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Sample records for callovo-oxfordian argillites application

  1. Osmotic flow and over pressures within the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite in the eastern part of the Paris Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croise, J. [Colenco Power Engineering AG, Groundwater Protection and Waste Disposal, Baden (Switzerland); Vinsotz, A. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), Lab. de Recherche Souterrain RD960, 55 - Bure (France); Noya, D. [British Geological Survey, Kingsley Dunham Centre, Nottingham NG (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    A middle Jurassic shale, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite (420-560 m b.g.), is currently being intensively investigated at the ANDRA site, about 300 km eastern from Paris, and particularly with respect to its hydrogeological and hydrochemical properties. The argillite rests between the Oxfordian Limestone above and the Dogger Limestone below. Observations from the different deep boreholes located at the site can be summarized as follows: the measured apparent hydraulic head across the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite show excess values of several tens of meters in comparison to the upper and lower aquifers, a fact which is referred to as anomalous overpressure in the shale literature; the salinity of the pore water in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite and the Dogger is much larger than that of the Oxfordian. The salinity levels in the Callovo-Oxfordian and the Dogger are similar. Among all physical processes which can be proposed as explanation for the formation of overpressure in shales, osmosis driven by a chemical potential (total dissolved solids) gradient is a possible candidate. As a matter of fact, the presence of contrasts in water composition and clay minerals content, as observed here, lead to osmotic effects. This paper presents the results of simulations using steady-state approximations and transient simulations (software OSMO, a numerical simulator developed by the British Geological Survey). It is shown that based on the extensive database of argillite measurements applicable to the study (including porosity values, specific surface determinations, pore water compositions, and effective diffusion coefficients), the chemo-osmosis is a process which can at least explain partly the anomalous overpressures observed. (authors)

  2. Modelling the effective diffusion coefficient of anions in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite knowing the microstructure of the rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.

    2009-01-01

    After having presented the issue of radioactive waste storage, the concept of geological storage and its application in the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground laboratory, and described the Callovo-Oxfordian geological formation and the argillite transport properties, this research thesis aims at developing a prediction of these properties at a macroscopic scale for water and anions. A first part presents the different experimental means implemented to acquire the diffusion coefficients for the studied materials (Callovo-Oxfordian argillite and purified Puy illite), and the spatial organisation of minerals by LIBS probe-based mapping to highlight a relationship between rock microstructure and its transport macroscopic properties. The next part presents the models which have been developed at the nanometer and micrometre scale to predict the diffusion coefficients. Experimental results are then compared with computed values

  3. Contributions to micromechanical model of the non linear behavior of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou-Chakra Guery, A.

    2007-12-01

    This work is performed in the general context of the project of underground disposal of radioactive waste, undertaken by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA). Due to its strong density and weak permeability, the formation of Callovo-Oxfordian argillite is chosen as one of possible geological barriers to radionuclides. The objective of the study to develop and validate a non linear homogenization approach of the mechanical behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian argillites. The material is modelled as a composite constituted of an elasto(visco)plastic clay matrix and of linear elastic or elastic damage inclusions. The macroscopic constitutive law is obtained by adapting the incremental method proposed by Hill. The derived model is first compared to Finite Element calculations on unit cell. It is then validated and applied for the prediction of the macroscopic stress-strain responses of the argillite at different geological depths. Finally, the micromechanical model is implemented in a commercial finite element code (Abaqus) for the simulation of a vertical shaft of the underground laboratory. This allows predicting the distribution of damage state and plastic strains and characterizing the excavation damage zone (EDZ). (author)

  4. Simulation of anions diffusion in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite by description of the rock microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.

    2008-01-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian argillite has been proposed as host rock for deep underground radioactive wastes storage. The aim of this study is to determine the report of effective diffusion coefficients De(anion)/De(water) at the micrometer scale considering the spatial distribution of minerals in the rock. (A.L.B.)

  5. Modelling the influence of water content on the mechanical behaviour of Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Y.; Zhang, F.; Shao, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The clay formation provides the geological background to many industrial and engineering applications. Especially in recent years, these types of material have been largely studied because they can be considered as potential host geological barrier for the underground storage of high level radioactive wastes. In view of this, several underground laboratories have been constructed in different countries. For instance: the Meuse/Haute Marne underground research laboratory (France), excavated in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland), constructed in Opalinus clay; the HADES Underground Research Laboratory (Belgium), located in Boom clay; the AECL underground research laboratory (Canada), achieved in the Lac du Bonnet granite batholith. The research realised in the underground laboratories allows us to obtain extensive experimental measurements and helps us to get a good understanding of the generalised behaviour of theses clays when subjected to complex solicitations (thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical). In the underground storage, the experimental investigation and numerical prediction show that coupled hydro-mechanical processes will occur in the geological barrier for a very long time due to excavation/ ventilation and subsequence backfilling/sealing. In the excavation and exploitation stage, the unloading of host rock creates an EDZ zone and induces an increase local of permeability by several orders of magnitude around the galleries. Moreover, additional damage may be induced by the desaturation/re-saturation processes during ventilation/backfilling phase. On the other hand, the behaviour of clay formation is affected also by the presence of water and the pore pressure evolution. It is necessary to achieve a good understanding of the coupled hydro-mechanical behaviour to of clay formation for the designer of an underground storage. This paper focus on the

  6. Contributions to micromechanical model of the non linear behavior of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; Contributions a la modelisation micromecanique du comportement non lineaire de l'argilite du callovo-oxfordien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Chakra Guery, A

    2007-12-15

    This work is performed in the general context of the project of underground disposal of radioactive waste, undertaken by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA). Due to its strong density and weak permeability, the formation of Callovo-Oxfordian argillite is chosen as one of possible geological barriers to radionuclides. The objective of the study to develop and validate a non linear homogenization approach of the mechanical behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian argillites. The material is modelled as a composite constituted of an elasto(visco)plastic clay matrix and of linear elastic or elastic damage inclusions. The macroscopic constitutive law is obtained by adapting the incremental method proposed by Hill. The derived model is first compared to Finite Element calculations on unit cell. It is then validated and applied for the prediction of the macroscopic stress-strain responses of the argillite at different geological depths. Finally, the micromechanical model is implemented in a commercial finite element code (Abaqus) for the simulation of a vertical shaft of the underground laboratory. This allows predicting the distribution of damage state and plastic strains and characterizing the excavation damage zone (EDZ). (author)

  7. Contributions to micromechanical model of the non linear behavior of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; Contributions a la modelisation micromecanique du comportement non lineaire de l'argilite du callovo-oxfordien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Chakra Guery, A

    2007-12-15

    This work is performed in the general context of the project of underground disposal of radioactive waste, undertaken by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA). Due to its strong density and weak permeability, the formation of Callovo-Oxfordian argillite is chosen as one of possible geological barriers to radionuclides. The objective of the study to develop and validate a non linear homogenization approach of the mechanical behavior of Callovo-Oxfordian argillites. The material is modelled as a composite constituted of an elasto(visco)plastic clay matrix and of linear elastic or elastic damage inclusions. The macroscopic constitutive law is obtained by adapting the incremental method proposed by Hill. The derived model is first compared to Finite Element calculations on unit cell. It is then validated and applied for the prediction of the macroscopic stress-strain responses of the argillite at different geological depths. Finally, the micromechanical model is implemented in a commercial finite element code (Abaqus) for the simulation of a vertical shaft of the underground laboratory. This allows predicting the distribution of damage state and plastic strains and characterizing the excavation damage zone (EDZ). (author)

  8. Equilibrium partial pressure of CO{sub 2} in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite as a function of relative humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassin, Arnault [BRGM-ISTO-UMR 7327, 3av. C. Guillemin, B.P. 36009, Orleans, 45060 (France); Marty, Nicolas; Henry, Benoit; Tremosa, Joachim; Gailhanou, Helene; Gaucher, Eric C. [BRGM, 3av. C. Guillemin, B.P. 36009, Orleans, 45060 (France); Made, Benoit; Altmann, Scott [Andra, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet,Chatenay-Malabry,92298 (France)

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the behavior of a clay mineral-rich rock submitted to different physical-chemical perturbations is important for assessing the safety of nuclear waste disposal facilities in the corresponding geological formations. In this work we studied the effect of rock desaturation on the CO{sub 2} partial pressure signature of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite. This integrated study, which combines experiments and geochemical modeling, points out the primary role of capillary forces on the chemical equilibria. In particular, it was possible to model, without any fitting parameters, the experimental decrease of pCO{sub 2} as a function of decreasing water content in the argillite. Moreover, this application to a complex natural system is an example of confirmation of the theoretical concepts of geochemistry in capillary contexts and is promising for dealing with other natural and industrial systems. (authors)

  9. On the compression behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajerani, M.; Delage, P.; Monfared, M.; Sulem, J.; Tang, A.M.; Schroeder, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework of research into radioactive waste disposal, it was decided to investigate some aspects of the volume change behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite, a possible host rock in which the ANDRA underground laboratory of Bure (East of France) has been excavated. To do so, high pressure oedometers able to apply a maximum load of 113 MPa were used. Oedometers are widely used in Soil mechanics but not so much in Rock mechanics. In spite of applying combined stress/strain conditions (controlled vertical stress with no radial strain allowed) in which the radial stress is not controlled, their advantage is to be simple and robust to use (easy long term stress control and strain measurements). They provide a simple way to investigate the elastoplastic behaviour of soils, particularly regarding the elastic modulus, yield point and plastic compressibility. A high pressure oedometer developed at UR Navier/CERMES was used. The apparatus is a double lever arm device able to apply a maximum axial stress of 113 MPa on a specimen contained in a rigid ring of diameter 38 mm. The sample is 10 mm high. Vertical strains are monitored by using an electronic strain transducer connected to a data acquisition system. Previous calibration of the system was carried out by running a test with no sample in the ring so as to account for the effects of the compression of the top and bottom porous disks, of cell and of the piston. A reversible response of the system was observed after applying various loading cycles between 0 and 113 MPa. The specimen was trimmed by using a diamond corer of corresponding diameter and placed inside the oedometer ring. The top and bottom faces of the sample were polished by using sand paper so as to get two flat, regular and parallel faces. The ring was placed into the oedometer cell with dry porous stones and specimen was loaded under 1 MPa to ensure good contact with the porous stones and the

  10. Petrophysical characterization of Callovo-Oxfordian argillites from the deep borehole Andra EST433 of Montiers-Sur-Saulx (Meuse, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosenza, P.; Pret, D.; Camerlynck, C.; Fleury, M.; Geraud, Y.; Kremer, T.; Zamora, M.; Landrein, P.; Lebon, P.; Villieras, F.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Petro-fabric and physico-chemical properties of Meuse/Haute-Marne Callovo-Oxfordian argillite have been extensively studied (e.g. Trouiller, 2006). This research project is aiming at establishing micro-macro models to link microstructural patterns and macroscopic measurements. In this context, data are acquired on the same samples at different scales: (a) microscopic scale (identification of mineralogical phases, mineral mapping, surface area, pore size distribution) and (b) macroscopic scale (hydraulic conductivity, elastic wave velocities, resistivity, thermal conductivity). Ultimately the resulting micro-macro models would be used by Andra to construct 3D representation of the petrophysical properties within the Callovo-Oxfordian formation by the mean of logging data. This project is part of the research programme TAPSS2000 (Present and past transfers in a sedimentary aquifer - aquitard system: a 2000 meter deep drill-hole in the Mesozoic of the Paris Basin). Data acquisition is performed on 9 cores (taken from 558.5 m to 619.5 m deep) of the deep borehole ANDRA EST433 located at Moultiers-sur-Saulx (Meuse, France). These data on the microstructure and the macroscopic physical behaviour of Callovo-Oxfordian show the following features: - The higher the P-and S- wave velocities, the higher the radiologic density measured by X-Ray tomography. These high values of velocities and density are associated with carbonates, the most rigid phase among the rock-bearing minerals. P-wave velocity measurements do not exhibit significant scale effect (i.e., logging vs laboratory). - The most heterogeneous samples (with regard to their values of elastic wave velocities and radiologic density) are located in the upper part of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, where argillite is more carbonated. On the contrary, the most homogeneous cores that exhibit lower values of elastic wave velocities are located at deeper depths: they are

  11. Microbial investigations in Opalinus clay from Mont Terri and in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Meuse/Haute-Marne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulain, S.

    2006-12-01

    The subject of this Ph.D. thesis deals with research achieved in the context of the Axis 2 of the law Bataille voted on December 30, 1991 about the possibility of building a deep geological repository for medium or high activity and long living nuclear waste. Nearby such a site, some microorganisms may influence the mobility of radionuclides coming from the waste canisters. This work consisted in looking for autochthonous microorganisms in the Opalinus clay formation from Mont Terri (Switzerland) and in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Meuse/Haute-Marne (France). Microbial Investigations in these unknown unperturbed environments suggested very low microbial densities in the clayey sediments. However, new bacterial species could be isolated from those samples. In addition, a part of the allochthonous population, which has been introduced by air and human activity, could be identified in the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory. (author)

  12. Coupled-processes in the Callovo-Oxfordian shales at the Bure site: implications for the transports of water and solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau-gueutin, P.

    2008-09-01

    This research thesis is related to the ANDRA's project of building a deep storage site for long-life, high- and medium-activity radioactive wastes within a Callovo-Oxfordian geological formation which is investigated by the Bure underground laboratory. As previous studies revealed hydrostatic loads greater than expected, the objective of this research is to explain these overpressures by validating or invalidating hypotheses on natural phenomena which could cause them. These hypotheses are: a progressive decrease of rock porosity in relationship with a continuous increase of mechanical stresses in the Callovo-Oxfordian, the existence in the past of hydrostatic pressures greater than now, and an osmotic effect. The author gives an overview of the knowledge about clays and their interactions with surrounding solutes, about coupled flows and overpressures. Based on petro-physical data, she proposes an assessment of the chemical osmotic coupling coefficient. Based on experimental and numerical investigations, she reports the measurement of this coefficient in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillites, and then proposes new interpretations of the measured overpressures

  13. The Callovo-Oxfordian of the Paris Basin: From its geological context to the modelling of its properties; Le Callovo-Oxfordien du bassin de Paris: du contexte geologique a la modelisation de ses proprietes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2006-10-15

    The French law from December 30, 1991 entrusted the French national agency for radioactive wastes (ANDRA) with the mission of assessing the feasibility of a deep geological repository in the clay-rich Callovo-Oxfordian formation of NE France (Meuse and Haute-Marne departements). A research program, coordinated by ANDRA and involving several university laboratories and other French organizations (CNRS, CEA, BRGM, INERIS, INPL, ENSMP) has permitted to gather a huge amount of information about the properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation of the eastern part of the Paris basin. These properties are summarized in this introductive paper: paleo-geography, bio-stratigraphy of ammonites, clay mineralogy and other minerals content, anisotropy of argillite beds, permeability and porosity, osmosis and thermal diffusion, chemistry of interstitial waters, fracturing.. (J.S.)

  14. Coupled transport phenomena in a clay from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszkuta, M.

    2005-06-01

    Low permeability materials containing clay play an important role in practical life and natural environment. Indeed, the ability of clay soils to act as semi permeable membranes, that inhibit the passage of electrolytes, is of great interest. The major objective of this thesis is to evaluate the transport properties of natural clays and in particular coupled transports when a pressure gradient, an electrical field, a concentration gradient and a temperature gradient interact. The material is a compact argillite extracted in East France from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation which was supplied to us by ANDRA. NaCl was used as the main solute. Two series of experiments were performed to measure permeability, diffusion, conductivity, the electro-osmotic coefficient and the Soret coefficient. (author)

  15. Contribution to a hydro-chemo-mechanical multi-mechanisms model based on the multi-scale and multi components structure of Callovo-Oxfordian argillites: experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, J.C.; Trinh, M.H.; Imbert, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The fundamental features of the Callovo Oxfordian argillite, namely the structure and the pore size distribution are considered to propose a model consistent with its mechanical behavior. The model deals with the main mechanisms selected: damage, plasticity and swelling. Structure of Argillites as fundamental base of mechanical behavior Callovian-Oxfordian argillites present specific characteristics: - a strong mineralogical heterogeneity made up from 23% to 25% of quartz, 20% to 27% of carbonate, 40% to 50% of argillaceous minerals and 5% to 10% various mineral; - a low porosity comprised between 12 to 15%, associated with the following pore size distribution: 14% of nano-pores, majority 81% of meso-pores and 5% of macro-pores; - a low Biot coefficient, around 0.6; - no cementing (within the meaning of a concrete). Four basic mechanisms are considered likely to explain the structure of argillite in place: - mechanical consolidation obtained by increasing external stress, - chemical consolidation by reduction in dielectric constant (leaching of chlorides), - thermal consolidation, - filling of the macro-porosity by precipitation of a carbonated phase (calcite). Experimental tests were performed to evaluate the weight of these mechanisms. Results show that mechanic and thermal consolidations, in the fields of stress and temperature encountered in situ by argillite during geological history, and chemical consolidation could not alone explain the state the high density without macro porosity. An assumption advanced to explain is the filling of macro porosity by non argillaceous mineral precipitation, in particular calcite that would confer to in situ argillite an apparent over-consolidation from a mechanical point of view. This assumption is partially validated by some experiments: - Percolation tests were made with hydrochloric acid on bulky and sound argillite to remove the carbonates in the macro-porosity; they

  16. Coupled transport phenomena in a clay from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation; Phenomenes de transport couples dans les argiles du Callovo-Oxfordien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paszkuta, M

    2005-06-15

    Low permeability materials containing clay play an important role in practical life and natural environment. Indeed, the ability of clay soils to act as semi permeable membranes, that inhibit the passage of electrolytes, is of great interest. The major objective of this thesis is to evaluate the transport properties of natural clays and in particular coupled transports when a pressure gradient, an electrical field, a concentration gradient and a temperature gradient interact. The material is a compact argillite extracted in East France from a Callovo-Oxfordian formation which was supplied to us by ANDRA. NaCl was used as the main solute. Two series of experiments were performed to measure permeability, diffusion, conductivity, the electro-osmotic coefficient and the Soret coefficient. (author)

  17. Microbial investigations in Opalinus clay from Mont Terri and in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Meuse/Haute-Marne; Caracterisation microbiologique de l'argile a opalinus du Mont Terri et de l'argilite du callovo-oxfordien de Meuse/Haute-Marne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulain, S

    2006-12-15

    The subject of this Ph.D. thesis deals with research achieved in the context of the Axis 2 of the law Bataille voted on December 30, 1991 about the possibility of building a deep geological repository for medium or high activity and long living nuclear waste. Nearby such a site, some microorganisms may influence the mobility of radionuclides coming from the waste canisters. This work consisted in looking for autochthonous microorganisms in the Opalinus clay formation from Mont Terri (Switzerland) and in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Meuse/Haute-Marne (France). Microbial Investigations in these unknown unperturbed environments suggested very low microbial densities in the clayey sediments. However, new bacterial species could be isolated from those samples. In addition, a part of the allochthonous population, which has been introduced by air and human activity, could be identified in the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory. (author)

  18. Microbial investigations in Opalinus clay from Mont Terri and in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Meuse/Haute-Marne; Caracterisation microbiologique de l'argile a opalinus du Mont Terri et de l'argilite du callovo-oxfordien de Meuse/Haute-Marne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulain, S

    2006-12-15

    The subject of this Ph.D. thesis deals with research achieved in the context of the Axis 2 of the law Bataille voted on December 30, 1991 about the possibility of building a deep geological repository for medium or high activity and long living nuclear waste. Nearby such a site, some microorganisms may influence the mobility of radionuclides coming from the waste canisters. This work consisted in looking for autochthonous microorganisms in the Opalinus clay formation from Mont Terri (Switzerland) and in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Meuse/Haute-Marne (France). Microbial Investigations in these unknown unperturbed environments suggested very low microbial densities in the clayey sediments. However, new bacterial species could be isolated from those samples. In addition, a part of the allochthonous population, which has been introduced by air and human activity, could be identified in the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory. (author)

  19. A microstructure insight into the water retention properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menaceur Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of changes in suction on the microstructure of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone along wetting and drying paths was investigated by using mercury intrusion porosimetry. Based on a simplified brick model, the changes of the average thickness of the platelets that constitute the clay matrix (50% are interpreted as the consequence of the successive adsorption of ordered layers of water molecules along the smectite surfaces, as demonstrated on pure smectites for a long time. This shows the predominant role played by the smectite phase in the overall response of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone when submitted to suction changes under no stress.

  20. Gas and water flow in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, J.F.; Noy, D.J.; Talandier, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Understanding the impact and fate of this gas phase is of significant importance within performance assessment and for the accurate long-term prediction of repository evolution. This paper describes the initial results from an ongoing experimental study to measure the two-phase flow behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Bure underground research laboratory (URL) in France, using the custom-designed BGS permeameter. The primary objectives of the study are to measure: (i) the hydraulic conductivity and intrinsic permeability; (ii) the capillary displacement pressure; (iii) the effective gas permeability and relative permeability to gas for a range of conditions; and (iv) the post-test gas saturation. During testing, the specimen, a cylinder of 54 mm thickness, cut perpendicular to bedding, is subject to an isotropic confining stress, with fluids injected through the base of the specimen. A novel feature of the apparatus is the use of porous annular guard-ring filters around the inflow and outflow filters. The pressures in these two 'guard-rings' can be independently monitored to provide data on the distribution of pressure and anisotropy of the sample. Initial measurements, performed on a specimen orientation perpendicular to the bedding plane, have been divided into three components: re-saturation and consolidation; hydraulic properties; gas behaviour. During the initial period of equilibration, re-saturation of the sample were noted. Net volume change due to re-saturation closely agreed with pre-test geotechnical measurements of water saturation, suggesting the bulk of the gas phase was resident in non-dilatant pores and that the specimen was fully saturated at the onset of testing. A two step consolidation test was then performed with confining pressure raised to 11 MPa for 5 days and then to 12.5 MPa for a further 8 days. Values for drained bulk modulus based on the total volume of fluid

  1. Liner failure around a tunnel or a storage cell in Callovo-Oxfordian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damjanac, Branko; Radakovic-Guzina, Zorica; Billaux, Daniel; Poutrel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework of the feasibility studies for the storage of radioactive waste in a deep geological layer, the post-failure behaviour of the concrete liner of the galleries and storage cells may have a direct effect on long term safety. In fact, the failure of the liner will result in new loads on the canisters placed inside the works, and in the de-stressing of the Callovo-Oxfordian clays, which may lead to a change in the Excavation Damage Zone. These phenomenons are studied via numerical modelling, using properties derived from ANDRA's underground laboratory (CMHM) project. Two types of gallery geometries are analyzed: one with a thinner concrete liner and filled interior (the standard gallery); and another with a thick concrete liner filled with concrete canisters (the MAVL disposal cell). The Standard Gallery is filled with a Cam-Clay material after 100 years of creep, while the MAVL disposal cell is filled with 16 concrete canisters immediately after installation of the concrete liner. Progressive failure of the concrete liner due to time-dependent deformation of the surrounding rock (Callovo-Oxfordian clay) over a long period of time is analyzed. The analyses are carried out in two steps. In the initial simulations, the concrete liner is represented as a continuum strain-softening Mohr-Coulomb material. The locations of stress-induced fractures in the concrete are determined from this continuum model. The stress-induced fractures are then specified as pre-defined discontinuities in the concrete liner in subsequent dis-continuum simulations. In a dis-continuum model, the large deformations and movements of the concrete blocks as the liner disintegrates can be simulated without numerical problems. The Callovo-Oxfordian clay is represented as an elastic-plastic-viscous material using the Lemaitre constitutive relation. The majority of the simulations are carried out over 5,000 years of creep time, with a

  2. Ageing effect on deep-buried argillites stored after coring: study cases of Opalinus Clays and Callovo-Oxfordian argillites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techer, I.; Clauer, N.; Liewig, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A petrophysical and geochemical study of deep-seated sediments requires either shaft excavation for in situ investigations or core drilling and storage for laboratory measurements and observations. In both cases, measured and observed data should be as representative as possible of the intrinsic characteristics of the rocks before human interference, which is especially critical for potential host-rocks of deep nuclear-waste storage. Almost instantaneous alteration processes were described due to interactions with the atmosphere by supply of O 2 , CO 2 , and water in some cases. Chemical exchanges and reactions were reported in conditioned and stored samples, despite all the care taken for treatment. The imprint of such processes remains to be very limited and therefore difficult to identify, especially by routine analyses. To provide further information about these limited modifications and to discuss the evolution of the geochemical records in deep clayed rocks when exposed to atmosphere, a coupled mineralogical and geochemical study was performed on two argillaceous rocks: the Opalinus Clays collected in the Mont-Terri URL (Switzerland) and the Callovo-Oxfordian Clays sampled in the Bure URL (France). A ∼8-m long core was drilled perpendicular to an experimental niche or gallery in each underground laboratory. Several core sections were selected as a function of distance to the wall of the niche/gallery and were analyzed repetitively relative to storage time. The samples were stored in Al-bags under vacuum, or not, and at ambient temperature or subjected to temperatures of 95 deg. C and 150 deg. C over varied periods of time, in order to enhance the reactions. The objective was the evaluation of the storage effect on the chemical and Sr isotopic compositions by leaching the rock powders with dilute acetic acid and analyzing the leachates for elemental and 87 Sr/ 86 Sr compositions. The study was complemented

  3. Characterization of the failure in Callovo-Oxfordian argillite under plane strain compression using full field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besuelle, P.

    2012-01-01

    orthogonal to the plane strain direction, is in contact with a hard transparent window. The deformation of this surface is representative of the deformation in the whole specimen, up to and beyond strain localization. Therefore the evolution of the strain field in the sample can be measured by digital image correlation (DIC) of photographs taken of this surface. It is noted that the cell can sustain a confining pressure up to 100 MPa and so the regime of deformation in soft rocks from brittle through to ductile can be studied. Moreover, the stress path that is imposed to the specimen is not an axisymmetric state and is more realistic with respect to the paths followed in the field. In the selected results, we analysed the process of failure in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite. First, strain localization under the form of shear bands propagate through the specimen, and then cracks born and propagate in the middle of the band. Complex patterns of cracks, with sets of conjugated cracks are observed in some case. The effect of the mean stress applied during tests on the failure is also observed. The kinetic of crack propagation is studied quantitatively, using the displacement field measured by DIC. The displacement gap on cracks is decomposed in a sliding component and a opening. The mechanical response of argillite specimens is also presented, with the link between post peak response (stress softening) and localization. (authors)

  4. Influence of carbonate micro-fabrics on the failure strength of Callovo-Oxfordian clay stones and Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Dohrmann, R.; Kaufhold, S.; Siegesmund, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The potential use of clay stones as host rock for radioactive waste disposal is currently investigated. For this application, hydraulic conductivity, swelling properties, water uptake, rheological and mechanical properties are of great importance. The Opalinus Clay (Mont-Terri, Switzerland) and the Callovo- Oxfordian clay stone (France) are the most frequently studied clay stones. One goal is to develop a numerical model being able to predict the mechanical behaviour of clay stones under repository-like conditions. Experimental investigations reveal that Opalinus Clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone behave different with respect to the dependence of mechanical strength on the carbonate content. The failure strength of Opalinus Clay decreases with increasing carbonate content, whereas it increases with increasing carbonate content when Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone is considered. To supply proper data and enable reliable model assumptions, the use of suitable experimental techniques for the description of the microstructure is indispensable. After mechanical testing, samples were taken perpendicular to the bedding and polished sections were prepared. The micro-fabrics were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. Backscattered electron (BSE) images were used for the image analysis because carbonates can be extracted by grey level analysis. The image analysis of the extracted particles provides the following parameters: area, longest and shortest axis of an ellipse (surrounding the particle), perimeter, the angle to horizontal (longest axis), and the aspect ratio (longest axis/shortest axis). Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone shows a homogenous distribution of fine-grained carbonates and dovetail connection of calcium carbonate with the clayey matrix. In contrast Opalinus Clay shows large elongated carbonate grains (high aspect ratios) of shell fragments. Cracks are mostly related to these

  5. Geostatistical characterization of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay variability: from conventional and high resolution log data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefranc, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Andra (National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) has conducted studies in its Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory located at a depth of about 490 m in a 155-million-year-old argillaceous rock: the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite. The purpose of the present work is to obtain as much information as possible from high-resolution log data and to optimize their analysis to specify and characterize space-time variations of the argillites from the Meuse/Haute-Marne site and subsequently predict the evolution of argillite properties on a 250 km 2 zone around the underground laboratory (transposition zone). The aim is to outline a methodology to transform depth intervals into geological time intervals and thus to quantify precisely the sedimentation rate variation, estimate duration; for example the duration of bio-stratigraphical units or of hiatuses. The latter point is particularly important because a continuous time recording is often assumed in geological modelling. The spatial variations can be studied on various scales. First, well-to-well correlations are established between seven wells at different scales. Relative variations of the thickness are observed locally. Second, FMI (Full-bore Formation Micro-Imager, Schlumberger) data are studied in detail to extract as much information as possible. For example, the analysis of FMI images reveals a clear carbonate - clay inter-bedding which displays cycles. Third, geostatistical tools are used to study these cycles. The vario-graphic analysis of conventional log data shows one metre cycles. With FMI data, smaller periods can be detected. Variogram modelling and factorial kriging analysis suggest that three spatial periods exist. They vary vertically and laterally in the boreholes but cycle ratios are stable and similar to orbital-cycle ratios (Milankovitch cycles). The three periods correspond to eccentricity, obliquity and precession. Since the duration of these orbital cycles is known, depth intervals can

  6. Fe(0)-clays interactions at 90°C under anoxic conditions: a comparative study between clay fraction of Callovo-Oxfordian and other purified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Villieras, F.; Barres, O.; Galmiche, M.; Ghanbaja, J.; Kohler, A.; Michau, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste it is of prime importance to understand the interactions between the saturated clay formation and steel containers. This can be achieved through an in-depth analysis of iron-clay interactions. Previous studies on the subject investigated the influence of solid/liquid ratio, iron/clay ratio, temperature and reaction time. The aim of the present study is to explain Callovo-Oxfordian-Fe(0) interactions by determining the role of each mineral phases present in the Callovo-Oxfordian (clay minerals, quartz, carbonates and pyrite) on the mechanisms of interaction between metal iron and clay particles. In that context, it is especially important to understand in detail the influence of clay nature and to obtain some insight about the relationships between interaction mechanisms at the molecular scale and crystallographic properties (particle size, TO or TOT layers, amount of edge faces...). The influence of the combination of different clays and the addition of other minerals must also be studied. In a first step, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Andra's underground research laboratory was purified to extract the clay fraction (illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and chlorite). Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) for durations of one, three or nine months in the presence of metallic iron powder. Experiments without iron were used as control. The iron/clay ratio was fixed at 1/3 with a solid/liquid ratio of 1/20. The above mentioned experiments were also carried out in parallel on other purified clays: two smectites (Georgia bentonite and SWy2 from the Clay Minerals Society), one illite (illite du Puy) and one kaolinite (KGa2, from the Clay Minerals society). At the end of the experiments, solid and liquid phases were

  7. Influence of antioxidants synthesized by plants on physico-chemical and microbiological evolution of Callovo-Oxfordian clay material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubersfeld, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    This study is a part of the deep disposal site development for radioactive waste in Meuse-Haute Marne (France), most specifically on the bio-physico-chemical conversion of sedimentary clay rocks (Callovo- Oxfordian, COx), excavated and stored on surface in the form of heap. During the experimental and operational phases, several million cubic meters of argillite will be excavated. Argillite stored in the open air will be exposed to meteoritic alterations, oxidizing conditions of surface and colonized biologically (plants, bacteria, fungi). The aim of the thesis is to study the impact of naturally derived antioxidants from revegetation of heap with antioxidant-producing plants on the physical, chemical or microbial weathering processes of argillite. This work was designed to (i) identify suitable naturally derived antioxidants and the plants to produce them (ii) assess the antioxidant inhibitory effects on weathering and leaching COx metals in the laboratory, (iv) field test selected plants on the heap, (iii) follow in situ physicochemical and microbiological evolution of the argillite heap planted with antioxidant producing plants. In the laboratory, percolating model antioxidants of Lamiaceae (linalool, thymol, carvacrol) through a packed column of argillite showed variable water weathering/leaching rate depending on the metal elements present; very low for aluminum (<1 o/oo), between 1-3% for other metals (Ca, Mg, Fe...) and reach more than 60% for sodium. With thymol at 20 mg/l for 3 months, it was found that there are a decrease in sulfur leached amount and the metal elements from the sulfides (Fe, As) and carbonates (Ca, Sr) and inhibition of bacterial and fungal microflora growths. However, intake of artificial root exudates in columns stimulates microbial growth, improves the availability of aluminum, iron and provides sequestration of calcium. Among the tested plants, lavender and lavandin were selected. Two successive plantation tests were carried out in

  8. Thermal Volume Changes and Creep in the Callovo-Oxfordian Claystone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmokhtar, Malik; Delage, Pierre; Ghabezloo, Siavash; Conil, Nathalie

    2017-09-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) claystone is considered as a potential host rock for high-level radioactive waste disposal at great depth in France. Given the exothermic nature of radioactive wastes, a temperature elevation planned to be smaller than 100 °C will affect the host rock around the disposal cells. To gain better understanding of the thermal volumetric response of the COx claystone, a new thermal isotropic compression cell was developed with particular attention devoted to monitoring axial and radial strains. To do so, a high-precision LVDTs system ensuring direct contact between the LVDT stem and the claystone sample through the membrane was developed. A short drainage length (10 mm) was also ensured so as to allow full saturation of the sample under stress conditions close to in situ, and fully drained conditions during compression. High-precision strain monitoring allowed to observe a volumetric creep under stress conditions close to in situ. A drained heating test under constant stress carried out afterwards up to 80 °C exhibited a thermoelastic expansion up to a temperature of 48 °C, followed by thermoplastic contraction at higher temperature. Creep volume changes, that appeared to be enhanced by temperature, were modelled by using a simple Kelvin-Voigt model, so as to estimate the instantaneous response of the COx claystone and to determine its thermal expansion coefficient. The temperature at which the transition between thermal expansion and contraction appeared is close to the maximum burial temperature of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone, estimated at 50 °C. This is in agreement with what has been already observed on the Opalinus Clay by Monfared et al. (2012) that was interpreted as a thermal hardening phenomenon, showing that the material kept the memory of the highest temperature supported during its geological history.

  9. New Experimental Approach for Studying Diffusion through an Intact and Unsaturated Medium: A Case Study with Callovo-Oxfordian Argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoye, S.; Puente, C.; Coelho, D.; Imbert, Ch.; Page, J.

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion of tritiated water and anionic species was studied in an unsaturated core of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone, which is a potential host-rock for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. The diffusion parameters in such conditions were determined using modified through-diffusion cells in which the suction is generated by the osmosis process. This specific device leads to values of saturation degree ranging from 81% to 100%. The results show that the diffusion through unsaturated samples is clearly slower than that in fully saturated samples, with steady-state fluxes decreasing by a factor up to 7 for tritium and up to 50 for anionic species. While tritium porosity values follow volumetric water contents (from 21 to 16%), the porosity accessible to anionic species significantly decreases (from 7. 5 to 0. 7%). Such diffusive behaviors have been modeled by means of a modified Archie's law, taking into account a critical water saturation below which no tracer can percolate. These results indicate that the largest pores, which are initially affected by dehydration, would play an important role on the connectivity of the porous medium. This would especially affect anionic species diffusion behavior because they are constrained to diffuse into the largest pores first. (authors)

  10. Mass Transfer and Porous Media (MTPM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotenberg, B.; Marry, V.; Malikova, N.; Vuilleumier, R.; Giffaut, E.; Turq, P.; Robinet, J.C.; Diaz, N.; Sardini, P.; Goutelard, F.; Menut, D.; Parneix, J.C.; Sammartino, S.; Pret, D.; Coelho, D.; Jougnot, D.; Revil, A.; Boulin, P.F.; Angulo-Jaramillo, R.; Daian, J.F.; Talandier, J.; Berne, P.; Cochepin, B.; Trotignon, L.; Bildstein, O.; Steefel, C.; Lagneau, V.; Van der Lee, J.; Birchall, D.J.; Harrington, J.F.; Noy, D.J.; Sellin, P.; Bildstein, O.; Piault, E.; Trotignon, L.; Montarnal, P.; Deville, E.; Genty, A.; Le Potier, C.; Imbert, C.; Semete, P.; Desgree, P.; Fevrier, B.; Courtois, A.; Touze, G.; Sboui, A.; Roberts, J.E.; Jaffre, J.; Glaus, M.A.; Rosse, R.; Van Loon, L.R.; Matray, J.M.; Parneix, J.C.; Tinseau, E.; Pret, D.; Mayor, J.C.; Ohkubo, T.; Kikuchi, H.; Yamaguchi, M.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Patelli, A.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Leskinen, A.; Rigato, V.; Samper, J.; Dewonck, S.; Zheng, L.; Yang, Q.; Naves, A.; Dai, Z.; Samper, J.; Wolfsberg, A.; Levitt, D.; Cormenzana, J.L.; Missana, T.; Mingarro, M.; Schampera, B.; Dultz, S.; Riebe, B.; Samper, J.; Yang, Q.; Genty, A.; Perraud, D.; Poller, A.; Mayer, G.; Croise, J.; Marschall, P.; Krooss, B.; Matray, J.M.; Tanaka, T.; Vogel, P.; Lavanchy, J.M.; Enssle, C.P.; Cruchaudet, M.; Dewonck, S.; Descostes, M.; Blin, V.; Radwan, J.; Poinssot, C.; Mibus, J.; Sachs, S.; Devol-Brown, I.; Motellier, S.; Tinseau, E.; Thoby, D.; Marsal, F.; DeWindt, L.; Tinseau, E.; Pellegrini, D.; Bauer, A.; Fiehn, B.; Marquardt, Ch.; Romer, J.; Gortzen, A.; Kienzler, B

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 48 articles (posters) dealing with: interlayer / micro-pore exchange of water and ions in clays: a molecular dynamics study; the multi-scale characterisation of mineral and textural spatial heterogeneities in Callovo-Oxfordian argilite and its consequence on solute species diffusion modelling; the diffusion of ions in unsaturated clay rocks: Theory and application to the Callovo- Oxfordian argillite; the porous media characterization with respect to gas transfer in Callovo Oxfordian argillite; the predictions on a 2-D cementation experiment in porous medium: intercomparison on the Comedie project; the large-scale gas injection test (LASGIT) at the Aespoe hard rock laboratory in Sweden; simulating the geochemical coupling between vitrified waste, canister and near-field on the alliances platform; toward radionuclide transport calculations on whole radioactive waste disposal with CAST3M platform; the experimental study of the water permeability of a partially saturated argillite; a mixed hexahedral finite elements for Darcy flow calculation in clay porous media; the diffusive properties of stainless steel filter discs before and after use in diffusion experiments with compacted clays; the structural organization of porosity in the Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory under saturated and unsaturated conditions; the evaluation of pore structure in compacted saturated Bentonite using NMR relaxometry; diffusion coefficients measurement in consolidated clays: a combination of micro-scale profiling and solid pore structure analyses; the numerical interpretation of in-situ DIR diffusion experiments on the Callovo- Oxfordian clay at the Meuse/Haute-Marne URL the identification of relative conductivity models for water flow and solute transport in unsaturated compacted Bentonite; diffusion experiments in Callovo- Oxfordian clay from the Meuse/Haute-Marne URL, France: experimental setup and data analyses; the transport in organo

  11. Mobility of zinc in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoye, S.; Fayette, A.; Beaucaire, C. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SECR, L3MR, F-91191 Gif s/Yvette (France); Lacour, J.-L. [CEA, DEN, DPC, SEARS, LANIE, F-91191 Gif s/Yvette (France)

    2013-07-01

    The diffusion of zinc was studied in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone, which is a potential host rock for the retrievable disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Two in-diffusion laboratory experiments were performed with initial zinc concentrations of 4 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1} and 8 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1} (resp.) for 35 days. The zinc rock profile was acquired using an original technique, the μLIBS, with a high resolution (10 μm), calibrated with the abrasive peeling method. The experimental data, i.e. Zn concentration monitoring in the source reservoir and Zn rock profile, were successfully reproduced using a chemical-transport code. In that code, the sorption of Zn was described by a multi-site ion-exchange model, with only the effective diffusion coefficient value being adjusted (De = 8 10{sup -11} m{sup 2} s{sup -1}). This De value, 2 times higher than that of tritiated water, indicates that zinc, like most cations, is also subject to enhanced diffusion in clay rocks. (authors)

  12. Natural Ni speciation in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rocks: implications for potential 63Ni isotopic exchange and retention mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grangeon, S.; Tournassat, C.; Schaefer, T.; Lerouge, C.; Wille, G.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the perspective of deep underground long-term nuclear waste storage, 63 Ni is considered as a priority radio-element to be studied. 63 Ni behaviour prediction is made difficult mainly because its geochemical behaviour is still subject to debate. For instance, the solubility of Ni simple compounds at high pH is ill-defined, and the knowledge on solubility control phases is still pending. Clay rocks such as Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) contain non negligible amounts of natural and stable isotopes of Ni. As a consequence, a good understanding of the natural speciation of Ni in the formation could help to understand 63 Ni controls in this environment, including long term isotopic exchange with naturally present Ni. We focused our study on the COx formation, where the Bure (France) ANDRA underground research laboratory is located. Speciation of naturally occurring Ni was studied by combining chemical, microscopic and spectrometric methods. Chemical methods consisted of total rock analyses and sequential extractions on various COx samples representative of the variability of the formation (from carbonate rich samples to clay rich samples). This method enabled quantifying the main Ni reservoirs. Physical methods were used to get a closer look at the Ni-bearing phases. Optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to identify and isolate minerals from thin rock sections, originating from different geological horizons. Chemical results indicate that the mean Ni concentration in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock is of ∼30 ppm (10 -6 g/g). Identified Ni-bearing minerals were mainly primary minerals (biotite, chlorite, muscovite), calcite and pyrite; organic matter being also observed. Electron microprobe and X-ray fluorescence analyses were performed in order to quantify the amounts and variability of Ni contents in these different Callovo-Oxfordian components. Ni is occasionally present in primary minerals with

  13. Predicting the diagenetic evolution of argillite repositories: application of flow-through reaction cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warr, L.; Clatter, N.; Liewig, N.

    2005-01-01

    In order to successfully predict the diagenetic evolution of argillite repositories we need to know i) which reactions occur under a defined set of conditions, ii) how these reactions modify the material properties of the argillite seal, and iii) how fast these chemical reactions take place. Based on the application of thermodynamics, and the construction of activity diagrams for low temperature mineral phases (e.g. Velde 1992), fair predictions of mineral stability can be made under a given set of physical and chemical conditions. Such predictions are strengthened by examining natural mineral reactions preserved in the geological record, in combination with results obtained from controlled laboratory experiments. Changes in the material behavior can also be reasonably assessed, as the basic physical and chemical properties of argillaceous rocks of varying mineralogy are well documented in the petrophysical and engineering literature (e.g. Bell, 1999). Probably the most difficult task, however, is to assess the rates of the chemical reactions involved. This difficulty reflects our poor knowledge of the reaction kinetics for these low-temperature, fine-grained mineral materials, and apparent differences between rates estimated from natural and experimental systems. A new approach to monitoring the reaction kinetics of fine-grained minerals in percolating solution has been developed using flow-through reaction (wet-cell) chambers. These devices can be routinely mounted onto the X-ray diffractometer for in-situ measurements of the sample. With the aid of a cap to maintain constant volume, the device can be subjected to diagenetic or hydrothermal conditions (<150 C). First results are here presented for the alteration of Callovo-Oxfordian shales in a reactive simple young fluid (strongly alkaline, pH ca. 13) at 90 C, designed to simulate the alteration of concrete at the repository site. (authors)

  14. Investigating the swelling pressure of compacted crushed-Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, C. S.; Tang, A. M.; Cui, Y. J.; Delage, P.; Schroeder, C.; De Laure, E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the swelling pressure of heavily compacted crushed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone at a dry unit mass ρ d =2.0 Mg/m 3 using four different methods: constant-volume, swell-reload, zero-swell and adjusted constant-volume method. Results show that the swelling pressure varies in the range of 1-5 MPa and depends significantly on the test method. From the constant-volume tests, it is observed that the swelling behavior during wetting is a function of the suction and depends on both the hydration paths and wetting conditions (e.g. vapor-wetting or liquid-wetting). The swelling pressure decreases significantly with saturation time. To identify the microstructure changes of specimens before and after wetting, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests were performed. It is observed that, after wetting, the large inter-aggregate pores observed in the as-compacted specimen are no longer apparent; the whole pattern is characterized by a general swell of hydrated clay particles, rendering the soil more homogenous. Results from MIP indicated that wetting caused a significant reduction of the entrance diameter of the dominant inter-aggregate pores from 2.1 to 0.5μm whereas intra-aggregate pores were not significantly influenced. (authors)

  15. Scientific investigation in deep boreholes at the Meuse/Haute Marne underground research laboratory, northeastern France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebours, H.; Delay, J.; Vinsot, A.

    2006-01-01

    From 1994 to 1996, the preliminary investigation carried out by Andra, identified a sector favourable for hosting a laboratory in argillaceous Callovo-Oxfordian formation which has a thickness of 130 m and lies more than 400 m below ground level. In November 1999 Andra began building an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) with a 3D seismic survey over 4 km 2 . From 2000 to 2004, large programs of boreholes were carried out on site and on the sector in order to define the characteristics of formations, to improve the regional geological and hydrogeological knowledge and to provide an accurate definition of structural features in Callovo-Oxfordian argillites and Dogger limestones. These drilling programs have provided a fine characterization of the argillites on the laboratory area and a good correlation of geological properties at a sector scale. (author)

  16. Modelling the coupled chemico-osmotic and advective-diffusive transport of nitrate salts in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baechler, S.; Croise, J.; Altmann, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Fine-grained saturated porous materials can act as a semi-permeable osmotic membrane when exposed to a solute concentration gradient. The ions diffusion is hindered while water movement towards higher concentrations takes place in the semi-permeable membrane. The capacity of the fine-grained porous material to act as a semi permeable osmotic membrane is referred to as the osmotic efficiency (its value is 1 when the membranes is ideal, less than 1 when the membrane is leaky, allowing diffusion). The efficiency to retain ions in solution is dependent on the thickness of the diffuse double layer which itself depends on the solution concentration in the membrane. Clay rich formations have been shown to act as non-ideal semi-permeable membrane. Andra is investigating the Callovo-Oxfordian clay as a host rock for intermediate-level to high-level radioactive waste. In this context, it has been feared that osmotic water flows generated by the release of sodium nitrate salt in high concentrations, out of intermediate radioactive bituminous waste, could induce important over-pressures. The latest would eventually lead to fracturing of the host rock around the waste disposal drifts. The purpose of the present study was to develop a simulation code with the capacity to assess the potential impact of osmosis on: the re-saturation of the waste disposal drifts, the pressure evolution and the solute transport in and around a waste disposal drift. A chemo-osmotic coupled flow and transport model was implemented using the FlexPDE-finite element library. Our model is based on the chemo-osmotic formulation developed by Bader and Kooi, 2005. The model has been extended to highly concentrated solutions based on Pitzer's equation. In order to assess the impact of osmotic flow on the re-saturation time, the model was also designed to allow unsaturated flow modelling. The model configuration consists of an initially unsaturated 2D

  17. Analysis of pore pressure response of Callovo Oxfordian clay-stone to heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobmann, M.; Polster, M.; Li, S.; Schlegel, R.; Will, J.; Vymlatil, P.; Conil, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. One of the aims of the TED heater experiment at Bure is to perform a parameter identification of the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay. A detailed description of the heater experiment can be found in the paper presented by N. Conil, also at this meeting. Three artificial heat sources are used to simulate heat generating waste canisters and are placed in three parallel horizontal boreholes. The heating process is carried out by using three heating phases with different amounts of heat release. The thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) response of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone is monitored by a large number of temperature and pore water pressure sensors as well as extensometers installed in the heater boreholes as well as in a couple of observation boreholes. One possibility to identify the THM parameters of the clay-stone is to perform a series of forward simulations by adjusting the THM input parameters until the calculation results fit best to the measured values at the different sensor locations. Given the large number of sensors to consider, doing this fitting process manually is a long and laborious task. Thus, an automatic parameter identification process has been applied. Parameter identification In this paper we focus on the analysis of the pore water pressure response to drilling and heating. For the process of parameter identification, an automatic procedure was used by applying the software 'optiSLang' which allows for optimizing nonlinear tasks that include many parameters. The software is able to offer a sampling-based sensitivity analysis to identify important parameters, to quantify the individual influence on the calculation results, and to generate a so-called best design approximating the measurement results taken in situ as good as possible. optiSLang changes input parameters within given ranges automatically and autonomously starts new calculations by triggering the

  18. Multivariate and spatial statistical analysis of Callovo-Oxfordian physical properties from lab and borehole logs data: towards a characterization of lateral and vertical spatial trends in the Meuse/Haute-Marne transposition zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, M.H.; Rabaute, A.; Yven, B.; Guillemot, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The geological exploration of the Meuse/Haute-Marne area began in 1994. Several boreholes were drilled, and the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite, thought to become a potential storage formation, were cored and logged. 2D and 3D seismic surveys were completed, as well as geological field observations, and an underground research laboratory was created. A 250 km 2 -wide Transposition Zone was delimited, which was subject to further investigations in 2007 and 2008, including another series of coring and logging in four additional boreholes, and a tighter 2D seismic survey. The main objective of this study was to improve the knowledge of the spatial variability of geological and physical properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation. The paper focuses on the three following aspects of the study to present and discuss the methods that have been used and the results that have been obtained: - Use of well-log data to identify equivalent homogeneous log-units on the boreholes. - Relating log attributes to physical properties of argillites measured on cores in laboratory. - Study of lateral and vertical spatial trends of selected physical properties across the Transposition Zone (TZ). To identify equivalent homogeneous log-units, a combination of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Fuzzy Cluster Analysis (FCA) was used. PCA was classically performed to reduce the number of variables to retain principal components gathering most of the original dataset variance. PCA was also used to identify isolated groups of correlated variables that could be associated to different properties of the formation. Then, FCA was applied to identify homogeneous log-units on the eight boreholes across the TZ. Well-logs data being much more numerous and better distributed along boreholes than lab data measured on rock samples, relations and correlations were sought between the two types of data to identify log attributes that were likely to provide

  19. Water circulation control on carbonate-δ18O records in a low permeability clay formation and surrounding limestones: The Upper Dogger-Oxfordian sequence from the eastern Paris basin, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavastre, Veronique; Ader, Magali; Buschaert, Stephane; Petit, Eddy; Javoy, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Up. Dog./Oxf. sequence is investigated for radioactive waste disposal feasibilities. → Marine carbonates suffered isotopic exchanges with meteoric water. → Modelling shows that very low W/R ratio can explain isotopic changes in clay layer. → Higher W/R ratio are needed to reach isotopic changes in carbonated layers. → Confirmed barrier property of clay layer was probably reached during early burial. - Abstract: Upper Dogger to Oxfordian Formations in the eastern part of the Paris basin (France) are currently being investigated by the French nuclear waste management agency (Andra), testing the feasibility of long-term deep nuclear waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones. Characterising the hydrogeological behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones is, therefore, essential in evaluating its potential as a geological barrier. In order to evaluate and quantify water/rock interactions experienced over geological time by these Formations, bulk carbonate δ 13 C and δ 18 O were measured and calculations of water-rock ratios were used to explain carbonate-δ 18 O changes. Meteoric porewater and a maximum temperature reached of about 40 deg. C were considered. The Jurassic marine carbonate δ 13 C was preserved in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones and in the overlying limestones (-0.28 per mille to 3.39 per mille/PDB), while the δ 18 O values are lower by 0-5 per mille (-6.25 per mille to -1.32 per mille/PDB). Calculations show that Upper Dogger and Oxfordian Limestone δ 18 O data: (i)have random-like distribution through theoretical δ 18 O-W/R curves and (ii)suggest that water/rock ratios (0.08-0.4) needed to explain δ 18 O changes are higher by a factor of about 2-20 compared to the present-day water/rock ratio. These features indicate advection in both aquifers. According to the history of the Paris basin, this hydrogeological behaviour could have been effective since Jurassic/Cretaceous transition times. Inversely, the

  20. Water circulation control on carbonate-{delta}{sup 18}O records in a low permeability clay formation and surrounding limestones: The Upper Dogger-Oxfordian sequence from the eastern Paris basin, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavastre, Veronique, E-mail: veronique.lavastre@univ-st-etienne.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Jean Monnet, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France)] [CNRS, UMR 6524, LMV, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France)] [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Ader, Magali [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Buschaert, Stephane [Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 7-8 rue Jean Monnet, 92 298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Petit, Eddy; Javoy, Marc [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2011-05-15

    Research Highlights: > Up. Dog./Oxf. sequence is investigated for radioactive waste disposal feasibilities. > Marine carbonates suffered isotopic exchanges with meteoric water. > Modelling shows that very low W/R ratio can explain isotopic changes in clay layer. > Higher W/R ratio are needed to reach isotopic changes in carbonated layers. > Confirmed barrier property of clay layer was probably reached during early burial. - Abstract: Upper Dogger to Oxfordian Formations in the eastern part of the Paris basin (France) are currently being investigated by the French nuclear waste management agency (Andra), testing the feasibility of long-term deep nuclear waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones. Characterising the hydrogeological behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones is, therefore, essential in evaluating its potential as a geological barrier. In order to evaluate and quantify water/rock interactions experienced over geological time by these Formations, bulk carbonate {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O were measured and calculations of water-rock ratios were used to explain carbonate-{delta}{sup 18}O changes. Meteoric porewater and a maximum temperature reached of about 40 deg. C were considered. The Jurassic marine carbonate {delta}{sup 13}C was preserved in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones and in the overlying limestones (-0.28 per mille to 3.39 per mille/PDB), while the {delta}{sup 18}O values are lower by 0-5 per mille (-6.25 per mille to -1.32 per mille/PDB). Calculations show that Upper Dogger and Oxfordian Limestone {delta}{sup 18}O data: (i)have random-like distribution through theoretical {delta}{sup 18}O-W/R curves and (ii)suggest that water/rock ratios (0.08-0.4) needed to explain {delta}{sup 18}O changes are higher by a factor of about 2-20 compared to the present-day water/rock ratio. These features indicate advection in both aquifers. According to the history of the Paris basin, this hydrogeological behaviour could have been

  1. ARGAZ: a new device for experimental study of the coupling between hydrogen production and hydrogen transfer through saturated Callovian-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbert, C.; Bataillon, C.; Touze, G.; Vigier, P.; Talandier, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A specific experimental device has been designed to produce hydrogen at the metal-argillite interface by electrochemistry. The target is for one hand to reproduce the production of hydrogen occurring when a metal is corroded by the water contained in the porosity of the mud-stone. On the other hand, the transfer of the hydrogen through the mud-stone can be studied. The specific features of the experiment are the following: - Hydrogen is generated inside a cell by electrochemistry, at the interface between the argillite and a metallic surface; no gas injection is required; - Electrochemistry gives the possibility to control the hydrogen production rate; - Hydrogen generation implies water consumption: the water comes from the porosity of the bulk argillite, near the interface; - That one-dimensional experiment has been built around a cylindrical sample of bulk and undamaged argillite coming from the Callovian-Oxfordian formation. Inside the device a cylindrical sample of argillite is placed above a nickel plate. Around the argillite, a ring of compacted bentonite ensures a mechanical confinement. When saturated, the bentonite will apply a swelling pressure close to the total pressure encountered by the sample in the geological formation. The hydrogen is generated at the interface nickel-argillite. The nickel plate is one of the two electrodes required for electrochemistry. At the top face of bentonite, iron electrode is used to close the electrical circuit. The hydrogen produced at the bottom face of the mud-stone is expected to go across the argillite towards the top face. A porous plate connected with a sampling bottle allows the capture of hydrogen. The argillite sample has a diameter of 50 mm, and a height of 50 mm. It is obtained by over-coring a core sample, and by a careful machining leading to a perfect geometry and surface quality. The production rate of hydrogen can be calculated from the current intensity

  2. Nature and reactivity of organic matter in argillaceous formations: example of the Callovo-Oxfordian of Bure (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michels, R.; Elie, M.; Faure, P.; Huault, V.; Martinez, L.; Bartier, D.; Fleck, S.; Hautevelle, Y.

