René F; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Lessmann, Volkmar; Lilliehook, Christina; Goldman, Steven A; Gahr, Manfred

    2009-12-09

    Testosterone-induced singing in songbirds is thought to involve testosterone-dependent morphological changes that include angiogenesis and neuronal recruitment into the HVC, a central part of the song control circuit. Previous work showed that testosterone induces the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase), which in turn leads to an upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production in HVC endothelial cells. Here we report for the first time that systemic inhibition of the VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase is sufficient to block testosterone-induced song in adult female canaries, despite sustained androgen exposure and the persistence of the effects of testosterone on HVC morphology. Expression of exogenous BDNF in HVC, induced locally by in situ transfection, reversed the VEGFR2 inhibition-mediated blockade of song development, thereby restoring the behavioral phenotype associated with androgen-induced song. The VEGFR2-inhibited, BDNF-treated females developed elaborate male-like song that included large syllable repertoires and high syllable repetition rates, features known to attract females. Importantly, although functionally competent new neurons were recruited to HVC after testosterone treatment, the time course of neuronal addition appeared to follow BDNF-induced song development. These findings indicate that testosterone-associated VEGFR2 activity is required for androgen-induced song in adult songbirds and that the behavioral effects of VEGFR2 inhibition can be rescued by BDNF within the adult HVC.

  1. Preservation of general intelligence following traumatic brain injury: contributions of the Met66 brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

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    Aron K Barbey

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promotes survival and synaptic plasticity in the human brain. The Val66Met polymorphism of the BDNF gene interferes with intracellular trafficking, packaging, and regulated secretion of this neurotrophin. The human prefrontal cortex (PFC shows lifelong neuroplastic adaption implicating the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism in the recovery of higher-order executive functions after traumatic brain injury (TBI. In this study, we examined the effect of this BDNF polymorphism on the preservation of general intelligence following TBI. We genotyped a sample of male Vietnam combat veterans (n = 156 consisting of a frontal lobe lesion group with focal penetrating head injuries for the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism. Val/Met did not differ from Val/Val genotypes in general cognitive ability before TBI. However, we found substantial average differences between these groups in general intelligence (≈ half a standard deviation or 8 IQ points, verbal comprehension (6 IQ points, perceptual organization (6 IQ points, working memory (8 IQ points, and processing speed (8 IQ points after TBI. These results support the conclusion that Val/Met genotypes preserve general cognitive functioning, whereas Val/Val genotypes are largely susceptible to TBI.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is increased in serum and skin levels of patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria.

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    Rössing, K; Novak, N; Mommert, S; Pfab, F; Gehring, M; Wedi, B; Kapp, A; Raap, U

    2011-10-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria is triggered by many direct and indirect aggravating factors including autoreactive/autoimmune mechanisms, infections, non-allergic and pseudoallergic intolerance reactions. However, the role of neuroimmune mechanisms in chronic spontaneous urticaria so far is unclear. Thus, we wanted to address the regulation of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in serum and inflammatory skin of patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria in comparison to subjects with healthy skin. Fifty adult patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria and 23 skin-healthy subjects were studied. Chronic spontaneous urticaria was defined as recurrent weals for more than 6 weeks. Autologous serum skin test was performed in all patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria and BDNF serum levels were analysed by enzyme immunoassay in all subjects. Furthermore, skin biopsies were taken from weals of eight patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria as well as from healthy skin of eight controls to evaluate the expression of BDNF and its receptors including tyrosine kinase (trk) B and pan-neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) by immunohistochemistry. BDNF serum levels were detectable in all subjects studied. However, BDNF levels were significantly higher in patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria compared to non-atopic skin-healthy controls (Pneurotrophins in the pathophysiology of this chronic inflammatory skin disease. Further studies are needed to address the functional role of BDNF on key target effector cells in chronic spontaneous urticaria to establish new therapeutic implications. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling in the HVC Is Required for Testosterone-Induced Song of Female Canaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Tessa E.; Dittrich, Falk; Pieneman, Anton W.; Jansen, René F.; Frankl-Vilches, Carolina; Lessmann, Volkmar; Lilliehook, Christina; Goldman, Steven A.; Gahr, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone-induced singing in songbirds is thought to involve testosterone-dependent morphological changes that include angiogenesis and neuronal recruitment into the HVC, a central part of the song control circuit. Previous work showed that testosterone induces the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase), which in turn leads to an upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production in HVC endothelial cells. Here we report for the first time that systemic inhibition of the VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase is sufficient to block testosterone-induced song in adult female canaries, despite sustained androgen exposure and the persistence of the effects of testosterone on HVC morphology. Expression of exogenous BDNF in HVC, induced locally by in situ transfection, reversed the VEGFR2 inhibition-mediated blockade of song development, thereby restoring the behavioral phenotype associated with androgen-induced song. The VEGFR2-inhibited, BDNF-treated females developed elaborate male-like song that included large syllable repertoires and high syllable repetition rates, features known to attract females. Importantly, although functionally competent new neurons were recruited to HVC after testosterone treatment, the time course of neuronal addition appeared to follow BDNF-induced song development. These findings indicate that testosterone-associated VEGFR2 activity is required for androgen-induced song in adult songbirds and that the behavioral effects of VEGFR2 inhibition can be rescued by BDNF within the adult HVC. PMID:20007475

  4. Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, learning capacity and cognition in patients with first episode psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Azua Sonia Ruiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive impairments are seen in first psychotic episode (FEP patients. The neurobiological underpinnings that might underlie these changes remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF levels are associated with cognitive impairment in FEP patients compared with healthy controls. Methods 45 FEP patients and 45 healthy controls matched by age, gender and educational level were selected from the Basque Country area of Spain. Plasma BDNF levels were assessed in healthy controls and in patients. A battery of cognitive tests was applied to both groups, with the patients being assessed at 6 months after the acute episode and only in those with a clinical response to treatment. Results Plasma BDNF levels were altered in patients compared with the control group. In FEP patients, we observed a positive association between BDNF levels at six months and five cognitive domains (learning ability, immediate and delayed memory, abstract thinking and processing speed which persisted after controlling for medications prescribed, drug use, intelligence quotient (IQ and negative symptoms. In the healthy control group, BDNF levels were not associated with cognitive test scores. Conclusion Our results suggest that BDNF is associated with the cognitive impairment seen after a FEP. Further investigations of the role of this neurotrophin in the symptoms associated with psychosis onset are warranted.

  5. The associations between serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, potential confounders, and cognitive decline: a longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Nettiksimmons

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a role in the maintenance and function of neurons. Although persons with Alzheimer's disease have lower cortical levels of BDNF, evidence regarding the association between circulating BDNF and cognitive function is conflicting. We sought to determine the correlates of BDNF level and whether BDNF level was prospectively associated with cognitive decline in healthy older adults. We measured serum BDNF near baseline in 912 individuals. Cognitive status was assessed repeatedly with the modified Mini-Mental Status Examination and the Digit Symbol Substitution test over the next 10 years. We evaluated the association between BDNF and cognitive decline with longitudinal models. We also assessed the association between BDNF level and demographics, comorbidities and health behaviors. We found an association between serum BDNF and several characteristics that are also associated with dementia (race and depression, suggesting that future studies should control for these potential confounders. We did not find evidence of a longitudinal association between serum BDNF and subsequent cognitive test trajectories in older adults, although we did identify a potential trend toward a cross-sectional association. Our results suggest that serum BDNF may have limited utility as a biomarker of prospective cognitive decline.

  6. Interaction between different sports branches such as taekwondo, box, athletes and serum brain derived neurotrophic factor levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztasyonar, Yunus

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to compare serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels "which contributes in both neuron development/regeneration" between combat sport braches, which requires high attention and concentration and can lead micro and macro brain trauma, and athleticism, which requires durability in competition. The study design included 4 groups. Group 1 had sedentary participants, and group 2 athletes (middle and long runners) who exercised for two 2-hour daily training sessions 6 days a week. group 3 included boxers, and group 4 taekwondo fighters. We investigated changes in the blood BDNF levels of taekwondo fighters, boxers, and athletes before and after training and compared them among each other and with measurements of sedentary controls. All athletes had higher basal BDNF levels than sedentary participants. Boxers and taekwondo athletes had especially high basal BDNF levels. When we compared different sports branch each other Pre- and post- training BDNF values are ranked as follows: taekwondo > boxing > athletes > sedentary. In sport branches such as combat sports and athletes, serum BDNF levels have been demonstrated to be higher after training than before. In addition, serum BDNF levels were higher in taekwondo fighters and boxers than athletes. BDNF might have a role in the protection mechanism against brain damage or contributes in occurrence and maintenance of high attention and concentration especially among combat sports.

  7. Mecamylamine attenuates dexamethasone-induced anxiety-like behavior in association with brain derived neurotrophic factor upregulation in rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong Ik; Kim, Hong Gi; Jung, Woo Ram; Shin, Min Kyoo; Kim, Kil Lyong

    2011-01-01

    Mecamylamine (MEC), which was initially developed as a ganglionic blocker for the treatment of hypertension has been investigated as a potent antagonist for most types of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Most studies of MEC have focused on its inhibitory effects for nAChRs; however its biological uses have recently been expanded to the treatment of psychological disorders accompanying anxiety-related symptoms. Although MEC shows obvious anxiolytic action, there is no clear evidence on its function. In this study, we investigated whether MEC affects brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in vitro and in vivo. MEC increased BDNF expression in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and the cerebral cortex region of rat brains. To determine if the anxiolytic effect of MEC is associated with BDNF upregulation, the elevated plus maze (EPM) task was conducted in a dexamethasone (DEX)-induced anxiety model. MEC reduced DEX-induced anxiety-like behavior, and increased BDNF expression in the cerebral cortex of rats. These results suggest that the anxiolytic effect of MEC in EPM might be associated with BDNF upregulation in the cerebral cortex region of rats. The therapeutic efficacy of MEC for anxiety might be partly dependent on BDNF modulation. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor correlate with the number of T2 MRI lesions in multiple sclerosis

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    Comini-Frota, E.R. [Unidade de Neurologia, Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, D.H. [Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Miranda, E.C. [Ecoar Diagnostic Center, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Brum, D.G. [Hospital das Clínicas,Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto,Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Kaimen-Maciel, D.R. [Unidade de Neurologia, Hospital Universitário, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Donadi, E.A. [Hospital das Clínicas,Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto,Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Teixeira, A.L. [Unidade de Neurologia, Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-11-23

    The objective of the present study was to determine if there is a relationship between serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the number of T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (T2/FLAIR) lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has revolutionized the study of MS. However, MRI has limitations and the use of other biomarkers such as BDNF may be useful for the clinical assessment and the study of the disease. Serum was obtained from 28 MS patients, 18-50 years old (median 38), 21 women, 0.5-10 years (median 5) of disease duration, EDSS 1-4 (median 1.5) and 28 healthy controls, 19-49 years old (median 33), 19 women. BDNF levels were measured by ELISA. T1, T2/FLAIR and gadolinium-enhanced lesions were measured by a trained radiologist. BDNF was reduced in MS patients (median [range] pg/mL; 1160 [352.6-2640]) compared to healthy controls (1640 [632.4-4268]; P = 0.03, Mann-Whitney test) and was negatively correlated (Spearman correlation test, r = -0.41; P = 0.02) with T2/FLAIR (11-81 lesions, median 42). We found that serum BDNF levels were inversely correlated with the number of T2/FLAIR lesions in patients with MS. BDNF may be a promising biomarker of MS.

  9. Voluntary exercise ameliorates cognitive deficits in morphine dependent rats: the role of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Fathollahi, Yaghoub; Akhavan, Maziar M; Semnanian, Saeed; Safari, Manouchehr

    2011-10-01

    Chronic exposure to opiates impairs spatial learning and memory. Given the well-known beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on cognitive functions, we investigated whether voluntary exercise would ameliorate the cognitive deficits that are induced by morphine dependence. If an effect of exercise was observed, we aimed to investigate the possible role of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in morphine-dependent rats. The rats were injected with bi-daily doses (10mg/kg, at 12h intervals) of morphine over a period of 10 days of voluntary exercise. Following these injections, a water maze task was performed twice a day for five consecutive days, followed by a probe trial 2 days later. A specific BDNF inhibitor (TrkB-IgG chimera) was used to block the hippocampal BDNF action during the 10 days of voluntary exercise. We found that voluntary exercise blocked the ability of chronic morphine to impair spatial memory retention. A blockade of the BDNF action blunted the exercise-induced improvement of spatial memory in the dependent rats. Moreover, the voluntary exercise diminished the severity of the rats' dependency on morphine. This study demonstrates that voluntary exercise ameliorates, via a TrkB-mediated mechanism, the cognitive deficits that are induced by chronic morphine. Thus, voluntary exercise might be a potential method to ameliorate some of the deleterious behavioral consequences of the abuse of morphine and other opiates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inhibits Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 Expression in Interleukin-1β-Treated Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Katsuhiro; Obinata, Yusuke; Konishi, Akihiro; Kajiya, Mikihito; Matsuda, Shinji; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Sasaki, Shinya; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi

    2016-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances periodontal tissue regeneration. Tissue regeneration is characterized by inflammation, which directs the quality of tissue repair. The objective of this study is to propose the relevance of BDNF to inflammation. In this study, we investigated the effect of BDNF on intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, which is an inflammatory marker, expressed in interleukin (IL)-1β-treated human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs). In addition, we studied the effect of BDNF on the adhesion of neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells to HMVECs in a cell adhesion assay. We demonstrated that BDNF attenuates the IL-1β-induced ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression. Treatment of HMVECs with IL-1β led to an increase in the number of adherent neutrophil-like HL-60 cells. BDNF significantly decreased the number of neutrophil-like HL-60 cells attached to HMVECs. In conclusion, BDNF may reduce excess inflammation through reduced neutrophil recruitment by regulating ICAM-1 expression.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its precursor (proBDNF) in genetically defined fear-induced aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its precursor (proBDNF) and BDNF mRNA levels were studied in the brain of wild rats selectively bred for more than 70 generations for either high level or for the lack of affective aggressiveness towards man. Significant increase of BDNF mRNA level in the frontal cortex and increase of BDNF level in the hippocampus of aggressive rats was revealed. In the midbrain and hippocampus of aggressive rats proBDNF level was increased, whereas BDNF/proBDNF ratio was reduced suggesting the prevalence and increased influence of proBDNF in highly aggressive rats. In the frontal cortex, proBDNF level in aggressive rats was decreased. Thus, considerable structure-specific differences in BDNF and proBDNF levels as well as in BDNF gene expression between highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats were shown. The data suggested the implication of BDNF and its precursor proBDNF in the mechanism of aggressiveness and in the creation of either aggressive or nonaggressive phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism interacts with gender to influence cortisol responses to mental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rong; Babyak, Michael A; Brummett, Beverly H; Siegler, Ilene C; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Williams, Redford B

    2017-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism has been associated with cortisol responses to stress with gender differences reported, although the findings are not entirely consistent. To evaluate the role of Val66Met genotype and gender on cortisol responses to stress, we conducted a 45-min mental stress protocol including four tasks and four rest periods. Blood cortisol was collected for assay immediately before and after each task and rest period. A significant two-way interaction of Val66Met genotype×gender (P=0.022) was observed on the total area under the curve (AUC), a total cortisol response over time, such that the Val/Val genotype was associated with a larger cortisol response to stress as compared to the Met group in women but not in men. Further contrast analyses between the Val/Val and Met group for each stress task showed a similar increased cortisol pattern among women Val/Val genotype but not among men. The present findings indicate the gender differences in the effect of Val66Met genotype on the cortisol responses to stress protocol, and extend the evidence for the importance of gender and the role of Val66Met in the modulation of stress reactivity and subsequent depression prevalence. Further studies and the underlying mechanism need to be investigated, which may provide an insight for prevention, intervention, and treatment strategies that target those at high risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during abstinence could be associated with relapse in cocaine-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Roncero, Carlos; Daigre, Constanza; Grau-Lopez, Lara; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Sanchez-Mora, Cristina; Lopez, Maria Victoria; Ribases, Marta; Casas, Miguel

    2015-02-28

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in cocaine craving in humans and drug seeking in rodents. Based on this, the aim of this study was to explore the possible role of serum BDNF in cocaine relapse in abstinent addicts. Forty cocaine dependent subjects (DSM-IV criteria) were included in an inpatient 2 weeks abstinence program. Organic and psychiatric co-morbidities were excluded. Two serum samples were collected for each subject at baseline and at after 14 abstinence days. After discharge, all cocaine addicts underwent a 22 weeks follow-up, after which they were classified into early relapsers (ER) (resumed during the first 14 days after discharge,) or late relapsers (LR) (resumed beyond 14 days after discharge). The only clinical differences between groups were the number of consumption days during the last month before detoxification. Serum BDNF levels increased significantly across the 12 days of abstinence in the LR group (p=0.02), whereas in the ER group BDNF remained unchanged. In the ER group, the change of serum BDNF during abstinence negatively correlated with the improvement in depressive symptoms (p=0.02). These results suggest that BDNF has a role in relapse to cocaine consumption in abstinent addicts, although the underlying neurobiological mechanisms remain to be clarified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of cigarette smoke on monocyte procoagulant activity: Focus on platelet-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, Patrizia; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sandrini, Leonardo; Weksler, Babette B; Tremoli, Elena; Barbieri, Silvia S

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) activates platelets, promotes vascular dysfunction, and enhances Tissue Factor (TF) expression in blood monocytes favoring pro-thrombotic states. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the family of neurotrophins involved in survival, growth, and maturation of neurons, is released by activated platelets (APLTs) and plays a role in the cardiovascular system. The effect of CS on circulating levels of BDNF is controversial and the function of circulating BDNF in atherothrombosis is not fully understood. Here, we have shown that human platelets, treated with an aqueous extract of CS (CSE), released BDNF in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, incubation of human monocytes with BDNF or with the supernatant of platelets activated with CSE increased TF activity by a Tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB)-dependent mechanism. Finally, comparing serum and plasma samples of 12 male never smokers (NS) and 29 male active smokers (AS) we observed a significant increase in microparticle-associated TF activity (MP-TF) as well as BDNF in AS, while in serum, BDNF behaved oppositely. Taken together these findings suggest that platelet-derived BDNF is involved in the regulation of TF activity and that CS plays a role in this pathway by favoring a pro-atherothrombotic state.

  15. The synergistic effect of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and coronary artery disease on brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Te; Wang, Jun-Sing; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Shih-Yi; Fu, Chia-Po; Liang, Kae-Woei; Hsu, Chiann-Yi; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neural protection and energy homeostasis. In this study, we examined the effects of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and coronary artery disease (CAD) on BDNF. Subjects who had undergone diagnostic angiography for angina were recruited, and a total of 240 subjects (144 with CAD and 96 without CAD) were enrolled. Serum BDNF was determined at 0, 30, and 120min during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) for BDNF. Serum VCAM-1 was determined at fasting. Significantly lower AUC of BDNF (42.8±10.7 vs. 47.4±11.7ng-h/ml, P=0.002) and higher serum VCAM-1 (583±383 vs. 482±171ng/ml, P=0.017) were noted in subjects with CAD compared to those without CAD. High VCAM-1 level was an independent predictor of low AUC of BDNF in subjects with and without CAD (95%CI between -0.011 and -0.002, P=0.008; -0.033 and -0.002, P=0.029, respectively). Serum BDNF was lowest in the CAD subjects with high VCAM-1 levels at all time points during OGTT. Our results showed that CAD was associated with low serum BDNF in response to OGTT, and VCAM-1 had a synergistic effect with CAD on the BDNF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Over-expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mesenchymal stem cells transfected with recombinant lentivirus BDNF gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Zhu, J; Zhang, K; Liu, T; Zhang, Z

    2016-12-30

    This study was aimed at investigating the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified with recombinant lentivirus bearing BDNF gene. Lentivirus vectors bearing BDNF gene were constructed. MSCs were isolated from rats and cultured. The lentiviral vectors containing BDNF gene were transfected into the MSCs, and BDNF gene and protein expressions were monitored with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). RT-PCR and Western blot were used to measure gene and protein expressions, respectibvely in MSCs, MSCs-EGFP and MSCs-EGFP-BDNF groups. Green fluorescence assay confirmed successful transfection of BDNF gene recombinant lentivirus into MSCs. RT-PCR and Western blot revealed that BDNF gene and protein expressions in the MSCs-EGFP-BDNF group were significantly higher than that in MSCs group and MSCs-EGFP group. There were no statistically significant differences in gene expression between MSCs and MSCs-EGFP groups. MSCs can over-express BDNF when transfected with recombinant lentivirus bearing BDNF gene.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and oxidative stress in heroin-dependent male patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Chang; Huang, Tiao-Lai

    2017-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and oxidative stress may play a role in patients with heroin dependence. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum levels and activities of BDNF and oxidative stress markers, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyl content (PCC), and 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in heroin-dependent patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). 60 heroin-dependent male MMT patients and 30 healthy males were recruited for this study. The serum BDNF and oxidative stress markers of these subjects were measured with assay kits. Analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) with age and body mass index adjustments indicated that the serum levels of BDNF in the MMT patients were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls (F=5.169; p=0.026). However, there were no significant differences between the heroin-dependent patients and the healthy controls in the serum levels or activities of oxidative stress markers (p>0.05). In conclusion, our results suggest that MMT increases BDNF levels in heroin-dependent patients, and that patients undergoing MMT might be in a balanced state of reduced oxidation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, learning capacity and cognition in patients with first episode psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Azua, Sonia; Matute, Carlos; Stertz, Laura; Mosquera, Fernando; Palomino, Aitor; de la Rosa, Iris; Barbeito, Sara; Vega, Patricia; Kapczinski, Flávio; González-Pinto, Ana

    2013-01-15

    Cognitive impairments are seen in first psychotic episode (FEP) patients. The neurobiological underpinnings that might underlie these changes remain unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate whether Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels are associated with cognitive impairment in FEP patients compared with healthy controls. 45 FEP patients and 45 healthy controls matched by age, gender and educational level were selected from the Basque Country area of Spain. Plasma BDNF levels were assessed in healthy controls and in patients. A battery of cognitive tests was applied to both groups, with the patients being assessed at 6 months after the acute episode and only in those with a clinical response to treatment. Plasma BDNF levels were altered in patients compared with the control group. In FEP patients, we observed a positive association between BDNF levels at six months and five cognitive domains (learning ability, immediate and delayed memory, abstract thinking and processing speed) which persisted after controlling for medications prescribed, drug use, intelligence quotient (IQ) and negative symptoms. In the healthy control group, BDNF levels were not associated with cognitive test scores. Our results suggest that BDNF is associated with the cognitive impairment seen after a FEP. Further investigations of the role of this neurotrophin in the symptoms associated with psychosis onset are warranted.

  19. Autism as a disorder of deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and altered metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-10-01

    Autism has a strong genetic and environmental basis in which inflammatory markers and factors concerned with synapse formation, nerve transmission, and information processing such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and their products and neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and catecholamines and cytokines are altered. Antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements are needed for the normal metabolism of neurotrophic factors, eicosanoids, and neurotransmitters, supporting reports of their alterations in autism. But, the exact relationship among these factors and their interaction with genes and proteins concerned with brain development and growth is not clear. It is suggested that maternal infections and inflammation and adverse events during intrauterine growth of the fetus could lead to alterations in the gene expression profile and proteomics that results in dysfunction of the neuronal function and neurotransmitters, alteration(s) in the metabolism of PUFAs and their metabolites resulting in excess production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory cytokines and bioactive lipids that ultimately results in the development of autism. Based on these evidences, it is proposed that selective delivery of BDNF and methods designed to augment the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and PUFAs may prevent, arrest, or reverse the autism disease process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. CCK-4-induced anxiety but not panic is associated with serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor in healthy subjects.

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    Maron, E; Tõru, I; Mäemets, K; Sepp, S; Vasar, V; Shlik, J; Zharkovsky, A

    2009-06-01

    Recent animal studies consistently confirm the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the regulation of anxiety-related behaviours. The role of BDNF in human anxiety has been less investigated. The aim of our study was to examine the association between serum BDNF levels and panic/anxiety responses to cholecystokinin-tetrapeptide (CCK-4) challenge in healthy subjects. BDNF concentrations were detected in serum samples of 37 male and female volunteers before and 120 min after CCK-4 injection. The baseline levels of serum BDNF did not predict the occurrence of CCK-4-induced panic attacks or intensity of panic symptoms and did not significantly change 2 h after the challenge. BDNF serum concentrations 120 min after provocation did not differentiate panickers from non-panickers; however, the subjects reporting stronger anxiety response showed higher levels of BDNF than those with mild anxiety. The anxiety net increase on the Visual Analogue Scale, but not severity of panic symptoms, significantly and positively correlated with the change in BDNF concentration from baseline values. This is the first challenge study to demonstrate a possible impact of BDNF on human anxiety. Our findings suggest a general involvement of BDNF in the regulation of anxiety rather than a specific role of BDNF in disposition to panic attacks.

  1. Regional differences in brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and dendritic spine density confer resilience to inescapable stress.

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    Yang, Chun; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Ren, Qian; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2015-01-07

    In the learned helplessness (LH) paradigm, approximately 35% of rats are resilient to inescapable stress. The roles of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and dendritic spine density in the brain regions of LH (susceptible) and non-LH rats (resilient) were examined. Western blot analysis and Golgi staining were performed. BDNF levels in the medial prefrontal cortex, CA3, and dentate gyrus (DG) were significantly lower in the LH group than in the control and non-LH groups, whereas BDNF levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the LH group but not the non-LH group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Furthermore, spine density in the prelimbic cortex, CA3, and DG was significantly lower in the LH group than in the control and non-LH groups, although spine density in the NAc was significantly higher in the LH group than in the control and non-LH groups. The results suggest that regional differences in BDNF levels and spine density in rat brain may contribute to resilience to inescapable stress. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  2. Post-stroke recovery: the role of activity-dependent release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

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    Berretta, Antonio; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2014-11-01

    Stroke remains the leading cause of long-term disability with no pharmacological approaches available to limit the degree of damage or aid in recovery. Considerable effort has been made to minimize neuronal damage using neuroprotective compounds. However, attempts have so far failed to translate into the clinic. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase type B are actively produced throughout the brain and are involved in regulating neuronal activity and normal day-to-day function. Further, BDNF has been shown to play a role in both protection and recovery of functions after stroke. This review focuses on the endogenous release of BDNF as well as activity-induced (pharmacological and physical) elevation in BDNF, and the role this plays during both acute (hours to days) and subacute (days to weeks) periods after stroke. Exogenous administration has previously been shown not to cross the blood-brain barrier; therefore, we have focused this review on approaches that allow us to directly stimulate, using pharmacological therapies and mimetics, physical activity and potential drug delivery systems that can be used to administer BDNF. Finally, we also discuss the role of BDNF polymorphisms and the influence of epigenetic regulation of BDNF on post-stroke recovery.

  3. Dietary levels of pure flavonoids improve spatial memory performance and increase hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

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    Catarina Rendeiro

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests that flavonoid-rich foods are capable of inducing improvements in memory and cognition in animals and humans. However, there is a lack of clarity concerning whether flavonoids are the causal agents in inducing such behavioral responses. Here we show that supplementation with pure anthocyanins or pure flavanols for 6 weeks, at levels similar to that found in blueberry (2% w/w, results in an enhancement of spatial memory in 18 month old rats. Pure flavanols and pure anthocyanins were observed to induce significant improvements in spatial working memory (p = 0.002 and p = 0.006 respectively, to a similar extent to that following blueberry supplementation (p = 0.002. These behavioral changes were paralleled by increases in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (R = 0.46, p<0.01, suggesting a common mechanism for the enhancement of memory. However, unlike protein levels of BDNF, the regional enhancement of BDNF mRNA expression in the hippocampus appeared to be predominantly enhanced by anthocyanins. Our data support the claim that flavonoids are likely causal agents in mediating the cognitive effects of flavonoid-rich foods.

  4. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and interleukin-6 response to high-volume mechanically demanding exercise.

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    Verbickas, Vaidas; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Snieckus, Audrius; Venckunas, Tomas; Baranauskiene, Neringa; Brazaitis, Marius; Satkunskiene, Danguole; Unikauskas, Alvydas; Skurvydas, Albertas

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to follow circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels in response to severe muscle-damaging exercise. Young healthy men (N = 10) performed a bout of mechanically demanding stretch-shortening cycle exercise consisting of 200 drop jumps. Voluntary and electrically induced knee extension torque, serum BDNF levels, and IL-6 levels were measured before and for up to 7 days after exercise. Muscle force decreased by up to 40% and did not recover by 24 hours after exercise. Serum BDNF was decreased 1 hour and 24 hours after exercise, whereas IL-6 increased immediately and 1 hour after but recovered to baseline by 24 hours after exercise. IL-6 and 100-Hz stimulation torque were correlated (r = -0.64, P < 0.05) 24 hours after exercise. In response to acute, severe muscle-damaging exercise, serum BDNF levels decrease, whereas IL-6 levels increase and are associated with peripheral fatigue. Muscle Nerve 57: E46-E51, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A lack of correlation between brain-derived neurotrophic factor serum level and verbal memory performance in healthy Polish population

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    Monika eWilkosc

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain derived neurotrophic factor is considered to be connected with memory and learning through the processes of long term synaptic potentiation and synaptic plasticity. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between precursor BDNF (proBNDF and mature BDNF (mBDNF serum levels and performance on Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT in 150 healthy volunteers. In addition, we have verified the relationships between serum concentration of both forms of BDNF and RAVLT with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors. We found no strong evidence for the correlation of proBDNF and mBDNF serum levels with performance on RAVLT in healthy Polish population in early and middle adulthood. We observed the mBDNF serum concentration to be higher in women compared with men. Moreover, we revealed higher mBDNF level to be connected with lower Body Mass Index (BMI. In turn, the results of RAVLT correlated with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, such as: age, education, gender, BMI and smoking.

  6. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor differences between the luteal and follicular phases in premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

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    Oral, Elif; Kirkan, Tulay Sati; Yildirim, Abdulkadir; Kotan, Zerrin; Cansever, Zeliha; Ozcan, Halil; Aliyev, Elvin; Gulec, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that comparison of the serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels between women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and women without PMDD in the luteal and follicular phases of their menstrual cycles would reflect the altered neuromodulator responses that compensate the underlying pathogenesis in PMDD. Twenty-nine participants without PMDD and 20 with PMDD were enrolled in the study. The serum BDNF, estrogen and progesterone levels were assessed at the follicular and luteal phases in their two consecutive menstrual cycles. Participants with PMDD had significantly higher luteal serum BDNF levels than the control subjects. The serum BDNF levels were significantly higher in the luteal phase than in the follicular phase in women with PMDD. The difference in the serum BDNF levels between the luteal and follicular phases were significantly higher in the PMDD patients than in the control. The higher serum BDNF levels in the luteal phase in the PMDD patients may reflect compensatory process that results in subsequent improvement of the PMDD-associated depressive symptoms in the follicular phase. The higher difference in the serum BDNF levels between the phases in PMDD patients may reflect an altered neuromodulator response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The acute response of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a result of exercise in major depressive disorder.

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    Gustafsson, Gunnar; Lira, Claudia Mallea; Johansson, Jon; Wisén, Anita; Wohlfart, Björn; Ekman, Rolf; Westrin, Asa

    2009-10-30

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and other neurotrophins are believed to play an important role in affective disorders. In this study we investigated plasma-BDNF response during an incremental exercise test in 18 patients suffering from moderate major depressive disorder (MDD) and 18 controls. The patients were not treated with antidepressants or neuroleptics. Possible associations between plasma plasma-BDNF levels, dexamethasone suppression test cortisol levels and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores were also tested. No difference in basal BDNF levels between patients and controls was found. BDNF increased significantly during exercise in both male and female patients as well as in male controls, with no significant differences between the groups. BDNF levels declined after exercise, but after 60 min of rest BDNF levels showed tendencies to increase again in male patients. No correlation between BDNF and cortisol or MADRS scores was found. We conclude that unmedicated patients with moderate depression and normal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis do not have a disturbed peripheral BDNF release during exercise. The BDNF increase 60 min after interruption of exercise in male patients might indicate up-regulated BDNF synthesis, but this needs to be further investigated in future studies.

  8. Differential involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in reconsolidation and consolidation of conditioned taste aversion memory.

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    Yue Wang

    Full Text Available Consolidated memory can re-enter states of transient instability following reactivation, which is referred to as reconsolidation, and the exact molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unexplored. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity and memory processes. We have recently observed that BDNF signaling in the central nuclei of the amygdala (CeA and insular cortex (IC was involved in the consolidation of conditioned taste aversion (CTA memory. However, whether BDNF in the CeA or IC is required for memory reconsolidation is still unclear. In the present study, using a CTA memory paradigm, we observed increased BDNF expression in the IC but not in the CeA during CTA reconsolidation. We further determined that BDNF synthesis and signaling in the IC but not in the CeA was required for memory reconsolidation. The differential, spatial-specific roles of BDNF in memory consolidation and reconsolidation suggest that dissociative molecular mechanisms underlie reconsolidation and consolidation, which might provide novel targets for manipulating newly encoded and reactivated memories without causing universal amnesia.

  9. Cognitive functions and serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with major depressive disorder.

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    Oral, Elif; Canpolat, Serpil; Yildirim, Serap; Gulec, Mustafa; Aliyev, Elvin; Aydin, Nazan

    2012-08-01

    We assessed major cognitive domains in major depressive disorder (MDD) compared to a healthy control group using neurocognitive tests. We hypothesized that lower serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels would be associated with poorer neurocognitive performance in patients with major depression and that these associations would be shown in healthy controls as well. Executive functions, sustaining and focusing of attention, memory functions, and verbal fluency were assessed in this study using the Trail-Making Test (TMT), Stroop Color Word Interference Test-TBAG Form (SCWT), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Test of Variables of Attention (TOVA), Auditory Consonant Trigram test (ACTT), Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale (DST), Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), and Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT). The MDD group showed significantly poorer performance than the control group in cognitive functions; they also had lower levels of BDNF than the control group. However, there was no correlation between cognitive performances and BDNF levels except in the TMT, Part B. The current understanding of the importance of neurocognitive assessment and related biological markers in depression is improving. Further studies with larger sample sizes evaluating neurocognitive functions with molecular analyses of BDNF levels may reveal a novel marker for predicting and monitoring neurocognitive deficits in depression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. β5 Integrin Up-Regulation in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Promotes Cell Motility in Human Chondrosarcoma

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    Li, Te-Mao; Fong, Yi-Chin; Liu, Shan-Chi; Chen, Po-Chun; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis; it has a poor prognosis and shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a small-molecule protein from the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcomes of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on migration activity in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma tissues showed significant expression of BDNF, which was higher than that in normal cartilage and primary chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased the migration and expression of β5 integrin in human chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, knockdown of BDNF expression markedly inhibited migratory activity. BDNF-mediated migration and β5 integrin up-regulation were attenuated by antibody, inhibitor, or siRNA against the TrkB receptor. Pretreatment of chondrosarcoma cells with PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB inhibitors or mutants also abolished BDNF-promoted migration and integrin expression. The PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB signaling pathway was activated after BDNF treatment. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration of chondrosarcoma by increasing β5 integrin expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis. PMID:23874483

  11. β5 integrin up-regulation in brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes cell motility in human chondrosarcoma.

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    Chih-Yang Lin

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity to invade locally and cause distant metastasis; it has a poor prognosis and shows a predilection for metastasis to the lungs. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is a small-molecule protein from the neurotrophin family of growth factors that is associated with the disease status and outcomes of cancers. However, the effect of BDNF on migration activity in human chondrosarcoma cells is mostly unknown. Here, we found that human chondrosarcoma tissues showed significant expression of BDNF, which was higher than that in normal cartilage and primary chondrocytes. We also found that BDNF increased the migration and expression of β5 integrin in human chondrosarcoma cells. In addition, knockdown of BDNF expression markedly inhibited migratory activity. BDNF-mediated migration and β5 integrin up-regulation were attenuated by antibody, inhibitor, or siRNA against the TrkB receptor. Pretreatment of chondrosarcoma cells with PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB inhibitors or mutants also abolished BDNF-promoted migration and integrin expression. The PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB signaling pathway was activated after BDNF treatment. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF enhances the migration of chondrosarcoma by increasing β5 integrin expression through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PI3K, Akt, and NF-κB. BDNF thus represents a promising new target for treating chondrosarcoma metastasis.

  12. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in Individuals With Schizophrenia and Healthy Aging: Testing the Accelerated Aging Hypothesis of Schizophrenia.

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    Islam, Farhana; Mulsant, Benoit H; Voineskos, Aristotle N; Rajji, Tarek K

    2017-07-01

    Schizophrenia has been hypothesized to be a syndrome of accelerated aging. Brain plasticity is vulnerable to the normal aging process and affected in schizophrenia: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important neuroplasticity molecule. The present review explores the accelerated aging hypothesis of schizophrenia by comparing changes in BDNF expression in schizophrenia with aging-associated changes. Individuals with schizophrenia show patterns of increased overall mortality, metabolic abnormalities, and cognitive decline normally observed later in life in the healthy population. An overall decrease is observed in BDNF expression in schizophrenia compared to healthy controls and in older individuals compared to a younger cohort. There is a marked decrease in BDNF levels in the frontal regions and in the periphery among older individuals and those with schizophrenia; however, data for BDNF expression in the occipital, parietal, and temporal cortices and the hippocampus is inconclusive. Accelerated aging hypothesis is supported based on frontal regions and peripheral studies; however, further studies are needed in other brain regions.

  13. Fingolimod phosphate attenuates oligomeric amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity via increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neurons.

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    Yukiko Doi

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative processes that underlie Alzheimer's disease are mediated, in part, by soluble oligomeric amyloid β, a neurotoxic protein that inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation, disrupts synaptic plasticity, and induces the production of reactive oxygen species. Here we show that the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptor (S1PR agonist fingolimod phosphate (FTY720-P-a new oral drug for multiple sclerosis-protects neurons against oligomeric amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity. We confirmed that primary mouse cortical neurons express all of the S1P receptor subtypes and FTY720-P directly affects the neurons. Treatment with FTY720-P enhanced the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neurons. Moreover, blocking BDNF-TrkB signaling with a BDNF scavenger, TrkB inhibitor, or ERK1/2 inhibitor almost completely ablated these neuroprotective effects. These results suggested that the neuroprotective effects of FTY720-P are mediated by upregulated neuronal BDNF levels. Therefore, FTY720-P may be a promising therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Chronic unpredictable stress decreases expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in mouse ovaries: relationship to oocytes developmental potential.

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    Li-Min Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF was originally described in the nervous system but has been shown to be expressed in ovary tissues recently, acting as a paracrine/autocrine regulator required for developments of follicles and oocytes. Although it is generally accepted that chronic stress impairs female reproduction and decreases the expression of BDNF in limbic structures of central nervous system, which contributes to mood disorder. However, it is not known whether chronic stress affects oocytes developments, nor whether it affects expression of BDNF in ovary. METHODS: Mice were randomly assigned into control group, stressed group, BDNF-treated group and BDNF-treated stressed group. The chronic unpredictable mild stress model was used to produce psychosocial stress in mice, and the model was verified by open field test and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity. The methods of immunohistochemistry and western blotting were used to detect BDNF protein level and distribution. The number of retrieved oocytes, oocyte maturation, embryo cleavage and the rates of blastocyst formation after parthenogenetic activation were evaluated. RESULTS: Chronic unpredictable stress decreased the BDNF expression in antral follicles, but didn't affect the BDNF expression in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. Chronic unpredictable stress also decreased the number of retrieved oocytes and the rate of blastocyst formation, which was rescued by exogenous BDNF treatment. CONCLUSION: BDNF in mouse ovaries may be related to the decreased number of retrieved oocytes and impaired oocytes developmental potential induced by chronic unpredictable stress.

  15. Serum level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in fibromyalgia syndrome correlates with depression but not anxiety.

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    Nugraha, Boya; Korallus, Christoph; Gutenbrunner, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been known to play a role in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients. Depression and anxiety are quite common additional symptoms in FMS. However the role of BDNF in these symptoms still needs to be elucidated. Although BDNF has been shown to be relevant in major depression, however studies could not show such differences between FMS patients with and without major depression. As mood-related symptom occurs frequently and differs in its intensity in FMS patients, BDNF level should be measured in subgroup regarding depression and anxiety scale. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of BDNF in serum of FMS with intensity of depression and anxiety. Additionally, interleukin (IL)-6 was measured. This study showed that serum level of BDNF was age-dependent in HCs. FMS patients had higher level of serum BDNF as compared to HC. Additionally, serum level of BDNF showed correlation with depression, but not with anxiety. Serum level of BDNF increased with depression score in FMS. However, serum level of IL-6 was not correlated with both depression and anxiety scores. Taken together, BDNF is involved in the pathophysiology of FMS. Additionally, it seems to be correlated with intensity of depressive symptoms in FMS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Music Aerobic Exercise on Depression and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Community Dwelling Women

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    Shu-Hui Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A randomized clinical trial was utilized to compare the improvement of depression and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels between community women with and without music aerobic exercise (MAE for 12 weeks. The MAE group involved 47 eligible participants, whereas the comparison group had 59 participants. No significant differences were recorded in the demographic characteristics between the participants in the MAE group and the comparison group. Forty-one participants in the MAE group and 26 in the comparison group completed a pre- and posttest. The MAE group displayed significant improvement in depression scores (p = 0.016, decreased depression symptoms in crying (p = 0.03, appetite (p = 0.006, and fatigue (p = 0.011. The BDNF levels of the participants significantly increased after the 12-week MAE (p = 0.042. The parallel comparison group revealed no significant changes in depression scores or BDNF levels. In summary, the 12-week MAE had a significant impact on the enhancement of BDNF levels and improvement of depression symptoms. Middle-aged community women are encouraged to exercise moderately to improve their depression symptoms and BDNF levels.

  17. Effects of music aerobic exercise on depression and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in community dwelling women.

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    Yeh, Shu-Hui; Lin, Li-Wei; Chuang, Yu Kuan; Liu, Cheng-Ling; Tsai, Lu-Jen; Tsuei, Feng-Shiou; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Yang, Kuender D

    2015-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial was utilized to compare the improvement of depression and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels between community women with and without music aerobic exercise (MAE) for 12 weeks. The MAE group involved 47 eligible participants, whereas the comparison group had 59 participants. No significant differences were recorded in the demographic characteristics between the participants in the MAE group and the comparison group. Forty-one participants in the MAE group and 26 in the comparison group completed a pre- and posttest. The MAE group displayed significant improvement in depression scores (p = 0.016), decreased depression symptoms in crying (p = 0.03), appetite (p = 0.006), and fatigue (p = 0.011). The BDNF levels of the participants significantly increased after the 12-week MAE (p = 0.042). The parallel comparison group revealed no significant changes in depression scores or BDNF levels. In summary, the 12-week MAE had a significant impact on the enhancement of BDNF levels and improvement of depression symptoms. Middle-aged community women are encouraged to exercise moderately to improve their depression symptoms and BDNF levels.

  18. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Induces Decreased Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroprotection in the Diabetic Retina

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    Ahmed M. Abu El-Asrar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-(BDNF- mediated neuroprotection is reduced by high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in diabetic retina, paired vitreous and serum samples from 46 proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 34 nondiabetic patients were assayed for BDNF, HMGB1, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and TBARS. We also examined retinas of diabetic and HMGB1 intravitreally injected rats. The effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced changes in retinal BDNF expressions was studied. Western blot, ELISA, and TBARS assays were used. BDNF was not detected in vitreous samples. BDNF levels were significantly lower in serum samples from diabetic patients compared with nondiabetics, whereas HMGB1, sRAGE, sICAM-1, and TBARS levels were significantly higher in diabetic serum samples. MCP-1 levels did not differ significantly. There was significant inverse correlation between serum levels of BDNF and HMGB1. Diabetes and intravitreal administration of HMGB1 induced significant upregulation of the expression of HMGB1, TBARS, and cleaved caspase-3, whereas the expression of BDNF and synaptophysin was significantly downregulated in rat retinas. Glycyrrhizin significantly attenuated diabetes-induced downregulation of BDNF. Our results suggest that HMGB1-induced downregulation of BDNF might be involved in pathogenesis of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signalling mediates the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in chronically stressed mice.

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    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po

    2014-03-15

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that piperine produced antidepressant-like action in various mouse models of behavioral despair. This study aimed to investigate the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). The results showed that CUMS caused depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. It was also found that BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were significantly decreased in CUMS-treated mice. Chronic treatment of piperine at the dose of 10mg/kg significantly ameliorated behavioural deficits of CUMS-treated mice in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test. Piperine treatment also significantly decreased immobility time in the forced swim test in naive mice. In parallel, chronic piperine treatment significantly increased BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of both naive and CUMS-treated mice. In addition, inhibition of BDNF signalling by injection of K252a, an inhibitor of the BDNF receptor TrkB, significantly blocked the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test of CUMS-treated mice. Taken together, this study suggests that BDNF signalling is an essential mediator for the antidepressant-like effect of piperine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation between Peripheral Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Hippocampal Volume in Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder

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    Tatiana Lauxen Peruzzolo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD is a serious mental disorder that affects the development and emotional growth of affected patients. The brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is recognized as one of the possible markers of the framework and its evolution. Abnormalities in BDNF signaling in the hippocampus could explain the cognitive decline seen in patients with TB. Our aim with this study was to evaluate possible changes in hippocampal volume in children and adolescents with BD and associate them to serum BDNF. Subjects included 30 patients aged seven to seventeen years from the ProCAB (Program for Children and Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder. We observed mean right and left hippocampal volumes of 41910.55 and 41747.96 mm3, respectively. No statistically significant correlations between peripheral BDNF levels and hippocampal volumes were found. We believe that the lack of correlation observed in this study is due to the short time of evolution of BD in children and adolescents. Besides studies with larger sample sizes to confirm the present findings and longitudinal assessments, addressing brain development versus a control group and including drug-naive patients in different mood states may help clarify the role of BDNF in the brain changes consequent upon BD.

  1. Histone deacetylase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in a pharmacological model of mania

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    Laura Stertz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of repeated D-amphetamine (AMPH exposure, a well-accepted animal model of acute mania in bipolar disorder (BD, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors on locomotor behavior and HDAC activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of rats. Moreover, we aimed to assess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF protein and mRNA levels in these samples. Methods: We treated adult male Wistar rats with 2 mg/kg AMPH or saline intraperitoneally for 14 days. Between the 8th and 14th days, rats also received 47.5 mg/kg lithium (Li, 200 mg/kg sodium valproate (VPT, 2 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB, or saline. We evaluated locomotor activity in the open-field task and assessed HDAC activity in the PFC and PBMCs, and BDNF levels in the PFC and plasma. Results: AMPH significantly increased locomotor activity, which was reversed by all drugs. This hyperactivity was associated with increased HDAC activity in the PFC, which was partially reversed by Li, VPT, and SB. No differences were found in BDNF levels. Conclusion: Repeated AMPH administration increases HDAC activity in the PFC without altering BDNF levels. The partial reversal of HDAC increase by Li, VPT, and SB may account for their ability to reverse AMPH-induced hyperactivity.

  2. DNA methylation profiles of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene as a potent diagnostic biomarker in major depression.

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    Manabu Fuchikami

    Full Text Available Major depression, because of its recurring and life-threatening nature, is one of the top 10 diseases for global disease burden. Major depression is still diagnosed on the basis of clinical symptoms in patients. The search for specific biological markers is of great importance to advance the method of diagnosis for depression. We examined the methylation profile of 2 CpG islands (I and IV at the promoters of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF gene, which is well known to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression. We analyzed genomic DNA from peripheral blood of 20 Japanese patients with major depression and 18 healthy controls to identify an appropriate epigenetic biomarker to aid in the establishment of an objective system for the diagnosis of depression. Methylation rates at each CpG unit was measured using a MassArray® system (SEQUENOM, and 2-dimensional hierarchical clustering analyses were undertaken to determine the validity of these methylation profiles as a diagnostic biomarker. Analyses of the dendrogram from methylation profiles of CpG I, but not IV, demonstrated that classification of healthy controls and patients at the first branch completely matched the clinical diagnosis. Despite the small number of subjects, our results indicate that classification based on the DNA methylation profiles of CpG I of the BDNF gene may be a valuable diagnostic biomarker for major depression.

  3. No influence of noradrenaline manipulation on acute exercise-induced increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goekint, Maaike; Heyman, Elsa; Roelands, Bart; Njemini, Rose; Bautmans, Ivan; Mets, Tony; Meeusen, Romain

    2008-11-01

    To examine the influence of a selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) on the exercise-induced increase in circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design, 11 young, healthy male subjects were treated with either placebo or reboxetine. On each occasion, they performed a 60-min cycling exercise at 55% of their maximal power output (Wmax) followed by a time trial (TT) at 75% of Wmax. HR and ratings of perceived exertion were measured. Blood samples were taken at four time points. An increase in serum BDNF was found after exercise without any influence of drug administration on BDNF levels. Serum BDNF returned to resting levels after 15 min of recovery. Time trial (TT) performance was significantly worse after reboxetine intake. Serum cortisol increased in both trials during and after exercise and was significantly higher in the reboxetine trial. Also, HR was increased with reboxetine intake, probably because of the sympathomimetic effect of SNRI. Midterm memory was significantly impaired after the exercise protocol without difference between reboxetine and placebo trial. The administration of an SNRI has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in BDNF. However, effects were seen on serum cortisol, HR, and memory. Future research should focus on the effect of regular exercise training in combination with several reuptake inhibitors in both healthy and depressed subjects on BDNF and memory.

  4. No effect of escitalopram versus placebo on brain-derived neurotrophic factor in healthy individuals: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Ulla; Koefoed, Pernille; Soendergaard, Mia H Greisen; Vinberg, Maj; Gether, Ulrik; Gluud, Christian; Wetterslev, Jørn; Winkel, Per; Kessing, Lars V

    2016-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) seems to play an important role in the course of depression including the response to antidepressants in patients with depression. We aimed to study the effect of an antidepressant intervention on peripheral BDNF in healthy individuals with a family history of depression. We measured changes in BDNF messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and whole-blood BDNF levels in 80 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with depression randomly allocated to receive daily tablets of escitalopram 10 mg versus placebo for 4 weeks. We found no statistically significant difference between the escitalopram and the placebo group in the change in BDNF mRNA expression and whole-blood BDNF levels. Post hoc analyses showed a statistically significant negative correlation between plasma escitalopram concentration and change in whole-blood BDNF levels in the escitalopram-treated group. The results of this randomised trial suggest that escitalopram 10 mg has no effect on peripheral BDNF levels in healthy individuals.

  5. The Neuroprotective Effects of Muscle-Derived Stem Cells via Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Spinal Cord Injury Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghe Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs possess multipotent differentiation and self-renewal capacities; however, the effects and mechanism in neuron injury remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MDSCs on neuron secondary injury, oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. An in vivo study showed the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB score and number of neurons significantly increased after MDSCs’ transplantation in spinal cord injury (SCI rats. An in vitro study demonstrated that MDSCs attenuated neuron apoptosis, and the expression of antioxidants was upregulated as well as the ratio of Bcl-2 and Bax in the MNT (MDSCs cocultured with injured neurons group compared with the NT (injured neurons group. Both LC3II/LC3I and β-catenin were enhanced in the MNT group, while XAV939 (a β-catenin inhibitor decreased the expression of nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and LC3II/LC3I. Moreover, MDSCs became NSE- (neuron-specific enolase- positive neuron-like cells with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF treatment. The correlation analysis indicated that there was a significant relation between the level of BDNF and neuron injury. These findings suggest that MDSCs may protect the spinal cord from injury by inhibiting apoptosis and replacing injured neurons, and the increased BDNF and β-catenin could contribute to MDSCs’ effects.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor can act as a pronecrotic factor through transcriptional and translational activation of NADPH oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun H.; Won, Seok J.; Sohn, Seonghyang; Kwon, Hyuk J.; Lee, Jee Y.; Park, Jong H.; Gwag, Byoung J.

    2002-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that neurotrophins (NTs) potentiate or cause neuronal injury under various pathological conditions. Since NTs enhance survival and differentiation of cultured neurons in serum or defined media containing antioxidants, we set out experiments to delineate the patterns and underlying mechanisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)–induced neuronal injury in mixed cortical cell cultures containing glia and neurons in serum-free media without antioxidants, where the three major routes of neuronal cell death, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and apoptosis, have been extensively studied. Rat cortical cell cultures, after prolonged exposure to NTs, underwent widespread neuronal necrosis. BDNF-induced neuronal necrosis was accompanied by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and was dependent on the macromolecular synthesis. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that BDNF increased the expression of cytochrome b558, the plasma membrane-spanning subunit of NADPH oxidase. The expression and activation of NADPH oxidase were increased after exposure to BDNF. The selective inhibitors of NADPH oxidase prevented BDNF-induced ROS production and neuronal death without blocking antiapoptosis action of BDNF. The present study suggests that BDNF-induced expression and activation of NADPH oxidase cause oxidative neuronal necrosis and that the neurotrophic effects of NTs can be maximized under blockade of the pronecrotic action. PMID:12460985

  7. The Effect of Exercise Training on Resting Concentrations of Peripheral Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF: A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Dinoff

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which physical activity supports healthy brain function remain to be elucidated. One hypothesis suggests that increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF mediates some cognitive and mood benefits. This meta-analysis sought to determine the effect of exercise training on resting concentrations of BDNF in peripheral blood.MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, Rehabilitation & Sports Medicine Source, and CINAHL databases were searched for original, peer-reviewed reports of peripheral blood BDNF concentrations before and after exercise interventions ≥ 2 weeks. Risk of bias was assessed using standardized criteria. Standardized mean differences (SMDs were generated from random effects models. Risk of publication bias was assessed using funnel plots and Egger's test. Potential sources of heterogeneity were explored in subgroup analyses.In 29 studies that met inclusion criteria, resting concentrations of peripheral blood BDNF were higher after intervention (SMD = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17-0.60, p < 0.001. Subgroup analyses suggested a significant effect in aerobic (SMD = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.33-0.99, p < 0.001 but not resistance training (SMD = 0.07, 95% CI: -0.15-0.30, p = 0.52 interventions. No significant difference in effect was observed between males and females, nor in serum vs plasma.Aerobic but not resistance training interventions increased resting BDNF concentrations in peripheral blood.

  8. DIFFERENT CIRCULATING BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR RESPONSES TO ACUTE EXERCISE BETWEEN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE AND SEDENTARY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Nofuji

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Although circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF level is affected by both acute and chronic physical activity, the interaction of acute and chronic physical activity was still unclear. In this study, we compared the serum and plasma BDNF responses to maximal and submaximal acute exercises between physically active and sedentary subjects. Eight active and 8 sedentary female subjects participated in the present study. Both groups performed 3 exercise tests with different intensities, i.e. 100% (maximal, 60% (moderate and 40% (low of their peak oxygen uptake. In each exercise test, blood samples were taken at the baseline and immediately, 30 and 60 min after the test. The serum BDNF concentration was found to significantly increase immediately after maximal and moderate exercise tests in both groups. In maximal exercise test, the pattern of change in the serum BDNF concentration was different between the groups. While the serum BDNF level for the sedentary group returned to the baseline level during the recovery phase, the BDNF levels for the active group decreased below the baseline level after the maximal exercise test. No group differences were observed in the pattern of plasma BDNF change for all exercise tests. These findings suggest that regular exercise facilitates the utilization of circulating BDNF during and/or after acute exercise with maximal intensity

  9. Pharmacological Profile of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Splice Variant Translation Using a Novel Drug Screening Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghi, Valentina; Polacchini, Alessio; Baj, Gabriele; Pinheiro, Vera L. M.; Vicario, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neuronal development and plasticity. BDNF is a major pharmaceutical target in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, pharmacological modulation of this neurotrophin is challenging because BDNF is generated by multiple, alternatively spliced transcripts with different 5′- and 3′UTRs. Each BDNF mRNA variant is transcribed independently, but translation regulation is unknown. To evaluate the translatability of BDNF transcripts, we developed an in vitro luciferase assay in human neuroblastoma cells. In unstimulated cells, each BDNF 5′- and 3′UTR determined a different basal translation level of the luciferase reporter gene. However, constructs with either a 5′UTR or a 3′UTR alone showed poor translation modulation by BDNF, KCl, dihydroxyphenylglycine, AMPA, NMDA, dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, or serotonin. Constructs consisting of the luciferase reporter gene flanked by the 5′UTR of one of the most abundant BDNF transcripts in the brain (exons 1, 2c, 4, and 6) and the long 3′UTR responded selectively to stimulation with the different receptor agonists, and only transcripts 2c and 6 were increased by the antidepressants desipramine and mirtazapine. We propose that BDNF mRNA variants represent “a quantitative code” for regulated expression of the protein. Thus, to discriminate the efficacy of drugs in stimulating BDNF synthesis, it is appropriate to use variant-specific in vitro screening tests. PMID:25074925

  10. Characterization and functional analysis of the calmodulin-binding domain of Rac1 GTPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Xu

    Full Text Available Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, has been shown to promote formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of motile cells and affect cell migration. We previously demonstrated that calmodulin can bind to a region in the C-terminal of Rac1 and that this interaction is important in the activation of platelet Rac1. Now, we have analyzed amino acid residue(s in the Rac1-calmodulin binding domain that are essential for the interaction and assessed their functional contribution in Rac1 activation. The results demonstrated that region 151-164 in Rac1 is essential for calmodulin binding. Within the 151-164 region, positively-charged amino acids K153 and R163 were mutated to alanine to study impact on calmodulin binding. Mutant form of Rac1 (K153A demonstrated significantly reduced binding to calmodulin while the double mutant K153A/R163A demonstrated complete lack of binding to calmodulin. Thrombin or EGF resulted in activation of Rac1 in CHRF-288-11 or HeLa cells respectively and W7 inhibited this activation. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that higher amount of CaM was associated with Rac1 during EGF dependent activation. In cells expressing mutant forms of Rac1 (K153A or K153A/R163A, activation induced by EGF was significantly decreased in comparison to wild type or the R163A forms of Rac1. The lack of Rac1 activation in mutant forms was not due to an inability of GDP-GTP exchange or a change in subcelllular distribution. Moreover, Rac1 activation was decreased in cells where endogenous level of calmodulin was reduced using shRNA knockdown and increased in cells where calmodulin was overexpressed. Docking analysis and modeling demonstrated that K153 in Rac1 interacts with Q41 in calmodulin. These results suggest an important role for calmodulin in the activation of Rac1 and thus, in cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration.