    2004-01-01

    In carbon cycle models, it is admitted that less than 1% of produced organic carbon is transferred to the geological cycle as sedimentary organic matter (Tissot and Welte, 1984). Although, coal or petroleum source rocks are most well known, sedimentary organic matter also occurs in various concentrations throughout many different rock facies. Organic matter is therefore a witness of the record of environmental changes as well as biomass evolution through time. It is also a reliable tracer of diagenetic conditions, from sediment deposition to metamorphism and subsurface alteration. Especially in the case of argillaceous sediments, known for their potential proneness of organic matter, the study of fossil organic matter is able to unravel a large amount of information concerning the geological past (depositional conditions and preservation, paleo-environment, burial, thermal history) as well as the future (effects of induced thermal perturbation, oxidative alteration, biodegradation). We are presenting here data obtained on the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous formations of Bure (France), which are the target layers for the installation of a future laboratory. (authors)

  3. Experimental study and modelling of physico-chemical mechanisms of clay-concrete interactions in the radioactive waste geological disposal context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauzeres, A.

    2010-09-01

    These research works are carried out as part of the radioactive wastes geological disposal feasibility study. The current option developed by Andra, includes several cementitious materials in contact with the surrounding Callovo-Oxfordian (COX) (an argillite). Concretes and argillite present very different pore solutions (ionic concentrations and pH). Controlled by the concentrations differences, the aqueous species diffusion in the solids generates chemical and physical disturbances. This study is based on experimental, analytical and numerical works, in order to identify the mechanisms controlling the clayey environment influence on cementitious materials. (author)

  4. Influence of temperature on the geochemistry of Callovo-Oxfordian argillite: batch experiments and modelling at 80 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gailhanou, H.; Tournassat, C.; Laperche, V.; Grangeon, S.; Blanc, P.; Marty, N.; Crouzet, C.; Henry, B.; Gaucher, E.C.; Greneche, J.M.; Kars, M.; Made, B.; Altmann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A repository of high-level nuclear wastes in the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay rock will lead to a temporary increase in temperature locally around the disposal cells, up to about 80 C. Thermally induced modifications of the pore-water chemistry of the clay rock must be assessed since the pore water chemistry can affect the rates of corrosion of metallic materials used in the disposal facility. The chemistry of COx pore water has been studied at ambient temperature (∼ 25 C) using modelling approaches constrained by parameter values measured on core samples and by measurements of pore water collected by means of specially designed in-situ experiments. In particular, the predictive model from Gaucher et al. (2009) reproduces the measured, in situ pore-water composition without any estimated parameters. In the present study, carried out as part of a collaborative BRGM/Andra research program, the results of long-term batch experiments performed at 80 C, are compared with compositions predicted using a model based on the one developed for 25 C. Batch experiments Two batch experiments have been performed with COx rock samples in contact with synthetic water, for respectively 6 and 20 months. The experiments were prepared at 25 C under anoxic atmosphere in closed reactors, with solution compositions close to the pore water composition. Afterwards, each system was heated at 80 C. During the experiments, measurements of PCO 2 were carried out as this parameter is considered as an indicator of the reactivity of this carbonate-dominated system. At the end of the experiments, the suspension was filtered at 0.1 μm at 80 C, under anoxic atmosphere. The pH was also measured at 80 C. Major cations (Ca, Mg, K, Na, Sr) and anions (notably Cl, SO 4 ), TIC and minor and trace elements (notably Si, Al, Fe, Zn, Pb) were analysed. Concerning the solids, some minor changes were detected in the mineralogy between initial and final solids

  5. Profiles of chloride and water stable isotope in porewater obtained from a 2000 m-deep borehole through the Mesozoic sedimentary series in the East of France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensenouci, F.; Michelot, J.L.; Matray, J.M.; Savoye, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A method to obtain information about fluid flow and solute transport in porous media with low hydraulic conductivity and low water content is based on the study of the natural tracer distribution in pore water. This approach was previously applied to the Callovo-Oxfordian argillites, studied by Andra at the Bure URL (East of France), using several natural tracer profiles ( 4 He, 2 H, 18 O, Cl - , 37 Cl). These profiles were interpreted as the result of a diffusive exchange between pore water in the aquitard and groundwater in the surrounding aquifers. However, at the Bure URL, and in contrast to other investigated argillaceous formations, the concentrations of tracers in lower aquifer groundwater may be higher than those in argillite pore water and increase with depth. The continuity of the profiles and the origin of pore water salinity remained questionable. This study aims at presenting and interpreting chloride and stable isotope profiles in pore water through more than 800 m of sediments, from the lower Oxfordian to the lower Hettangian. Drill-core samples were collected from the 2000 m-deep borehole (EST 433) drilled by Andra in the so-called 'Transposition Zone', located north to the Bure URL. In the framework of the TAPPS 2000 programme, twenty-five core samples were collected from the Oxfordian to the lower Hettangian during the drilling campaign, and in-situ conditioned. The chloride concentrations in pore water were firstly estimated by aqueous leaching, using a geochemical porosity two times smaller than the porosity measured by heating at 150 deg. C. After this estimation of pore water salinities, the radial diffusion and vapour exchange methods were applied to determine the stable isotope and anion concentrations in pore water. The deuterium contents of pore water derived from the vapour exchange experiments describe a classical bell-shape profile in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillites with an

  6. Diffusion Experiments with Opalinus and Callovo-Oxfordian Clays: Laboratory, Large-Scale Experiments and Microscale Analysis by RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Cormenzana, J.L.; Mingarro, M.; Morejon, J.; Gil, P.

    2009-01-01

    Consolidated clays are potential host rocks for deep geological repositories for high-level radioactive waste. Diffusion is the main transport process for radionuclides (RN) in these clays. Radionuclide (RN) diffusion coefficients are the most important parameters for Performance Assessment (PA) calculations of clay barriers. Different diffusion methodologies were applied at a laboratory scale to analyse the diffusion behaviour of a wide range of RN. Main aims were to understand the transport properties of different RNs in two different clays and to contribute with feasible methodologies to improve in-situ diffusion experiments, using samples of larger scale. Classical laboratory essays and a novel experimental set-up for large-scale diffusion experiments were performed, together to a novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), for diffusion analyses at the micrometer scale. The main experimental and theoretical characteristics of the different methodologies, and their advantages and limitations are here discussed. Experiments were performed with the Opalinus and the Callovo-Oxfordian clays. Both clays are studied as potential host rock for a repository. Effective diffusion coefficients ranged between 1.10 - 10 to 1.10 - 12 m 2 /s for neutral, low sorbing cations (as Na and Sr) and anions. Apparent diffusion coefficients for strongly sorbing elements, as Cs and Co, are in the order of 1.10-13 m 2 /s; europium present the lowest diffusion coefficient (5.10 - 15 m 2 /s). The results obtained by the different approaches gave a comprehensive database of diffusion coefficients for RN with different transport behaviour within both clays. (Author) 42 refs

  7. Hydro-mechanical behaviour of crushed COx argillite used as backfilling material in HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Chaosheng; Shi Bin; Cui Yujun; Anh-Minh Tang

    2010-01-01

    At present, the crushed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) argillite powder is proposed as an alternative backfilling material in France, which will be constructed in the engineering barrier of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository. In this investigation, the compression behavior of two crushed COx argillite powders (coarser one and finer one) was studied by running l-D compression tests with several loading-unloading cycles. After the final dry density 2.0 g/cm 3 was reached, the specimen was flooding with distilled water and the evolution of axial stress was studied during saturation process. The effects of initial axial stress level and grain size distribution (GSD) on hydro-mechanical behaviour of compacted specimen were analyzed. The results show that the compression curves are significantly influenced by the GSD of the soils. To obtain the same degree of compaction, the axial stress applied to finer soil is much higher than that of coarser soil. In addition, the compression index of the finer soil is bigger than that of coarser soil. The swelling index at initial water content increases with the dry density and seems to be independent of the GSD. During saturation, the initial lower axial stress causes obvious swelling behavior for both the coarser and finer powder samples and the corresponding axial stress increase gradually. At initial higher axial stress condition, monotone collapse behavior is observed for the coarser powder samples. Whereas the axial stress decrease firstly, then increase and finally decrease again for the finer powder samples. After saturation, the equilibrium axial stresses of finer powder samples are higher than that of coarser powder samples. (authors)

  8. Diffusion Experiments with Opalinus and Callovo-Oxfordian Clays: Laboratory, Large-Scale Experiments and Microscale Analysis by RBS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Missana, T.; Cormenzana, J.L.; Mingarro, M.; Morejon, J.; Gil, P.

    2009-09-25

    Consolidated clays are potential host rocks for deep geological repositories for high-level radioactive waste. Diffusion is the main transport process for radionuclides (RN) in these clays. Radionuclide (RN) diffusion coefficients are the most important parameters for Performance Assessment (PA) calculations of clay barriers. Different diffusion methodologies were applied at a laboratory scale to analyse the diffusion behaviour of a wide range of RN. Main aims were to understand the transport properties of different RNs in two different clays and to contribute with feasible methodologies to improve in-situ diffusion experiments, using samples of larger scale. Classical laboratory essays and a novel experimental set-up for large-scale diffusion experiments were performed, together to a novel application of the nuclear ion beam technique Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), for diffusion analyses at the micrometer scale. The main experimental and theoretical characteristics of the different methodologies, and their advantages and limitations are here discussed. Experiments were performed with the Opalinus and the Callovo-Oxfordian clays. Both clays are studied as potential host rock for a repository. Effective diffusion coefficients ranged between 1.10{sup -}10 to 1.10{sup -}12 m{sup 2}/s for neutral, low sorbing cations (as Na and Sr) and anions. Apparent diffusion coefficients for strongly sorbing elements, as Cs and Co, are in the order of 1.10-13 m{sup 2}/s; europium present the lowest diffusion coefficient (5.10{sup -}15 m{sup 2}/s). The results obtained by the different approaches gave a comprehensive database of diffusion coefficients for RN with different transport behaviour within both clays. (Author) 42 refs.

  9. In situ measurement of the rate of oxygen consumption by the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinsot, A.; Lundy, M.; Claret, F.; Wechner, S.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The ventilation of excavated drifts in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock induces its exposure to air. The oxygen from air reacts with several reduced mineral species from the rock. It may also react with organic species existing in the rock. The effects of these reactions on the rock mineralogy were observed in the first meters of many boreholes drilled in the Andra's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) drifts at 490 m deep. They generate mainly sulfated and ferric secondary phases. The consequences of these reactions on the evolution of a radioactive waste disposal in such a rock are two folds. First, they will contribute to oxygen consumption and the generation of an anoxic atmosphere in the drifts and vaults after their closure. In addition, they will influence the composition of the water which will later on fill the drifts and vaults. These phenomena are taken into account in the modeling of disposal evolutions at various times and space scales. The main remaining uncertainties regarding these phenomena concern: i) the identification of all the species involved in the oxygen reduction; ii) the reaction kinetics; and iii) the extension of the oxidized zone around the drifts and vaults. The aim of the 'POX experiment' is to reduce these uncertainties. This experiment includes a test dedicated to the quantitative study of oxygen consumption in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock. This test was implemented in 2009 in the Andra's URL. After an initial phase during which the rock natural gases and pore water at the test location were observed, the first oxygen injection was performed in July 2011. The experimental concept is based on gas circulation in a borehole. It consists of a 15 m-long and 76 mm-diameter ascending borehole, from which the last 5 m constitute the test interval. The rock surface in the test interval is close to 1 m 2 . The last 6 m of the borehole were cored with argon as a drilling

  10. Convergence in anisotropic conditions: gallery behaviour in the Callovo-Oxfordian clayey layer in North-Eastern France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Martin, L.; Hadj-Hassen, F.; Philippe, J.C.; Boidy, E.; Colombet, G.; Armand, G.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Coyne et Bellier (Tractebel Engineering) has been supplying geotechnical services to Andra since 1994 regarding the feasibility for developing a repository for radioactive waste in a 490 m deep clayey formation at the Meuse/Haute-Marne site. Armines/Mines-ParisTech (French engineering school) has been an Andra scientific partner for several years due to its expertise in rock creep behaviour as well as in mining technologies. Throughout the different works carried out for Andra (especially the studies concerning the enlargement of the underground research laboratory), the behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian clayey were computed. These studies are used mainly for predicting the long-term behaviour of this layer. Lemaitre's rheological law (or modified Norton's law) has been used for such purposes. This time-dependent law is able to model the isotropic hardening of an elastic-viscoplastic solid by taking into account a non linear viscosity (γ) which Coyne et Bellier has decided to represent by means of a cone-shaped dash-pot element (stiffness increases during creep, cf. Eric Boidy's PhD). This hypothesis, together with that standing for 'long-term incompressibility' (viscoplastic deformation occurs at constant volume), allows the law be expressed by means of the second invariants of the stress (q) and strain (ε vp ) tensors. The rheological model when the long term behaviour takes place beyond a stress threshold (σ S ) is shown. Modelling works that use this law reproduce well convergence measurements as long as radial stresses around the galleries are isotropic. When the stress field around the gallery is anisotropic, the classic Lemaitre's law no longer fits the convergence measurements. This is the case for the GMR gallery at the main level of the laboratory: the horizontal stress is 1.3 times greater than the vertical stress whilst the average vertical convergence is more than five

  11. Contribution of natural tracers for understanding transfers through argillaceous formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensenouci, F.

    2010-01-01

    This study is part of a research programme conducted by IRSN on the safety of deep geological disposal of high level and intermediate long-lived radioactive wastes. It more especially concerns the geological medium considered as a full component of the multi-barrier concept proposed by Andra for a deep repository. Indeed, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite of the Paris Basin, in the east of France, is being investigated by Andra as a potential host rock for this repository. Performance assessment of this natural barrier is based on the knowledge of its confinement properties and therefore on phenomena possibly involved in the mass transport of radionuclides. In this context, this work aimed at studying the distribution of tracers naturally present in pore waters obtained from boreholes having crossed Mesozoic sedimentary series involving impervious and compacted clay rocks in the East (Andra borehole, EST433) and south of France (IRSN boreholes). Radial diffusion and vapour exchange methods were used to calculate the concentrations and diffusion parameters of the studied tracers. In Tournemire formations, the different profiles describe a curved shapes attributed to a diffusive exchange between the argillite pore water and the surrounding aquifers. Concerning the Mesozoic formations crossed by EST433, the study of the different profiles confirms the diffusion as the dominant transport mechanism in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, and permits identifying the transport processes in the whole studied column from the Oxfordian formations down to the Liassic one. This study also helps to identify the Liassic formations as a major source of salinity of the Dogger aquifer

  12. Inputs from in situ experiments to the understanding of the unsaturated behaviour of Callovo-Oxfordian claystone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armand Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The French national radioactive waste management agency (Andra research program is dedicated to preparing the construction and operation of a deep geological disposal facility for high-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste (HL, IL-LLW in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone (COx. The characterization of the COx thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM behavior, at different scales of interest, must gradually give relevant data for design and safety calculations. The effects of saturation and desaturation of COx claystone are studied in laboratory conditions (sample scale and in situ (drift scale, in order to improve knowledge on ventilation effect at gallery wall as galleries will remains open during operational phase (more than 100 years for some specific galleries in the repository. The Saturation Damaged Zone (SDZ experiment is outlined and its results are discussed. This experimentation aims to change the relative humidity in an isolated portion of a gallery in order to follow the HM behavior of the surrounding rock mass. Drying and wetting cycles could induce in certain cases cracks and swelling and modify the hydromechanical behavior of the claystone around the gallery (Young modulus, strength, creep…. The long term behavior of the COx claystone at the vicinity of gallery is then studied by performing climatic, hydraulic, geological and geomechanical measurements. Results of the in situ experiment are discussed with respect to the identified process on samples. The discussion given on this paper intends to highlights the inputs from 7 years of an in situ experiment to better understand the unsaturated behavior of the COx claystone.

  13. Contribution in the study of the stability of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock minerals in the presence of iron at 90 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, Camille

    2011-01-01

    In the context of underground disposal of high-level radioactive waste, it is of prime importance to understand the interaction mechanisms between Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (COx), selected as a potential host-rock by Andra (French national radioactive waste management agency) and metallic iron, that enters the composition of containers and disposal cells. Interactions between metallic iron and COx clay-rock, COx Callovo-Oxfordian clay fraction (SCOx) and pure clay phases (kaolinite, illite, smectites) were investigated at 90 deg. C under anoxic atmosphere in chlorine solution. In order to study the role of COx non clay minerals, the reactivity of mixtures between SCOx and quartz, calcite, dolomite or pyrite, was also studied. Liquid and solid by-products were characterised by chemical analyses, mineralogical and morphometric techniques, at different scales. In our experimental conditions, major evolutions were observed during the first month, which shows that the oxidation of metallic iron is rapid. The release of iron cations in solution, pH increase (8-10) and Eh decrease (reductive conditions) are responsible for the partial dissolution of initial clay phases. Released iron is involved in the crystallization of Fe-serpentines (odinite or berthierite mainly) or precipitates under the form of magnetite in low amount. Fe-serpentine stability is controlled by the redox conditions as the introduction of dioxygen into the system leads to iron exsolution under the form of iron oxides and hydroxides and precipitation of clay particles with composition close to the initial ones. Whereas carbonates and pyrite do not significantly influence SCOx-metallic iron interactions, reaction pathways are modified in the presence of quartz. Indeed, in such conditions one observes a slight decrease of pH, an increase in Eh, the absence of magnetite and differences in the crystal chemistry of Fe-serpentines that are silica enriched, in comparison with those formed without any quartz

  14. The evolution of the callovo-oxfordian argillite site, Eastern France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brulhet, J.

    2004-01-01

    In France, investigations on the feasibility of a repository for long-lived radioactive waste in a deep geological formation are carried out according to a regulatory framework (Basic Safety Rule, RFS III.2.f prescribing that the long-term geological evolution be taken into account to assess the dynamics of radionuclide transfers over the very long timescales involved. As a matter of fact, the period in the future is in the order of 1 million years and is consistent with the timescales of geological evolutions likely to be significant, especially at ground surface, due to fast and high-amplitude climate variations. In order to achieve that goal, external and internal geodynamic phenomena that would generate the potential evolution are studied both on the surface and deep underground. The purpose is to define a reference scenario where the evolution of the environment is induced by a series of very likely natural events in the future. In such a framework, the basis of the approach is to continue studying the geological evolution together with past situation analogies. The work also involves the description of one or several possible variations, such as potential extreme variations or disturbances of the evolution due to the impact of human activities. That aspect is particularly important with regard to the climate evolution, because of the hypotheses on the long-term effects of greenhouse gases. In that context, the goal is to forecast potential exceptional situations in the future with or without similar conditions in the past. (author)

  15. Effect of damage on water retention and gas transport properties geo-materials: Application to geological storage of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M'Jahad, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the context of geological disposal of radioactive waste, this work contributes to the characterization of the effect of diffuse damage on the water retention and gas transfer properties of concrete (CEM I and CEM V) selected by Andra, Callovo-Oxfordian argillite (host rock) and argillite / concrete interfaces. This study provides information on the concrete microstructure from Mercury porosimetry intrusion and water retention curves: each concrete has a distinct microstructure, CEM I concrete is characterized by a significant proportion of capillary pores while CEM V concrete has a large proportion of C-S-H pores. Several protocols have been developed in order to damage concrete. The damage reduces water retention capacity of CEM I concrete and increases its gas permeability. Indeed, gas breakthrough pressure decreases significantly for damaged concrete, and this regardless of the type of concrete. For argillite, the sample mass increases gradually at RH = 100%, which creates and increases damage in the material. This reduces its ability to retain water. Otherwise, water retention and gas transport properties of argillite are highly dependent of its initial water saturation, which is linked to its damage. Finally, we observed a clogging phenomenon at the argillite/concrete interfaces, which is first mechanical and then hydraulic (and probably chemical) after water injection. This reduces the gas breakthrough pressure interfaces. (author)

  16. Organic geochemistry of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillo-carbonated sedimentary series of the East of the Paris basin and of England. Variabilities and paleo-environmental implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautevelle, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones from the East of the Paris basin are studied by ANDRA in order to test the feasibility of a possible storage of radioactive waste. The molecular analysis of their organic matter indicates that they can be considered as homogenous from their organic content point of view because they are characterized by only one molecular facies. However, the transition to the surrounding limestones is underlined by a major evolution of the molecular facies indicating a change and an increase of the variability of the deposition and diagenesis conditions. The evolution of the distribution of the plant bio-markers indicates, at the end of the Lower Oxfordian, a paleo-floristic change characterized by the increase of the proportion of Pinaceae (a conifer family) or their forerunners on the London-Brabant massif. This paleo-floristic evolution reflects a paleo-climatic change characterized by the increase of aridity at the global scale. Other complementary results get on other sedimentary series of similar ages highlight the occurrence of a period of water anoxia during the Middle Callovian which certainly happened on the major part of the Western Europe. This event could be at the origin of the crisis of the carbonate production at the Dogger/Malm transition. On the other hand, an experimental technique based on artificial maturation of extant plants has been developed and will allow the acquisition of new palaeo-chemo-taxonomic data. These data will contribute to a better interpretation of plant bio-marker assemblages in terms of palaeo-floristic composition. (author)

  17. Isolation and characterization of dissolved organic matter from the Callovo-Oxfordian formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdouan, Amandine; Christl, Iso; Meylan, Sebastien; Wersin, Paul; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2007-01-01

    Characterizing dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the pore water of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, a potential host rock for the disposal of radioactive waste, is important to estimate its potential influence on the mobility of radionuclides in the rock. To isolate DOM, crushed rock material was extracted under anoxic conditions with deionized water, 0.1 M NaOH and synthetic pore water (SPW, water containing all major ions at pore water concentrations but no organic matter), respectively. The effects of extraction parameters on the extracted DOM including the solid-to-liquid ratio, extraction time, exposure to O 2 and acid pretreatment of the rock material prior to the anoxic extraction were evaluated. In addition, DOM in one of the first pore water samples collected in the underground rock laboratory at Bure (France) was characterized for comparison. The size distribution and the low molecular weight organic acid contents of the extracts and pore water DOM were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with an organic C detector (LC-OCD) and by ion chromatography. The results revealed that only a fraction of less than 1.2% of the total organic C present in the rock was extractable. Maximum dissolved organic C (DOC) concentrations in the anoxic extracts ranged from 5.5 ± 0.3 mg/L for SPW extracts to 14.2 ± 1.1 mg/L for 0.1 M NaOH extracts. The major portion of the DOC in the anoxic extracts consisted of hydrophilic compounds (48-78%) having a molecular weight of less than 500 Da. Up to 21% of DOC in the anoxic extracts was identified as acetate, formate, lactate and malate. The short-term exposure of rock material to O 2 during rock crushing strongly increased DOC concentrations and led to a shift towards smaller molecular weight compounds and to a higher low molecular weight organic acid (LMWOA) content as compared to the strictly anoxic extraction. The pore water sampled from a packed-off borehole exhibited a higher DOC concentration (56.7 mg/L) than the

  18. Investigation on the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock within the framework of ANDRA/GRS cooperation programme. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany); Armand, Gilles; Conil, Nathalie [French Agence Nationale Pour la Gestion de Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2015-01-15

    An underground repository for disposal of radioactive waste is planned to be constructed in the sedimentary Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous formation (COX) in France /AND 05/. The clay rock exhibits inherent anisotropy with bedding structure, which leads to directional dependences of the rock properties (e.g. mineralogical, physical, mechanical, hydraulic, thermal, etc.) with respect to the bedding planes. For the design of the repository and the assessment of its safety during the operation and post-closure phases it is necessary to characterise and predict the anisotropic properties and processes in the host rock, particularly in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) near the openings. Within the framework of the bilateral cooperation agreement between the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) and the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), concerning the research activities in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (MHM-URL), a joint research programme was initiated by ANDRA and GRS in 2013 to investigate mechanical anisotropy of the COX clay rock for the purpose of precise characterization, better understanding and reliable prediction of the development of EDZ around the repository. This programme was funded by ANDRA under contract number 059844 and performed by GRS during the time period of November 2013 to December 2014. GRS gratefully acknowledges the financial support from and the fruitful cooperation with ANDRA.

  19. Direct observations of the 3D pore network of a Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, J.C.; Talandier, J.; Davy, C.A.; Ghayaza, M.; Skoczylas, F.; Troadec, D.; Sardini, P.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Long term deep underground storage of radioactive nuclear waste is planned in the East of France within an argillaceous rock layer (the host rock), also called argillite, situated at ca. 450-500 m depth. Andra, the French national agency for nuclear waste management, is in charge of assessing the feasibility, the safety and the performance of this underground disposal. The drilling of storage tunnels generates an Excavated Damaged Zone (EDZ), where argillite is macro-cracked in various locations. This requires strengthening by different means, e.g. shotcrete or pre-fabricated concrete arches. It is also expected that underground water seepage will contribute to argillite sealing: mainly self-sealing, and sealing at the interface with concrete. Sealing phenomena include crystalline swelling of smectitic clay components of argillite and inter-particle swelling of clay minerals due to osmosis mechanisms. Small scale pores and mineral organisation of the COx clay-stone are widely acknowledged to control transfer properties of water, gas and varied solutes. In order to assess these properties, the COx small-scale structure has been imaged down to micrometric resolution by various means, including classical Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray computed microtomography and autoradiography. To go further into pore and mineral characterisation of COx clay-stone, the following investigations are currently under way: (i) acquiring/quantifying the 3D geometry of the pore network of undisturbed COx with a nano-metric resolution and (ii) imaging/quantifying the small-scale (mm-nm) structure of self-sealed volumes. The FIB (Focused Ion Beam) /SEM technique allows performing 3D observations of solid volumes of ca. a few microns, with a resolution of about ten nanometers, by acquiring and computing regularly spaced 2D SEM images. This technique provides quantification of the 3D spatial distribution mainly of macro- and meso

  20. Main outcomes from in situ thermo-hydro-mechanical experiments programme to demonstrate feasibility of radioactive high-level waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Armand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context of radioactive waste disposal, an underground research laboratory (URL is a facility in which experiments are conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing and operating a radioactive waste disposal facility within a geological formation. The Meuse/Haute-Marne URL is a site-specific facility planned to study the feasibility of a radioactive waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx claystone. The thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM behaviour of the host rock is significant for the design of the underground nuclear waste disposal facility and for its long-term safety. The French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra has begun a research programme aiming to demonstrate the relevancy of the French high-level waste (HLW concept. This paper presents the programme implemented from small-scale (small diameter boreholes to full-scale demonstration experiments to study the THM effects of the thermal transient on the COx claystone and the strategy implemented in this new programme to demonstrate and optimise current disposal facility components for HLW. It shows that the French high-level waste concept is feasible and working in the COx claystone. It also exhibits that, as for other plastic clay or claystone, heating-induced pore pressure increases and that the THM behaviour is anisotropic.

  1. Water retention properties of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Min; Delage, Pierre; Tang, Anh Minh; GATMIRI, Behrouz

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Many investigations were carried out on the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone that has been selected by the French radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) as a potential host rock for high level radioactive waste disposal at great depth. Various authors demonstrated the significant water sensitivity of clay-stones. Some cracks generated by desaturation have been observed in the Tournemire URL (France) excavated in clay-stone. By carrying out some ESEM (environmental scanning electron microscope) observations on COx clay-stone samples submitted to cyclic changes in relative humidity, Montes et al. (2004) evidenced the water sensitivity of the clay fraction, with significant successive openings and closures of cracks and pores. Hysteresis effects have been observed in the water retention curve, in the ultrasonic velocity evolution and in the strain changes induced by hydration cycles on COx samples submitted to controlled relative humidities by Pham et al., (2007). Better knowledge of the mechanism of desaturation of the clay-stone is necessary to further understand the changes in hydro-mechanical properties of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) that becomes significantly de-saturated all around the galleries because of ventilation. In this framework, a detailed study of the water retention properties of the COx clay-stone was carried out i) to complete existing observations with respect to volume changes under suction cycles and ii) to determine the main drying and wetting curves so as to better investigate hysteresis effects in the water retention curve.. Particular attention was paid to the characterization of the initial state in the laboratory (where samples are provided unsaturated due to the combined effect of coring, storage and transportation) and to the volume changes and changes in degree of saturation along the main wetting and drying paths. The determination of the water retention properties was

  2. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-06-20

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  3. Investigations of Near-Field Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical-Chemical Models for Radioactive Waste Disposal in Clay/Shale Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.H.; Li, L.; Zheng, L.; Houseworth, J.E.; Rutqvist, J.

    2011-01-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of radioactive waste. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA.

  4. Numerical modelling of the long term mechanical behaviour of a storage cell for high level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian, H.B.; Jia, Y.; Duveau, G.; Shao, J.F.; Poutrel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In France, a clay formation, called Callovo-Oxfordian clay, is considered as potential geological barrier for storage of radioactive wastes. An underground research laboratory is constructed in this clay layer in Bure (CMHM). The French Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) plans to conduct a series of full scale experiments in the Bure Underground Research Laboratory in order to study the coupled Chemo- Thermo-Hydraulic-Mechanical processes due to the excavation, ventilation, subsequent backfilling/sealing, corrosion of metal components and heat release from the radioactive wasters. These phenomena will occur in the storage structures and the geologic barrier for a short/very long period of time. Especially for the High-Level Wastes, due to the important increase of temperature released by the waste packages, the behaviour of geological barrier is perhaps perturbed and the design of repository is also influenced in terms of admissible thermal loading. In this paper, a disposal cell for the radioactive High-Level Wastes (HLW) is studied in order to analyser the coupled phenomena evolving in the HLW storage. The carbon steel is adopted as the first choice material for the container of waste because of its relevant geochemical condition. In the underground radioactive wastes storage, due to the arrival of water from the geological formation, the metallic components will be corroded, by step, with a decrease of mechanical resistance and a generated supplementary volume. The space between the metallic container and the host rock will then be closed under the combination of metallic corrosion and the behaviour differs of Callovo-Oxfordian clay. As results, important stress will be created on the interface of Callovo-Oxfordian clay and wastes packages. In addition, local hydration of barrier modifies the water infiltration from the Callovo-Oxfordian clay and the stress distribution in the argillite. According to

  5. Effect of temperature on the containment properties of argillaceous rocks: The case study of Callovo-Oxfordian claystones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoye, S; Goutelard, F; Beaucaire, C; Charles, Y; Fayette, A; Herbette, M; Larabi, Y; Coelho, D

    2011-07-01

    Heat generated by high level radioactive wastes could alter the performance of a clay repository. It was intended to investigate the effect of such a thermal period on the diffusive properties of Callovo-Oxfordian claystones. Thus, through-diffusion experiments with HTO, Cl-36, Na-22 and Cs-137 were performed before, during and after stages of heating at 80°C that lasted for up to one year. A special attention was paid to limit the occurrence of any chemical disturbance. Therefore (i) the temperature was raised to 80°C, then progressively brought back to 21°C, thanks to three intermediate temperature stages, and (ii) specific synthetic solutions were used for each temperature, chemistry of which being close to the equilibrium state, especially with respect to the carbonate and sulphate minerals. It was found that experiments carried out at 80°C showed a clear increase of the effective diffusion coefficient values for the four tracers with respect to those obtained at 21°C (by a factor of 3 for HTO and Cl-36, 5 for Na-22 and 2 for Cs-137). On the other hand, the porosity and rock capacity values did not exhibit any significant discrepancy between 21°C and 80°C, indicating no observable damage of both the pore conducing network and the sorption properties of clay minerals. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, based on the temperature dependency of the viscosity of bulk water, could be used to describe the temperature dependence of the diffusion of HTO and Cl-36 but failed to describe the diffusive evolution of the two sorbing cations, Na-22 and Cs-137. Furthermore, experiments performed after the thermal period led to diffusive properties well matching those obtained before heating. All these results suggest that at the lab scale the heating of rock samples would not alter the claystone containment properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Technological demonstrators. Researches and studies on the storage and disposal of long living intermediate level and high level radioactive wastes; Les demonstrateurs technologiques. Recherches et etudes sur le stockage et l'entreposage des dechets de haute activite et de moyenne activite a vie longue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This brochure presents the technological demonstrators made by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) and exhibited at Limay (Yvelines, France). These demonstrators, built at scale 1, have been an essential support to the establishment of the 'Dossier 2005' which demonstrates the feasibility of a reversible disposal of long living-intermediate level and high level radioactive wastes in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite of Meuse-Haute Marne. Two type of demonstrators were built: demonstrators of storage containers for long living-intermediate level wastes and for spent fuels, and dynamic demonstrators for containers handling. This brochure presents these different demonstrators, their characteristics and the results of their tests. (J.S.)

  7. Effect of Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock on the dissolution rate of the SON68 simulated nuclear waste glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeway, James J., E-mail: James.Neeway@pnnl.gov [SUBATECH, Unité Mixte de Recherche 6457, École des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Ribet, Solange; El Mendili, Yassine [SUBATECH, Unité Mixte de Recherche 6457, École des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Schumacher, Stéphan [ANDRA, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1/7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry (France); Grambow, Bernd [SUBATECH, Unité Mixte de Recherche 6457, École des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Nantes, BP 20722, 44307 Nantes cedex 3 (France)

    2015-04-15

    Long-term storage of high-level nuclear waste glass in France is expected to occur in an engineered barrier system (EBS) located in a subsurface Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay rock formation in the Paris Basin in northeastern France. Understanding the behavior of glass dissolution in the complex system is critical to be able to reliably model the performance of the glass in this complex environment. To simulate this multi-barrier repository scenario in the laboratory, several tests have been performed to measure glass dissolution rates of the simulated high-level nuclear waste glass, SON68, in the presence of COx claystone at 90 °C. Experiments utilized a High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pump to pass simulated Bure site COx pore water through a reaction cell containing SON68 placed between two COx claystone cores for durations up to 200 days. Silicon concentrations at the outlet were similar in all experiments, even the blank experiment with only the COx claystone (∼4 mg/L at 25 °C and ∼15 mg/L at 90 °C). The steady-state pH of the effluent, measured at room temperature, was roughly 7.1 for the blank and 7.3–7.6 for the glass-containing experiments demonstrating the pH buffering capacity of the COx claystone. Dissolution rates for SON68 in the presence of the claystone were elevated compared to those obtained from flow-through experiments conducted with SON68 without claystone in silica-saturated solutions at the same temperature and similar pH values. Additionally, through surface examination of the monoliths, the side of the monolith in direct contact with the claystone was seen to have a corrosion thickness 2.5× greater than the side in contact with the bulk glass powder. Results from one experiment containing {sup 32}Si-doped SON68 also suggest that the movement of Si through the claystone is controlled by a chemically coupled transport with a Si retention factor, K{sub d}, of 900 mL/g.

  8. Effect of temperature on the containment properties of argillaceous rocks: The case study of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoye, S.; Goutelard, F.; Beaucaire, C.; Charles, Y.; Fayette, A.; Herbette, M.; Larabi, Y.; Coelho, D.

    2011-01-01

    Heat generated by high level radioactive wastes could alter the performance of a clay repository. It was intended to investigate the effect of such a thermal period on the diffusive properties of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones. Thus, through-diffusion experiments with HTO, 36 Cl, 22 Na and 137 Cs were performed before, during and after stages of heating at 80 degrees C that lasted for up to one year. A special attention was paid to limit the occurrence of any chemical disturbance. Therefore (i) the temperature was raised to 80 degrees C, then progressively brought back to 21 degrees C, thanks to three intermediate temperature stages, and (ii) specific synthetic solutions were used for each temperature, chemistry of which being close to the equilibrium state, especially with respect to the carbonate and sulphate minerals. It was found that experiments carried out at 80 degrees C showed a clear increase of the effective diffusion coefficient values for the four tracers with respect to those obtained at 21 degrees C (by a factor of 3 for HTO and 36 Cl, 5 for 22 Na and 2 for 137 Cs). On the other hand, the porosity and rock capacity values did not exhibit any significant discrepancy between 21 degrees C and 80 degrees C, indicating no observable damage of both the pore conducing network and the sorption properties of clay minerals. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, based on the temperature dependency of the viscosity of bulk water, could be used to describe the temperature dependence of the diffusion of HTO and 36 Cl but failed to describe the diffusive evolution of the two sorbing cations, 22 Na and 137 Cs. Furthermore, experiments performed after the thermal period led to diffusive properties well matching those obtained before heating. All these results suggest that at the lab scale the heating of rock samples would not alter the clay-stone containment properties. (authors)

  9. Organic geochemistry of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillo-carbonated sedimentary series of the East of the Paris basin and of England. Variabilities and paleo-environmental implications; Geochimie organique des series argilo-carbonatees du Callovo-Oxfordien de l'Est du bassin de Paris et d'Angleterre: Variabilites et implications paleoenvironnementales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautevelle, Y

    2005-12-15

    The Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones from the East of the Paris basin are studied by ANDRA in order to test the feasibility of a possible storage of radioactive waste. The molecular analysis of their organic matter indicates that they can be considered as homogenous from their organic content point of view because they are characterized by only one molecular facies. However, the transition to the surrounding limestones is underlined by a major evolution of the molecular facies indicating a change and an increase of the variability of the deposition and diagenesis conditions. The evolution of the distribution of the plant bio-markers indicates, at the end of the Lower Oxfordian, a paleo-floristic change characterized by the increase of the proportion of Pinaceae (a conifer family) or their forerunners on the London-Brabant massif. This paleo-floristic evolution reflects a paleo-climatic change characterized by the increase of aridity at the global scale. Other complementary results get on other sedimentary series of similar ages highlight the occurrence of a period of water anoxia during the Middle Callovian which certainly happened on the major part of the Western Europe. This event could be at the origin of the crisis of the carbonate production at the Dogger/Malm transition. On the other hand, an experimental technique based on artificial maturation of extant plants has been developed and will allow the acquisition of new palaeo-chemo-taxonomic data. These data will contribute to a better interpretation of plant bio-marker assemblages in terms of palaeo-floristic composition. (author)

  10. Experimental study of thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of Callovo-Oxfordian Clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohajerani, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the different phases of the exothermic radioactive waste deep disposal (excavation, operation) and after permanent closure, the host rock is submitted to various coupled mechanical, hydraulic and thermal phenomena. Hence, a thorough investigation of the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of the rock is necessary to complete existing data and to better understand and model the short and long term behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay formation in Bure (Meuse/Haute-Marne - M/HM), considered by ANDRA as a potential host rock in France.In this work, the compression - swelling behaviour of the COx Clay-stone was first investigated by carrying out a series of high-pressure oedometric tests. The results, interpreted in terms of coupling between damage and swelling, showed that the magnitude of swelling was linked to the density of the fissures created during compression. In a second step, the hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of the saturated Clay-stone under a mean stress close to the in situ one were investigated by using two devices with short drainage path (10 mm), namely a isotropic cell and a newly designed hollow cylinder triaxial cell with local displacement measurements. These devices helped to solve two majors problems related to testing very low permeability materials: i) a satisfactory previous sample saturation (indicated by good Skempton values) and ii) satisfactory drainage conditions. Some typical constitutive parameters (Skempton and Biot's coefficients, drained and undrained compressibility coefficients) have been determined at ambient temperature through isotropic compression tests that also confirmed the transverse isotropy of the Clay-stone. The consistency of the obtained parameters has been checked in a saturated poro-elastic framework. Two aspects of the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of the COx Clay-stone have then been investigated through different heating tests and through drained and undrained isotropic

  11. Earth tidal and barometric responses observed in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation at ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delcourt-Honorez, M.; Scholz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Fluid pressure or hydraulic head measured in wells in geological formations can respond to Earth tidal forces and atmospheric pressure variations. At Andra Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory located in Bure (France), water level and fluid pressure are measured in several boreholes in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation (COX) and in overlying geological formations. One of these boreholes (EST207) is equipped with a multi-packer system monitoring 11 intervals, including 8 in the COX. The recorded fluid pressures in EST207 were analyzed to determine possible Earth tidal responses. In this borehole, the fluid pressure and atmospheric pressure variations data are recorded every fifteen minutes and 6.5 years of such data from 2004/06/02 to 2010/12/31 were analyzed. Various perturbed data, gaps, drift and abnormal data were corrected through a data preprocessing process. Data interpolation and filtering processes were performed to have data available every 15 minutes at 0, 15, 30 and 45 minutes on the hour. A spectral analysis (Fast Fourier Transform) of each pressure data series shows amplitude peaks at frequencies corresponding to various Earth tidal frequencies: diurnal and semi diurnal waves can be identified. Spectral analyses were also performed on the atmospheric pressure data. The solar semi diurnal wave (S2) was identified. The 'Earth Tides ETERNA package' was used to separate the waves according to the frequencies bands. The analyses performed using ETERNA are indicated as 'Earth Tidal Analyses' (ETAN). Tidal parameters are estimated from ETAN: amplitudes A and its standard deviation σ(A)[hPa], phase φ for the main waves in diurnal and semi diurnal frequencies bands before and after atmospheric pressure variations correction. The barometric efficiency (BE) and its standard deviation σ (BE) as regression coefficient is calculated. The atmospheric pressure data are also analyzed with ETERNA; the

  12. Hydrogen transfer experiments and modelization in clay rocks for radioactive waste deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulin, P.

    2008-10-01

    Gases will be generated by corrosion of high radioactive waste containers in deep geological repositories. A gas phase will be generated. Gas pressure will build up and penetrated the geological formation. If gases do not penetrate the geological barrier efficiently, the pressure build up may create a risk of fracturing and of creation of preferential pathways for radionuclide migration. The present work focuses on Callovo-Oxfordian argillites characterisation. An experiment, designed to measure very low permeabilities, was used with hydrogen/helium and analysed using the Dusty Gas Model. Argillites close to saturation have an accessible porosity to gas transfer that is lower than 0,1% to 1% of the porosity. Analysis of the Knudsen effect suggests that this accessible network should be made of 50 nm to 200 nm diameter pores. The permeabilities values were integrated to an ANDRA operating model. The model showed that the maximum pressure expected near the repository would be 83 bar. (author)

  13. In situ heating test in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone: measurement and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conil, N.; Armand, G.; De La Vaissiere, R.; Morel, J.; Garitte, B.; Jobmann, M.; Jellouli, M.; Filippi, M.

    2012-01-01

    months long. After one year the two surrounding heaters were activated and the same heating load was applied. Before each heating step, permeability tests were performed in all pressure measurement boreholes in order to investigate the impact of heat on the rock permeability. After two years of heating, the measurements of the temperature field provide clear evidence of thermal anisotropy. The pore pressures measured (Figure 1) also confirm the anisotropy of permeability and stiffness. The in situ permeability measurements do not show any changes as a function of temperature. The correlation between the measured temperature and pore pressure and the results obtained by modeling is very good ([2], [3], [4], [5]). Thermal conductivity and heat capacity values were determined on the basis of the back-analysis of the in situ measurements ([2], [3], [4]). They are very similar to the values taking from samples which then increase the viability of those parameters. The successful reproduction of the temporary instantaneous pore pressure decrease after increasing power by numerical modeling, confirms the mechanical anisotropy in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone [3]. TED experiment results show the capability of current models to satisfactorily predict the evolution of temperature and pore pressure in the far-field of disposal cells. The THM behavior will also be analyzed during the cooling phase. Cooling will start once the excess pore water pressure generated by heating will be drained in most of the installed piezometers. (authors)

  14. Past, present and predicted geochemical dynamics in the Callovian-Oxfordian argillites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaucher, E.C.; Lerouge, C.; Tournassat, C.; Blanc, Ph.; Burnol, A.; Claret, F.; Marty, N.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaboreau, S.; Buschaert, S.; Altmann, S.

    2010-01-01

    C-depleted. The 13 C-depletion could be attributed to organic matter degradation. The δ 18 O values of late diagenetic chalcedony suggest precipitation from marine-derived pore waters at temperatures of maximum burial. Late calcite in veinlet reworking with chalcedony and celestite, and late euhedral quartz grains in a limestone from the top of the formation have lower δ 18 O values, suggesting a precipitation process from meteoric fluids. The transition from very active biotic diagenesis precipitates to abiotic diagenesis precipitates seems not to be due to a lack of organic carbon or sulphates but linked to the compaction of the clayey formation, which prohibits the cellular movements by reduction of the porosity. The second part of this presentation is devoted to current water/rock/gas equilibria in the formation. A geochemical model has been developed over the last 10 years based on evolving data regarding clay-rock mineralogy, its ion exchange properties, constraints on calco-carbonate equilibrium by CO 2 partial pressure measurements, leachable Cl and SO 4 concentrations and analyzed exchangeable cations. The current version of this model has benefited greatly from information on in-situ pore water composition obtained by the PAC experiments carried out in the Bure URL. New core sampling and analysis procedures were developed in order to reduce or quantify unwanted experimental side reactions such as sample oxidation and soluble mineral dissolution that affect measured SO 4 concentrations and exchangeable cation distributions. The model considers phase equilibria only with minerals that are observed in the formation including the principal clay phases. The model has been used to calculate the composition of mobile pore water in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock and validated against measurements of water chemistry made in Bure underground research laboratory. The model reproduces the measured in situ pore-water composition without any estimated parameters, all

  15. Analysis of water/gas flows in argillites from Callovo-Oxfordian using gradient percolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefort, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The work presented in this manuscript is motivated by the study of nuclear waste underground repository. In this context, we study the hyper slow drainage problem, which is related to the gas production, mainly hydrogen, taking place within the repository. Although the gas production rate is quite small, and thus the drainage hyper slow, the amount of produced gas is quite significant because the production takes place over thousands years. The study is performed within the framework of the theory of invasion percolation in a gradient. We first show that the hyper slow drainage process can be modelled using the traditional two-phase flow model based on the generalized Darcy's law. A crucial step is then to specify properly the parameters of the model. We show how they must be specified from the asymptotic behaviours of the parameters for an infinite medium as predicted by percolation theory. The obtained solution indicates that the hyper slow drainage operates in the vicinity of breakthrough pressure, which is the subject of a specific study. Furthermore, the hyper slow drainage is characterized by a weak desaturation of the medium and a great sensitivity to the model parameters in the range of high wetting fluid saturation. We also study the impact of coupling between the flow and the local deformation of porous matrix at the pore network scale from numerical simulations using a model coupling a pore network model and a deformation model based on a system of interconnected springs. The simulations indicate a major change of the invasion pattern compared to the rigid matrix with the self-generation of invasion preferential paths when the coupling is sufficiently strong. (author)

  16. Microbial corrosion of steel in Toarcian argillite: potential influence of bio-films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urios, L.; Desneux, J.; Magot, M.; Perez, A.; Mercier, F.; Dillmann, P.; Wittebroodt, C.; Dauzeres, A.; Marsal, F.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a geological disposal of radioactive waste in clayey formations, the consequences of microbial activity are of concern regarding the corrosion of metallic components, such as the overpack surrounding vitrified waste. Generalized corrosion is one of the main processes taken into account in the dimensioning of these overpacks. However, the presence of microorganisms such as sulfate- or thiosulfate-reducing bacteria in the host rock in contact with these non-alloy materials may enhance localized corrosion processes, leading to a premature and undesirable loss of watertightness. Moreover, the passive corrosion layer, which is formed progressively during the generalized corrosion process and induces a decrease of corrosion rates, may react with iron-reducing bacteria and thus reactivate corrosion. The formation of bio-films may also lead to significant modifications of environment at the biofilm/metal interface in terms of pH, dissolved oxygen, organic and inorganic species, that may lead to electrochemical reactions that could potentially increase corrosion rates. There is thus a need for further investigations of the potential consequences on the physico-chemical conditions within geological disposal facilities. The French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has been conducting research programs since 1991 in the Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL), a railway tunnel which crosses a Toarcian argillaceous formation. This geological layer is particularly interesting for its physical and chemical properties close to those of Callovo-Oxfordian argillite. The importance of microbial processes in this formation was first shown by the study of time evolution of the chemical and isotopic compositions of fracture groundwaters collected in several boreholes. These investigations suggested that aqueous sulphates and their isotopic composition were controlled by bacterial

  17. Experimental evidence for self-sealing of fractures in argillites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In argillaceous rocks, self-sealing of fractures generated by the excavation of underground repositories can be expected due to combined impact of rock compression, backfill resistance, and clay swelling during the post-closure phase. The sealing process is determined by the deformability and swelling capacity of the host rock and the backfill as well as by the boundary conditions. As a crucial factor for the long-term safety of repositories, the sealing behaviour of fractures in argillites has been experimentally investigated by GRS on the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite (COX) and the Opalinus clay (OPA) under relevant repository conditions. Comprehensive laboratory tests were carried out on artificially-fractured samples of different sizes (diameter/length = 50/50 - 280/600 mm) and shapes (cylinder and hollow cylinder) under various confining stresses, fluid pressures, and temperatures. The sealing of fractures was detected by measurement of deformation, permeability and wave velocity variations. Following previous studies in which the sealing of fractured samples was determined by gas flow at ambient temperature, additional tests were performed by flowing synthetic pore water through fractures under different confining stresses and at elevated temperatures. Typical results of the tests are presented in this paper. Current results of the ongoing long-term permeability measurements on fractured COX and OPA samples (D/L = 50/50 mm) are summarized, some of which were pre-heated up to high temperatures of 50, 100 and 150 deg. C. In those tests, synthetic pore water was flowed through at injection pressure of 1 MPa, confining stresses of 2 to 3 MPa, and elevated temperatures from 20 to 90 deg. C. All fractured samples showed the same high initial gas permeability of 3.10 -12 m 2 . As the water was injected, the permeability dropped down by three to five orders of magnitude to 10 -15 to 10 -18 m 2 , depending on the

  18. Experimental observations of mechanical dilation at the onset of gas flow in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuss, R.J.; Harrington, J.F.; Giot, R.; Auvray, C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the advective movement of gas and its potential impact on the repository and host rock is important to both performance assessment and the long-term prediction of the repositories evolution. In a clay-based geological disposal facility (GDF), four primary phenomenological models can be defined to describe gas flow: (i) gas movement by diffusion and/or solution within interstitial fluids along prevailing hydraulic gradients; (ii) gas flow in the original porosity of the fabric, commonly referred to visco-capillary flow; (iii) gas flow along localised dilatant pathways (micro-fissuring) which may or may not interact with the continuum stress field; and (iv) gas fracturing of the rock similar to that performed during hydrocarbon stimulation exercises. To investigate which mechanism(s) control the advective movement of gas, two independent experimental studies on Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone (COx) have been undertaken at the British Geological Survey (BGS) and Laego-Ensg Nancy. A bespoke triaxial apparatus, christened the stress path permeameter (SPP), was designed and constructed at the BGS. The SPP was specifically manufactured to be able to resolve very small volumetric (axial and radial) strains potentially associated with the onset of gas flow. To this end, three pressure-balanced dash-pots were located around the mid-plane of the sample, providing a continuous record of subtle variations in sample diameter during testing. Axial strain was recorded using a digital micrometer. Experiments were performed on preserved test material with a start saturation of 96%. At the start of testing the sample was loaded to the in situ conditions at Bure with a confining pressure of 12.5 MPa, axial stress of 13 MPa and a pore pressure of 4.5 MPa. The initial stage of testing was designed to re-saturate the sample fully and lasted 47 days. The sample exhibited a negative volumetric strain

  19. Rheology, strain localization and stress history in the limestones of Bure (Meuse, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolland, A.

    2013-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository (HLW) in clay-stone formation, the french national radioactive waste management agency (Andra) started in 2000 to build an underground research laboratory (URL) at Bure in the south of the Meuse district. The target horizon for the laboratory is a 135 m thick layer of argillaceous rock (Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone) that lies between about 420 and 555 meters below the surface at the URL site. The argillite layer (COX) is surrounded by limestones from the Dogger and the Oxfordian ages (respectively 164,7 to 175,6 Ma and 161,2 to 164,7 Ma). Numerous stylolites were found in these limestones. The aim of this work is to study the rheology of these stylolites-rich horizons and the stylolites as stress gauges in the Dogger and Oxfordian formations. In this work, a wide range of samples with and without stylolites were sampled in the Dogger and Oxfordian formations. Petrophysical measurements and microstructural studies showed that all these limestones have a microporous structure. We showed that the stylolites induced significant variations in some physical properties and in the rock strength. Based on an analytical model, presented here in details, linking a characteristic length associated to the stylolites morphology and the stress associated to the development of that stylolites, a method for the morphology analysis of stylolites is developed, using a Fourier power spectrum technique, by taking into account all the difficulties linked to the use of cores from deep boreholes. We apply this method on stylolites at various depths, starting from the Oxfordian formation at a depth of 158 meters to the Dogger formation at a depth of 800 meters. No stylolites are found in the intermediate Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone formation. We analyze 1D profiles taken on the outer part of the cores. In agreement with theoretical predictions, we always observe two regimes for small and large scales separated by a

  20. Impact of the solution ionic strength on strontium diffusion through the Callovo-Oxfordian clayrocks: An experimental and modeling study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoye, S.; Beaucaire, C.; Grenut, B.; Fayette, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • HTO and 85 Sr diffusion is studied in clayrocks under increasing ionic strengths. • Sr diffusive flux is 5 times higher than HTO under standard porewater ionic strength. • Sr diffusive flux is reduced when the porewater ionic strength increases. • The Sr diffusive evolution is qualitatively reproduced by a surface diffusion model. - Abstract: Diffusion of cations in clayrocks is widely investigated, because deep clay-rich formations are currently considered as one of the potential host rocks for radioactive waste repositories. However, several authors have already reported that sorbing cations seem to diffuse at rates larger than those predicted by a simple pore diffusion model from their sorption coefficients and from the diffusive flux of non-sorbing water tracers. This process has been attributed to the migration of cations within the electrical double layer, next to the mineral surfaces, called the surface diffusion phenomenon. The aim of this work was to verify whether this “enhanced” cation diffusion compared to neutral species was observed for strontium and, if so, to what extent this effect might vary with the salinity of the synthetic solutions. These questions were addressed by performing batch sorption, through-diffusion and out-diffusion experiments on rock samples from the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone formation (France). The results showed that there was a good agreement of the distribution ratios (R D ) determined on crushed and intact rocks by batch and through-diffusion methods with a R D decrease related to the increase of the sodium concentration, a sorption competitor. Such a trend was also well reproduced by means of a geochemical modeling based on the multi-site ion exchange (MSIE) theory. Moreover, the “enhanced” diffusion for strontium was clearly observed in this study: the Sr diffusive flux was almost five times higher than that for HTO in the cell with the lowest ionic strength, and diminished to less than 1

  1. Are distribution coefficients measured from batch experiments meaningful for quantifying retention in compacted material?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutelard, F.; Charles, Y.; Page, J. [CEA/DEN/DPC/SECR/L3MR batiment 450, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    }Ni are used to quantify the distribution coefficient. The equilibrium state is checked with activity measurement of the aqueous phase at consistent elapse time. Callovo-Oxfordian argillite is a natural compacted material, then square pieces (1 x 1 cm{sup 2}) are produced from rough material. In the simulated site water, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite does not weather. In order to ensure that chemical equilibrium is reached before addition of radioactive tracers, a pre-equilibration period is going on for at least 2 month. All adsorption experiments are followed by desorption experiments. The distribution coefficient onto aqueous suspensions of bentonite and Callovo-Oxfordian are calculated and compared to those found for compacted materials. Main results are discussed towards literature values. [1] Miyahara, K. A., T.; Kohara,Y.; Yusa,Y.; Sasaki, N. (1991). 'Effect of bulk density on diffusion for cesium in compacted sodium bentonite'. Radiochimica acta 52/53: 293-297. [2] Sato, H. A., T.; kohara, Y.; Yui, M.; Sasaki, N. (1992). 'Effect of dry density of some radionuclides in compacted sodium bentonite'. Journal of Nuclear Science and technology 29(9): 873-882. [3] Ly, J. L. V., J-C.; Meier, P. (1998). Retention dans une barriere argileuse en milieu granitique: Effet de la consolidation et de la composition de l'eau. Paris, CEA: 32. (authors)

  2. Are distribution coefficients measured from batch experiments meaningful for quantifying retention in compacted material?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutelard, F.; Charles, Y.; Page, J.