  11. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II in Vascular Smooth Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddouk, F Z; Ginnan, R; Singer, H A

    2017-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways are central regulators of differentiated vascular smooth muscle (VSM) contractile function. In addition, Ca2+ signals regulate VSM gene transcription, proliferation, and migration of dedifferentiated or "synthetic" phenotype VSM cells. Synthetic phenotype VSM growth and hyperplasia are hallmarks of pervasive vascular diseases including hypertension, atherosclerosis, postangioplasty/in-stent restenosis, and vein graft failure. The serine/threonine protein kinase Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous mediator of intracellular Ca2+ signals. Its multifunctional nature, structural complexity, diversity of isoforms, and splice variants all characterize this protein kinase and make study of its activity and function challenging. The kinase has unique autoregulatory mechanisms, and emerging studies suggest that it can function to integrate Ca2+ and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species signaling. Differentiated VSM expresses primarily CaMKIIγ and -δ isoforms. CaMKIIγ isoform expression correlates closely with the differentiated phenotype, and some studies link its function to regulation of contractile activity and Ca2+ homeostasis. Conversely, synthetic phenotype VSM cells primarily express CaMKIIδ and substantial evidence links it to regulation of gene transcription, proliferation, and migration of VSM in vitro, and vascular hypertrophic and hyperplastic remodeling in vivo. CaMKIIδ and -γ isoforms have opposing functions at the level of cell cycle regulation, proliferation, and VSM hyperplasia in vivo. Isoform switching following vascular injury is a key step in promoting vascular remodeling. Recent availability of genetically engineered mice with smooth muscle deletion of specific isoforms and transgenics expressing an endogenous inhibitor protein (CAMK2N) has enabled a better understanding of CaMKII function in VSM and should facilitate future studies. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of methionine oxidation on calmodulin structural dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Megan R.; Thompson, Andrew R.; Nitu, Florentin [Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Moen, Rebecca J. [Chemistry and Geology Department, Minnesota State University, Mankato, MN 56001 (United States); Olenek, Michael J. [Biology Department, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI 54601 (United States); Klein, Jennifer C., E-mail: jklein@uwlax.edu [Biology Department, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI 54601 (United States); Thomas, David D., E-mail: ddt@umn.edu [Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics Department, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • We measured the distance distribution between two spin labels on calmodulin by DEER. • Two structural states, open and closed, were resolved at both low and high Ca. • Ca shifted the equilibrium toward the open state by a factor of 13. • Methionine oxidation, simulated by glutamine substitution, decreased the Ca effect. • These results have important implications for aging in muscle and other tissues. - Abstract: We have used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) to examine the structural impact of oxidizing specific methionine (M) side chains in calmodulin (CaM). It has been shown that oxidation of either M109 or M124 in CaM diminishes CaM regulation of the muscle calcium release channel, the ryanodine receptor (RyR), and that mutation of M to Q (glutamine) in either case produces functional effects identical to those of oxidation. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and double electron–electron resonance (DEER), a pulsed EPR technique that measures distances between spin labels, to characterize the structural changes resulting from these mutations. Spin labels were attached to a pair of introduced cysteine residues, one in the C-lobe (T117C) and one in the N-lobe (T34C) of CaM, and DEER was used to determine the distribution of interspin distances. Ca binding induced a large increase in the mean distance, in concert with previous X-ray crystallography and NMR data, showing a closed structure in the absence of Ca and an open structure in the presence of Ca. DEER revealed additional information about CaM’s structural heterogeneity in solution: in both the presence and absence of Ca, CaM populates both structural states, one with probes separated by ∼4 nm (closed) and another at ∼6 nm (open). Ca shifts the structural equilibrium constant toward the open state by a factor of 13. DEER reveals the distribution of interprobe distances, showing that each of these states is itself partially disordered, with the width of each

  13. Calmodulin-activated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase from brain. Relationship of subunit structure to activity assessed by radiation inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, R L; Kempner, E; Manganiello, V C; Osborne, J C; Vaughan, M

    1981-11-10

    The apparent target sizes of the basal and calmodulin-dependent activities of calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase from bovine brain were estimated using target theory analysis of data from radiation inactivation experiments. Whether crude or highly purified samples were irradiated, the following results were obtained. Low doses of radiation caused a 10 to 15% increase in basal activity, which, with further irradiation, decayed with an apparent target size of approximately 60,000 daltons. Calmodulin-dependent activity decayed with an apparent target size of approximately 105,000 daltons. The percentage stimulation of enzyme activity by calmodulin decreased markedly as a function of radiation dosage. These observations are consistent with results predicted by computer-assisted modeling based on the assumptions that: 1) the calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase exists as a mixture of monomers which are fully active in the absence of calmodulin and dimers which are inactive in the absence of calmodulin; 2) in the presence of calmodulin, a dimer exhibits activity equal to that of two monomers; 3) on radiations destruction of a dimer, an active monomer is generated. This monomer-dimer hypothesis provides a plausible explanation for and definition of basal and calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase activity.

  14. Nicotine-Induced Effects on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors (nAChRs), Ca2+ and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in STC-1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jie; Mummalaneni, Shobha K; Alkahtani, Reem M; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S; Grider, John R; Lyall, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the T2R bitter taste receptors, neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have recently been shown to be involved in the bitter taste transduction of nicotine, acetylcholine and ethanol. However, at present it is not clear if nAChRs are expressed in enteroendocrine cells other than beta cells of the pancreas and enterochromaffin cells, and if they play a role in the synthesis and release of neurohumoral peptides. Accordingly, we investigated the expression and functional role of nAChRs in enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. Our studies using RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical and Western blotting techniques demonstrate that STC-1 cells express several α and β nAChR subunits. Exposing STC-1 cells to nicotine acutely (24h) or chronically (4 days) induced a differential increase in the expression of nAChR subunit mRNA and protein in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Mecamylamine, a non-selective antagonist of nAChRs, inhibited the nicotine-induced increase in mRNA expression of nAChRs. Exposing STC-1 cells to nicotine increased intracellular Ca2+ in a dose-dependent manner that was inhibited in the presence of mecamylamine or dihydro-β-erythroidine, a α4β2 nAChR antagonist. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein were detected in STC-1 cells using RT-PCR, specific BDNF antibody, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Acute nicotine exposure (30 min) decreased the cellular content of BDNF in STC-1 cells. The nicotine-induced decrease in BDNF was inhibited in the presence of mecamylamine. We also detected α3 and β4 mRNA in intestinal mucosal cells and α3 protein expression in intestinal enteroendocrine cells. We conclude that STC-1 cells and intestinal enteroendocrine cells express nAChRs. In STC-1 cells nAChR expression is modulated by exposure to nicotine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nicotine interacts with nAChRs and inhibits BDNF expression in STC-1 cells.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Val66Met and serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR polymorphisms modulate plasticity in inhibitory control performance over time but independent of inhibitory control training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Enge

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Several studies reported training-induced improvements in executive function tasks and also observed transfer to untrained tasks. However, the results are mixed and there is large interindividual variability within and across studies. Given that training-related performance changes would require modification, growth or differentiation at the cellular and synaptic level in the brain, research on critical moderators of brain plasticity potentially explaining such changes is needed. In the present study, a pre-post-follow-up design (N=122 and a three-weeks training of two response inhibition tasks (Go/NoGo and Stop-Signal was employed and genetic variation (Val66Met in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF promoting differentiation and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity was examined. Because Serotonin (5-HT signaling and the interplay of BDNF and 5-HT are known to critically mediate brain plasticity, genetic variation in the 5-HT transporter (5-HTTLPR was also addressed. The overall results show that the kind of training (i.e., adaptive vs. non-adaptive did not evoke genotype-dependent differences. However, in the Go/NoGo task, better inhibition performance (lower commission errors were observed for BDNF Val/Val genotype carriers compared to Met-allele ones supporting similar findings from other cognitive tasks. Additionally, a gene-gene interaction suggests a more impulsive response pattern (faster responses accompanied by higher commission error rates in homozygous l-allele carriers relative to those with the s-allele of 5-HTTLPR. This, however, is true only in the presence of the Met-allele of BDNF, while the Val/Val genotype seems to compensate for such non-adaptive responding. Intriguingly, similar results were obtained for the Stop-Signal task. Here, differences emerged at post-testing, while no differences were observed at T1. In sum, although no genotype-dependent differences between the relevant training groups emerged suggesting

  16. Insufficient Astrocyte-Derived Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Contributes to Propofol-Induced Neuron Death Through Akt/Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β/Mitochondrial Fission Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanan; Yan, Yasheng; Inagaki, Yasuyoshi; Logan, Sarah; Bosnjak, Zeljko J; Bai, Xiaowen

    2017-07-01

    Growing animal evidence demonstrates that prolonged exposure to propofol during brain development induces widespread neuronal cell death, but there is little information on the role of astrocytes. Astrocytes can release neurotrophic growth factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which can exert the protective effect on neurons in paracrine fashion. We hypothesize that during propofol anesthesia, BDNF released from developing astrocytes may not be sufficient to prevent propofol-induced neurotoxicity. Hippocampal astrocytes and neurons isolated from neonatal Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to propofol at a clinically relevant dose of 30 μM or dimethyl sulfoxide as control for 6 hours. Propofol-induced cell death was determined by propidium iodide (PI) staining in astrocyte-alone cultures, neuron-alone cultures, or cocultures containing either low or high density of astrocytes (1:9 or 1:1 ratio of astrocytes to neurons ratio [ANR], respectively). The astrocyte-conditioned medium was collected 12 hours after propofol exposure and measured by protein array assay. BDNF concentration in astrocyte-conditioned medium was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neuron-alone cultures were treated with BDNF, tyrosine receptor kinase B inhibitor cyclotraxin-B, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) inhibitor CHIR99021, or mitochondrial fission inhibitor Mdivi-1 before propofol exposure. Western blot was performed for quantification of the level of protein kinase B and GSK3β. Mitochondrial shape was visualized through translocase of the outer membrane 20 staining. Propofol increased cell death in neurons by 1.8-fold (% of PI-positive cells [PI%] = 18.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 15.2-21.9, P .05]). Astrocytes secreted BDNF in a cell density-dependent way and propofol decreased BDNF secretion from astrocytes. Administration of BDNF, CHIR99021, or Mdivi-1 significantly attenuated the propofol-induced neuronal death and aberrant mitochondria in

  17. Extracellular calmodulin regulates growth and cAMP-mediated chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Day, Danton H., E-mail: danton.oday@utoronto.ca [Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Harbord St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G5 (Canada); Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Rd. N., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6 (Canada); Huber, Robert J. [Department of Cell and Systems Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Harbord St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3G5 (Canada); Suarez, Andres [Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Rd. N., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6 (Canada)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin is present throughout growth and development in Dictyostelium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin localizes within the ECM during development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin inhibits cell proliferation and increases chemotaxis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin exists in eukaryotic microbes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extracellular calmodulin may be functionally as important as intracellular calmodulin. -- Abstract: The existence of extracellular calmodulin (CaM) has had a long and controversial history. CaM is a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein that has been found in every eukaryotic cell system. Calcium-free apo-CaM and Ca{sup 2+}/CaM exert their effects by binding to and regulating the activity of CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Most of the research done to date on CaM and its CaMBPs has focused on their intracellular functions. The presence of extracellular CaM is well established in a number of plants where it functions in proliferation, cell wall regeneration, gene regulation and germination. While CaM has been detected extracellularly in several animal species, including frog, rat, rabbit and human, its extracellular localization and functions are less well established. In contrast the study of extracellular CaM in eukaryotic microbes remains to be done. Here we show that CaM is constitutively expressed and secreted throughout asexual development in Dictyostelium where the presence of extracellular CaM dose-dependently inhibits cell proliferation but increases cAMP mediated chemotaxis. During development, extracellular CaM localizes within the slime sheath where it coexists with at least one CaMBP, the matricellular CaM-binding protein CyrA. Coupled with previous research, this work provides direct evidence for the existence of extracellular CaM in the Dictyostelium and provides insight into its functions in this model amoebozoan.

  18. Structure and expression of the chicken calmodulin I gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Q; Berchtold, M W

    1997-01-01

    The chicken calmodulin I (CaMI) gene has been isolated and characterized on the level of cDNA and genomic DNA. The deduced amino acid (aa) sequence is identical to the one of chicken CaMII which consists of 148 aa. The CaMI gene contains six exons. Its intron/exon organization is identical...... to that of the chicken CaMII and the CaMI and CaMIII genes of rat and human. Expression of the CaMI gene was detected in all chicken tissues examined, although at varying levels. The gene is transcribed into four mRNAs of 0.8, 1.4, 1.7 and 4.4 kb as determined by Northern blot analysis. Our results demonstrate...... that the "multigene-one-protein" principle of CaM synthesis is not only applicable to mammals whose CaM is encoded by three different genes, but also to chickens....

  19. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 [mu]M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 [mu]M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  20. Calmodulin immunolocalization to cortical microtubules is calcium independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.D.; Cyr, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    Calcium affects the stability of cortical microtubules (MTs) in lysed protoplasts. This calmodulin (CaM)-mediated interaction may provide a mechanism that serves to integrate cellular behavior with MT function. To test the hypothesis that CaM associates with these MTs, monoclonal antibodies were produced against CaM, and one (designated mAb1D10), was selected for its suitability as an immunocytochemical reagent. It is shown that CaM associates with the cortical Mats of cultured carrot (Daucus carota L.) and tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum L.) cells. Inasmuch as CaM interacts with calcium and affects the behavior of these Mats, we hypothesized that calcium would alter this association. To test this, protoplasts containing taxol-stabilized Mats were lysed in the presence of various concentrations of calcium and examined for the association of Cam with cortical Mats. At 1 {mu}M calcium, many protoplasts did not have CaM in association with the cortical Mats, while at 3.6 {mu}M calcium, this association was completely abolished. The results are discussed in terms of a model in which CaM associates with Mats via two types of interactions; one calcium dependent and one independent.

  1. Alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the mouse hippocampus following acute but not repeated benzodiazepine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Stephanie C; Shinday, Nina M; Huizenga, Megan N; Darnell, Shayna B; Sangrey, Gavin R; Rudolph, Uwe; Rowlett, James K; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh

    2013-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZs) are safe drugs for treating anxiety, sleep, and seizure disorders, but their use also results in unwanted effects including memory impairment, abuse, and dependence. The present study aimed to reveal the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the effects of BZs in the hippocampus (HIP), an area involved in drug-related plasticity, by investigating the regulation of immediate early genes following BZ administration. Previous studies have demonstrated that both brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and c-Fos contribute to memory- and abuse-related processes that occur within the HIP, and their expression is altered in response to BZ exposure. In the current study, mice received acute or repeated administration of BZs and HIP tissue was analyzed for alterations in BDNF and c-Fos expression. Although no significant changes in BDNF or c-Fos were observed in response to twice-daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of diazepam (10 mg/kg + 5 mg/kg) or zolpidem (ZP; 2.5 mg/kg + 2.5 mg/kg), acute i.p. administration of both triazolam (0.03 mg/kg) and ZP (1.0 mg/kg) decreased BDNF protein levels within the HIP relative to vehicle, without any effect on c-Fos. ZP specifically reduced exon IV-containing BDNF transcripts with a concomitant increase in the association of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) with BDNF promoter IV, suggesting that MeCP2 activity at this promoter may represent a ZP-specific mechanism for reducing BDNF expression. ZP also increased the association of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) with BDNF promoter I. Future work should examine the interaction between ZP and DNA as the cause for altered gene expression in the HIP, given that BZs can enter the nucleus and intercalate into DNA directly.

  2. Modulatory effects of aromatherapy massage intervention on electroencephalogram, psychological assessments, salivary cortisol and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jin-Ji; Cui, Yanji; Yang, Yoon-Sil; Kang, Moon-Seok; Jung, Sung-Cherl; Park, Hyeung Keun; Yeun, Hye-Young; Jang, Won Jung; Lee, Sunjoo; Kwak, Young Sook; Eun, Su-Yong

    2014-06-01

    Aromatherapy massage is commonly used for the stress management of healthy individuals, and also has been often employed as a therapeutic use for pain control and alleviating psychological distress, such as anxiety and depression, in oncological palliative care patients. However, the exact biological basis of aromatherapy massage is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluated here the effects of aromatherapy massage interventions on multiple neurobiological indices such as quantitative psychological assessments, electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectrum pattern, salivary cortisol and plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels. A control group without treatment (n = 12) and aromatherapy massage group (n = 13) were randomly recruited. They were all females whose children were diagnosed as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and followed up in the Department of Psychiatry, Jeju National University Hospital. Participants were treated with aromatherapy massage for 40 min twice per week for 4 weeks (8 interventions). A 4-week-aromatherapy massage program significantly improved all psychological assessment scores in the Stat-Trait Anxiety Index, Beck Depression Inventory and Short Form of Psychosocial Well-being Index. Interestingly, plasma BDNF levels were significantly increased after a 4 week-aromatherapy massage program. Alpha-brain wave activities were significantly enhanced and delta wave activities were markedly reduced following the one-time aromatherapy massage treatment, as shown in the meditation and neurofeedback training. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were significantly reduced following the one-time aromatherapy massage treatment. These results suggest that aromatherapy massage could exert significant influences on multiple neurobiological indices such as EEG pattern, salivary cortisol and plasma BDNF levels as well as psychological assessments. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men

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    A. Zembron-Lacny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP and oxidized LDL (oxLDL, in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years and 17 young males (20-24 years participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001. In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL, hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism and cognitive function in persons with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Ashley J; Alosco, Michael L; Miller, Lindsay A; McGeary, John E; Poppas, Athena; Cohen, Ronald A; Gunstad, John

    2013-12-01

    Cognitive impairment is common among persons with cardiovascular disease (CVD), and several potential aetiological mechanisms have been described, including contributions of genetic markers such as variations in the brain-derived neurotrophic (BDNF) gene. This current study examined the associations of BDNF genotype with cognitive function among individuals with CVD. This study included 110 participants with CVD who completed a comprehensive neuropsychological battery that assessed global cognitive function, attention/executive function, memory, language, and visuospatial abilities. All participants also underwent blood draw to provide a DNA sample that was used to determine BDNF genotype. Carriers of either one or two copies of the methionine allele of BDNF were categorized into one group (n = 33); non-carriers were categorized into a second group (n = 77). After adjustment for demographic and medical characteristics, hierarchical regression analyses revealed persons with one or more methionine alleles displayed better performance than valine/valine individuals for attention/executive function (β = 0.22, P = 0.047) and memory (β = 0.25, P = 0.03), as well as a trend for language (β = 0.19, P = 0.08) and visuospatial abilities (β = 0.21, P = 0.06). BDNF Val66Met had little impact on cognitive functioning in a sample of older adults with CVD, and significant findings contradicted that predicted by past work. Future work is much needed to clarify the mechanisms of these findings, particularly studies examining both circulating BDNF levels and genetic variation in the BDNF gene and cognitive function over time. © 2013 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2013 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  5. Lack of Postprandial Peak in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Marta; Esteba-Castillo, Susanna; Novell, Ramon; Giménez-Palop, Olga; Coronas, Ramon; Gabau, Elisabeth; Corripio, Raquel; Baena, Neus; Viñas-Jornet, Marina; Guitart, Míriam; Torrents-Rodas, David; Deus, Joan; Pujol, Jesús; Rigla, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Context Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by severe hyperphagia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and leptin are reciprocally involved in energy homeostasis. Objectives To analyze the role of BDNF and leptin in satiety in genetic subtypes of PWS. Design Experimental study. Setting University hospital. Subjects 90 adults: 30 PWS patients; 30 age-sex-BMI-matched obese controls; and 30 age-sex-matched lean controls. Interventions Subjects ingested a liquid meal after fasting ≥10 hours. Main Outcome Measures Leptin and BDNF levels in plasma extracted before ingestion and 30’, 60’, and 120’ after ingestion. Hunger, measured on a 100-point visual analogue scale before ingestion and 60’ and 120’ after ingestion. Results Fasting BDNF levels were lower in PWS than in controls (p = 0.05). Postprandially, PWS patients showed only a truncated early peak in BDNF, and their BDNF levels at 60' and 120' were lower compared with lean controls (p<0.05). Leptin was higher in PWS patients than in controls at all time points (p<0.001). PWS patients were hungrier than controls before and after eating. The probability of being hungry was associated with baseline BDNF levels: every 50-unit increment in BDNF decreased the odds of being hungry by 22% (OR: 0.78, 95%CI: 0.65–0.94). In uniparental disomy, the odds of being hungry decreased by 66% (OR: 0.34, 90%CI: 0.13–0.9). Postprandial leptin patterns did no differ among genetic subtypes. Conclusions Low baseline BDNF levels and lack of postprandial peak may contribute to persistent hunger after meals. Uniparental disomy is the genetic subtype of PWS least affected by these factors. PMID:27685845

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tyrosine kinase B receptor signalling in post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Conley, Robert R; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2008-12-01

    Teenage suicide is a major public health concern, but its neurobiology is not very well understood. Stress and major mental disorders are major risk factors for suicidal behaviour, and it has been shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) are not only regulated by stress but are also altered in these illnesses. We therefore examined if BDNF/TrkB signalling is altered in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims. Protein and mRNA expression of BDNF and of TrkB receptors were determined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), Brodmann's Area 9 (BA 9), and hippocampus obtained from 29 teenage suicide victims and 25 matched normal control subjects. Protein expression was determined using the Western blot technique; mRNA levels by a quantitative RT-PCR technique. The protein expression of BDNF was significantly decreased in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with normal control subjects, whereas no change was observed in the hippocampus. Protein expression of TrkB full-length receptors was significantly decreased in both PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims without any significant changes in the truncated form of TrkB receptors. mRNA expression of both BDNF and TrkB was significantly decreased in the PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims compared with normal control subjects. These studies indicate a down-regulation of both BDNF and its receptor TrkB in the PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims, which suggests that stress and altered BDNF may represent a major vulnerability factor in teenage suicidal behaviour.

  7. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on memory and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, H F; Khalil, K I; Hussein, A M; Zaki, M S A; Eid, R A; Alkhateeb, M

    2014-02-01

    The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on memory and cognition in experimental animals is well known, but its efficacy in clinical dementia is unproven. So, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DHEA on learning and memory activities in a rat model of vascular dementia (VD). Forty-eight male rats that positively passed the holeboard memory test were chosen for the study before bilateral permanent occlusion of the common carotid artery. They were divided into four groups (n=12, each) as follows (i) untreated control, (ii) rats exposed to surgical permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (BCCAO) leading to chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, (iii) rats exposed to BCCAO then received DHEA (BCCAO + DHEA) and (i.v.) rats exposed to BCCAO then received donepezil (BCCAO + DON). Holeboard memory test was used to assess the time, latency, working memory and reference memory. Central level of acetylcholine, norepinephrine and dopamine in the hippocampus were measured. Furthermore, the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus was determined. Histopathological studies of the cerebral cortex and transmission electron microscope of the hippocampus were performed. BCCAO decreased the learning and memory activities in the holeboard memory. Also, it decreased the expression of BDNF as well as the central level of acetylcholine, noradrenaline and dopamine as compared to control rats. Treatment with DHEA and donepezil increased the working and reference memories, BDNF expression as well as the central acetylcholine in the hippocampus as compared to BCCAO rats. DHEA produced neuroprotective effects through increasing the expression of BDNF as well as increasing the central level of acetylcholine and catecholamines which are non-comparable to donepezil effects.

  8. Coronary artery disease and depression: possible role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzini, Sara; Gambelli, Patrick; Boiocchi, Chiara; Schirinzi, Sandra; Falcone, Rossana; Buzzi, Paola; Storti, Cesare; Falcone, Colomba

    2009-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and depression are two of the most common human health problems. Patients with depression have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease and mortality after experiencing a cardiac event. Both diseases are complex disorders that are influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Brain-derived neuro-trophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in regulating both vascular development and response to injury, and promotes survival, differentiation, and maintenance of neurons in the peripheral and nervous system. Evidence suggests that BDNF can enhance serotoninergic transmission. Serotonin modulates different brain functions and is known to regulate sleep, appetite, pain and inflammation. The aims of the present case-control study were to investigate the possible role of BDNF Val66Met, 5-HTTLPR and -1438 G/A polymorphisms in the development of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with and without depression. Regarding BDNF, our data suggest an involvement of the AA genotype in the pathogenesis of CAD in females and in the predisposition to CAD associated with depression. Furthermore, it could be argued that the GG genotype is protective against CAD in the female population and against CAD associated with depression. In our CAD population we also observed a significant increase in the L/L genotype and a decrease in the S/L genotype with respect to the controls. A higher frequency of the L allele, responsible for enhancing the efficiency of transcription, was found in CAD patients. These findings may be responsible for the increased capacity of platelet serotonin uptake previously observed in patients with CAD. Although no differences were found for genotype and allelic frequencies of the -1438 G/A polymorphism between the CAD patients and controls, we cannot exclude the possible role of this receptor in coronary artery disease.

  9. Physical training prevents depressive symptoms and a decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuon, T; Valvassori, S S; Dal Pont, G C; Paganini, C S; Pozzi, B G; Luciano, T F; Souza, P S; Quevedo, J; Souza, C T; Pinho, R A

    2014-09-01

    Depression is a neuropsychiatric disorder that is commonly found in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Many studies have suggested that physical exercise can have an antidepressant effect by increasing the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and may also prevent neurodegenerative disease. However, different forms of training may promote different changes in the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two types of physical training on depressive-like behavior, and on the levels of proBDNF, BDNF, and its receptor, TrkB, in a mouse model of PD. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 60 days of exercise: either running on a treadmill or performing a strength exercise. PD was induced by striatal administration of 6-OHDA 24h after the last physical exercise session. Seven days after 6-OHDA injection, depressive-like behavior and apomorphine-induced rotational behavior were evaluated. The levels of proBDNF, BDNF, and TRKB were measured in the striatum and the hippocampus of mice by immunoblotting assay. The 6-OHDA-treated animals showed a significant increase in immobility time and rotational behavior compared with the control group. In addition, significant decreases in the levels of proBDNF, BDNF, and its receptor, TrkB were observed in the 6-OHDA group. Both types of physical exercise prevented depressive-like behavior and restored the levels of proBDNF, BDNF, and TrkB in the striatum and hippocampus of mice administered 6-OHDA. Our results demonstrate that exercise training was effective for neuroprotection in the striatum and the hippocampus in an experimental model of PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ginsenoside Reduces Cognitive Impairment During Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Through Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Regulated by Epigenetic Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qun; Ma, Xue; Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Ting; Xia, Feng; Zhao, Gang; Wu, Yu-Mei

    2017-05-01

    Increased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been associated with memory-enhancing and neuroprotective properties of some drugs under chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) condition. Ginsenoside Rd (GSRd), one of the main active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is widely used for brain protection. However, it is poorly understood whether epigenetic mechanisms implied in the BDNF modulation after GSRd treatment for CCH remain elusive. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of GSRd and the involved mechanisms. We demonstrated that GSRd administration ameliorated CCH-induced impairment of learning and memory behaviors, evidenced by decreased escape latency and increased number of crossing the platform in Morris water maze test. This improvement was associated with promoted neuron survival and increased BDNF expression in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of CCH mice. GSRd improved neuron survival and decreased neuron apoptosis and the level of caspase-3 under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) by upregulation of BDNF as well as in vitro. The levels of acetylated histone H3 (Ac-H3) and histone deacetylase (histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2)) were altered under OGD/R in a time-dependent manner, and GSRd reestablished the balance between Ac-H3 and HDAC2 which resulted in upregulation of BDNF and increased neuron survival. MS-275, an inhibitor of class I HDACs, abolished the levels of Ac-H3 at the bdnf promoters and enhanced upregulation of BDNF after GSRd administration, suggesting a synergistic effect between GSRd and MS-275. All the data suggested that GSRd provided neuroprotection by epigenetic modulation which accounted for the regulation of BDNF in CCH mice.

  11. Neurocognitive function, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and IL-6 levels in cancer patients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehn, C F; Becker, B; Flath, B; Nogai, H; Vuong, L; Schmid, P; Lüftner, D

    2015-10-15

    Increased IL-6 and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. The objective was to assess the influence of BDNF and IL-6 on cognitive function and depression in patients with cancer. Serum BDNF and plasma IL-6 were measured in patients with metastatic cancer. Diagnosis of depression was established according to DSM-IV criteria. Cognitive function was assessed by the Verbal Learning and Memory Test (VLMT). A total of 59 patients were recruited in this study. Only IL-6 levels were significantly elevated in patients with clinical depression (35.7 vs. 6.9 pg/ml; pBDNF levels (p=0.16). Patients with clinical depression showed significant impairment of short-term memory (STM) (24.4 vs. 37.5; p=0.01), but not of long-term memory (LTM) (3.9 vs. 2.8; p=0.3). STM was dependent on the level of BDNF and younger age (b=0.60; p=0.001; b= -0.63; p=0.003, respectively). IL-6 was not only strongly associated with depression, but was an independent predictor of BDNF level as well (b= -0.50; p=0.01). LTM was associated only with a good KPS (b=0.47; p=0.037). Hemoglobin levels and the prior number of chemotherapy lines were not predictive of memory performance. Low BDNF is associated with cognitive impairment, STM, in patients with cancer, however no influence on depression could be found. IL-6 is strongly associated with depression and an independent predictor of BDNF levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Maternal obesity alters brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling in the placenta in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Calais S; Maloyan, Alina; Myatt, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a major clinical problem in obstetrics being associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and fetal programming. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a validated miR-210 target, is necessary for placental development, fetal growth, glucose metabolism, and energy homeostasis. Plasma BDNF levels are reduced in obese individuals; however, placental BDNF has yet to be studied in the context of maternal obesity. In this study, we investigated the effect of maternal obesity and sexual dimorphism on placental BDNF signaling. BDNF signaling was measured in placentas from lean (pre-pregnancy BMI 30) women at term without medical complications that delivered via cesarean section without labor. MiRNA-210, BDNF mRNA, proBDNF, and mature BDNF were measured by RT - PCR, ELISA, and Western blot. Downstream signaling via TRKB (BDNF receptor) was measured using Western blot. Maternal obesity was associated with increased miRNA-210 and decreased BDNF mRNA in placentas from female fetuses, and decreased proBDNF in placentas from male fetuses. We also identified decreased mature BDNF in placentas from male fetuses when compared to female fetuses. Mir-210 expression was negatively correlated with mature BDNF protein. TRKB phosphorylated at tyrosine 817, not tyrosine 515, was increased in placentas from obese women. Maternal obesity was associated with increased phosphorylation of MAPK p38 in placentas from male fetuses, but not phosphorylation of ERK p42/44. BDNF regulation is complex and highly regulated. Pre-pregnancy/early maternal obesity adversely affects BDNF/TRKB signaling in the placenta in a sexually dimorphic manner. These data collectively suggest that induction of placental TRKB signaling could ameliorate the placental OB phenotype, thus improving perinatal outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Prenatal lead exposure related to cord blood brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and impaired neonatal neurobehavioral development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, L H; Mu, X Y; Chen, H Y; Yang, H L; Qi, W

    2016-06-01

    To explore the relationship between umbilical cord blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neonatal neurobehavioral development in lead exposure infants. All infants and their mother were randomly selected during 2011 to 2012, subjects were selected according to the umbilical cord blood lead concentrations, which contcentration of lead was higher than 0.48 μmol/L were taken into high lead exposure group, about 60 subjects included. Comparing to the high lead exposure group, according to gender, weight, pregnant week, length and head circumferenece, the level of cord blood lead concentration under 0.48 μmol/L were taken into control group, 60 cases included. Lead content was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Neonatal behavioral neurological assessment (NBNA) was used to determine the development of neonatal neuronal behavior. The content of BDNF was detected by ELISA. Comparing the BDNF and the NBNA score between two groups, and linear correlation was given on analysis the correlation between lead concentration in cord blood and BDNF, BDNF and the NBNA score. Lead content in high exposure group was (0.613±0.139) μmol/L, and higher than (0.336±0.142) μmol/L in low exposure group (t=3.21, PBDNF content in high exposure group which was (3.538±1.203) ng/ml was higher than low exposure group (2.464±0.918) ng/ml (t=7.60, PBDNF content was negatively correlated with NBNA summary score, passive muscle tension and active muscle tone score (r was -0.27, -0.29, -0.30, respectively, P values were BDNF was negatively correlated with neonatal neurodevelopment, may serve as a useful biomarker.