    2005-01-01

    distribution coefficient. The equilibrium state is checked with activity measurement of the aqueous phase at consistent elapse time. Callovo-Oxfordian argillite is a natural compacted material, then square pieces (1 x 1 cm 2 ) are produced from rough material. In the simulated site water, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite does not weather. In order to ensure that chemical equilibrium is reached before addition of radioactive tracers, a pre-equilibration period is going on for at least 2 month. All adsorption experiments are followed by desorption experiments. The distribution coefficient onto aqueous suspensions of bentonite and Callovo-Oxfordian are calculated and compared to those found for compacted materials. Main results are discussed towards literature values. [1] Miyahara, K. A., T.; Kohara,Y.; Yusa,Y.; Sasaki, N. (1991). 'Effect of bulk density on diffusion for cesium in compacted sodium bentonite'. Radiochimica acta 52/53: 293-297. [2] Sato, H. A., T.; kohara, Y.; Yui, M.; Sasaki, N. (1992). 'Effect of dry density of some radionuclides in compacted sodium bentonite'. Journal of Nuclear Science and technology 29(9): 873-882. [3] Ly, J. L. V., J-C.; Meier, P. (1998). Retention dans une barriere argileuse en milieu granitique: Effet de la consolidation et de la composition de l'eau. Paris, CEA: 32. (authors)

  3. On line ion chromatography for the in situ characterization of the Callovo-Oxfordian pore water composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, M.; Vinsot, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Since 1994, Andra has been studying the feasibility of a high-level long-lived radioactive waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation. In order to improve the knowledge on the pore water composition, the PAC experiment has been conducted since 2005 in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory. One of the experimental principles combined a gas equilibration test and the collection of water samples in the borehole named PAC1002. In October 2006, an ion chromatograph was installed to perform on line analysis of the sampled water. Six cations and seven anions were measured: lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, sulfate, acetate and formate. This work presents the characteristics of the analytical equipment and the results obtained from the on line analysis of the sampled water. These results were compared with laboratory analyses which were performed by Hydroisotop GmbH. The experimental set up included a water sampling module which was connected to the borehole and to the ion chromatograph with inert PEEK lines. The water sampling module made it possible to collect the seepage water produced by the formation in 9-mL PEEK syringes without contact with the atmosphere. When a syringe was full, the collected water was immediately sent to a Metrohm 811 Online Ion Chromatograph and a programmed sample sequence was activated. The two-channel chromatograph allowed the simultaneous determination of cations (eluent: 4 mM HNO 3 , column: Metrosep C3) and anions (eluent: 3.6 mM Na 2 CO 3 , column: Metrosep A Supp 7). In addition, ten individual sample streams made it possible to execute inline calibrations and to analyse one or two certified control solutions. 200 workable analyses were obtained. The results showed a very good concordance of the on line and laboratory measurements for the following major and trace species: calcium, magnesium, sulfate

  4. Water flow in the Oxfordian and Dogger limestone around the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linard, Y.; Vinsot, A.; Delay, J.; Scholz, E.; Lundy, M.; Garry, B.; La Vaissiere, R. de; Cruchaudet, M.; Dewonck, S.; Vigneron, G.; Vincent, B.; Wechner, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Within its scientific program to study the feasibility of a high level radioactive waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock (COx) of the eastern Paris Basin, Andra has conducted an extensive characterization of the Oxfordian and Dogger limestone formations above and below the COx. More than 35 wells ranging from 400 to 700 meters deep were drilled over 15 years to study a 400 km 2 area around the Andra's Meuse / Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL). An original methodology was applied in these wells to characterize the geology, the hydrogeology and the geochemistry of the Jurassic carbonates. This multidisciplinary effort provided a unique set of 3D data. The first purpose of this study is to integrate the geological, hydrogeological and geochemical data into a water flow conceptual model. Geological data include the study of cored wells, complete modern wire-line log sets in both cored and un-cored wells, and outcrop analogues. Hydrogeological data include transmissivity and hydraulic head measurements in the Oxfordian and Dogger limestone formations. Geochemical data include several on site measurements (pH, alkalinity, electrical conductivity, temperature) and chemical and isotopic analyses performed on water samples taken at selected depths. More than one hundred hydraulic tests have been performed since 1994 to measure transmissivity distribution in the Oxfordian and Dogger limestone. Several hydraulic testing methods were used in each well: global pumping tests, fluid logging tests, thermal flow logging tests and packer tests. After completion of the hydraulic tests, hydraulic heads were deduced from long term pressure measurements in open wells or in multi-packer completions; pressure monitoring lasted between a few months and more than 10 years. Long term/high volume pumping tests were also performed after the hydraulic tests to obtain a stationary composition of the well

  5. Experimental study of the anisotropic properties of argillite under moisture and mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, D.S.; Chanchole, S.; Wang, L.L.; Bornert, M.; Gatmiri, B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Due to various factors, such as sedimentation, layered morphology of clay mineral, in-situ stress, etc., the behavior of argillite rocks is often anisotropic. In order to study the anisotropy of the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) argillite considered as a possible host rock for high-level radioactive nuclear waste repository in France, a series of tests including uniaxial compression and dehydration and hydration at different constant applied stress levels, are carried out using a specific setup combining mechanical and moisture loading devices. During these hydro-mechanical tests, this specific setup can also continuously capture images of the sample surfaces to be subsequently analyzed using Digital Image Correlation techniques (DIC) in order to determine full-field strains. In this study, three sampling directions are used with the angle θ between the bedding plane and the cylindrical sample axis equal to 45 deg., 60 deg. and 90 deg.. To investigate the mechanical anisotropy, uniaxial compressive tests with mechanical loading and unloading cycles are performed on several different samples at the same moisture level. The results show that the mechanical parameters (apparent modulus, failure stress) depend on loading orientation relative to the stratification plane. For a given water content, the failure stress reaches maximum values for θ =90 deg. and minimum values for θ =45 deg.. To study the hydric anisotropy, dehydration and hydration tests under stress-free conditions are performed on two cylindrical samples (θ=90 deg. and θ=60 deg.). Three cycles of hydration and dehydration are carried out by varying the relative humidity between 40% and 95%. The sample weight, the deformation measured by strain gages and the relative humidity are continuously recorded during the test by means of another specific setup described in [Pham et al., 2007]. Fig.1a illustrates the evolution of the strains of the sample EST28030-No

  6. Influence of non-clay minerals on the interaction between metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Villieras, F.; Michau, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, it is of prime importance to understand the interaction mechanisms between the geological matrix, Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock (COx) and metallic iron, from the package overpack. In order to evidence the individual role of each clay component entering in the mineralogy of the COx, interactions between metallic iron and pure clays (smectites, illite and kaolinite) were first conducted. To investigate the role of the other minerals, the reactivity of COx, COx clay fraction (COxCF) and mixtures between COxCF and quartz, calcite or pyrite, was studied. Clays and additional minerals were put in contact with powder metallic iron with a weight ratio iron:clay fixed at 1:3 and a clay:solution ratio of 1:20. Proportions of non-clay minerals were deduced from the average COx composition: 50% clays, 24.5% quartz, 24.5% calcite and 1% pyrite. Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) in Parr reactors for durations of one, three or nine months. After reaction, solid and liquid phases were separated by centrifugation and characterized by classical techniques combining chemical analyses (liquid analyses, transmission electron microscopy combined with Energy Dispersive of X-rays spectroscopy TEM-EDS), mineralogical (X-ray diffraction), spectroscopic ( 57 Fe Moessbauer) and morphometric techniques (TEM, scanning electron microscopy and N 2 adsorption). For COx, COxCF and all the pure clay phases, major evolutions were observed during the first month, which shows that the oxidation of metallic iron is rapid in our experimental conditions. Release of iron cations in solution, pH increase (8-10) and Eh decrease (reductive conditions) are responsible for the partial dissolution of initial clay phases. Released iron is involved in the crystallization of Fe

  7. Biological and geochemical processes involved during denitrification in Callovo-Oxfordian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ollivier, P.; Parmentier, M.; Joulian, C.; Pauwels, H.; Albrecht, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The clay-rich Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) formation has been selected for the disposal of medium and high level, long-lived radioactive waste. After waste cell closure and degradation of package some intermediate-level waste will release nitrate. The latter is likely to diffuse into the surrounding environment (engineered barriers and geological host formation) and interact with a variety compounds present in the barrier components and the rocks. These interactions may result in modification of chemical conditions and impact storage conditions and radionuclide retention. Our work is focused on the understanding of the fate of nitrates released during and after degradation of waste package. We developed a coupled approach considering both geochemical and biological processes of nitrate reduction to simulate reactions occurring at the interface of the engineered barrier and the clay-rich COx formation. Laboratory experiments have been carried out in order to acquire data on kinetics of denitrification coupled with a molecular approach using enzymatic and metabolic activities as a tool for an accurate estimation of biomass. Denitrification has been monitored in a synthetic solution comparable to COx pore water supplemented with acetate and nitrate and amended with a heterotrophic denitrifying strain, Pseudomonas mandelii. Several conditions are applied considering different acetate/nitrate ratios in the presence or absence of COx clay. Before the beginning of experiments, the headspace is flushed with N 2 gas to remove oxygen from flasks. Acetylene is used to stop denitrification reaction after the production of N 2 O gas and thus avoid the formation of N 2 gas. Two successive redox reactions are thus expected to occur in experiments. Samples are regularly collected to analyze physical and chemical parameters as well as biological parameters. Biomass is estimated and monitored using both optical microscopy and

  8. The underground laboratory. A unique scientific tool to design a reversible storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-07-01

    The National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), was established by the December 1991 Waste Act as a public body in charge of the long-term management of all radioactive waste, under the supervision of the Ministry of Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea (formerly the Ministry of Industry and the Ministry of Environment), and the Ministry of Research. The Andra is carrying out studies on deep reversible waste storage for high-level and long living intermediate-level radioactive wastes thanks to the underground laboratory of its Meuse/Haute-Marne center. This brochure presents the geologic surveys which have led to the selection of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite formation for the sitting of the underground lab and the underground architecture of the lab. The rock mechanic, heat transfer and rock-fluid interaction experiments carried out in the lab in collaboration with several scientific partners are briefly summarised

  9. Effect of chemical retention on anionic species diffusion in compacted clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazer-Bachi, Frederic

    2005-01-01

    Anionic radioisotopes are of particular importance within the framework of the calculated health risk associated with high-level and long-lived intermediate-level underground radioactive waste disposal. Therefore, the objective of this work is the construction of a transport model coupled with chemistry in order to quantify the behaviour of anionic solutes in the Callovo-Oxfordian (CO_x) argillite, the argillaceous host rock of the ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne underground laboratory. An experimental methodology was defined to characterize this migration, several experimental methods being implemented: batch experiments, laboratory columns and through-diffusion cells. The study of the diffusion of the non-sorbing anionic tracer "3"6Cl"- highlighted the fact that, due to anionic exclusion, anions only had access to a part of the porosity. The retention of "3"5SO_4"2"- and "1"2"5I- on CO_x argillite was then characterized, quantified by batch experiments and confirmed by other experimental methods. Nevertheless, their migration was less retarded than expected by a model based on batch experiments and on "3"6Cl"- diffusive data. This difference was explained by anion exclusion which reduced sorption site accessibility. Thus, the intensity of this phenomenon has to be considered to model anion migration in compacted clays. (author) [fr

  10. Parameters controlling fracturing distribution: example of an Upper Jurassic marly-calcareous formation (eastern Paris Basin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, G.; Rebours, H.; Wileveau, Y.; Proudhon, B.

    2006-01-01

    Study of fractures along a 490-m vertical section of marl/limestone alternations in the Upper Jurassic (Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory-eastern Paris Basin) reveals their organization and the different states of palaeo-stress. Type and extension of tectonic structures seem to be controlled principally by lithology and secondary by depth. Also, it appears deviations of Alpine palaeo-stresses between Kimmeridgian and Oxfordian formations. These deviations are related to the presence of marl/limestone contacts. The vertical evolution of current horizontal maximum stress shows a similar behaviour, with deviations at the walls of Callovo-Oxfordian argilites. These results allow us to point out and to discuss the impact of lithology, rheology and depth on fracturing occurrence and distribution. Furthermore, this study suggests the role of Callovo-Oxfordian as a barrier for fracture development between the limestones of Dogger and Oxfordian formations. (authors)

  11. Parameters controlling fracturing distribution: example of an Upper Jurassic marly-calcareous formation (eastern Paris Basin); Parametres controlant la distribution de la fracturation: exemple dans une serie marno-calcaire du Jurassique superieur (Est du bassin de Paris)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andre, G.; Rebours, H.; Wileveau, Y. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), Laboratoire de recherche souterrain de Meuse/Haute-Marne, 55 - Bure (France); Proudhon, B. [GEO.TER, 34 - Clapiers (France)

    2006-10-15

    Study of fractures along a 490-m vertical section of marl/limestone alternations in the Upper Jurassic (Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory-eastern Paris Basin) reveals their organization and the different states of palaeo-stress. Type and extension of tectonic structures seem to be controlled principally by lithology and secondary by depth. Also, it appears deviations of Alpine palaeo-stresses between Kimmeridgian and Oxfordian formations. These deviations are related to the presence of marl/limestone contacts. The vertical evolution of current horizontal maximum stress shows a similar behaviour, with deviations at the walls of Callovo-Oxfordian argilites. These results allow us to point out and to discuss the impact of lithology, rheology and depth on fracturing occurrence and distribution. Furthermore, this study suggests the role of Callovo-Oxfordian as a barrier for fracture development between the limestones of Dogger and Oxfordian formations. (authors)

  12. Simulation of hygric and thermal processes at ventilated tunnel surfaces of a deep geological repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poppei, J.; Mayer, G.; Hubschwerlen, N.; Pepin, G.; Wendling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The calculation of vapour and heat exchange in drifts is a fundamental task when designing the ventilation system for a deep geological repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay. In general, it requires a complex numerical modelling of transient (forced) convective and conductive heat and fluid transport in both the ventilated drifts and the adjacent rock mass. The humidity of the air in the drifts depends - along with the meteorological conditions at the entrance - mostly on the thermal-hygric transitional conditions on the exposed rock surface of the drift walls. Some portions receive water influx while others receive heat influx from the wastes which have already been emplaced in the host rock beyond the drifts. The coupling between the transport processes in the host rock and the transfer processes along drift wall is treated in a simplified manner: The processes described by coefficients for heat (Nusselt number) and vapour (Sherwood number) both depend on the ventilation velocity (Reynolds number). In Poppei et al., 2009, we discuss an approach involving supportive TOUGH2 computations for coupling the complex transport problems in the host rock with the air flow in a simplified manner. The results obtained with TOUGH2 were processed and applied for the transient analysis of temperature and humidity changes of the ventilation air in a 1D approach along the ventilation path. Furthermore, the analysis of the evaporation along the drift wall was supported by a one-dimensional radial-symmetric EOS9 model. The results of the TOUGH2 computations with different Sherwood numbers were parameterized accordingly. The prevailing humidity along the drift wall was then determined with an iterative approach whereby the humidity was controlled either by the ventilation (i.e. through the Sherwood number) or the leakage capacity of the host rock. Finally, the humidity changes in the ventilation air were derived from the computed

  13. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock: FY17 Progress. Predecisional Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Xu, Hao; Kim, Kunwhi; Voltolini, Marco; Cao, Xiaoyuan

    2017-07-03

    The focus of research within the Spent Fuel and Waste Science and Technology (SFWST) (formerly called Used Fuel Disposal) Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of EBS bentonite and an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrologicalmechanical- chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer materials and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of temperature rise caused by waste heat. This report documents the following research activities. Section 2 presents THM model developments and validation, including modeling of underground heater experiments at Mont Terri and Bure underground research laboratories (URLs). The heater experiments modeled are the Mont Terri FE (Full-scale Emplacement) Experiment, conducted as part of the Mont Terri Project, and the TED in heater test conducted in Callovo-Oxfordian claystone (COx) at the Meuse/Haute-Marne (MHM) underground research laboratory in France. The modeling of the TED heater test is one of the Tasks of the DEvelopment of COupled Models and their VAlidation against EXperiments (DECOVALEX)-2019 project. Section 3 presents the development and application of thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) modeling to evaluate EBS bentonite and argillite rock responses under different temperatures (100 °C and 200 °C). Model results are presented to help to understand the impact of high temperatures on the properties and behavior of bentonite and argillite rock. Eventually the process model will support a robust GDSA model for repository performance assessments. Section 4 presents coupled THMC modeling for an in situ test conducted at Grimsel underground laboratory in Switzerland in the Full

  14. Advice relative to the examination of the 'clay 2005 file'; Avis relatif a l'examen du 'dossier 2005 argile'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-12-15

    On request of the general director of the French nuclear safety and radiation protection institute (IRSN), the permanent group of experts for long duration waste disposal facilities has examined the 'clay 2005 file' made by the ANDRA and which aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a disposal facility for high level and long living rad-wastes in the argillite formation of the Bure site. The group of experts has examined in particular the critical safety aspects of such a facility and the identification and consideration of uncertainties by the ANDRA in its safety analysis. It has also identified the main additional research works that may be carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of an industrial implementation of a safe disposal facility in the same Callovo-Oxfordian argilite formation. This document is the favourable advice and the recommendations expressed by the group of experts after examination of the ANDRA's 'clay 2005 file'. (J.S.)

  15. Advice of the French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety about the 'Clay 2005' file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN) presents in this document its evaluation of the 'Clay 2005' file made by the ANDRA and which aims at demonstrating the feasibility of a disposal facility for high level and long living rad-wastes in the argillite formation of the Bure site. The critical points of the safety have been considered more thoroughly, together with the uncertainties concerning some important data and phenomena in relation with the confining properties of such a disposal facility. The basic geologic data gathered by the ANDRA about the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation of the Bure site are sufficient to confirm the favorable intrinsic properties of this formation with respect to the confinement of wastes. The main possible disturbances of internal and external origin (thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical, climatic change, earthquakes, erosion..) would have no redhibitory impact on the overall confining capacity of the facility. The design safety principles retained for the exploitation of the facility and the post-closure safety aspects are globally satisfactory. Therefore, the IRSN considers the disposal of rad-wastes in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilite formation as feasible but in the case of a continuation of this project, several complementary informations would have to be supplied in particular concerning: the possible fracturing of the host and surrounding formations, the possibility of localized inhomogeneous fluid flows inside the surrounding formations, the improvement of our knowledge about the changes of the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the site rocks and of concretes with time, the dimensioning of the metallic components of the facility (shafts, containers..), and the efficiency of the ventilation system with respect to the explosion risks inside B-type waste alveoles. (J.S.)

  16. An original state equation for argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cariou, S.; Dormieux, L.; Skoczylas, F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Argillite is available in large quantities in France and exhibits a very small permeability: that is the reason why it is an excellent candidate for the storage of nuclear waste depositories. This study focuses particularly on argillite from Meuse-Haute-Marne (East of France) located 500 m deep. Following the observation that Biot theory does not permit us to explain some of our experiments, we propose in this contribution to use the tools of continuum micro-mechanics in order to develop a macroscopic state equation that would be consistent with our experimental data. In order to apply homogenization tools to argillite, the first step is to describe the microstructure of this material. Argillite can be modelled as a multi-scale material: - At the macro-scale, argillite looks like a homogenized material. - At the meso-scale, a shale matrix surrounding some inclusions can be distinguished. - At the micro-scale, the shale matrix reveals to be made of a solid phase and of a partially saturated porous network; capillary effects are taken into account at this scale. - At the nano-scale, the solid phase is not homogeneous but is a set of particles that are parallel platelets with an electrolyte in-between; the solid phase is not physically inert with regard to water in the porous network; first, liquid pressure in the electrolyte exists and is equal to liquid pressure in the porous network; then, the unbalance between the ion concentration in-between the platelets building up the solid phase and the ion concentration in the porous network implies an overpressure in the electrolyte. This complex model of argillite leads us though several homogenization steps to an original macroscopic state equation. We propose to compare this state equation with experimental data. Results of a poro-mechanical test run on a partially saturated sample of argillite are shown. One can read that the deformations of the sample are identical

  17. Analysis of long-term closure in drifts excavated in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone: roles of anisotropy and hydro-mechanical couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guayacan Carrillo, Lina Maria

    2016-01-01

    The French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) began in 2000 the construction of an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) with the main goal of demonstrating the feasibility of a geological repository in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone. Several research programs have taken place to improve the knowledge of the rock properties and its response to the excavation progress. A network of experimental drifts has been constructed with variations on: excavation method, structure geometry, supports system and orientations with respect to principal stresses' directions. In each drift different sections have been instrumented to monitor the hydro-mechanical behavior of the rock mass formation. Continuous monitoring of the excavated zone around the drifts in the main level (-490 m) revealed the development of a fractured zone (extensional and shear fractures) induced by the excavation. The extent of this fractured zone depends on the drift orientation regarding the in-situ stress field. Accordingly, the convergence measurements showed an anisotropic closure which depends also on the drifts' orientations. Moreover, marked overpressures and an anisotropic pore pressure field around the drifts have been also observed. The approach proposed in this work is mainly based on a direct analysis of the convergence measurements, for studying the anisotropic response of the rock formation during and after excavation. The convergence evolution is analyzed on the basis of the semi-empirical law proposed by Sulem et al. (1987) [Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 24: 145-154]. The monitoring and analysis of convergence data can provide a reliable approach of the interaction between rock mass and support. Therefore, the anisotropy and the variability of the closure are analyzed taking into account different field cases: drifts excavated in two different orientations (i.e. influence of the initial stress state), different methods, sizes and rates of excavation and

  18. Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange; Colon, Carlos Jové; Bianchi, Marco; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-08

    properties (parameters) used in these models are different, which not only make inter-model comparisons difficult, but also compromise the applicability of the lessons learned from one model to another model. The establishment of a reference case would therefore be helpful to set up a baseline for model development. A generic salt repository reference case was developed in Freeze et al. (2013) and the generic argillite repository reference case is presented in this report. The definition of a reference case requires the characterization of the waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, EBS backfill, host rock, and biosphere. This report mainly documents the processes in EBS bentonite and host rock that are potentially important for performance assessment and properties that are needed to describe these processes, with brief description other components such as waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, aquifer, and biosphere. A thorough description of the generic argillite repository reference case will be given in Jové Colon et al. (2014).

  19. Geochemistry and mineralogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plecas, I.; Dimovic, S.; Orta, M.M.; Alba, M.D.; Alvero, R.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Chain, P.; Escudero, A.; Naranjo, M.; Pavon, E.; Trillo, J.M.; Vejsada, J.; Vokal, A.; Zadvernyuk, H.P.; Fedorenko, Y.G.; Zlobenko, B.P.; Koromyslichenko, T.I.; Battaglia, S.; Cervelli, M.; Millot, R.; Girard, J.P.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Alonso, U.; Muurinen, A.; Carlsson, T.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Becerro, A.I.; Castro, M.A.; Escudero, A.; Gonzalez-Carrascosa, T.; Hurtado, S.; Pavon, E.; Villa, M.; Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A.C.M.; Marques Fernandes, M.; Rabung, Th.; Dahn, R.; Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H.; Breynaert, E.; Maes, A.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Vancluysen, J.; Credoz, A.; Bildstein, O.; Jullien, M.; Raynal, J.; Petronin, J.C.; Trotignon, L.; Pokrovsky, O.; Jacquier, P.; Beaucaire, C.; Vuillaume, A.L.; Wittebroodt, Ch.; Ly, J.; Page, J.; Savoye, S.; Pitsch, H.; Jacques, D.; Wang, L.; Galunin, E.; Chain, P.; Alba, M.D.; Vidal, M.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L.; Bruno, J.; Andre, L.; Pauwels, H.; Azaroual, M.; Albrecht, A.; Romero, M.A.; Aerts, S.; Boven, P.; Van Geet, M.; Boever, P. de; Alonso, U.; Albarran, N.; Missana, T.; Garcia-Gutierrez, M.; Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Guillaume, D.; Jacquot, E.; Tournassat, Ch.; Lerouge, C.; Brendle, J.; Greneche, J.M.; Touzelet, St.; Blanc, Ph.; Gaucher, E.C.; Thoenen, T.; Klinkenberg, M.; Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R.; Siegesmund, S.; Liu, D.J.; Bruggeman, C.; Maes, N.; Weber, T.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Bildstein, O.; Combarieu, G. de; Frugier, P.; Menut, D

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 52 articles (posters) dealing with: the influence of natural sorbents immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cement; the chemical stability of rare-earth silicate; the mineralogical heterogeneity of Rokle bentonite and radionuclide adsorption: A case study for cesium; the rheological and sorption properties of clay-polymer composites; the clay mineral interactions with leachate solutions in landfills; the lithium isotope fractionation during adsorption onto mineral surfaces; the sorption of Sr{sup 2+} onto mixed smectite / illite clays; Eh and pH in the pore water of compacted bentonite; the chemical interaction of {sup 152}Eu with the clay barrier; the modeling of the acid-base surface chemistry of Montmorillonite; a time resolved laser fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of lanthanide/actinide sorption on clay minerals: influence of carbonate complexation; the structure elucidation and occurrence of Tc(IV) pyrogallol complexes; the geochemistry of Se(0) under boom clay conditions; an experimental and modelling study of pure secondary silicate minerals reactivity in geological CO{sub 2} sequestration conditions; an experimental evaluation of a retention model for major groundwater elements on the Tournemire argillite; modelling the long term interaction of cementitious pore water with Boom clay; the sorption-desorption of radionuclides and analogues in clays suitable for barriers; the modelling of the Redox evolution in the tunnel backfill of a high level nuclear waste repository; the reactivity of nitrates in the different storage compartments of type-b wastes; an investigation into the biodiversity of sulphate reducing bacteria in Boom clay; the colloid generation mechanisms from compacted bentonite under different geochemical conditions; the experimental reduction of aqueous sulphate by hydrogen in the context of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite; cation exchanged Fe(II) and Sr as compared to other divalent cations

  20. Long term monitoring of water production flow rates in boreholes in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinsot, A.; Delay, J.; La Vaissiere, R. de; Cruchaudet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Water production was observed in several boreholes in the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock (COx). These boreholes were implemented in 2005 in the Andra's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) at more than 400 m in depth. Despite the low COx permeability: close to 10-13 m/s, two original experimental setups made it possible to monitor water production flow rates ranging from 0.5 to 50 mL/day during 3 to 4 years in 4 boreholes. This contribution describes the water flow rate evaluation methods and the results obtained from several experimental phases which may be considered as a series of constant pressure production tests. The first experimental concept was based on seepage water collection. It consisted in filling with gas the interval of an ascending borehole at a pressure close to 1 bar and closing it. The hydraulic pressure in the rock surrounding the sealed interval was higher than 30 bars. Due to the hydraulic pressure difference between the interval and the surrounding rock, the interstitial water of the formation flowed into the interval, accumulated at its base by gravity and was pumped out at a controlled flow rate. The pumping rate was adjusted so that the water level would not exceed 40 cm inside the 5-meter-long interval. The water level was deduced from the difference between two absolute pressure measurements: one above the water surface in the gas phase and the other at the bottom of the water column. The total volume of the daily produced formation water was obtained by adding the water volume pumped out during the day and the water volume difference inside the interval between the beginning and the end of the day. This kind of experiment was performed in two boreholes. The second experimental concept was based on water circulation. It consisted in filling with water the interval of a descending borehole. Two water circulation lines and one pressure control line linked the test interval to

  1. Studies of the Eleana Argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lappin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Waste-rock interaction studies of the Eleana have become focused on its response to the emplacement of a near-surface heater. Thermal expansion to 500 0 C appears to vary as a function of both quartz content and orientation in even the most massive argillite, although the directional dependence of the massive type is only 10%. Samples cut perpendicular to the bedding in a layered sample behave quite similarly to other samples up to 450 0 C, above which they contract, while samples cut in other orientations undergo a non-linear, and increasing expansion. Unconfined compression tests of massive argillite indicate a critical strength of up to 8300 psi. Work is being planned to determine thermal expansion, strength, and argillite elastic properties to temperatures of 500 0 C and pressures of up to 4200 psi. Heat capacities of powdered samples have been determined to 500 0 C, and show considerable variability as a function of mineralogy, and clay and water contents. When analyzed in air, one sulfide-rich sample goes through an exothermic sulfide oxidation at 425 0 C. Between 150 and 420 0 C, however, argillite heat capacities are fairly uniform and almost constant. Thermal conductivities at ambient temperature have been measured for more than 50 samples. Taken without regard to the layering, they average 2.69 W/m 0 C. Conductivities measured parallel to the layering average 3.04 W/m 0 C. Integrated thermo-mechanical modeling will begin at the start of FY 1978

  2. Mineralogical and Micro-fabric investigation of the Sandy Facies of Opalinus Clay (Mont Terri)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufhold, Annette; Siegesmund, Siegfried; Dohrmann, Reiner; Graesle, Werner; Plischke, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    In the field of geological disposal of radioactive waste in many countries argillaceous formations are considered as potential host rock. For the understanding of the long-term behaviour of clay host rock, it is important to understand the interaction between mechanical behaviour, micro-fabric, and mineral composition. Previous publications showed that particularly the carbonate content and the arrangement of the carbonate grains (as cement in the matrix or as shells) determines the mechanical strength of Opalinus Clay and Callovo-Oxfordian Clay specimens, respectively. Klinkenberg et al. (2009) studied the shaly facies of Opalinus Clay, however, the actual deposit is planned to be built in the sandy facies of Opalinus Clay. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relation between micro-fabric, mineral composition, and mechanical properties of different samples derived from the sandy facies (BLT-A2). Image analysis showed that the carbonates in the sandy facies mainly occur as 1) matrix which in turn acts as cement. Carbonates also occur 2) in the fine sand fraction and 3) biogenic carbonates as traces. The carbonates of the sandy facies, therefore, appear to be similar to the carbonates of the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay with respect to their possible influence on failure strength. The mechanical testing showed that the shear strength increases with increasing carbonate content. This phenomenon was also observed for the samples of the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay, while the opposite relation was found for the shaly facies of the Opalinus Clay. Preliminary results presented here, indicate that the sandy facies (drilling BLT-A2) and Callovo-Oxfordian Clay show similar mechanical properties - in detail: 1) Micro-fabric: carbonates predominate in the matrix, 2) Mineralogy: high carbonate content and 3) Mechanical testing: shear strength increases with increasing carbonate content, where the type of carbonates which controls the increase of strength has to be

  3. Hydraulic homogenization of a clayey porous rock with 3D statistical and deterministic discontinuities: application to THE 'EDZ' at the Bure Callovo-Oxfordian URL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ababou, R.; Canamon, I.; Poutrel, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The present work, carried out in the Underground Research Laboratory at Bure operated by Andra, focuses on the hydraulic homogenization (up-scaling) of the Excavated Damaged Zone (EDZ) around a cylindrical excavation, taking into account the specific structure of the micro-fissures and of the larger fractures induced by the excavation, as well as the permeability of the intact rock (the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone, 130 m thick, and located between 400 m and 600 m depth at this site). Two types of discontinuities are distinguished: (1) a statistically isotropic network of micro-fissures, and (2) a quasi-periodic set of complex shaped, curved fractures (chevron pattern). Hydraulic up-scaling are expressed in terms of effective macro-permeability tensors, and they are compared, in the final stage of this work, against in situ data, including permeability profiles along boreholes. We firstly consider a 3D stretch of a cylindrical gallery with: (i) section length L = 20 m; (ii) drift diameter = 4 m; (iii) thickness of the annular EDZ around the drift = 4 m. The domain of investigation is a 3D rectangular box of size 20 x 13 x 13 m, which encloses the drift and its EDZ. The transverse scales correspond to those of the experimental drifts and EDZ observed at the URL site. - Statistical network of micro-fissures (randomly oriented plane discs). The micro-fissures and small fractures are modeled as statistical plane discs, with randomly isotropic orientations, and radially decreasing density and diameters away from the drift wall. - Deterministic set of curved fractures ('herringbone' or 'chevron' pattern).The extensive shear fractures ('chevrons') are modeled as a periodic set of mathematical surfaces (generalized elliptical conoids) analogous to those observed in the Bure drifts The method adopted here for hydraulic homogenization of a 3D porous fractured rock is based on a &apos

  4. In situ Tournemire argillite / iron metal interactions: results after 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillet, A.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of a long lived radioactive waste storage concept in deep geological layer developed by Andra, IRSN leads an in situ study on the Experimental Station of Tournemire, in association with EDF to determine the interactions steel/argillite in a natural context. After 10 years of interaction, two drillings overcoring performed to characterize the processing of the Tournemire argillite in contact with carbon and stainless steels and to compare reactive phenomena highlighted and those induced by simulations tools combining chemistry and transport. Argillite/carbon steel samples show a significant corrosion of steel disk. Iron released, in the form of rings and cracks in the rock, disrupts the argillite in contact resulting in mineralogical and structural changes. Iron oxides precipitation and a calcite and smectitic leaf of mixed-layers I/S dissolution are identified. A succession of areas: metal/metal corroded/argillite disturbed/argillite is highlighted and porosity variations are observed on the interfaces between two areas. Geochemical simulations show that major changes are initiated speedily during establishment of the system and the oxygen trapped in the closed system is consumed by the corrosion of steel but mostly it diffuses into the surrounding material through concentration gradient. Argillite/stainless steel samples have a very low pitting corrosion of steel disk. This does not seem to affect the mineralogy of the argillite in contact. (author)

  5. Experimental study and modeling of the propagation of an alkaline concentration wave coming from a cement matrix an passing through the argilite of the Meuse / Haute-Marne laboratory; Etude experimentale et modelisation de la propagation d'une onde de concentration alcaline issue d'une matrice cimentiere a travers l'argilite du site du laboratoire Meuse / Haute-Marne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, Th

    2001-12-01

    The propagation of an alkaline wave through a clay rock has been investigated- The wave is generated by a cementitious matrix through the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite of the Meuse Haute-Marne Laboratory (-480 m depth). The argillite itself is composed of quartz, micas, calcite and an interstratified l/S. In order to characterise the interactions between the alkaline fluid and the argillaceous medium, dynamic column experiments have been carried out. The originality of the investigation methodology consists in exploiting the data generated from the breakthrough curves as well as from the characterisation of the solids extracted from the columns. Two types of processes having totally different reaction times have hence been thoroughly studied: - Fast surface adsorption and condensation reactions: On the one hand cation adsorption reactions by site ionisation have been characterised. They are responsible of the buffering effect of the clays. On the other hand an original reaction of calcium compound condensation in the interlayer space of the swelling clays has been revealed. These processes have been modelled and their simulations with the IMPACT calculation code showed that the models elaborated were very satisfying. - Strongly kinetically limited dissolution/precipitation reactions: The main primary phases dissolved are quartz and interstratified l/S. The precipitation of secondary phases are mainly C(A)SH and zeolites. After the injection of an alkaline fluid for 6 months at 60 deg C, the argillite is strongly amorphized but only 20 to 30% of the quartz and the interstratified I/S are dissolved. Therefore, dissolution kinetics of the primary phases and the solubility products of the main secondary phases have been determined. (author)

  6. Experimental study and modeling of the propagation of an alkaline concentration wave coming from a cement matrix an passing through the argilite of the Meuse / Haute-Marne laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, Th.

    2001-12-01

    The propagation of an alkaline wave through a clay rock has been investigated- The wave is generated by a cementitious matrix through the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite of the Meuse Haute-Marne Laboratory (-480 m depth). The argillite itself is composed of quartz, micas, calcite and an interstratified l/S. In order to characterise the interactions between the alkaline fluid and the argillaceous medium, dynamic column experiments have been carried out. The originality of the investigation methodology consists in exploiting the data generated from the breakthrough curves as well as from the characterisation of the solids extracted from the columns. Two types of processes having totally different reaction times have hence been thoroughly studied: - Fast surface adsorption and condensation reactions: On the one hand cation adsorption reactions by site ionisation have been characterised. They are responsible of the buffering effect of the clays. On the other hand an original reaction of calcium compound condensation in the interlayer space of the swelling clays has been revealed. These processes have been modelled and their simulations with the IMPACT calculation code showed that the models elaborated were very satisfying. - Strongly kinetically limited dissolution/precipitation reactions: The main primary phases dissolved are quartz and interstratified l/S. The precipitation of secondary phases are mainly C(A)SH and zeolites. After the injection of an alkaline fluid for 6 months at 60 deg C, the argillite is strongly amorphized but only 20 to 30% of the quartz and the interstratified I/S are dissolved. Therefore, dissolution kinetics of the primary phases and the solubility products of the main secondary phases have been determined. (author)

  7. Experimental study and modeling of the propagation of an alkaline concentration wave coming from a cement matrix an passing through the argilite of the Meuse / Haute-Marne laboratory; Etude experimentale et modelisation de la propagation d'une onde de concentration alcaline issue d'une matrice cimentiere a travers l'argilite du site du laboratoire Meuse / Haute-Marne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, Th

    2001-12-01

    The propagation of an alkaline wave through a clay rock has been investigated- The wave is generated by a cementitious matrix through the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite of the Meuse Haute-Marne Laboratory (-480 m depth). The argillite itself is composed of quartz, micas, calcite and an interstratified l/S. In order to characterise the interactions between the alkaline fluid and the argillaceous medium, dynamic column experiments have been carried out. The originality of the investigation methodology consists in exploiting the data generated from the breakthrough curves as well as from the characterisation of the solids extracted from the columns. Two types of processes having totally different reaction times have hence been thoroughly studied: - Fast surface adsorption and condensation reactions: On the one hand cation adsorption reactions by site ionisation have been characterised. They are responsible of the buffering effect of the clays. On the other hand an original reaction of calcium compound condensation in the interlayer space of the swelling clays has been revealed. These processes have been modelled and their simulations with the IMPACT calculation code showed that the models elaborated were very satisfying. - Strongly kinetically limited dissolution/precipitation reactions: The main primary phases dissolved are quartz and interstratified l/S. The precipitation of secondary phases are mainly C(A)SH and zeolites. After the injection of an alkaline fluid for 6 months at 60 deg C, the argillite is strongly amorphized but only 20 to 30% of the quartz and the interstratified I/S are dissolved. Therefore, dissolution kinetics of the primary phases and the solubility products of the main secondary phases have been determined. (author)

  8. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the nearfield around a HLW repository in argillaceous formations. Vol. II. In-situ-investigations and interpretative modelling. May 2007 to May 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Czaikowski, Oliver; Komischke, Michael; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2014-06-15

    Deep disposal of heat-emitting high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in clay formations will inevitably induce thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical disturbances to the host rock and engineered barriers over very long periods of time. The responses and resulting property changes of the natural and engineered barriers are to be well understood, characterized, and predicted for assessing the long-term performance and safety of the repositories. In accordance with the R and D programme defined by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi), GRS has intensively performed site-independent research work on argillaceous rocks during the last decade. Most of the investigations have been carried out on the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite and the Opalinus clay by par-ticipation in international research projects conducted at the underground research laboratories at Bure in France (MHM-URL) and Mont-Terri in Switzerland (MT-URL). The THM-TON project, which was funded by BMWi under contract number 02E10377, in-vestigated the THM behaviours of the clay host rock and clay-based backfill/sealing materials with laboratory tests, in situ experiments and numerical modelling.

  9. Thermo-hydro-mechanical behavior of argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Duy Thuong; Dormieux, Luc; Lemarchand, Eric; Skoczylas, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Argillite is a very low permeability geo-material widely encountered: that is the reason why it is an excellent candidate for the storage of long-term nuclear waste depositories. This study focuses on argillites from Meuse-Haute-Marne (East of France) which forms a geological layer located approximately 400 m and 500 m depth. We know that this material is made up of a mixture of shale, quartz and calcite phases. The multi-scale definition of this material suggests the derivation of micro-mechanics reasonings in order to better account for the mechanisms occurring at the local (nano and micro-) scale and controlling the macroscopic mechanical behavior. In this work, up-scaling techniques are used in the context of thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings. The first step consists in clarifying the morphology of the microstructure at the relevant scales (particles arrangement, pore size distribution) and identifying the mechanisms that take place at those scales. These local informations provide the input data of micro-mechanics based models. Schematic picture of the microstructure where the argillite material behaves as a dual-porosity, with liquid in both micro-pores and interlayer space in between clay solid platelets, seems a reasonable starting point for this micro-mechanical modelling of clay. This allows us to link the physical phenomena (swelling clays) and the mechanical properties (elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio). At the pressure applied by the fluid on the solid platelets appears as the sum of the uniform pressure in the micro-pores and of a swelling overpressure depending on the distance between platelets and on the ion concentration in the micro-pores. The latter is proved to be responsible for a local elastic modulus of physical origin. This additional elastic component may strongly be influenced by both relative humidity and temperature. A first contribution of this study is to analysing this local elastic

  10. A heating experiment in the argillites in the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wileveau, Yannick; Su, Kun; Ghoreychi, Mehdi

    2007-01-01

    A heating experiment named TER is being conducted with the objectives to identify the thermal properties, as well as to enhance the knowledge on THM processes in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay at the Meuse/Haute Marne Underground Research Laboratory (France). The in situ experiment has being switched on from early 2006. The heater, 3 m length, is designed to inject the power in the undisturbed zone at 6 m from the gallery wall. A heater packer is inflated in a metallic tubing. During the experiment, numerous sensors are emplaced in the surrounding rock and are experienced to monitor the evolution in temperature, pore-water pressure and deformation. The models and numerical codes applied should be validated by comparing the modeling results with the measurements. In parallel, some lab testing have been achieved in order to compare the results given with two different scales (cm up to meter scale). In this paper, we present a general description of the TER experiment with installation of the heater equipment and the surrounding instrumentation. Details of the in situ measurements of temperature, pore-pressure and strain evolutions are given for the several heating and cooling phases. The thermal conductivity and some predominant parameters in THM processes (as linear thermal expansion coefficient and permeability) will be discussed. (authors)

  11. Hydrogen solubility in pore water of partially saturated argillites: Application to Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock in the context of a nuclear waste geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassin, A.; Dymitrowska, M.; Azaroual, M.

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear waste geological disposals, large amounts of hydrogen (H 2 ) are expected to be produced by different (bio-)geochemical processes. Depending on the pressure generated by such a process, H 2 could be produced as a gas phase and displace the neighbouring pore water. As a consequence, a water-unsaturated zone could be created around the waste and possibly affect the physical and physic-chemical properties of the disposal and the excavation disturbed zone around it. The present study is the first part of an ongoing research program aimed at evaluating the possible chemical evolution of the pore water-minerals-gas system in such a context. The goal of this study was to evaluate, in terms of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, the geochemical disturbance of the pore water due to variations in hydrogen pressure, temperature and relative humidity. No heterogeneous reactions involving mineral phases of the clay-rock or reactive surface sites were taken into account in the thermodynamic analysis. In the case sulphate reduction reaction is allowed, geochemical modelling results indicate that the main disturbance is the increase in pH (from around 7 up to more than 10) and an important decrease in the redox potential (Eh) related to hydrogen dissolution. This occurs from relatively low H 2 partial pressures (∼1 bar and above). Then, temperature and relative humidity (expressed in terms of capillary pressure) further displace the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions, namely the pH and the aqueous speciation as well as saturation indices of mineral phases. Finally, the results suggest that the generation of hydrogen, combined with an increase in temperature (between 30 deg. C and 80 deg. C) and a decrease in relative humidity (from 100% to 30%), should increase the chemical reactivity of the pore water-rock-gas system. (authors)

  12. Modelling of the mechanical behaviour and damage of clay-stones: application to the East argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aublive-Conil, N.

    2003-03-01

    The storage in deep geological formation is one of the solutions retained by France for the management of highly long life radioactive waste. The retained host rock is a clay-stone named East argillite located in the departments of Meuse and Haute-Marne. A thermodynamic formulation is used to propose a rheological model, which reproduces the mechanical behavior of clay-stones. Initially, an anisotropic damage plastic model was formulated in order to describe material degradations. Then, the damage plastic model is reformulated in order to taken into account the damage influence on the hydraulic behavior of porous material. The numerical simulations correctly reproduce the mechanical behavior of East Argillites but also the anisotropy of the hydraulic behavior introduced by the damage effect. (author)

  13. Evaluation report no.11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This 11. report of the French national commission of evaluation (CNE) presents the recent advances in the researches relative to the management of radioactive wastes in France and in the rest of the world: 1 - Introduction; 2 - comments from the commission about the informations and documents received: auditions and trips, organisation of evaluation, comments about the text supplied by the CEA entitled 'main conclusions and perspectives'; 3 - axis 1 - researches on advanced separation and transmutation (summary, introduction, scenario studies, separation, transmutation fuels and targets, transmutation, results of the PDS-XADS project, conclusion), statement of the commission, actinide content of transmutation fuels and targets; 4 - axis 2 - disposal in deep underground: summary, characterization criteria of potential sites, introduction, status of researched carried out at Bure's site, reversibility of disposal, granite, additional researches, conclusion, advice of the commission about ANDRA's 2003 status and works document, reflection about the salinity difference between Dogger, Callovo-Oxfordian and Oxfordian waters and on the osmosis phenomena inside the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, importance of diffusion in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, description of the storage materials foreseen in the different modules; 5 - Axis 3 - long duration conditioning and disposal: summary, introduction, wastes conditioning, disposal; 6 - PRECCI program: introduction, researches evaluation, operational models, conclusion; 7 - status of researches and realizations performed abroad: overview, separation and transmutation, geological disposal, radioactive waste management in Sweden: a complete system, list of projects in progress about storage, separation and transmutation, Atalante 2004 conference (Nimes, France, June 21-24), advances of big European projects. Appendixes: Commission's members, dose-effect relationship and estimation of carcinogenic effects of low ionizing

  14. Migration of Gas in Water Saturated Clays by Coupled Hydraulic-Mechanical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaksei Pazdniakou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the gas migration in highly water saturated sedimentary rock formations is of great importance for safety of radioactive waste repositories which may use these host rocks as barrier. Recent experiments on drainage in argillite samples have demonstrated that they cannot be represented in terms of standard two-phase flow Darcy model. It has been suggested that gas flows along highly localized dilatant pathways. Due to very small pore size and the opacity of the material, it is not possible to observe this two-phase flow directly. In order to better understand the gas transport, a numerical coupled hydraulic-mechanical model at the pore scale is proposed. The model is formulated in terms of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH and is applied to simulate drainage within a sample reconstructed from the Focused Ion Beam (FIB images of Callovo-Oxfordian claystone. A damage model is incorporated to take into account the degradation of elastic solid properties due to local conditions, which may lead to formation of new pathways and thus to modifications of fluid transport. The influence of the damage model as well as the possible importance of rigid inclusions is demonstrated and discussed.

  15. Dealing with geological discontinuities in safety assessment: the approach of the French technical safety organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocher, M.; Hoyos, A. de; Cushing, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper focuses on IRSN structural studies aiming at assessing the existence of tectonic structures in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation and their potential role on radionuclide transport. IRSN has first determined the type of fracturing that could be present in the Callovo-Oxfordian, by carrying out surface fieldwork in Meuse/Haute-Marne and investigations in clay and limestone layers in the Tournemire experimental station. IRSN has also examined the results of the ANDRA 3-D seismic survey associated with inclined boreholes around the Bure URL, as well as the limits of these survey methods, based on its own 3-D High-Resolution seismic survey campaign carried out in Tournemire on fault zones already recognised by drifts and boreholes. At the scale of the Paris sedimentary basin, on the basis of a geological model and of measured hydrodynamic parameters, IRSN has developed underground water flow schemes, which allow the determination of possible water pathways, outlets and associated transfer times. This modelling shows that several combinations in the representation of tectonic structures are possible to fit measured data, and that the remaining uncertainties regarding their hydrogeological role should be reduced. In addition, the influence of a hypothetic fault in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay close to disposal cells on radionuclide molar flows is tested at the repository scale. At last, perspectives are given regarding in particular methods to detect hydro-geologically active faults, differential fracturing patterns in clays and limestones as well as improvement of IRSN hydrogeological model. (authors)

  16. Experimental formation of cronstedtite from Cox argillite-iron interaction at decreasing temperature in the 90 deg. C-40 deg. C range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignatelli, Isabella; Mosser-Ruck, Regine; Rozsypal, Christophe; Truche, Laurent; Randi, Aurelien; Bartier, Daniele; Cathelineau, Michel; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Mouton, Ludovic; Michau, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Cronstedtite crystals experimentally formed during a cooling experiment (90 deg.C-40 deg. C) simulating the time-temperature evolution of the iron-clay system around the steel overpacks in nuclear waste disposal, were characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM study. Cronstedtite is a T-O phyllosilicate with general formula (Fe 2+ 3-x Fe 3+ x )(Si 2-x Fe 3+ x )O 5 (OH) 4 , with 0 2 ), Callovo-Oxfordian argillite (COx) of the Paris Basin (with a solution/COx mass ratio of 10) and metal iron (powder and plates, with an iron powder/COx mass ratio of 0.5). This system was put in Teflon-line autoclaves heated at (90±2) deg. C for 6 months; then the temperature was decreased every month by step of 10 deg. C until 40 deg. C. The XRD results on run products clearly show that the T-O phyllosilicates crystallize and replace the predominant clay in the starting argillite, e.g. illite-smectite mixed-layer clays when the experimental temperature decreases. The reflections at 7.1 Angstrom, 4.76 Angstrom, 3.55 Angstrom and 2.73 Angstrom indicate that the T-O phyllosilicate formed is cronstedtite, but this technique is not efficient to determine its polytype. The SEM analyses confirm the presence of cronstedtite and show the morphological evolution of crystals with the temperature. At 90 deg. C three morphologies are recognized: trigonal pyramids and cones with hexagonal or rounded cross-section (Fig. 1), these crystals coexist with hairy berthierine-like minerals, as described by [10] and [12] The three cronstedtite shapes are observed until 70 deg. C and at lower temperatures the pyramidal morphology is dominant. From the energy dispersive X-ray analyses, structural formula of cronstedtite were calculated. The Fe II / Fe III ratio was adjusted to fix the octahedron to 3 in the calculation of the structural formula. Slight differences in the chemical compositions of cronstedtites are noticed: the pyramidal crystals have more Fe 2+ in the

  17. Effects of magnesium minerals representative of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay-stone on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debure, M.

    2012-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses dissolution has been studied in presence of magnesium minerals. Those minerals (dolomite, illite, smectite...) belong to the Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone layer, studied in France as a potential site for nuclear waste disposal. Such minerals contain magnesium, an element able to sustain glass alteration when it is available in solution. In the confined media of the wastes disposal, the solids reactivity controls the solution composition and can be the driving force of nuclear glass alteration. Experiments show that magnesium carbonates (hydro-magnesite and dolomite) increase in the glass alteration: the precipitation of magnesium silicates consumes silicon which slows down the formation of the glass passivating layer. The lower the magnesium mineral solubility, the lower the glass alteration. The purified clay phases (illite, smectite...) from the COx layer increase the glass alteration. Half the magnesium was replaced by sodium during the purification process. In such conditions, the effect of clay phases on glass alteration is in part due to the acidic pH-buffering effect of the clay fraction. The GRAAL model implemented in the geochemical transport code HYTEC has confirmed and quantified the mechanisms put in evidence in the experiments. Cells diffusion experiments where the two solids were separated by an inert diffusion barrier allow to valid reactive transport modelling. Such experiments are more representative of the glass package which will be separated from the COx by corrosion products. They show that glass alteration rate is reduced when solids are not close. (author) [fr

  18. Thermal conductivity of unsaturated clay-rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jougnot

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parameters used to describe the electrical conductivity of a porous material can be used to describe also its thermal conductivity. A new relationship is developed to connect the thermal conductivity of an unsaturated porous material to the thermal conductivity of the different phases of the composite, and two electrical parameters called the first and second Archie's exponents. A good agreement is obtained between the new model and thermal conductivity measurements performed using packs of glass beads and core samples of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rocks at different saturations of the water phase. We showed that the three model parameters optimised to fit the new model against experimental data (namely the thermal conductivity of the solid phase and the two Archie's exponents are consistent with independent estimates. We also observed that the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock was mainly due to the anisotropy of the thermal conductivity of the solid phase.

  19. A study on the dynamic behavior of the Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, M.; Kaiser, P. K.; Suorineni, F.; Su, K.

    Excavation of underground tunnels can be conducted by tunnel boring machines (TBM) or drill-and-blast. TBMs cause minimum damage to excavation walls. Blasting effects on excavation walls depend on the care with which the blasting is executed. For blast-induced damage in excavation walls, two issues have to be addressed: rate of loss of confinement (rate of excavation) and dynamic loading from wave propagation that causes both intended and unintended damage. To address these two aspects, laboratory dynamic tests were conducted for the determination of the dynamic properties of the Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite. In the present study, 17 tensile (Brazilian) and 15 compression split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted. The test revealed that the dynamic strengths of the argillite are strain rate dependent. The average dynamic increase factors (ratio of dynamic strength to static strength) for tensile and compressive strength are about 3.3 and 2.4, respectively. A high-speed video camera was used to visualize the initiation of failure and subsequent deformation of the specimens. The direct compression specimens were found to deform and fail uniformly around the circumference of the specimen, by a spalling process. The SHPB Brazilian tests indicated that failure occurred in tension along the line of load application. Radial fractures were also observed. The test results can be used for the development of a dynamic constitutive model for the argillite for the prediction of damage in underground excavation utilizing the drill-and blast method.

  20. Scientific investigation in deep wells for nuclear waste disposal studies at the Meuse/Haute Marne underground research laboratory, Northeastern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Jacques; Rebours, Hervé; Vinsot, Agnès; Robin, Pierre

    Andra, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency, is constructing an underground test facility to study the feasibility of a radioactive waste disposal in the Jurassic-age Callovo-Oxfordian argillites. This paper describes the processes, the methods and results of a scientific characterization program carried out from the surface via deep boreholes with the aim to build a research facility for radioactive waste disposal. In particular this paper shows the evolution of the drilling programs and the borehole set up due to the refinement of the scientific objectives from 1994 to 2004. The pre-investigation phase on the Meuse/Haute-Marne site started in 1994. It consisted in drilling seven scientific boreholes. This phase, completed in 1996, led to the first regional geological cross-section showing the main geometrical characteristics of the host rock. Investigations on the laboratory site prior to the sinking of two shafts started in November 1999. The sinking of the shafts started in September 2000 with the auxiliary shaft completed in October 2004. The experimental gallery, at a depth of 445 m in the main shaft, was in operation by end 2004. During the construction of the laboratory, two major scientific programs were initiated to improve the existing knowledge of the regional hydrogeological characteristics and to accelerate the process of data acquisition on the shales. The aim of the 2003 hydrogeological drilling program was to determine, at regional scale, the properties of groundwater transport and to sample the water in the Oxfordian and Dogger limestones. The 2003-2004 programs consisted in drilling nine deep boreholes, four of which were slanted, to achieve an accurate definition of the structural features.

  1. Redox reactions induced by hydrogen in deep geological nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truche, L.

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the abiotic hydrogen reactivity in deep geological nuclear waste storage. One crucial research interest concerns the role of H 2 as a reducing agent for the aqueous/mineral oxidised species present in the site. Preliminary batch experiments carried out with Callovo-Oxfordian argillite, synthetic pore water and H 2 gas lead to an important H 2 S production, in only few hours at 250 C to few months at 90 C. In order to explore whether H 2 S can originate from sulphate or pyrite (few percents of the argillite) reduction we performed dedicated experiments. Sulphate reduction experimented in di-phasic systems (water+gas) at 250-300 C and under 4 to 16 bar H 2 partial pressure exhibits a high activation energy (131 kJ/mol) and requires H 2 S initiation and low pH condition as already observed in other published TSR experiments. The corresponding half-life is 210,000 yr at 90 C (thermal peak of the site). On the contrary, pyrite reduction into pyrrhotite by H 2 occurs in few days at temperature as low as 90 C at pH buffered by calcite. The rate of the reaction could be described by a diffusion-like rate law in the 90-180 C temperature interval. The obtained results suggest that pyrite reduction is a process controlled both by the H 2 diffusion across the pyrrhotite pits increasing during reaction progress and the reductive dissolution of pyrite. These new kinetics data can be applied in computation modelling, to evaluate the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup by taking into account the H 2 reactive geochemistry. (author)

  2. Tracing of natural radionuclides mobility in deep sedimentary environment using radioactive (234U/238U) disequilibria: application to the Mesozoic formations of the Eastern part of the Paris Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschamps, P.

    2003-11-01

    This thesis forms part of the geological investigations undertaken by the French agency for nuclear waste management, ANDRA, around the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) located in the Eastern part of the Paris Basin in order to evaluate the feasibility of high-level radioactive waste repository in deep argilite formations. The aim of the study is to examine the radionuclide migration in the deep Callovo-Oxfordian target argilite layer and its surrounding low- permeability Bathonian and Oxfordian limestone formations in order to assess the long term confining capacities of the sedimentary series. This study is based on measurement of radioactive disequilibria within U-series by Multiple- Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The high precision and accuracy achieved allowed to demonstrate the 234 U/ 238 U radioactive equilibrium in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites. This result shows the uranium immobility in the target formation and provides a strong evidence for the current chemical stability and closure of the system for uranium and most probably for the other actinides. This is a fundamental result with respect to the problematic of disposal of high level radioactive waste in deep geological formation since it provides a in situ indication of the confining capacities of the clayey target formation in the current settings. Conversely, ( 234 U/ 238 U) disequilibria are systematically observed within zones, located in the surrounding carbonate formations, that are characterized by pressure dissolution structures (stylolites or dissolution seams). These disequilibria provide evidence for a discrete uranium relocation during the last two million years in the vicinity of stylolitic structures. This is a surprising result since it is generally supposed that these deep, low permeability, compact formations behave as closed system at the time scale of the U-series. (author)

  3. Tracing of natural radionuclides mobility in deep sedimentary environment using radioactive ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) disequilibria: application to the Mesozoic formations of the Eastern part of the Paris Basin; Tracage de la mobilite des radionucleides naturels en milieu sedimentaire profond a l'aide des desequilibres radioactifs ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U): application aux formations mesozoiques de l'est du Bassin de Paris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, P

    2003-11-01

    This thesis forms part of the geological investigations undertaken by the French agency for nuclear waste management, ANDRA, around the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) located in the Eastern part of the Paris Basin in order to evaluate the feasibility of high-level radioactive waste repository in deep argilite formations. The aim of the study is to examine the radionuclide migration in the deep Callovo-Oxfordian target argilite layer and its surrounding low- permeability Bathonian and Oxfordian limestone formations in order to assess the long term confining capacities of the sedimentary series. This study is based on measurement of radioactive disequilibria within U-series by Multiple- Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The high precision and accuracy achieved allowed to demonstrate the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U radioactive equilibrium in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites. This result shows the uranium immobility in the target formation and provides a strong evidence for the current chemical stability and closure of the system for uranium and most probably for the other actinides. This is a fundamental result with respect to the problematic of disposal of high level radioactive waste in deep geological formation since it provides a in situ indication of the confining capacities of the clayey target formation in the current settings. Conversely, ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) disequilibria are systematically observed within zones, located in the surrounding carbonate formations, that are characterized by pressure dissolution structures (stylolites or dissolution seams). These disequilibria provide evidence for a discrete uranium relocation during the last two million years in the vicinity of stylolitic structures. This is a surprising result since it is generally supposed that these deep, low permeability, compact formations behave as closed system at the time scale of the U-series. (author)

  4. Tracing of natural radionuclides mobility in deep sedimentary environment using radioactive ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) disequilibria: application to the Mesozoic formations of the Eastern part of the Paris Basin; Tracage de la mobilite des radionucleides naturels en milieu sedimentaire profond a l'aide des desequilibres radioactifs ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U): application aux formations mesozoiques de l'est du Bassin de Paris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deschamps, P

    2003-11-01

    This thesis forms part of the geological investigations undertaken by the French agency for nuclear waste management, ANDRA, around the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) located in the Eastern part of the Paris Basin in order to evaluate the feasibility of high-level radioactive waste repository in deep argilite formations. The aim of the study is to examine the radionuclide migration in the deep Callovo-Oxfordian target argilite layer and its surrounding low- permeability Bathonian and Oxfordian limestone formations in order to assess the long term confining capacities of the sedimentary series. This study is based on measurement of radioactive disequilibria within U-series by Multiple- Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). The high precision and accuracy achieved allowed to demonstrate the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U radioactive equilibrium in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites. This result shows the uranium immobility in the target formation and provides a strong evidence for the current chemical stability and closure of the system for uranium and most probably for the other actinides. This is a fundamental result with respect to the problematic of disposal of high level radioactive waste in deep geological formation since it provides a in situ indication of the confining capacities of the clayey target formation in the current settings. Conversely, ({sup 234}U/{sup 238}U) disequilibria are systematically observed within zones, located in the surrounding carbonate formations, that are characterized by pressure dissolution structures (stylolites or dissolution seams). These disequilibria provide evidence for a discrete uranium relocation during the last two million years in the vicinity of stylolitic structures. This is a surprising result since it is generally supposed that these deep, low permeability, compact formations behave as closed system at the time scale of the U-series. (author)

  5. In situ determination of anisotropic permeability of clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, H.; Soennke, J.; Morel, J.; Krug, S.

    2011-01-01

    Argillaceous formations are being considered as potential host rocks for repositories of radioactive waste in many countries. For this purpose, the thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, and chemical properties of the clay stone are being widely investigated in the laboratories and in situ. However, clay stone behaves, due to its tectonic evolution of the formation, hydraulically and mechanically transversal isotropic. Argillite bedding or layering structure has been observed in the underground laboratories Mont Terri in the Switzerland and Meuse/Haute-Marne at Bure site in France. Conventional packer systems used for the borehole hydraulic characterisation cannot distinguish the difference between the properties parallel and perpendicular to the bedding. For this purpose, a new 'slot packer' system has been developed by the BGR. This type of new packer system is intensively tested in the BGR laboratory and the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory to judge the feasibility. The anisotropic ratio of the Opalinus clay defined by permeability value parallel to the bedding/permeability value perpendicular to the bedding is evaluated up to eight times to one order of magnitude within the HG-B experiment in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory. Within the cooperation between BGR and ANDRA, the 'slot packer' will be used for the measurement of anisotropic permeability of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation at the Bure site. (authors)

  6. Ten years of Toarcian argillite - carbon steel in situ interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauzeres, Alexandre [IRSN, PRP-DGE/SRTG/LETIS, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Maillet, Anais [IRSN, PRP-DGE/SRTG/LETIS, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR CNRS 7285, IC2MP, Batiment B35 - 5, avenue Albert Turpain, 86022 Poitiers cedex (France); Gaudin, Anne [UMR CNRS 6112, LPGN, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); El Albani, Abderrazak; Vieillard, Philippe [UMR CNRS 7285, IC2MP, Batiment B35 - 5, avenue Albert Turpain, 86022 Poitiers cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In situ interaction experiments over periods of 2, 6, and 10 years between Toarcian argillite and carbon steel discs were carried out in the Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL), yielding a dataset of the materials' geochemical evolution under conditions representative of the future geological disposal of high-level long-lived radioactive wastes. The carbon steel discs were exposed to corrosion due to trapped oxygen. The corrosion rates indicate that the oxidizing transient lasted between 2 and 6 years. A systematic dissolution of calcium phases (Ca-smectite sheets in I/S and calcite) was observed in the iron diffusion halos. The iron release induced mineralogical dissolution and precipitation reactions, which partly clogged the argillite porosity. (authors)

  7. Air oxidation of samples from different clay formations of East Paris basin: quantitative and qualitative consequences on the dissolved organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchart, Pascale; Faure, Pierre; Michels, Raymond; Parant, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. During the excavation and the building of an underground research laboratory in clay geological formations, exposure to air is one of the most important parameters affecting the composition of fossil organic matter. Indeed the net effect of air oxidation of the organic matter is enrichment in oxygen and carbon combined with a loss of hydrogen. Effluents formed are CO 2 and water as well as the liberation of hydrocarbons. This process may have an impact on water chemistry of the clay, especially on the quantity and composition of Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM). The clays studied were the following and may be distinguished on the basis of their organic matter content: - The Callovo-Oxfordian argillite, collected in the Bure Underground Research Laboratory (Meuse, France), which contains a mixture of type II and III kerogen; - The Toarcian shales of East Paris Basin collected from drilling EST 204 (Meuse, France) contains type II kerogen; - The Kimmeridgian shales of East Paris Basin collected from drilling HTM 102 (Meuse, France) also contains type II kerogen. The powdered clay samples were oxidized in a ventilated oven at 100 C under air flow during 2, 256, 512 and 1088 hours for Callovo-Oxfordian samples and during 512 and 2048 hours for Toarcian and Kimmeridgian samples. The DOM of each sample was extracted by soxhlet using pure water. Different analyses were carried out: - Quantitative evolution of DOM with the oxidation process; - Evolution of several chemical parameters of DOM with oxidation using molecular analyses (PyGC-MS) molecular weight distribution (GPC-HPLC) as well as spectroscopic measurements (3D-Fluorescence). Increasing oxidation induces an increase of DOC values for all samples. Also, Changes in the chemical composition of the DOM are observed: decrease in the molecular weight range; enrichment in acidic functional groups (alkane-dioic acids, alkanoic acids, aromatics poly acids). Moreover the

  8. Interaction of radionuclides with argillite from the Eleana Formation on the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.; Lynch, A.W.

    1979-02-01

    Distribution coefficients have been determined for 137 Cs, 85 Sr, 144 Ce, 99 Tc, 152 Eu, 238 Pu, 244 Cm, and 243 Am between argillite from the Eleana Formation on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and several aqueous phases. Radionuclide concentrations in the range of 1 to 0.001 μCi/ml were used with contact times of 14, 28, and 56 days. Reaction mechanism, concentration effects, exchange capacity, equilibration times, and particle size effects were addressed in a more comprehensive study of the interaction of argillite with Cs in deionized water. The experimental parameters used in the distribution coefficient measurements were based in part on this work. The aqueous phases included a simulated groundwater with composition based on the analysis of a NTS groundwater, the same simulant and deionized water which were pre-equilibrated with powdered argillite, and a groundwater simulant with approximately the same qualitative composition of the NTS simulant, but with a higher ionic strength. A system to provide continuous pH control by CO 2 addition during equilibration of the argillite-solution mixtures was designed and assembled. Initial experiments were done with Cs and Eu and the effects of pH on their distribution coefficients are discussed

  9. 1.6. The kinetics of hydrochloric acid decomposition of argillite of Chashma-Sang Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Mirzoev, D.Kh.; Boboev, Kh.E.

    2016-01-01

    Present article of book is devoted to kinetics of hydrochloric acid decomposition of argillite of Chashma-Sang Deposit. It was defined that with temperature increasing the extraction rate of Al_2O_3 and Fe_2O_3 increases. The dependence of extraction rate of Al_2O_3 and Fe_2O_3 on process duration at hydrochloric acid decomposition of argillite was studied. The activation energy of the process was defined.

  10. Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory examination, on a shaft wall, of pluri-decametric features induced by borehole hydro fracturing tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, L.; Gros, Y. [ANTER, Direction Technique, 45 - Orleans (France); Reboursz, H.; Wileveauz, Y. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA/DP/EST/SS), 55 - Bure (France); Proudhon, B. [GEO-TER, subcontractor to EDF-TEGG, 13 - Aix en Provence (France)

    2005-07-01

    In the year 2000, prior to the sinking of the two shafts of the laboratory, two vertical cored boreholes were drilled according to the axis of each of the shafts. The EST205 borehole drilled along the axis of the auxiliary shaft intersects the Callovo-Oxfordian layers in its lower part. Stress measurements were performed there by hydraulic fracturing method, on the one hand at the bottom of the Oxfordian limestone (6 tests between 375 and 416 m depth), on the other hand in the more clayey Callovo-Oxfordian layer (8 tests between 417 and 500 m depth). Both boreholes were subsequently sealed by cement. During shaft sinking, a detailed geological survey of the walls was performed at each blast round. During this survey, positioned by means of a grid of targets whose locations are recorded by topographical measurements, lithological changes as well as structural features visible on the wall are carefully recorded. In this context, the wall of 3 successive blast rounds are seen to display, roughly aligned with the West and South generating lines of the shaft, two sub-vertical joints with nil aperture and an average strike of N155 degree. These joints can be traced over more than 15 m height, between levels -434 and -451 m. More at depth, the walls display four parallel sub-horizontal joints, recorded between 466,5 and 476 m depth. These smoothly undulating joints are observed over the entire shaft wall perimeter. (authors)

  11. Hydro-mechanical coupling and transport in Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite: experimental and multi-scale approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cariou, S.

    2010-07-01

    This thesis deals with the hydro-mechanical behaviour of argillite. Classical Biot theory is shown to be badly adapted to the case of argillite. An original state equation is then built by use of homogenization tools, and takes into account the microstructure of argillite as well as physical phenomena happening inside the material, like the swelling overpressure inside the clay particles or the capillary effects in the porous network. This state equation explains some experiments which were not by the classical Biot theory. It is then improved by integrating the experimental data that are the dependency of the elasticity tensor with the saturation degree and the existence of a porosity surrounding the inclusions. Combined with the monitoring of length variation under hydric loading, this relevant state equation permits one to determine the Biot tensor of argillite. Since this state equation is coupled with the hydric state of the material, one is interested in modelling the variation of the saturation degree during a drying process. Two transport models are studied and compared, then a model for the porous network is proposed in order to explain the unusual permeability measurements. (author)

  12. X-ray Micro Tomography as a Tool for Studying Localized Damage / Deformation in Clay Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viggiani, Gioacchino; Besuelle, Pierre; Desrues, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Deformation in geo-materials (soils, rocks, concrete, etc.) is often localized, e.g., in the form of shear bands or fractures. In experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior of such materials, standard laboratory methods are insufficient as the majority of measurements are made at the sample scale and rarely at a local scale. X-ray tomography monitoring during loading allows high-resolution full-field observation of the development of deformation. However, such images only indicate clearly the de-formation when there are significant changes in material density (i.e., volume changes) that produce a change in x-ray absorption. As such 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) approaches have been developed that allow quantification of the full strain tensor field throughout the imaged volume. This paper presents results from triaxial compression tests on a clay rock (Callovo-Oxfordian argillite) with in situ synchrotron x-ray micro tomography imaging providing complete 3D images of the specimen at several stages throughout the test. These images have been analyzed using 3D DIC to provide full-field displacement and strain measurements, which allowed the detection of the onset of strain localization and its timing relative to the load peak plus insight into the 3D structure of the localized zone. The paper concludes with a few general remarks concerning the lessons learned from this study and perspectives for current and future work. (authors)

  13. Iodine transfer in the Tournemire argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittebroodt, Ch.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of an underground radioactive waste disposal, 129 I constitutes for the argillaceous media one of the most penalizing elements owing to its very long life and its very low affinity. The objective of this work is to characterize the iodide transfer through the Tournemire argillite (Aveyron, France), in order to study thoroughly the iodide diffusive behaviour through an argillaceous matrix. An experimental methodology, which was based on a multi experimental method approach (batch, radial diffusion and through diffusion experiments), was applied for three different tracers: iodide, bromide, HTO. In the first part of this work, we show that the comparison between the HTO diffusion parameters and the anionic species highlights the existence of an anionic exclusion phenomenon which restricts the access of the anionic species to an accessible porosity inferior to the total rock porosity. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that our retention and diffusion experiments indicate the existence of a significant affinity between 125 I and the Tournemire argillite. The 125 I retention appears to be irreversible, or with a kinetically very slow desorption within the duration of our experiments. Moreover, this retention intensity seems to be dependent on different experimental parameters such as the initial concentration of iodide or the ionic strength of the synthetic pore-water solution. (author)

  14. Alteration of R7T7-type nuclear glass in deep geological storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combarieu, G. de

    2007-02-01

    This PhD thesis is aimed to study the alteration of SON68 glass, French inactive glass of R7T7-type, in contact with near field materials of a deep geological storage (French concept from ANDRA) which are mainly metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay. Therefore, experiments involving a 'glass-iron-clay' system at lab-scale have been carried out. Interactions between glass, iron and clay have been characterised from submicron to millimeter scale by means of SEM, TEM, XRD and XAS and Raman spectroscopies in terms of chemistry and crystal-chemistry. In the mean time, a conceptual model of glass alteration has been developed to account for most of the experimental observations and known mechanisms of alteration. The model has been then transposed within the transport-chemistry code HYTEC, together with developed models of clay and iron corrosion, to simulate the experiments described above. This work is thus a contribution to the understanding of iron corrosion in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and subsequent glass alteration in the newly formed corrosion products, the whole process being considered as a lab-scale model of a deep geological storage of radioactive wastes. (author)

  15. Alteration of R7T7-type nuclear glass in deep geological storage conditions; Alteration du verre de confinement de dechets type R7T7 en condition de stockage geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combarieu, G de

    2007-02-15

    This PhD thesis is aimed to study the alteration of SON68 glass, French inactive glass of R7T7-type, in contact with near field materials of a deep geological storage (French concept from ANDRA) which are mainly metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay. Therefore, experiments involving a 'glass-iron-clay' system at lab-scale have been carried out. Interactions between glass, iron and clay have been characterised from submicron to millimeter scale by means of SEM, TEM, XRD and XAS and Raman spectroscopies in terms of chemistry and crystal-chemistry. In the mean time, a conceptual model of glass alteration has been developed to account for most of the experimental observations and known mechanisms of alteration. The model has been then transposed within the transport-chemistry code HYTEC, together with developed models of clay and iron corrosion, to simulate the experiments described above. This work is thus a contribution to the understanding of iron corrosion in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and subsequent glass alteration in the newly formed corrosion products, the whole process being considered as a lab-scale model of a deep geological storage of radioactive wastes. (author)

  16. Alteration of R7T7-type nuclear glass in deep geological storage conditions; Alteration du verre de confinement de dechets type R7T7 en condition de stockage geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combarieu, G. de

    2007-02-15

    This PhD thesis is aimed to study the alteration of SON68 glass, French inactive glass of R7T7-type, in contact with near field materials of a deep geological storage (French concept from ANDRA) which are mainly metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay. Therefore, experiments involving a 'glass-iron-clay' system at lab-scale have been carried out. Interactions between glass, iron and clay have been characterised from submicron to millimeter scale by means of SEM, TEM, XRD and XAS and Raman spectroscopies in terms of chemistry and crystal-chemistry. In the mean time, a conceptual model of glass alteration has been developed to account for most of the experimental observations and known mechanisms of alteration. The model has been then transposed within the transport-chemistry code HYTEC, together with developed models of clay and iron corrosion, to simulate the experiments described above. This work is thus a contribution to the understanding of iron corrosion in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and subsequent glass alteration in the newly formed corrosion products, the whole process being considered as a lab-scale model of a deep geological storage of radioactive wastes. (author)

  17. The distribution of some rare metals in the process of separation of organic matter from Estonian dictyonema argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palvadre, R.; Ahelik, V.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of rare metals Mo, U and V in the process of separation of organic matter from Maardu and Toolse argillite s is discussed. The beneficiation process of argillite consists of the hydro cycling treatment, in the course of which organic matter is separated as a light fraction, followed by direct flotation of organic matter and pyrite concentrates. Determinations of Mo and U were made by X-ray fluorescence, V by titration and pyrite by titration of iron. It can be concluded that rare metals Mo, U and V were concentrating in organic matter, their recovery in pyrite and quartz was negligible, depending on the degree of pyrite separation. The recovery of rare metals, especially that of V in the mineral phase, was more considerable in the processing of Maardu argillite, whose content of clay minerals was higher than that of Toolse argillite. 4 tabs., 6 refs

  18. Fe(0)-Kaolinite (KGA2) interactions at 90° C under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Montarges-Pelletier, E.; Michot, L.; Villieras, F.; Abdelmoula, M.; Karunakaran, C.; Ventelon, D.; Michau, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Because of the use of steel containers for geological deposit of nuclear waste, it is of prime importance to understand the interaction mechanisms between the geological matrix, Callovo-Oxfordian argillite, and the steel container. In order to evidence the individual role of each different clay phase entering in the mineralogy of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite, the iron-clay interactions were studied by the use of reference clays. The Georgia Kaolinite (KGa2) supplied by the Clay Mineral Society was selected to represent kaolinite minerals; as it has been extensively characterized in our laboratory. To reproduce the repository conditions, raw kaolinite was put in contact with powder metallic iron with a weight ratio fixed at 1/3 and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/20. Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) in Parr reactors for durations of one, three or nine months. Similar experiments without iron were carried out to show up the influence of iron on mineralogical transformations in such conditions. After, one, three or nine months, solid and liquid phases were separated by centrifugation and characterized by classical techniques combining chemical analyses, X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, XPS and Moessbauer analyses. Supplementary observation tools, based on the use of synchrotron radiation were used to reinforce the information about iron localisation and its status in individualized clay particles (Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM) and Micro-Xray Absorption Spectroscopy (μ-XAS)). Without iron, kaolinite KGa2 remains unchanged, from a mineralogical point of view, even after nine months in suspension. With iron, first results from one month experiments showed a decrease of pristine metallic iron as well as the apparition

  19. Influence of the incorporation of grog and argillite in a clayey body for production of ceramic paver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpini, V.; Pinheiro, R.M.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    This work has for objective to evaluate the influence argillite and grog addition, obtained from defective bricks fired al low temperatures, into a clayey body for production of ceramic paver. Cylindrical specimens were uniaxial mold-press and then fired at 850 deg C in a laboratory furnace. The evaluated properties were: water absorption, diametral shrinkage and uniaxial compressive strength. The microstructure of the fired ceramics was evaluated electron scanning microscopy. The results showed that the argillite significantly decreased the water absorption and the shrinkage of the clayey body. The grog also decreased the shrinkage, but also decreased the mechanical strength. With respect to the water absorption, the grog not change this property of the composition elaborated with clays and argillite. (author)

  20. Alteration of the Tournemire argillite (France) submitted to an alkaline plume: through-diffusion and advection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devol-Brown, I.; Tinseau, E.; Rebischung, F.; De Windt, L.; Bartier, D.; Motellier, S.; Techer, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Tournemire experimental platform of IRSN in Aveyron is based on a tunnel and several galleries. The tunnel was excavated between 1882 and 1886 through Domerian marls and Toarcian argillites. Its walls were recovered by lime that is yet in contact with the argillites. The program associated to the study of the engineered analogues provided by the Tournemire experimental platform is presented in another paper. In parallel, lab experiments (diffusion and advection) are performed in smaller time (1 year) and space scale to control some parameters and complete engineered analogues results. This paper details the scientific program developed on these diffusion and advection lab samples. The diffusion study was designed to provide better understanding of the phenomena that govern diffusion processes during the transient phase between site and alkaline conditions. The advection study was designed to evaluate the influence of an advective hydraulic regime on the interaction argillite/alkaline fluid in comparison with the diffusive one. In all experiments, pH and concentrations (cations, anions) were monitored in time. Mineralogical and petrographic analyses (XRD, SEM, TEM) of the argillite cores were performed before and after the experiments for characterizing the mineral alterations and their potential role on the alkaline plume migration

  1. Long term behaviour of compacted argillite submitted to an alkaline fluid circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuisinier, O.; Masrouri, F.; Deneele, Dimitri

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the French concept of deep nuclear wastes repository, the galleries should be backfilled with excavated argillite after the site exploitation period. After several thousands of years, the degradation of the concrete lining of the galleries will generate alkaline fluid (pH > 12) that will diffuse through the backfill. The object of the study is to describe the influence of such solute diffusion on the microstructure of compacted argillite. Saturated-portlandite water was circulated through compacted samples for 3, 6 and 12 months at 20 or 60 deg. C. First, the mechanical behaviour of the samples was determined after the fluid circulation period. The microstructure of the samples was also analysed via mercury intrusion porosimetry tests, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. Since it is planned to introduce additives (bentonite, calcareous sand or lime) in the remoulded argillite to backfill the deep galleries, such mixtures were also studied. The results showed that MA particles are sensitive to the alkaline fluid circulation at the microstructural level. In the case of the calcareous sand, no major changes of the microstructure nor the mechanical behaviour were observed. The pure argillite underwent slight modifications that can be related to a limited dissolution of its clayey particles. Conversely, intense alteration of the MX-80 particles was evidenced with a strong increase of the macro-pore void ration while the mechanical behaviour was slightly altered by the fluid circulation. Lime addition improved the mechanical characteristics of the argillite through the precipitation of cementitious compounds. The microstructure of the lime-treated argillite was also altered by the fluid circulation. That study evidenced that alkaline fluid circulation led to the dissolution clayey particles, leading to the increase of the macro-pore void ratio. Some of the dissolved compounds allowed the formation of

  2. Distribution regularities and prospecting of carbonate-siliceous-argillitic rock type uranium deposit in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Fengmin; Pan Yan

    2012-01-01

    The carbonate-siliceous-argillitic rock type uranium deposit is one of the important types of uranium deposits in China. Exogenic permeability type and hydrothermal type are dominated in genetic type. Four mineralization zones, two independent mineralization districts, two potential mineralization zones can be classified in China, uranium mineralization districts can be classified further. They are classified as four levels through the potential metallogenic evaluation on the mineralization districts, an important prospective area in the near future. In order to develop and make use of carbonate-siliceous-argillitic rock type uranium resources, exploration and study should be listed in the development planning on uranium geology. (authors)

  3. Hydro-mechanical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laouafa, F.; Kazmierczak, J.B. [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique ALATA, 60 - Verneuil en Halatte (France); Armand, G. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs, Lab. de Souterrain de Meuse/Haute-Marne, 55 - Bure (France); Vaunat, J. [Catalonia UPC- Technical Univ., Barcelona (Spain); Jobmann, M.; Polster, M. [DBETEC- DBE Technology GmbH, Peine (Germany); Su, K.; Lebon, P.; Plas, F.; Armand, G.; Abou-Chakra Guery, A.; Cormery, F.; Shao, J.F.; Kondo, D. [ANDRA - Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Souley, M. [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), 54 - Nancy (France); Coll, C.; Charlier, R.; Collin, F.; Gerard, P. [Liege Univ., Dept. ArGEnCo (Belgium); Xiang Ling, Li [ESV EURIDICE, SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium); Collin, F. [Liege Univ., Charge de Recherches FNRS (Belgium); Pellet, F.L.; Fabre, G. [University Joseph Fourier, Laboratory 3S-R, 38 - Grenoble (France); Garcia-Sineriz, J.L.; Rey, M. [AITEMIN - Asociacion para la Investigacion y Desarrollo Industrial de los Recursos Naturales, Madrid (Spain); Mayor, J.C. [ENRESA - Empresa Nacional des Residuos Radioactivos, Madrid (Spain); Castellanos, E.; Romero, E.; Lloret, A.; Gens, A. [Catalunya Univ. Politecnica, UPC (Spain); Villar, M.V. [CIEMAT - Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain); Chambon, R. [Laboratoire 3S, UJF-INPG-CNRS, 38 - Grenoble (France); Czaikowski, O.; Lux, K.H. [Clausthal Univ. of Technology, Professorship for Waste Disposal and Geomechanics, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Van Geet, M.; Bastiaens, W.; Volckaert, G.; Weetjens, E.; Sillen, X. [SCK-CEN, Waste and Disposal dept., Mol (Belgium); ONDRAF/NIRAS, Brussel (Belgium); Imbert, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DPC/SCCME/LECBA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)] [and others

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 13 articles dealing with: three-dimensional and time stepping modelling of the whole Meuse/Haute-Marne ANDRA URL (F. Laouafa, J.B. Kazmierczak, G. Armand, J. Vaunat, M. Jobmann, M. Polster); a constitutive model for a deep argillaceous rock using Hoek-Brown criteria (K. Su, C. Chavant, M. Souley); the long term behaviour of the Boom clay: influence of viscosity on the pore pressure distribution (C. Coll, R. Charlier, X.L. Li, F. Collin); the microstructural changes induced by viscoplastic deformations in argillaceous rocks (F.L. Pellet, G. Fabre, K. Su, P. Lebon); the engineered barrier experiment at Mont Terri rock laboratory (J.L. Garcia-Sineriz, M. Rey, J.C. Mayor); the chemical influence on the Hydro-Mechanical behaviour of high-density FEBEX bentonite (E. Castellanos, M.V. Villar, E. Romero, A. Lloret, A. Gens); the influence of water exchanges on the gallery convergence (P. Gerard, R. Charlier, R. Chambon, F. Collin); a new method for ageing resistant storage of argillaceous rock samples to achieve reproducible experimental results even after long intermediate storage times (O. Czaikowski, K.H. Lux); the installation and evaluation of a large-scale in-situ shaft seal experiment in Boom clay the RESEAL project M. Van Geet, W. Bastiaens, G. Volckaert, E. Weetjens, X. Sillen, A. Gens, M.V. Villar, Ch. Imbert, M. Filippi, F. Plas); the hydro-Mechanical response of the Callovo-Oxfordian mud-stone around a deep vertical drift (J. Vaunat, B. Garitte, A. Gens, K. Su, G. Armand); the sensitivity of total stress to changes in externally applied water pressure in KBS-3 buffer bentonite (J.F. Harrington, D.J. Birchall, P. Sellin); the comparison of the poro-elastic behavior of Meuse/Haute Marne and Tournemire argillites: effect of loading and saturation states (E. Bemer, A. Noiret, F. Homand, A. Rejeb); and the multi-scale modelling of the argillites mechanical behaviour (A. Abou-Chakra Guery, F. Cormery, K. Su, J.F. Shao, D. Kondo)

  4. Measuring the permeability of Eleana argillite from area 17, Nevada Test Site, using the transient method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.

    1978-01-01

    Using the transient method, we determine the permeability of high-quartz Eleana argillite from the Nevada Test Site as a function of effective pressure. By comparing calculated and observed pressure decay in the upstream reservoir, we have determined the permeability of intact and fractured specimens at effective pressures ranging from 1.0 to 24.0 MPa. Over this pressure range, Eleana argillite has a low permeability (10 -16 to 10 -19 cm 2 ) when intact and a higher permeability (10 -12 to 10 -17 cm 2 ) with one induced through-going fracture

  5. Fundamentals of gas flow in shale; What the unconventional reservoir industry can learn from the radioactive waste industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuss, Robert; Harrington, Jon; Graham, Caroline

    2013-04-01

    Tight formations, such as shale, have a wide range of potential usage; this includes shale gas exploitation, hydrocarbon sealing, carbon capture & storage and radioactive waste disposal. Considerable research effort has been conducted over the last 20 years on the fundamental controls on gas flow in a range of clay-rich materials at the British Geological Survey (BGS) mainly focused on radioactive waste disposal; including French Callovo-Oxfordian claystone, Belgian Boom Clay, Swiss Opalinus Clay, British Oxford Clay, as well as engineered barrier material such as bentonite and concrete. Recent work has concentrated on the underlying physics governing fluid flow, with evidence of dilatancy controlled advective flow demonstrated in Callovo-Oxfordian claystone. This has resulted in a review of how advective gas flow is dealt with in Performance Assessment and the applicability of numerical codes. Dilatancy flow has been shown in Boom clay using nano-particles and is seen in bentonite by the strong hydro-mechanical coupling displayed at the onset of gas flow. As well as observations made at BGS, dilatancy flow has been shown by other workers on shale (Cuss et al., 2012; Angeli et al. 2009). As well as experimental studies using cores of intact material, fractured material has been investigated in bespoke shear apparatus. Experimental results have shown that the transmission of gas by fractures is highly localised, dependent on normal stress, varies with shear, is strongly linked with stress history, is highly temporal in nature, and shows a clear correlation with fracture angle. Several orders of magnitude variation in fracture transmissivity is seen during individual tests. Flow experiments have been conducted using gas and water, showing remarkably different behaviour. The radioactive waste industry has also noted a number of important features related to sample preservation. Differences in gas entry pressure have been shown across many laboratories and these may be

  6. Sealing efficiency of an argillite-bentonite plug subjected to gas pressure, in the context of deep underground nuclear waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jiang-Feng

    2013-01-01

    In France, the deep underground nuclear waste repository consists of a natural barrier (in an argillaceous rock named argillite), associated to artificial barriers, including plugs of swelling clay (bentonite)-sand for tunnel sealing purposes. The main objective of this thesis is to assess the sealing efficiency of the bentonite-sand plug in contact with argillite, in presence of both water and gas pressures. To assess the sealing ability of partially water-saturated bentonite/sand plugs, their gas permeability is measured under varying confining pressure (up to 12 MPa). It is observed that tightness to gas is achieved under confinement greater than 9 MPa for saturation levels of at least 86-91%. We than assess the sealing efficiency of the bentonite-sand plug placed in a tube of argillite or of Plexiglas-aluminium (with a smooth or a rough interface). The presence of pressurized gas affects the effective swelling pressure at values P gas from 4 MPa. Continuous gas breakthrough of fully water-saturated bentonite-sand plugs is obtained for gas pressures on the order of full swelling pressure (7-8 MPa), whenever the plug is applied along a smooth interface. Whenever a rough interface is used in contact with the bentonite-sand plug, a gas pressure significantly greater than its swelling pressure is needed for gas to pass continuously. Gas breakthrough tests show that the interface between plug/argillite or the argillite itself are two preferential pathways for gas migration, when the assembly is fully saturated. (author)

  7. Hydromechanical response to a mine by test experiment in a deep claystone

    OpenAIRE

    Armand , Gilles; Souley , Mountaka; Su , Kun; Renaud , Vincent; Wileveau , Yannick

    2006-01-01

    International audience; In order to demonstrate the feasibility of radioactive waste repository in deep geological formation, an underground research laboratory is being constructed by Andra (French national radioactive waste management agency) in eastern France, in a Callovo-Oxfordian claystone. 15 boreholes were drilled from a drift at -447 m to install sensors around the shaft (6 m diameter) at depth -460 m to -474 m in order to record the hydromechanical behaviour of the claystone during ...

  8. Physicochemical aspects of decomposition of silica-alumina ores of argillites and green clays of Chashma-Sang Deposit of the Republic of Tajikistan by hydrochloric and nitric acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayumov, A.M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of work is to study the processes of decomposition of silica-alumina ores of argillites and green clays of Chashma-Sang Deposit of the Republic of Tajikistan by hydrochloric and nitric acids in temperature interval 20-98 deg C with the using of methods of selective extraction of valuable materials; elaboration of rational conditions of decomposition of raw material. Physicochemical properties of initial aluminium comprising ores, intermediate and final products of processing of argillites and green clays have been studied. Kinetic parameters of processes at acidic decomposition of argillites and green clays have been studied as well. The kinetic parameters of processes of decomposition of green clays and argillites by nitric and hydrochloric acids have been calculated. The flowsheet of complex processing of green clays and argillites of Chashma-Sang Deposit has been elaborated.

  9. Diffusion and retention of organic anions in Callovian-Oxfordian clay rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasamimanana, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian mud-stone (CO_x) is studied as a possible host rock for a deep disposal of radioactive waste (Cigeo project). Indeed, besides being very weakly permeable, it presents a high content of clayey minerals, capable of retaining radionuclides under cationic form and to delay strongly their transport. Nevertheless, some waste packages may release a significant amount of organic molecules, capable of complexing these radionuclides and drastically increase their mobility. So, the objective of this work was to better understand the diffusive behavior of several organic molecules of interest in this mudstone, by investigating at first their affinity with the host rock. The retention of organic molecules under anionic form (acetate, phthalate, adipate, benzoate, and citrate) was quantified on to the dispersed CO_x mudstone using adsorption/desorption batch experiments. Experiments on de-carbonated rock and clay fraction only (≤ 2μm) were also performed to identify solid phases and chemical functions responsible for the retention. a correlation of the intensity of retention, R_d, was pointed out whit the dipole moment μ(Orga.), providing a qualitative estimate of retention capacity for polar hydrophilic organic molecules. So, phthalate, slightly polar, displays a reversible retention (R_d ≅1,6 L.kg"-"1), mainly on clayey phases. Citrate, very polar and strongly adsorbed (R_d ≅ 40 L.kg"-"1), displays a persistent desorption hysteresis and an affinity to different solid phases (clayey minerals and minor oxides). Lastly, acetate, adipate and benzoate, weakly polar, display a lower affinity with rock (R_d ≤ 0,2 L.kg"-"1). The diffusive behavior in compact rock of these organic anions was then studied. The effective diffusion coefficient and retardation factor values were quantified. The low diffusivity, [D_e/D_0](Organic Anions) ≅ 0,1 a0,25 * [D_e/D_0](Water) evidences an effect of anionic exclusion, with a same intensity as that observed for

  10. Abiotic nitrate reduction in the presence of steel material and hydrogen in cementitious environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truche, L.; Berger, G.; Albrecht, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Abiotic nitrate reduction induced by different electron donors represents a major reaction of interest in the context of disposal of nuclear waste containing such oxyanions (Honda et al., 2006; Katsounaros et al., 2009). These wastes are characterized, amongst others by the coexistence of oxyanions (nitrate, phosphate, sulfate...) and potentially reducing agents such as organic matter, native metals and hydrogen gas formed or from package material via radiolysis or anaerobic corrosion. In addition to the large number of reactants present in the waste itself, the medium-level long-lived (MAVL) waste concept is based on large masses of concrete and steel in part used for primary waste containers as well as armored cement over pack and engineered barrier; a concept that guarantees the mechanical stability of both the waste container and the waste cell. In this experimental study we evaluate the consequences of steel material (carbon steel and 316L stainless steel) from waste canisters and construction material (concrete and Callovo- Oxfordian argillite), as well as magnetite as their possible corrosion by-products, on the reduction of aqueous nitrate in the presence of hydrogen. A parametric study (0 2 ) - ] 2+ , Fe 2+ ) that can act as electron donors. This experimental study demonstrates that abiotic nitrate reduction induced by the combination of steel materials and hydrogen is a likely process under waste cell conditions, thus applicable to cases where nitrate-bearing waste (i.e. nuclear) is disposed in near-surface or in deep geological settings. Depending on the nature of the steel, the reaction may exhibit different kinetic features that would require dedicated assessment. An increase in nitrate concentrat ions above the steel saturation level of 10 mM (Fig. 1; beyond the range of the current study) may also have an influence on reaction processes and kinetics and thus influence nitrate reactivity. (authors)

  11. Microbiological study of a crushed 'core heart' packaged under sterile atmosphere and isolation of different bacterial strains from the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous rock (Bure, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayeux, B.; Daumas, S.; Vinsot, A.; Labat, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. To study the feasibility of a reversible storage of high activity and long life radioactive waste, many parameters have to be take into account, including microbiological parameters. Indeed, it is necessary to determine the extent of biological reactions that could develop in a disposal. For example, processes such as canister corrosion, retention and transport of radionuclides and gas production may be partially mediated by microbial activities. An initial microbiological characterization of the Callovo- Oxfordian clay-rock was conducted in 2006 by S. Poulain. This previous work highlighted a number of bacterial strains responsible for the disturbances of some geochemical parameters observed in experiments performed in the Andra's Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL). A thoroughly metabolic study on each isolated strain was then launched after a new phase of microorganism isolation. The purpose of this new study is to analyse the gas produced by bacteria (like CO 2 , H 2 or H 2 S) and the products of their metabolism, in particular corrosive molecules. The microflora was mainly studied on solid samples. These samples came from a 5-m long borehole drilled using aseptic techniques on June, 2009. All parts of the drilling equipment were cleaned with bleach, rinsed with demineralized water, and wrapped in sterile foil and clean plastic, prior to arrival on site. The equipment was handled with ethanol-sterilized gloves and when needed (i.e., after each retraction from the borehole to remove core sections), re-cleaned on site with ethanol. The borehole was drilled with compressed N 2 to avoid air contamination. After retrieval of the cores, they were conditioned on site on a conditioning table prepared for working under clean conditions. The sample were placed in sterile plastic bags, flushed with filter-sterilized N 2 and closed by thermal sealing at ambient temperature. The samples were further

  12. Calibration of antimony-based electrode for pH monitoring into underground components of nuclear repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Betelu , Stéphanie; Ignatiadis , Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear waste repositories are being installed in deep excavated rock formations in some places in Europe to isolate and store radioactive waste. In France, Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) is potential candidate for nuclear waste repository. It is thus necessary to measure in situ the state of a structure's health during its entire life. The monitoring of the near-field rock and the knowledge of the geochemical transformations can be carried out by a set of sensors for a sustainable managem...

  13. 2005 dossier: clay. Tome: phenomenological evolution of the geologic disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the phenomenological processes taking place in an argilite-type geologic disposal facility for high-level and long-lived (HLLL) radioactive wastes. Content: 1 - introduction: goal, input data, time and space scales, long-time forecasting of the phenomenological evolution; 2 - the Meuse/Haute-Marne site, the HLLL wastes and the disposal concepts: impact of the repository architecture; 3 - initial state of the geologic environment prior to the building up of the repository: general framework, geologic formations, tectonics and fractures, surface environment, geologic synthesis; 4 - phenomenological processes: storage-related processes, geodynamics-related processes, time scales of processes and of radionuclides migration, independence and evolution similarities of the repository and of the geologic environment; 5 - heat loads: heat transfers between containers and geologic formations, spatial organization of the thermal load, for C-type wastes and spent fuels, for B-type wastes, synthesis of the repository thermal load; 6 - flows and liquid solution and gas transfers: hydraulic behaviour of surrounding Jurassic formations (Tithonian, Kimmeridgian, Callovian, Oxfordian); 7 - chemical phenomena: chemical evolution of ventilated facilities (alveoles, galleries, boreholes), chemical evolution of B-type waste alveoles and of gallery and borehole sealing after closure, far field chemical evolution of Callovo-Oxfordian argilites and of other surrounding formations; 8 - mechanical evolution of the disposal and of the surrounding geologic environment: creation of an initial excavated damaged zone (EDZ), mechanical evolution of ventilated galleries, alveoles and sealing before and after closure, large-scale mechanical evolution; 9 - geodynamical evolution of the Callovo-Oxfordian and other surrounding formations and of the surface environment: internal

  14. Modeling Cl- concentration and δ37Cl profiles in pore water across a 250 m-thick indurated argillite at the Tournemire URL (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Rebeix, Romain; Lancelot, Joel; Matray, Jean-Michel; Bensenouci, Fethic; Michelot, Jean-Luc; Dauzeres, Alexandre; Wittebroodt, Charles; Frape, Shaun; ShouakarStash, Orphane

    2013-01-01

    Dissolved chloride in argillite pore water has been studied as a natural analogue for radionuclides potentially released from radioactive waste disposal. The Tournemire URL intersects impervious and compacted argillite. A previously obtained chloride concentration profile of intact rock is symmetric with a maximum concentration of 0.6±0.1 g/L, compared to 19 g/L for the original connate seawater. Dissolved chloride shows high δ 37 Cl values, ranging between +6 and +80/00 vs. SMOC. The modeled profile considers diffusive exchange between connate seawater and meteoric freshwater. Transport parameters were obtained by radial diffusion experiments. Numerical modeling was performed with the coupled reactive-transport code Hytec. Simulations suggest a diffusive-exchange time of 85±10 Ma for Cl, which correlates with a major erosional period. Simulated δ 37 Cl values between 1.002 and 1.003 agree with observed pore water δ 37 Cl. This study strongly suggests that the dissolved chloride profile in the argillites results from diffusive exchange and indicates that unfractured argillites can provide good confinement. (authors)

  15. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-04-15

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  16. Constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock: Data Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Geological repositories have been considered a feasible option worldwide for storing high-level nuclear waste. Clay rock is one of the rock types under consideration for such purposes, because of its favorable features to prevent radionuclide transport from the repository. Coupled hydromechanical processes have an important impact on the performance of a clay repository, and establishing constitutive relationships for modeling such processes are essential. In this study, we propose several constitutive relationships for elastic deformation in indurated clay rocks based on three recently developed concepts. First, when applying Hooke's law in clay rocks, true strain (rock volume change divided by the current rock volume), rather than engineering strain (rock volume change divided by unstressed rock volume), should be used, except when the degree of deformation is very small. In the latter case, the two strains will be practically identical. Second, because of its inherent heterogeneity, clay rock can be divided into two parts, a hard part and a soft part, with the hard part subject to a relatively small degree of deformation compared with the soft part. Third, for swelling rock like clay, effective stress needs to be generalized to include an additional term resulting from the swelling process. To evaluate our theoretical development, we analyze uniaxial test data for core samples of Opalinus clay and laboratory measurements of single fractures within macro-cracked Callovo-Oxfordian argillite samples subject to both confinement and water reduced swelling. The results from this evaluation indicate that our constitutive relationships can adequately represent the data and explain the related observations.

  17. Clay 2001 dossier: progress report on feasibility studies and research into deep geological disposal of high-level, long-lived waste; Dossier 2001 argile: sur l'avancement des etudes et recherches relatives a la faisabilite d'un stockage de dechets a haute activite et a vie longue en formation geologique profonde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    A French Act of Parliament passed on 30 December 1991 set out the main areas of research required to prepare solutions for the long-term management of high-level, long-lived radioactive waste. The three avenues of research listed in the Act included a feasibility study of the deep geological disposal of these waste, with responsibility for steering the study given to ANDRA, France National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management. Following government decisions taken in 1998, the study focused on two types of geological medium, clay and granite. The clay formations study is essentially based on results from an underground laboratory sited at the border between the Meuse and Haute-Marne departments, where the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite beds are being investigated. No site has yet been chosen for an underground laboratory for the granite study, so for the time being this will draw on generic work and on research carried out in laboratories outside France. ANDRA has decided to present an initial report on the results of its research programme, publishing a dossier on the work on clay formations in 2001 with a second dossier covering the work on granite due for release in 2002. This dossier is thus a review of the work carried out by ANDRA on the feasibility study into a radioactive waste repository in a clay formation. It represents one step in a process of studies and research work leading up to the submission of a report due in 2005 containing ANDRA conclusions on the feasibility of a repository in the clay formation. (author)

  18. Clay 2001 dossier: progress report on feasibility studies and research into deep geological disposal of high-level, long-lived waste; Dossier 2001 argile: sur l'avancement des etudes et recherches relatives a la faisabilite d'un stockage de dechets a haute activite et a vie longue en formation geologique profonde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    A French Act of Parliament passed on 30 December 1991 set out the main areas of research required to prepare solutions for the long-term management of high-level, long-lived radioactive waste. The three avenues of research listed in the Act included a feasibility study of the deep geological disposal of these waste, with responsibility for steering the study given to ANDRA, France National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management. Following government decisions taken in 1998, the study focused on two types of geological medium, clay and granite. The clay formations study is essentially based on results from an underground laboratory sited at the border between the Meuse and Haute-Marne departments, where the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite beds are being investigated. No site has yet been chosen for an underground laboratory for the granite study, so for the time being this will draw on generic work and on research carried out in laboratories outside France. ANDRA has decided to present an initial report on the results of its research programme, publishing a dossier on the work on clay formations in 2001 with a second dossier covering the work on granite due for release in 2002. This dossier is thus a review of the work carried out by ANDRA on the feasibility study into a radioactive waste repository in a clay formation. It represents one step in a process of studies and research work leading up to the submission of a report due in 2005 containing ANDRA conclusions on the feasibility of a repository in the clay formation. (author)

  19. Clay 2001 dossier: progress report on feasibility studies and research into deep geological disposal of high-level, long-lived waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    A French Act of Parliament passed on 30 December 1991 set out the main areas of research required to prepare solutions for the long-term management of high-level, long-lived radioactive waste. The three avenues of research listed in the Act included a feasibility study of the deep geological disposal of these waste, with responsibility for steering the study given to ANDRA, France National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management. Following government decisions taken in 1998, the study focused on two types of geological medium, clay and granite. The clay formations study is essentially based on results from an underground laboratory sited at the border between the Meuse and Haute-Marne departments, where the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite beds are being investigated. No site has yet been chosen for an underground laboratory for the granite study, so for the time being this will draw on generic work and on research carried out in laboratories outside France. ANDRA has decided to present an initial report on the results of its research programme, publishing a dossier on the work on clay formations in 2001 with a second dossier covering the work on granite due for release in 2002. This dossier is thus a review of the work carried out by ANDRA on the feasibility study into a radioactive waste repository in a clay formation. It represents one step in a process of studies and research work leading up to the submission of a report due in 2005 containing ANDRA conclusions on the feasibility of a repository in the clay formation. (author)

  20. Strontium distribution and origins in a natural clayey formation (Callovian-Oxfordian, Paris Basin, France): a new sequential extraction procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Negrel, P.; Crouzet, C.; Guerrot, C.; Gautier, A.; Michel, P.; Vinsot, A.; Buschaert, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Strontium is a minor element in the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey formation of Bure (ANDRA Underground Research laboratory, France) and may be interesting as a natural analogue of cationic radionuclides. The objective of our study was to better understand the chemical behaviour of this element since the sediment deposition. Previous mineralogical work showed that main strontium-bearing minerals in the clay-stones, in addition to clay minerals, are celestite, carbonates and accessory micas and K-feldspars. In order to establish the strontium distribution and determine its origins across the clayey formation and establish a strontium diffusion profile, a four step sequential extraction procedure combined with strontium isotopes was developed and adapted to the mineralogy of the Bure clay-stones. The four-steps sequential extraction developed and applied to sixteen samples of Callovian-Oxfordian clay-stones showed that the exchangeable fraction (27 to 48% of the total strontium) and the carbonate fraction (38-47% of the total strontium) are the two main fractions carrying the strontium, the detrital fraction being secondary (< 15%). Celestite is the major strontium-carrier mineral that can perturb the results of the sequential extraction but not significantly modify the distribution of strontium at the scale of the formation. The celestite was studied on micronic to centi-metric crystals, separated by hand-picking on core samples. The development of this sequential extraction procedure for the Callovian-Oxfordian formation shows the importance of the first cobalt hexamine trichloride step to extract the exchangeable strontium adsorbed on clay minerals and block the exchangeable sites with cobalt for the following steps, allowing a good separation of exchangeable fraction and carbonates. However the reagent/solid ratio of 20 seems to be less adapted to carbonate-rich samples. The good separation between exchangeable

  1. The Meuse-Haute Marne underground research laboratory. A scientific research tool for the study of deep geologic disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The Meuse-Haute Marne underground research laboratory, is an essential scientific tool for the achievement of one of the ANDRA's mission defined in the framework of the law from December 30, 1991 about the long-term management of high-level and long-living radioactive wastes. This document presents this laboratory: site characterization, characteristics of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay, and laboratory creation, coordinated experiments carried out at the surface and in depth, and the results obtained (published in an exhaustive way in the 'Clay 2005' dossier). (J.S.)

  2. Argillite / cementitious materials interaction: in-situ investigations and modeling of engineered analogues from the Tournemire experimental station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techer, I.; Bartier, D.; Dauzeres, A.; Boulvais, P.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Deep geological disposal of high-activity and long-period radioactive wastes is designed by the French National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (Andra) with a confinement system based on the multiplication of argillaceous and cement-bearing barriers called 'engineered barriers'. The role of these barriers is to avoid the release of radioelements into the biosphere, as well as to prevent the potential addition of external fluids to the waste materials. In a deep clay-rich medium, cementitious materials will compose most of the building structures and will be emplaced at the immediate contact with the natural argillaceous formation. Cementitious materials are known to produce hyper-alkaline pore fluids (with pHs ranging between 10 and 13.5) during their aging. Their introduction in a deep clayey disposal is thus expected to induce a chemical disequilibrium which imprint on the safety assessment of the storage must be characterized. One way to evaluate the potential disturbing of a clayey formation at the contact to a cementitious material and thus towards the percolation of hyper-alkaline fluids consists with the investigation of natural analogues or engineered analogues. These systems deals with clayey formations that have been maintained over several years to hundred of years at the contact with a natural or engineered cementitious material. The Tournemire Experimental Platform of the French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) (Aveyron, SE France) presents many contexts of so-defined engineered analogues. For instance, exploration boreholes that were drilled vertically from the tunnel basement into the Toarcian argillite in 1990/1991 were filled soon after their drilling with CEM II cement paste and concrete. Today, the over coring of such concreted boreholes gives opportunities to examine the cementitious and the clayey materials and to discuss potential changes of their intrinsic

  3. Modelling of the mechanical behaviour and damage of clay-stones: application to the East argillite; Modelisation du comportement mecanique des argiles raides avec prise en compte de l'endommagement: application aux argilites de l'Est

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aublive-Conil, N

    2003-03-15

    The storage in deep geological formation is one of the solutions retained by France for the management of highly long life radioactive waste. The retained host rock is a clay-stone named East argillite located in the departments of Meuse and Haute-Marne. A thermodynamic formulation is used to propose a rheological model, which reproduces the mechanical behavior of clay-stones. Initially, an anisotropic damage plastic model was formulated in order to describe material degradations. Then, the damage plastic model is reformulated in order to taken into account the damage influence on the hydraulic behavior of porous material. The numerical simulations correctly reproduce the mechanical behavior of East Argillites but also the anisotropy of the hydraulic behavior introduced by the damage effect. (author)

  4. Selenium behaviour in the presence of minerals and under hydrogen atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanson, A.; Gebala, N.; Fattahi, M.; Landesman, C.; Granbow, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework of nuclear waste handling, radionuclide diffusion ability in soil has to be studied in order to better evaluate the risks of infiltration of radioactive elements in our environment. Indeed, radionuclide behaviour is deeply dependent of the soil characteristics, like its composition, pH, potentials, or the water composition. In the case of a deep geological depository, the high-level radioactive waste will be put in a glass matrix, confined in a steel container. Those containers are exposed to corrosion phenomena, forming ferrous minerals, hydrogen gas, and potentially leading to radionuclide leaks. In this case, radionuclides could be in the presence of minerals and hydrogen in a reducing environment. 79 Selenium is expected to be present as a fission product of 235 U. It is present at the oxidation state (+IV) in the glass matrix, but under reductive conditions ([-400;-300] mV (E.N.H.)) can be under the form of selenide (Se(-II)). Those reductive condition could exist in Callovo-Oxfordian soil (COX) in the presence of H 2 gas and Fe(II) coming from the containers corrosion. Thus, our study focuses on Se(IV) and Se(-II) behaviour in the presence of minerals (magnetite, and COX argillite), under hydrogen atmosphere. According to Martinez et al., selenium is sorbed on magnetite surface. When pH increases, selenium is less adsorbed on magnetite. Se(IV) sorption mechanism has been proposed by Mayant et al.: it implies the formation of two types of complexes in the inner sphere of magnetite surface. Moreover, Sheinost et al. show that synthetic nanoparticles of magnetite quantitatively reduce Se(IV) to Se(-II) in a few hours, leading to the formation of an iron selenide cluster close to Fe II 5 Fe III 2 Se 8 . While Se(IV) sorption on minerals has been broadly studied, very few data is found about Se(-II), due to its very high sensibility to oxidation causing its handling to be difficult. Suspensions of

  5. Characterization of a clay-rich rock through development and installation of specific hydrogeological and diffusion test equipment in deep boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Jacques; Distinguin, Marc; Dewonck, Sarah

    Andra (Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs - National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) has developed specific tools and methodologies to evaluate and understand the main transport mechanisms of solute species in an argillaceous rock in the framework of the scientific program of the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory. This paper focuses on three specific equipments already installed in boreholes for the determination of convection and diffusion parameters in a very low permeability environment. The first one is a specific borehole completion for head and permeability measurements with an integrated wireless telemetry device. In 1995, Andra devised a probe equipped with a pressure sensor to monitor the long-term evolution of electro-magnetically transmitted pore pressures. The data gathered by this first device, and a second one installed in 2001, have shown the occurrence of overpressures in very low permeability formations. The second device is derived from the multipacker system used for monitoring the drainage of the Oxfordian limestone due to the sinking of the shaft above the Callovo-Oxfordian. It is used for obtaining from a single borehole, a pressure profile of the argillaceous formation and its encasing units. To date, the major information obtained with these two borehole equipments is the existence of a 25-35 m anomalous excess hydraulic head in the 130 m thick Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous formation. Head values in the argillaceous rock exceed those in the overlying Oxfordian limestone by 25-35 m, and those in the underlying Dogger by over 45 m. The third equipment described in the paper, is derived from the experiment carried out at the Mont Terri rock laboratory since 1996 for the characterization of diffusion and retention processes. The system is adapted for a borehole drilled from the surface. The objectives of this experiment are as follows: Verification of the predominant role played by molecular diffusion

  6. Argillite And Crystalline Disposal Research: Accomplishments And Path-Forward.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Kevin A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The intention of this document is to provide a path-forward for research and development (R&D) for two host rock media-specific (argillite and crystalline) disposal research work packages within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The two work packages, Argillite Disposal R&D and Crystalline Disposal R&D, support the achievement of the overarching mission and objectives of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Technologies Program. These two work packages cover many of the fundamental technical issues that will have multiple implications to other disposal research work packages by bridging knowledge gaps to support the development of the safety case. The path-forward begins with the assumption of target dates that are set out in the January 2013 DOE Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (http://energy.gov/downloads/strategy-management-and-disposal-used-nuclear-fuel-and-high-levelradioactive- waste). The path-forward will be maintained as a living document and will be updated as needed in response to available funding and the progress of multiple R&D tasks in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign and the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program. This path forward is developed based on the report of “Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap (FCR&D-USED- 2011-000065 REV0)” (DOE, 2011). This document delineates the goals and objectives of the UFDC R&D program, needs for generic disposal concept design, and summarizes the prioritization of R&D issues.