  14. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in TBI-related mortality: Interrelationships between Genetics and Acute Systemic and CNS BDNF Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, Michelle D.; Conley, Yvette P.; Wagner, Amy K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults have higher mortality rates after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared to younger adults. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling is altered in aging and is important to TBI given its role in neuronal survival/plasticity and autonomic function. Following experimental TBI, acute BDNF administration has not been efficacious. Clinically, genetic variation in BDNF (reduced signaling alleles: rs6265, Met-carriers; rs7124442, C-carriers) were protective in acute mortality. Post-acutely, these genotypes carried lower mortality risk in older adults, and greater mortality risk among younger adults. Objective Investigate BDNF levels in mortality/outcome following severe TBI in the context of age and genetic risk. Methods CSF and serum BDNF were assessed prospectively during the first week following severe TBI (n=203), and in controls (n=10). Age, BDNF genotype, and BDNF levels were assessed as mortality/outcome predictors. Results CSF BDNF levels tended to be higher post-TBI (p=0.061) versus controls and were associated with time until death (p=0.042). In contrast, serum BDNF levels were reduced post-TBI versus controls (pBDNF serum and gene*age interactions were mortality predictors post-TBI in the same multivariate model. CSF and serum BDNF tended to be negatively correlated post-TBI (p=0.07). Conclusions BDNF levels predicted mortality, in addition to gene*age interactions, suggesting levels capture additional mortality risk. Higher CSF BDNF post-TBI may be detrimental due to injury and age-related increases in pro-apoptotic BDNF target receptors. Negative CSF and serum BDNF correlations post-TBI suggest blood-brain barrier transit alterations. Understanding BDNF signaling in neuronal survival, plasticity, and autonomic function may inform treatment. PMID:25979196

  15. Remission of depression following electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is associated with higher levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Thiago Fernando Vasconcelos; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; da Rocha, Neusa Sica

    2016-03-01

    Research on the association between electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels has produced conflicting result. There have been few studies which have evaluated BDNF levels in clinical contexts where there was remission following treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate whether remission of depression following ECT is associated with changes in BDNF levels. Adult inpatients in a psychiatric unit were invited to participate in this naturalistic study. Diagnoses were made using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and symptoms were evaluated at admission and discharge using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS-17). Thirty-one patients who received a diagnosis of depression and were subjected to ECT were included retrospectively. Clinical remission was defined as a score of less than eight on the HDRS-17 at discharge. Serum BDNF levels were measured in blood samples collected at admission and discharge with a commercial kit used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Subjects HDRS-17 scores improved following ECT (t = 13.29; p = 0.00). A generalized estimating equation (GEE) model revealed a remission × time interaction with BDNF levels as a dependent variable in a Wald chi-square test [Wald χ(2) = 5.98; p = 0.01]. A post hoc Bonferroni test revealed that non-remitters had lower BDNF levels at admission than remitters (p = 0.03), but there was no difference at discharge (p = 0.16). ECT remitters had higher serum BDNF levels at admission and the level did not vary during treatment. ECT non-remitters had lower serum BDNF levels at admission, but levels increased during treatment and were similar to those of ECT remitters at discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism affects sympathetic tone in a gender-specific way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An; Chen, Tien-Yu; Fang, Wen-Hui; Huang, San-Yuan

    2014-09-01

    The Val/Val genotype of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphism (Val66Met) has been reported to affect human anxiety-related phenotypes. Substantial research has demonstrated that anxiety is associated with sympathetic activation, while sex steroid hormones have been shown to exert differential actions in regulating BDNF expression. Thus, we examined whether the BDNF variant modulates autonomic function in a gender-dependent manner. From 708 adults initially screened for medical and psychiatric illnesses, a final cohort of 583 drug-free healthy Han Chinese (355 males, 228 females; age 34.43±8.42 years) was recruited for BDNF genotyping (Val/Val: 136, 23.3%, Val/Met: 294, 50.4%, and Met/Met: 153, 26.2%). Time- and frequency-domain analyses of heart rate variability (HRV) were used to assess autonomic outflow to the heart. Significant genotype-by-gender interaction effects were found on HRV indices. Even after adjusting for possible confounders, male participants bearing the Val/Val genotype had significant increases in low frequency (LF), LF% and LF/high frequency (HF) ratio, indicating altered sympathovagal balance with increased sympathetic modulation, compared to male Met/Met homozygotes. Females, however, showed an opposite but non-significant pattern. These results suggest that the studied BDNF polymorphism is associated with sympathetic control in a gender-specific way. The findings here support the view that male subjects with the Val/Val genotype have increased risk of anxiety by association with sympathetic activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

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    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations.

  18. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in depressed patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysokiński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) are neurotrophins-proteins that induce the survival, development, and function of neurons. Their role in the development of schizophrenia and mood disorders is widely studied. This study was aimed to determine whether depression affects levels of BDNF and NT-3 in patients with schizophrenia. Data for 53 Caucasian adult hospitalized patients with chronic paranoid schizophrenia was compared with 27 healthy subjects. Clinical symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and positive, negative and general sub-scores, the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and the Clinical Global Impressions scale (CGI). Patients were defined as depressed (SHZ-DEP) with scores CDSS > 6 and HDRS > 7, otherwise they were included into the non-depressed group (SHZ-nonDEP). In total, 17 patients (32.1%) with schizophrenia met criteria for depression. SHZ-DEP patients had higher scores in HDRS, CDSS, PANSS total, PANSS negative, PANSS general and CGI (p BDNF or NT-3 levels between patients with schizophrenia and controls. BDNF levels were lower in SHZ-DEP compared to SHZ-nonDEP: 18.82 ± 5.95 versus 22.10 ± 5.31 ng/mL, p = 0.045. NT-3 levels were higher in SHZ-DEP compared to SHZ-nonDEP: 133.31 ± 222.19 versus 56.04 ± 201.28 pg/mL, p = 0.033. There were no differences in neurotrophin levels between patients with schizophrenia and controls. We found lower BDNF and higher NT-3 serum levels in depressed patients with schizophrenia.

  19. Effect of dietary fat and the circadian clock on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzer, Yoni; Dadon, Maayan; Burg, Chen; Chapnik, Nava; Froy, Oren

    2016-07-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most abundant neurotrophin in the brain and its decreased levels are associated with the development of obesity and neurodegeneration. Our aim was to test the effect of dietary fat, its timing and the circadian clock on the expression of BDNF and associated signaling pathways in mouse brain and liver. Bdnf mRNA oscillated robustly in brain and liver, but with a 12-h shift between the tissues. Brain and liver Bdnf mRNA showed a 12-h phase shift when fed ketogenic diet (KD) compared with high-fat diet (HFD) or low-fat diet (LFD). Brain or liver Bdnf mRNA did not show the typical phase advance usually seen under time-restricted feeding (RF). Clock knockdown in HT-4 hippocampal neurons led to 86% up-regulation of Bdnf mRNA, whereas it led to 60% down-regulation in AML-12 hepatocytes. Dietary fat in mice or cultured hepatocytes and hippocampal neurons led to increased Bdnf mRNA expression. At the protein level, HFD increased the ratio of the mature BDNF protein (mBDNF) to its precursor (proBDNF). In the liver, RF under LFD or HFD reduced the mBDNF/proBDNF ratio. In the brain, the two signaling pathways related to BDNF, mTOR and AMPK, showed reduced and increased levels, respectively, under timed HFD. In the liver, the reverse was achieved. In summary, Bdnf expression is mediated by the circadian clock and dietary fat. Although RF does not affect its expression phase, in the brain, when combined with high-fat diet, it leads to a unique metabolic state in which AMPK is activated, mTOR is down-regulated and the levels of mBDNF are high. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor plasma levels are increased in older women after an acute episode of low back pain.

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    Diz, Juliano Bergamaschine Mata; de Souza Moreira, Bruno; Felício, Diogo Carvalho; Teixeira, Luiza Faria; de Jesus-Moraleida, Fabianna Resende; de Queiroz, Bárbara Zille; Pereira, Daniele Sirineu; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo

    2017-07-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a growing public health problem in old age, and it is associated with disabling pain and depressive disorders. We compared brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plasma levels, a key neurotrophin in pain modulation, between older women after an acute episode of LBP and age-matched pain-free controls, and investigated potential differences in BDNF levels between controls and LBP subgroups based on pain severity, presence of depressive symptoms and use of analgesic and antidepressant drugs. A total of 221 participants (154 with LBP and 67 pain-free) were studied. A comprehensive assessment of sociodemographic and clinical variables was conducted including pain severity (11-point NRS), depressive symptoms (GDS-15), age, body mass index, physical activity and total number of comorbidities and medications in use. BDNF levels in LBP group were significantly higher than controls (7515.9±3021.2; Md=7116.0 vs 6331.8±3364.0; Md=5897.5pg/mL, P=0.005). LBP subgroups exhibited higher BDNF levels than controls, regardless of pain severity, presence of depressive symptoms and use of analgesic drugs. BDNF levels were significantly higher in LBP subgroup without use of antidepressant drugs compared to both controls and LBP subgroup with use of antidepressant drugs. This study provides evidence that older women with acute low back pain exhibit higher BDNF plasma levels compared to pain-free controls. Subgroup comparisons suggest that use of pain-relief drugs may influence BDNF levels. The study results offer a novel target for research on mechanisms of back pain in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a biomarker in bipolar disorder: a meta-analysis of 52 studies.

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    Fernandes, Brisa S; Molendijk, Marc L; Köhler, Cristiano A; Soares, Jair C; Leite, Cláudio Manuel G S; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Thamara L; Silva, Jéssica C; Sales, Paulo M G; Quevedo, João; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana; Berk, Michael; Carvalho, André F

    2015-11-30

    The neurotrophic hypothesis postulates that mood disorders such as bipolar disorder (BD) are associated with a lower expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, its role in peripheral blood as a biomarker of disease activity and of stage for BD, transcending pathophysiology, is still disputed. In the last few years an increasing number of clinical studies assessing BDNF in serum and plasma have been published. Therefore, it is now possible to analyse the association between BDNF levels and the severity of affective symptoms in BD as well as the effects of acute drug treatment of mood episodes on BDNF levels. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies on serum and plasma BDNF levels in bipolar disorder. Through a series of meta-analyses including a total of 52 studies with 6,481 participants, we show that, compared to healthy controls, peripheral BDNF levels are reduced to the same extent in manic (Hedges' g = -0.57, P = 0.010) and depressive (Hedges' g = -0.93, P = 0.001) episodes, while BDNF levels are not significantly altered in euthymia. In meta-regression analyses, BDNF levels additionally negatively correlate with the severity of both manic and depressive symptoms. We found no evidence for a significant impact of illness duration on BDNF levels. In addition, in plasma, but not serum, peripheral BDNF levels increase after the successful treatment of an acute mania episode, but not of a depressive one. In summary, our data suggest that peripheral BDNF levels, more clearly in plasma than in serum, is a potential biomarker of disease activity in BD, but not a biomarker of stage. We suggest that peripheral BDNF may, in future, be used as a part of a blood protein composite measure to assess disease activity in BD.

  2. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism with early-onset bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassan, Malik; Croarkin, Paul E; Luby, Joan L; Veldic, Marin; Joshi, Paramjit T; McElroy, Susan L; Post, Robert M; Walkup, John T; Cercy, Kelly; Geske, Jennifer R; Wagner, Karen D; Cuellar-Barboza, Alfredo B; Casuto, Leah; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schalling, Martin; Jensen, Peter S; Biernacka, Joanna M; Frye, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met (rs6265) functional polymorphism has been implicated in early-onset bipolar disorder. However, results of studies are inconsistent. We aimed to further explore this association. DNA samples from the Treatment of Early Age Mania (TEAM) and Mayo Clinic Bipolar Disorder Biobank were investigated for association of rs6265 with early-onset bipolar disorder. Bipolar cases were classified as early onset if the first manic or depressive episode occurred at age ≤19 years (versus adult-onset cases at age >19 years). After quality control, 69 TEAM early-onset bipolar disorder cases, 725 Mayo Clinic bipolar disorder cases (including 189 early-onset cases), and 764 controls were included in the analysis of association, assessed with logistic regression assuming log-additive allele effects. Comparison of TEAM cases with controls suggested association of early-onset bipolar disorder with the rs6265 minor allele [odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, p = 0.04]. Although comparison of early-onset adult bipolar disorder cases from the Mayo Clinic versus controls was not statistically significant, the OR estimate indicated the same direction of effect (OR = 1.21, p = 0.19). When the early-onset TEAM and Mayo Clinic early-onset adult groups were combined and compared with the control group, the association of the minor allele rs6265 was statistically significant (OR = 1.30, p = 0.04). These preliminary analyses of a relatively small sample with early-onset bipolar disorder are suggestive that functional variation in BDNF is implicated in bipolar disorder risk and may have a more significant role in early-onset expression of the disorder. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A functional brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant increases the risk of moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Quek, Jia Min; Lee, Bernett; Au, Bijin; Sio, Yang Yie; Irwanto, Astrid; Schurmann, Claudia; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Suri, Bani Kaur; Matta, Sri Anusha; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Esko, Tonu; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Larbi, Anis; Xu, Xin; Poidinger, Michael; Liu, Jianjun; Chew, Fook Tim; Rotzschke, Olaf; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secretory protein that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic asthma, and eczema, but it is currently unknown whether BDNF polymorphisms influence susceptibility to moderate-to-severe AR. We sought to identify disease associations and the functional effect of BDNF genetic variants in patients with moderate-to-severe AR. Tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the BDNF gene were selected from the human HapMap Han Chinese from Beijing (CHB) data set, and associations with moderate-to-severe AR were assessed in 2 independent cohorts of Chinese patients (2216 from Shandong province and 1239 living in Singapore). The functional effects of the BDNF genetic variants were determined by using both in vitro and ex vivo assays. The tagging SNP rs10767664 was significantly associated with the risk of moderate-to-severe AR in both Singapore Chinese (P = .0017; odds ratio, 1.324) and Shandong Chinese populations (P = .039; odds ratio, 1.180). The coding nonsynonymous SNP rs6265 was in perfect linkage with rs10767664 and conferred increased BDNF protein secretion by a human cell line in vitro. Subjects bearing the AA genotype of rs10767664 exhibited increased risk of moderate-to-severe AR and displayed increased BDNF protein and total IgE levels in plasma. Using a large-scale expression quantitative trait locus study, we demonstrated that BDNF SNPs are significantly associated with altered BDNF concentrations in peripheral blood. A common genetic variant of the BDNF gene is associated with increased risk of moderate-to-severe AR, and the AA genotype is associated with increased BDNF mRNA levels in peripheral blood. Together, these data indicate that functional BDNF gene variants increase the risk of moderate-to-severe AR. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor improves proliferation of endometrial epithelial cells by inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress during early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Whasun; Bae, Hyocheol; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2017-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family binds to two transmembrane receptors; neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (NTRK2) with high affinity and p75 with low affinity. Although BDNF-NTRK2 signaling in the central nervous system is known, signaling in the female reproductive system is unknown. Therefore, we determined effects of BDNF on porcine endometrial luminal epithelial (pLE) cells isolated from Day 12 of pregnancy, as well as expression of BDNF and NTRK2 in endometria of cyclic and pregnant pigs. BDNF-NTRK2 genes were expressed in uterine glandular (GE) and luminal (LE) epithelia during early pregnancy. In addition, their expression in uterine GE and LE decreased with increasing parity of sows. Recombinant BDNF increased proliferation in pLE cells in a dose-dependent, as well as expression of PCNA and Cyclin D1 in nuclei of pLE cells. BDNF also activated phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K, S6, ERK1/2, JNK, P38 proteins in pLE cells. In addition, cell death resulting from tunicamycin-induced ER stress was prevented when pLE cells were treated with the combination of tunicamycin and BDNF which also decreased cells in the Sub-G 1 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response genes were mostly down-regulated to the basal levels as compared to non-treated pLE cells. Our finding suggests that BDNF acts via NTRK2 to induce development of pLE cells for maintenance of implantation and pregnancy by activating cell signaling via the PI3K and MAPK pathways and by inhibiting ER stress. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor exon IV transcription through calcium responsive elements in cortical neurons.

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    Fei Zheng

    Full Text Available Activity-dependent transcription of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been studied as an important model to elucidate the mechanisms underlying numerous aspects of neuroplasticity. It has been extensively emphasized that Ca(2+ influx through different routes may have significantly different effects on BDNF transcription. Here, we examined the regulatory property of the major calcium responsive elements (CaRE in BDNF promoter IV in cultured rat cortical neurons. BDNF promoter IV, as well as CaRE1 and CaRE3, was significantly activated by Ca(2+ influx through L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (L-VGCC or NMDA receptor (NMDAR. However, the L-VGCC- and NMDAR-mediated activation of CaRE was differentially regulated by different Ca(2+-stimulated protein kinases. Specifically, PKA, CaMKI, and CaMKIV activity were required for L-VGCC-, but not NMDAR-mediated CaRE1 activation. CaMKI activity was required for NMDAR- but not L-VGCC-mediated CaRE3 activation. Surprisingly, the activation of CaRF, a previously identified transcription factor for CaRE1, was stimulated via L-VGCC but not NMDAR, and required MEK, PI3K and CaMKII activity. These results suggest a new working model that activity-dependent BDNF IV up-regulation may be coordinately mediated by CaRE1 and CaRE3 activity, which show different responses to Ca(2+-stimulated kinases. Our data also explain how the individual cis-element in BDNF promoter is distinctively coupled to different Ca(2+ routes.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling plays a role in resilience to stress promoted by isoquinoline in defeated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesarico, Ana Paula; Rosa, Suzan G; Martini, Franciele; Goulart, Tales A; Zeni, Gilson; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2017-11-01

    Certain stressful life events have been associated with the onset of depression. This study aims to investigate if 7-fluoro-1,3-diphenylisoquinoline-1-amine (FDPI) is effective against social avoidance induced by social defeat stress model in mice. Furthermore, it was investigated the effects of FDPI in the mouse prefrontal cortical plasticity-related proteins and some parameters of toxicity. Adult Swiss mice were subjected to social defeat stress for 10 days. Two protocols with FDPI were carried out: 1- FDPI (25 mg/kg, intragastric) was administered to mice 24 h after the last social defeat stress episode; 2- FDPI (1-25 mg/kg, intragastric) was administered to mice once a day for 10 days concomitant with the social defeat stress. The mice performed social avoidance and locomotor tests. The prefrontal cortical protein contents of kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF), p75NTR, neuronal nuclear protein (NeuN) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were determined in mice. A single administration of FDPI (25 mg/kg) partially protected against social avoidance induced by stress in mice. Repeated administration of FDPI (25 mg/kg) protected against social avoidance induced by stress in mice. Social defeat stress decreased the protein contents of p75NTR, NeuN and the pERK/ERK ratio but increased those of proBDNF and the pCREB/CREB ratio, without changing that of NF-κB. Repeated administration of FDPI modulated signaling pathways altered by social defeat stress in mice. The present findings demonstrate that FDPI promoted resilience to stress in mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Promotes Functional Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury via Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liu-Lin; Hu, Yue; Zhang, Piao; Zhang, Zhuo; Li, Li-Hong; Gao, Guo-Dong; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2017-04-18

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces cognitive impairments, motor and behavioral deficits. Previous evidences have suggested that neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation could facilitate functional recovery from brain insults, but their underlying mechanisms remains to be elucidated. Here, we established TBI model by an electromagnetic-controlled cortical impact device in the rats. Then, 5 μl NSCs (5.0 × 10 5 /μl), derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mouse, was transplanted into the traumatic brain regions of rats at 24 h after injury. After differentiation of the NSCs was determined using immunohistochemistry, neurological severity scores (NSS) and rotarod test were conducted to detect the neurological behavior. Western blot and RT-PCR as well as ELASA were used to evaluate the expression of synaptophysin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In order to elucidate the role of BDNF on the neural recovery after NSC transplantation, BDNF knockdown in NSC was performed and transplanted into the rats with TBI, and potential mechanism for BDNF knockdown in the NSC was analyzed using microassay analysis. Meanwhile, BDNF antibody blockade was conducted to further confirm the effect of BDNF on neural activity. As a result, an increasing neurological function improvement was seen in NSC transplanted rats, which was associated with the upregulation of synaptophysin and BDNF expression. Moreover, transplantation of BDNF knockdown NSCs and BDNF antibody block reduced not only the level of synaptophysin but also exacerbated neurological function deficits. Microassay analysis showed that 14 genes such as Wnt and Gsk3-β were downregulated after BDNF knockdown. The present data therefore showed that BDNF-mediated neuroplasticity underlie the mechanism of NSC transplantation for the treatment of TBI in adult rats.

  8. Hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates recovery from chronic stress-induced spatial reference memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, J Bryce; Mathewson, Coy M; Hoffman, Ann N; Hanavan, Paul D; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Conrad, Cheryl D

    2014-11-01

    Chronic restraint stress impairs hippocampal-mediated spatial learning and memory, which improves following a post-stress recovery period. Here, we investigated whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein important for hippocampal function, would alter the recovery from chronic stress-induced spatial memory deficits. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused into the dorsal hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA)3 region with an adeno-associated viral vector containing the sequence for a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed against BDNF or a scrambled sequence (Scr). Rats were then chronically restrained (wire mesh, 6 h/day for 21 days) and assessed for spatial learning and memory using a radial arm water maze (RAWM) either immediately after stressor cessation (Str-Imm) or following a 21-day post-stress recovery period (Str-Rec). All groups learned the RAWM task similarly, but differed on the memory retention trials. Rats in the Str-Imm group, regardless of adeno-associated viral contents, committed more errors in the spatial reference memory domain on the single retention trial during day 3 than did the non-stressed controls. Importantly, the typical improvement in spatial memory following the recovery from chronic stress was blocked with the shRNA against BDNF, as Str-Rec-shRNA performed worse on the RAWM compared with the non-stressed controls or Str-Rec-Scr. The stress effects were specific for the reference memory domain, but knockdown of hippocampal BDNF in unstressed controls briefly disrupted spatial working memory as measured by repeated entry errors on day 2 of training. These results demonstrated that hippocampal BDNF was necessary for the recovery from stress-induced hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits in the reference memory domain. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Short-term striatal gene expression responses to brain-derived neurotrophic factor are dependent on MEK and ERK activation.

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    Ozgun Gokce

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is believed to be an important regulator of striatal neuron survival, differentiation, and plasticity. Moreover, reduction of BDNF delivery to the striatum has been implicated in the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease. Nevertheless, many essential aspects of BDNF responses in striatal neurons remain to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we assessed the relative contributions of multipartite intracellular signaling pathways to the short-term induction of striatal gene expression by BDNF. To identify genes regulated by BDNF in these GABAergic cells, we first used DNA microarrays to quantify their transcriptomic responses following 3 h of BDNF exposure. The signal transduction pathways underlying gene induction were subsequently dissected using pharmacological agents and quantitative real-time PCR. Gene expression responses to BDNF were abolished by inhibitors of TrkB (K252a and calcium (chelator BAPTA-AM and transient receptor potential cation channel [TRPC] antagonist SKF-96365. Interestingly, inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1 and 2 (MEK1/2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase ERK also blocked the BDNF-mediated induction of all tested BDNF-responsive genes. In contrast, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS, phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K, and CAMK exhibited less prevalent, gene-specific effects on BDNF-induced RNA expression. At the nuclear level, the activation of both Elk-1 and CREB showed MEK dependence. Importantly, MEK-dependent activation of transcription was shown to be required for BDNF-induced striatal neurite outgrowth, providing evidence for its contribution to striatal neuron plasticity. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that the MEK/ERK pathway is a major mediator of neuronal plasticity and other important BDNF-dependent striatal functions that are fulfilled through the positive regulation of gene expression.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases vascular endothelial growth factor expression and enhances angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Yang; Hung, Shih-Ya; Chen, Hsien-Te; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Fong, Yi-Chin; Wang, Shih-Wei; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2014-10-15

    Chondrosarcomas are a type of primary malignant bone cancer, with a potent capacity for local invasion and distant metastasis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is commonly upregulated during neurogenesis. The aim of the present study was to examine the mechanism involved in BDNF-mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and angiogenesis in human chondrosarcoma cells. Here, we knocked down BDNF expression in chondrosarcoma cells and assessed their capacity to control VEGF expression and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We found knockdown of BDNF decreased VEGF expression and abolished chondrosarcoma conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis effects in vivo in the chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel plug nude mouse models. In addition, in the xenograft tumor angiogenesis model, the knockdown of BDNF significantly reduced tumor growth and tumor-associated angiogenesis. BDNF increased VEGF expression and angiogenesis through the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α signaling pathway. Finally, we analyzed samples from chondrosarcoma patients by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of BDNF and VEGF protein in 56 chondrosarcoma patients was significantly higher than in normal cartilage. In addition, the high level of BDNF expression correlated strongly with VEGF expression and tumor stage. Taken together, our results indicate that BDNF increases VEGF expression and enhances angiogenesis through a signal transduction pathway that involves the TrkB receptor, PLCγ, PKCα, and the HIF-1α. Therefore, BDNF may represent a novel target for anti-angiogenic therapy for human chondrosarcoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multimodal physical activity increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and improves cognition in institutionalized older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedovelli, Kelem; Giacobbo, Bruno Lima; Corrêa, Márcio Silveira; Wieck, Andréa; Argimon, Irani Iracema de Lima; Bromberg, Elke

    2017-07-13

    Physical activity has been proposed as a promising intervention to improve cognition and decrease the risk of dementia in older adults. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to mediate, at least partially, these effects of exercise. However, intervention studies of the effects of multimodal exercises on cognition and BDNF levels are scarce and composed by small samples. Thus, the generalization of the conclusions of these studies depends on the reproducibility of the results. In order to contribute to the knowledge on the field, the present study evaluated the effects of a physical activity intervention composed by muscle strengthening and aerobic conditioning on BDNF levels and cognition in older women. Independent and non-demented subjects (≥75 years) were assigned to a 3-month physical activity intervention (n = 22, 60 min exercise sessions three times a week) or to a control condition (n = 10, no exercise). Clinical (anxiety and depression symptoms), neuropsychological (Digit Span, Stroop, Trail Making, and Contextual Memory tests), physical (upper and lower limb strength, aerobic conditioning), and physiological (serum BDNF) parameters were evaluated immediately before, 1 month, and 3 months after starting intervention. Results indicated that controls had stable levels for all measured variables, whereas the intervention group improved on physical fitness, depressive symptoms, cognitive performance, and BDNF levels. Moreover, a linear regression identified an association between aerobic conditioning and BDNF levels. In conclusion, combined muscle strengthening and aerobic conditioning was able to improve cognitive performance and increase BDNF levels. Aerobic conditioning seems to be an important mediator of these outcomes.

  12. Role of Serum Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Central N-Acetylaspartate for Clinical Response under Antidepressive Pharmacotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Nase

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The predictive therapeutic value of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its changes associated with the use of specific antidepressants are still unclear. In this study, we examined BDNF as a peripheral and NAA as a central biomarker over the time course of antidepressant treatment to specify both of their roles in the response to the medication and clinical outcome. Methods: We examined serum BDNF (ELISA kit in a sample of 76 (47 female and 29 male depressed patients in a naturalistic setting. BDNF was assessed before medication and subsequently after two, four and six weeks of antidepressant treatment. Additionally, in fifteen patients, N-acetylaspartate (NAA was measured in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. Over a time course of six weeks BDNF and NAA were also examined in a group of 41 healthy controls. Results: We found significant lower serum BDNF concentrations in depressed patients compared to the sample of healthy volunteers before and after medication. BDNF and clinical symptoms decreased significantly in the patients over the time course of antidepressant treatment. Serum BDNF levels at baseline predicted the symptom outcome after eight weeks. Specifically, responders and remitters had lower serum BDNF at baseline than the nonresponders and nonremitters. NAA was slightly decreased but not significantly lower in depressed patients when compared with healthy controls. During treatment period, NAA showed a tendency to increase. Limitations: A relative high drop-out rate and possibly, a suboptimal observation period for BDNF. Conclusion: Our data confirm serum BDNF as a biomarker of depression with a possible role in response prediction. However, our findings argue against serum BDNF increase being a prerequisite to depressive symptom reduction.

  13. Decreased peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis study (N=7277).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, X-Y; Cao, C; Cawley, N X; Liu, T-T; Yuan, J; Loh, Y P; Cheng, Y

    2017-02-01

    Studies suggest that dysfunction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a possible contributor to the pathology and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several studies report reduced peripheral blood levels of BDNF in AD, but findings are inconsistent. This study sought to quantitatively summarize the clinical BDNF data in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI, a prodromal stage of AD) with a meta-analytical technique. A systematic search of Pubmed, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library identified 29 articles for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Random-effects meta-analysis showed that patients with AD had significantly decreased baseline peripheral blood levels of BDNF compared with healthy control (HC) subjects (24 studies, Hedges' g=-0.339, 95% confidence interval (CI)=-0.572 to -0.106, P=0.004). MCI subjects showed a trend for decreased BDNF levels compared with HC subjects (14 studies, Hedges' g=-0.201, 95% CI=-0.413 to 0.010, P=0.062). No differences were found between AD and MCI subjects in BDNF levels (11 studies, Hedges' g=0.058, 95% CI=-0.120 to 0.236, P=0.522). Interestingly, the effective sizes and statistical significance improved after excluding studies with reported medication in patients (between AD and HC: 18 studies, Hedges' g=-0.492, P<0.001; between MCI and HC: 11 studies, Hedges' g=-0.339, P=0.003). These results strengthen the clinical evidence that AD or MCI is accompanied by reduced peripheral blood BDNF levels, supporting an association between the decreasing levels of BDNF and the progression of AD.

  14. Relationship between Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Metabolic Parameters in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Boyuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Studies have suggested that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF plays a role in glucose and lipid metabolism and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum BDNF levels and various metabolic parameters and inflammatory markers in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Materials and Methods. The study included 88 T2DM patients and 33 healthy controls. Fasting blood samples were obtained from the patients and the control group. The serum levels of BDNF were measured with an ELISA kit. The current paper introduces a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC generalization curve to identify cut-off for the BDNF values in type 2 diabetes patients. Results. The serum levels of BDNF were significantly higher in T2DM patients than in the healthy controls (206.81 ± 107.32 pg/mL versus 130.84 ± 59.81 pg/mL; P<0.001. They showed a positive correlation with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (r=0.28; P<0.05, the triglyceride level (r=0.265; P<0.05, and white blood cell (WBC count (r=0.35; P<0.001. In logistic regression analysis, age (P<0.05, body mass index (BMI (P<0.05, C-reactive protein (CRP (P<0.05, and BDNF (P<0.01 were independently associated with T2DM. In ROC curve analysis, BDNF cut-off was 137. Conclusion. The serum BDNF level was higher in patients with T2DM. The BDNF had a cut-off value of 137. The findings suggest that BDNF may contribute to glucose and lipid metabolism and inflammation.

  15. The Homeostatic Regulation of REM Sleep: A role for Localized Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Brainstem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Knapp, Clifford M.; Koul-Tiwari, Richa; Barnes, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation of REM sleep plays a key role in neural plasticity and deficits in this process are implicated in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this homeostatic regulation process. This study examined the hypothesis that, during selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD), increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in REM sleep regulating areas is critical for the development of homeostatic drive for REM sleep, as measured by an increase in the number of REM sleep transitions. Rats were assigned to RSD, non-sleep deprived (BSL), or total sleep deprivation (TSD) groups. Physiological recordings were obtained from cortical, hippocampal, and pontine EEG electrodes over a 6-hour period, in which sleep deprivation occurred during the first 3 hours. In the RSD, but not the other conditions, homeostatic drive for REM sleep increased progressively. BDNF protein expression was significantly greater in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) in the RSD as compared to the TSD and BSL groups, areas that regulate REM sleep, but not in the medial preoptic area, which regulates non-REM sleep. There was a significant positive correlation between RSD-induced increases in number of REM sleep episodes and increased BDNF expression in the PPT and SubCD. These increases positively correlated with levels of homeostatic drive for REM sleep. These results, for the first time, suggest that selective RSD-induced increased expression of BDNF in the PPT and SubCD are determinant factors in the development of the homeostatic drive for REM sleep. PMID:26146031

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes adaptive plasticity within the spinal cord and mediates the beneficial effects of controllable stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huie, J R; Garraway, S M; Baumbauer, K M; Hoy, K C; Beas, B S; Montgomery, K S; Bizon, J L; Grau, J W

    2012-01-03

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been characterized as a potent modulator of neural plasticity in both the brain and spinal cord. The present experiments use an in vivo model system to demonstrate that training with controllable stimulation increases spinal BDNF expression and engages a BDNF-dependent process that promotes adaptive plasticity. Spinally transected rats administered legshock whenever one hind limb is extended (controllable stimulation) exhibit a progressive increase in flexion duration. This simple form of response-outcome (instrumental) learning is not observed when shock is given independent of leg position (uncontrollable stimulation). Uncontrollable electrical stimulation also induces a lasting effect that impairs learning for up to 48 h. Training with controllable shock can counter the adverse consequences of uncontrollable stimulation, to both prevent and reverse the learning deficit. Here it is shown that the protective and restorative effect of instrumental training depends on BDNF. Cellular assays showed that controllable stimulation increased BDNF mRNA expression and protein within the lumbar spinal cord. These changes were associated with an increase in the BDNF receptor TrkB protein within the dorsal horn. Evidence is then presented that these changes play a functional role in vivo. Application of a BDNF inhibitor (TrkB-IgG) blocked the protective effect of instrumental training. Direct (intrathecal) application of BDNF substituted for instrumental training to block both the induction and expression of the learning deficit. Uncontrollable stimulation also induced an increase in mechanical reactivity (allodynia), and this too was prevented by BDNF. TrkB-IgG blocked the restorative effect of instrumental training and intrathecal BDNF substituted for training to reverse the deficit. Taken together, these findings outline a critical role for BDNF in mediating the beneficial effects of controllable stimulation on spinal plasticity

  17. Nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and their high-affinity receptors are overexpressed in extramammary Paget's disease.

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    Qian, Yue; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Chen, Shan-Juan; Dugu, Long; Tsuji, Gaku; Xie, Lining; Nakahara, Takeshi; Moroi, Yoichi; Tu, Ya-Ting; Furue, Masutaka

    2010-11-01

    Neurotrophin (NT) systems appear to play important roles in the pathogenesis of several tumors, but their expression in extramammary Paget's disease (EPD) has not been investigated. Thirty-four paraffin-embedded EPD specimens (32 primary EPD and 2 metastatic to lymph nodes) were subject to immunohistochemical staining for nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), NT3, NT4, their high-affinity receptors (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC) and the common low-affinity receptor, p75 NT receptor (p75). All 34 EPD specimens, including 2 metastatic to lymph nodes, showed cytoplasmic overexpression of NGF, BDNF, TrkA and TrkB. The expression (% positive cells) of NGF, BDNF, NT3, NT4, TrkA and TrkB (81.6 ± 14.9, 86.0 ± 10.4, 89.6 ± 14.9, 87.8 ± 17.9, 83 ± 14.4 and 86.2 ± 11.7%) in EPD was significantly higher than in normal skin (21.6 ± 6.5, 27.6 ± 4.5, 19.7 ± 10.1, 8.2 ± 10.0, 25.0 ± 5.3 and 25.4 ± 6.4%), and the expression of these factors in invasive EPD was significantly higher than in noninvasive EPD. Interestingly, Paget cells were negative for p75 and TrkC in all the 34 EPD specimens. These results suggest that overexpression of NGF, BDNF and their high-affinity receptors (TrkA and TrkB) might play a role in the pathogenesis of EPD. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Gene therapy with brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a protection: retinal ganglion cells in a rat glaucoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Keith R G; Quigley, Harry A; Zack, Donald J; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hana; Kielczewski, Jennifer; Valenta, Danielle; Baumrind, Lisa; Pease, Mary Ellen; Klein, Ronald L; Hauswirth, William W

    2003-10-01

    To develop a modified adenoassociated viral (AAV) vector capable of efficient transfection of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and to test the hypothesis that use of this vector to express brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could be protective in experimental glaucoma. Ninety-three rats received one unilateral, intravitreal injection of either normal saline (n = 30), AAV-BDNF-woodchuck hepatitis posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE; n = 30), or AAV-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-WPRE (n = 33). Two weeks later, experimental glaucoma was induced in the injected eye by laser application to the trabecular meshwork. Survival of RGCs was estimated by counting axons in optic nerve cross sections after 4 weeks of glaucoma. Transgene expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and direct visualization of GFP. The density of GFP-positive cells in retinal wholemounts was 1,828 +/- 299 cells/mm(2) (72,273 +/- 11,814 cells/retina). Exposure to elevated intraocular pressure was similar in all groups. Four weeks after initial laser treatment, axon loss was 52.3% +/- 27.1% in the saline-treated group (n = 25) and 52.3% +/- 24.2% in the AAV-GFP-WPRE group (n = 30), but only 32.3% +/- 23.0% in the AAV-BDNF-WPRE group (n = 27). Survival in AAV-BDNF-WPRE animals increased markedly and the difference was significant compared with those receiving either AAV-GFP-WPRE (P = 0.002, t-test) or saline (P = 0.006, t-test). Overexpression of the BDNF gene protects RGC as estimated by axon counts in a rat glaucoma model, further supporting the potential feasibility of neurotrophic therapy as a complement to the lowering of IOP in the treatment of glaucoma.

  19. Differential effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 on hindlimb function in paraplegic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Vanessa S; Park, Jihye; Gage, Fred H; Mendell, Lorne M

    2012-01-01

    We compared the effect of viral administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on locomotor recovery in adult rats with complete thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection injuries, in order to determine the effect of chronic neurotrophin expression on spinal plasticity. At the time of injury, BDNF, NT-3 or green fluorescent protein (GFP) (control) was delivered to the lesion via adeno-associated virus (AAV) constructs. AAV-BDNF was significantly more effective than AAV-NT-3 in eliciting locomotion. In fact, AAV-BDNF-treated rats displayed plantar, weight-supported hindlimb stepping on a stationary platform, that is, without the assistance of a moving treadmill and without step training. Rats receiving AAV-NT-3 or AAV-GFP were incapable of hindlimb stepping during this task, despite provision of balance support. AAV-NT-3 treatment did promote the recovery of treadmill-assisted stepping, but this required continuous perineal stimulation. In addition, AAV-BDNF-treated rats were sensitized to noxious heat, whereas AAV-NT-3-treated and AAV-GFP-treated rats were not. Notably, AAV-BDNF-treated rats also developed hindlimb spasticity, detracting from its potential clinical applicability via the current viral delivery method. Intracellular recording from triceps surae motoneurons revealed that AAV-BDNF significantly reduced motoneuron rheobase, suggesting that AAV-BDNF promoted the recovery of over-ground stepping by enhancing neuronal excitability. Elevated nuclear c-Fos expression in interneurons located in the L2 intermediate zone after AAV-BDNF treatment indicated increased activation of interneurons in the vicinity of the locomotor central pattern generator. AAV-NT-3 treatment reduced motoneuron excitability, with little change in c-Fos expression. These results support the potential for BDNF delivery at the lesion site to reorganize locomotor circuits. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of

  20. Alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the mouse hippocampus following acute but not repeated benzodiazepine treatment.

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    Stephanie C Licata

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines (BZs are safe drugs for treating anxiety, sleep, and seizure disorders, but their use also results in unwanted effects including memory impairment, abuse, and dependence. The present study aimed to reveal the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the effects of BZs in the hippocampus (HIP, an area involved in drug-related plasticity, by investigating the regulation of immediate early genes following BZ administration. Previous studies have demonstrated that both brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and c-Fos contribute to memory- and abuse-related processes that occur within the HIP, and their expression is altered in response to BZ exposure. In the current study, mice received acute or repeated administration of BZs and HIP tissue was analyzed for alterations in BDNF and c-Fos expression. Although no significant changes in BDNF or c-Fos were observed in response to twice-daily intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of diazepam (10 mg/kg + 5 mg/kg or zolpidem (ZP; 2.5 mg/kg + 2.5 mg/kg, acute i.p. administration of both triazolam (0.03 mg/kg and ZP (1.0 mg/kg decreased BDNF protein levels within the HIP relative to vehicle, without any effect on c-Fos. ZP specifically reduced exon IV-containing BDNF transcripts with a concomitant increase in the association of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 with BDNF promoter IV, suggesting that MeCP2 activity at this promoter may represent a ZP-specific mechanism for reducing BDNF expression. ZP also increased the association of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB with BDNF promoter I. Future work should examine the interaction between ZP and DNA as the cause for altered gene expression in the HIP, given that BZs can enter the nucleus and intercalate into DNA directly.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as a potential mechanism of the effects of acute exercise on cognitive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T. Piepmeier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that improvements in cognitive performance may be observed following an acute bout of exercise. However, evidence in support of the biological mechanisms of this effect is still limited. Findings from both rodent and human studies suggest brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as a potential mechanism of the effect of acute exercise on memory. The molecular properties of BDNF allow this protein to be assessed in the periphery (pBDNF (i.e., blood serum, blood plasma, making measurements of acute exercise-induced changes in BDNF concentration relatively accessible. Studies exploring the acute exercise–pBDNF–cognitive performance relationship have had mixed findings, but this may be more reflective of methodological differences between studies than it is a statement about the role of BDNF. For example, significant associations have been observed between acute exercise-induced changes in pBDNF concentration and cognitive performance in studies assessing memory, and non-significant associations have been found in studies assessing non-memory cognitive domains. Three suggestions are made for future research aimed at understanding the role of BDNF as a biological mechanism of this relationship: 1 Assessments of cognitive performance may benefit from a focus on various types of memory (e.g., relational, spatial, long-term; 2 More fine-grained measurements of pBDNF will allow for the assessment of concentrations of specific isoforms of the BDNF protein (i.e., immature, mature; 3 Statistical techniques designed to test the mediating role of pBDNF in the acute exercise-cognitive performance relationship should be utilized in order to make causal inferences.

  2. The homeostatic regulation of REM sleep: A role for localized expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Subimal; Knapp, Clifford M; Koul-Tiwari, Richa; Barnes, Abigail

    2015-10-01

    Homeostatic regulation of REM sleep plays a key role in neural plasticity and deficits in this process are implicated in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this homeostatic regulation process. This study examined the hypothesis that, during selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD), increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in REM sleep regulating areas is critical for the development of homeostatic drive for REM sleep, as measured by an increase in the number of REM sleep transitions. Rats were assigned to RSD, non-sleep deprived (BSL), or total sleep deprivation (TSD) groups. Physiological recordings were obtained from cortical, hippocampal, and pontine EEG electrodes over a 6h period, in which sleep deprivation occurred during the first 3h. In the RSD, but not the other conditions, homeostatic drive for REM sleep increased progressively. BDNF protein expression was significantly greater in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) in the RSD as compared to the TSD and BSL groups, areas that regulate REM sleep, but not in the medial preoptic area, which regulates non-REM sleep. There was a significant positive correlation between RSD-induced increases in number of REM sleep episodes and increased BDNF expression in the PPT and SubCD. These increases positively correlated with levels of homeostatic drive for REM sleep. These results, for the first time, suggest that selective RSD-induced increased expression of BDNF in the PPT and SubCD are determinant factors in the development of the homeostatic drive for REM sleep. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Brain derived neurotrophic factor and cognitive status: the delicate balance among people living with HIV, with and without alcohol abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez-Burbano, Maria Jose; Espinoza, Luis; Whitehead, Nicole Ennis; Bryant, Vaughn E; Vargas, Mayra; Cook, Robert L; Quiros, Clery; Lewis, John E; Deshratan, Asthana

    2014-01-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral therapy(cART) has lead to a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV(PLWH). However, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) still remain a significant problem. One possible mechanism for the persistence of these disorders is through the effect of HIV on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is influenced by various factors including hazardous alcohol use (HAU), which is prevalent among PLWH. This study attempts to elucidate the relationships between HAU, BDNF and HAND. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted on a sample of 199 hazardous alcohol users and 198 non-HAU living with HIV. Members of each group were matched according to sociodemographic characteristics and CD4 count. Research procedures included validated questionnaires, neuropsychological assessments and a blood sample to obtain BDNF and immune measurements. Hazardous alcohol users showed either significantly lower or significantly higher BDNF levels compared to the Non-hazardous (OR=1,4; 95% CI: 1-2.1, p = 0.003). Therefore, for additional analyses, subjects were categorized based on BDNF values in: Group 1 8,000 pg/mL. Groups 1 and 3 performed significantly worse than those in Group 2 in the domains of processing speed, auditory-verbal and visuospatial learning and memory. Multivariate analyses confirmed that HAU and BDNF are significant contributors of HAND. Our findings offer novel insights into the relationships between BDNF, and alcohol use among PLWH. Our results also lend support to expanding clinical movement to use BDNF as an intervention target for PLWH, in those with evidence of deficiencies, and highlight the importance of including HAUat the inception of clinical trials.

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus increases energy expenditure by elevating metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, ChuanFeng; Bomberg, Eric; Billington, Charles; Levine, Allen; Kotz, Catherine M

    2007-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) decreases food intake and body weight, but few central sites of action have been identified. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is important in energy metabolism regulation, and expresses both BDNF and its receptor. We tested three hypotheses: 1) PVN BDNF reduces feeding and increases energy expenditure (EE), 2) PVN BDNF-enhanced thermogenesis results from increased spontaneous physical activity (SPA) and resting metabolic rate (RMR), and 3) PVN BDNF thermogenic effects are mediated, in part, by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue (BAT). BDNF (0.5 microg) was injected into the PVN of Sprague-Dawley rats; and oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, food intake, and SPA were measured for 24 h in an indirect calorimeter. SPA was also measured in open-field activity chambers for 48 h after BDNF injection. Animals were killed 6 or 24 h after BDNF injection, and BAT UCP1 gene expression was measured with quantitative real-time PCR. BDNF significantly decreased food intake and body weight gain 24 h after injection. Heat production and RMR were significantly elevated for 7 h immediately after BDNF injection. BDNF had no effect on SPA, but increased UCP1 gene expression in BAT at 6 h, but not 24 h after injection. In conclusion, PVN BDNF reduces body weight by decreasing food intake and increasing EE consequent to increased RMR, which may be due, in part, to BAT UCP1 activity. These data suggest that the PVN is an important site of BDNF action to influence energy balance.

  5. Epigenetic Manipulation of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improves Memory Deficiency Induced by Neonatal Anesthesia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiang; Bie, Bihua; Naguib, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Although neonatal exposure to anesthetic drugs is associated with memory deficiency in rodent models and possibly in pediatric patients, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. The authors tested their hypothesis that exposure of the developing brain to anesthesia triggers epigenetic modification, involving the enhanced interaction among transcription factors (histone deacetylase 2, methyl-cytosine-phosphate-guanine-binding protein 2, and DNA methyltransferase 1) in Bdnf promoter region(s) that inhibit brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, resulting in insufficient drive for local translation of synaptic mRNAs. The authors further hypothesized that noninvasive environmental enrichment (EE) will attenuate anesthesia-induced epigenetic inhibition of BDNF signaling and memory loss in rodent models. Seven days after birth (P7), neonatal rats were randomly assigned to receive either isoflurane anesthesia for 6 h or sham anesthesia. On P21, pups were weaned, and animals were randomly assigned to EE or a standard cage environment (no EE). Behavioral, molecular, and electrophysiological studies were performed on rats on P65. The authors found a substantial reduction of hippocampal BDNF (n = 6 to 7) resulting from the transcriptional factors-mediated epigenetic modification in the promoter region of Bdnf exon IV in rats exposed postnatally to anesthetic drugs. This BDNF reduction led to the insufficient drive for the synthesis of synaptic proteins (n = 6 to 8), thus contributing to the hippocampal synaptic (n = 8 to 11) and cognitive dysfunction (n = 10) induced by neonatal anesthesia. These effects were mitigated by the exposure to an enriched environment. The findings of this study elucidated the epigenetic mechanism underlying memory deficiency induced by neonatal anesthesia and propose EE as a potential therapeutic approach.

  6. Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reverse dipping pattern of nocturnal blood pressure in patients with cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Manabu; Koyama, Hidenori; Kanzaki, Akinori; Kurajoh, Masafumi; Hatayama, Miki; Shiraishi, Jun; Okazaki, Hirokazu; Shoji, Takuhito; Moriwaki, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Inaba, Masaaki; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Basic studies have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has critical roles in the survival, growth, maintenance, and death of central and peripheral neurons, while it is also involved in regulation of the autonomic nervous system. Furthermore, recent clinical studies have suggested potential role of plasma BDNF in the circulatory system. We investigated the mutual relationships among plasma BDNF, patterns of nocturnal blood pressure changes (dippers, non-dippers, extra-dippers, and reverse-dippers), and cardiac autonomic function as determined by heart rate variability (HRV). This was a cross-sectional study of patients registered in the Hyogo Sleep Cardio-Autonomic Atherosclerosis (HSCAA) Study from October 2010 to November 2012. Two-hundred fifty patients with 1 or more cardiovascular risk factor(s) (obesity, smoking, presence of cardiovascular event history, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease) were enrolled. Plasma BDNF levels (natural logarithm transformed) were significantly (p = 0.001) lower in reverse-dipper patients (7.18±0.69 pg/ml, mean ± SD, n = 36) as compared to dippers (7.86±0.86 pg/ml, n = 100). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that BDNF (odds ratios: 0.417, 95% confidence interval: 0.228-0.762, P = 0.004) was the sole factor significantly and independently associated with the reverse-dippers as compared with dippers. Furthermore, plasma BDNF level was significantly and positively correlated with the time-domain (SDNN, SDANN5, CVRR) and frequency-domain (LF) of HRV parameters. Finally, multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the relationship between plasma BDNF and the reverse-dippers was weakened, yet remained significant or borderline significant even after adjusting for HRV parameters. Low plasma BDNF was independently associated with patients showing a reverse-dipper pattern of nocturnal blood pressure, in which an imbalance of cardiac autonomic function

  7. Physical exercise and acute restraint stress differentially modulate hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts and epigenetic mechanisms in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Musazzi, Laura; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Physical exercise and stressful experiences have been shown to exert opposite effects on behavioral functions and brain plasticity, partly by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Although epigenetic modifications are known to play a pivotal role in the regulation of the different BDNF transcripts, it is poorly understood whether epigenetic mechanisms are also implied in the BDNF modulation induced by physical exercise and stress. Here, we show that total BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were reduced immediately after acute restraint stress (RS) in the hippocampus of mice, and returned to control levels 24 h after the stress session. On the contrary, exercise increased BDNF mRNA expression and counteracted the stress-induced decrease of BDNF transcripts. Physical exercise-induced up-regulation of BDNF transcripts was accounted for by increase in histone H3 acetylated levels at specific BDNF promoters, whereas the histone H3 trimethylated lysine 27 and dimethylated lysine 9 levels were unaffected. Acute RS did not change the levels of acetylated and methylated histone H3 at the BDNF promoters. Furthermore, we found that physical exercise and RS were able to differentially modulate the histone deacetylases mRNA levels. Finally, we report that a single treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors, prior to acute stress exposure, prevented the down-regulation of total BDNF and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, and 6, partially reproducing the effect of physical exercise. Overall, these results suggest that physical exercise and stress are able to differentially modulate the expression of BDNF transcripts by possible different epigenetic mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cabergoline, a dopamine receptor agonist, has an antidepressant-like property and enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuichi; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Ninomiya, Midori; Yoon, Hyung Shin; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2010-08-01

    Dopamine agonists have been implicated in the treatment of depression. Cabergoline is an ergot derivative with a high affinity to dopamine D(2)-like receptors; however, there have been few preclinical studies on its antidepressant-like effects. Behavioral effects of cabergoline were examined in rats using forced swimming (FST), novelty-suppressed feeding (NST), open field (OFT), and elevated-plus maze (EPT) tests. In a single treatment paradigm, behaviors of rats were analyzed 4 h after single injection of cabergoline (s.c., 0-4 micromol/kg). In a repeated-treatment paradigm, OFT, EPT, and FST were conducted on days 11, 12, and 13-14, respectively, during daily cabergoline injections (s.c., 0.5 micromol/kg), and then hippocampus was removed 24 h after the last injection. NST was conducted in a separate experiment at day 14. Western blotting was used for the analysis of the protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the activation of intracellular signaling molecules. Single injection of cabergoline demonstrated decreased immobility in FST and distance traveled during 0-10 min in OFT, while time spent and entry into open arms were increased at 4 micromol/kg. When cabergoline was repeatedly administered, immobility in FST and the latency of feeding in NSF were significantly reduced, while vertical movement was increased in OFT. The time in closed arms was tended to be decreased in EPT. Expression of BDNF and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 were up-regulated after the chronic administration of cabergoline. Cabergoline exerts antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like effects, which may be mediated by potentiation of intracellular signaling of BDNF.

  9. The effect of exercise training modality on serum brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon L Swift

    Full Text Available Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been implicated in memory, learning, and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the relationship of BDNF with cardiometabolic risk factors is unclear, and the effect of exercise training on BDNF has not been previously explored in individuals with type 2 diabetes.Men and women (N = 150 with type 2 diabetes were randomized to an aerobic exercise (aerobic, resistance exercise (resistance, or a combination of both (combination for 9 months. Serum BDNF levels were evaluated at baseline and follow-up from archived blood samples.Baseline serum BDNF was not associated with fitness, body composition, anthropometry, glucose control, or strength measures (all, p>0.05. Similarly, no significant change in serum BDNF levels was observed following exercise training in the aerobic (-1649.4 pg/ml, CI: -4768.9 to 1470.2, resistance (-2351.2 pg/ml, CI:-5290.7 to 588.3, or combination groups (-827.4 pg/ml, CI: -3533.3 to 1878.5 compared to the control group (-2320.0 pg/ml, CI: -5750.8 to 1110.8. However, reductions in waist circumference were directly associated with changes in serum BDNF following training (r = 0.25, p = 0.005.Serum BDNF was not associated with fitness, body composition, anthropometry, glucose control, or strength measures at baseline. Likewise, serum BDNF measures were not altered by 9 months of aerobic, resistance, or combination training. However, reductions in waist circumference were associated with decreased serum BDNF levels. Future studies should investigate the relevance of BDNF with measures of cognitive function specifically in individuals with type-2 diabetes.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes nerve regeneration by activating the JAK/STAT pathway in Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guiting; Zhang, Haiyang; Sun, Fionna; Lu, Zhihua; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda; Lee, Yung-Chin; Wang, Guifang; Banie, Lia; Lue, Tom F

    2016-04-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) carries the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED) due to cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Schwann cells are essential for the maintenance of integrity and function of peripheral nerves such as the CNs. We hypothesize that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activates the Janus kinase (JAK)/(signal transducer and activator of transcription) STAT pathway in Schwann cells, not in neuronal axonal fibers, with the resultant secretion of cytokines from Schwann cells to facilitate nerve recovery. Using four different cell lines-human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C and SH-SY5Y, human Schwann cell (HSC), and rat Schwann cell (RSC) RT4-D6P2T-we assessed the effect of BDNF application on the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway. We also assessed the time response of JAK/STAT pathway activation in RSCs and HSCs after BDNF treatment. We then assayed cytokine release from HSCs as a response to BDNF treatment using oncostatin M and IL6 as markers. We showed extensive phosphorylation of STAT3/STAT1 by BDNF at high dose (100 pM) in RSCs, with no JAK/STAT pathway activation in human neuroblastoma cell lines. The time response of JAK/STAT pathway activation in RSCs and HSCs after BDNF treatment showed an initial peak at shortly after treatment and then a second higher peak at 24-48 hours. Cytokine release from HSCs increased progressively after BDNF application, reaching statistical significance for IL6. We demonstrated for the first time the indirect mechanism of BDNF enhancement of nerve regeneration through the activation of JAK/STAT pathway in Schwann cells, rather than directly on neurons. As a result of BDNF application, Schwann cells produce cytokines that promote nerve regeneration.

  11. Effect of short-term exercise training on brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Alice; Garnier, Philippe; Quirie, Aurore; Pernet, Nicolas; Demougeot, Céline; Marie, Christine; Prigent-Tessier, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level has been reported in the hippocampus of hypertensive rats. The present study explored whether brain neurons and/or endothelial cells are targeted by hypertension with respect to BDNF expression and the potential of physical exercise to cope with hypertension. Physical exercise was induced in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. The hippocampus of sedentary and exercised rats (n = 6 for each group) were used for western blots to assess proBDNF, mature BDNF (mBDNF), tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), P-TrkB (TrkB phosphorylated at tyrosine 816), synaptophysin, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and eNOS phosphorylated at serine 1177 protein levels. BDNF and proBDNF localization in the hippocampus was studied in WKY rats, SHR and exercised SHR (n = 5 each). mBDNF and proBDNF protein levels were also assessed in hippocampal slices prepared from SHR (n = 10) that were incubated for 24 h with the nitric oxide (NO) donor glyceryl trinitrate. SBP was measured by the tail-cuff method. Exercise modified blood pressure neither in SHR nor WKY. As compared with WKY rats, SHR displayed decreased levels of mBDNF, P-TrkB, synaptophysin, eNOS and eNOS phosphorylated at serine 1177 but no change in proBDNF and TrkB levels. These effects coincided with low BDNF staining in both endothelial cells and neurons. Exercise improved the endothelium-derived NO system and the BDNF pathway in both strains. The NO donor increased mBDNF but decreased proBDNF levels. Our results revealed that endothelial and neuronal BDNF expressions were both impaired in hypertension and that physical exercise improved hippocampal mBDNF levels and signaling through blood pressure-independent mechanisms.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor works coordinately with partner molecules to initiate tyrosine hydroxylase expression in striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, X; Stull, N D; Iacovitti, L

    1995-05-22

    Previous studies demonstrated that the cooperative interaction of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) and a partner molecule could induce the novel expression of the catecholamine (CA) biosynthetic enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in striatal neurons [Du and Iacovitti, J. Neurosci., in press; Du et al., J. Neurosci., 14 (1994) 7688-7694; Iacovitti et al., submitted]. The present study demonstrates that in addition to aFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is also capable of moderate levels of TH induction (30% TH+ striatal neurons) when administered at high concentrations (100 ng/ml). As with aFGF, BDNF's activity depended on its coupling to an appropriate partner molecule; the most potent of which were 10 microM dopamine (DA) and 50 microM mazindol. BDNF + DA-induced TH expression was first evident after at 12 h; peaked by 18 h and declined by 4 days in culture. Cyclohexamide eliminated nearly all and alpha-amanitin reduced by half the TH induction elicited by DA and BDNF; indicating that both de novo transcription and translation were required for increased expression. In contrast with aFGF and BDNF, other putative dopamine differentiation factors, such as glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), were able to elicit barely detectable (10%) levels of TH induction, regardless of the partner molecule used. These studies suggest that aFGF and/or BDNF may work coordinately with partner molecules to initiate TH expression; while a number of factors including, CNTF and GDNF, may be involved in its subsequent modulation.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for axonal growth of selective groups of neurons in the arcuate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Guey-Ying; Bouyer, Karine; Kamitakahara, Anna; Sahibzada, Niaz; Wang, Chien-Hua; Rutlin, Michael; Simerly, Richard B; Xu, Baoji

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent regulator of neuronal development, and the Bdnf gene produces two populations of transcripts with either a short or long 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). Deficiencies in BDNF signaling have been shown to cause severe obesity in humans; however, it remains unknown how BDNF signaling impacts the organization of neuronal circuits that control energy balance. We examined the role of BDNF on survival, axonal projections, and synaptic inputs of neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARH), a structure critical for the control of energy balance, using Bdnf (klox/klox) mice, which lack long 3' UTR Bdnf mRNA and develop severe hyperphagic obesity. We found that a small fraction of neurons that express the receptor for BDNF, TrkB, also expressed proopiomelanocortin (POMC) or neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related protein (AgRP) in the ARH. Bdnf(klox/klox) mice had normal numbers of POMC, NPY, and TrkB neurons in the ARH; however, retrograde labeling revealed a drastic reduction in the number of ARH axons that project to the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) in these mice. In addition, fewer POMC and AgRP axons were found in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) and the lateral part of PVH, respectively, in Bdnf (klox/klox) mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the impact of BDNF deficiency on inputs to ARH neurons. We found that excitatory inputs onto POMC and NPY neurons were increased and decreased, respectively, in Bdnf (klox/klox) mice, likely due to a compensatory response to marked hyperphagia displayed by the mutant mice. This study shows that the majority of TrkB neurons in the ARH are distinct from known neuronal populations and that BDNF plays a critical role in directing projections from these neurons to the DMH and PVH. We propose that hyperphagic obesity due to BDNF deficiency is in part attributable to impaired axonal growth of TrkB-expressing ARH neurons.