  7. Evidence and identification of microorganisms in argillite from Tournemire (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urios, L.; Magot, M.; Marsal, F.; Pellegrini, D.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Generalised corrosion is one of the main processes taken into account in the dimensioning of non-alloy steel overpacks for high level nuclear waste packages. However, the presence of microorganisms such as sulfate-reducing bacteria in the host rock in contact with these non-alloy materials may also influence localised corrosion processes, leading to a premature loss of the overpack watertightness. Available void and presence of free water are key conditions for bacterial development, which are not often met in an argillaceous environment. Nevertheless, microbial activity has been proven to occur in argillaceous formations such as the Opalinus Clay in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory. Indigenous sulfate-reducing bacteria have also been put into evidence in MX-80 bentonite, a clayey material likely to be used as engineered barrier in many countries for nuclear waste repositories. The French Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has been conducting a research program at the Tournemire experimental platform on the biodiversity of Toarcian argillite, aiming at assessing the potential development of a microbial activity in deep clayey environments, disturbed or not by an excavation. The occurrence of microbial processes in this formation was first shown by the study of time evolution of the chemical and isotopic composition of fracture groundwaters collected in several boreholes. These investigations suggested that aqueous sulfates and their isotopic composition were controlled by bacterial sulfate reduction. The presence of living sulfate-reducing bacteria in water samples from an air-drilled borehole crossing a tectonic fracture (MB1) was later shown. Thus, a characterisation of the microbial biodiversity of the Toarcian argillite was launched. Samples have been collected in different locations of the Tournemire experimental platform: pieces of wall of the gallery, as well as cores from

  8. Evidence and identification of microorganisms in argillite from Tournemire (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urios, L.; Magot, M. [Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, IPREM UMR 5254, Equipe Environnement et Microbiologie, IBEAS, F-64013 PAU (France); Marsal, F.; Pellegrini, D. [IRSN, DSU/SSIAD/BERIS, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Generalised corrosion is one of the main processes taken into account in the dimensioning of non-alloy steel overpacks for high level nuclear waste packages. However, the presence of microorganisms such as sulfate-reducing bacteria in the host rock in contact with these non-alloy materials may also influence localised corrosion processes, leading to a premature loss of the overpack watertightness. Available void and presence of free water are key conditions for bacterial development, which are not often met in an argillaceous environment. Nevertheless, microbial activity has been proven to occur in argillaceous formations such as the Opalinus Clay in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory. Indigenous sulfate-reducing bacteria have also been put into evidence in MX-80 bentonite, a clayey material likely to be used as engineered barrier in many countries for nuclear waste repositories. The French Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has been conducting a research program at the Tournemire experimental platform on the biodiversity of Toarcian argillite, aiming at assessing the potential development of a microbial activity in deep clayey environments, disturbed or not by an excavation. The occurrence of microbial processes in this formation was first shown by the study of time evolution of the chemical and isotopic composition of fracture groundwaters collected in several boreholes. These investigations suggested that aqueous sulfates and their isotopic composition were controlled by bacterial sulfate reduction. The presence of living sulfate-reducing bacteria in water samples from an air-drilled borehole crossing a tectonic fracture (MB1) was later shown. Thus, a characterisation of the microbial biodiversity of the Toarcian argillite was launched. Samples have been collected in different locations of the Tournemire experimental platform: pieces of wall of the gallery, as well as cores from

  9. The Meuse-Haute Marne underground research laboratory. A scientific research tool for the study of deep geologic disposal of radioactive wastes; Le Laboratoire de Recherche souterrain de Meuse/Haute-Marne. Un outil de recherche scientifique pour etudier le stockage geologique profond de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The Meuse-Haute Marne underground research laboratory, is an essential scientific tool for the achievement of one of the ANDRA's mission defined in the framework of the law from December 30, 1991 about the long-term management of high-level and long-living radioactive wastes. This document presents this laboratory: site characterization, characteristics of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay, and laboratory creation, coordinated experiments carried out at the surface and in depth, and the results obtained (published in an exhaustive way in the 'Clay 2005' dossier). (J.S.)

  10. Modeling Cl{sup -} concentration and δ{sup 37}Cl profiles in pore water across a 250 m-thick indurated argillite at the Tournemire URL (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Rebeix, Romain; Lancelot, Joel [Universite de Nimes / Site GIS - 30035 Nimes cedex 01 (France); Aix-Marseille Universite, CEREGE UMR7330, 13545 Aix en Provence (France); Matray, Jean-Michel [IRSN, BP17 - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Bensenouci, Fethic [IRSN, BP17 - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); IDES, UMR CNRS 8148 Universite Paris-Sud - 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Michelot, Jean-Luc [IDES, UMR CNRS 8148 Universite Paris-Sud - 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dauzeres, Alexandre; Wittebroodt, Charles [IRSN, BP17 - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Frape, Shaun; ShouakarStash, Orphane [University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue. West Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Dissolved chloride in argillite pore water has been studied as a natural analogue for radionuclides potentially released from radioactive waste disposal. The Tournemire URL intersects impervious and compacted argillite. A previously obtained chloride concentration profile of intact rock is symmetric with a maximum concentration of 0.6±0.1 g/L, compared to 19 g/L for the original connate seawater. Dissolved chloride shows high δ{sup 37}Cl values, ranging between +6 and +80/00 vs. SMOC. The modeled profile considers diffusive exchange between connate seawater and meteoric freshwater. Transport parameters were obtained by radial diffusion experiments. Numerical modeling was performed with the coupled reactive-transport code Hytec. Simulations suggest a diffusive-exchange time of 85±10 Ma for Cl, which correlates with a major erosional period. Simulated δ{sup 37}Cl values between 1.002 and 1.003 agree with observed pore water δ{sup 37}Cl. This study strongly suggests that the dissolved chloride profile in the argillites results from diffusive exchange and indicates that unfractured argillites can provide good confinement. (authors)

  11. Confinement properties evolution of the cap-rocks argillite-type under CO2 enriched-fluids: impact of the natural and artificial discontinuities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthe, G.

    2012-01-01

    This research is part of the studies of feasibility of CO 2 storage in deep geological strata, focusing more particularly on the evolution of the confinement properties of cap-rocks type argillite subjected to CO 2 enriched fluids. The argillite of Tournemire (Aveyron, France) were used as analog rocks, having identified what their weak points could be face to storage, namely their mineralogy, natural fractures filled with calcite and the presence of interfaces cement/argillite expected in filled injection wells. The 'through diffusion' experimental setup has been adapted to estimate (i) the possible modification of diffusive transport parameters recorded before and after acid attack for different radioactive tracers (tritium and chlorine-36) and non-radioactive tracers (deuterium and bromide) used to characterize samples of argillite of Tournemire and cement paste and (ii) the evolution of the chemical compositions of the solutions in the upstream and downstream reservoirs of diffusion cells during acid attacks. Finally, the analysis of solids was carried out in part by SEM-EDS, XRD and X-μTomography. Firstly, for all the samples studied, the values of the transport parameters determined before acid attack (effective diffusion coefficient and porosity) are consistent with those of the literature. In addition, it appears that all materials have reacted strongly to acid attacks. Thus, argillites saw their diffusion parameters increase up to a factor of two, especially for anionic tracers, and, whatever the proportion of carbonate minerals initially present in samples of argillite. The post-mortem observations have led to the identification of a zone of dissolution of carbonate minerals in them, but whose extension (400 microns or less) can not alone explain the significant degradation of the containment properties. Only unobservable phenomena during investigation scale, such as wormhole effects in porous network could be the cause. In addition, the samples of

  12. Modelling of the mechanical behaviour and damage of clay-stones: application to the East argillite; Modelisation du comportement mecanique des argiles raides avec prise en compte de l'endommagement: application aux argilites de l'Est

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aublive-Conil, N

    2003-03-15

    The storage in deep geological formation is one of the solutions retained by France for the management of highly long life radioactive waste. The retained host rock is a clay-stone named East argillite located in the departments of Meuse and Haute-Marne. A thermodynamic formulation is used to propose a rheological model, which reproduces the mechanical behavior of clay-stones. Initially, an anisotropic damage plastic model was formulated in order to describe material degradations. Then, the damage plastic model is reformulated in order to taken into account the damage influence on the hydraulic behavior of porous material. The numerical simulations correctly reproduce the mechanical behavior of East Argillites but also the anisotropy of the hydraulic behavior introduced by the damage effect. (author)

  13. Groundwater flow reference model of the Meuse/Haute-Marne region: implications on performance analysis of high and intermediate level and long lived radwaste repository in clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benabderrahmane, H.; Plas, F.; Yven, B.; Cornaton, F.; Perrochet, P.; Kerrou, J.; Stucki, J.; Caloz, P.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An integrated multi-scale hydrogeological conceptual model of the Paris basin and the Meuse/Haute-Marne sector was developed to study the groundwater flow and solute transport behaviour in the multi-layered aquifer system and around the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation as potential host for the French high and intermediate level and long lived radioactive waste. The Paris basin system (200000 km 2 ) consists of 27 aquiferous and semi-permeable (aquitard) hydrogeological units from Trias to Quaternary affected by 80 regional faults. It produces boundary conditions to the refined aquifer system of the 250 km 2 Meuse/Haute-Marne site, which includes 27 layers from Trias to Portlandian. The Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation is located at a mean depth of 500 m, with a minimum thickness of 130 m and hydraulic conductivity values of the order of 10-14 m/s. The numerical steady-state flow solution is calculated on a finite element mesh of about 3 million 2-D and 3-D linear elements (GEOS-CHYN 2009). At the top surface, the mesh refinement (250 m to 50 m) is locally constrained by the fault lineaments and the river network. At depth, it takes into account the 10 m to 500 m throw of the faults and the vertical flow through semi-permeable units. Triangular elements are used to represent a top surface layer that includes the weathered part of the outcropping formations, and quadrangular elements allow for the representation of the faults planes at depth. The layers are discretized into 6-nodded wedge elements, while 4-nodded tetrahedrons and 5-nodded pyramids are used to handle the pinching and the outcrop of the layers. The flow boundary conditions and source-sink terms are: - Specified hydraulic heads (Dirichlet) along the rivers and elsewhere on the top surface inflow fluxes (Neumann) derived from hydrological balance (with a mean inflow of 240 mm/year). - Specified hydraulic heads (Dirichlet) at the Manche coast side. - No

  14. Comparison of performance of concrete barriers in a clayey geological medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotignon, Laurent; Peycelon, Hugues; Bourbon, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Cement based materials play an important role in the design and performance of future deep radioactive waste disposals. The type of materials selected for engineered barrier systems (EBS) is an important issue: protection of waste packages against corrosion and chemical degradation may be greatly enhanced by a proper choice and dimensioning. The long-term geochemical performance of two concrete types, CEM-I (pure Portland cement) and CEM-V (blended Portland, fly ash, blast furnace slag cement) was evaluated using reactive transport simulations of the interactions between the Callovo-Oxfordian mud-rock (argillite) and concrete EBS over periods up to 10 6 years at 25 deg. C. Simulations have been run with cylindrical geometry using the modeling tool Hytec 3.5 (ENSMP/CIG). Diffusion of solutes in the pore-water of the solid media was considered to be the dominant transport process. Different scenarios were studied, including the case of sulfate attack. Various assumptions on the transport properties of the EBS and the argillite medium have been considered and compared. The interactions between concrete, CEM-I or CEM-V, and mud-rock are in both cases predicted to lead to a significant clogging in the mud-rock, in the vicinity of the interface with the concrete EBS. However, the nature and extent of the EBS/mud-rock interface transformations greatly differ for the two materials considered. CEM-V, due to lower diffusion coefficients, keeps longer internal high pH conditions which are favorable to the waste packages from a chemical point of view. In addition, simulations predict that CEM-V material should have a better resistance to sulfate attack than CEM-I based barriers. In the case of CEM-I, the altered clay zone has a greater extent (up to 1.3 m in 400,000 y) and the drop of porosity is mainly due to zeolites and re-precipitated illite, quartz and calcite. For CEM-V, the altered clay zone is much smaller (less than 0.2 m in 400,000 y) and secondary smectite and

  15. Mechanical modeling of nuclear waste disposal in argillite at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.K.; Lappin, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Numerical calculations for a near surface heater experiment in argillite conducted at the Nevada Test Site were performed using the finite element code ADINA assuming a two-dimensional axisymmetric geometry. The existence and extent of the region of tensional opening of joints surrounding the heater, predicted by the mechanical model, were confirmed by posttest borehole inspection, permeability measurements, and drillback. Exrapolation of near surface heater model to repository depths reveals the necessity for prior knowledge of the mechanical properties and state of stress in-situ. The extent of the joint opening zone, for example, is not altered by changes in the elastic modulus at the near surface, but is significantly decreased beyond certain depths depending upon the in-situ elastic modulus. Results of these calculations are presented. To further define the behavior at depth, and place bounds on the joint opening zone, far-field calculations were performed for a generic repository in argillite. Both spent fuel and high level waste heat sources were considered at different burial densities and depths. Results of a parametric study are presented in which the mechanical properties, in-situ stresses, and waste heat sources were varied

  16. Multi-technical approach to characterize the dissolved organic matter from clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchart, Pascale; Michels, Raymond; Faure, Pierre; Parant, Stephane; Bruggeman, Christophe; De Craen, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Currently, different clay formations (Boom Clay, Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, Opalinus Clay, Toarcian shales...) are studied as reference host rocks for methodological studies on the geological disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. While a significant effort is being done on the characterization of the mineral composition and the reactivity of the clays as barriers, the occurrence of organic matter, even in low proportion cannot be neglected. The organic matter appears as gas (C 1 -C 4 as identified in the Bure underground facilities), as solid (kerogen), as hydrocarbon liquids (free hydrocarbons within the kerogen or adsorbed on minerals) as well as in the aqueous phase (Dissolved Organic Matter - DOM). DOM raises specific interest, as it may have complexation properties towards metals and rare earth elements and is potentially mobile. Therefore, it is important to characterize the DOM as part of a study of feasibility of geological disposal. In this study, four host rocks were studied: - The Callovo-Oxfordian shales of Bure Underground Research Laboratory (Meuse, France); - The Opalinus Clay of Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (Switzerland); - The Toarcian shales of Tournemire (Aveyron, France); - The Boom Clay formation studied in The HADES Underground Research Laboratory (Mol, Belgium). Organic matter characteristics vary upon formation in terms of (i) origin (mainly marine type II; mixtures of marine type II and higher plants type III organic matter often poorly preserved), (ii) TOC contents, (iii) thermal maturity (for instance, Opalinus Clay and Toarcian shales are more mature and have poor oxygen content compare to Callovo-Oxfordian shales and Boom Clay). These differences in organic matter quality may have an influence on the quantity and the quality of DOM. The DOM of the rocks was isolated by Soxhlet extraction using pure water. A quantitative and qualitative multi

  17. Rb-Sr geochronology of coarse-grained greywackes and argillites from the Coffs Harbour Block, eastern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, I.J.; Korsch, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Coffs Harbour Block, eastern Australia, includes a sequence of turbidity-current-deposited greywackes and argillites dominated by quartz-poor to quartz-intermediate, volcanic-lithic and feldspathic types. The rocks have a common provenance consisting of dacite with minor andesite and rhyolite, derived from a continental margin volcanic arc. Rb-Sr whole-rock dating of coarse-grained greywackes and argillites suggests that low-grade regional metamorphism (prehnite-pumpellyite to lowest greenschist facies) has completely equilibrated sediments of all grain sizes, giving an age of 318 +- 8 Ma. A subsequent metamorphism which produced thermal biotite on a regional scale over the southern part of the area, re-equilibrated only the fine-grained sediments 238 +- 5 Ma ago; the coarse-grained sediments were unaffected isotopically and still lie on the older isochron. The wide variations in sandstone petrographic modes imply that the older isochron represents neither the age of volcanism in the magmatic arc nor the age of sedimentation at the deposition site, but rather dates the time of earlier metamorphism. (orig.)

  18. Test results and supporting analysis of a near-surface heater experiment in the Eleana argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, D.F.; Lappin, A.R.; Thomas, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of the in-situ thermomechanical response of argillite to heating was obtained from a near-surface heater test in the Eleana Formation, at the United States Department of Energy, Nevada Test Site. The experiment consisted of a 3.8 kW, 3-m long x 0.3-m diameter electrical heater in a central hole surrounded by peripheral holes containing instrumentation to measure temperature, gas pressures, and vertical displacement. A thermal model of the experiment agreed well with experimental results; a comparison of measured and predicted temperatures indicates that some nonmodeled vertical transport of water and water vapor occurred near the heater, especially at early times. A mechanical model indicated that contraction of expandable clays in the argillite produced a region 1.5 - 2.0 m in radius, in which opening of preexisting joints occurred as a result of volumetric contraction. Results of thermal and mechanical modeling, laboratory property measurements, experimental temperature measurements, and post-test observations are all self-consistent and provide preliminary information on the in-situ response of argillaceous rocks to the emplacement of heat-producing nuclear waste

  19. THE STRATIGRAPHY OF THE UPPER BATHONIAN TO MIDDLE OXFORDIAN SUCESSION OF THE ARAGONESE BRANCH OF THE CORDILLERA IBÉRICA (SPAIN AND ITS EUROPEAN CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KEVIN N. PAGE

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Bathonian-Middle Oxfordian succession of the Aragonese branch of the Cordillera Ibérica is one of the most completely developed in Europe and includes localities of international importance for Jurassic bio- and chronostratigraphy. Of particular importance are a potential stratotype for the Upper Bathonian of North West Europe and reference sections for a number of Submediterranean Province Middle Oxfordian biostratigraphic units. The intervening Callovian sequence, albeit locally strongly condensed, also includes faunas of key stratigraphical importance. The sequence of stratigraphically important ammonite faunas for this interval is here reviewed and placed in its European context.

  20. Investigation on geological environments (IGE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, C.; Widory, D.; Guerrot, C.; Gaucher, E.C. [Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres (BRGM), 45 - Orleans (France); Buschaert, S. [ANDRA - Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs, Dir. Scientifique, 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Kurikami, H.; Takeuchi, R. [JAEA - Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Hokkaido (Japan); Yabuuchi, S. [METI - Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kunimaru, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Horonobe Underground Research Unit, Geological Isolation Research and Development Directorate, Hokkaido (Japan); Yamamoto, H. [Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, Yokohama (Japan); Matray, J.M.; Savoye, S.; Cabrera, J.; Lecathelinais, P. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Goncalves, J.; Girardin, I. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7619-Sisyphe, 75 - Paris (France); Craen, M. de; Honty, M.; Wemaere, I.; Van Geet, M. [SCK-CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research Centre - Environment, Healt and Safety Institute, Mol (Belgium); Van Geet, M. [ONDRAF/NIRAS - Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials, Brussel (Belgium); Le Gal La Salle, C.; Lancelot, J. [Nimes Univ., GIS, UMR 6635 CNRS, 30 (France); Benedetti, L.; Bourles, D.; Hamelin, B. [Aix-Marseille-3 Univ., CEREGE, UMR 6635 CNRS, 13 (France); Fatmi, H.; Ababou, R. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, 31 -Toulouse (France); Wemaere, I.; Marivoet, J.; Labat, S. [SCK-CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium); Fedor, F. [MECSEKERC Ltd, Dir. of Environmental Protection (Hungary); Mathe, Z. [MECSEKERC Ltd, Lab. of Env. Geology and Soil Mechanics (Hungary); Hamos, G. [MECSEKERC Ltd, Dept. of Geosciences (Hungary); Somodi, G. [MECSEKERC Ltd, Dept. of Geotechnics (Hungary)

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 9 articles (posters) dealing with: (S, O, Sr) isotopic constraints on the diagenetic evolution of the Callovo-Oxfordian formation at the Meuse/Haute-Marne URL; the scale effect and heterogeneity of hydraulic conductivity of sedimentary rocks at Horonobe URL site; the investigation and modeling of 3D distribution of water chemistries in Horonobe, Hokkaido, Japan; PH4: a 250 m deep borehole in Tournemire for assessing the contribution of transport phenomena to assumed overpressures in the Toarcian/Domerian semipermeable; the lateral variability of mineralogy and pore water chemistry of the Boom Clay; {sup 36}Cl in groundwaters of Oxfordian and Dogger limestones of the Eastern Paris basin: implications for old groundwater dating; the statistical preprocessing and analyses of hydro-geo-meteorologic time series in the PP experiment of Mont Terri (method. and first results); the hydraulic conductivity of the Boom Clay in north-east Belgium based on four core-drilled boreholes; and a new approach of laboratory permeability measurement of very tight rocks: experimental data of BCF, Mecsek Mts, SW Hungary.

  1. Dealing with uncertainties in the safety of geological disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Ch.

    2002-01-01

    Confidence in the safety assessment of a possible project of radioactive waste geological repository will only be obtained if the development of the project is closely guided by transparent safety strategies, acknowledging uncertainties and striving for limiting their effects. This paper highlights some sources of uncertainties, external or internal to the project, which are of particular importance for safety. It suggests safety strategies adapted to the uncertainties considered. The case of a possible repository project in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay layer of the French Bure site is examined from that point of view. The German project at Gorleben and the Swedish KBS-3 project are also briefly examined. (author)

  2. Multi-scale modelling of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Eijnden, Bram

    2015-01-01

    Feasibility studies for deep geological radioactive waste disposal facilities have led to an increased interest in the geomechanical modelling of its host rock. In France, a potential host rock is the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone. The low permeability of this material is of key importance, as the principle of deep geological disposal strongly relies on the sealing capacity of the host formation. The permeability being coupled to the mechanical material state, hydro-mechanical coupled behaviour of the clay-stone becomes important when mechanical alterations are induced by gallery excavation in the so-called excavation damaged zone (EDZ). In materials with microstructure such as the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone, the macroscopic behaviour has its origin in the interaction of its micromechanical constituents. In addition to the coupling between hydraulic and mechanical behaviour, a coupling between the micro (material microstructure) and macro scale will be made. By means of the development of a framework of computational homogenization for hydro-mechanical coupling, a double-scale modelling approach is formulated, for which the macro-scale constitutive relations are derived from the microscale by homogenization. An existing model for the modelling of hydro-mechanical coupling based on the distinct definition of grains and intergranular pore space is adopted and modified to enable the application of first order computational homogenization for obtaining macro-scale stress and fluid transport responses. This model is used to constitute a periodic representative elementary volume (REV) that allows the representation of the local macroscopic behaviour of the clay-stone. As a response to deformation loading, the behaviour of the REV represents the numerical equivalent of a constitutive relation at the macro-scale. For the required consistent tangent operators, the framework of computational homogenization by static condensation is extended to hydro-mechanical coupling. The

  3. Microbial diversity of the 180 million-year-old Toarcian argillite from Tournemire, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urios, Laurent; Marsal, François; Pellegrini, Delphine; Magot, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Even though the microbiology of various subsurface environments has been investigated for more than 30 a, the microbial diversity of deep argillaceous media is still poorly known. In the context of radioactive waste disposal in clayey formations, the consequence of microbial activity is of concern regarding e.g. the corrosion of metallic components. The purpose of the present work was to characterise the cultivable microbial diversity of different zones of the Toarcian argillite of Tournemire (France) as a preliminary indication regarding the potential of development of microbes in such subterrestrial environments. Cores were drilled in the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) and in the deeper undisturbed zone of the argillite layer, as well as in a zone intersected by a geological fault. Samples from the wall of the drift were also collected. Microorganisms were cultivated from all samples, but the biodiversity differed depending mainly on the O 2 and moisture content. Aerobic bacteria were identified on the wall, in the EDZ and in the wet faulted area, whereas SO 4 -reducing bacteria were isolated from the wet faulted area only. Anaerobic heterotrophs were cultivated from all zones. One hundred and twelve isolates were identified. Small ribosomal subunit gene sequences showed that bacteria of the undisturbed zone were affiliated to three genera only, whereas the three other sampled zones harbour more diverse microflora, including isolates closely related to taxons characterized from subsurface, deep marine and polar environments.

  4. Viscoplastic behaviour including damage for deep argillaceous rocks: from in situ observations to constitutives equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souley, Mountaka; Ghoreychi, Mehdi; Armand, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in clay-stone formation, French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started in 2000 to build an underground research laboratory CMHM) at Bure located at nearly 300 km East of Paris. The host formation consists of a clay-stone (Callovo-Oxfordian argillites) and lies between 430 m and 550 m deep. On the basis of numerous campaigns of laboratory tests (uniaxial/triaxial, mono/multi stage creep and relaxation) undertaken for characterizing mechanical and hydro-mechanical short-term or long-term behaviour of these argillites, several constitutive models were developed in the framework of MODEXREP European project and scientific cooperation between ANDRA and national institutions. Moreover, more than 400 m horizontal galleries at the main level of -490 m at CMHM laboratory have been instrumented since April 2005 with the aim to understand the rock behaviour (especially the long term behaviour) needed for the repository design. The continuous measurements of convergencies of the galleries are available contributing to better understand the time-dependent response of the argillites at natural scale. Analysis of convergence data over a period of 2 years leads to the following conclusions: (a) viscoplastic strains are anisotropic and depend on the gallery orientation with regard to the initial stress anisotropy in the investigated formation; (b) the viscoplastic strain rates observed in the undamaged area far from the galleries walls are in the same order of magnitude as those obtained on samples, whereas those recorded in the damaged or fractured zone near to the walls are one to two orders of magnitude higher; indicating the damage and created macroscopic fractures influences on the viscoplastic strains. This influence has not been taken into account in the previous constitutive models. From these observations, a macroscopic

  5. Disentangling the control of tectonics, eustasy, trophic conditions and climate on shallow-marine carbonate production during the Aalenian-Oxfordian interval: From the western France platform to the western Tethyan domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, Simon; Brigaud, Benjamin; Barbarand, Jocelyn; Lasseur, Eric; Saucède, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this work is to improve our understanding of the processes controlling changes in the architecture and facies of intracontinental carbonate platforms. We examined the facies and sequence stratigraphy of Aalenian to Oxfordian limestones of western France. Seventy-seven outcrop sections were studied and thirty-one sedimentary facies identified in five depositional environments ranging from lower offshore to backshore. Platform evolution was reconstructed along a 500 km cross-section. Twenty-two depositional sequences were identified on the entire western France platform and correlated with European third-order sequences at the biozone level, demonstrating that eustasy was the major factor controlling the cyclic trend of accommodation. The tectonic subsidence rate was computed from accommodation measurements from the Aalenian to the Oxfordian in key localities. Tectonism controlled the sedimentation rate and platform architecture at a longer time scale. Tectonic subsidence triggered the demise of carbonate production at the Bathonian/Callovian boundary while the uplift made possible the recovery of carbonate platform from Caen to Le Mans during the mid Oxfordian. Topography of the Paleozoic basement mainly controlled lateral variations of paleodepth within the western France platform until the mid Bathonian. A synthesis of carbonate production in the western Tethyan domain at that time was conducted. Stages of high carbonate production during the Bajocian/Bathonian and the middle to late Oxfordian are synchronous with low δ13C, high eccentricity intervals, and rather dry climate promoting (1) evaporation and carbonate supersaturation, and (2) oligotrophic conditions. Periods of low carbonate production during the Aalenian and from the middle Callovian to early Oxfordian correlate with high δ13C and low eccentricity intervals, characterized by wet climate and less oligotrophic conditions. Such conditions tend to diminish growth potential of carbonate

  6. Hydro-mechanical coupling and transport in Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite: experimental and multi-scale approaches; Couplage hydro-me canique et transfert dans l'argilite de Meuse/Haute-Marne: approches experimentale et multi-echelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cariou, S.

    2010-07-15

    This thesis deals with the hydro-mechanical behaviour of argillite. Classical Biot theory is shown to be badly adapted to the case of argillite. An original state equation is then built by use of homogenization tools, and takes into account the microstructure of argillite as well as physical phenomena happening inside the material, like the swelling overpressure inside the clay particles or the capillary effects in the porous network. This state equation explains some experiments which were not by the classical Biot theory. It is then improved by integrating the experimental data that are the dependency of the elasticity tensor with the saturation degree and the existence of a porosity surrounding the inclusions. Combined with the monitoring of length variation under hydric loading, this relevant state equation permits one to determine the Biot tensor of argillite. Since this state equation is coupled with the hydric state of the material, one is interested in modelling the variation of the saturation degree during a drying process. Two transport models are studied and compared, then a model for the porous network is proposed in order to explain the unusual permeability measurements. (author)

  7. HM modelling of in-situ gas injection tests in bentonite and argillite: the PGZ experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerard, P.; Charlier, R.; Radu, J.P.; La Vaissiere, R. de; Talandier, J.; Collin, F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. During long-term repository of high and intermediate level nuclear waste in deep argillaceous geological formation, steel containers will corroded and organic material will be irradiated. The two processes lead mostly to hydrogen production. This study deals with the numerical modelling of the gas migration in both the host formation and a bentonite plug, with an emphasis on coupling between the gas transfer and the mechanical strains and stresses. More particularly the study aims to support the design of the PGZ in situ experiment that will be performed by Andra in its underground laboratory at Bure. The objective of the experiment is the analysis of the dynamics of the bentonite plug re-saturation, studying the competition between the liquid water coming from the argillite and a gas injection. The modelled experiment consists of a borehole drilled in rock clay, inside which a plug of MX-80 bentonite is set. The bentonite is naturally re-saturated by water coming from the host formation. At the same time a gas pressure, higher than the initial water pressure in the host rock, is imposed at both ends of the plug. The developed model takes into account the coupling between the mechanical behaviour and the water and gas transfers in undisturbed geo-materials. It manages explicitly liquid and vapour water, gaseous and dissolved hydrogen. Elastoplastic and non-linear elastic model are used to model the behaviour of, respectively, the argillaceous rock and the bentonite. The numerical results show the small desaturation obtained in bentonite and argillite. The influence of the coupling of the mechanic on the water and gas transfers is thus limited (due to the Bishop's effective stress). The swelling of the bentonite plug is not hindered by the gas migration and the confining effect of the engineered barrier is maintained. An analysis is made of the influence of the main transfer rock properties on the gas pressure

  8. Experimental study on poro-mechanical behavior of saturated Meuse-Haute/Marne argillite subjected to triaxial compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Dawei; Zhang, Fan; Xie, Shouyi; Shao, Jianfu

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Due to its low permeability (10 -18 to 10 -20 m 2 ), the Meuse-Haute/Marne argillite is chosen as the candidate host rock for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste by 'Agence Nationale de gestion des Dechets Radioactifs' (ANDRA). During the excavation of the underground tunnel in argillite formation, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) is expected to develop due to the stress redistribution during excavation and subsequent rock convergence. The nucleation and propagation of microcracks in EDZ can consequently affect the poro-mechanical behavior of the host rock. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to study the poro-mechanical behavior of Meuse-Haute/Marne argillite under the influence of stress induced microcracks. For this purpose, this paper presents the original experimental results of drained and undrained triaxial compression tests as well as evolution of Biot's coefficient during hydrostatic and deviatoric loading of saturated Meuse-Haute/Marne argillite. The size of samples used in the present work is 20x20 mm in order to reduce the saturating time. The axis of the cylindrical sample is perpendicular to the bedding planes. The test system is placed in an insulated room and a temperature control system is used to maintain a constant temperature of 20 ±0.2 C. The saturation condition is an important factor for the determination of the mechanical and poro-elastic properties of saturated argillite. Thus, for each sample, after putting into the triaxial cell, the confining pressure is loaded to 2 MPa and we inject distilled water both at the injection and outlet faces in order to insure the pore pressure at the two faces hold at 1 MPa. This procedure will be keep to 72 hours. Then, the pore pressure at the injection face is increased to 1.5 MPa, and we record the pore pressure at the outlet face. Once the pore pressure at the outlet face reaches the same value at injection face, the sample is

  9. Groundwater flows in Meuse/Haute-Marne aquifer system and the importance of the evolution of the geomorphology over the next million of years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, J.; Benabderrahmane, H.; Brulhet, J.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A clay-stone formation of Callovo-Oxfordian age is found throughout the multilayered sedimentary fill of the Paris Basin. It is considered as a potential host rock for France's high and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste. The Callovo-Oxfordian layer is located between an overlying limestone of Oxfordian age and an underlying limestone of Dogger age.. The Meuse/Haute-Marne sector area is located in the East of France, the area includes the Bure investigation site and a domain referred to as the 'transposition zone' selected as a suitable location for France's high- and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste The objective of the study was to estimate how the groundwater flow in the Meuse/Haute- Marne aquifer system will change because of the geomorphologic evolution over the next 1 million of years. The future groundwater flows and the future evolution of the vertical hydraulic gradient in the transposition zone are of importance in the performance assessment and the safety analysis of a future repository for radioactive waste. The study is based on numerical modelling and the established model covers the whole of the Paris basin. The studied time period corresponds to 1 million years into the future. The initial geometry of geological layers as well as the conductivity and the porosity of the layers are input data to model, and defined by the single-continuum multi-scale hydrogeological model of the Paris Basin and the Meuse/Haute-Marne Sector area as developed by Andra. A description of the transient geomorphologic evolution was used as input data to the groundwater flow modelling. The description include: (i) The deformation of the geological layers as a result of a non-symmetric tectonic uplift of the Paris basin and (ii) The movement of the topography because of mechanical erosion along valleys, chemical erosion along plateaus and sedimentation along valleys. The modelling of the

  10. Deformation and damage modes of deep argillaceous rocks under hydro-mechanical stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vales, F.

    2008-12-01

    An experimental identification of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of an argillite rock is proposed within a multi-scale approach. In particular, interest is focused on the spatial and temporal localization of strain and damage in a specimen during hydro-mechanical loading. Firstly, we describe the techniques used to follow the rock evolutions under loading, and in particular Digital Images Correlation (DIC), Acoustic Emission, microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Measurement errors and device limitations are discussed. The studied material is the Callovo-Oxfordian indurated argillaceous rock (or argillite) of the Bure site where ANDRA has built an underground research laboratory to study the radioactive waste storage. Petrophysical characterizations and microstructural observations by optical and scanning electron microscopy provide an identification of the constitutive phase and a characterization of their spatial distribution and typical sizes. Argillite can be described as a composite structure with a continuous clay matrix and embedded mineral particles, essentially quartz and carbonates. The typical size of these particles ranges from a few micrometers to a few hundreds micrometers, with an average close to 50 μ.m. The general experimental procedure combines two steps: in a fist time, imposed suctions bring samples to a given degree of water saturation, and, in a second time, uniaxial mechanical compression tests are performed. To understand the evolutions of the material under hydric and mechanical loading, samples are instrumented with standard measurement techniques, but also with Digital Image Correlation, at both the global scale of the sample and the local scale of the composite microstructure, and with Acoustic Emissions recording. Moisture transfers are imposed by controlled suctions on the range of 150 to 2.8 MPa, corresponding to the relative humidity range of 32 to 98%RH. During pure hydric solicitation, the changes in physical parameters

  11. Deformation and damage modes of deep argillaceous rocks under hydro-mechanical stresses; Modes de deformation et d'endommagement de roches argileuses profondes sous sollicitations hydro-mecaniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vales, F.

    2008-12-15

    An experimental identification of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of an argillite rock is proposed within a multi-scale approach. In particular, interest is focused on the spatial and temporal localization of strain and damage in a specimen during hydro-mechanical loading. Firstly, we describe the techniques used to follow the rock evolutions under loading, and in particular Digital Images Correlation (DIC), Acoustic Emission, microscopy and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Measurement errors and device limitations are discussed. The studied material is the Callovo-Oxfordian indurated argillaceous rock (or argillite) of the Bure site where ANDRA has built an underground research laboratory to study the radioactive waste storage. Petrophysical characterizations and microstructural observations by optical and scanning electron microscopy provide an identification of the constitutive phase and a characterization of their spatial distribution and typical sizes. Argillite can be described as a composite structure with a continuous clay matrix and embedded mineral particles, essentially quartz and carbonates. The typical size of these particles ranges from a few micrometers to a few hundreds micrometers, with an average close to 50 {mu}.m. The general experimental procedure combines two steps: in a fist time, imposed suctions bring samples to a given degree of water saturation, and, in a second time, uniaxial mechanical compression tests are performed. To understand the evolutions of the material under hydric and mechanical loading, samples are instrumented with standard measurement techniques, but also with Digital Image Correlation, at both the global scale of the sample and the local scale of the composite microstructure, and with Acoustic Emissions recording. Moisture transfers are imposed by controlled suctions on the range of 150 to 2.8 MPa, corresponding to the relative humidity range of 32 to 98%RH. During pure hydric solicitation, the changes in physical parameters

  12. Behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay around a converging heated borehole: thermal free wall experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garitte, B.; Gens, A.; Vaunat, J.; Armand, G.; Conil, N.

    2012-01-01

    measured temperature and pore water pressure response compared with computations performed using Code-Bright, a Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical finite element code developed at UPC. The pore water pressure response triggered by application of heat was found to be mostly dependent on: The temperature evolution, dependent on its turn on the thermal conductivity; The thermal expansion coefficient of water, dependent on temperature; The thermal expansion of the skeleton; The thermal expansion of the solid grain; The water compressibility; The water permeability; The compressibility of the skeleton. A plane strain computation was run using a heat loss coefficient to account for the longitudinal heat flux that is zero in the plane strain computation. The measurements were reproduced in a satisfactory way adopting the same parameters used in previous heating experiments in which the heating borehole was not allowed to converge. This suggests that the influence of the drilling damage zone may be negligible. The pore water pressure state at the start of heating is influenced by drainage towards the heating borehole since its drilling. The simulation reproduces well the initial pore pressure in TER1907, although drainage has been slightly overestimated in TER 1906. For comparison purposes, simulation results during the heating phase have been reset to measured values at start of heating for sensor TER1906. The coupling between temperature and pore water pressure is evident and further discussed in the full paper. During the heating phase, a priori unexplained variations of the pore water pressure were observed. Those are reproduced by the simulation and associated with small power variations. In the full paper, we also present a sensitivity analysis of the parameters given above to investigate their influence. We also pay particular attention to anisotropic rock features and to the potential influence of the drilling damage zone and to the development of damage during heating. The results

  13. Thermal and oxidation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamcova, J.; Kolaoikova, I. [Prague Univ., Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Mineral Resources, Faculty of Science, Charles (Czech Republic); Adamcova, J. [Czech Geological Survey, Geologicka 6, Prague (Czech Republic); Kaufhold, S.; Dohrmann, R. [BGR, Federal Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources, Hannover (Germany); Dohrmann, R. [LBEG, State Authority for Mining, Energy, and Geology, Hannover (Germany); Craen, M. de; Van Geet, M.; Honty, M.; Wang, L.; Weetjens, E. [CK-CEN - Belgian Nuclear Research Centre - Environment, Healt and Safety Institute, Mol (Belgium); Van Geet, M. [ONDRAF/NIRAS - Belgian Agency for Radioactive Waste and Enriched Fissile Materials, Brussel (Belgium); Pozzi, J.P.; Janots, D. [Ecole Normale Paris, CNRS Lab. de Geologie, 75 - Paris (France); Aubourg, C. [Universite Cergy Pontoise, CNRS Lab. de Tectonique, 95 (France); Cathelineau, M.; Rousset, D.; Ruck, R. [Nancy-1 Univ. Henri Poincare, CNRS G2R, 54 (France); Clauer, N. [Strasbourg-1 Univ., CNRS CGS, 67 (France); Liewig, N. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Techer, I. [Nimes Univ., CNRS Cerege, 30 (France)

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 4 articles dealing with: the alteration processes in bentonites: mineralogical and structural changes during long-term and short-term experiments (J. Adamcov, I. Kolarikova); the implications from the lot experiment regarding the selection of an optimum HLRW bentonite (S. Kaufhold, R. Dohrmann); the extent of oxidation in Boom clay as a result of excavation and ventilation of the HADES URF: Experimental and modelling assessments (M. De Craen, M. Van Geet, M. Honty, L. Wang, E. Weetjens); and the magnetic and mineralogical alterations under thermal stress at 95 deg. C of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones (Bure, France) and lower Dogger Mont Terri clay-stones, Switzerland (J.P. Pozzi, C. Aubourg, D. Janots, M. Cathelineau, N. Clauer, D. Rousset, R. Ruck, N. Liewig, I. Techer)

  14. Iron/argillite interactions in radioactive waste disposal context: Oxidising transient and bacterial activities influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chautard, Camille; Dauzeres, Alexandre; Maillet, Anais

    2014-01-01

    The design of a high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal facility developed by Andra (2005) in France involves emplacing metallic materials (containers, overpacks, liner) into a geological argillaceous formation. During the operational phase, ventilation of handling drifts will keep oxidising conditions at the front of disposal tunnels. Therefore, an oxidising transient may take place in parts of these tunnels in the post-closure phase possibly over several years. During this transient period, the environment of the disposal cell will evolve towards reducing and saturated conditions close to the equilibrium state of the original underground argillaceous formation. Moreover, high temperature conditions above 50 deg. C may be encountered in this environment over a few hundred years. Uniform corrosion represents the main type of degradation of metallic materials for the long term. The oxidising transient will be characterised by high corrosion rates (e.g. localised corrosion) due to the presence of oxygen whereas during the following anoxic stage, the main alteration factor will originate from the pore water associated with lower corrosion rates. In any case, metallic materials corrosion will lead to the release of aqueous iron, which may induce alteration of the favourable confining properties of the clayey materials. In this context, reactive pathways related to the metal corrosion under oxidising conditions and then followed by reducing conditions remain to be further understood (evolution of pH, redox and influence of temperature). Furthermore, some other significant issues remain open, in particular the dissolution/precipitation processes, the argillite perturbation extent and the effects of these transformations on the confining properties of materials. The presence of micro-organisms in deep argillaceous environment and the introduction of new bacterial species in the repository during the operational phase raise the question of their survival under real

  15. Considering clay rock heterogeneity in radionuclide retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Montavon, G.; Tournassat, C.; Giffaut, E.; Altmann, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock formation has a strong retention capacity for radionuclides, a favorable condition for the implementation of a nuclear waste repository. Principal retaining minerals are illite, and inter-stratified illite/smectite (I/S). Radionuclide retention has been studied on illite, illite/smectite and on clay rock obtained from different locations and data for retention on bentonite (80% smectite) are available. Sorption depends on the type of mineral, composition of mineralogical assemblages, individual mineral ion exchange capacities, ion distribution on exchange sites, specific surface areas, surface site types and densities for surface complexation as well as on water/rock ratios, temperature etc. As a consequence of mineralogical and textural variations, radionuclide retention properties are expected to vary with depth in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation. Using a simple additivity approach for the case of sorption of Cs and Ni it is shown that models and databases for illite and bentonite can be used to describe sorption in heterogeneous clay rock systems. A surface complexation/ion-exchange model as proposed by Bradbury and Baeyens without electrostatic contributions, was used directly as far as acid base properties are concerned but was modified with respect to sorption constants, in order to describe Na-, Ca, and Cs montmorillonite and bentonite MX-80 with a single set of surface complexation constants and also to account for carbonate and sulphate concentrations in groundwater. The model is integrated into the geochemical code PHREEQC considering dissolution/ precipitation/solubility constraints of accessory minerals (calcite, illite, celestite, quartz). Site densities for surface complexation and ion exchange are derived from the mass fractions of illite and of smectite in illite/smectite obtained from an overall fit of measured CEC data from all samples of the EST205 drill core

  16. Geochemical porosity values obtained in core samples from different clay-rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Argillaceous formations of low permeability are considered in many countries as potential host rocks for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes (HLRW). In order to determine their suitability for waste disposal, evaluations of the hydro-geochemistry and transport mechanisms from such geologic formations to the biosphere must be undertaken. One of the key questions about radionuclide diffusion and retention is to know the chemistry and chemical reactions and sorption processes that will occur in the rock and their effects on radionuclide mobility. In this context, the knowledge of the pore water chemistry is essential for performance assessment purposes. This information allows to establish a reliable model for the main water-rock interactions, which control the physico-chemical parameters and the chemistry of the major elements of the system. An important issue in order to model the pore water chemistry in clayey media is to determine the respective volume accessible to cations and anions, i.e, the amount of water actually available for chemical reactions/solute transport. This amount is usually referred as accessible porosity or geochemical porosity. By using the anion inventories, i.e. the anion content obtained from aqueous leaching, and assuming that all Cl - , Br - and SO4 2- leached in the aqueous extracts originates from pore water, the concentration of a conservative ion can be converted into the real pore water concentration if the accessible porosity is known. In this work, the accessible porosity or geochemical porosity has been determined in core samples belonging to four different formations: Boom Clay from Hades URL (Belgium, BE), Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (Switzerland, CH), and Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from Bure URL (France, FR). The geochemical or chloride porosity was defined as the ratio between the pore water volume containing Cl-bearing pore water and the total volume of a sample

  17. Evolution of the argillite / CEM I interface at 70 C.: in situ tests and modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalan, P.; Dauzeres, A.; Barker, E.; De Windt, L.; Detilleux, V.; Desveaux, P.

    2015-01-01

    French radioactive waste disposal concept involves cementitious materials in a clayey host-rock. The presence of exothermic wastes in the storage cells may induce a temperature of about 70 Celsius degrees at the material interfaces. At present, experiment thermal conditions have been undertaken at about 20 C. degrees and studies at higher temperature are really scarce, especially experiments considering diffusion through the cement / clay interface. The still on-going study presented here is focusing on argillite / CEM-I interface. A one-year experiment under in situ conditions at the Tournemire experimental station (IRSN) was carried out and meanwhile, preliminary reactive transport modelling with HYTEC helped to understand the impact of a high temperature on the physico-chemical behaviour of cement / clay interface. The first results showed decalcification of cement and diffuse carbonation as well as a possible illite precipitation of clay-type phases. A C-S-H ribbon appeared at the interface between the two materials and a layer grew between the C-S-H ribbon and the cementitious material. This layer contained zeolites and behaved as a diffusive barrier. After one year of in situ interactions, the disturbance thickness was about 350 microns in CEM-I cement paste and about 100 microns in argillite. The modelling reproduced relatively well the experimentally observed processes but the extension of the disturbance is too wide and the zeolite layer is misplaced according to the experimental observations. This study highlights the lack of data at highest temperature on the reaction kinetics, diffusion coefficients but also on porosity variations. (authors)

  18. Molecular simulation of the role of interlayer water on the mechanical properties of montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier, Benoit; Vandamme, Matthieu; Ebrahimi, Davoud; Whittle, Andrew J.; Pellenq, Roland J.M.; Van Damme, Henri

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Montmorillonite - a swelling clay - is the main component of the clay fraction of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite, which is considered as a possible host rock for radioactive waste disposal, and of the sealing bentonite plugs of storage tunnels. Montmorillonite layers have a great ability to adsorb water, resulting in the swelling of the clay. Montmorillonite consists of water molecules and sodium or calcium cations between negatively charged layers. Both the water content of the interlayer space and the nature of the charge-balancing cations are expected to have an effect on the mechanical properties of the clay layer. Computer simulations allow to reproduce the experimental swelling isotherms of the layers and to gain a deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms of the swelling process. They show how water is organized in discrete layers and how this process depends on the type of inter-layer cation. However, the effect of the swelling on the mechanical properties of the nano-scale have not been fully investigated. The objective of this work is to compute the elastic properties of a Na + - Montmorillonite and a Ca 2+ -Montmorillonite versus relative humidity at 300 K. The results of this work is the first step to build a macroscopic state equation of unsaturated clay-based materials. We use a simulation cell containing two Montmorillonite layers and sodium or calcium counterions. The partial charges of the atoms and the interatomic interaction parameters are given by the CLAYFF force field. Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo simulations are used to compute the adsorption/desorption isotherm. Each equilibrium configuration is then strained in all directions of space. Then, we perform Molecular Dynamics and compute the stress tensor and all the components of the elasticity tensor. We present the evolution of the elastic properties of the clay layers with the relative humidity. In

  19. Intercomparison of reactive transport models applied to degradation of a concrete / clay interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnol, A.; Blanc, P.; Tournassat, C.; Lassin, A.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Assuming a future disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep geologic formation of Callovian- Oxfordian argillite in France, concrete will be used extensively to construct the disposal chambers in the host formation, and also as radioactive waste containment material. After being sealed, the repository will become saturated with interstitial waters from the Callovian-Oxfordian argillite, which will produce high pH solutions through interaction with the concrete. The aggressiveness of these alkaline solutions may weaken the clay's confinement properties (bentonite and argillite) with respect to long-lived radionuclides by change of the mineralogy. Conversely, the clayey formation with a high partial pressure of CO 2 represents an aggressive media for the concrete. The hydrogeological and chemical reactions of deep-underground systems are therefore intimately coupled and reactive transport models are increasingly used for performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal [1]. The main objective of this study is to present an intercomparison study using different reactive transport codes, where among PHREEQC1D [2], PHAST [3] and TOUGHREACT [4] applied to determine, in space and time, the extension of the alkaline perturbation and the associated degradation of concrete. The calculations were carried out after the definition of a complete mineralogy for both media. The experimental work made in the European Ecoclay II project [5] allowed a selection of reaction paths and of new phases for the thermodynamic database. Calculations were carried out over a simulated period of 100,000 years at different temperatures. Results of the different codes are compared and discussed. [1] De Windt L., Burnol A., Montarnal P., Van Der Lee.J., (2003) Intercomparison of reactive transport models applied to UO 2 oxidative dissolution and uranium migration., Journal of Contaminant Hydrology, 61, 1-4, 303-312; [2] Parkhurst D.L., Appelo C.A.J. (1999) - User

  20. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Vinsot, A.; Made, B.; Altmann, S.

    2013-01-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  1. Controls of Ca/Mg/Fe activity ratios in pore water chemistry models of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerouge, C.; Grangeon, S.; Wille, G.; Flehoc, C.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C. [BRGM av. Claude Guillemin BP6009 45060 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Vinsot, A. [ANDRA Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground research Laboratory (URL), RD 960, 55290 Bure (France); Made, B.; Altmann, S. [ANDRA - Parc de la Croix Blanche, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the pore water chemistry model of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation, the divalent cations Ca, Mg, and Fe are controlled by equilibrium reactions with pure carbonates: calcite for Ca, dolomite for Mg, and siderite for Fe. Results of a petrological study and computing of the Ca/Mg and Ca/Fe activity ratios based on natural pore water chemistry provide evidence that equilibrium with pure calcite and pure dolomite is a reasonable assumption for undisturbed pore waters; on the other hand, siderite cannot be considered at equilibrium with pore waters at the formation scale. (authors)

  2. Modelling of permafrost freezing and melting and the impact of glaciation on groundwater flow at the Meuse/Haute-Marne site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, J.; Buoro, N.A.; Barret; Benabderrahmane, H.; Brulhet, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Meuse/Haute-Marne site covers an area of approximately 250 km 2 and it is located in the eastern part of the Paris Basin (200 000 km 2 ). The Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation, which is found throughout the Paris Basin, is considered as a potential host rock for France's high- and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste. At the project site (the Sector area), the Callovo-Oxfordian Formation is encountered at a depth of roughly 500 m, with a minimum thickness of approximately 130 m and a very low (on the order of 10-14 m/s) hydraulic conductivity. The Callovo-Oxfordian layer is confined between an overlying limestone aquifer of Jurassic-Oxfordian age and an underlying limestone of Jurassic-Dogger age. Analyses of the possible transfer of solute from the host formation into the surrounding aquifer system during the next million of years are required for safety calculations. These analyses are based on estimates of the future geomorphologic and climatic evolution of the area and on calculations of the future evolution of groundwater flow and solute transport behaviour in the units surrounding the Callovo-Oxfordian clay. To support the analyses of the future regional and local hydrogeological evolutions, a single-continuum multi-scale hydrogeological model of the Paris Basin and the Meuse/Haute-Marne sector has been developed. The model represents 27 hydrogeological units at the scale of the Paris Basin, and it is refined at the scale of the studied domain (the Sector area) to represent 27 different layers that range in age from Trias to Jurassic-Portlandian. The model has been calibrated to observed hydraulic heads. The present work deals with permafrost generation and retreat during a glacial cycle and the resulting consequences on the groundwater flow patterns within the Meuse/Haute-Marne aquifer system. The conceptual model of permafrost generation is that the pore water is frozen to create ice

  3. Development of a viscoplastic constitutive model for deep rocks: concepts And application to the MHM argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestre, Alexandra; Laigle, Francois

    2012-01-01

    cancellation of volumetric strains rate, in particular of dilation for high shear strains, - An ultimate friction angle related to the critical state angle, - Volumetric strains contractant or dilatant, depending on the state of stress. The delayed behaviour is implemented by the definition of a long term strength threshold, and allows taking into account: - The effect of the excavation average rate, - The effect of a stopping in excavation works, - The long-term behavior of an unsupported face heading. This advanced constitutive model is described in the paper from a conceptual point of view. The aim is not to define theoretical equations but only to expose the main physical concepts implemented. To illustrate the relevance of the model, an application to the Meuse/Haute-Marne Argillite is given from a simple example. (authors)

  4. Experimental simulation of the geological storage of CO2: particular study of the interfaces between well cement, cap-rock and reservoir rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobard, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The geological storage of the CO 2 is envisaged to mitigate the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in the short term. CO 2 is trapped from big emitters and is directly injected into a reservoir rock (mainly in deep salty aquifers, depleted hydrocarbon oil fields or unexploited charcoal lodes) located at more than 800 m deep. In the framework of the CO 2 storage, it is crucial to ensure the integrity of the solicited materials in order to guarantee the permanent confinement of the sequestrated fluids. Using experimental simulation the purpose of this work is to study the mechanisms which could be responsible for the system destabilization and could lead CO 2 leakage from the injection well. The experimental simulations are performed under pressure and temperature conditions of the geological storage (100 bar and from 80 to 100 deg. C). The first experimental model, called COTAGES (for 'Colonne Thermoregulee A Grains pour Gaz a Effet de Serre') allows studying the effects of the thermal destabilisation caused by the injection of a fluid at 25 deg. C in a hotter reservoir (submitted to the geothermal gradient). This device composed of an aqueous saline solution (4 g.L -1 of NaCl), crushed rock (Lavoux limestone or Callovo-Oxfordian argillite) and gas (N 2 or CO 2 ) allows demonstrating an important matter transfer from the cold area (30 deg. C) toward the hot area (100 deg. C). The observed dissolution/precipitation phenomena leading to changes of the petro-physical rocks properties occur in presence of N 2 or CO 2 but are significantly amplified by the presence of CO 2 . Concerning the experiments carried out with Lavoux limestone, the dissolution in the cold zone causes a raise of porosity of about 2% (initial porosity of 8%) due to the formation of about 500 pores/mm 2 with a size ranging between 10 and 100 μm 2 . The precipitation in the hot zone forms a micro-calcite fringe on the external part of the grains and fills the intergrain porosity

  5. Faunes du Jurassique supérieur dans les séries pélagiques de l'escarpement de Malte (Mer Ionienne. Implications paléogéographiques Upper Jurassic Fauna in the Pelagic Series of the Malta Escarpment (Lonian Sea. Paleogeographic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enay R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Au cours d'une campagne de plongée sur les escarpements qui bordent le bassin Ionien profond, des roches sédimentaires d'âge jurassique supérieur ont pu être récoltées dans l'escarpement de Malte, associées à des coulées de pillow-lavas. Les faunes d'Ammonites, typiquement mésogéennes, indiquent des âges oxfordien et tithonique. Elles peuvent correspondre à un milieu de dépôt profond. Les foraminifères recueillis dans les niveaux équivalents, riches en radiolaires, sclérites d'holothuries, fragments d'aptychus et rares Ostracodes, indiquent un âge oxfordien au sens large et un milieu de dépôt relativement profond. Cette série, relativement condensée et profonde, est comparable aux séries du même âge connues en Sicile. Elle s'oppose aux séries de calcaires de plate-forme néritiques du Trias-Lias inférieur qui constituent la base de la coupe. II y a donc eu un changement radical de milieu de sédimentation entre le Lias et le Callovo-Oxfordien, accompagné d'une distension révélée par un magmatisme important. During a diving campaing along the escarpments bordering the deep lonian Basin, Upper Jurassic sedimentary rocks were gathered from the Malta escarpment, associated with pillow-lava. Typically Mesogean ammonite fauna indicate Oxfordian and Tithonian ages. They correspond to a relatively deep deposition environment. The Foraminifers gathered in the equivalent levels, which proved to be rich in radiolarians, holothuroid sclerites, aptychus fragments and sparse ostracodes, indicate an Oxfordian age and a relatively deep deposition environnent. This relatively condensed and deep series can be compared with series of the same age known in Sicily. It is opposed to the Lower Triassic-Lias neritic platform limestone series making up the bottom of the section. A radical change in sedimentation thus occured between the Lias and the Callovo-Oxfordain, accompanied by a distension revealed by extensive magmatism.