  14. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hyperactivity is associated with decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor in female suicide attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrus, Livia; Lindqvist, Daniel; Träskman-Bendz, Lil; Westrin, Åsa

    2016-11-01

    Both decreased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation may be involved in the pathophysiology of suicidal behaviour, as well as cognitive symptoms of depression. Pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown interactions between HPA-axis activity and BDNF, but this has not been studied in a clinical cohort of suicidal subjects. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to investigate associations between HPA-axis activity and BDNF in suicide attempters. Furthermore, this study examined the relationship between the HPA-axis, BDNF, and cognitive symptoms in suicidal patients. Since previous data indicate gender-related differences in BDNF and the HPA axis, males and females were examined separately. Seventy-five recent suicide attempters (n = 41 females; n = 34 males) were enrolled in the study. The Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST) was performed and BDNF in plasma were analysed. Patients were evaluated with the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS) from which items 'Concentration difficulties' and 'Failing memory' were extracted. Only among females, DST non-suppressors had significantly lower BDNF compared to DST suppressors (p = 0.022), and there was a significant correlation between post-DST serum cortisol at 8 a.m. and BDNF (rs = -0.437, p = 0.003). Concentration difficulties correlated significantly with post-DST cortisol in all patients (rs = 0.256, p = 0.035), in females (rs = 0.396, p = 0.015), and with BDNF in females (rs = -0.372, p = 0.020). The findings suggest an inverse relationship between the HPA-axis and BDNF in female suicide attempters. Moreover, concentration difficulties may be associated with low BDNF and DST non-suppression in female suicide attempters.

  15. Genome-wide identification of Bcl11b gene targets reveals role in brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Tang

    Full Text Available B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 11B (Bcl11b is a transcription factor showing predominant expression in the striatum. To date, there are no known gene targets of Bcl11b in the nervous system. Here, we define targets for Bcl11b in striatal cells by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq in combination with genome-wide expression profiling. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed that 694 genes were significantly altered in striatal cells over-expressing Bcl11b, including genes showing striatal-enriched expression similar to Bcl11b. ChIP-seq analysis demonstrated that Bcl11b bound a mixture of coding and non-coding sequences that were within 10 kb of the transcription start site of an annotated gene. Integrating all ChIP-seq hits with the microarray expression data, 248 direct targets of Bcl11b were identified. Functional analysis on the integrated gene target list identified several zinc-finger encoding genes as Bcl11b targets, and further revealed a significant association of Bcl11b to brain-derived neurotrophic factor/neurotrophin signaling. Analysis of ChIP-seq binding regions revealed significant consensus DNA binding motifs for Bcl11b. These data implicate Bcl11b as a novel regulator of the BDNF signaling pathway, which is disrupted in many neurological disorders. Specific targeting of the Bcl11b-DNA interaction could represent a novel therapeutic approach to lowering BDNF signaling specifically in striatal cells.

  16. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways: potential mediators of skeletal muscle growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Stewart, Claire E

    2009-11-01

    The loss of muscle mass with age and disuse has a significant impact on the physiological and social well-being of the aged; this is an increasingly important problem as the population becomes skewed towards older age. Exercise has psychological benefits but it also impacts on muscle protein synthesis and degradation, increasing muscle tissue volume in both young and older individuals. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy involves an increase in muscle mass and cross-sectional area and associated increased myofibrillar protein content. Attempts to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie muscle growth, development and maintenance, have focused on characterising the molecular pathways that initiate, maintain and regenerate skeletal muscle. Such understanding may aid in improving targeted interventional therapies for age-related muscle loss and muscle wasting associated with diseases. Two major routes through which skeletal muscle development and growth are regulated are insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways. Many reviews have focused on understanding the signalling pathways of IGF-I and its receptor, which govern skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, alternative molecular signalling pathways such as the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent transcriptional pathways should also be considered as potential mediators of muscle growth. These latter pathways have received relatively little attention and the purpose herein is to highlight the progress being made in the understanding of these pathways and associated molecules: calmodulin, calmodulin kinases (CaMKs), calcineurin and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), which are involved in skeletal muscle regulation. We describe: (1) how conformational changes in the Ca(2+) sensor calmodulin result in the exposure of binding pockets for the target proteins (CaMKs and calcineurin). (2) How Calmodulin consequently activates either the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases

  17. Activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II following bovine rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavinikoo, Hadi; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Haqshenas, Gholamreza; Bamdad, Taravat; Teimoori, Ali; Goodarzi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4) is responsible for the increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration through a phospholipase C-dependent and phospholipase C-independent pathways in infected cells. It is shown that increasing of intracellular calcium concentration in rotavirus infected cells is associated with the activation of some members of protein kinases family such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, which plays a crucial role in replication and pathogenesis of the virus. The aim of this study was to expression bovine rotavirus NSP4 gene in HEK293 cell and evaluation of its biological effect related to activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in cell culture. Materials and Methods: MA104 cells was used as a sensitive cell for propagation of virus and defined as a positive control. The NSP4 gene was amplified and inserted into an expression vector, and introduced as a recombinant plasmid into HEK293T cells. Western blot analysis was performed as a confirmation test for both expression of NSP4 protein and activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Results: Expression of NSP4 and activated form of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II were demonstrated by western blotting. Conclusion: It was shown that the expression of biologically active full- length NSP4 protein in HEK293T cells may be associated with some biological properties such as calcium calmodulin kinase II activation, which was indicator of rotaviruses replication and pathogenesis. PMID:26019803

  18. Activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II following bovine rotavirus enterotoxin NSP4 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Razavinikoo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The rotavirus nonstructural protein 4 (NSP4 is responsible for the increase in cytoplasmic calcium concentration through a phospholipase C-dependent and phospholipase C-independent pathways in infected cells. It is shown that increasing of intracellular calcium concentration in rotavirus infected cells is associated with the activation of some members of protein kinases family such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, which plays a crucial role in replication and pathogenesis of the virus. The aim of this study was to expression bovine rotavirus NSP4 gene in HEK293 cell and evaluation of its biological effect related to activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II in cell culture. Materials and Methods: MA104 cells was used as a sensitive cell for propagation of virus and defined as a positive control. The NSP4 gene was amplified and inserted into an expression vector, and introduced as a recombinant plasmid into HEK293T cells. Western blot analysis was performed as a confirmation test for both expression of NSP4 protein and activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. Results:Expression of NSP4 and activated form of calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II were demonstrated by western blotting. Conclusion: It was shown that the expression of biologically active full- length NSP4 protein in HEK293T cells may be associated with some biological properties such as calcium calmodulin kinase II activation, which was indicator of rotaviruses replication and pathogenesis

  19. The Effects of Antecedent Exercise on Motor Function Recovery and Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression after Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    KIM, GYEYEOP; Kim, Eunjung

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, we investigated the effect of antecedent exercise on functional recovery and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression following focal cerebral ischemia injury. [Subjects] The rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model was employed. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group I included untreated normal rats (n=10); Group II included untreated rats with focal cerebral ischemia (n=10); Group III included rats that p...

  20. Treadmill exercise improves spatial learning ability by enhancing brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Hye Im; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Wook; Baek, Sang-Bin; Choi, Seung Wook

    2014-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients show learning difficulty and impulsiveness. Exercise is known to improve learning ability and memory function. In the present study, we investigated the duration-dependence of the effect of treadmill exercise on spatial learning ability in relation with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in ADHD rats. For this study, radial 8-arm maze test and western blot for BDNF and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) were performed. Spontaneou...

  1. Mutant huntingtin impairs the post-Golgi trafficking of brain-derived neurotrophic factor but not its Val66Met polymorphism.

    OpenAIRE

    Toro, Daniel del; Canals i Coll, Josep M.; Ginés Padrós, Silvia; Kojima, Masami; Egea Guri, Gustavo; Alberch i Vié, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphism is associated with the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington"s disease. In view ofthese data andthe involvement of huntingtin in intracellular trafficking, we examined the intracellular transport and release of Val66Val BDNF (Val-BDNF) and Val66Met BDNF (Met-BDNF) in transfected striatal knock-in cells expressing wild-type or mutant full-length huntingtin. Colocalization studies with specific markers ...

  2. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-09-22

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between -295 to -300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  3. Structural characterization of the interaction of human lactoferrin with calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L Gifford

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin (Lf is an 80 kDa, iron (Fe(3+-binding immunoregulatory glycoprotein secreted into most exocrine fluids, found in high concentrations in colostrum and milk, and released from neutrophil secondary granules at sites of infection and inflammation. In a number of cell types, Lf is internalized through receptor-mediated endocytosis and targeted to the nucleus where it has been demonstrated to act as a transcriptional trans-activator. Here we characterize human Lf's interaction with calmodulin (CaM, a ubiquitous, 17 kDa regulatory calcium (Ca(2+-binding protein localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of activated cells. Due to the size of this intermolecular complex (∼100 kDa, TROSY-based NMR techniques were employed to structurally characterize Ca(2+-CaM when bound to intact apo-Lf. Both CaM's backbone amides and the ε-methyl group of key methionine residues were used as probes in chemical shift perturbation and cross-saturation experiments to define the binding interface of apo-Lf on Ca(2+-CaM. Unlike the collapsed conformation through which Ca(2+-CaM binds the CaM-binding domains of its classical targets, Ca(2+-CaM assumes an extended structure when bound to apo-Lf. Apo-Lf appears to interact predominantly with the C-terminal lobe of Ca(2+-CaM, enabling the N-terminal lobe to potentially bind another target. Our use of intact apo-Lf has made possible the identification of a secondary interaction interface, removed from CaM's primary binding domain. Secondary interfaces play a key role in the target's response to CaM binding, highlighting the importance of studying intact complexes. This solution-based approach can be applied to study other regulatory calcium-binding EF-hand proteins in intact intermolecular complexes.

  4. Chemical shift assignments of calmodulin constructs with EF hand mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michael; Guillemette, J Guy; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding protein able to bind and regulate hundreds of different proteins. It consists of two globular domains joined by a flexible central linker region. Each one of these domains contains two EF hand pairs capable of binding to Ca(2+). Upon Ca(2+) binding CaM undergoes a conformational change exposing hydrophobic patches that interact with its intracellular target proteins. CaM is able to bind to target proteins in the Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-deplete forms. To study the Ca(2+)-dependent/independent properties of binding and activation of target proteins by CaM, CaM constructs with Ca(2+) binding disrupting mutations of Asp to Ala at position one of each EF hand have been used. One target protein of CaM is nitric oxide synthase, which catalyzes the production of nitric oxide. At elevated Ca(2+) concentrations, CaM binds to neuronal NOS and endothelial NOS, making them the Ca(2+)-dependent NOS enzymes. In contrast, inducible NOS is transcriptionally regulated in vivo and binds to CaM at basal levels of Ca(2+). Here we report the NMR backbone and sidechain resonance assignments of C-lobe Ca(2+)-replete and deplete CaM12, N-lobe Ca(2+)-replete and deplete CaM34, CaM1234 in the absence of Ca(2+) and N-lobe Ca(2+)-replete CaM34 with the iNOS CaM-binding domain peptide.

  5. Inference of Calmodulin's Ca2+-Dependent Free Energy Landscapes via Gaussian Mixture Model Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Annie M; Harpole, Tyler J; Blau, Christian; Delemotte, Lucie

    2018-01-09

    A free energy landscape estimation method based on the well-known Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is used to compare the efficiencies of thermally enhanced sampling methods with respect to regular molecular dynamics. The simulations are carried out on two binding states of calmodulin, and the free energy estimation method is compared with other estimators using a toy model. We show that GMM with cross-validation provides a robust estimate that is not subject to overfitting. The continuous nature of Gaussians provides better estimates on sparse data than canonical histogramming. We find that diffusion properties determine the sampling method effectiveness, such that diffusion-dominated apo calmodulin is most efficiently sampled by regular molecular dynamics, while holo calmodulin, with its rugged free energy landscape, is better sampled by enhanced sampling methods.

  6. Bacillus anthracis calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase: chemical and enzymatic properties and interactions with eucaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppla, S H

    1984-01-01

    Studies on the mechanism of action of anthrax toxin have led to the discovery that the edema factor component is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase. This enzyme can be obtained in milligram amounts at high purity from culture supernatants of avirulent B. anthracis strains. The cyclase binds to and probably enters eucaryotic cells to cause large, unregulated increases in cyclic AMP concentrations, an effect that may decrease an animal's ability to limit B. anthracis infection. The similarity of this bacterial adenylate cyclase to calmodulin-dependent eucaryotic adenylate cyclases suggests that EF may have originated as a eucaryotic enzyme. Such a relationship may eventually be established through comparison of the antigenic and genetic properties of the enzymes or by demonstrating that the genes have related DNA sequences. Even if such a relationship is not found, the edema factor cyclase will be a useful model for study of the properties of calmodulin-dependent enzymes.

  7. Physical exercise during adolescence versus adulthood: differential effects on object recognition memory and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, M E; Nitecki, R; Bucci, D J

    2011-10-27

    It is well established that physical exercise can enhance hippocampal-dependent forms of learning and memory in laboratory animals, commensurate with increases in hippocampal neural plasticity (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] mRNA/protein, neurogenesis, long-term potentiation [LTP]). However, very little is known about the effects of exercise on other, non-spatial forms of learning and memory. In addition, there has been little investigation of the duration of the effects of exercise on behavior or plasticity. Likewise, few studies have compared the effects of exercising during adulthood versus adolescence. This is particularly important since exercise may capitalize on the peak of neural plasticity observed during adolescence, resulting in a different pattern of behavioral and neurobiological effects. The present study addressed these gaps in the literature by comparing the effects of 4 weeks of voluntary exercise (wheel running) during adulthood or adolescence on novel object recognition and BDNF levels in the perirhinal cortex (PER) and hippocampus (HP). Exercising during adulthood improved object recognition memory when rats were tested immediately after 4 weeks of exercise, an effect that was accompanied by increased BDNF levels in PER and HP. When rats were tested again 2 weeks after exercise ended, the effects of exercise on recognition memory and BDNF levels were no longer present. Exercising during adolescence had a very different pattern of effects. First, both exercising and non-exercising rats could discriminate between novel and familiar objects immediately after the exercise regimen ended; furthermore there was no group difference in BDNF levels. Two or four weeks later, however, rats that had previously exercised as adolescents could still discriminate between novel and familiar objects, while non-exercising rats could not. Moreover, the formerly exercising rats exhibited higher levels of BDNF in PER compared to HP, while the reverse was

  8. S100B protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruisong; Xia, Wei; Zhang, Zhihong; Wu, Kun

    2011-01-01

    Human milk contains a wide variety of nutrients that contribute to the fulfillment of its functions, which include the regulation of newborn development. However, few studies have investigated the concentrations of S100B protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in human milk. The associations of the concentrations of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF with maternal factors are not well explored. To investigate the concentrations of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF in human milk and characterize the maternal factors associated with their levels in human milk, human milk samples were collected at days 3, 10, 30, and 90 after parturition. Levels of S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF, and their mRNAs in the samples were detected. Then, these concentrations were compared with lactation and other maternal factors. S100B protein levels in human milk samples collected at 3, 10, 30, and 90 d after parturition were 1249.79±398.10, 1345.05±539.16, 1481.83±573.30, and 1414.39±621.31 ng/L, respectively. On the other hand, the BDNF concentrations in human milk samples were 10.99±4.55, 13.01±5.88, 13.35±6.43, and 2.83±5.47 µg/L, while those of GDNF were 10.90±1.65, 11.38±1., 11.29±3.10, and 11.40±2.21 g/L for the same time periods. Maternal post-pregnancy body mass index was positively associated with S100B levels in human milk (r = 0.335, P = 0.030milk. S100B protein, BDNF, and GDNF are present in all samples of human milk, and they may be responsible for the long term effects of breast feeding.

  9. Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reverse dipping pattern of nocturnal blood pressure in patients with cardiovascular risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Kadoya

    Full Text Available Basic studies have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has critical roles in the survival, growth, maintenance, and death of central and peripheral neurons, while it is also involved in regulation of the autonomic nervous system. Furthermore, recent clinical studies have suggested potential role of plasma BDNF in the circulatory system.We investigated the mutual relationships among plasma BDNF, patterns of nocturnal blood pressure changes (dippers, non-dippers, extra-dippers, and reverse-dippers, and cardiac autonomic function as determined by heart rate variability (HRV.This was a cross-sectional study of patients registered in the Hyogo Sleep Cardio-Autonomic Atherosclerosis (HSCAA Study from October 2010 to November 2012.Two-hundred fifty patients with 1 or more cardiovascular risk factor(s (obesity, smoking, presence of cardiovascular event history, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease were enrolled.Plasma BDNF levels (natural logarithm transformed were significantly (p = 0.001 lower in reverse-dipper patients (7.18±0.69 pg/ml, mean ± SD, n = 36 as compared to dippers (7.86±0.86 pg/ml, n = 100. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that BDNF (odds ratios: 0.417, 95% confidence interval: 0.228-0.762, P = 0.004 was the sole factor significantly and independently associated with the reverse-dippers as compared with dippers. Furthermore, plasma BDNF level was significantly and positively correlated with the time-domain (SDNN, SDANN5, CVRR and frequency-domain (LF of HRV parameters. Finally, multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the relationship between plasma BDNF and the reverse-dippers was weakened, yet remained significant or borderline significant even after adjusting for HRV parameters.Low plasma BDNF was independently associated with patients showing a reverse-dipper pattern of nocturnal blood pressure, in which an imbalance of cardiac autonomic function

  10. Longitudinal assessment of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in Sardinian psychotic patients (LABSP): a protocol for a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primavera, Diego; Manchia, Mirko; Deriu, Luca; Tusconi, Massimo; Collu, Roberto; Scherma, Maria; Fadda, Paola; Fratta, Walter; Carpiniello, Bernardo

    2017-05-25

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a crucial role in neurodevelopment, synaptic plasticity and neuronal function and survival. Serum and plasma BDNF levels are moderately, but consistently, decreased in patients with schizophrenia (SCZ) compared with healthy controls. There is a lack of knowledge, however, on the temporal manifestation of this decline. Clinical, illness course and treatment factors might influence the variation of BDNF serum levels in patients with psychosis. In this context, we propose a longitudinal study of a cohort of SCZ and schizophrenic and schizoaffective disorder (SAD) Sardinian patients with the aim of disentangling the relationship between peripheral BDNF serum levels and changes of psychopathology, cognition and drug treatments. Longitudinal assessment of BDNF in Sardinian psychotic patients (LABSP) is a 24-month observational prospective cohort study. Patients with SAD will be recruited at the Psychiatry Research Unit of the Department of Medical Science and Public Health, University of Cagliari and University of Cagliari Health Agency, Cagliari, Italy. We will collect BDNF serum levels as well as sociodemographic, psychopathological and neurocognitive measures. Structured, semistructured and self-rating assessment tools, such as the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for psychopathological measures and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia for cognitive function, will be used. This study protocol was approved by the University of Cagliari Health Agency Ethics Committee (NP2016/5491). The study will be conducted in accordance with the principles of good clinical practice, in the Declaration of Helsinki in compliance with the regulations. Participation will be voluntary and written informed consent will be obtained for each participant upon entry into the study. We plan to disseminate the results of our study through conference presentations and publication in international peer-reviewed journals. Access to

  11. Zinc monotherapy increases serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and decreases depressive symptoms in overweight or obese subjects: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solati, Zahra; Jazayeri, Shima; Tehrani-Doost, Mehdi; Mahmoodianfard, Salma; Gohari, Mahmood Reza

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have shown a positive effect of zinc as an adjunctive therapy on reducing depressive symptoms. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined the effect of zinc monotherapy on mood. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of zinc monotherapy on depressive symptoms and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in overweight or obese subjects. Fifty overweight or obese subjects were randomly assigned into two groups and received either 30 mg zinc or placebo daily for 12 weeks. At baseline and post-intervention, depression severity was assessed using Beck depression inventory II (BDI II), and serum BDNF and zinc levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry, respectively. The trial was completed with 46 subjects. After a 12-week supplementation, serum zinc and BDNF levels increased significantly in the zinc-supplemented group compared with the placebo group. BDI scores declined in both the groups at the end of the study, but reduction in the zinc-supplemented group was significantly higher than the placebo group. More analysis revealed that following supplementation, BDI scores decreased in subgroup of subjects with depressive symptoms (BDI ≥ 10) (n = 30), but did not change in the subgroup of non-depressed subjects (BDI BDNF levels and depression severity in all participants. Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was found between serum BDNF and zinc levels at baseline. Zinc monotherapy improves mood in overweight or obese subjects most likely through increasing BDNF levels.

  12. Mechanistic Basis of Calmodulin Mediated Estrogen Receptor Alpha Activation and Antiestrogen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Prize for Outstanding Woman Senior in Biology (2002, KU) - Cora Downs Award for Outstanding Female Student, Graduate or Undergraduate (2003, KU...Biochemistry and Biophysics Section Faculty Seminar Series, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas. June 4, 1999 “Calmodulin: Old Dog , New Tricks...Mechanistic Studies of Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase from Zea mays with (Z)- and (E)-3-Fluorophosphoenolpyruvate as Substrates. Biochemistry 31, 6432

  13. Facilitation of plateau potentials in turtle motoneurones by a pathway dependent on calcium and calmodulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, J F; Mejia-Gervacio, S; Hounsgaard, J

    2000-01-01

    or trifluoperazine reduced the amplitude of depolarization-induced plateau potentials. Inactivation of calmodulin also inhibited facilitation of plateau potentials by activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors or muscarinic receptors. 3. In low-sodium medium and in the presence of tetraethylammonium...

  14. The Adsorption of Calmoduline via Nicotinamide Immobilized Poly(HEMA-GMA Cryogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Erol

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The separation and purification methods for the isolation of an important biomolecule calmoduline protein is extremely important. Among these methods, the adsorption technique is extremely popular, and the cryogels as adsorbents with the macro porous structure and interconnected flow channels cryogel they have are preferred in this field. In this study, the adsorption of calmoduline via Ca(II immobilized poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-glycidyl methacrylate, poly (HEMA-GMA, cryogels through changing interaction time, calmoduline initial concentration and temperature conditions. For the characterization of cryogels, the swelling test, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, surface area (BET, elemental analysis and ICP-OES methods were performed. Nicotinamide molecule was used as Ca (II chelating agent and the adsorption capacity of the cryogels was estimated as 1.812 mg calmoduline / g cryogel. The adsorption models of the adsorption reaction were examined by the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and was determined to be more appropriate for Langmuir isotherm model.

  15. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on contraction and45Ca movements in rat aorta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wermelskirchen, D.; Koch, P.; Wilhelm, D.; Nebel, U.; Leidig, A.; Wilffert, B.; Peters, Thies

    1989-01-01

    To study the selectivity of calmodulin antagonists it was assumed that they should inhibit noradrenaline (NA)- and K+-induced contractions similarly without an accompanying inhibition of45Ca uptake. Therefore, in isolated rat aorta the effects of W-7, calmidazolium and trifluoperazine on contraction

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of dermatophyte species using DNA sequence polymorphism in calmodulin gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, Bahram; Mirhendi, Hossein; Makimura, Koichi; de Hoog, G Sybren; Shidfar, Mohammad Reza; Nouripour-Sisakht, Sadegh; Jalalizand, Niloofar

    2016-01-01

    Use of phylogenetic species concepts based on rDNA internal transcribe spacer (ITS) regions have improved the taxonomy of dermatophyte species; however, confirmation and refinement using other genes are needed. Since the calmodulin gene has not been systematically used in dermatophyte taxonomy, we

  17. The TRPV5/6 calcium channels contain multiple calmodulin binding sites with differential binding properties.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalevskaya, N.V.; Bokhovchuk, F.M.; Vuister, G.W.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial Ca(2+) channels TRPV5/6 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5/6) are thoroughly regulated in order to fine-tune the amount of Ca(2+) reabsorption. Calmodulin has been shown to be involved into calcium-dependent inactivation of TRPV5/6 channels by binding directly to the distal

  18. Characterization of a Calmodulin-binding Transcription Factor from Strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangpeng Leng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor that has a broad range of functions from sensory mechanisms to regulating many growth and developmental processes. In this study, we isolated four strawberry ( genes using HMMER and BLAST analysis. The chromosome scaffold locations of these genes in the strawberry genome were determined and the protein domain and motif organization [CG-1, transcription factor immunoglobulin, ankyrin (ANK repeats, calmodulin-binding IQ motif of FaCAMTAs were also assessed. All FaCAMTAs were predicted to be Ca- and calmodulin-binding proteins. The expression profiles of genes were measured in different tissues and revealed distinct gene expression patterns under heat, cold, and salt stress. These data not only contribute to a better understanding of the complex regulation of the gene family but also provide evidence supporting the role of in multiple signaling pathways involved in stress responses. This investigation can provide useful information for further study.

  19. A dynamic model of interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and catalytic subunits of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Pepke

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available During the acquisition of memories, influx of Ca2+ into the postsynaptic spine through the pores of activated N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors triggers processes that change the strength of excitatory synapses. The pattern of Ca2+influx during the first few seconds of activity is interpreted within the Ca2+-dependent signaling network such that synaptic strength is eventually either potentiated or depressed. Many of the critical signaling enzymes that control synaptic plasticity,including Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, are regulated by calmodulin, a small protein that can bindup to 4 Ca2+ ions. As a first step toward clarifying how the Ca2+-signaling network decides between potentiation or depression, we have created a kinetic model of the interactions of Ca2+, calmodulin, and CaMKII that represents our best understanding of the dynamics of these interactions under conditions that resemble those in a postsynaptic spine. We constrained parameters of the model from data in the literature, or from our own measurements, and then predicted time courses of activation and autophosphorylation of CaMKII under a variety of conditions. Simulations showed that species of calmodulin with fewer than four bound Ca2+ play a significant role in activation of CaMKII in the physiological regime,supporting the notion that processing of Ca2+ signals in a spine involves competition among target enzymes for binding to unsaturated species of CaM in an environment in which the concentration of Ca2+ is fluctuating rapidly. Indeed, we showed that dependence of activation on the frequency of Ca2+ transients arises from the kinetics of interaction of fluctuating Ca2+with calmodulin/CaMKII complexes. We used parameter sensitivity analysis to identify which parameters will be most beneficial to measure more carefully to improve the accuracy of predictions. This model provides a quantitative base from which to build more complex dynamic

  20. Basal serum levels and reactivity of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor to standardized acute exercise in multiple sclerosis and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Stefan M; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Hartmann, Sten; Mladek, Mila; Lang, Undine E; Hellweg, Rainer; Reer, Rüdiger; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Heesen, Christoph

    2003-05-01

    Neurotrophins like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are thought to play an important role in neuronal repair and plasticity. Recent experimental evidence suggests neuroprotective effects of these proteins in multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the response of serum NGF and BDNF concentrations to standardized acute exercise in MS patients and controls. Basal NGF levels were significantly elevated in MS. Thirty minutes of moderate exercise significantly induced BDNF production in MS patients and controls, but no differential effects were seen. We conclude that moderate exercise can be used to induce neutrophin production in humans. This may mediate beneficial effects of physical exercise in MS reported recently.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT3) levels in post-mortem brain tissue from patients with depression compared to healthy individuals 

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheldrick, A; Camara, S; Ilieva, M

    2017-01-01

    suggests that antidepressant treatment may improve or normalise cerebral concentrations of neurotrophic factors. Therefore, we examined the concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT3) in different brain regions (cortex, cingulate gyrus, thalamus, hippocampus, putamen...... treatment and overall age 84.3±5 years versus 14 unaffected subjects at age 70.3±13.8. We detected significant elevation of BDNF (parietal cortex) and NT3 (parietal, temporal and occipital cortex, cingulate gyrus, thalamus, putamen and nucleus caudatus regions) in MDD patients who received antidepressant...

  2. UBE3B Is a Calmodulin-regulated, Mitochondrion-associated E3 Ubiquitin Ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braganza, Andrea; Li, Jianfeng; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan A; Dey, Nupur B; Andrews, Joel; Clark, Jennifer; Zamani, Leila; Wang, Xiao-Hong; St Croix, Claudette; O'Sullivan, Roderick; Garcia-Exposito, Laura; Brodsky, Jeffrey L; Sobol, Robert W

    2017-02-10

    Recent genome-wide studies found that patients with hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, congenital anomalies, characteristic facial dysmorphic features, and low cholesterol levels suffer from Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome (KOS, also reported as blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual disability syndrome). The primary cause of KOS is autosomal recessive mutations in the gene UBE3B However, to date, there are no studies that have determined the cellular or enzymatic function of UBE3B. Here, we report that UBE3B is a mitochondrion-associated protein with homologous to the E6-AP Cterminus (HECT) E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutating the catalytic cysteine (C1036A) or deleting the entire HECT domain (amino acids 758-1068) results in loss of UBE3B's ubiquitylation activity. Knockdown of UBE3B in human cells induces changes in mitochondrial morphology and physiology, a decrease in mitochondrial volume, and a severe suppression of cellular proliferation. We also discovered that UBE3B interacts with calmodulin via its N-terminal isoleucine-glutamine (IQ) motif. Deletion of the IQ motif (amino acids 29-58) results in loss of calmodulin binding and a significant increase in the in vitro ubiquitylation activity of UBE3B. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels in vitro disrupt the calmodulin-UBE3B interaction. These studies demonstrate that UBE3B is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and reveal that the enzyme is regulated by calmodulin. Furthermore, the modulation of UBE3B via calmodulin and calcium implicates a role for calcium signaling in mitochondrial protein ubiquitylation, protein turnover, and disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Addition of calmodulin antagonists to NRK cells during G1 inhibits proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Girona, A; Bosch, M; Bachs, O; Agell, N

    1995-07-01

    The mRNAs of most proteins involved in DNA synthesis show an S phase correlated expression when mammalian cells are stimulated to proliferate from G0. This is the case for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cofactor of DNA polymerase delta that is essential for the synthesis of the leading and lagging strands of DNA. Normal rat kidney cells re-entering the cell cycle from quiescence start DNA synthesis at 12 h and reach a maximum at 20 h. The expression of PCNA parallels the synthesis of DNA. Progression through the S phase was inhibited by addition of the anticalmodulin drug W13 to the cells during G1, 5 h after activation. W13 also inhibited the increase in both PCNA protein and mRNA indicating that calmodulin regulates its expression. Using TK-ts13 cells transfected with a plasmid containing the thymidine kinase gene under the control of the human 2.8 kb PCNA promoter, we demonstrated that this promoter is not regulated by calmodulin. The half-life of PCNA mRNA during G1/S transition was not modified by the treatment with W13, indicating that the decrease in the mRNA found when calmodulin was inhibited is not due to changes in its stability. Run-on assays revealed that control cells produced predominantly complete PCNA transcripts during S phase, while short incomplete transcripts were generated in W13-treated cells at the same time. These results indicate that calmodulin participates in a more direct or indirect way during G1 in the activation of PCNA expression. From data presented here it can be suggested that calmodulin activates the release of a transcriptional block leading to an increase in the amount of PCNA during S phase.

  4. Effects of Six-Week Ginkgo biloba Supplementation on Aerobic Performance, Blood Pro/Antioxidant Balance, and Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Physically Active Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sadowska-Krępa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracts of Ginkgo biloba leaves, a natural source of flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds, are commonly used as therapeutic agents for the improvement of both cognitive and physiological performance. The present study was aimed to test the effects of a six-week supplementation with 160 mg/day of a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba or a matching placebo on aerobic performance, blood antioxidant capacity, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF level in healthy, physically active young men, randomly allocated to two groups (n = 9 each. At baseline, as well as on the day following the treatment, the participants performed an incremental cycling test for the assessment of maximal oxygen uptake. Venous blood samples taken at rest, then immediately post-test and following 1 h of recovery, were analyzed for activities of antioxidant enzymes and plasma concentrations of non-enzymatic antioxidants, total phenolics, uric acid, lipid peroxidation products, ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP, and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Our results show that six weeks’ supplementation with Ginkgo biloba extract in physically active young men may provide some marginal improvements in their endurance performance expressed as VO2max and blood antioxidant capacity, as evidenced by specific biomarkers, and elicit somewhat better neuroprotection through increased exercise-induced production of BDNF.

  5. Interaction between the C-terminal region of human myelin basic protein and calmodulin: analysis of complex formation and solution structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi Nobuhiro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myelin sheath is a multilamellar membrane structure wrapped around the axon, enabling the saltatory conduction of nerve impulses in vertebrates. Myelin basic protein, one of the most abundant myelin-specific proteins, is an intrinsically disordered protein that has been shown to bind calmodulin. In this study, we focus on a 19-mer synthetic peptide from the predicted calmodulin-binding segment near the C-terminus of human myelin basic protein. Results The interaction of native human myelin basic protein with calmodulin was confirmed by affinity chromatography. The binding of the myelin basic protein peptide to calmodulin was tested with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC in different temperatures, and Kd was observed to be in the low μM range, as previously observed for full-length myelin basic protein. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the peptide bound to calmodulin, and binding was accompanied by a conformational change; furthermore, gel filtration chromatography indicated a decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of calmodulin in the presence of the peptide. NMR spectroscopy was used to map the binding area to reside mainly within the hydrophobic pocket of the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin. The solution structure obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering indicates binding of the myelin basic protein peptide into the interlobal groove of calmodulin, while calmodulin remains in an extended conformation. Conclusion Taken together, our results give a detailed structural insight into the interaction of calmodulin with a C-terminal segment of a major myelin protein, the myelin basic protein. The used 19-mer peptide interacts mainly with the C-terminal lobe of calmodulin, and a conformational change accompanies binding, suggesting a novel mode of calmodulin-target protein interaction. Calmodulin does not collapse and wrap around the peptide tightly; instead, it remains in an extended conformation in the solution structure

  6. Nephrocystin-5, a ciliary IQ domain protein, is mutated in Senior-Loken syndrome and interacts with RPGR and calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Edgar A; Loeys, Bart; Khanna, Hemant; Hellemans, Jan; Sudbrak, Ralf; Fan, Shuling; Muerb, Ulla; O'Toole, John F; Helou, Juliana; Attanasio, Massimo; Utsch, Boris; Sayer, John A; Lillo, Concepcion; Jimeno, David; Coucke, Paul; De Paepe, Anne; Reinhardt, Richard; Klages, Sven; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Kawakami, Isao; Kusakabe, Takehiro; Omran, Heymut; Imm, Anita; Tippens, Melissa; Raymond, Pamela A; Hill, Jo; Beales, Phil; He, Shirley; Kispert, Andreas; Margolis, Benjamin; Williams, David S; Swaroop, Anand; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2005-03-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the most frequent genetic cause of chronic renal failure in children. Identification of four genes mutated in NPHP subtypes 1-4 (refs. 4-9) has linked the pathogenesis of NPHP to ciliary functions. Ten percent of affected individuals have retinitis pigmentosa, constituting the renal-retinal Senior-Loken syndrome (SLSN). Here we identify, by positional cloning, mutations in an evolutionarily conserved gene, IQCB1 (also called NPHP5), as the most frequent cause of SLSN. IQCB1 encodes an IQ-domain protein, nephrocystin-5. All individuals with IQCB1 mutations have retinitis pigmentosa. Hence, we examined the interaction of nephrocystin-5 with RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator), which is expressed in photoreceptor cilia and associated with 10-20% of retinitis pigmentosa. We show that nephrocystin-5, RPGR and calmodulin can be coimmunoprecipitated from retinal extracts, and that these proteins localize to connecting cilia of photoreceptors and to primary cilia of renal epithelial cells. Our studies emphasize the central role of ciliary dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SLSN.

  7. Computational comparison of a calcium-dependent jellyfish protein (apoaequorin) and calmodulin-cholesterol in short-term memory maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Gene A; Kostellow, Adele B; Gupta, Raj K

    2017-03-06

    Memory reconsolidation and maintenance depend on calcium channels and on calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases regulating protein turnover in the hippocampus. Ingestion of a jellyfish protein, apoaequorin, reportedly protects and/or improves verbal learning in adults and is currently widely advertised for use by the elderly. Apoaequorin is a member of the EF-hand calcium binding family of proteins that includes calmodulin. Calmodulin-1 (148 residues) differs from Apoaequorin (195 residues) in that it contains four rather than three Ca 2+ -binding sites and three rather than four cholesterol-binding (CRAC, CARC) domains. All three cholesterol-binding CARC domains in calmodulin have a high interaction affinity for cholesterol compared to only two high affinity CARC domains in apoaequorin. Both calmodulin and apoaequorin can form dimers with a potential of eight bound Ca 2+ ions and six high affinity-bound cholesterol molecules in calmodulin with six bound Ca 2+ ions and a mixed population of eight cholesterols bound to both CARC and CRAC domains in apoaqueorin. MEMSAT-SVM analysis indicates that both calmodulin and apoaqueorin have a pore-lining region. The Peptide-Cutter algorithm predicts that calmodulin-1 contains 11 trypsin-specific cleavage sites (compared to 21 in apoaqueorin), four of which are potentially blocked by cholesterol and three are within the Ca-binding domains and/or the pore-lining region. Three are clustered between the third and fourth Ca 2+ -binding sites. Only calmodulin pore-lining regions contain Ca 2+ binding sites and as dimers may insert into the plasma membrane of neural cells and act as Ca 2+ channels. In a dietary supplement, bound cholesterol may protect both apoaequorin and calmodulin from proteolysis in the gut as well as facilitate uptake across the blood-brain barrier. Our results suggest that a physiological calmodulin-cholesterol complex, not cholesterol-free jellyfish protein, may better serve as a dietary supplement to

  8. Calmodulin-binding transcription activators and perspectives for applications in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chenjia; Yang, Yanjun; Du, Liqun; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, a novel family of calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs) has been reported in various species. The CAMTAs share a conserved domain organization, with a CG-1 DNA-binding domain, a transcription factor immunoglobulin domain, several ankyrin repeats, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a varying number of IQ motifs. CAMTAs participate in transcriptional regulation by recognizing and binding to a specific cis-element: (G/A/C)CGCG(C/G/T). Plants suffer from the environmental challenges, including abiotic and biotic stresses. Investigations in various plant species indicate a broad range of CAMTA functions involved in developmental regulation, environmental stress response, and hormone cross talk. In this review, we focus on the expression patterns and biological functions of CAMTAs to explore their probable applications in biotechnology. Furthermore, the identification and phylogenetic analysis of CAMTAs in crops could open new perspectives for enhancing stress tolerance, which could lead to improved crop production.

  9. Characterization of a Toxoplasma gondii calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Takano, Ryo; Gong, Haiyan; Ishiwa, Akiko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2016-07-21

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa and a major pathogen of animals and immunocompromised humans, in whom it causes encephalitis. Understanding the mechanism of tachyzoite invasion is important for the discovery of new drug targets and may serve as a model for the study of other apicomplexan parasites. We previously showed that Plasmodium falciparum expresses a homolog of human calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) that is important for host cell invasion. In this study, to identify novel targets for the treatment of Toxoplasma gondii infection (another apicomplexan parasite), we sought to identify a CaMK-like protein in the T. gondii genome and to characterize its role in the life-cycle of this parasite. An in vitro kinase assay was performed to assess the phosphorylation activities of a novel CaMK-like protein in T. gondii by using purified proteins with various concentrations of calcium, calmodulin antagonists, or T. gondii glideosome proteins. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was performed to detect the localization of this protein kinase by using the antibodies against this protein and organellar maker proteins of T. gondii. We identified a novel CaMK homolog in T. gondii, T. gondii CaMK-related kinase (TgCaMKrk), which exhibits calmodulin-independent autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation activity. However, calmodulin antagonists had no effect on its kinase activity. In T. gondii-infected cells, TgCaMKrk localized to the apical ends of extracellular and intracellular tachyzoites. TgCaMKrk phosphorylated TgGAP45 for phosphorylation in vitro. Our data improve our understanding of T. gondii motility and infection, the interaction between parasite protein kinases and glideosomes, and drug targets for protozoan diseases.

  10. Conformational Changes of Calmodulin on Calcium and Peptide Binding Monitored by Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirschl, Martin; Ottl, Johannes; Vörös, Janos

    2011-01-01

    Film bulk acoustic resonators (FBAR) are mass sensitive, label-free biosensors that allow monitoring of the interaction between biomolecules. In this paper we use the FBAR to measure the binding of calcium and the CaMKII peptide to calmodulin. Because the mass of the calcium is too small to be detected, the conformational change caused by the binding process is measured by monitoring the resonant frequency and the motional resistance of the FBAR. The resonant frequency is a measure for the amount of mass coupled to the sensor while the motional resistance is influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the adsorbent. The measured frequency shift during the calcium adsorptions was found to be strongly dependent on the surface concentration of the immobilized calmodulin, which indicates that the measured signal is significantly influenced by the amount of water inside the calmodulin layer. By plotting the measured motional resistance against the frequency shift, a mass adsorption can be distinguished from processes involving measurable conformational changes. With this method three serial processes were identified during the peptide binding. The results show that the FBAR is a promising technology for the label-free measurement of conformational changes. PMID:25585566

  11. Effect of Agomelatine and Fluoxetine on HAM-D Score, Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Level in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder With Severe Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Keshav; Gupta, Rachna; Bhatia, M S; Tripathi, A K; Gupta, Lalit K

    2017-12-01

    Evidence suggests that neurotrophic factors, inflammatory markers, and circadian rhythm dysfunctions could be involved in pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. This study evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of agomelatine, a melatonergic drug, and fluoxetine (positive comparator) and their effect on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α level in patients having major depressive disorder with severe depression. In the present study, we chose TNF-α and BDNF because reduction of TNF-α and rise in BDNF levels are linked with improvement in major depressive disorder. Patients with Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) score ≥25 were treated with agomelatine or fluoxetine and followed up for 12 weeks. In the agomelatine group, the HAM-D score, BDNF level, and TNF-α level at the start of treatment were 31.1 ± 1.88 ng/mL, 2.44 ± 0.38 ng/mL, and 512.5 ± 86.2 pg/mL, respectively, which significantly changed to 13.67 ± 2.22 ng/mL, 2.87 ± 0.44 ng/mL, and 391.64 ± 104.8 pg/mL, respectively (P depression. Trophic factors repair dysfunctional circuits in depression. Both treatments were found to be safe and well tolerated. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  12. Implications of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) with codissolved brain-derived neurotrophic factor injectable scaffold on motor function recovery rate following cervical dorsolateral funiculotomy in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grous, Lauren Conova; Vernengo, Jennifer; Jin, Ying; Himes, B Timothy; Shumsky, Jed S; Fischer, Itzhak; Lowman, Anthony

    2013-06-01

    In a follow-up study to their prior work, the authors evaluated a novel delivery system for a previously established treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI), based on a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), lightly cross-linked with a polyethylene glycol (PEG) injectable scaffold. The primary aim of this work was to assess the recovery of both spontaneous and skilled forelimb function following a cervical dorsolateral funiculotomy in the rat. This injury ablates the rubrospinal tract (RST) but spares the dorsal and ventral corticospinal tract and can severely impair reaching and grasping abilities. Animals received an implant of either PNIPAAm-g-PEG or PNIPAAm-g-PEG + brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The single-pellet reach-to-grasp task and the staircase-reaching task were used to assess skilled motor function associated with reaching and grasping abilities, and the cylinder task was used to assess spontaneous motor function, both before and after injury. Because BDNF can stimulate regenerating RST axons, the authors showed that animals receiving an implant of PNIPAAm-g-PEG with codissolved BDNF had an increased recovery rate of fine motor function when compared with a control group (PNIPAAm-g-PEG only) on both a staircase-reaching task at 4 and 8 weeks post-SCI and on a single-pellet reach-to-grasp task at 5 weeks post-SCI. In addition, spontaneous motor function, as measured in the cylinder test, recovered to preinjury values in animals receiving PNIPAAm-g-PEG + BDNF. Fluorescence immunochemistry indicated the presence of both regenerating axons and BDA-labeled fibers growing up to or within the host-graft interface in animals receiving PNIPAAm-g-PEG + BDNF. Based on their results, the authors suggest that BDNF delivered by the scaffold promoted the growth of RST axons into the lesion, which may have contributed in part to the increased recovery rate.

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor in maternal plasma and umbilical cord blood from pre-eclamptic and physiological pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienertova-Vasku, J; Bienert, P; Zlamal, F; Splichal, Z; Tomandl, J; Tomandlova, M; Hodicka, Z; Ventruba, P; Vasku, A

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the circulating levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in maternal serum and umbilical cord blood from respective pregnancies in pre-eclampsia (PE) cases and a control cohort. A total of 12 pre-eclampsia cases and 34 healthy controls were enrolled and the maternal peripheral blood - umbilical cord blood duos, were examined for BDNF and CNTF levels. BNDF levels were significantly higher in umbilical cord blood from pre-eclamptic pregnancies; there was also significant difference between maternal plasma and umbilical cord blood levels of BDNF (p CNTF levels in umbilical cord blood (CNTF-UCB) were significantly higher in PE cases than in the controls (p = 0.03). Significant differences were observed in expression of BDNF and CNTF proteins in maternal peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood between pre-eclampsia cases and healthy controls.

  14. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein gene expression in primary frontal cortical neurons. Comparison with NMDA and AMPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Sayed, Mona; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    The effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) mRNA levels in primary neuronal cultures of rat frontal cortex was characterized pharmacologically and compared to the effect on expression of c-fos, bdnf, neuritin, cox-2 as examples...... and BDNF mRNA, but not COX-2 mRNA. The pharmacological profile of NMDA and AMPA-induced arc gene expression in frontal cortical neurons was compared to BDNF. NMDA and AMPA increased Arc mRNA but their maximal effect did not exceed 20-fold. The effect of AMPA was completely blocked by the NMDA receptor...... plasticity in the frontal cortex....

  15. What keeps a body moving? The brain-derived neurotrophic factor val66met polymorphism and intrinsic motivation to exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell Hooper, Ann E; Bryan, Angela D; Hagger, Martin S

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are intrinsically motivated to exercise are more likely to do so consistently. In previous research, those with at least one copy of the methionine (met) allele in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF; rs6265) had greater increases in positive mood and lower perceived exertion during exercise. This study examined whether genotype for BDNF is also related to intrinsic motivation, measured by self-report during a treadmill exercise session and a free-choice behavioral measure (continuing to exercise given the option to stop) among 89 regular exercisers (age M = 23.58, SD = 3.95). Those with at least one copy of the met allele reported greater increases in intrinsic motivation during exercise and were more likely to continue exercising when given the option to stop (55 vs. 33%). Results suggest that underlying genetic factors may partially influence perceptions of inherent rewards associated with exercise and might inform the development of individually targeted interventions.

  16. Regional differences in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pro-peptide, proBDNF and preproBDNF in the brain confer stress resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bangkun; Yang, Chun; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Chen, Qian-Xue; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Using learned helplessness (LH) model of depression, we measured protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pro-peptide, BDNF precursors (proBDNF and preproBDNF) in the brain regions of LH (susceptible) and non-LH rats (resilience). Expression of preproBDNF, proBDNF and BDNF pro-peptide in the medial prefrontal cortex of LH rats, but not non-LH rats, was significantly higher than control rats, although expression of these proteins in the nucleus accumbens of LH rats was significantly lower than control rats. This study suggests that regional differences in conversion of BDNF precursors into BDNF and BDNF pro-peptide by proteolytic cleavage may contribute to stress resilience.

  17. Temporal expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA in the rat hippocampus after treatment with selective and mixed monoaminergic antidepressants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Marianne Hald; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Rønn, Lars Christian B

    2008-01-01

    Strong evidence suggests that antidepressants work by induction of neuroplastic changes mediated through regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). This study was undertaken to investigate the time-course of the effect of three antidepressants; fluoxetine, imipramine and venlafaxine......, which differentially affect monoamine reuptake, on BDNF mRNA expression in the hippocampus. The consequences of increased BDNF in the hippocampus are still indefinite. Here, we also determined the effects on the expression of two other genes (synaptophysin and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43......)) known to be involved in synapse formation and axonal growth and likely regulated by BDNF. The effects were determined in rats after sub-chronic (7 days) and chronic (14 and 21 days) treatment using semi-quantitative in situ hybridisation. BDNF mRNA levels in the dentate gyrus (DG) were increased after...

  18. Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) levels as a possible predictor of psychopathology in healthy twins at high and low risk for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2014-01-01

    with the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism predict onset of affective disorder in healthy individuals at heritable risk for affective disorder. In a high-risk study, we assessed whole blood levels of BDNF in 234 healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twins with or without a co-twin history of affective disorder (high......Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a potential biomarker of affective disorder. However, longitudinal studies evaluating a potential predictive role of BDNF on subsequent psychopathology are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BDNF alone or in interaction...... developed psychiatric disorder. Cox regression analysis revealed that BDNF levels at baseline were not associated with onset of illness in this explorative study. Further, two-way interactions between BDNF levels and the Val66Met polymorphism or between familial risk and the Val66Met polymorphism did...

  19. Activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling accompanying filial imprinting in domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Aoki, Naoya; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kitajima, Takaaki; Iikubo, Eiji; Katagiri, Sachiko; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2011-12-07

    Newly hatched domestic chicks serve as an important model for experimental studies of neural and behavioral plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation, which underlies learning and memory in rodents. Here we show that BDNF mRNA levels increased in the intermediate medial hyperpallium apicale (IMHA), which is the caudal area of the visual Wulst, of imprinted chick brains, and the upregulation of gene expression correlated with the strength of the learned preference to the training object. In addition, activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling was associated with filial imprinting. However, pharmacological deprivation of TrkB phosphorylation in IMHA did not impair memory formation, suggesting that activation of BDNF/TrkB signaling in IMHA is not involved in memory acquisition in filial imprinting.

  20. The effects of vitamin E on brain derived neurotrophic factor, tissues oxidative damage and learning and memory of juvenile hypothyroid rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghcheghi, Yousef; Beheshti, Farimah; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Salmani, Hossein; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2017-12-30

    The effects of vitamin E (Vit E) on brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and brain tissues oxidative damage as well as on learning and memory impairments in juvenile hypothyroid rats were examined. The rats were grouped as: (1) Control; (2) Propylthiouracil (PTU); (3) PTU-Vit E and (4) Vit E. PTU was added to their drinking water (0.05%) during 6 weeks. Vit E (20 mg/kg) was daily injected (IP). Morris water maze (MWM) and passive avoidance (PA) were carried out. The animals were deeply anesthetized and the brain tissues were removed for biochemical measurements. PTU increased the escape latency and traveled path in MWM (P E (P E improved BDNF, thiol, SOD and CAT while diminished MDA. The results of the present study showed that Vit E improved BDNF and prevented from brain tissues oxidative damage as well as learning and memory impairments in juvenile hypothyroid rats.

  1. Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with epigenetic modifications of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor-6 exon in adolescent offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo-Rodriguez, Maria; Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Leonard, Gabriel; Perron, Michel; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomás

    2010-10-05

    Prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking (PEMCS) is associated with variations in brain and behavior in adolescence. Epigenetic mechanisms may mediate some of the consequences of PEMCS through methylation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in genes important for brain development, such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). In the current study, we used bisulfite sequencing to assess DNA methylation of the BDNF promoter in the blood of adolescents whose mothers smoked during pregnancy. We demonstrate that PEMCS is associated with higher rates of DNA methylation in the BDNF-6 exon. These results suggest that PEMCS may lead to long-term down-regulation of BDNF expression via the increase of DNA methylation in its promoter region. Such mechanisms could, in turn, lead to modifications in both development and plasticity of the brain exposed in utero to maternal cigarette smoking.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is produced by skeletal muscle cells in response to contraction and enhances fat oxidation via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, V B; Åström, Maj-Brit; Chan, M H S

    2009-01-01

    C12 skeletal muscle cells were electrically stimulated to mimic contraction. L6 myotubes and isolated rat extensor digitorum longus muscles were treated with BDNF and phosphorylation of the proteins AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (Thr(172)) and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase beta (ACCbeta) (Ser...... into the circulation. Bdnf mRNA and protein expression was increased in muscle cells that were electrically stimulated. BDNF increased phosphorylation of AMPK and ACCbeta and enhanced FAO both in vitro and ex vivo. The effect of BDNF on FAO was AMPK-dependent, since the increase in FAO was abrogated in cells infected......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is produced in skeletal muscle, but its functional significance is unknown. We aimed to determine the signalling processes and metabolic actions of BDNF. METHODS: We first examined whether exercise induced BDNF expression in humans. Next, C2...

  3. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor reverses atrophy of rubrospinal neurons following both acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenberg, Marc J; Blits, Bas; Dijkhuizen, Paul A; te Beek, Erik T; Bakker, Arne; van Heerikhuize, Joop J; Pool, Chris W; Hermens, Wim T J; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, Joost

    2004-03-01

    Rubrospinal neurons (RSNs) undergo marked atrophy after cervical axotomy. This progressive atrophy may impair the regenerative capacity of RSNs in response to repair strategies that are targeted to promote rubrospinal tract regeneration. Here, we investigated whether we could achieve long-term rescue of RSNs from lesion-induced atrophy by adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector-mediated gene transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). We show for the first time that AAV vectors can be used for the persistent transduction of highly atrophic neurons in the red nucleus (RN) for up to 18 months after injury. Furthermore, BDNF gene transfer into the RN following spinal axotomy resulted in counteraction of atrophy in both the acute and chronic stage after injury. These novel findings demonstrate that a gene therapeutic approach can be used to reverse atrophy of lesioned CNS neurons for an extended period of time.

  4. Synergistic associations of catechol-O-methyltransferase and brain-derived neurotrophic factor with executive function in aging are selective and modified by apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Shraddha; Vergote, David; Westaway, David; Jhamandas, Jack; Dixon, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have shown promising but inconsistent linkages with executive function (EF) in normal aging. We tested (1) independent contributions of COMT and BDNF risk; (2) potential magnification by risk-related interactions or additive effects with age; and (3) effect modification through stratification by apolipoprotein E (APOE) (risk: ε4+). Multiple linear regression models were applied with nondemented older adults (N = 634; range: 53-95 years) for an EF latent variable. No independent effects of BDNF or COMT on EF were observed. Additive (but not interactive) effects of COMT, BDNF, and age showed that older adults with a high-risk allelic combination performed differentially worse. Of 2 tested models of synergistic effects, the additive approach selectively supported a magnification hypothesis, which was qualified by the presence or the absence of APOE ε4. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of moderate- and high-intensity chronic exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in fast and slow muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Maldonado, Alberto; Cerna-Cortés, Joel; Castro-Rodríguez, Elena M; Montero, Sergio A; Muñiz, Jesús; Rodríguez-Hernández, Alejandrina; Lemus, Mónica; De Álvarez-Buylla, Elena Roces

    2016-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression is sensitive to cellular activity. In the sedentary state, BDNF expression is affected by the muscle phenotype. Eighteen Wistar rats were divided into the following 3 groups: sedentary (S); moderate-intensity training (MIT); and high-intensity training (HIT). The training protocol lasted 8 weeks. Forty-eight hours after training, total RNA and protein levels in the soleus and plantaris muscles were obtained. In the plantaris, the BDNF protein level was lower in the HIT than in the S group (P effect was found in the soleus (without significant difference). In the soleus, higher Bdnf mRNA levels were found in the HIT group (P exercise reduces BDNF protein level in fast muscles and increases Bdnf mRNA levels in slow muscles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of Mirtazapine Treatment on Serum Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in Patients of Major Depressive Disorder with Severe Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rachna; Gupta, Keshav; Tripathi, A K; Bhatia, M S; Gupta, Lalit K

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical efficacy of mirtazapine and its effect on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in patients of major-depressive disorder (MDD) with severe depression. Patients (aged 18-60) with MDD diagnosed by DSM-IV criteria, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) score ≥25 were included (n = 30). Mirtazapine was given in the doses of 30 mg/day. All patients were followed up for 12 weeks for the evaluation of clinical efficacy, safety along with serum BDNF and TNF-α levels. HAM-D score at the start of treatment was 30.1 ± 1.92, which significantly (p depressed patients and treatment response is associated with an increase in serum BDNF and a decrease in serum TNF-α levels. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Continuous exercise training and curcumin attenuate changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and oxidative stress induced by lead acetate in the hippocampus of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Somayeh; Roshan, Valiollah Dabidi; Mahjoub, Soleiman

    2013-02-01

    For many years it has been known that lead is life-threatening, not only as an air pollutant but also because of it has been associated with several conditions including neurodegenerative disease. Curcumin (the principal curcuminoid found in turmeric) has demonstrated potent antioxidant properties. We investigated neuroprotective effects of endurance exercise and/or curcumin on lead acetate-induced neurotoxicity in the rat hippocampus. Forty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups: 1) lead acetate, 2) curcumin, 3) training, 4) training + curcumin, and 5) control. The rats in the training groups performed treadmill running five times a week for 8 weeks (15-22 m/min, 25-64 min). All groups except control received lead acetate (20 mg/kg), whereas the control group received curcumin solution (ethyl oleate). In addition, the curcumin and training + curcumin groups received curcumin solution (30 mg/kg) intraperioneally. Lead acetate resulted in a significantly increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) in plasma (72%), but not significant in hippocampus (59%). In addition, it led to significantly decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus (17%) and total antioxidant capacity (27%), as compared to control group. Treadmill running, curcumin supplementation or both resulted in a significant decrease in hippocampus MDA (17, 20, 31%, respectively) and plasma MDA (60, 22, 71%) and also, significantly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (76, 45, 94%) and total antioxidant capacity (47.13, 47.11, 61%) levels, as compared to lead acetate group. These results provide a rationale for an inhibitory role of curcumin and regular exercise in the attenuation of lead-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Primate phencyclidine model of schizophrenia: sex-specific effects on cognition, brain derived neurotrophic factor, spine synapses, and dopamine turnover in prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsworth, John D; Groman, Stephanie M; Jentsch, James D; Leranth, Csaba; Redmond, D Eugene; Kim, Jung D; Diano, Sabrina; Roth, Robert H

    2014-10-31

    Cognitive deficits are a core symptom of schizophrenia, yet they remain particularly resistant to treatment. The model provided by repeatedly exposing adult nonhuman primates to phencyclidine has generated important insights into the neurobiology of these deficits, but it remains possible that administration of this psychotomimetic agent during the pre-adult period, when the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in human and nonhuman primates is still undergoing significant maturation, may provide a greater understanding of schizophrenia-related cognitive deficits. The effects of repeated phencyclidine treatment on spine synapse number, dopamine turnover and BDNF expression in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and working memory accuracy were examined in pre-adult monkeys. One week following phencyclidine treatment, juvenile and adolescent male monkeys demonstrated a greater loss of spine synapses in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex than adult male monkeys. Further studies indicated that in juvenile males, a cognitive deficit existed at 4 weeks following phencyclidine treatment, and this impairment was associated with decreased dopamine turnover, decreased brain derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA, and a loss of dendritic spine synapses in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, female juvenile monkeys displayed no cognitive deficit at 4 weeks after phencyclidine treatment and no alteration in dopamine turnover or brain derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA or spine synapse number in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In the combined group of male and female juvenile monkeys, significant linear correlations were detected between dopamine turnover, spine synapse number, and cognitive performance. As the incidence of schizophrenia is greater in males than females, these findings support the validity of the juvenile primate phencyclidine model and highlight its potential usefulness in understanding the deficits in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia and

  9. Ginsenoside Rg1 reverses stress-induced depression-like behaviours and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression within the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiuzhi; Gao, Rui; Liu, Zhuxi; Cheng, Ziyi; Qi, Yihang; Fan, Cuiqin; Yu, Shu Yan

    2016-07-01

    Depression is a major neuropsychiatric disorder that exerts deleterious effects upon public health. However, the neuronal mechanisms of depression remain largely uncharacterized, which has retarded the identification and development of effective therapeutic tools for the treatment of this disorder. The aim of this study was to explore the neuronal mechanisms underlying the protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1, a natural steroidal saponin found in ginseng, against chronic stress-induced depression.The results showed that chronic administration of ginsenoside Rg1 (40 mg/kg, i.p., 5 weeks) significantly ameliorated depression-like behaviours in rats as assessed in the sucrose preference and forced swim tests. Furthermore, chronic stress decreased the phosphorylation levels of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and cAMP-response element-binding protein in the prefrontal cortex as well as producing a reduction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. Of particular importance, all reductions in these parameters were significantly reversed by pre-treatment with ginsenoside Rg1. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of ginsenoside Rg1 might be mediated, at least in part, by activating the cAMP-response element-binding protein-brain-derived neurotrophic factor system within the prefrontal cortex. These findings not only reveal some of the underlying neuronal mechanisms of depression, but also the therapeutic potential of ginsenoside Rg1 as a preventive agent in the treatment of depression. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Contraction-induced muscle fiber damage is increased in soleus muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats and is associated with elevated expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA in muscle fibers and activated satellite cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copray, S; Liem, R; Brouwer, N; Greenhaff, P; Habens, F; Fernyhough, P

    The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is elevated in the soleus muscle of streptozotocin-diabetic rats. To determine whether this diabetes-induced elevation was associated with or enhanced by muscle activity we have induced high-intensity muscle contraction by electrically

  11. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-dependent remodeling of Ca2+ current in pressure overload heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanggan; Tandan, Samvit; Cheng, Jun; Yang, Chunmei; Nguyen, Lan; Sugianto, Jessica; Johnstone, Janet L; Sun, Yuyang; Hill, Joseph A

    2008-09-12

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activity is increased in heart failure (HF), a syndrome characterized by markedly increased risk of arrhythmia. Activation of CaMKII increases peak L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca)) and slows I(Ca) inactivation. Whether these events are linked mechanistically is unknown. I(Ca) was recorded in acutely dissociated subepicardial and subendocardial murine left ventricular (LV) myocytes using the whole cell patch clamp method. Pressure overload heart failure was induced by surgical constriction of the thoracic aorta. I(Ca) density was significantly larger in subepicardial myocytes than in subendocardial/myocytes. Similar patterns were observed in the cell surface expression of alpha1c, the channel pore-forming subunit. In failing LV, I(Ca) density was increased proportionately in both cell types, and the time course of I(Ca) inactivation was slowed. This typical pattern of changes suggested a role of CaMKII. Consistent with this, measurements of CaMKII activity revealed a 2-3-fold increase (p process could not be induced, suggesting already maximal activation. Internal application of active CaMKII in failing myocytes did not elicit changes in I(Ca). Finally, CaMKII inhibition by internal diffusion of a specific peptide inhibitor reduced I(Ca) density and inactivation time course to similar levels in control and HF myocytes. I(Ca) density manifests a significant transmural gradient, and this gradient is preserved in heart failure. Activation of CaMKII, a known pro-arrhythmic molecule, is a major contributor to I(Ca) remodeling in load-induced heart failure.