  6. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  7. Geological repository layout for radioactive high level long lived waste in argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaussen, JL

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of the 1991 French radioactive waste act, ANDRA has studied the feasibility of a geological repository in the argillite layer of the Bure site for high level long lived waste. This presentation is focussed on the underground facilities which constitute the specific component of this project. The preliminary underground layout which has been elaborated is based on four categories of data: - the waste characteristics and inventory; - the geological properties of the host argillite; - the long term performance objectives of the repository; - the specifications in terms of operation and reversibility. The underground facilities consist of two types of works: the access works (shafts and drifts) and the disposal cells. The function of the access works is to permit the implementation of two concurrent activities: the nuclear operations (transfer and emplacement of the disposal packages into the disposal cells) and the construction of the next disposal cells. The design of the drifts network which matches up to this function is also influenced by two other specifications: the minimization of the drift dimensions in order to limit their influence on the integrity of the geological formation and the necessity of a safe ventilation in case of fire. The resulting layout is a network of 4 parallel drifts (2 of them being dedicated to the operation, the other two being dedicated to the construction activities). The average diameter of these access drifts is 7 meters. The link between the surface and the underground is ensured by 4 shafts. The most important function of the disposal cells is to contribute to the long term performance of the repository. In this regard, the thermal and geotechnical considerations play an important role. The B wastes (intermediate level wastes) are not (or not very) exothermic. Consequently, the design of their disposal cells result mainly from geotechnical considerations. The disposal packages (made of concrete) are piled up in

  8. Interpreting strain measurements when drilling anisotropic rocks: return of experience from using CSIRO cells in Tournemire argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Ouanas, Abdelmonem

    2010-01-01

    In Geomechanics, determining the state of stress and the rheology of rock massif can be obtained by measuring the strain response of the ground under the effect of a known stress. A method among others is to use a cell integrated (with strain gauges oriented in different directions) installed in a borehole and secured to the mass through an epoxy glue. This measurement is used, notably, to determine the stress state in situ by the 'overcoring' method and the elastic parameters of the rock from the 'biaxial' test. Between November 2005 and January 2006, a geomechanical testing campaign was conducted in the argillaceous formation of the Tournemire experimental site (Aveyron, France) using CSIRO Hi cells. The strain measurements obtained during overcoring and biaxial tests have shown unusual phenomena, which have made difficult the determination of anisotropic elastic parameters of the rock and the access to the site stress. Therefore, through researches for explanations of the origin of these phenomena, this thesis aimed to improve and contribute to the understanding of the Tournemire argillite behaviour and to upgrade the measurement protocol as well as the interpretation of cells CSIRO's strain. The approach was, firstly, to issue a number of hypotheses to explain certain phenomena observed in literature. In a second step, these hypotheses were tested through analytical and numerical modelling of the biaxial and overcoring tests then through the realization of new experiments in situ within laboratory on argillite, and also on materials tests (cement, sample of glue). It is concluded that the unusual phenomena observed are essentially the result of the conditions for implementing in situ CSIRO's cell. The study particularly focused on the artefacts induced by the visco-plastic behaviour of the epoxy glue when it is incompletely polymerised. The role of damage on the rock generated by drilling operations is also discussed. Some practical recommendations for

  9. Sequence stratigraphy and tectonosedimentary history of the Upper Jurassic of the Eastern Paris Basin (Lower and Middle Oxfordian, Northeastern France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Cédric; Lathuilière, Bernard; Ferry, Serge; Sausse, Judith

    2007-04-01

    In the present study, the difficulty which lies in the identification of sea-level fall discontinuities in deep depositional environments led the authors to use the transgressive surfaces (i.e. the most noticeable surfaces in the present case) to determine depositional cycles. Four (3rd order?) Lower and Middle Oxfordian cycles were identified (S1, S2, S3, and S4) in the Eastern Paris Basin. These four cycles can be organised into two lower frequency cycles (So I and So II) which comprise the S1, S2 and the S3, S4 cycles respectively. During the time intervals of the S1, S2, and S3 cycles, sedimentation occurred along a southward dipping carbonate-siliciclastic ramp, prograding from the northern Ardennes area. The S4 cycle shows the development of a reefal distally steepened ramp which subsequently evolved into a flat-topped platform as a result of the compensation infill of the available accommodation space by the carbonate production during a climatic warming, in this case reef growth. Isopach and facies maps suggest synsedimentary activities of hercynian faults coevals with the floodings of the So I and So II cycles. One of these events generated a diachronism of the maximum flooding (Plicatilis Zone) during the So II cycle between the northwestern and southeastern parts of the studied area. The depositional patterns found in the Eastern Paris Basin and the Swiss Jura show great similarities for the Early-Middle Oxfordian. Both regions were probably connected and recorded the same tectonosedimentary evolution. In contrast a tectonic control certainly generated differences between the sequence-stratigraphic framework of the Eastern Paris Basin and the eustatic chart.

  10. Analysis of the accelerometric data applied to seismic hazard assessment in France; Anisotropies magnetique et de porosite des argilites du callovo-oxfordien du laboratoire souterrain de l'Andra (Meuse/Haute-Marne, Bassin de Paris)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, L

    2006-09-15

    In order to test the feasibility of nuclear waste storage, ANDRA, the French Agency in charge of radioactive waste management, gave us the opportunity to study preserved specimens of Jurassic clay-rich rocks from eastern Paris Basin. These rocks, deposited during the Callovian and beginning of the Oxfordian, are dark- to light-grey marls that consist mainly in a mixture of clay, calcite and silt. Core-specimens regularly collected along the Callovo-Oxfordian formation from several vertical and oblique boreholes, were subjected to a magnetic mineralogy study, and to a petro-fabric study with respect to the geographical frame, itself related to a study of the pore network. The mineralogy study helps to characterize the nature of the para- and -ferrimagnetic fractions at the origin of the magnetic susceptibility and remanence which vary according to the clay/calcite/silt ratios, the latter being mostly made of detrital grains of magnetite. In the clay-rich rocks (illite and smectites), the ferrimagnetic fraction is also made of authigenic sulfides, possibly greigite, which accompany the ubiquitous framboids of pyrite. This fraction seems to equate with the soft coercive fraction which was used to re-orient the vertical borehole cores with respect to the present magnetic north. The hard fraction equates with the iron-oxides, in agreement with the random nature of the natural remanence. Hence, the coexistence in the same sediment of iron-sulfides and iron-oxides is related to distinct origins rather than to variable conditions during sedimentation or diagenesis. Preservation of these species is attributed to the very low permeability that the sediment reached after its compaction. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) reflects the zone-axis organization of the clay minerals, and eventually the shape fabric of the ferromagnetic fraction. Expectingly, the short axis of the AMS (K3) is vertical (perpendicular to bedding) with an anisotropy degree on the order of

  11. Thermal effects on clay rocks for deep disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal effects on the Callovo-Oxfordian and Opalinus clay rocks for hosting high-level radioactive waste were comprehensively investigated with laboratory and in situ experiments under repository relevant conditions: (1 stresses covering the range from the initial lithostatic state to redistributed levels after excavation, (2 hydraulic drained and undrained boundaries, and (3 heating from ambient temperature up to 90 °C–120 °C and a subsequent cooling phase. The laboratory experiments were performed on normal-sized and large hollow cylindrical samples in various respects of thermal expansion and contraction, thermally-induced pore water pressure, temperature influences on deformation and strength, thermal impacts on swelling, fracture sealing and permeability. The laboratory results obtained from the samples are consistent with the in situ observations during heating experiments in the underground research laboratories at Bure and Mont-Terri. Even though the claystones showed significant responses to thermal loading, no negative effects on their favorable barrier properties were observed.

  12. Theoretical Analysis of Pore Pressure Diffusion in Some Basic Rock Mechanics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Philipp; Ghabezloo, Siavash; Delage, Pierre; Sulem, Jean; Conil, Nathalie

    2018-05-01

    Non-homogeneity of the pore pressure field in a specimen is an issue for characterization of the thermo-poromechanical behaviour of low-permeability geomaterials, as in the case of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone ( k radioactive waste disposal in France. In tests with drained boundary conditions, excess pore pressure can result in significant errors in the measurement of material parameters. Analytical solutions are presented for the change in time of the pore pressure field in a specimen submitted to various loading paths and different rates. The pore pressure field in mechanical and thermal undrained tests is simulated with a 1D finite difference model taking into account the dead volume of the drainage system of the triaxial cell connected to the specimen. These solutions provide a simple and efficient tool for the estimation of the conditions that must hold for reliable determination of material parameters and for optimization of various test conditions to minimize the experimental duration, while keeping the measurement errors at an acceptable level.

  13. Groundwater age and lifetime expectancy modelling approach for site characterization and performance assessment of radwaste repository in clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornaton, F.; Perrochet, P.; Benabderrahmane, H.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A deep geological repository of high level and long lived radwaste requires an understanding of the far field and near field groundwater flow and of the transport properties, at actual and future climatic conditions. Andra, French National radioactive waste management Agency, is developing since last 15 years an integrated multi-scale hydrogeological model of whole Paris basin of 200000 km 2 of area (regional scale) to produce a regional flow field associated to groundwater behavior. It includes locally the Meuse/Haute Marne clay site of about 250 km 2 of area in the eastern part of the Paris basin that was chosen for the emplacement of a repository. The Callovo-Oxfordian host formation is a clay layer characterized by a very low permeability of the order 10 -14 m/s, a mean thickness of 130 m at about 500 m depth, and is embedded by calcareous aquifer formations (Dogger and Oxfordian). The hydrogeological conceptual model is based on stratigraphic and petro-physic modeling of the Paris basin and is accounting for the structural, geological, hydrogeological and geochemical data in an integrated way. This model represents 27 hydrogeological units at the scale of the Paris Basin, and it is refined at the scale of the sector to represent 27 different layers that range in age from the Trias to the Portlandian. The finite element flow and transport simulator Ground Water (GW) is used to solve for groundwater flow at steady-state in a 3 Million elements model, considering current climatic conditions. The model is calibrated against about 1250 hydraulic head measurements, and results in maximum absolute hydraulic head differences of 20 meters at the regional scale and 3 meters at the local scale. The calibrated reference model includes transmissive major faults as well as structures acting as barrier to flow. Groundwater age (the time elapsed since recharge) and lifetime expectancy (the time remaining prior to exit) are

  14. Study of reactive transfer of hydrogen within intact clay-rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen gas will be produced by anaerobic corrosion of radioactive waste containers in the geological repository. This gas could affect the geological layer (Callovo-Oxfordian) stability, first due to its reductive capacity and then also due to its continuous production for about 100,000 years. The local pressure increase could affect the properties of hydro-gaseous dynamic of hydrogen transfers. The reductive capacity of H 2 could change the redox properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian and the barrier hydraulic properties, and therefore (1) its mineralogy, (2) the speciation of outgoing radionuclides and (3) their transfer. Moreover, if the hydrogen gas transport is difficult within the geological layer, the pressure increase could cause cracking and create preferential pathways for radionuclides migration. An experimental device was developed to measure the entry pressure of H 2 (g) and transport parameters as permeability and diffusion coefficient through the CO x . The entry pressure is estimated to be between 49 and 63 bar. Knowing that the maximum expected pressure is about 80 bar, there may therefore be a displacement of hydrogen gas into the water saturated clay-rock. Moreover, for a saturation greater than 0.90 and at T = 23 C, permeability is measured to be close to 10 -23 m 2 and the diffusion coefficient to be as low as 10 -12 m 2 .s -1 . Therefore hydrogen gas will move slowly in the geological layer, for example it will take about 31,710 years to go through one meter of clay-rock by diffusion. These transport parameters are found to depend mainly on the sample water saturation and not much on temperature. Regarding hydrogen reactivity, under conditions close to those in the storage, H 2 will reduce up to 9 wt% of structural Fe (III) at 90 C and PH 2 = 5 bar. This reaction is not complete and hydrogen gas will mainly sorb on the material, with a sorption up to 0.05 wt% at 90 C and PH 2 = 0.45 bar. This process depends strongly on the water saturation of

  15. Coupled HM modelling of the mine-by test at Meuse-Haute-Marne (MHM) URL France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildizdag, K.; Shao, H.; Hesser, J.; Soennke, J.; Noiret, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In order to test the feasibility of disposing High-Level and Long-Lived Wastes (HLW-LL) in Callovo- Oxfordian clay formation (COx), the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (ANDRA) has carried out scientific and engineering investigations in the Meuse-Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) since November 1999. The COx (Figure 1) is of a special interest because of its very favourable characteristics for being a possible host rock for the disposal of radioactive waste. The project OHZ (Observation and Monitoring of the EDZ) was initiated in 2008 by ANDRA. In the framework of this project, a Mine-by experiment was performed in the niche GCS. The excavation was started on 29.01.2008. Displacement and pore pressure evolution during the excavation was measured by different sensors. Within the cooperation between BGR and ANDRA numerical calculations have been done using the code RockFlow to understand the hydraulic and mechanical (HM) coupling mechanisms of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone observed during the Mine-by experiment. Modelling results: With regard to the bedding of COx a transverse isotropy approach was applied. Thus the anisotropy effects caused by the bedding have been considered in coupled HM models (Massmann, 2009). Intensive parameter studies in comparison with measured deformation and pore pressure data have been conducted to reduce modelling uncertainties. Fully saturated models yield very precise results in the far field wherein excavation effect has its lower impact. Rapid decline of pore pressure and continuously increasing deformation subsequent to excavation in the near field could not be interpreted even taking shrinkage and partially saturation into consideration. During the Mine-by test, overpressures on sidewalls and reduced pressures on roof and floor were measured due to the mechanical effect on pore pressure which is induced by the bedding. Good agreement between

  16. Lithology, hydro-dynamism and thermicity in the multi-layer sedimentary system intersected by the Andra deep borehole of Montiers-sur-Saulx (Meuse, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landrein, Philippe; Vigneron, Georges; Delay, Jacques; Lebon, Patrick; Pagel, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Andra (French national radioactive waste management agency) has conducted a research program to determine the feasibility of a disposal facility for long-lived high level and medium level (LL-HLML) nuclear wastes in a deep geological environment. In 2005, following 15 years of research, Andra established the feasibility of this type of disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formations located in the eastern region of the Paris basin. Between 2006 and 2008, a geological survey campaign was carried out over 250 km 2 at the boundary of the Meuse and Haute-Marne departments. Six drilling platforms were involved on the studied zone and a 2D seismic campaign was carried out using a 2 x 2 km to 3 x 3 km grid as regular as possible. One of the drilling platforms was located in the central area of the studied zone, at a distance of the faults located at the boundary of the studied sector. Three boreholes called EST431, EST432 and EST433 were drilled from this platform. Their main objectives were to contribute to the sitting of the disposal facility, and enhance the knowledge on the formations overlying and underlying the host layer (Dogger, carbonated Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian), as well as on the deep Lias and Trias formations. More specifically, it is meant (i) to acquire a better understanding of the global functioning of the hydrogeological System and the vertical exchanges between the formations and (ii) to assess the potential geothermal resources on the zone in order to verify the absence of exceptional exploitable resources in the vicinity of the site earmarked for the disposal facility. Beyond these objectives, Andra associated the French scientific community to the exploitation of the results yielded by this borehole. Thus, as early as the design stage, Andra entered into a partnership with university laboratories through a program called 'Current and Past transfers in an Aquiferous - Aquitard Sedimentary System'. The partner laboratories were able to carry out

  17. Structural characterization of the mineralogical transitions in the argillaceous formations: geochemical controls and implications of the conversion to illite processes. Particular case of an alkaline disturbance in the Callovian-Oxfordian of the Meuse / Haute-Marne underground laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claret, F.

    2001-11-01

    The Callovian-Oxfordian argillaceous formation covers a mineralogical transition between a disordered illite/smectite interstratified bed (R0 - upper part) and an ordered one (R1 - lower part). The mineralogy of these clays influences the conditions of retention of the formation and their reactivity with respect to physico-chemical disturbances potentially induced by the disposal. In order to make a fine characterization of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay minerals, the simplified conventional methods have been rejected. The method retained consists in the direct comparison of calculated X-ray diffraction spectra with those recorded on a given sample after several processes, and in reproducing all its characteristics (peaks position, intensity ratios, profiles) using a unique structural model. The clay minerals of the EST104 borehole can be described as a mixture of three main phases: an illite, a smectite and an interstratified illite/disordered expansible mineral (R0) with a fixed composition (35% exp.). The physical characteristics of these phases are constant with depth. The mineralogical transition described above corresponds to a change in the relative proportion of the different phases. This description differs from the one classically proposed for the diagenetic conversion to illite of sedimentary series. However, the use of the same tools on a reference diagenetic series leads to a similar description. These new results imply to reconsider the reaction mechanisms proposed for these minerals and their kinetic modeling. Finally, the reactivity of Callovian-Oxfordian clay minerals as a response to an alkaline disturbance is strongly limited by the presence of the organic matter covering the argillaceous particulates and which protects the reactive sites of the clay minerals. (J.S.)

  18. Physico-chemical investigation of cement carbonation in aqueous solution in equilibrium with calcite and with a controlled CO2 partial pressure at 25 and 50 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomat, Laure; Trepy, Nadia; Le Bescop, Patrick; Dauzeres, Alexandre; Monguillon, Corinne

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of radioactive waste geological disposal, structural concretes have to be adapted to underground chemical conditions. For concrete in water saturated medium, it is believed that carbonation will have a major impact on the interaction between concrete and the geological medium. So, to understand the complex degradation of the cement paste in that context, it is interesting to study a simplified system such as degradation in carbonated water solution. This solution must be at equilibrium with a CO 2 partial pressure 30 times higher than the atmospheric pCO 2 , to reproduce underground natural conditions of Callovo-Oxfordian clayey rock of Bure (France). In this study, the behaviour of a new low pH material (CEM I + silica fume + fly ashes) is compared with a CEM I cement paste, both of them being submitted to carbonation in aqueous solution in equilibrium with calcite and with a pCO 2 equal to 1.32 kPa (1.3 10 -2 atm). Two different temperatures, 25 and 50 C, are considered. To realize these experiments, two different original types of devices were developed

  19. Operational safety of geological disposal: IRSN project 'EXREV' for developing a safety assessment strategy for the operation and reversibility of a geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tichauer, M.; Pellegrini, D.; Serres, C.; Besnus, F.

    2014-01-01

    A high-level waste geological disposal facility is envisioned by the legislator in the French Planning Act no. 2006-739 of 28 June 2006. This act sets major milestones for the operator (Andra) in 2013 (public debate), 2015 (licensing) and 2025 (operation). In the framework of the regulatory review process, IRSN's mission is to conduct an assessment of the safety case provided by Andra at every stage of the process for the French regulator, namely the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN). In 2005, IRSN gathered more than twenty years of research and expertise in order to provide a comprehensive appraisal of the 'Dossier 2005' prepared by Andra, related to the feasibility of a geological disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation. At this time, the description of the operational phase was only at a preliminary stage, but this step paved the way for developing an assessment strategy of the operational phase. In this perspective, IRSN set up the EXREV project in 2008 in order to build up a doctrine and to identify key safety issues to be dealt with. (authors)

  20. The influence of temperature and P/P0 upon cationic exchange constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, P.; Vieillard, P.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaboreau, S.; Gaucher, E.C.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The knowledge of thermodynamic properties of clay minerals forming clay materials is important in the context of a disposal within clayey formations (Callovo-Oxfordian argillite) or for clayey barriers. Different experiments have been previously performed concerning the long term behavior of clay materials, indicating that strong transformations are influenced by the alkaline solutions issued from the cementitious materials. But the first stages of the transformations affect the hydration and exchange capacity of the mineral, which are closely related to their retention properties. This work aims at assessing the influence of temperature and relative humidity upon the thermodynamic functions related to cationic exchange and hydration reactions. It is carried out within the framework of the Thermochimie project, aiming at defining a consistent thermodynamic database for modeling purposes. This work is an extension of the thermodynamic of hydration study carried out by Vieillard et al. (2010). Using the same, regular, solid solution model developed by the authors, we first consider the influence of temperature on the hydration reaction by expressing the hydration constant LogK hyd (T) according to the enthalpy and entropy of hydration and to the gas constant. Predicted isotherms are then compared with experimental data acquired on the MX80 smectite at 40, 60, 75, 90 and 100 deg. C. We now consider a cationic exchange reaction between cations A+ and B+, with z cations per mole of smectite and y2 and y1 mole of water per mole of smectite for A and B end members, respectively. The exchange constant LogK A/B , for a given temperature and relative humidity, is expressed as a function of the difference between anhydrous end members, and of the difference between anhydrous end-members activities. A comparison with room temperature exchange constants derived from experiments suggests that discrepancies are related to

  1. Modelling of permafrost freezing and melting and the impact of a climatic cycle on groundwater flow at the Meuse/Haute-Marne site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, J.; Benabderrahmane, H.; Buoro, A.; Brulhet, J.

    2011-01-01

    A fully coupled three-dimensional groundwater flow and heat transport (convection-conduction) model has been developed, including permafrost. The model covers the entire Paris basin and is focused on the Meuse/Haute-Marne Sector area and the Bure investigation site. The model was calibrated on the basis of the present hydro-thermal situation. The studied time period corresponds to what is considered a typical climatic cycle of length 130,000 year. A build-up of a superficial glacial ice mass is not included in the model; it is assumed that accumulated snow will melt during the summer months. The temperature boundary condition on top of the model is specified as a time-varying surface temperature. The temperatures are derived from an estimate of the future climatic evolution. It is the changes with time of the prescribed temperatures along the topography that drives all changes in groundwater flow, temperature and permafrost inside the model. The simulations are transient, but the initial condition of the base case represents a steady state situation. The simulated time period, for reaching a steady state situation of groundwater flows and temperatures in the deep and highly permeable layers of the Dogger (in the Sector area) is considerable (in the range of 50,000. years), depending on perturbation studied (e.g. a change in surface temperature of 5 deg.) and convergence criteria. The simulated depth of the permafrost varies in space and time during the studied glacial periods. Within the area studied (the Sector area), the simulated permafrost reaches a maximum depth of approx. 110 m. This is a median depth taking into account the spatial distribution of the permafrost. The lowest simulated temperature in the lower parts of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone, in the immediate vicinity of the Bure investigation site (in the Sector area), is approx. 14.5 deg. C, which is approx. 7.5 deg. C lower than the initial temperature (22 deg. C). A full reversion back to the

  2. An experimental study of the thermal conductivity: application of EST 205 borehole of Meuse/Haute Marne site (ANDRA); Etude experimentale de la conductivite thermique: application au forage EST 205 du site de Meuse/Haute Marne (ANDRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorand, R

    2006-10-15

    The determination of the thermal properties of clayey rocks is fundamental for predicting the behaviour a radioactive waste geological repository, and geothermal and oil reservoirs. The main objectives of this thesis work were to 1) better understand the effects of the parameters controlling the thermal conductivity, 2) study to which extent the laboratory measurements can be extrapolated to the field, and 3) find relationships between the thermal conductivity and other quantities easier to measure on the field, e.g. the P- and S- wave velocities. The study was conducted on 24 cores of marls carbonates and argillites coming from the EST205 borehole of the M/HM site (ANDRA). After a complete characterisation of the samples, their thermal conductivities were measured using a stationary method. The borehole was drilled with a special oil-based mud to avoid damaging the argillites, and many logs were available. Hence, it is ideal to study the properties of clayey rocks and compare them with field data. The results show the major effect of the microstructure (mainly the particles orientation), which causes the important anisotropy of the thermal conductivity in the marls and argillites. For all lithologies, linear relationships between the conductivity and the P- and S- wave velocities were obtained. The application of this experimental law to the sonic log helped building a synthetic log of thermal conductivity. Finally, we developed a heat probe, which allows measurements in function of temperature and saturation. We showed with this method that the thermal conductivity increases quasi-linearly with the saturation in a sandstone and a carbonate samples. (author)

  3. Thermal Analysis of a Nuclear Waste Repository in Argillite Host Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadgu, T.; Gomez, S. P.; Matteo, E. N.

    2017-12-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geological repository requires analysis of heat distribution as a result of decay heat. Such an analysis supports design of repository layout to define repository footprint as well as provide information of importance to overall design. The analysis is also used in the study of potential migration of radionuclides to the accessible environment. In this study, thermal analysis for high-level waste and spent nuclear fuel in a generic repository in argillite host rock is presented. The thermal analysis utilized both semi-analytical and numerical modeling in the near field of a repository. The semi-analytical method looks at heat transport by conduction in the repository and surroundings. The results of the simulation method are temperature histories at selected radial distances from the waste package. A 3-D thermal-hydrologic numerical model was also conducted to study fluid and heat distribution in the near field. The thermal analysis assumed a generic geological repository at 500 m depth. For the semi-analytical method, a backfilled closed repository was assumed with basic design and material properties. For the thermal-hydrologic numerical method, a repository layout with disposal in horizontal boreholes was assumed. The 3-D modeling domain covers a limited portion of the repository footprint to enable a detailed thermal analysis. A highly refined unstructured mesh was used with increased discretization near heat sources and at intersections of different materials. All simulations considered different parameter values for properties of components of the engineered barrier system (i.e. buffer, disturbed rock zone and the host rock), and different surface storage times. Results of the different modeling cases are presented and include temperature and fluid flow profiles in the near field at different simulation times. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and

  4. Results from the geological surveys carried out in the Bure laboratory's drifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebours, Herve; Righini, Celine

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. After the government's authorization to build and operate an underground laboratory, Andra started the investigation works in November 99 on the Meuse/Haute-Marne URL site. The Meuse/Haute-Marne URL is located at the border of the Champagne-Ardenne and Lorraine regions, on the township of Bure in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rich rock. At this place, the layer is about 135 m-thick and lies at a depth of 417 m to 552 m. The construction of the underground installations started in August 2000 with the sinking of the main shaft and the first phase of diggings was completed on the 27 April 2006 when it linked up with the south drift of the laboratory. The laboratory consists in two vertical shafts crossing the 505-m thick sedimentary cover and two levels of experimental drifts dug in Callovo-Oxfordian formation. The first experimental drift dug at -445 m with a drill-and-blast method with steps of 2.4 m. The technical and experimental drifts at the main level (-490 m of depth) were dug with a hydraulic stone crusher. The aims of the geological surveys carried out during the drifts digging are to observe the lateral variation of the lithology, if there is one, to confirm the absence of fault and the geometry of the argillites formation. These works should also allow to characterize the natural or inducted fracturing (EDZ - Excavation Damaged Zone) induced by the digging by a sedimentary and structural follow-up. The EDZ characterization has been established from the geological survey of the drift face and sidewalls carried out from 1 to 5 meters in the drifts, and completed by the structural analysis of the cores of the boreholes drilled for the experimentations' equipments. After the safe keeping of the front, the geological team goes down to carry out the survey which consists in a lithologic and sedimentary mapping, a structural survey for the understanding of joints distribution and EDZ characterization, and

  5. Comparison of single and dual continuum representations of faults and fractures for simulating groundwater flow and solute transport in the Meuse/Haute-Marne aquifer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, R.; Sudicky, E.; Therrien, R.; Benabderrahmane, H.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Paris Basin system covers approximately 200 000 km 2 and consists of 27 aquiferous and semipermeable (aquitard) hydrogeological units of Trias to Quaternary age that are intersected by 80 regional faults. The Meuse/Haute-Marne site is located in the eastern part of the Paris Basin and covers approximately 250 km 2 . Within the sector, the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation is a potential host for the French high and intermediate level and long lived radioactive waste. It is located at a mean depth of 500 m and has a minimum thickness of 130 m and very low hydraulic conductivity, on the order of 10-14 m/s. The Callovo-Oxfordian is confined between the overlying Oxfordian aquifer and the underlying Dogger aquifer. Both the Oxfordian and Dogger are limestone aquifers characterized locally by macro-pores, regional faults that oriented along the N40 deg. E direction (the Gondrecourt and Joinville faults) and the N150 deg. E direction (the Marne and Poissons faults), as well as diffuse fracture zones located south west of the Meuse/Haute-Marne Repository site. To support site investigation of the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground repository, a single continuum multi-scale hydrogeological model of the Paris Basin and the Meuse/Haute-Marne sector has been developed. The model represents 27 hydrogeological units at the scale of the Paris Basin, and it is refined at the scale of the sector to represent 27 different layers that range in age from the Trias to the Portlandian. The model has been calibrated to observed hydraulic heads by varying the hydraulic conductivity of the individual layers, using a single continuum approach. To investigate the impact of treating the two confining layers for the clay formation, the Oxfordian and Dogger aquifers, as single continua with equivalent hydraulic properties for the combined fracture and matrix system, additional simulations have been conducted with either a dual continuum or

  6. Small scale heater tests in argillite of the Eleana Formation at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, D.F.; Thomas, R.K.; Lappin, A.R.

    1979-11-01

    Near-surface heater tests were run in the Eleana Formation at the Nevada Test Site, in an effort to evaluate argillaceous rock for nuclear waste storage. The main test, which employed a full-scale heater with a thermal output approximating commercial borosilicate waste, was designed to operate for several months. Two smaller, scaled tests were run prior to the full-scale test. This report develops the thermal scaling laws, describes the pretest thermal and thermomechanical analysis conducted for these two tests, and discusses the material properties data used in the analyses. In the first test, scaled to a large heater of 3.5 kW power, computed heater temperatures were within 7% of measured values for the entire 96-hour test run. The second test, scaled to a large heater having 5.0 kW power, experienced periodic water in-flow onto the heater, which tended to damp the temperature. For the second test, the computed temperatures were within 7% of measured for the first 20 hours. After this time, the water effect became significant and the measured temperatures were 15 to 20% below those predicted. On the second test, rock surface spallation was noted in the bore hole above the heater, as predicted. The scaled tests indicated that in-situ argillite would not undergo major thermostructural failure during the follow-on, 3.5 kW, full-scale test. 24 figures, 6 tables

  7. State of the art for fabricating and emplacing concrete containers into large horizontal disposal caverns in the french geological repository - 59267

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel; Guariso, Maurice; Pineau, Francois

    2012-01-01

    The research and development work presented in this paper was initialized by Andra in 2007. The work necessary for manufacturing and testing a full scale demonstrator is presently implemented. The case story is twofold. The first part is related to the initial development of a high performance concrete formulation used for fabricating concrete storage containers (containing Intermediate Level and Long Lived Waste primary canisters) to be stacked and emplaced into 400-m long concrete lined horizontal disposal vaults (also called cavern), excavated in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay host formation at a 550 to 600-m depth, with an inside diameter of approximately 8-m. The fabrication of the concrete boxes is illustrated. The second part presents the outcome at the end of the detailed design phase, for a system which is now being manufactured (for further test and assembly), for the emplacement of the concrete containers inside the vault. The application was engineered for remote emplacing a pile of 2 concrete containers (the containers are preliminarily stacked in a pile of 2, inside a hot cell, thanks to a ground travelling gantry crane). The emplacement process is justified and the related emplacement synoptic is illustrated. The test campaign is scheduled in 2011-2012. The successful completion of the technical trials is mandatory to confirm the mechanical feasibility of remotely emplacing concrete containers into large horizontal disposal caverns over long distances. The later display of the machinery at work in Andra's showroom will be instrumental for the confidence building process involving the various stakeholders concerned by the public enquiry period (mid-2013) preceding the deep geological repository license application (2014-2015). (authors)

  8. Adsorption of polar organic molecules on sediments: Case-study on Callovian-Oxfordian claystone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasamimanana, S; Lefèvre, G; Dagnelie, R V H

    2017-08-01

    The release and transport of anthropogenic organic matter through the geosphere is often an environmental criterion of safety. Sedimentary rocks are widely studied in this context as geological barriers for waste management. It is the case of Callovian-Oxfordian claystone (COx), for which several studies report adsorption of anthropogenic organic molecules. In this study, we evaluated and reviewed adsorption data of polar organic molecules on COx claystone. Experiments were performed on raw claystone, decarbonated and clay fractions. Adsorption isotherms were measured with adsorbates of various polarities: adipate, benzoate, ortho-phthalate, succinate, gluconate, oxalate, EDTA, citrate. A significant adsorption was observed for multidentate polycarboxylic acids as evidenced with phthalate, succinate, oxalate, gluconate, EDTA and citrate (R d  = 1.53, 3.52, 8.4, 8.8, 12.4, 54.7 L kg -1 respectively). Multiple linear regression were performed as a statistical analysis to determine the predictors from these adsorption data. A linear correlation between adsorption data (R d ) and dipole moment (μ) of adsorbates was evidenced (R 2  = 0.91). Molecules with a high dipole moment, μ(D) > 2.5, displayed a significant adsorption, R d ≫1 L kg -1 . A qualitative correlation can be easily estimated using the water/octanol partition coefficient, P ow , of adsorbates (R 2  = 0.77). In this case, two opposite trends were distinguished for polar and apolar molecules. The use of organic carbon content in sediments is relevant for predicting adsorption of apolar compounds, log (P ow )>+1. The oxides/clays contents may be relevant regarding polar molecules, log ( apparent P ow )<-1. The proposed scheme offers a general methodology for investigation of geo-barriers towards heterogeneous organic plumes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  10. Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-01-01

    As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For

  11. BIO-SEDIMENTARY SIGNATURES OF HIGH-FREQUENCY SALINITY/SUBAERIAL EXPOSURE CHANGES: EXAMPLES FROM THE OXFORDIAN OF PORTUGAL (CABAÇOS FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA C. AZERÊDO

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The detailed sedimentary and micropalaeontological analysis of a complex association of continental to marginal-marine deposits from the Oxfordian of Portugal (Cabaços Formation has allowed the recognition of high-frequency, subtle changes in the environmental conditions. The main factors controlling the palaeobiological responses to such minor-scale fluctuations were also identified. Two factors have shown to be especially significant: subaerial exposure duration and frequency (estimated by assigning type of features to the exposure index and salinity trends, as suggested by the sedimentary and fossil records. In the west of the basin, salinity fluctuations were much stronger and more frequent (fresh- brackish-restricted marine-hypersaline, and subaerial exposure more marked for longer periods, than in the east of the basin. The microfossil assemblages, as a whole, but in particular the ostracod faunas, show differences in abundance, diversity, dominant species, degree of intrageneric and intraspecific variations, both along the successions and between west and east. The western populations seem to have been much less stable, which suggests that high-frequency changes in salinity (more than its absolute values and degree of exposure were the most important controls on the palaeobiota. PDF

  12. Expectations, open questions to be addressed in the workshop within the context of a deep geological repository in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landais, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the clay properties in the various domains concerned by the construction feasibility, the exploitation phase of repository facilities, as well as the long term evolution of the waste and of its environment is of crucial importance in assessing the performance and the safety of the various radioactive waste disposal concepts. The knowledge to be acquired on clays as such goes well beyond solely the field of disposal of radioactive waste. For both, clay formations or bentonites in engineered barriers, the characterization in a continuous way from the nanometer to the micrometer, of their internal structure and the study of the associated physico-chemical phenomena is a fundamental issue. It aims for explaining: The 'Initial state' of the clays, in particular for the clay formations: the nature of the mechanical, hydraulic and geochemical processes, in a broad sense, and the way these processes were involved during the geological history of these formations, The fundamental processes involved by physico-chemical or hydraulic stresses, related to the evolution of the repository at the macroscopic scale. The choice of the characterization scale and relevant modeling is of first importance in the approaches leading to the establishment of the models of representation. Various research works pointed to experimental difficulties in quantifying the microstructure of the clay rocks at scales smaller than a micrometer, because of technical/instrumental limitations. This lack of knowledge at small scales does not allow to fully connect all the Thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) mechanisms and to integrate them into an up-scaling approach. There already exist conceptual models and experimental approaches to describe the microstructure of argillaceous formations in terms of porosity and texture. Examples on the undisturbed Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) argillite are given in this paper. Questions and objectives to be addressed during the

  13. A multi-packer completion to measure hydraulic heads in a lightly fractured area in the Oxfordian limestone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, E.; Cruchaudet, M.; Delay, J.; Piedevache, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Andra has designed a new type of borehole completion in order to monitor simultaneously hydraulic heads. This completion is installed in a 420 m deep borehole drilled in the Oxfordian limestone formation. The borehole is located in the South-West of Andra's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in a lightly fractured area. The multi-packer completion is built and installed by Solexperts. This device is composed of five measurement intervals isolated with rubber expandable packers and supported by stainless steel tubing. The packers are inflated with water at a pressure of 10 bars above the water pressure at that depth. Each measurement interval comprises an interval module embedding a pressure / temperature gauge connected to the interval through a filter. The gauges are connected through one cable to a data acquisition system on surface. This completion is removable. The packers can be deflated and the completion can be installed in another borehole. The packers are positioned in the EST461 borehole according to the caliper logging and the results of permeability tests. The hydraulic head measurements are compared with the local rainfall. Interval 1 (the deepest) shows a stable hydraulic head whereas intervals 2 to 5 show hydraulic head variations. The amplitude of the hydraulic head variations are closely related to the interval depth: the deepest the interval, the lowest the hydraulic head variation. Hydraulic heads in intervals 4 and 5 are similar. These intervals are probably connected. (authors)

  14. Adsorption of hydrogen gas and redox processes in clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Mathilde; Leone, Laura; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Giffaut, Eric; Charlet, Laurent

    2012-03-20

    In order to assess the adsorption properties of hydrogen gas and reactivity of adsorbed hydrogen, we measured H(2)(g) adsorption on Na synthetic montmorillonite-type clays and Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clayrock using gas chromatography. Synthetic montmorillonites with increasing structural Fe(III) substitution (0 wt %, 3.2 wt %, and 6.4 wt % Fe) were used. Fe in the synthetic montmorillonites is principally present as structural Fe(III) ions. We studied the concomitant reduction of structural Fe(III) in the clays using (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry. The COx, which mainly contains smectite/illite and calcite minerals, is also studied together with the pure clay fraction of this clayrock. Experiments were performed with dry clay samples which were reacted with hydrogen gas at 90 and 120 °C for 30 to 45 days at a hydrogen partial pressure close to 0.45 bar. Results indicate that up to 0.11 wt % of hydrogen is adsorbed on the clays at 90 °C under 0.45 bar of relative pressure. (57)Fe Mössbauer spectrometry shows that up to 6% of the total structural Fe(III) initially present in these synthetic clays is reduced upon adsorption of hydrogen gas. No reduction is observed with the COx sample in the present experimental conditions.

  15. Alteration of French waste glass matrix of R7T7 type in deep geological disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combarieu, G. de

    2007-02-01

    The Geological disposal is a possible option for safe and long term management of long lived and highly radioactive wastes. In order to predict the release of radionuclides in the environment, the comprehensive knowledge of glass dissolution rates as well as the properties of near- and far-field in which migration will occur is necessary. This thesis is aimed to describe the alteration of SON68 glass, inactive analog of French R7T7 glass, in contact with disposal materials: metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian argilite. Therefore, original experiments have been carried out on a laboratory scaled system involving 'glass-iron-argilite' interactions. The transformations of chemistry and crystal-chemistry are investigated with multi-scale probing tools: SEM, TEM, XRD, XRF, EXAFS and Raman spectroscopies. In the same time, the glass alteration is modeled to obtain a source term in good agreement with the major phenomena observed in common experiments. As an end, geochemical models of iron and argilite transformations are also developed and set together in the transport-chemistry code HYTEC to simulate chemical reactions (iron corrosion, argilite evolution, and glass alteration). Simulations and comparison with experiments have improved the overall knowledge of the glass-iron-clay system. (author)

  16. Long term behaviour of glass and steel in interaction with argillites in deep geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bildstein, O.; Lartigue, J.E.; Devallois, V.; Pointeau, V.; Trotignon, L.; Michau, N.; Cochepin, B.; Munier, I.

    2010-01-01

    . C) was conducted in order to identify the parameters controlling the overall reactivity of the system. This sensitivity analysis included kinetic parameters for selected minerals, diffusion coefficient, corrosion rate, and gas partial pressure. Another set of calculations was also performed in non-isothermal conditions using the variable temperature field resulting from the heat produced by the waste packages. Modeling results in the reference case show that the glass alteration products mainly consist of zeolites (gyrolite, natrolite) and pure silica minerals (chalcedony). Steel corrosion products are distributed as follows: iron oxides (magnetite or goethite) at the core of the canister; iron silicates (cronstedtite), aluminosilicates (chamosite, Fe-saponite), and sulphide (pyrrhotite) precipitate at the interface between glass and argillites. In the argillites, primary minerals such as dolomite, smectites and calcite are destabilized close to the canister surface. These minerals disappear in favour of gyrolite, natrolite, chalcedony and philippsite-K. The sensitivity analysis shows that the relative amount and evolution in space and time of these secondary minerals strongly depend on the corrosion rate and the release of gas (H 2 and possibly CH 4 ) in the system. The relative intensity of the transport process (diffusion coefficient) and mineral reaction rates (kinetic rate and reactive surface area) also strongly influence the evolution of the system (nature of secondary phases, porosity, gas pressure...). These reaction pathways and para-genesis predicted by the calculations are qualitatively supported by 'short-term' (∼1 year) experiments. A significant reduction of porosity is systematically predicted at the interface between the different materials and is also locally observed in the different materials depending on the simulation conditions, e.g. depending on the corrosion rate. An overall decrease of the reactivity of the system is also

  17. Thermal volume changes in clays and clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Sulem, J.; Mohajerani, M.; Tang, A.M.; Monfared, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The disposal of high activity exothermic radioactive waste at great depth in clay host rocks will induce a temperature elevation that has been investigated in various underground research laboratories in Belgium, France and Switzerland through in-situ tests. Thermal effects are better known in clays (in particular Boom clay) than in clay-stone (e.g. Opalinus clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone). In terms of volume changes, Figure 1 confirms the findings of Hueckel and Baldi (1990) that volume changes depend on the over-consolidation ratio (OCR) of the clay. In drained conditions, normally consolidated clays exhibit plastic contraction when heated, whereas over-consolidated clay exhibit elastic dilation. The nature of thermal volume changes in heated clays obviously has a significant effect on thermally induced pore pressures, when drainage is not instantaneous like what occurs in-situ. Compared to clays, the thermal volume change behaviour of clay-stones is less well known than that of clays. clay-stone are a priori suspected to behave like over-consolidated clays. In this paper, a comparison of recent results obtained in the laboratory on the drained thermal volume changes of clay-stones is presented and discussed. It is difficult to run drained mechanical tests in clay-stones like the Opalinus clay and the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone because of their quite low permeability (10 -12 - 10 -13 m/s). This also holds true for thermal tests. Due to the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficient between minerals and water, it is necessary to adopt very slow heating rate (0.5 - 1 C/h) to avoid any thermal pressurization. To do so, a new hollow cylinder apparatus (100 mm external diameter, 60 mm internal diameter) with lateral drainages reducing the drainage length to half the sample thickness (10 mm) has been developed (Monfared et al. 2011). The results of a drained cyclic thermal test carried out on

  18. Conditioning of traced rock section for diffusion profile analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewonck, S.; Auriere, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The French National Agency for radioactive waste management investigates for a high-level radioactive waste repository in deep geological formation. The Andra's disposal concept is based notably on the impermeable properties of the host rock barrier (the Callovo-Oxfordian mud-stone of the Eastern Paris Basin). Diffusion is assumed to be the main transport mechanism governing radionuclide migration through argillite. Diffusion properties were measured in situ, in the constrained rock, by experiments taken place at the Andra's Underground Research Laboratory. The diffusion experiments consist in injecting a traced solution as pulse, in a packed-off borehole interval, at a pressure similar of the hydraulic pressure of the rock. After several months of circulation, the traced solution is purged and the downhole equipment is dismantled. With a drilling machine, the overcoring of the rock section around the injection interval is performed to analyze the repartition of the radionuclides in the clay section. Totally new technical developments were necessary to make these tasks possible. This contribution reports on: - the method developed to going up the over-core from the gallery to the surface without damaging the traced clay section and avoiding any contamination of the underground installation by dust particles, - the specific room created to sampling the rock section in diffusion profiles with respect of radioprotection laws. In gallery, the over-core is extracted from the core barrel directly to a metallic box especially built to transport the clay section to the surface. This box is a good confining device avoiding all radioactive contamination of the galleries and the shaft. Moreover, this box made in iron decrease the dose equivalent rate and consecutively it's not necessary to have safety classification to transport the core. When the over-core is in the radioactive cutting room, technicians have

  19. H, HM, and THM-C processes in natural barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javeri, V.; Le, T.T.; Cui, Y.J.; Delage, P.; Li, X.J.; Wieczorek, K.; Jockwer, N.; Romero, E.; Lima, A.; Gens, A.; Li, X.L.; Francois, B.; Nuth, M.; Laloui, L.; Chen, W.; Jia, S.; Yu, H.; Wu, G.; Li, X.; Bernier, F.; Tan, X.; Wu, G.; Jia, S.; Giot, R.; Hoxha, D.; Giraud, A.; Homand, F.; Su, K.; Chavant, C.; Duveau, G.; Jia, Y.; Shao, J.F.; Peron, H.; Laloui, L.; Hueckel, T.; Hu, L.B.; Auvray, C.; Lequiller, B.; Cuisinier, O.; Ferber, V.; Cui, Y.J.; Deneele, D.; Uhlig, L.; Jobmann, M.; Polster, M.; Vaunat, J.; Garrite, B.; Wileveau, Y.; Sato, H.; Jacinto, A.; Sanchez, M.; Ledesma, A.; Morel, J.; Balland, C.; Armand, G.; Nguyen Minh, D.; Vales, F.; Pham, Q.T.; Gharbi, H.; Mokni, N.; Olivella, S.; Li, X.; Smets, St.; Valcke, E.; Karnland, O.; Nilsson, U.; Olsson, S.; Sellin, P.; Fernandez, A.M.; Melon, A.M.; Villar, M.V.; Turrero, M.J.; Garitte, B.; Guimaraes, L.D.N.; Gens, A.; Mayor, J.C.; Koliji, A.; Laloui, L.; Vulliet, L.; Hamdi, N.; Marzouki, A.; Srasra, E.; Cuss, R.J.; Harrington, J.F.; Noy, D.J.; Birchall, D.J.; Marschall, P.; Mallet, A.; Ababou, R.; Matray, J.M.; Renaud, V.; Maison, T.; Enachescu, C.; Frieg, B.; Rohs, St.; Paris, B.; Robinet, J.C.; Bui, T.D.; Barnichon, J.D.; Plas, F.; Klubertanz, G.; Folly, M.; Hufschmied, P.; Frank, E

    2007-07-01

    in the Opalinus clay formation subjected to a ventilation test; a Soil structure considerations in description of compacted and natural clay behaviour; the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Tunisian clayey soil used as discharge site of acidic waste; the Consolidation and rebound properties of Opalinus clay: a long-term, fully-drained test; the multidimensional modeling of a poro-elastic medium: identification of the behaviour of a clay formation from a stochastic representation of piezometric fluctuations; various approaches for the comprehension of the time-dependent behaviour of Callovo-Oxfordian argilite; a new approach of estimating the influence of drilling mud on the borehole pressure history; the thermo-chemical-hydro-mechanical modelling: contributions to the assessment of the long term behaviour of a nuclear waste disposal in a deep clay formation; and the impact of thermal load on the far field and galleries of a repository.

  20. Molecular hydrogen: an energy source for bacterial activity in nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, M.; Esnault, L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Hydrogen is a common product of microbial metabolism, large number of bacteria are able to use it as energetic substrate in subsurface ecosystems. Moreover H 2 is known as one of the most energetic substrates for deep subsurface ecosystem. It could be produced in different ways mainly volcanic activity (basalts iron rich volcanic rocks) or natural radiolysis of water or even fermentation. The millimolar concentrations of H 2 observed in the ground waters are consistent with the activity of a large variety of hydrogen-oxidising bacteria as described in the following Table. Electron acceptors are identified as O 2 , CO 2 , NO 3 , SO 4 or Fe +++ . Aerobic, anaerobic, obligate and facultative autotrophs are included. Numerous of these bacteria are thermophilic bacteria. This bacterial activity leads to the production of methane, acetate, nitrogen, hydrogen sulphur or ferrous oxides. In anoxic environments, H 2 concentrations are governed by microbial metabolism. In most cases, H 2 producing microorganisms are thermodynamically controlled by the abundance of H 2 , and survive thanks to H 2 consumers, a metabolism called inter-species H 2 transfer. Metabolism of H 2 is catalysed by hydrogenase as cytoplasmic enzymes or membrane bound enzymes. Several situations of H 2 production will occur in nuclear waste repository: - Radiolysis of water. - Radiolysis of organic matter (such as bitumen, in case of B waste), H 2 production due to gamma radiolysis of bitumen is evaluated to 1 L H 2 /kg of bitumen /MGy. - Corrosion of metal containers (in deaerated solutions). Large amount of H 2 are predicted in some situations, and will select the development of hydrogen species. Then, aerobic hydrogen bacteria oxidising hydrogen could be found in basins containing irradiating waste, or during the oxic period of storage, denitrifying bacteria or sulfate reducing bacteria will develop near the bitumen waste. Groundwater of the Callovo-Oxfordian

  1. Geology of the Syncline Ridge area related to nuclear waste disposal, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoover, D.L.; Morrison, J.N.

    1980-01-01

    The Syncline Ridge area is in the western part of Yucca Flat, Nye Co., Nev. Drill holes, geophysical surveys, mapping, and laboratory studies during 1976 through 1978 were used to investigate argillite in unit J (Mississippian) of the Eleana Formation (Devonian and Mississippian) as a possible nuclear waste repository site. Argillite in unit J has a minimum stratigraphic thickness of at least 700 m. The argillite underlies most of the Syncline Ridge area east of the Eleana Range, and is overlain by Quaternary alluvium and the Tippipah Limestone of Syncline Ridge. At the edges of the Syncline Ridge area, alluvium and volcanic rocks overlie the argillite. The argillite is underlain by more than 1000 m of quartzite, siliceous argillite, and minor limestone in older units of the Eleana Formation. These older units crop out in the Eleana Range. The area is divided into southern, central, and northern structural blocks by two lateral faults. The southern and central blocks either have volumes of argillite too small for a repository site, or have irregular-shaped volumes caused by Mesozoic high-angle faults that make the structure too complex for a repository site. The northern block appears to contain thick argillite within an area of 6 to 8 km 2 . The postvolcanic history of the Syncline Ridge area indicates that the area has undergone less deformation than other areas in Yucca Flat. Most of the late Tertiary and Quaternary deformation consisted of uplift and eastward tilting in the Syncline Ridge area. Preliminary engineering geology investigations indicate that although the competency of the argillite is low, the argillite may be feasible for construction of a nuclear waste disposal facility. Physical, thermal, chemical, and mineralogical properties of the argillite appear to be within acceptable limits for a nuclear waste repository

  2. Towards an assessment of colloid transport in undisturbed clay stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durce, D.; Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Colloids are known as a potentially important transport vector for sparingly soluble radionuclides in natural water environments. For assessing the mass transfer resistance of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock formation for colloid transport, a series of percolation experiments have been performed, using high pressure stainless steel advection cells of different diameters containing clay cores machined to about 50 μm of accuracy to the inner diameter of the cells. Synthetic clay pore water was pushed by a high pressure syringe pump across the clay core. In order to assess the cut-off size for colloid transport, molecules of different molecular weight were injected. C 14 labeled polymaleic acid (PMA) of sizes of 2 and 50 kDa were used. The effect of clay permeability, of water flow rate (injection pressure) and of ionic strength was studied. Low ionic strength experiments (I = 0.001) were realized by replacing the pore water by advective displacement with the required composition. Clay rock permeabilities were between 10 -12 and 10 -14 m/s. Hydrodynamic parameters were determined by HTO and 36 Cl injection. The results show already at 2 kDa and a permeability of 10 -12 m/s strong retention by partial filtration. The experimental results were modeled using simple chromatographic theory. (authors)

  3. New numerical modelling of the mechanical long-term behaviour of the GMR gallery in ANDRA's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Martin, L.; Hadj-Hassen, F.; Tijani, M.; Armand, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a new macroscopic numerical modelling of the mechanical long-term behaviour of ANDRA's Underground Research Laboratory. The study focuses on the GMR gallery, oriented along the minor horizontal principal stress and located at the main level 490 m deep. The simulations are made using the finite element method (FEM).Convergence measurements in this gallery exhibit an important dis-symmetry between the vertical and horizontal directions, as well as a significant time effect in the vertical trend. In attempts to both understand the phenomena that lie beneath such dis-symmetry and reproduce the experimental data, a modification to Lemaitre's creep law has been proposed. The new viscoplastic law takes into account the following aspects: rock transverse isotropy, creep behaviour and rock expansion. The excavation history of the GMR gallery has also been considered in the numerical modelling. The numerical results are very satisfactory for the GMR drift. However, the mechanisms of anisotropic shear and expansion on which the new law is based do not lead to an accurate reproduction of the data measured in the galleries oriented in the perpendicular direction. Therefore, a thorough insight into the mechanical behaviour of the rock mass and into the proposed new law is needed before the latter can be applied to the Callovo-Oxfordian layer. (authors)

  4. Probing Fe (III)/Fe (II) redox potential in a clayey material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournassat, Christophe; Chainet, Fabien; Betelu, Stephanie; Hadi, Jebril; Gaucher, Eric C.; Ignatiadis, Ioannis; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Charlet, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Redox is one of the main factors affecting the migration of redox-sensitive radionuclides. As a consequence reducing conditions are considered of strategic importance for the confinement properties of a clayey formation towards nuclear waste. A representative redox potential of clay formation such as Callovian- Oxfordian (COx) can be derived from thermodynamic calculations considering equilibrium between observed redox phases such as pyrite and siderite. However, there is little information on the reactivity of the different reservoirs of redox constituents in this type of complex material. The present study aims at investigating the reactivity of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox couple in the structure of clay minerals using different investigation methods: electrochemistry and O 2 reduction kinetic experiments. Clay modified electrodes were specifically designed to probe Fe(III)/Fe(II) redox potential in the structure of clay minerals. The clay fraction of a Callovian-Oxfordian argillite sample originating from the same level than ANDRA underground research laboratory was used after pre-treatment to remove organic matter and accessory minerals such as pyrite that could influence redox potential measurements. These electrodes were used to verify the validity of the model of Favre et al. (2006) that links the redox potential (E clay ) to the the Fe(II)/Fe tot ratio in the structure (m rel ), the pH and the sodium concentration in solution: equation 1. The good agreement between direct potential measurements and model prediction provides a strong evidence of the relevance of this model in our experimental conditions although the clay composition and its too low Fe content do not a priori fulfil the conditions set by Drits and Manceau (2000) for the calculation of K 0 parameter. Following the verification of the model, we tried to apply it to the specific case of a Callovian-Oxfordian sample that had been very well preserved

  5. Sensitivity analysis of alkaline plume modelling: influence of mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboreau, S.; Claret, F.; Marty, N.; Burnol, A.; Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Munier, I.; Michau, N.; Cochepin, B.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a disposal facility for radioactive waste in clayey geological formation, an important modelling effort has been carried out in order to predict the time evolution of interacting cement based (concrete or cement) and clay (argillites and bentonite) materials. The high number of modelling input parameters associated with non negligible uncertainties makes often difficult the interpretation of modelling results. As a consequence, it is necessary to carry out sensitivity analysis on main modelling parameters. In a recent study, Marty et al. (2009) could demonstrate that numerical mesh refinement and consideration of dissolution/precipitation kinetics have a marked effect on (i) the time necessary to numerically clog the initial porosity and (ii) on the final mineral assemblage at the interface. On the contrary, these input parameters have little effect on the extension of the alkaline pH plume. In the present study, we propose to investigate the effects of the considered initial mineralogy on the principal simulation outputs: (1) the extension of the high pH plume, (2) the time to clog the porosity and (3) the alteration front in the clay barrier (extension and nature of mineralogy changes). This was done through sensitivity analysis on both concrete composition and clay mineralogical assemblies since in most published studies, authors considered either only one composition per materials or simplified mineralogy in order to facilitate or to reduce their calculation times. 1D Cartesian reactive transport models were run in order to point out the importance of (1) the crystallinity of concrete phases, (2) the type of clayey materials and (3) the choice of secondary phases that are allowed to precipitate during calculations. Two concrete materials with either nanocrystalline or crystalline phases were simulated in contact with two clayey materials (smectite MX80 or Callovo- Oxfordian argillites). Both

  6. Characterization and quantification by mass spectrometry of mobile organic matter from clay rock: influence of the origin and of the sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huclier-Markai, S.; Landesman, C.; Montavon, G.; Grambow, B.; Monteau, F.; Fernandez, A.M.; Vinsot, A.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In environmental studies, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) plays a key role on the bioavailability and the toxicity of metallic compounds. If one wants to evaluate the mobility of heavy metals / radionuclides, which is in natura in most of the cases dependant on their interactions with NOM. One part of the organic inventory in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) exists as small dissolved compounds in the pore water but the weak content and the weak porosity of the formation (∼ 8 % of water in weight) make the complexation study with metal ions difficult. One part of the organic matter attached to the sediment (∼ 1 % in weight) can be mobilized in a synthetic pore water 1 and can be considered as similar to in situ pore water dissolved organic matter (DOM) regarding its size distribution. The collection of clay pore water has been done through percolation experiment, a unique and original experimental process developed to get pore water from a core sample,that have been described previously. From these experiments, it was shown that mobile organic matter concentration could reach 0.01 mol C/L by application of a pressure gradient up to 100 bars. Since part of the OM from the COx is known to be sensitive to air oxidation, the characterization and quantification of DOM were then performed under anoxic conditions (about - 170 mV vs Standard Hydrogen Electrode SHE). In addition, the chemical composition of NOM contained in the pore water from the argillite clay rock has been determined in in-situ like conditions by ESI-MS and APCI-MS, which are suitable techniques to identify the chemical composition of NOM contained in the COx pore water available from boreholes. Mostly low molecular weight molecules were identified, of whom structural features observed were mainly acidic compounds, fatty acids as well as aldehydes and amino acids. Fulvic and Humic Acids have such low concentrations in the COx formation, leading to a

  7. Quality evaluation of carbonaceous industrial by-products and its effect on properties of autoclave aerated concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomina, E. V.; Lesovik, V. S.; Fomin, A. E.; Kozhukhova, N. I.; Lebedev, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    Argillite is a carbonaceous industrial by-product that is a potential source in environmentally friendly and source-saving construction industry. In this research, chemical and mineral composition as well as particle size distribution of argillite were studied and used to develop autoclave aerated concrete as partial substitute of quartz sand. Effect of the argillite as a mineral admixture in autoclave aerated concrete was investigated in terms of compressive and tensile strength, density, heat conductivity etc. The obtained results demonstrated an efficiency of argillite as an energy-saving material in autoclave construction composites.