  12. W342F Mutation in CCaMK Enhances Its Affinity to Calmodulin But Compromises Its Role in Supporting Root Nodule Symbiosis in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard Jauregui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK is regulated by free Ca2+ and Ca2+-loaded calmodulin. This dual binding is believed to be involved in its regulation and associated physiological functions, although direct experimental evidence for this is lacking. Here we document that site-directed mutations in the calmodulin-binding domain of CCaMK alters its binding capacity to calmodulin, providing an effective approach to study how calmodulin regulates CCaMK in terms of kinase activity and regulation of rhizobial symbiosis in Medicago truncatula. We observed that mutating the tryptophan at position 342 to phenylalanine (W342F markedly increased the calmodulin-binding capability of the mutant. The mutant CCaMK underwent autophosphorylation and catalyzed substrate phosphorylation in the absence of calcium and calmodulin. When the mutant W342F was expressed in ccamk-1 roots, the transgenic roots exhibited an altered nodulation phenotype. These results indicate that altering the calmodulin-binding domain of CCaMK could generate a constitutively activated kinase with a negative role in the physiological function of CCaMK.

  13. Mechanisms of involvement in calmodulin in regulation of affinity for Ca/sup 2 +/ and maximum activity of Ca pump of erythrocyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, S.N.; Pokudin, N.I.; Sitozhevskii, A.V.

    1986-06-20

    The activity of the Ca pump of inside-out vesicles of human erythrocyte membranes was studied using /sup 45/Ca and membrane filters. It was found that trifluoperazine completely inhibits the increase in the maximum activity of the Ca pump caused by the addition of calmodulin and has no effect on the calmodulin-stimulated increase in the affinity of the Ca pump for Ca/sup 2 +/. A comparison of characteristic curves of the calmodulin-stimulated components of the activity of the Ca pump, inhibited and not inhibited by trifluoperazine, and the fluorescence intensity of N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine in the presence of calmodulin showed that the mechanisms of action of calmodulin on the maximum activity of the Ca pump and its affinity for Ca/sup 2 +/ differ significantly. In the first case the activation was due to the Ca-calmodulin complex and in the second to the calcium-free form of calmodulin. This conclusion is supported by data on the dependence of the activity of the Ca pump on the calmodulin concentration at low and saturating Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations as well as by the results obtained in the case of moderate treatment of the membranes with trypsin.

  14. Association of Peripheral Blood Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiao-Yan; Feng, Jin-Chao; Cao, Chang; Wu, Huan-Tong; Loh, Y Peng; Cheng, Yong

    2016-11-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may be implicated in the developmental outcomes of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To use meta-analysis to determine whether children with ASD have altered peripheral blood levels of BDNF. A systematic search of PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science was performed for English-language literature through February 7, 2016. The search terms included brain-derived neurotrophic factor or BDNF in combination with autism, without year restriction. Two additional records were retrieved after a review of the reference lists of selected articles. Studies were included if they provided data on peripheral blood levels of BDNF in children with ASD and healthy control children. Studies that included adults or with overlapping samples were excluded. Data were extracted by 2 independent observers from 19 included studies. Data were pooled using a random-effects model with Comprehensive Meta-analysis software. Blood levels of BDNF in children with ASD compared with healthy controls. Altered levels of BDNF were hypothesized to be related to ASD. This meta-analysis included 19 studies with 2896 unique participants. Random-effects meta-analysis of all 19 studies showed that children with ASD had significantly increased peripheral blood levels of BDNF compared with healthy controls (Hedges g, 0.490; 95% CI, 0.185-0.794; P = .002). Subgroup analyses in 4 studies revealed that neonates diagnosed with ASD later in life had no association with blood levels of BDNF (Hedges g, 0.384; 95% CI, -0.244 to 1.011; P = .23), whereas children in the nonneonate ASD group (15 studies) demonstrated significantly increased BDNF levels compared with healthy controls (Hedges g, 0.524; 95% CI, 0.206 to 0.842; P = .001). Further analysis showed that children in the nonneonate ASD group had increased BDNF levels in serum (10 studies) (Hedges g, 0.564; 95% CI, 0.168 to 0.960; P = .005) but not in plasma

  15. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on a task-switching protocol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentrations in young adults with different levels of cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Pan, Chien-Yu; Chen, Fu-Chen; Wang, Chun-Hao; Chou, Feng-Ying

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Neurocognitive functions can be enhanced by acute aerobic exercise, which could be associated with changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations. We aimed to explore acute exercise-induced changes in BDNF concentrations, neuropsychological and neurophysiological performances when individuals with different levels of cardiorespiratory fitness performed a cognitive task. What is the main finding and its importance? Only young adults with higher cardiorespiratory fitness could attain switching cost and neurophysiological benefits via acute aerobic exercise. The mechanisms might be fitness dependent. Although acute aerobic exercise could enhance serum BDNF concentrations, changes in peripheral BDNF concentrations could not be the potential factor involved in the beneficial effects on neurocognitive performance. This study investigated the effects of acute aerobic exercise on neuropsychological and neurophysiological performances in young adults with different cardiorespiratory fitness levels when performing a task-switching protocol and explored the potential associations between acute aerobic exercise-induced changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations and various neurocognitive outcomes. Sixty young adults were categorized into one control group (i.e. non-exercise-intervention; n = 20) and two exercise-intervention (EI) groups [i.e. higher (EIH , n = 20) and lower (EIL , n = 20) cardiorespiratory fitness] according to their maximal oxygen consumption. At baseline and after either an acute bout of 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or a control period, the neuropsychological and neurophysiological performances and serum BDNF concentrations were measured when the participants performed a task-switching protocol involving executive control and greater demands on working memory. The results revealed that although acute aerobic exercise decreased reaction

  16. Calmodulin interacts with PAC1 and VPAC2 receptors and regulates PACAP-induced FOS expression in human neuroblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falktoft, B.; Georg, B.; Fahrenkrug, J.

    2009-01-01

    The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) mediates its physiological functions through activation of PAC1, VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptors, and the ubiquitous Ca2+-sensor calmodulin has been implicated in PACAP-induced signaling. The immediate early response gene FOS....... NB-I cells were shown to express PAC1 and VPAC2 receptors, and immunoprecipitation of both receptors displayed a co-association with calmodulin in the absence of Ca2+. Our findings indicate a novel mechanism of calmodulin in regulating PACAP signaling by possible interaction with the inactive state...... of PAC1 and VPAC2 receptors. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...

  17. Exome Analyses of Long QT Syndrome Reveal Candidate Pathogenic Mutations in Calmodulin-Interacting Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Ozaki, Kouichi; Miya, Fuyuki; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Shimizu, Wataru; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an arrhythmogenic disorder that can lead to sudden death. To date, mutations in 15 LQTS-susceptibility genes have been implicated. However, the genetic cause for approximately 20% of LQTS patients remains elusive. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing analyses on 59 LQTS and 61 unaffected individuals in 35 families and 138 unrelated LQTS cases, after genetic screening of known LQTS genes. Our systematic analysis of familial cases and subsequent verification by Sanger sequencing identified 92 candidate mutations in 88 genes for 23 of the 35 families (65.7%): these included eleven de novo, five recessive (two homozygous and three compound heterozygous) and seventy-three dominant mutations. Although no novel commonly mutated gene was identified other than known LQTS genes, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses revealed ten new pathogenic candidates that directly or indirectly interact with proteins encoded by known LQTS genes. Furthermore, candidate gene based association studies using an independent set of 138 unrelated LQTS cases and 587 controls identified an additional novel candidate. Together, mutations in these new candidates and known genes explained 37.1% of the LQTS families (13 in 35). Moreover, half of the newly identified candidates directly interact with calmodulin (5 in 11; comparison with all genes; p=0.042). Subsequent variant analysis in the independent set of 138 cases identified 16 variants in the 11 genes, of which 14 were in calmodulin-interacting genes (87.5%). These results suggest an important role of calmodulin and its interacting proteins in the pathogenesis of LQTS. PMID:26132555

  18. Catalase activity is modulated by calcium and calmodulin in detached mature leaves of sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afiyanti, Mufidah; Chen, Hsien-Jung

    2014-01-15

    Catalase (CAT) functions as one of the key enzymes in the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and affects the H2O2 homeostasis in plants. In sweet potato, a major catalase isoform was detected, and total catalase activity showed the highest level in mature leaves (L3) compared to immature (L1) and completely yellow, senescent leaves (L5). The major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity were strongly suppressed by ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). This inhibition could be specifically and significantly mitigated in mature L3 leaves by exogenous CaCl2, but not MgCl2 or CoCl2. EGTA also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Furthermore, chlorpromazine (CPZ), a calmodulin (CAM) inhibitor, drastically suppressed the major catalase isoform as well as total enzymatic activity, and this suppression was alleviated by exogenous sweet potato calmodulin (SPCAM) fusion protein in L3 leaves. CPZ also inhibited the activity of the catalase isoform in vitro. Protein blot hybridization showed that both anti-catalase SPCAT1 and anti-calmodulin SPCAM antibodies detect a band at the same position, which corresponds to the activity of the major catalase isoform from unboiled, but not boiled crude protein extract of L3 leaves. An inverse correlation between the major catalase isoform/total enzymatic activity and the H2O2 level was also observed. These data suggest that sweet potato CAT activity is modulated by CaCl2 and SPCAM, and plays an important role in H2O2 homeostasis in mature leaves. Association of SPCAM with the major CAT isoform is required and regulates the in-gel CAT activity band. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Developmental regulation of the gene for chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in anthers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Xia, M.; Liu, Z.; Wang, W.; Yang, T.; Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Franceschi, V. R.

    1999-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was cloned from developing anthers of lily (Lilium longiflorum Thumb. cv. Nellie White) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi). Previous biochemical characterization and structure/function studies had revealed that CCaMK has dual modes of regulation by Ca(2+) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin. The unique structural features of CCaMK include a catalytic domain, a calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain. The existence of these three features in a single polypeptide distinguishes it from other kinases. Western analysis revealed that CCaMK is expressed in a stage-specific manner in developing anthers. Expression of CCaMK was first detected in pollen mother cells and continued to increase, reaching a peak around the tetrad stage of meiosis. Following microsporogenesis, CCaMK expression rapidly decreased and at later stages of microspore development, no expression was detected. A tobacco genomic clone of CCaMK was isolated and transgenic tobacco plants were produced carrying the CCaMK promoter fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Both CCaMK mRNA and protein were detected in the pollen sac and their localizations were restricted to the pollen mother cells and tapetal cells. Consistent results showing a stage-specific expression pattern were obtained by beta-glucuronidase analysis, in-situ hybridization and immunolocalization. The stage- and tissue-specific appearance of CCaMK in anthers suggests that it could play a role in sensing transient changes in free Ca(2+) concentration in target cells, thereby controlling developmental events in the anther.

  20. Mutations in yeast calmodulin cause defects in spindle pole body functions and nuclear integrity

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Yeast calmodulin (CaM) is required for the progression of nuclear division (Ohya, Y. and Y. Anraku. 1989. Curr. Genet. 15:113-120), although the precise mechanism and physiological role of CaM in this process are unclear. In this paper we have characterized the phenotype caused by a temperature-sensitive lethal mutation (cmdl-101) in the yeast CaM. The cmdl-101 mutation expresses a carboxyl-terminal half of the yeast CaM (Met72-Cys147) under the control of an inducible GAL1 promoter. Incubati...

  1. Alzheimer's Disease Brain-Derived Amyloid-{beta}-Mediated Inhibition of LTP In Vivo Is Prevented by Immunotargeting Cellular Prion Protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Andrew E

    2011-05-18

    Synthetic amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers bind with high affinity to cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but the role of this interaction in mediating the disruption of synaptic plasticity by such soluble Aβ in vitro is controversial. Here we report that intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ-containing aqueous extracts of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) brain robustly inhibits long-term potentiation (LTP) without significantly affecting baseline excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vivo. Moreover, the disruption of LTP was abrogated by immunodepletion of Aβ. Importantly, intracerebroventricular administration of antigen-binding antibody fragment D13, directed to a putative Aβ-binding site on PrP(C), prevented the inhibition of LTP by AD brain-derived Aβ. In contrast, R1, a Fab directed to the C terminus of PrP(C), a region not implicated in binding of Aβ, did not significantly affect the Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. These data support the pathophysiological significance of SDS-stable Aβ dimer and the role of PrP(C) in mediating synaptic plasticity disruption by soluble Aβ.

  2. Loneliness in Relation to Depression: The Moderating Influence of a Polymorphism of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene on Self-efficacy and Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Marc; Woods, Robbie; Crump, Carly; Anisman, Hymie

    2017-01-01

    Disturbances of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, which may occur among those with a polymorphism of the Val66Met gene, comprising a Met substitution for the Val allele, may be associated with depressive cognitions. However, presumed elevated BDNF levels among individuals with the Val/Val genotype, might confer increased responsivity to contextual challenges, thus fostering vulnerability to depression. In Study 1, among undergraduate students (N = 252), increased loneliness perceptions were accompanied with depressive symptoms. This relationship was moderated by self-efficacy and BDNF genotype, such that when individuals appraised high self-efficacy, those with the Val/Val genotype, compared to Met carriers, reported greater depression scores when they perceived feeling lonely. Study 2 revealed that among undergraduate students (N = 178), lower depressive scores were associated with increased problem-focused coping among Val/Val individuals, but not Met carriers. Moreover, with increased perceived loneliness, Val/Val carriers endorsed lower problem-focused coping. Findings suggest that Val/Val individuals may have adverse neurocognitive vulnerability to loneliness experiences. PMID:28769852

  3. The influence of inhalative corticosteroids on circulating Nerve Growth Factor, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Neurotrophin-3 in allergic asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, O; Hanf, G; Schäper, C; O'Connor, A; Kunkel, G

    2001-12-01

    The neurotrophins Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin (NT)-3 are produced, stored and released by various immunological cells. The influence of NTs upon the function of these cells is described. Elevated plasma levels were found in inflammatory, autoimmune and allergic diseases with the highest levels in allergic asthma. A connection between bronchial hyper-responsiveness and serum levels has been reported. Little is known about the influence of treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on serum NT levels and their influence on the asthmatic state. Eighty-seven volunteers were studied. Thirty-eight were stable allergic asthmatics with constant ICS doses, 29 were asthmatics not receiving anti-asthmatic treatment and 20 were age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Demographic and lung function data were evaluated. NT serum levels were determined by ELISA. NGF and BDNF levels were significantly increased in untreated asthmatics compared to the control and the treated group, while NT-3 demonstrated significantly higher levels in treated asthmatics compared to healthy controls. After stabilization of untreated subjects with ICS, the NT levels decreased significantly. These results suggest that NTs participate in allergic inflammation and asthma. Effective treatment leads to a decrease of circulating neurotrophic factors.

  4. Investigation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression in hypothalamus of obese rats: Modulation by omega-3 fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Maksoud, Sahar M; Hassanein, Sally I; Gohar, Neveen A; Attia, Saad M M; Gad, Mohamed Z

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was investigating the effect of omega-3 fatty acids (ω-3 FAs) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression, using in vivo and in vitro models, to unravel the potential mechanisms of polyunsaturated fatty acids use in obesity. Twenty-nine Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; lean controls fed normal chow diet for 14 weeks, obese controls fed 60% of their diet as saturated fats for 14 weeks, and ω-3 FAs-treated rats fed 60% saturated fat diet for 14 weeks with concomitant oral administration of 400 mg/kg/day ω-3 FAs, mainly docosahexaenoic acid and EPA, from week 12 to week 14. For the in vitro experiment, hypothalamic cells from six obese rats were cultured in the presence of different concentrations of ω-3 FAs to determine its direct effect on BDNF expression. In vivo results showed that obesity has negative effect on BDNF gene expression in rat hypothalamus that was reversed by administration of ω-3 FAs. Obese rats showed hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, normoinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and hyperleptinemia. Treatment with ω-3 FAs showed significant decrease in serum total cholesterol and TAG. Also serum glucose level and HOMA index were decreased significantly. In vitro results demonstrated the increase in BDNF expression by ω-3 FAs in a dose-dependent manner. Obesity causes down-regulation of BDNF gene expression that can be reversed by ω-3 FAs treatment, making them an interesting treatment approach for obesity and metabolic disease.

  5. The relationship of Chlamydophila pneumoniae with schizophrenia: The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) in this relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayci, Fatma; Ozdemir, Armagan; Saribas, Suat; Yuksel, Pelin; Ergin, Sevgi; Kuskucu, Ali Mert; Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Balcioglu, Ibrahim; Alpay, Nihat; Kurt, Aykut; Sezgin, Zeynep; Kocak, Banu Tufan; Icel, Rana Sucu; Can, Gunay; Tokman, Hrisi Bahar; Kocazeybek, Bekir

    Several pathogens have been suspected of playing a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Chronic inflammation has been proposed to occur as a result of persistent infection caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae cells that reside in brain endothelial cells for many years. It was recently hypothesized that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) may play prominent roles in the development of schizophrenia. NT-3 and BDNF levels have been suggested to change in response to various manifestations of infection. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the roles of BDNF and NT3 in the schizophrenia-C. pneumoniae infection relationship. RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and ELISA methods were used. Fifty patients suffering from schizophrenia and 35 healthy individuals were included as the patient group (PG) and the healthy control group (HCG), respectively. We detected persistent infection in 14 of the 50 individuals in the PG and in 1 of the 35 individuals in the HCG. A significant difference was found between the two groups (p0.05). C. pneumoniae DNA was not detected in any group. A significant difference in NT-3 levels was observed between the groups, with very low levels in the PG (p0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that NT-3 levels during persistent C. pneumoniae infection may play a role in this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Selective cognitive deficits and reduced hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in small-conductance calcium-activated K+ channel deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, J P R; Redrobe, J P; Hansen, H H

    2009-01-01

    Small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels 1-3 (SK1-3) are important for neuronal firing regulation and are considered putative CNS drug targets. For instance non-selective SK blockers improve performance in animal models of cognition. The SK subtype(s) involved herein awaits identification...... and the question is difficult to address pharmacologically due to the lack of subtype-selective SK-channel modulators. In this study, we used doxycycline-induced conditional SK3-deficient (T/T) mice to address the cognitive consequences of selective SK3 deficiency. In T/T mice SK3 protein is near-eliminated from...... performed equally well in passive avoidance, object recognition and the Morris water maze. Thus, some aspects of working/short-term memory are disrupted in T/T mice. Using in situ hybridization, we further found the cognitive deficits in T/T mice to be paralleled by reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor...

  7. Neuroprotection of vestibular sensory cells from gentamicin ototoxicity obtained using nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, reactive oxygen species scavengers, brain-derived neurotrophic factors and calpain inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumida, Masaya; Anniko, Matti; Shimizu, Akira; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    In order to devise a new treatment for inner ear disorders, the efficacy of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-N(G)-nitroarginine methylester [L-NAME]), a radical scavenger (D-methionine), a neurotrophin (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF]) and a calpain inhibitor (leupeptin) for protection from hair cell damage was investigated. The effects of these drugs on gentamicin-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied by means of the fluorescence indicators 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate and dihydrotetramethylrosamine. The effect on gentamicin-induced vestibular hair cell damage was examined by using an in vitro LIVE/DEAD system. L-NAME inhibited the production of NO, D-methionine and BDNF restricted the production of ROS and leupeptin inhibited neither NO nor ROS. All the drugs used limited the vestibular hair cell damage caused by gentamicin. The combinations L-NAME + BDNF, L-NAME + leupeptin and D-methionine + BDNF had a significantly stronger preventive effect on hair cell damage. It is suggested that combined treatment with a radical inhibitor and either a neurotrophin or calpain inhibitor may help to treat inner ear disorders more effectively.

  8. Lower brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels associated with worsening fatigue in prostate cancer patients during repeated stress from radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saligan, L N; Lukkahatai, N; Holder, G; Walitt, B; Machado-Vieira, R

    2016-12-01

    Fatigue during cancer treatment is associated with depression. Neurotrophic factors play a major role in depression and stress and might provide insight into mechanisms of fatigue. This study investigated the association between plasma concentrations of three neurotrophic factors (BDNF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor; GDNF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor; and SNAPIN, soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion attachment receptor-associated protein) and initial fatigue intensification during external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in euthymic non-metastatic prostate cancer men. Fatigue, as measured by the 13-item Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Fatigue (FACT-F), and plasma neurotrophic factors were collected at baseline (prior to EBRT) and mid-EBRT. Subjects were categorized into fatigue and no fatigue groups using a > 3-point change in FACT-F scores between the two time points. Multiple linear regressions analysed the associations between fatigue and neurotrophic factors. FACT-F scores of 47 subjects decreased from baseline (43.95 ± 1.3) to mid-EBRT (38.36 ± 1.5, P < 0.001), indicating worsening fatigue. SNAPIN levels were associated with fatigue scores (rs = 0.43, P = 0.005) at baseline. A significant decrease of BDNF concentration (P = 0.008) was found in fatigued subjects during EBRT (n = 39). Baseline SNAPIN and decreasing BDNF levels may influence worsening fatigue during EBRT. Further investigations are warranted to confirm their role in the pathophysiology and therapeutics of fatigue.

  9. Effect of Interval and Continuous Aerobic Training on Basal Serum and Plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Values in Seniors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enette, Lievyn; Vogel, Thomas; Fanon, Jean Luc; Lang, Pierre Olivier

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to provide a comprehensive analysis of the available clinical trials analyzing, in seniors, the effect of interval aerobic training (IAT) and continuous aerobic training (CAT) on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentration. We identified 14 randomized or not-randomized intervention studies published up to January 2017 through a computer-assisted search (PUBMED, Pedro, and Science direct data bases). The five trials considering IAT and the nine considering CAT totalized 988 individuals (age range: 58.1-77 years). The parameters of aerobic training (AT) protocol in terms of frequency and intensity are the primary determinants of the BDNF response to AT. The interpretation of the relationship between AT and BDNF signaling pathway was very challenging when specific health conditions were taken into consideration. This was more particularly true with mild cognitive impairment or depressive symptoms. These findings argue in favor of a generalization of the practice of AT and show that the type of training is not the main determining factor of the increase in BDNF level, which results more from the combination of several factors such as intensity and frequency of sessions, duration of programs, and also some genetic determinant coding for BDNF protein. All these factors have to be carefully addressed in future researches in that field. Thus, further researches are still necessary to better the signaling pathway by which AT contributes to better health outcomes.

  10. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Loaded PS80 PBCA Nanocarrier for In Vitro Neural Differentiation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chiu-Yen; Lin, Martin Hsiu-Chu; Lee, I-Neng; Lee, Tsong-Hai; Lee, Ming-Hsueh; Yang, Jen-Tsung

    2017-03-19

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can induce neural differentiation in stem cells and has the potential for repair of the nervous system. In this study, a polysorbate 80-coated polybutylcyanoacrylate nanocarrier (PS80 PBCA NC) was constructed to deliver plasmid DNAs (pDNAs) containing BDNF gene attached to a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE-cmvBDNF). The hypoxia-sensing mechanism of BDNF expression and inductiveness of the nano-formulation on mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate into neurons following hypoxia was tested in vitro with immunofluorescent staining and Western blotting. The HRE-cmvBDNF appeared to adsorb onto the surface of PS80 PBCA NC, with a resultant mean diameter of 92.6 ± 1.0 nm and zeta potential of -14.1 ± 1.1 mV. HIF-1α level in iPSCs was significantly higher in hypoxia, which resulted in a 51% greater BDNF expression when transfected with PS80 PBCA NC/HRE-cmvBDNF than those without hypoxia. TrkB and phospho-Akt were also elevated which correlated with neural differentiation. The findings suggest that PS80 PBCA NC too can be endocytosed to serve as an efficient vector for genes coupled to the HRE in hypoxia-sensitive cells, and activation of the PI3/Akt pathway in iPSCs by BDNF is capable of neural lineage specification.

  11. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Loaded PS80 PBCA Nanocarrier for In Vitro Neural Differentiation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu-Yen Chung

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF can induce neural differentiation in stem cells and has the potential for repair of the nervous system. In this study, a polysorbate 80-coated polybutylcyanoacrylate nanocarrier (PS80 PBCA NC was constructed to deliver plasmid DNAs (pDNAs containing BDNF gene attached to a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE-cmvBDNF. The hypoxia-sensing mechanism of BDNF expression and inductiveness of the nano-formulation on mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs to differentiate into neurons following hypoxia was tested in vitro with immunofluorescent staining and Western blotting. The HRE-cmvBDNF appeared to adsorb onto the surface of PS80 PBCA NC, with a resultant mean diameter of 92.6 ± 1.0 nm and zeta potential of −14.1 ± 1.1 mV. HIF-1α level in iPSCs was significantly higher in hypoxia, which resulted in a 51% greater BDNF expression when transfected with PS80 PBCA NC/HRE-cmvBDNF than those without hypoxia. TrkB and phospho-Akt were also elevated which correlated with neural differentiation. The findings suggest that PS80 PBCA NC too can be endocytosed to serve as an efficient vector for genes coupled to the HRE in hypoxia-sensitive cells, and activation of the PI3/Akt pathway in iPSCs by BDNF is capable of neural lineage specification.

  12. Prior regular exercise reverses the decreased effects of sleep deprivation on brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus of ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadati, Hakimeh; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Darvishzadeh-Mahani, Fatemeh; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main candidate to mediate the beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive function in sleep deprived male rats. In addition, our previous findings demonstrate that female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive performance and synaptic plasticity. Therefore, the current study was designed to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise and/or sleep deprivation (SD) on the levels of BDNF mRNA and protein in the hippocampus of female rats. Intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats were used in the present experiment. The exercise protocol was four weeks treadmill running and sleep deprivation was accomplished using the multiple platform method. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblot analysis were used to evaluate the level of BDNF mRNA and protein in the rat hippocampus respectively. Our results showed that protein and mRNA expression of BDNF was significantly (prats in compared with other groups. Furthermore, sleep deprived OVX rats under exercise conditions had a significant (pexercise can exert a protective effect against hippocampus-related functions and impairments induced by sleep deprivation probably by inducing BDNF expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Treadmill exercise and methylphenidate ameliorate symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder through enhancing dopamine synthesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in spontaneous hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong; Heo, Hong-Im; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Lee, Su-Shin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Deung; Shin, Mal-Soon; Choi, Young-Woong; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2011-10-17

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder of cognition. Behavioral symptoms of ADHD are inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. We investigated the effects of treadmill exercise and methylphenidate (MPH) on activity and spatial learning memory in relation to dopamine synthesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression using spontaneously hypertensive adult male rats. The rats in the MPH-treated group received 1mg/kg MPH orally once a day for 28days. The rats in the treadmill exercise group were made to run on a treadmill for 30min once a day, five times a week, for 28days. Activity was determined by an open-field test and spatial learning memory was evaluated by an 8-arm maze test. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were conducted to examine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine, and BDNF. The rats in the ADHD group showed hyperactivity and spatial learning memory deficit. Reduction of TH in the striatum and substantia nigra and BDNF in the hippocampus was observed of the rats in the ADHD group. Treadmill exercise and MPH alleviated the ADHD-induced hyperactivity and spatial learning memory impairment. Expressions of TH and BDNF in the ADHD rats were also increased by both treadmill exercise and MPH. These findings provide a possibility that exercise may be used as an effective therapeutic intervention for ADHD patients as MPH treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effects of Antecedent Exercise on Motor Function Recovery and Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression after Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyeyeop; Kim, Eunjung

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, we investigated the effect of antecedent exercise on functional recov