  8. Effect of metallic iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 doped with a radioactive alpha emitter in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odorowski, Mélina; Jegou, Christophe; De Windt, Laurent; Broudic, Véronique; Jouan, Gauthier; Peuget, Sylvain; Martin, Christelle

    2017-12-01

    In the hypothesis of direct disposal of spent fuel in a geological nuclear waste repository, interactions between the fuel mainly composed of UO2 and its environment must be understood. The dissolution rate of the UO2 matrix, which depends on the redox conditions on the fuel surface, will have a major impact on the release of radionuclides into the environment. The reducing conditions expected for a geological disposal situation would appear to be favorable as regards the solubility and stability of the UO2 matrix, but may be disturbed on the surface of irradiated fuel. In particular, the local redox conditions will result from a competition between the radiolysis effects of water under alpha irradiation (simultaneously producing oxidizing species like H2O2, hydrogen peroxide, and reducing species like H2, hydrogen) and those of redox active species from the environment. In particular, Fe2+, a strongly reducing aqueous species coming from the corrosion of the iron canister or from the host rock, could influence the dissolution of the fuel matrix. The effect of iron on the oxidative dissolution of UO2 was thus investigated under the conditions of the French disposal site, a Callovian-Oxfordian clay formation chosen by the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), here tested under alpha irradiation. For this study, UO2 fuel pellets doped with a radioactive alpha emitter (238/239Pu) were leached in synthetic Callovian-Oxfordian groundwater (representative of the French waste disposal site groundwater) in the presence of a metallic iron foil to simulate the steel canister. The pellets had varying levels of alpha activity, in order to modulate the concentrations of species produced by water radiolysis on the surface and to simulate the activity of aged spent fuel after 50 and 10,000 years of alpha radioactivity decay. The experimental data showed that whatever the sample alpha radioactivity, the presence of iron inhibits the oxidizing dissolution of

  9. Study of Different Argillaceous Formations Performed in the Context of the FUNMIG project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A. M.; Melon, A.; Sanchez, D. M.; Gaucher, E.; Tournassat, C.; Altmann, S.C.; Vinsot, A.; Maes, N.; Craen, M. de; Leupin, O.; Wersin, P.; Astudillo, J.

    2010-07-01

    Argillaceous Rock Formations of low permeability have been selected in several countries as potential geological host rock for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes (HLRW). The general barrier function of the host rock is to retard and attenuate the migration of radionuclides to the biosphere, and the properties of clay minerals sustain this barrier functions. Nowadays, a number of Underground Research Laboratories (URL) have been constructed for a more in depth investigation of the indurated as well as plastic clay rock formations indifferent countries. The HADES under ground research facility (URF) was constructed at Mol (Belgium), where the Boom Clay formation is being studied as a reference host rock formation. The Opalinus Clay formation has been studied in the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory (Switzerland). The Callovo- Oxfordian clayrock is being characterised in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Site at Bure (France). The Boda Claystone is being analysed at Mecsek in Hungary. The knowledge on biogeochemical processes which affect the transport of radionuclides through the geosphere is a key parameter for the safety case of a HLRW repository, which was the aim of the EC Project FUNMIG: Fundamental Processes of Radionuclide Migration. The main factors controlling the mobility of the radionuclides are the chemistry of the pore water, the chemical reactions involving the radionuclides and the sorption processes on clay minerals. There fore, the pore water chemistry plays an important role in determining radionuclide migration characteristics in clay-rock formations. (Author)

  10. PHREEQC modelling of concrete/clay interactions in a 2D geometry with explicit effect of porosity evolution on transport properties due to mineralogical changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claret, F.; Marty, N.C.M.; Tournassat, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Burnol, A.; Chiaberge, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Munier, I.; Cochepin, B.; Michau, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of deep repository for radioactive waste, significant use of concrete will be made. This material constitutes a compromise between properties, technical uses and costs. Within the French concepts, concrete will be used to build access structures, drifts as well as waste disposal cells and waste packages for Intermediate Level Wastes (ILW). With this design, concrete will be at the interface with either/both the host rock, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites in our case, and/or the clay plug built with swelling clay such as bentonite. Due to the chemical disequilibrium between concrete and clay, chemical reactions can modify both chemical and physical properties of these materials (e.g. mineralogical composition, diffusion coefficient...). In order to assess the long term behaviour of concrete/clay interfaces and the evolution of their properties with time, predictive modelling have to be performed. The high chemical contrast (e.g. pH or pe at the interface) often leads to problems of numerical convergence. Our own experience showed that PHREEQC is very successful in handling such difficulties in 1D geometry. PHREEQC is also able to handle 2D geometries as presented hereafter thanks to the MIX option as well as feedback on porosity thanks to the MCD option (multi component diffusion). Indeed, 2D simulation of a drift sealing concept developed by Andra was attempted using PHREEQC with the MIX option which allows the use of different transport properties in the different cells. A basic program was developed to generate this complex 2D mesh and another one to treat the outputs under TECPLOT R . The mesh is composed of 3081 cells with a refinement of 3 cm at each interface. Such a simulation was already conducted under ALLIANCES geochemistry transport tools, but in our cases the mesh refinement and the chemistry of the system are extended and the feedback on porosity is now considered. Furthermore, the new multi

  11. Biogeochemical reactive-transport modelling of the interactions of medium activity long-lived nuclear waste in fractured argillite and the effect on redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, J.S.; Steele, H.; Kwong, S.; Albrecht, A.

    2010-01-01

    -surface LLW disposal has been applied to the geological disposal of organic containing MAVL. The study uses microbial kinetic data from studies of LLW degradation, but considers the physical and chemical conditions relevant to the disposal of bituminous waste in the argillaceous (clay) Callovian-Oxfordian (COx) formation at the Meuse/Haute-Marne Site in Eastern France. The objective of the modelling being to scope out the potential microbial activity that may develop in experimental systems that test and investigate the processes controlling microbial activity and redox conditions in the EDZ. The results presented examine the microbial activity that may develop through interaction of a contaminant source containing soluble organics, nitrate, and sulphate with the COx. Processes are modelled representing a column experiment, where reaction-transport coupling effects may occur in open fractures or in regions of intact COx, where diffusion controls transport of chemical species. One of the main processes examined in the model is the overall denitrification process to form N 2 gas from soluble nitrate. Microbial denitrifiers included groups that consume organics, and others that consume hydrogen as electron donors. In the case of organic denitrifiers soluble organics (represented by acetate) are considered in the degradation products of bitumen and also present at lower concentrations in the COx (equivalent to 9 x 105 mol/l acetate). Initially transport of nitrate is largely unaffected by the microbial processes, but after a lag phase of 0.2 y denitrification becomes established. Diffusion of nitrate into the COx is observed. Breakthrough of the acetate concentration is similar to that for nitrate although an excess of acetate is required due to the utilisation of acetate as a carbon source for microbial growth, and this is the reason why incomplete nitrate reduction occurs. The model simulates that denitrification consumes the organic electron donor present in the COx. The GRM

  12. Thermo-hydro mechanical modeling in unsaturated hard clay: application to nuclear waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Y.

    2006-07-01

    This work presents an elastoplastic damage model for argillite in unsaturated conditions. A short resume of experimental investigations is presented in the first part. The results obtained show an important plastic deformation coupled with damage induced by initiation and growth of microcracks. Influences of water content on the mechanical behaviour are also investigated. Based on experimental data and micro-mechanical considerations, a general constitutive model is proposed for the poro-mechanical behavior of argillite in unsaturated conditions. The time dependent creep has also been incorporated in they model. The performance of the model is examined by comparing numerical simulation with experimental data in various load paths under saturated and unsaturated conditions. Finally, the model is applied to hydro-mechanical coupling study of the REP experiment and thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling study of the HE-D experiment. A good agreement is obtained between experimental data and numerical predictions. It has been shown that the proposed model describe correctly the main features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated rocks. (author)

  13. Fortunatus in Disguise: The Adventures of Master F.I. Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford

    OpenAIRE

    Pigman, G. W., III

    2012-01-01

    Like most "Stratfordians," I did not think that Oxfordians "deserved the compliment of rational opposition," as Jane Austen would say, and never would have reviewed this book had I not encountered a footnote in the fascinating, tortured correspondence between Sigmund Freud (a notorious Oxfordian in later life) and his fiancée Martha Bernays. If scholars of their caliber, three of the world’s most eminent historians of psychoanalysis, can take Oxfordianism seriously, Shakespeareans need to spe...

  14. Application of mathematical model methods for optimization tasks in construction materials technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomina, E. V.; Kozhukhova, N. I.; Sverguzova, S. V.; Fomin, A. E.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, the regression equations method for design of construction material was studied. Regression and polynomial equations representing the correlation between the studied parameters were proposed. The logic design and software interface of the regression equations method focused on parameter optimization to provide the energy saving effect at the stage of autoclave aerated concrete design considering the replacement of traditionally used quartz sand by coal mining by-product such as argillite. The mathematical model represented by a quadric polynomial for the design of experiment was obtained using calculated and experimental data. This allowed the estimation of relationship between the composition and final properties of the aerated concrete. The surface response graphically presented in a nomogram allowed the estimation of concrete properties in response to variation of composition within the x-space. The optimal range of argillite content was obtained leading to a reduction of raw materials demand, development of target plastic strength of aerated concrete as well as a reduction of curing time before autoclave treatment. Generally, this method allows the design of autoclave aerated concrete with required performance without additional resource and time costs.

  15. Various causes behind the desorption hysteresis of carboxylic acids on mudstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasamimanana, S; Lefèvre, G; Dagnelie, R V H

    2017-02-01

    Adsorption desorption is a key factor for leaching, migration and (bio)degradation of organic pollutants in soils and sediments. Desorption hysteresis of apolar organic compounds is known to be correlated with adsorption/diffusion into soil organic matter. This work focuses on the desorption hysteresis of polar organic compounds on a natural mudstone sample. Acetic, citric and ortho-phthalic acids displayed adsorption-desorption hysteresis on Callovo-Oxfordian mudstone. The non-reversible behaviours resulted from three different mechanisms. Adsorption and desorption kinetics were evaluated using 14C- and 3H-labelled tracers and an isotopic exchange method. The solid-liquid distribution ratio of acetate decreased using a NaN 3 bactericide, indicating a rapid bacterial consumption compared with negligible adsorption. The desorption hysteresis of phthalate was apparent and suppressed by the equilibration of renewal pore water with mudstone. This confirms the significant and reversible adsorption of phthalate. Finally, persistent desorption hysteresis was evidenced for citrate. In this case, a third mechanism should be considered, such as the incorporation of citrate in the solid or a chemical perturbation, leading to strong desorption resilience. The results highlighted the different pathways that polar organic pollutants might encounter in a similar environment. Data on phthalic acid is useful to predict the retarded transport of phthalate esters and amines degradation products in sediments. The behaviour of citric acid is representative of polydentate chelating agents used in ore and remediation industries. The impact of irreversible adsorption on solid/solution partitioning and transport deserves further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Coupled modelling (transport-reaction) of the fluid-clay interactions and their feed back on the physical properties of the bentonite engineered clay barrier system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, N.

    2006-11-01

    The originality of this work is to process feed back effects of mineralogical and chemical modifications of clays, in storage conditions, on their physical properties and therefore on their transport characteristics (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). These feed back effects are modelled using the KIRMAT code (Kinetic of Reaction and MAss Transfer) developed from the kinetic code KINDIS by adding the effect of water renewal in the mineral-solution reactive cells. KIRMAT resolves mass balance equations associated with mass transport together with the geochemical reactions in a 1D approach. After 100 000 years of simulated interaction at 100 C, with the fluid of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological level (COX) and with iron provided by the steel overpack corrosion, the montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed (into illite, chlorite, saponite...). Only outer parts of the modelled profile seem to be significantly affected by smectite dissolution processes, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. The modifications of physical properties show a closure of the porosity at the boundaries of the barrier, by creating a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion, essentially at the interface with the iron. Permeability laws applied to this system show a decrease of the hydraulic conductivity correlated with the porosity evolution. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier decreases. In the major part of the modelled profile, the engineered clay barrier system seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure) and functionalities. (author)

  17. Discrete Analysis of Damage and Shear Banding in Argillaceous Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç, Özge; Scholtès, Luc

    2018-05-01

    A discrete approach is proposed to study damage and failure processes taking place in argillaceous rocks which present a transversely isotropic behavior. More precisely, a dedicated discrete element method is utilized to provide a micromechanical description of the mechanisms involved. The purpose of the study is twofold: (1) presenting a three-dimensional discrete element model able to simulate the anisotropic macro-mechanical behavior of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone as a particular case of argillaceous rocks; (2) studying how progressive failure develops in such material. Material anisotropy is explicitly taken into account in the numerical model through the introduction of weakness planes distributed at the interparticle scale following predefined orientation and intensity. Simulations of compression tests under plane-strain and triaxial conditions are performed to clarify the development of damage and the appearance of shear bands through micromechanical analyses. The overall mechanical behavior and shear banding patterns predicted by the numerical model are in good agreement with respect to experimental observations. Both tensile and shear microcracks emerging from the modeling also present characteristics compatible with microstructural observations. The numerical results confirm that the global failure of argillaceous rocks is well correlated with the mechanisms taking place at the local scale. Specifically, strain localization is shown to directly result from shear microcracking developing with a preferential orientation distribution related to the orientation of the shear band. In addition, localization events presenting characteristics similar to shear bands are observed from the early stages of the loading and might thus be considered as precursors of strain localization.

  18. Coupled modelling (transport-reaction) of the fluid-clay interactions and their feed back on the physical properties of the bentonite engineered clay barrier system; Modelisation couplee (transport - reaction) des interactions fluides - argiles et de leurs effets en retour sur les proprietes physiques de barrieres ouvragees en bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marty, N

    2006-11-15

    The originality of this work is to process feed back effects of mineralogical and chemical modifications of clays, in storage conditions, on their physical properties and therefore on their transport characteristics (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability). These feed back effects are modelled using the KIRMAT code (Kinetic of Reaction and MAss Transfer) developed from the kinetic code KINDIS by adding the effect of water renewal in the mineral-solution reactive cells. KIRMAT resolves mass balance equations associated with mass transport together with the geochemical reactions in a 1D approach. After 100 000 years of simulated interaction at 100 C, with the fluid of the Callovo-Oxfordian geological level (COX) and with iron provided by the steel overpack corrosion, the montmorillonite of the clay barrier is only partially transformed (into illite, chlorite, saponite...). Only outer parts of the modelled profile seem to be significantly affected by smectite dissolution processes, mainly at the interface with the geological environment. The modifications of physical properties show a closure of the porosity at the boundaries of the barrier, by creating a decrease of mass transport by molecular diffusion, essentially at the interface with the iron. Permeability laws applied to this system show a decrease of the hydraulic conductivity correlated with the porosity evolution. Near the COX, the swelling pressure of the clays from the barrier decreases. In the major part of the modelled profile, the engineered clay barrier system seems to keep its initial physical properties (porosity, molecular diffusion, permeability, swelling pressure) and functionalities. (author)

  19. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David Carl; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kuhhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Caporuscio, Florie Andre; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark.; Jerden, James L.; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William L.

    2014-08-01

    repository leveraging in large part on the information garnered in URLs and laboratory data to test and demonstrate model prediction capability and to accurately represent behavior of the EBS and the natural (barrier) system (NS). In addition, experimental work to improve our understanding of clay barrier interactions and TM couplings at high temperatures are key to evaluate thermal effects as a result of relatively high heat loads from waste and the extent of sacrificial zones in the EBS. To assess the latter, experiments and modeling approaches have provided important information on the stability and fate of barrier materials under high heat loads. This information is central to the assessment of thermal limits and the implementation of the reference case when constraining EBS properties and the repository layout (e.g., waste package and drift spacing). This report is comprised of various parts, each one describing various R&D activities applicable to shale/argillite media. For example, progress made on modeling and experimental approaches to analyze physical and chemical interactions affecting clay in the EBS, NS, and used nuclear fuel (source term) in support of R&D objectives. It also describes the development of a reference case for shale/argillite media. The accomplishments of these activities are summarized as follows: Development of a reference case for shale/argillite; Investigation of Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in EBS: FY14; Update on Experimental Activities on Buffer/Backfill Interactions at elevated Pressure and Temperature; and Thermodynamic Database Development: Evaluation Strategy, Modeling Tools, First-Principles Modeling of Clay, and Sorption Database Assessment;ANL Mixed Potential Model For Used Fuel Degradation: Application to Argillite and Crystalline Rock Environments.

  20. Temporal and spatial variability of Fe and Mn in perched groundwater flowing through weathered argillite underlying a steep forested hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Bishop, J. K.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater flowing through weathered bedrock dictates the runoff chemistry to streams in many catchments yet; its chemical evolution has been rarely documented. In particular, observations of Fe and Mn dynamics in groundwater are extremely challenging due to their high reactivity. To preserve the sample integrity for these elements we have developed a new sampling scheme that is applicable to autosamplers; a gravitational filtration system (GFS). GFS is capable of filtering samples by gravity within 30 minutes after the sampling. The GFS samples showed a good agreement with reference samples, which were collected following the standard sampling method for trace metals (i.e. immediate filtration and acidification). Since October 2011, GFS has been employed to monitor Fe and Mn in perched groundwater that moves through weathered argillite in an intensively instrumented hillslope (Rivendell), in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve. The study site is located at the headwaters of the Eel River, northern California, characterized by a typical coastal Californian Mediterranean climate. We collected groundwater samples at 3 wells along the hillslope (upslope (W10), mid-slope (W3) and near the creek (W1)) with 1-3 day intervals. Additionally, rainwater and throughfall samples were collected at a meadow near the hillslope and at the middle of the hillslope, respectively. The results from our observations indicate that Fe and Mn exhibit distinct spatial and temporal behavior under variable hydrologic conditions. The concentrations of Fe in throughfall vs. rainwater were similar (0.45μM vs. 0.49μM), but Mn in throughfall was 10-fold higher than that in rainwater (1.2 μM vs. 0.1 μM). In the early rainy season, W10's water table was deep (-18m) and Fe and Mn in W10 were 30-150 nM and 1-2 μM, respectively. As the rainy season proceeds, W10's water table rose by 4-6m, indicating the arrival of new water. At this time, Mn in W10 decreased to ~0.1 μM, synchronizing with the water

  1. Results from the geological surveys carried out in the Bure laboratory's shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebours, Herve; Righini, Celine

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. After the government's authorization to build and operate an underground laboratory, Andra started the investigation works in November 99 on the Meuse/Haute-Marne URL site. The Meuse/Haute-Marne URL is located at the border of the Champagne-Ardenne and Lorraine regions, on the township of Bure in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rich rock. On the URL site, the layer is about 135 m-thick and lies at a depth of 417 m to 552 m. The laboratory consists of two levels of experimental drifts at depths of 445 m and 490 m, respectively, with two vertical shafts crossing the 505 m-thick sedimentary cover of Kimeridgian (about 100 meters of marls and limestones), Oxfordian (about 300 meters of limestones) and Callovo-Oxfordian formations. The construction of the underground installations started in August 2000 with the sinking of the main shaft and was completed on the 27 April 2006 when it linked up with the southern drift of the laboratory. The two access shafts are sunk with a drill and blast method with steps of 2.4 to 3.1 m. A temporary support with grouted bolts and wire mesh is set immediately after the blasting and removal of the muck. The definitive concrete lining is installed about 12 to 20 m behind the face. The excavated diameter of the main shaft where the geological surveys and experiments have been undertaken is of 6 m (5 m after lining). The second shaft (auxiliary shaft for the ventilation of the URL) is sunk in a smaller diameter (5 m). The aims of the geological surveys carried out during the shaft sinking are to describe the vertical and lateral (between the two shafts) variations of the lithology, to confirm the absence of fault and the geometry of the argillaceous rocks formation. These surveys allow to characterize the natural or inducted fracturing by a sedimentary and structural follow-up of the excavation face. This follow-up was carried out every 2.4 to 3.0 meters in the shafts. During the shaft

  2. Corrosion of iron and low alloyed steel within a water saturated brick of clay under anaerobic deep geological disposal conditions: An integrated experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, F.A.; Bataillon, C.; Schlegel, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behaviour of iron and low alloyed steels under simulated geological disposal conditions, related to long-term disposal of nuclear wastes in the site of Bure (Meuse-Haute Marne, Champagne, France). The dedicated experiment was a fully integrated set-up: three different bars of material (iron, steel or nickel) have been introduced inside a solid block of clay, which has been saturated with synthetic Bure water and maintained at 90 deg. C during 8 months. Two types of clay have been tested: first, a compacted MX80 (Wyoming, USA) and second, argilite directly taken from the Bure site (Callovo-Oxfordian). In situ electrochemistry has been performed: impedance spectra, chronopotentiometry... The samples have been analysed using a combination of techniques, such as SEM, XRD, EDS, μXAS, μRaman, gravimetry after desquamation. In both cases, the steel or the iron seemed to passivate in contact with the clay. Post-processing of the EIS determined the corrosion rates and the changes in the kinetics have been noticed. The post mortem analysis of the corrosion products showed in both cases the presence of an internal layer made of magnetite (Raman, EDX). The external layer was made of partially Ca-substituted siderite (Fe 1-x Ca x CO 3 ), which could play an extra role in the passivation. Moreover, the samples embedded in the Bure argilite presented an intermediate unique layer containing Fe, O, Na and Si. This study suggests the corrosion products started to react with the silica issued from the dissolution of the Bure clay minerals, resulting in clay minerals neo-formation and in corrosion kinetic changes

  3. The contribution of tracers in understanding transportation processes in indurated argillaceous formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoye, Sebastien

    2008-01-01

    In a first part, the author recalls briefly the properties of the two argillaceous formations studied in this HDR report: the Toarcian/Domerian argillite and the Opalinus clay of Mont Terri. At first, have been described the two undamaged argillite materials and then the damaged Tournemire argillite. The second part gives the results obtained from the researches on the undamaged rock with natural tracers and with approaches using artificial tracers. The third part deals with the study of the damaged rock in separating natural perturbations of those of anthropogenic origin. At last, the conclusion gives the guiding thema of this research work and the main long-term future prospects that may result. (O.M.)

  4. Microbial activity in argillite waste storage cells for the deep geological disposal of French bituminous medium activity long lived nuclear waste: Impact on redox reaction kinetics and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A.; Leone, L.; Charlet, L.

    2009-04-01

    Micro-organisms are ubiquitous and display remarkable capabilities to adapt and survive in the most extreme environmental conditions. It has been recognized that microorganisms can survive in nuclear waste disposal facilities if the required major (P, N, K) and trace elements, a carbon and energy source as well as water are present. The space constraint is of particular interest as it has been shown that bacteria do not prosper in compacted clay. An evaluation of the different types of French medium and high level waste, in a clay-rich host rock storage environment at a depth between 500 and 600 m, has shown that the bituminous waste is the most likely candidate to accommodate significant microbial activity. The waste consists of a mixture of bitumen (source of bio-available organic matter and H2 as a consequence of its degradation and radiolysis) and nitrates and sulphates kept in a stainless steel container. The assumption, that microbes only have an impact on reaction kinetics needs to be reassessed in the case where nitrates and sulphates are present since both are known not to react at low temperatures without bacterial catalysis. The additional impact of both oxy-anions and their reduced species on redox conditions, radionuclide speciation and mobility gives this evaluation their particular relevance. Storage architecture proposes four primary waste containers positioned into armoured cement over packs and placed with others into the waste storage cell itself composed of a cement mantle enforcing the argillite host rock, the latter being characterized by an excavation damaged zone constricted both in space and in time and a pristine part of 60 m thickness. Bacterial activity within the waste and within the pristine argillite is disregarded because of the low water activity (biofilms are within the interface zones. A major restriction for the initial development of microbial colonies is the high pH controlled by the cement solution. Archea are able to survive

  5. Iron-clay reactivity in radioactive waste disposal - Impacts of bacterial activities and heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chautard, C.

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the interactions between two materials that may be introduced in a geological disposal of radioactive waste: metallic materials such as the high-level waste overpack, and clay materials such as the clay host rock. Indeed, the interactions between these two materials in such conditions could induce a change of their initial confinement properties. This work aimed at determining the influence of heterogeneities (technological gaps and fractures) and bacterial activities on these interactions, in terms of evolution of chemical and hydraulic properties of clayey materials. To this end, two percolation cells have been conducted during 13 months: the first one with two bacteria (SRB, IRB), the second one without bacteria. These experiments, carried out at 60 C, involved circulating synthetic water representative of the Tournemire pore water through iron powder and through Toarcian artificially cracked argillite from Tournemire. An iron rod was also placed into the argillite. Thus, solid characterizations (SEM, SEM/EDS, Raman, XRD, X-ray tomography) allowed the study of both interfaces: the iron powder/argillite interface and the iron rod/argillite interface. The water probably circulated into the crack during the entire test, which was confirmed by reactive transport modeling with the HYTEC reactive transport code. However, no secondary phase was identified in the crack. In addition, bacteria survival in the biotic cell was confirmed during the experiment by monitoring their population and by analyzing their genetic diversity at the end of the experiment. A strong decrease in sulfate concentration was measured in the output, which confirms the SRB activity. Solid characterization conducted at the end of the experiments have highlighted, with and without bacteria, the occurrence of magnetite and chukanovite in the iron powder, the latter being mainly located close to the argillite interface. In the argillite, a Fe-enriched zone (10 μm) was

  6. Self-sealing of fractures in argillaceous formations - Evidence, mechanisms and implications for performance assesment (an NEA Clay Club project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bock, H.; Dehandschutter, B.; Martin, C.D.; Mazurek, M.; Haller, A. de; Skoczylas, F.; Davy, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. After some earlier attempts dating back to the year 1999, the Self-Sealing Project of the Clay Club of the NEA/OECD was re-launched in 2007 and recently completed with the publication of NEA monograph No. 6184 (Bock et al., 2010). The project aimed at providing an overview and synthesis of the current understanding of, and conceptual approaches to, the processes that lead to self-sealing of natural and man-induced fractures in argillaceous formations at typical repository depths. The term 'self-sealing' relates to a phenomenon that fractured argillaceous formations tend to become, with the passage of time, less conductive to groundwater and finally hydraulically insignificant. It directly addresses the long-term functionality of the host rock as a migration barrier to radio-nuclides and it is often considered as one of the decisive factors favouring the choice of argillaceous formations as host rocks for deep disposals. In its outcome the project has significantly consolidated the evidence on self-sealing in argillaceous formations. It reconfirmed that self-sealing is a common phenomenon in a wide variety of argillaceous formations which are currently considered in context with deep geological repositories; from plastic clays (Boom Clay in the HADES URF) to moderately indurated clays (Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri and Callovo- Oxfordian argillites at the Meuse-Haute Marne URL). One of the most compelling evidence stems from the fact that self-sealing is observed over a large spread of scales in terms of length and time: At the millimetre to metre scale in laboratory testing, at the repository scale (10 m to 100 m range) in URL field tests and at the kilometre scale in geologic and geotechnical analogues such as traffic tunnels and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Over geological time scales, it is, for example, evidenced in the existence of hydraulically and geochemically inactive geological faults, in the existence

  7. A new water permeability measurement method for unsaturated tight materials using saline solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinsky, Laurent; Talandier, Jean

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Relative water permeability of material in a radioactive waste disposal is a key parameter to simulate and predict saturation state evolution. In this paper we present a new measurement method and the results obtained for Callovo-Oxfordian (Cox) clay-stone, host rock of the underground Andra laboratory at Bure (Meuse/Haute-Marne). Relative water permeability of such a low permeability rock as Cox clay-stone has been measured up to now by an indirect method. It consists in submitting a rock sample to successive relative humidity steps imposed by saline solutions. The transient mass variation during each step and the mass at hydric equilibrium are interpreted generally by using an inverse analysis method. The water relative permeability function of water saturation is derived from water diffusion coefficient evolution and water retention curve. The proposed new method consists in directly measuring the water flux across a flat cylindrical submitted to a relative humidity gradient. Two special cells have been developed. The tightness of the lateral sample surface is insured by crushing a polyurethane ring surrounding the sample set in an aluminium device placed over a Plexiglas vessel filled with a saline solution. One of the cells is designed to allow humidity measurement in the cell. These cells can also be used to measure the relative humidity produced by a saline solution or by an unsaturated material. During a permeability measurement, the cell with the sample to be tested is continuously weighted in a Plexiglas box in which a saline solution imposes a different relative humidity at the upper sample face. The experimental set-up is shown on Figure 1. The mean permeability of the sample is proportional to the rate of mass variation when steady state is reached. The result of one test is shown on Figure 2(a). Twenty four permeability measurements have been performed on four argillite samples of 15 mm in height and

  8. 2005 dossier: clay. Tome: architecture and management of the geologic disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the design of a geologic disposal facility for high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in argilite formations. Content: 1 - approach of the study: goal, main steps of the design study, iterative approach, content; 2 - general description: high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes, purposes of a reversible disposal, geologic context of the Meuse/Haute-Marne site - the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, design principles of the disposal facility architecture, role of the different disposal components; 3 - high-level and long-lived wastes: production scenarios, description of primary containers, inventory model, hypotheses about receipt fluxes of primary containers; 4- disposal containers: B-type waste containers, C-type waste containers, spent fuel disposal containers; 5 - disposal modules: B-type waste disposal modules, C-type waste disposal modules, spent-fuel disposal modules; 6 - overall underground architecture: main safety questions, overall design, dimensioning factors, construction logic and overall exploitation of the facility, dimensioning of galleries, underground architecture adaptation to different scenarios; 7 - boreholes and galleries: general needs, design principles retained, boreholes description, galleries description, building up of boreholes and galleries, durability of facilities, backfilling and sealing up of boreholes and galleries; 8 - surface facilities: general organization, nuclear area, industrial and administrative area, tailings area; 9 - nuclear exploitation means of the facility: receipt of primary containers and preparation of disposal containers, transfer of disposal containers from the surface to the disposal alveoles, setting up of containers inside alveoles; 10 - reversible management of the disposal: step by step disposal process, mastery of disposal behaviour and action capacity, observation and

  9. Quantitative palynofacies analysis as a new tool to study transfers of fossil organic matter in recent terrestrial environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graz, Y.; Di-Giovanni, C. [Universite d' Orleans, Universite Francois Rabelais - Tours, CNRS/INSU, Institut des Sciences de la Terre d' Orleans - UMR 6113 Campus Geosciences, 1A, rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France); Copard, Y. [M2C, UMR 6143 CNRS/Universite de Rouen, place E. Blondel, Bat. Irese A, Universite de Rouen, 76821 Mont Saint Aignan Cedex (France); Laggoun-Defarge, F.; Boussafir, M.; Lallier-Verges, E.; Baillif, P.; Perdereau, L.; Simonneau, A. [Universite d' Orleans, Universite Francois Rabelais - Tours, CNRS/INSU, Institut des Sciences de la Terre d' Orleans - UMR 6113 Campus Geosciences, 1A, rue de la Ferollerie, 45071 Orleans cedex 2 (France)

    2010-10-01

    Classical palynofacies method, which consists of an organic concentrate microscopic qualitative observation after mineral phase dissolution, is commonly used in order to study sedimentary organic matter. In the present study we develop a new quantitative palynofacies method that allows organic particles mass concentrations to be determined in studied samples. This method was developed to help quantify the input of fossil organic matter (FOM) into modern environments as a result of sedimentary rocks weathering. Studied samples were collected from different pools, like bedrocks, weathering profiles, soils and riverine particles in an experimental watershed ''Le Laval''. This watershed overlying Callovo-Oxfordian marls (1 km{sup 2} in area) is located near Digne, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence, in France. In addition to palynofacies techniques, Rock-Eval 6 pyrolysis and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content measurements (inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry) were carried out on the samples. Obtained results show that this quantitative palynofacies method is suitable for FOM studies in modern environments, and FOM particles are quantified in the different pools. Results also give evidence that FOM alteration depends on the type of weathering, but also on the kind of organic particles. Soil formation under vegetation, resulting from the (bio)chemical weathering, lead to fossil organic particles concentration losses that do not exceed 30%. Elsewhere, mechanical weathering appears extremely fast and has no qualitative or quantitative influence on the observed FOM particles, which feeds directly into riverine stocks. FOM appears to be very resistant to weathering processes, this highlights its occurrence into supergene pools and then into carbon cycle. Quantitative palynofacies analysis is a new method adapted to such study, but can also be applied to other palynological, paleoenvironmental or archeological studies. (author)

  10. THM large spatial-temporal model to simulate the past 2 Ma hydrogeological evolution of Paris Basin including natural tracer transport as part of site characterization for radwaste repository project Cigéo - France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabderrahmane, A., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogeological site characterization for deep geological high level and intermediate level long lived radioactive waste repository cover a large time scale needed for safety analysis and calculation. Hydrogeological performance of a site relies also on the effects of geodynamic evolution as tectonic uplift, erosion/sedimentation and climate including glaciation on the groundwater flow and solute and heat transfer. Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical model of multilayered aquifer system of Paris Basin is developed to reproduce the present time flow and the natural tracer (Helium) concentration profiles based on the last 2 Ma of geodynamic evolution. Present time geological conceptual model consist of 27 layers at Paris Basin (Triassic-Tertiary) with refinement at project site scale (29 layers from Triassic to Portlandian). Target layers are the clay host formation of Callovo-Oxfrodian age (160 Ma) and the surrounding aquifer layers of Oxfordian and Dogger. Modelled processes are: groundwater flow, heat and solutes (natural tracers) transport, freezing and thawing of groundwater (expansion and retreat of permafrost), deformation of the multilayered aquifer system induced by differential tectonic uplift and the hydro-mechanical stress effect as caused by erosion of the outcropping layers. Numerical simulation considers a period from 2 Ma BP and up to the present. Transient boundary conditions are governed by geodynamic processes: (i) modification of the geometry of the basin and (ii) temperatures along the topography will change according to a series of 15 identical climate cycles with multiple permafrost (glaciation) periods. Numerical model contains 71 layers and 18 million cells. The solution procedure solves three coupled systems of equations, head, temperature and concentrations, by the use of a finite difference method, and by applying extensive parallel processing. The major modelling results related to the processes of importance for site characterization as hydraulic

  11. Influence of natural mobile organic matter on europium retention on Bure clay rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu-Do, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    Bure clay rock (CR) was chosen as host rock for the French high and intermediate level long lived radioactive waste repository. This choice is mostly explained by the retention ability of the Callovo-Oxfordian rock (COx). Bure clay rock contains natural organic matter (OM) that could have an influence on radionuclide retention. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of natural mobile OM on the retention of Eu on clay rock. Eu was chosen as a chemical model for trivalent actinides contained in vitrified waste. Three organic molecules were studied: suberic, sorbic and tiglic acids, small organic acids identified in COx pore water. All the experiments were carried out in an environment recreating COx water (pH=7.5; I=0.1 mol/L; PCO 2 =10 -2 bar).Clay rock sample characterization showed that the sample used in this work was similar to those previously extracted from the area of interest and that it was necessary to maintain pH at 7.5 to avoid altering the clay rock. The Eu-OM system study indicated that organic acids had no influence on Eu speciation in COx water. The Eu-CR system experimental study confirmed that retention implied sorption on CR (C(Eu)≤6.10 -6 mol/L) and precipitation in COx water (C(Eu)≥6.10 -6 mol/L). Distribution coefficient Rd (quantifying sorption) was estimated at 170 ± 30 L/g. This high value is consistent with literature values obtained on clay rocks. The ternary Eu-OM-CR system study showed a slight increase of sorption in the presence of organic matter. This synergistic effect is very satisfactory in terms of storage security: the presence of small organic acids in clay rock does not question retention properties with respect to europium and trivalent actinides. (author)

  12. Effect of the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey fraction on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debure, M.; Frugier, P.; GIN, S.; De Windt, L.; Michau, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In France, high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is confined in a glass matrix packaged into stainless steel canister and carbon steel overpack. The HLW should be buried in a geological clay formation like, potentially, the Callovian-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone located in the north-eastern Parisian basin. The COx clay-stone contains minerals that can feed the near-field with soluble Mg. Such minerals are carbonates (ankerite, dolomite) as well as clay minerals (chlorite, illite, interstratified illite/smectite). Previous laboratory experiments have proved that aqueous solutions of Mg salts could significantly increase the alteration rate of nuclear glass (Jollivet et al., 2012). This motivated to go a step further by studying the alteration of nuclear glass put in contact with Mg minerals. A first set of experiments have revealed that the rate of glass dissolution was increased with hydro-magnesite (4MgCO 3 .Mg(OH) 2 .4H 2 O, a chemically simple model mineral) and dolomite. In both cases, Mg coming from carbonate dissolution reacts with Si, provided by the glass, in order to form Mg silicates (Debure et al., 2012). In that case, Si consumption sustains glass alteration. Mg silicate precipitation also consumes protons; therefore the interdiffusion of alkali within the glass alteration layer eventually becomes a driving force that sustains Mg silicate precipitation. The second set of experiments, presented here, aimed at better characterizing the role of the COx clayey fraction. The separation of the clayey phases of the COx clay-stone has been made in collaboration with the LEM lab (Nancy, France) by a sequence of sieving, acidic dissolution of carbonates, NaCl washing and sedimentation (Rivard, 2011). According to XRD and infrared analyses, the clayey fraction was mainly composed of kaolinite, illite, interstratified illite/smectite and chlorite (plus a little residual amount of quartz). This first step aimed to remove

  13. M4SF-17LL010301071: Thermodynamic Database Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Institute, Physical & Life Sciences; Wolery, T. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Akima Infrastructure Services, LLC

    2017-09-05

    This progress report (Level 4 Milestone Number M4SF-17LL010301071) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within the Argillite Disposal R&D Work Package Number M4SF-17LL01030107. The DR Argillite Disposal R&D control account is focused on the evaluation of important processes in the analysis of disposal design concepts and related materials for nuclear fuel disposal in clay-bearing repository media. The objectives of this work package are to develop model tools for evaluating impacts of THMC process on long-term disposal of spent fuel in argillite rocks, and to establish the scientific basis for high thermal limits. This work is contributing to the GDSA model activities to identify gaps, develop process models, provide parameter feeds and support requirements providing the capability for a robust repository performance assessment model by 2020.

  14. FRACTEX: an experiment aiming at characterizing the transport properties of a secondary fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittebroodt, C.; Matray, J.M.; Dick, P.; Cabrera, J.; Barnichon, J.D.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Because of their favourable transport and retention properties, argillaceous rocks are considered as potential host rocks for radioactive waste repositories. At the request of the French Authority of Nuclear Safety (ASN), the French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) is in charge of an independent expertise of the French industrial (Andra's) project. Therefore, IRSN develops experimental research programs in such geological formations at the Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL, Aveyron, France). One of the objectives of this project is to evaluate the occurrence and the driving processes controlling the radionuclide migration through an argillaceous formation similar to those studied elsewhere for nuclear waste disposal. Since undisturbed argillaceous rocks display very low values for both hydraulic conductivity (K h ) and water content (θ e ), diffusion is considered to be the main transport mechanism governing radionuclide migration through the argillite. On the other hand, in the presence of fracture in the argillaceous formation, the flux of water through this preferential pathway could dramatically accelerate the migration of the radionuclide it contains. Thus, the implementation of a radwaste disposal facility requires a precise sedimentary and structural characterization of the preselected site to guarantee the presence of a regular, homogenous and fault-free clay layer over a large area and so to determine its ability to ensure an effective radionuclide confinement. The site characterization and fracture detection can be performed using complementary approaches such as geological studies, in situ measurements and non-destructive geophysical methods. In order to evaluate both the capacity and the limit of these seismic methods to detect a secondary fault in an argillaceous media, IRSN performed a 3D HR seismic survey from the surface of its Tournemire URL. Due to the weak

  15. ANALYSIS OF DEFORMABILITY OF ANISOTROPIC AGRILLITE CLAYSTONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomaryov Andrey Budimirovicn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the results of deformability study of agrillite claystones are used for determination of the Jointed rock model parameters. The number of stamp, pressuremeter and compressive tests allowed to research anisotropic deformability of argillite claystone in vertical and horizontal direction. The following problems were solved during the study: 1 the in-place and laboratory experiments to calculate the anisotropy coefficient were done for anisotropic agrillite claystones with both natural moisture and total water saturation; 2 the deformation parameters were determined and the numerical simulation of the stress-strain state of claystone in field tests was carried out with the use of Plaxis 2D software application; 3 the comparative analysis was done for calculated claystone deformation and the values obtained during the in-place tests. The authors proved that agrillite claystones shows two times less deformation under loading in the horizontal direction than vertically. The ratio is obtained to determine the parameters for numerical simulation of the Jointed Rock model used as a practical tool for analysis of stress-strain behavior of anisotropic soils. The authors provided a recommended practice for consideration of specific properties of argillite claystones when carrying out foundation works.

  16. Mineralogical evolution of argilites in dehydrated-oxidised zones: the example of the argilitic walls from Tournemire tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, D.; Cathelineau, M.; Mosser-Ruck, R.; Bruno, G.

    2001-01-01

    Digging of underground work such as that of the Tournemire tunnel in a Toarcian argillite formation, has an impact on the surface mineralogy of the rock blocks. In spite of its very low water content, the argillite is reactive as a consequence of the modification of the redox conditions. Thus, atmospheric oxygen in presence of adsorbed water induces pyrite corrosion and formation of secondary mineral phases such as gypsum, celestite, jarosite and Fe-hydroxides, which play a significant role on the water-rock equilibria of the mechanically disturbed zone. (authors)

  17. Indian program on management of high level radioactive waste - emphasis on value recovery for societal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Tomar, Neelima Singh; Kumar, Amar; Wadhwa, S.; Diwan, Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Power Programme in India is based on 'closed fuel cycle'. Closed fuel cycle involves reprocessing and recycling of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) coming out of nuclear reactors. During reprocessing, uranium and plutonium, constituting bulk of the SNF are separated and subsequently recycled. The remaining small portion constitutes high level radioactive waste containing most of the fission products and minor actinides. A three-step strategy involving immobilization, interim storage followed by ultimate disposal has been adopted in India for management of High Level Waste (HLW). Borosilicate glass matrix has been identified for immobilization of HLW owing to optimal waste loading, adequate leach resistance and long term stability of the product. An interim storage facility is in operation for storage and surveillance of VWP. A comprehensive program based on screening of different materials like granite, argillite, clay with respect to sorption of different radionuclides is being pursued to identify the suitable areas of disposal of the conditioned waste products. Separation of useful radionuclides like "1"3"7Cs, "9"0Sr, "9"0Y, "1"0"6Ru etc and its utilization for societal applications is being practiced in India. (author)

  18. PHREEQC integrated modelling of plutonium migration from alpha ILL radwaste: organic complexes, concrete degradation and alkaline plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochepin, B.; Munier, I.; Giffaut, E.; Grive, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The effects of organic compounds derived from Long-Lived Intermediate-Level waste (LLILW) degradation need to be precisely described regarding the radionuclide migration in storage cells and argillites. These evaluations play a major role in the final decision for accepting these waste products in the future storage facility. The evaluation process engaged by Andra implies the use of coupled chemical transport tools able to take into account the linking of processes occurring in storage conditions as well as the different cell components (containers, packages, lining...). The relevance of this approach must fundamentally be based on a consistent characterization concerning (i) the waste packages, (ii) their degradation products (nature and kinetics), (iii) the chemical evolution of these products in the storage disposal (for cement material particularly) and in the argillites, and (iv) the correlation with the radionuclide behavior regarding to these sequestering agents (chemistry and transport). Andra is now involved in an internal evaluation of technological organic waste packages contaminated by plutonium coming from the MOX fuel plant called MELOX located at Marcoule (France), considering the consistent work undertaken to characterize these organic agents. This evaluation is based on an integrated representation in terms of chemical processes and transport of the concrete chemical degradation (e.g. waste packages, backfill and lining), the alkaline plume in the near field of argillites and the plutonium-organic complexes. The conceptual model is based on the following assessments: On the chemical aspect: (i) Both concrete and argillites undertake chemical perturbations with dissolution/precipitation, ion exchanges, surface and aqueous complexation. (ii) The degradation products of the MELOX waste organic compounds are limited to five major organic acids: iso-saccharinic (ISA), acetic, phtalic, adipic and

  19. DECOVALEX-THMC Project. Task C. Hydro-mechanical response of the Tournemire argillite to the underground openings excavation: unsaturated zones and mine-by-test experiment. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejeb, A.; Rouabhi, A. (Ecole des Mines de Paris (France)); Millard, A. (Commissariat d' Energie Atomique (France)); Massmann, J. (Hannover Univ. (DE)); Uehara, S. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    2008-06-15

    This report describes the final results of Task C of the international DECOVALEX-THMC project devoted to Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) in argillaceous rock at the Tounemire site in France. Task C is aimed to develop adequate numerical models for interpretation of observed damaged zones around three openings excavated at different times. The research teams are asked to model the evolution of the EDZ with time and to compare their results with measurements that were performed at the site. The main objective is to investigate the hydro-mechanical behavior of Tounemire argillite around the three openings (1881 tunnel, 1996 gallery, 2003 gallery) of Tournemire site. The work was divided into 3 parts: 1. Modelling of the unsaturated zones around the three openings; 2. Modelling of the mine-by-test experiment around the 2003 gallery; 3. EDZ modeling around the 3 openings. Each research team has performed its own HM numerical calculations based on the principal following considerations: The hydraulic time dependent boundary condition at each opening wall was calculated by the Kelvin equation using the provided humidities and temperatures; The effective stress approach of partially saturated medium was used; The swelling-shrinkage of Tournemire argillite was taken into account; The capillary pressure curve was assumed to be given by the Van Genuchten relation and calibrated from the provided data of the two successful laboratory tests; The influence of the degree of saturation on liquid water permeability was modelled using a relative permeability function which is based also on the Van Genuchten model; The intrinsic permeability was calibrated in order to get a better fit with experimental data. To achieve the first objective, the three research teams act as follows: 2D HM coupled simulations have been undertaken by ISEB-BGR team. Hydraulic and mechanical anisotropies were considered; 2D HM coupled simulations have been also undertaken by CEA-IRSN team. Only mechanical

  20. Preliminary appraisal of gravity and magnetic data at Syncline Ridge, Western Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponce, D.A.; Hanna, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    A gravity and magnetic study of the Syncline Ridge area was conducted as part of an investigation of argillite rocks of the Eleana Formation under consideration as a medium for the possible storage of high-level radioactive waste. Bouguer gravity anomaly, low-level aeromagnetic anomaly, density, and magnetization data collectively indicate the following, relative to the Eleana Formation, the principal target of the investigation: (1) in an area extending northwestward from Mine Mountain, through Syncline Ridge, to the Eleana Range, the Eleana Formation, where not exposed, occurs at depths of less than approx. 200 m, except for a small region of exposed older Paleozoic rocks; (2) in the region of shallowly buried Eleana Formation, occurrences of volcanic rock cover are delineated by low-level aeromagnetic anomaly data, which also discriminate normally polarized from reversely polarized tuff units; and (3) selective detection of high-quartz argillite relative to low-quartz argillite using surface gravity data is not feasible if the high-quartz and low-quartz varieties are intimately interbedded, as observed in boreholes. 4 figures, 2 tables

  1. Modeling the viscoplastic and damage behavior in deep argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souley, M.; Armand, G.; Su, K.; Ghoreychi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone formation, the French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started in 2000 to build an underground research laboratory at Bure (East of France). One of the key issues is to understand long term behavior of the drifts. More than 400 m horizontal galleries at the main level of -490 m have been instrumented since April 2005. The continuous measurements of convergence of the galleries are available, allowing a better understanding of the time-dependent response of the clay-stone at natural scale. Results indicate that the viscoplastic strain rates observed in the undamaged area far from the gallery walls are of the same order of magnitude as those obtained on rock samples, whereas those recorded in the damaged or fractured zone near the gallery walls are one to two orders of magnitude higher, indicating the significant influence of damage or/and macro-fractures on the viscoplastic strains. Based on these observations, a macroscopic viscoplastic model which aims to improve the viscoplastic strain prediction in the EDZ is proposed and implemented in FLAC 3Dc . Both the instantaneous and the time-dependent behavior are considered in the model. The short term response is assumed to be elastoplastic with strain hardening/softening whereas the time-dependent behavior is based on the concepts of visco-plasticity (Lemaitre's model). Finally, the damage-induced viscoplastic strains changes is examined through the plastic deformation (assumed to approach the damage rate).In order to verify both constitutive equations and their implementations, several simulations are performed: (a) triaxial tests at different confining pressures; (b) single- and multi-stage creep tests; (c) relaxation tests with different total axial strain levels, etc. Finally, an example of a blind prediction of the excavation of a drift parallel to the horizontal minor stress,

  2. Long-term hydrodynamic response induced by past climatic and geo-morphologic forcing: The case of the Paris basin, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, A.; Violette, S.; Goncalves, J.; Ledoux, E.; Guyomard, Y.; Guillocheau, F.; Kageyama, M.; Ramstein, G.; Suc, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    In the framework of safe underground storage of radioactive waste in low-permeability layers, it is essential to evaluate the mobility of deep groundwaters over timescales of several million years. On these timescales, the environmental evolution of a repository should depend upon a range of natural processes that are primarily driven by climate and geo-morphologic variations. In this paper, the response of the Paris basin groundwater system to variations in its hydrodynamic boundary conditions induced by past climate and geodynamic changes over the last five million years is investigated. A three-dimensional transient modelling of the Paris basin aquifer/aquitard system was developed using the code NEWSAM (Ecole des Mines de Paris, ENSMP). The geometry and hydrodynamic parameters of the model originate from a basin model, NEWBAS (ENSMP), built to simulate the geological history of the basin. Geo-morphologic evolution is deduced from digital elevation model analysis, which allows to estimate river-valley incision and alpine uplift. Climate forcing results from paleo-climate modelling experiments using the LMDz atmospheric general circulation model (Institut Pierre Simon Laplace) with a refined spatial resolution, for the present, the Last Glacial Maximum (21 ka) and the Middle Pliocene Warmth (similar to 3 Ma). The water balance is computed by the distributed hydrological model MODSUR (ENSMP). Results about the simulated evolution of piezometric heads in the system in response to the altered boundary conditions are presented, in particular in the vicinity of ANDRA's Bure potential repository site within the Callovo-Oxfordian argillaceous layer. For the present, the comparison of head patterns between steady state and time dependent simulation shows little differences for aquifer layers close to the surface but suggests a transient state of the current system in the main aquitards of the basin and in the deep aquifers, characterized by abnormally low fluid

  3. Modelling of thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings and damage of viscoplastic rocks in the context of radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkhour, H.

    2002-12-01

    Trying to develop a model taking into account the complex rheology of a geologic media characterized by visco-plasticity, damage and thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings is unusual in geotechnics. This is not the case for radioactive waste storage that presents specificities from several viewpoints. Indeed, the scales of time and space concerned by this type of storage are disproportionate to those of civil engineering works or mines. Another specificity of the radioactive waste storage lies in the coupled processes involved. No effect likely to compromise the long-term security of the storage could be ignored. For example this is the case of damage, a phenomenon which does not necessarily lead to a major change of the mechanical behavior of the works but can influence the permeability of the medium in relation with a migration of radionuclides. It can be conceived that this phenomenon finds all its importance in the context of the thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings of a waste storage with high activity. However, the interaction between the damage and the THM coupled processes was the object of very few research subject up to now. This. is even more true for viscoplastic media considered as ductile, and therefore, less prone to cracking than brittle media. It is exactly in this 'original' but difficult context that took place the research presented in this report. This study was dedicated to the analysis of the phenomena and the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical couplings occurring in the near and far field of a high activity radioactive waste storage. Two examples of geological media were considered in this report: the clayey rock of Callovo-Oxfordian, called ' Argilites de l'Est ', target rock of the ANDRA project to carry out a subterranean laboratory for the study of long life radioactive waste storage; and the salt rock of the. subterranean laboratory in the old salt mine of Asse in Germany. (author)

  4. Tracing of variabilities within a geological barrier by molecular organic geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautevelle, Yann; Michels, Raymond; Malartre, Fabrice; Elie, Marcel; Trouiller, Alain

    2007-01-01

    The Callovo-Oxfordian claystones located at 500 m depth at Bure (Meuse, France) are currently being investigated by Andra (the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) for testing the feasibility of long-term and deep geological nuclear waste disposal. In order to evaluate its potential as a geological barrier, it is very important to study, assess and describe its physico-chemical variability. The molecular biomarker composition of 150 samples of these claystones and their surrounding limestones carry diverse information on the sources of the sedimentary organic matter, the chemistry of the depositional environment, the preservation and diagenesis conditions. It also allows assessing the degree of lateral and vertical variability of the organic matter within these sedimentary series. The abundance of unsaturated biomarkers, the distribution of steroids and hopanoids and CPI values >2 prove the thermal immaturity of the organic matter. The co-occurrence of plankton, bacteria and land plant biomarkers indicate that the organic matter is a mixture of marine and continental contributions. The data also reveal that the organic matter was deposited under oxic and open-sea conditions except for a brief event of photic zone anoxia at the beginning of the Middle Callovian. In the claystones, the geosynthesis of diasterenes is favored to the detriment of the formation of steranes, especially in smectite-rich levels, and the organic matter is rapidly isolated from oxidizing then reducing conditions after the deposition due to the protective effect of clays. On the scale investigated, the claystones are characterized by a unique molecular facies and are thus homogenous from their organic content point of view. Yet, detailed investigation of specific molecular families indicates changes related to major claystone-limestone transitions. The homogeneity of these claystones can be explained by the paleogeographic position of their depositional setting and the plane

  5. Modelling of thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings and damage of viscoplastic rocks in the context of radioactive waste storage; Modelisation des couplages thermo-hydro-mecaniques et de l'endommagement des roches viscoplastiques dans le contexte du stockage de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharkhour, H

    2002-12-01

    Trying to develop a model taking into account the complex rheology of a geologic media characterized by visco-plasticity, damage and thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings is unusual in geotechnics. This is not the case for radioactive waste storage that presents specificities from several viewpoints. Indeed, the scales of time and space concerned by this type of storage are disproportionate to those of civil engineering works or mines. Another specificity of the radioactive waste storage lies in the coupled processes involved. No effect likely to compromise the long-term security of the storage could be ignored. For example this is the case of damage, a phenomenon which does not necessarily lead to a major change of the mechanical behavior of the works but can influence the permeability of the medium in relation with a migration of radionuclides. It can be conceived that this phenomenon finds all its importance in the context of the thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings of a waste storage with high activity. However, the interaction between the damage and the THM coupled processes was the object of very few research subject up to now. This. is even more true for viscoplastic media considered as ductile, and therefore, less prone to cracking than brittle media. It is exactly in this 'original' but difficult context that took place the research presented in this report. This study was dedicated to the analysis of the phenomena and the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical couplings occurring in the near and far field of a high activity radioactive waste storage. Two examples of geological media were considered in this report: the clayey rock of Callovo-Oxfordian, called ' Argilites de l'Est ', target rock of the ANDRA project to carry out a subterranean laboratory for the study of long life radioactive waste storage; and the salt rock of the. subterranean laboratory in the old salt mine of Asse in Germany. (author)

  6. Organic matter and hydrogen as electron donor for SRB and IRB activities in a clayey medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chautard, C.; Mifsud, A.; Libert, M.; Marsal, F.

    2012-01-01

    potentially be used as electron donor. For that purpose, DOM was extracted from crushed rock under anoxic conditions with solutions representative of Tournemire pore water for 36 hours. The factors influencing DOM extraction, such as extraction time, solid-to-liquid ratio, exposure to oxygen gas and temperature, were tested according to the same experimental methodology as previously applied to the OM of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone. The DOM and the low molecular weight organic acids were determined, respectively, by Total Organic Carbon (TOC) analyzer and Ion Chromatography (IC). The dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was identified as fumarate, acetate, lactate, formate and propionate, so that only 35 % are low molecular weight organic acids. These organic acids (propionate excepted) have also been identified in pore water samples directly collected from Tournemire argillite. In order to study the role of hydrogen and DOM from Tournemire clay on bacterial activity and growth, batch experiments were performed in presence of a SRB Thermo desulfovibrio hydrogeniphilus, an IRB Thermo toga subteranea strain SLT 1 and a mixed culture of both species. Three sets of experiments were launched: the first one under hydrogen, the second one with DOM and the third one with both DOM and hydrogen. The culture medium consists of a solution representative of Tournemire pore water and essential nutrients for bacterial growth. DOM is added as a solution obtained by equilibration of synthetic pore water with crushed rock material at a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1500 g.L -1 for one week. Control experiments without bacteria were carried out under the same conditions. Hydrogen partial pressure was periodically monitored by gas chromatography, DOC and organic acid in the liquid phase by TOC analyzer and IC. Results are discussed with respect to bacterial activity (SRB, IRB and both species) and consequently, to the influence of the different electron donors (hydrogen, OM and both). (authors)

  7. Investigations on self-sealing of indurated clay - Part of the NF-PRO project. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang; Rothfuchs, T.; Dittrich, J.; Mueller, J.

    2008-03-01

    The self-sealing potential of the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite and the Opalinus clay was investigated on strongly damaged samples. Gas permeability as a function of the confining stress before and after water resaturation was measured. Not only normally-sized but also large-scale and cylindrical ring-shaped samples were tested. Each test lasted over a time period of 5 to 16 months. The experimental findings are: 1. The permeability of the pre-damaged samples decreased significantly with a concurrent increase of the confining stress due to fracture closure. The permeability measured in radial direction on a hollow sample decreased from 10 -15 m 2 at a low confining stress of 1 MPa to 10 -21 m 2 at 28 MPa. The compression of the sample led to plastic closure of pre-existing fractures, leading to a significantly lower permeability after unloading. A similar permeability reduction with increasing confining stress was also observed in axial direction, parallel to the bedding plane. But, at low confining stresses below 10 MPa, the axial permeability parallel to the bedding was about one to two orders of magnitude higher than the radial one perpendicular to the bedding. The hydraulic anisotropy vanishes off with increasing the confining stress. 2. The permeability of fractured clay rocks was dominated by the confining stress normal to the fracture plane. This was validated by gas permeability measurements on a large sample (D=260 mm/L=616 mm) with fractures oriented parallel to the sample axis. The increase of the lateral stress from 3 to 18 MPa at 19 MPa axial stress led to a decrease of axial permeability from 10 -13 to 10 -19 m 2 . 3. The permeability od damaged clay rocks decreased also with time due to the time-dependent compaction of pores and fractures. On the pre-damaged samples, a permeability reduction by a factor of 4 to 8 was observed over two months at a low confining stress of 1.5 MPa. 4. The high swelling potential of the studied clay rocks led to the

  8. Self-sealing of excavation induced fractures in clay host rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chun-Liang [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Excavation of an underground repository for disposal of radioactive waste in clay formations generates fractures around the openings, which may act as pathways for water transport and radionuclides migration. Because of the favorable properties of the clay rocks such as the rheological deformability and swelling capability, a recovery process of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) can be expected due to the combined impact of rock compression, backfill resistance, and clay swelling during the post-closure phase. Another important issue is the impact of gases produced from anoxic corrosion of waste containers and other metallic components within the repository. The EDZ may act as a conduit for preferential gas flow, depending on the extent of the recovery process. For the safety assessment of a repository, the self-sealing behaviour and impact on water and gas transport through the EDZ have to be characterized, understood, and predicted. Recently, GRS has extensively investigated these important issues with various kinds of laboratory and in- situ experiments under relevant repository conditions. Test samples were taken from the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite at Bure in France and the Opalinus clay (shaly facies) at Mont Terri in Switzerland. Major findings are summarized as follows. As observed in laboratory and in-situ, the gas permeabilities of the claystones increase with stress-induced damage by several orders of magnitude from the impermeable state up to high levels of 10{sup -12}-10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. When hydrostatic confining stress is applied and increased, the fractures in the claystones tend to close up, leading to a decrease in gas permeability down to different levels of 10{sup -16}-10{sup -21} m{sup 2} at stresses in a range of 10 to 20 MPa. As water enters and flows through fractures, the clay matrix can take up a great amount of the water and expand into the interstices. Consequently, the hydraulic conductivity decreases dramatically by several orders of

  9. Selection of areas for testing in the Eleana formation: Paleozoic geology of western Yucca Flat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweeney, J J

    1984-07-01

    The Paleozoic geology of NTS is reviewed to select an area for underground nuclear testing in shale. Constraints on possible areas, dictated by test program requirements and economics, are areas with topographic slope less than 5/sup 0/, depths to working point less than 3000 ft., and working points above the water table. The rock formation selected is Unit J (argillite) of the Mississippian age Eleana Formation. Within NTS, Western Yucca Flat is selected as the best area to meet the requirements. Details of the Paleozoic structure of western Yucca Flat are presented. The interpretation is based on published maps, cross-sections, and reports as well as borehole, refraction seismic, and gravity data. In terms of subsurface structure and areas where Eleana Formation Unit J occurs at depths between 500 ft to 3000 ft, four possible testing areas are identified. The areas are designated here as A, B, C and the Gravity High. Available data on the water table (static water level) is reviewed for western Yucca Flat area. Depth to the water table increases from 500 to 600 ft in Area A to 1500 ft or more in the Gravity High area. Review of the water table data rules out area A and B for testing in argillite above the water table. Area C is relatively unexplored and water conditions are unknown there. Thus, the Gravity High is selected as the most promising area for selecting testing sites. There is a dolomite thrust sheet of unknown thickness overlying the argillite in the Gravity High area. An exploration program is proposed to better characterize this structure. Finally, recommendations are made for procedures to follow for eventual site characterization of a testing site in argillite. 22 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  10. Impact of chemical oxidation and water acidification on the mineralogical and physico-chemical properties of the Tournemire argillaceous formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, D.

    2001-11-01

    The French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) has selected a site near Tournemire (France) for research programmes on deep geological waste disposal in clay-rich rock formation. A railway tunnel was built about 100 years ago through the thick indurated Toarcian argillite of the Tournemire Massif and two galleries were constructed five years ago. They are used to study the evolution of rock mineralogical composition, texture, water content and water-rock interactions in the excavated disturbed zone. Multi-scale and multi-technique investigations were carried out on the evolution of physical and mineralogical rock properties. Experiments and numerical modelling were used to predict changes due to water-rock interactions and subsequent rock mineralogy and water chemistry modifications. The argillite consists of detrital clay-rich layers and carbonate layers. Pyrites are always present in significant amounts (2 to 2.5 %). The rock presents very low porosity and very low water content (around 3 %). Leaching experiments show that the interstitial water is Na and SO 4 -rich and Cl-poor. The tunnel and galleries digging induces fracture formation. In the altered samples, the clay particles show a better orientation in the stratification plan, which increases the porosity. The oxidation effect yields to mineralogical transformation on the surfaces of the argillite: oxidation of pyrite, dissolution of calcite, dissolution of illite layers in interstratified I/S and formation of gypsum, Fe-oxi/hydroxides, celestite and jarosite. During cycles of hydration/dehydration, condensation water interacts with the argillite and quickly becomes Ca and SO 4 -rich. The local dissolution of clay particles leads to an increase of the chloride and potassium water content. These phenomena are important for the consideration of the underground work stability, especially the evolution of the water-rock equilibria during the re-hydration of the excavated disturbed zones. (author)

  11. Alteration of nuclear glass in contact with iron and claystone at 90 °C under anoxic conditions: Characterization of the alteration products after two years of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Michel L.; Martin, Christelle; Brucker, Florence; Bataillon, Christian; Blanc, Cécile; Chorro, Matthieu; Jollivet, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the alteration of a fractured glass block in contact with iron and Callovo-Oxfordian claystone at 90 °C under anoxic and water-saturated conditions. The alteration rates and the nature of glass alteration products at the different compact interfaces (glass-clay, glass-iron) and in cracks were assessed by solution chemistry and microscopic-scale techniques (scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray microscopy, microRaman spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy). A significant but modest (two-fold) increase in glass alteration in contact with steel was observed, leading to an average alteration rate over the experiment of about 0.007–0.014 g/m"2/d. This rate is significantly lower than forward rate r_0 in clay-equilibrated groundwater (1.7 g/m"2/d), indicating that a decrease of the alteration rate was not hindered by the steel presence. The corrosion–alteration interface was made up of successive layers of corrosion products in contact with iron, a layer of Fe silicates, and an altered glass layer enriched in Fe. Characterization of the glass block in direct contact with claystone revealed that the thickness of altered glass was much more important than at the glass-iron interface. The altered glass layer in contact with clay was slightly enriched in Fe and Mg, and depleted in alkali cations. Altered glass layers in cracks were usually limited to fringes thinner than 2 μm, with a thickness decreasing from the crack mouth, indicating that alteration is controlled by transport in the cracks. The fractures were partially filled with calcite and lanthanide hydroxocarbonate precipitates. These results contribute to the understanding of nuclear vitrified waste-iron-corrosion products interactions in a deep geological repository. - Highlights: • Anoxic alteration of glass in contact with iron and clay at 90 °C for two-years. • Alteration rates of 0.015 and 0.5 g/m"2/d at glass

  12. Study of the argillaceous fraction of sedimentary sequences of Meuse and Gard. Reconstitution of the diagenetic history and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the targets. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic aspects; Etude de la fraction argileuse de sequences sedimentaires de la Meuse et du Gard. Reconstitution de l'histoire diagenetique et des caracteristiques physico-chimiques des cibles. Aspects mineralogiques, geochimiques et isotopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, D

    2002-01-01

    Very low permeable argillaceous rocks like Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones or Vraconian siltstones were chosen to host a research laboratory built to determine the physico-chemical properties of the host formations for a potential underground disposal of radioactive waste. Knowledge and understanding of post-sedimentary modifications are of prime importance for definition of these properties; evaluation and quantification of the post-sedimentary changes represent the aim of this study, focused specifically on the clay material of the sequences. Samples were taken from two drillings (HTM102 and MAR501). In the HTM102 core samples, illite and mixed-layers illite/smectite are the dominant clay components of most clay fractions. Systematic SEM and TEM observations and isotopic K-Ar and Rb-Sr analyses pointed to diagenetic neo-formations of carbonates (calcite, dolomite) and clays. For instance, veils and laths of authigenic clay particles around old detrital ones can distinctly be observed. The epoch, duration and extent of the diagenetic activity(ies) are difficult to evaluate because of an overall detrital contribution even in the finest granulometric fractions. However; analysis of a bentonite layer in the sequence provides a diagenetic reference for the authigenic clay material. Correlation between relative sea level and authigenesis of smectite-rich mineral has been outlined. Chemistry of diagenetic fluids also seems to be reliable with sea level variations. These observations argue in favour of diagenetic activities limited in restricted rock volumes. The case study of MAR501 is close to the HTM102 one: smectite-rich illite/smectite mixed-layers represent the major component of the clay fraction and K-Ar values argue ire the sense of a mixing between detrital and younger clay populations. Diagenetic glauconites in the sequence yield are age close to 93,7 {+-}0,3 Ma for Vraconian level, in agreement with stratigraphical data. The case study of a clay-filled fault

  13. Study of the argillaceous fraction of sedimentary sequences of Meuse and Gard. Reconstitution of the diagenetic history and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the targets. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic aspects; Etude de la fraction argileuse de sequences sedimentaires de la Meuse et du Gard. Reconstitution de l'histoire diagenetique et des caracteristiques physico-chimiques des cibles. Aspects mineralogiques, geochimiques et isotopiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, D

    2002-01-01

    Very low permeable argillaceous rocks like Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones or Vraconian siltstones were chosen to host a research laboratory built to determine the physico-chemical properties of the host formations for a potential underground disposal of radioactive waste. Knowledge and understanding of post-sedimentary modifications are of prime importance for definition of these properties; evaluation and quantification of the post-sedimentary changes represent the aim of this study, focused specifically on the clay material of the sequences. Samples were taken from two drillings (HTM102 and MAR501). In the HTM102 core samples, illite and mixed-layers illite/smectite are the dominant clay components of most clay fractions. Systematic SEM and TEM observations and isotopic K-Ar and Rb-Sr analyses pointed to diagenetic neo-formations of carbonates (calcite, dolomite) and clays. For instance, veils and laths of authigenic clay particles around old detrital ones can distinctly be observed. The epoch, duration and extent of the diagenetic activity(ies) are difficult to evaluate because of an overall detrital contribution even in the finest granulometric fractions. However; analysis of a bentonite layer in the sequence provides a diagenetic reference for the authigenic clay material. Correlation between relative sea level and authigenesis of smectite-rich mineral has been outlined. Chemistry of diagenetic fluids also seems to be reliable with sea level variations. These observations argue in favour of diagenetic activities limited in restricted rock volumes. The case study of MAR501 is close to the HTM102 one: smectite-rich illite/smectite mixed-layers represent the major component of the clay fraction and K-Ar values argue ire the sense of a mixing between detrital and younger clay populations. Diagenetic glauconites in the sequence yield are age close to 93,7 {+-}0,3 Ma for Vraconian level, in agreement with stratigraphical data. The case study of a clay-filled fault

  14. Study of the argillaceous fraction of sedimentary sequences of Meuse and Gard. Reconstitution of the diagenetic history and of the physico-chemical characteristics of the targets. Mineralogical, geochemical and isotopic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, D.

    2002-01-01

    Very low permeable argillaceous rocks like Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stones or Vraconian siltstones were chosen to host a research laboratory built to determine the physico-chemical properties of the host formations for a potential underground disposal of radioactive waste. Knowledge and understanding of post-sedimentary modifications are of prime importance for definition of these properties; evaluation and quantification of the post-sedimentary changes represent the aim of this study, focused specifically on the clay material of the sequences. Samples were taken from two drillings (HTM102 and MAR501). In the HTM102 core samples, illite and mixed-layers illite/smectite are the dominant clay components of most clay fractions. Systematic SEM and TEM observations and isotopic K-Ar and Rb-Sr analyses pointed to diagenetic neo-formations of carbonates (calcite, dolomite) and clays. For instance, veils and laths of authigenic clay particles around old detrital ones can distinctly be observed. The epoch, duration and extent of the diagenetic activity(ies) are difficult to evaluate because of an overall detrital contribution even in the finest granulometric fractions. However; analysis of a bentonite layer in the sequence provides a diagenetic reference for the authigenic clay material. Correlation between relative sea level and authigenesis of smectite-rich mineral has been outlined. Chemistry of diagenetic fluids also seems to be reliable with sea level variations. These observations argue in favour of diagenetic activities limited in restricted rock volumes. The case study of MAR501 is close to the HTM102 one: smectite-rich illite/smectite mixed-layers represent the major component of the clay fraction and K-Ar values argue ire the sense of a mixing between detrital and younger clay populations. Diagenetic glauconites in the sequence yield are age close to 93,7 ±0,3 Ma for Vraconian level, in agreement with stratigraphical data. The case study of a clay-filled fault

  15. Far-field thermomechanical response of argillaceous rock to emplacement of a nuclear-waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, D.F.; Thomas, R.K.; Lappin, A.R.

    1980-08-01

    Before heat-producing wastes can be emplaced safely in any argillaceous rock, it will be necessary to understand the far-field thermal and thermomechanical response of this rock to waste emplacement. This report presents the results of a first series of calculations aimed at estimating the far-field response of argillite to waste emplacement. Because the thermal and mechanical properties of argillite are affected by its content of expandable clay, its behavior is briefly compared and contrasted with that of a shale having the same matrix thermal properties, but containing no expandable clay. Under this assumption, modeled temperatures are the same for the two rock types at equivalent power densities and reflect the large dependence of in-situ temperatures on both initial power density and waste type. Thermomechanical calculations indicate that inclusion of contraction behavior of expandable clays in the assumed argillite thermal expansion behavior results, in some cases, in generation of a large zone in and near the repository that has undergone volumetric contraction but is surrounded by uniformly compressive stresses. Information available to date indicates that this contraction would likely result in locally increased fluid permeability and decreased in-situ thermal conductivity, but might well be advantageous as regards radionuclide retention, because of the increased surface area within the contracted zone. Assumption of continuous and positive expansion behavior for the shale eliminates the near-repository contraction and tensional zones, but results in near-surface tensional zones directly above the repository

  16. Non disturbing characterization and quantification of natural organic matter (NOM) contained in clay rock pore water by mass spectrometry using electro-spray and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huclier-Markai, S.; Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Rogniaux, H.; Monteau, F.; Vinsot, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Callovo-Oxfordian formation (COx) rock may contain up to 1% w/w of organic Carbon. Most of the Organic Matter (OM) is attached to the mineral particles whereas a small portion is present as Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) in the pore water. In environmental studies, Natural Organic Matter (NOM) plays a key role on the bioavailability and the toxicity of metallic compounds. It is necessary to know the structure of any organic substance in order to assess which chemical and biological reactions occur under environmentally relevant conditions. The 150 Myears solid-bound organic matter of the COx (kerogen) has been already investigated in several studies and originates from a mixture of marine and terrestrial sources. In addition to this, the CCl 4 soluble organic fraction (bitumen) has been already characterized by liquid and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. It allows proportion and distribution of biological markers to be determined as polar compounds with aromatic and saturated hydrocarbons. DOM was extracted from a crushed clay rock of the COx formation with a high rock/water ratio of about 1500 g/L. Part of the OM from the COx is known to be sensitive to air oxidation which can significantly modify the nature of the bitumen by an overall shift towards lower molecular weight compounds. Therefore, the characteristics of the DOM must be determined in in-situ like conditions if one wants to assess the mobility of DOM in the clay pore space and to evaluate the mobility of heavy metals/ radionuclides. Due to their high binding capacity with metal ions and their colloidal sizes in natural waters, these macromolecules, through complexation reactions, might either enhance the mobility of trace elements, or reduce their migration rates by sorption processes in relation with their size and that of the porous medium. Consequently, the characterization of DOM in anoxic pore water samples from the COx

  17. Analysis of the accelerometric data applied to seismic hazard assessment in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, L.

    2006-09-01

    In order to test the feasibility of nuclear waste storage, ANDRA, the French Agency in charge of radioactive waste management, gave us the opportunity to study preserved specimens of Jurassic clay-rich rocks from eastern Paris Basin. These rocks, deposited during the Callovian and beginning of the Oxfordian, are dark- to light-grey marls that consist mainly in a mixture of clay, calcite and silt. Core-specimens regularly collected along the Callovo-Oxfordian formation from several vertical and oblique boreholes, were subjected to a magnetic mineralogy study, and to a petro-fabric study with respect to the geographical frame, itself related to a study of the pore network. The mineralogy study helps to characterize the nature of the para- and -ferrimagnetic fractions at the origin of the magnetic susceptibility and remanence which vary according to the clay/calcite/silt ratios, the latter being mostly made of detrital grains of magnetite. In the clay-rich rocks (illite and smectites), the ferrimagnetic fraction is also made of authigenic sulfides, possibly greigite, which accompany the ubiquitous framboids of pyrite. This fraction seems to equate with the soft coercive fraction which was used to re-orient the vertical borehole cores with respect to the present magnetic north. The hard fraction equates with the iron-oxides, in agreement with the random nature of the natural remanence. Hence, the coexistence in the same sediment of iron-sulfides and iron-oxides is related to distinct origins rather than to variable conditions during sedimentation or diagenesis. Preservation of these species is attributed to the very low permeability that the sediment reached after its compaction. The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) reflects the zone-axis organization of the clay minerals, and eventually the shape fabric of the ferromagnetic fraction. Expectingly, the short axis of the AMS (K3) is vertical (perpendicular to bedding) with an anisotropy degree on the order of

  18. DR Argillite Disposal R&D at LBNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Xu, Hao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-12

    Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL’s research activities have focused on understanding and modeling EDZ evolution and the associated coupled processes and impacts of high temperature on parameters and processes relevant to performance of a clay repository to establish the technical base for the maximum allowable temperature. This report documents results from some of these activities. These activities address key Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), which have been ranked in importance from medium to high, as listed in Table 7 of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap (FCR&D-USED-2011-000065 REV0) (Nutt, 2011). Specifically, they address FEP 2.2.01, Excavation Disturbed Zone, for clay/shale, by investigating how coupled processes affect EDZ evolution; FEP 2.2.05, Flow and Transport Pathways; and FEP 2.2.08, Hydrologic Processes, and FEP 2.2.07, Mechanical Processes, and FEP 2.2.09, Chemical Process—Transport, by studying near-field coupled THMC processes in clay/shale repositories. The activities documented in this report also address a number of research topics identified in Research & Development (R&D) Plan for Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development (Wang 2011), including Topics S3, Disposal system modeling – Natural System; P1, Development of discrete fracture network (DFN) model; P14, Technical basis for thermal loading limits; and P15 Modeling of disturbed rock zone (DRZ) evolution (clay repository).

  19. DR Argillite Disposal R&D at LBNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Liange; Kim, Kunhwi; Xu, Hao; Rutqvist, Jonny

    2016-01-01

    Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling EDZ evolution and the associated coupled processes and impacts of high temperature on parameters and processes relevant to performance of a clay repository to establish the technical base for the maximum allowable temperature. This report documents results from some of these activities. These activities address key Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), which have been ranked in importance from medium to high, as listed in Table 7 of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap (FCR&D-USED-2011-000065 REV0) (Nutt, 2011). Specifically, they address FEP 2.2.01, Excavation Disturbed Zone, for clay/shale, by investigating how coupled processes affect EDZ evolution; FEP 2.2.05, Flow and Transport Pathways; and FEP 2.2.08, Hydrologic Processes, and FEP 2.2.07, Mechanical Processes, and FEP 2.2.09, Chemical Process-Transport, by studying near-field coupled THMC processes in clay/shale repositories. The activities documented in this report also address a number of research topics identified in Research & Development (R&D) Plan for Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development (Wang 2011), including Topics S3, Disposal system modeling - Natural System; P1, Development of discrete fracture network (DFN) model; P14, Technical basis for thermal loading limits; and P15 Modeling of disturbed rock zone (DRZ) evolution (clay repository).

  20. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weck, Philippe F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Glenn Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kuhlman, Kristopher L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheshire, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Palaich, Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norskog, Katherine E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolery, Thomas J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jerden, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Copple, Jacqueline M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cruse, Terry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ebert, William L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-04

    -transport and reaction path modeling. The focus of these investigations into the nature of sacrificial zones is to evaluate the chemical effects of heterogeneous chemical reactions at EBS interfaces. The difference in barrier material types and the extent of chemical reactions within these interfacial domains generates changes in mineral abundances. These mineralogical alterations also result in volume changes that, although small, could affect the interface bulk porosity. As in previous deliverables, this report is structured according to various national laboratory contributions describing R&D activities applicable to clay/shale/argillite media.

  1. Activités volcaniques sous-marines à la limite Jurassique-Crétacé dans le Rif externe (Maroc). Âge et relation avec la sédimentation et la paléogéographie du sillon rifain externe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzaggagh, Mohamed

    2011-04-01

    Following the recent stratigraphic works carried out on the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary in the external Rif chain (Mesorif area and Bou Haddoud nappe), numerous submarine volcanism traces have been discovered in Upper Oxfordian to Upper Berriasian deposits. These traces display various aspects: volcaniclastic complexes incorporated within Upper Berriasian marls; volcanic lavas and basalt clasts included in the breccias with clay matrix of Upper Oxfordian to Lower Berriasian age, or in brecciated Lower Tothonian calcareous beds of the Early Tithonian. These submarine volcanic activities took place in a carbonate platform environment during the Kimmeridgian to Early Tithonian interval or in a pelagic basin from Late Tithonian onwards. They caused an intense brecciation of Upper Jurassic carbonate formations and a general dismantling of marly calcareous alternations of Upper Tithonian-Lower Berriasian. Therefore, the Upper Tithonian-Lower Berriasian deposits are marked by frequent stratigraphic gaps in many outcrops of Mesorif, Prerif areas and in the Bou Haddoud nappe.

  2. Difficulty in assessing low 3H, 14C and 36Cl concentrations in old groundwaters and its implication for groundwater dating - ANDRA 2007/2008 drilling program (Meuse/Haute-Marne)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean-Baptiste, P.; Fourre, E.; Dapoigny, A.; Michelot, J.L.; Massault, M.; Noret, A.; Rebeix, R.; Le Gal La Salle, C.; Aquilina, L.; Labasque, T.; Vinsot, A.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In 2007-2008, the French Nuclear Waste Agency (Andra) carried out a drilling campaign in the vicinity of its underground laboratory of Bure (Meuse/Haute-Marne), over an area of ∼400 km 2 . The objective was to obtain a detailed description of the geophysical, geological and transport properties of the 150 m thick Callovo-Oxfordian (COx) clay layer in order to check the homogeneity of this geological formation which is potentially suitable for establishing a nuclear waste deep repository. As part of this program, water samples were taken from the two limestone formations adjacent to the COx, to analyse the geochemical and isotopic characteristics of these two deep aquifers and investigate their interactions with the COx layer. Multiple permeable layers were identified in the thickness of the carbonate formations which offered the very interesting opportunity to investigate groundwater circulation in individual permeable layers within the aquifer. As the age of these groundwaters is clearly beyond the detection limit for tritium and also presumably for radiocarbon, the analysis of both tracers was designed as a check of the quality of the samples and possible mixing with younger waters within the boreholes. Besides, CFC and SF 6 samples were collected in the same purpose. Tritium was measured at the LSCE-Saclay noble gas facility using helium-3 mass spectrometry, with a limit of detection limit of 0.1 TU (the detection limit is defined as the minimum concentration of a substance being analyzed that has a 99 percent probability of being identified, thus corresponding to 3-sigma at the blank level). The radiocarbon samples were prepared at IDES (Orsay) and measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LMC14 (Saclay, Artemis facility, INSU national service). The detection limit was usually lower than 0.2 pmC, corresponding to a radiocarbon apparent age of ∼50 Kyr. CFC and SF 6 were measured at Geosciences

  3. Kinetics and reversibility of radionuclide sorption reactions with rocks. Progress report for fiscal year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Brown, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Sorption-desorption reactions of cesium, strontium, neptunium, americium, and plutonium on basalt, granite, and argillite were observed for 218 days. Equilibrium in batch experiments was not reached for most radionuclides even after this long time. Reactions of the crushed rock with ground waters (dissolution, hydrolysis, precipitation, etc.) also did not reach equilibrium after 150 days. The dissolution of basalt is accompanied by the formation of colloidal particles which contain Si, Fe, Ca, and Al. These colloids sorb Cs, Sr, Am, and Pu during equilibration. Some of the colloids pass through 0.3-μm flters, are not retained even on 0.01-μm filters and, therefore, cause calculated K/sub d/ values to be too low. Samples of crushed basalt, granite, and argillite were artificially weathered by continuous leaching with distilled water for 6 months both in air and in an oxygen-free stream of nitrogen gas. The weathered rock was then characterized for surface area, surface structure, cation exchange capacity, and composition of weathered surface on the rock. Comparisons were made of radionuclide sorption (after 14 days) on fresh rock, rock weathered in air, and rock weathered in N 2 . Sorption on rocks weathered in N 2 generally is less than on rock weathered in air. This is possibly due to the lack of an Fe(OH) 3 coating on the rock weathered in N 2 . The Fe(OH) 3 is known to scavenge cations and silica from solution. Sorption of Cs, Si, Am, and Pu is strongly affected by weathering basalt and argillite. However, the cation exchange capacity is changed very little, suggesting that ion exchange plays a minor role in sorption of these radionuclides

  4. When did the Penglai orogeny begin on Taiwan?: Geochronological and petrographic constraints on the exhumed mountain belts and foreland-basin sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W. S.; Syu, S. J.; Yeh, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    Foreland basin receives large amounts of synorogenic infill that is eroded from the adjacent exhumed mountain belt, and therefore provides the important information on exhumation evolution. Furthermore, a complete stratigraphic sequence of Taiwan mountain belt consists of five units of Miocene sedimentary rocks (the Western Foothills and the uppermost sequence on the proto-Taiwan mountain belt), Oligocene argillite (the Hsuehshan Range), Eocene quartzite (the Hsuehshan Range), Eocene-Miocene slate and schist (Backbone Range), and Cretaceous schist (Backbone Range) from top to bottom. Based on the progressive unroofing history, the initiation of foreland basin received sedimentary lithic sediments from the uppermost sequence of proto-Taiwan mountain belt, afterwards, and receiving low- to medium-grade metamorphic lithic sediments in ascending order of argillite, quartzite, slate, and schist clasts. Therefore, the sedimentary lithics from mountain belt were deposited which represents the onset of the mountain uplift. In this study, the first appearance of sedimentary lithic sediments occurs in the Hengchun Peninsula at the middle Miocene (ca. 12-10 Ma). Thus, sandstone petrography of the late Miocene formation (10-5.3 Ma) shows a predominantly recycled sedimentary and low-grade metamorphic sources, including sandstone, argillite and quartzite lithic sediments of 10-25% which records erosion to slightly deeper metamorphic terrane on the mountain belt. Based on the results of previous thermogeochronological studies of the Yuli belt, it suggests that the middle Miocene occurred mountain uplift. The occurrence of low-grade metamorphic lithic sediments in the Hengchun Peninsula during late Miocene is coincident with the cooling ages of uplift and denuded Yuli schist belt at the eastern limb of Backbone Range.

  5. Creep and damage in argillaceous rocks: microstructural change and phenomenological modeling; Fluage et endommagement des roches argileuses: evolution de la microstructure et modelisation phenomenologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabre, G

    2005-06-15

    The underground radioactive waste disposal far exceeds the period of exploitation of common civil engineering works. These specific projects require to predict the irreversible deformations over a large time scale (several centuries) in order to assess the extension and to forecast the evolution of the EDZ (Excavation Damage Zone) around the cavity. In this study, the viscosity of three sedimentary argillaceous rocks has been studied under different conditions of uniaxial compression: static or cyclic creep tests, monotonic and quasistatic tests, performed across various strata orientations. Argillaceous rocks are studied as a possible host layer for radioactive waste disposals. Indeed, they present some of the physical characteristics and mechanical properties, which are essential for being a natural barrier: low permeability, high creep potential and important holding capacity of radioactive elements. The purpose of the experimental study was to shed some light over the mechanisms governing the development of delayed deformations and damage of argillaceous rocks. It relates three rocks: an argillite from East of France, a Tournemire argillite and a marl from Jurassic Mountains. On atomic scale, viscoplastic deformations are due to irreversible displacements of crystalline defects, called dislocations. The experimental study was also supplemented with observations on thin sections extracted from the argillite and marl samples using a SEM. The aim was to identify the mechanisms responsible for the time-dependent behaviour on a microstructural scale. Analytical simulations of the mechanical behaviour of the three rocks gave parameters used in different viscoplastic models. The best modeling was obtained with the viscoplastic model which takes account of the development of volumetric strains and of the damage anisotropy. (author)

  6. Action of a clay suspension on an Fe(0) surface under anoxic conditions: Characterization of neoformed minerals at the Fe(0)/solution and Fe(0)/atmosphere interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, Pierre; Rivard, Camille; Pelletier, Manuel; Bihannic, Isabelle; Gley, Renaud; Mathieu, Sandrine; Salsi, Lise; Migot, Sylvie; Barres, Odile; Villiéras, Frédéric; Michau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Immersion of an Fe(0) foil in a clay suspension at 90 °C and in anoxic conditions. • Magnetite was observed on the atmospheric part. • Iron-rich 7 Å serpentines were observed on the clay suspension part. • A gradient in serpentine cristallochemistry was observed. • A pure Fe–Si phyllosilicate was identified at the Fe(0)/clay suspension contact. - Abstract: To better understand the reaction mechanisms involved at the Fe(0)/clay minerals interface, we investigate in the present study the reaction between an Fe(0) surface and a clay suspension extracted from the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone (COx). Batch experiments were carried out under anoxic conditions in sealed autoclave, at 90 °C to mimic predicted radioactive waste disposal conditions. An Fe(0) foil was introduced into the autoclave so that the lower part of the foil was immersed in the clay suspension while the upper part was contacted with the atmosphere of the experimental setup. After two months, the mineralogical deposits that precipitated at the surface of the Fe(0) foil were analyzed using multiple techniques, namely X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/transmission electron microscopy associated to microanalysis (SEM/TEM–EDXS), and micro-spectroscopic measurements (μ-FTIR and μ-Raman). Both parts of the Fe(0) foil were then shown to react: magnetite was the main resulting mineral formed at the Fe(0) surface in the atmospheric conditions whereas serpentine 1:1 phyllosilicates were the main end-products in the clay suspension. The analyses performed on the immersed part of the foil revealed a spatial heterogeneity in both serpentine cristallochemistry and morphology, with a gradient from the Fe(0) contact point toward the clay suspension. A pure Fe–Si phyllosilicate ring was observed at the direct contact point with the Fe(0) foil and a progressive incorporation of Al instead of Fe into the clay phases was identified as deposit thickness increased from the Fe(0) surface to

  7. Corrosion of metal iron in contact with anoxic clay at 90 °C: Characterization of the corrosion products after two years of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Michel L.; Bataillon, Christian; Brucker, Florence; Blanc, Cécile; Prêt, Dimitri; Foy, Eddy; Chorro, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Generalized, heterogeneous corrosion is observed. • The corrosion interface is made of several layers with distinct mineralogy. • Magnetite, chukanovite, Fe-phyllosilicate, ankerite are identified from metal to clay. • The estimated corrosion damage (15 μm in two years) supports surface passivation. • The corrosion products contain only half of oxidized Fe. - Abstract: Chemical and mineralogical properties of solids formed upon free corrosion of two iron probes (one massive iron rod, and one model overpack made by two pipes covering the ends of a glass rod) in saturated clay rock (Callovo-Oxfordian formation, East of Paris Basin, France) at 90 °C over two years were investigated by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques (X-ray tomography, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman microspectroscopy, micro-X-ray diffraction, and micro-X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy). The corrosion rate of the massive rod was monitored in situ by electrochemical impedance spectrometry, and found to decrease from about 90 μm/year during the first month of reaction, to less than 1 μm/year after two years. X-ray tomography revealed the presence of several fractures suggesting the presence of preferential flow and diffusion pathways along the iron samples. Microscopic observations revealed similar corrosion interfaces for both samples. Corrosion heterogeneously affected the interface, with damaged thickness from ∼0 to 80 μm. In extensively damaged areas, an inner discontinuous layer of magnetite in contact with metal, an intermediate chukanovite (Fe 2 CO 3 (OH) 2 ) layer (only when magnetite is present, and only for the overpack), and an outer layer of poorly ordered Fe phyllosilicate were observed. In areas with little damage, only the Fe-silicate solids are observed. The clay transformation layer is predominantly made of ankerite ((Fe,Ca,Mg)CO 3 ) forming a massive unit near the trace of the original

  8. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglizaud, N.

    2006-12-01

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS 2 ). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH ≥ 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10 -9 mol g -1 , an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. ≥ -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 ± 0.8) x 10 -7 mol L -1 of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage (≥ 4 x 10 -9 mol g -1 ) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10 7 L mol -1 . Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the saturation concentration allows the observation of

  9. Retention and reduction of uranium on pyrite surface; Retention et reduction de l'uranium a la surface de la pyrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eglizaud, N

    2006-12-15

    In the hypothesis of a storage of the spent fuel in a deep geological formation, understanding the uranium dispersion in the environment is important. Pyrite is a reducing mineral present in the Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, the geological formation actually studied for such a storage. However, pyrite impact on uranium migration has already been poorly studied. The aim of the study was to understand the mechanisms of uranium(VI) retention and reduction on the pyrite surface (FeS{sub 2}). Solution chemistry was therefore coupled with solid spectroscopic studies (XPS and Raman spectroscopy). All uranium-pyrite interactions experiments were performed under an anoxic atmosphere, in a glove box. Pyrite dissolution under anoxic conditions releases sulfoxy-anions and iron(II), which can then be adsorbed on the pyrite surface. This adsorption was confirmed by interaction experiments using iron(II) isotopic dilution. Uranium(VI) is retained by an exchange reaction with iron(II) adsorbed on sulphur sites, with a maximal amount of sorbed uranium at pH {>=} 5.5. Cobalt(II) and europium(III) are also adsorbed on the pyrite surface above pH 5.5 confirming then that reduction is not required for species to adsorb on pyrite. When the concentration of uranium retained is lower than 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}, an oxidation-reduction reaction leads to the formation of a uranium (VI) (IV) mixed oxide and to solid sulphur (d.o. {>=} -I). During this reaction, iron remains mostly at the +II oxidation degree. The reaction products seem to passivate the pyrite surface: at higher amounts of retained uranium, the oxidation-reduction reaction is no longer observed. The surface is saturated by the retention of (3.4 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} of uranium(VI). Modelling of uranium sorption at high surface coverage ({>=} 4 x 10{sup -9} mol g{sup -1}) by the Langmuir model yields an adsorption constant of 8 x 10{sup 7} L mol{sup -1}. Finally, a great excess of uranium(VI) above the

  10. Detection of seasonal cycles of erosion processes in a black marl gully from a time series of high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bechet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Roubine catchment located in the experimental research station of Draix-Bléone (south French Alps is situated in Callovo-Oxfordian black marls, a lithology particularly prone to erosion and weathering processes. For 30 years, this small watershed (0.13 ha has been monitored for analysing hillslope processes on the scale of elementary gullies. Since 2007, surface changes have been monitored by comparing high-resolution digital elevation models (HRDEMs produced from terrestrial laser scanner (TLS. The objectives are (1 to detect and (2 to quantify the sediment production and the evolution of the gully morphology in terms of sediment availability/transport capacity vs. rainfall and runoff generation. Time series of TLS observations have been acquired periodically based on the seasonal runoff activity with a very high point cloud density ensuring a resolution of the digital elevation model (DEM on the centimetre scale. The topographic changes over a time span of 2 years are analysed. Quantitative analyses of the seasonal erosion activity and of the sediment fluxes show and confirm that during winter, loose regolith is created by mechanical weathering, and it is eroded and accumulates in the rills and gullies. Because of limited rainfall intensity in spring, part of the material is transported in the main gullies, which are assumed to be a transport-limited erosion system. In the late spring and summer the rainfall intensities increase, allowing the regolith, weathered and accumulated in the gullies and rills during the earlier seasons, to be washed out. Later in the year the catchment acts as a sediment-limited system because no more loose regolith is available. One interesting result is the fact that in the gullies the erosion–deposition processes are more active around the slope angle value of 35°, which probably indicates a behaviour close to dry granular material. It is also observed that there exist thresholds for the rainfall

  11. Ten years of experience in technology development... What use for the Cigeo project?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel; Delort, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Since 2003, Andra (the French public body in charge of radioactive waste management) has been working on the progressive technological development of waste storage containers, package handling mechanical prototypes, excavation techniques and support lining of underground openings at the Bure Underground Laboratory (URL) site, in order to evaluate the feasibility of constructing and operating a Deep Geological Repository (DGR aka Cigeo), in the Callovian-Oxfordian clayish formation (the ''Argillites''), likely to receive as of 2025-2030 the first of many intermediate and high-level long lived wastes, at a 500m depth. The Cigeo Project, which has now entered into an intense engineering development phase, must take into account all the data, knowledge and experience gathered over more than 10 years of technical research. The spectrum of activities concerned encompasses a wide array of subjects such as the return of experience gathered from the shaft sinking operations, the drift excavation operations (via means of rock hammer, road header and tunnel boring machine) and the subsequent lining support of the horizontal drifts (via metal arches, mesh, rock bolts, shotcrete, cast concrete and wedges). The story of coring, drilling and casing vertical, slanted or horizontal boreholes is also of interest. The implementation and evaluation of sealing technologies or hydraulic cut-offs must be integrated in the design. The construction and qualification in 3 campaigns of 9 families of concrete containers and 3 categories of carbon steel overpacks also come as input data. The design, construction and testing of 3 package emplacement systems, the implementation of 2 waste retrievability tests are accounted for in the studies ongoing. Finally the collation of environmental and geotechnical data on the excavated material (likely to be re- used for opening backfilling at time of repository closure) will help to minimize the acreage, volume and visual impact of

  12. Ten years of experience in technology development... What use for the Cigeo project?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosgiraud, Jean-Michel; Delort, Daniel [Andra, Chatenay-Malabry (France)

    2015-07-01

    Since 2003, Andra (the French public body in charge of radioactive waste management) has been working on the progressive technological development of waste storage containers, package handling mechanical prototypes, excavation techniques and support lining of underground openings at the Bure Underground Laboratory (URL) site, in order to evaluate the feasibility of constructing and operating a Deep Geological Repository (DGR aka Cigeo), in the Callovian-Oxfordian clayish formation (the ''Argillites''), likely to receive as of 2025-2030 the first of many intermediate and high-level long lived wastes, at a 500m depth. The Cigeo Project, which has now entered into an intense engineering development phase, must take into account all the data, knowledge and experience gathered over more than 10 years of technical research. The spectrum of activities concerned encompasses a wide array of subjects such as the return of experience gathered from the shaft sinking operations, the drift excavation operations (via means of rock hammer, road header and tunnel boring machine) and the subsequent lining support of the horizontal drifts (via metal arches, mesh, rock bolts, shotcrete, cast concrete and wedges). The story of coring, drilling and casing vertical, slanted or horizontal boreholes is also of interest. The implementation and evaluation of sealing technologies or hydraulic cut-offs must be integrated in the design. The construction and qualification in 3 campaigns of 9 families of concrete containers and 3 categories of carbon steel overpacks also come as input data. The design, construction and testing of 3 package emplacement systems, the implementation of 2 waste retrievability tests are accounted for in the studies ongoing. Finally the collation of environmental and geotechnical data on the excavated material (likely to be re- used for opening backfilling at time of repository closure) will help to minimize the acreage, volume and visual impact of

  13. Paleogeographic and paleo-oceanographic influences on carbon isotope signatures: Implications for global and regional correlation, Middle-Upper Jurassic of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltom, Hassan A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Hasiotis, Stephen T.; Rankey, Eugene C.; Cantrell, Dave L.

    2018-02-01

    Carbon isotope data (δ13C) can provide an essential means for refining paleogeographic and paleo-oceanographic reconstructions, and interpreting stratigraphic architecture within complex carbonate strata. Although the primary controls on global δ13C signatures of marine carbonates are well understood, understanding their latitudinal and regional variability is poor. To better constrain the nature and applications of δ13C stratigraphy, this study: 1) presents a new high-resolution δ13C stratigraphic curve from Middle to Upper Jurassic carbonates in the upper Tuwaiq Mountain, Hanifa, and lower Jubaila formations in central Saudi Arabia; 2) explores their latitudinal and regional variability; and 3) discusses their implications for stratigraphic correlations. Analysis of δ13C data identified six mappable units with distinct δ13C signatures (units 1-6) between up-dip and down-dip sections, and one unit (unit 7) that occurs only in the down-dip section of the study succession. δ13C data from the upper Tuwaiq Mountain Formation and the lower Hanifa Formation (units 1, 2), which represent Upper Callovian to Middle Oxfordian strata, and record two broad positive δ13C excursions. In the upper part of the Hanifa Formation (units 3-6, Early Oxfordian-Late Kimmeridgian), δ13C values decreased upward to unit 7, which showed a broad positive δ13C excursion. Isotopic data suggest similar δ13C trends between the southern margin of the Tethys Ocean (Arabian Plate; low latitude, represented by the study succession) and northern Tethys oceans (high latitude), despite variations in paleoclimatic, paleogeographic, and paleoceanographic conditions. Variations in the δ13C signal in this succession can be attributed to the burial of organic matter and marine circulation at the time of deposition. Our study uses δ13C signatures to provide independent data for chronostratigraphic constraints which help in stratigraphic correlations within heterogeneous carbonate successions.

  14. Use of geophysical methods for determination of physico-mechanical properties of coal-bearing rocks in wells of the Vorkutskoye field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechukhin, V.V.; Iokhin, S.B.; Baklanov, V.G.; Chernikov, A.G.

    1974-01-01

    The total porosity (P), electric resistivity (Er), density, bulk density, water content, velocity of longitudinal elastic waves (Vl), intensity of natural γ-radiation, and polarization self-potential (Ps) are determined of the lithol. different interlayered sandstones, argillites, mudstones, siltstones, and concretions. A direct linear correlation exists between these parameters and the mineralogical composition, coefficient of sorting, and sedimentation conditions

  15. Impact of porosity variation on diffusive transport: experimentation vs simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatnassi, Ikram

    2015-01-01

    Reactions induced by the diffusion of reactants from different sources may alter rock confinement properties, and are therefore critical processes to assess short-term and long-term behaviour of rocks displaying a low permeability, such as argillites which are used as barriers in underground storage installation. In order to test transport-chemistry codes based on a continuous approach, the author of this research thesis reports the development and performance of simplest as possible experiments of sealing/dissolution diffusion, by using porous media of increasing complexity: compact sand, sintered glass, stoneware, chalk, until a material close to that envisaged within the frame of a storage like a Tournemire argillite. The principle of these experiments relies on the characterisation of the diffusive behaviour of an inert tracer within a porous medium submitted to dissolution reactions (attack of a carbonate matrix by an acid solution) and/or precipitation of mineral compounds (calcium oxalate, gypsum or barite) which results in an evolution of porosity and a modification of the diffusive transport of the studied tracer. At the end of the experiment, porous media and precipitates are characterised by SEM-EDS [fr

  16. Natural isotope tracing of hydric transfers in a very low porosity clay stone formation: the argilites of Tournemire (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau-Le Golvan, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Since 1988, the experimental site of the French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety Safety (IPSN) situated in a tunnel near Tournemire (Aveyron, France), is studied in order to develop techniques and methods for the characterization of water behaviour in a clay-stone formation with very low water content and very low permeability. Isotope geochemistry was used to define the fluid transfer modalities. After the development development of the improvement of sampling techniques, the measurement of the stable isotope contents (oxygen - 18, deuterium, carbon-13) and radioactive isotope contents (tritium, carbon-14, chlorine-36) of fluids (pore water, fracture water) and solids (calcite fracture fillings) allowed to distinguish several origins and behaviours of water in the massif. The stable isotope distribution of pore water could be due to a diffusion driven mixing between argillite formation water and water from karsts, over and underlying the argillite formation. In this hypothesis, the time needed to establish the distribution profile should be longer than 5 million years. The role of the fractures seems complex, with indications of local paleo-transfers from the matrix to the fracture, and indications of transfers from the karstic aquifer. (author)

  17. An experimental study of electrical and dielectric properties of consolidated clayey materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparon, L.

    2005-06-01

    This study is devoted to the electrical and dielectric properties of consolidated clays. A better understanding of the conduction and polarization phenomena in clays is necessary to better interpret in situ measurements in terms of water saturation and texture. An experimental study was carried out on synthetic clay samples (kaolinite and smectite) compacted with various water contents, porosities and mineralogical compositions, on a large frequency range, using three laboratory setups. The electrical properties of natural argillites (from ANDRA) were then investigated. We found that the response of the synthetic samples is mainly controlled by water content on the whole frequency range; two polarization phenomena were observed, which were related to the Maxwell-Wagner polarization and the electrical double layer polarization around the clay particles. The electrical response of argillites is more complex; it is controlled by water content but also by the microstructure of the rock. In these rocks, the electrical and dielectric anisotropies are high; anisotropy was also measured for the synthetic clays. The existing models explain the high frequency limit of the dielectric permittivity of the clayey materials, but the low frequency part of the spectra (≤1 MHz) needs theoretical developments. (author)

  18. Engineered analogues of cement/clay interactions in the Tournemire experimental platform (France): a coupled mineralogical and geochemical approach to track tiny disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techer, Isabelle; Michel, Pauline; Tinseau, Elisabeth; Devol-Brown, Isabelle; Bartier, Daniele; Boulvais, Philippe; Suchorski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    A scientific program has been especially established to better understand the high-pH fluids / clay interactions through a mineralogical and geochemical study of three engineered analogues available by means of the IRSN Tournemire experimental platform. This platform, located in Aveyron (France), is based on a tunnel, excavated between 1882 and 1886 through Domerian marls and Toarcian argillites, and is dedicated since 1990 to multidisciplinary research programs. Different contexts presenting the argillite formation in contact with a cementitious material are encountered and are linked to its historical construction and scientific evolution. These rare examples of cement / clay contacts maintained over time scales ranging from a few years to a hundred of years are studied as engineered analogues of a deep geological storage. This approach is moreover completed by experiments (diffusion and advection) performed in laboratory over shorter time and smaller space scales in order to discriminate and control the major parameters involved in such interactions (details are given in another paper). This paper presents the scientific program developed on the three engineered analogues: tunnel walls recovered by lime after excavation; four concreted exploration boreholes; two experimental research galleries excavated in 2003

  19. An experimental study of electrical and dielectric properties of consolidated clayey materials; Etude experimentale des proprietes electriques et dielectriques des materiaux argileux consolides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comparon, L

    2005-06-15

    This study is devoted to the electrical and dielectric properties of consolidated clays. A better understanding of the conduction and polarization phenomena in clays is necessary to better interpret in situ measurements in terms of water saturation and texture. An experimental study was carried out on synthetic clay samples (kaolinite and smectite) compacted with various water contents, porosities and mineralogical compositions, on a large frequency range, using three laboratory setups. The electrical properties of natural argillites (from ANDRA) were then investigated. We found that the response of the synthetic samples is mainly controlled by water content on the whole frequency range; two polarization phenomena were observed, which were related to the Maxwell-Wagner polarization and the electrical double layer polarization around the clay particles. The electrical response of argillites is more complex; it is controlled by water content but also by the microstructure of the rock. In these rocks, the electrical and dielectric anisotropies are high; anisotropy was also measured for the synthetic clays. The existing models explain the high frequency limit of the dielectric permittivity of the clayey materials, but the low frequency part of the spectra ({<=}1 MHz) needs theoretical developments. (author)

  20. Chemical Entities in the foliated Argillite of coastal sedimentary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-12-01

    Dec 1, 2013 ... (360) gave rates of +20% of mineral palygorskites in the sample and 5-20% of mineral ..... Therapeutic and nutritional interest of ... Bentonite manufactured in Poland on acidity and chemical composition of milk, Medycyna.

  1. Influence of osmotic processes on the excess-hydraulic head measured in the Toarcian/Domerian argillaceous formation of Tournemire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremosa, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the studies dealing on ability to store radioactive wastes in argillaceous formations, signification of interstitial pressures is an important point to understand water and solutes transport. In very low permeability argillaceous formations, like those studied in the Callovo-Oxfordian of the Paris basin by ANDRA, pore pressure is frequently higher than the theoretical hydrostatic pressure or than the pressure in the surrounding aquifers. Such an overpressure is also measured in the Toarcian/Domerian argillaceous formation (k = 10 -21 m 2 ), studied by the IRSN in the underground research laboratory of Tournemire (Aveyron, France). The hydraulic head profile has been specified in this manuscript and found to present a 30 ±10 m excess head. This excess-head can be due to compaction disequilibrium of the argillaceous formation, diagenetic evolution of the rock, tectonic compression, changes in hydrodynamic boundary conditions or osmotic processes. Amongst these potential causes, chemical osmosis and thermo-osmosis, a fluid flow under a chemical concentration and a temperature gradient, respectively, are expected to develop owing to the small pore size and the electrostatic interactions related to the charged surface of clay minerals. The goal of the work presented here was to study and quantify the contribution of each cause to the measured excess-head. Chemo-osmotic and thermo-osmotic permeabilities were obtained by experiments and using theoretical models. Theoretical models are based on the reproduction of the interactions occurring between the charged surface of clay minerals and pore solution and their up-scaling at the representative elementary volume macroscopic scale. Chemical osmosis phenomenon is related to anionic exclusion and the determination of the chemo-osmotic efficiency requires the resolution of an electrical interactions model. A triple-layer-model which considers diffuse layers overlapping was improved during this thesis to be

  2. Analysis of the temperature and pore water pressure field in the TED heating experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garitte, B.; Vaunat, J.; Gens, A.; Conil, N.; Armand, G

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The TED experiment is a heating experiment in Callovo-Oxfordian Clay performed in the Meuse Haute Marne underground research laboratory. It was set up by Andra to confirm the results obtained in a previous thermal experiment (TER). The main objectives are: characterisation of the thermal properties of intact argillite, identification of the Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical (THM) coupling parameters, improvement of the understanding of THM behaviour and comparison of parameters measured in-situ and in the laboratory. The three heaters in the TED experiment were installed parallel at a distance of about 2.7 m to reproduce as closely as possible the real storage case (HA cells). This arrangement should allow the verification of: i) the superposition of several temperature fields generated by the three heaters and ii) the overpressure generated in the symmetry planes between the three heaters. Three heaters 4 m long and 0.143 m diameter have been installed in parallel boreholes drilled form GED gallery. To limit the influence of the conditions prevailing in the gallery, a distance of 12 m have been left between the GED wall and the closest extremity of the heaters. Rock has been intensively instrumented within a zone of 15 m around the heaters. There are 108 thermal sensors, 10 pore pressure sensors, 2 extensometers/inclinometers, placed in 13 different small diameter boreholes (56 mm). 11 boreholes were filled with bentonite (those containing thermal and pore pressure sensors) and 2 of them left open (those equipped with extensometer/inclinometers). First heating started on 22 January 2010 at the central heater and consists of three steps: 120 days at 180 W, 150 days at 300 W and one last period at 600 W. The two lateral heaters have been switched on after 14 months following the same heating sequence. The concept and the results of the TED experiment are fully described in a companion paper. Concerning heat transport

  3. Geological investigations contributing to the hydrogeological conceptual model in the Meuse/Haute-Marne area, Eastern France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocher, M.; De Hoyos, A.; Hibsch, C.; Viennot, P.

    2010-01-01

    Callovian-Oxfordian (COX) indurated clay formation is currently studied by Andra in the 'Meuse/Haute-Marne' (MHM) area for hosting a potential repository of high level, long-lived radioactive waste. IRSN is conducting studies in support of the safety evaluation of the geological disposal programme developed by Andra. IRSN, in collaboration with the Paris School of Mines, develops conceptual and numerical models of the underground water flows throughout the Paris sedimentary basin. The calibrated numerical model correctly represents the hydraulic heads and water salinities collected throughout the basin. At the MHM scale however, several flow patterns can still reproduce the measured heads, some of them assuming specific flow pathways along regional tectonic trends. Considering or not such tectonic trends in the model has however an impact on the estimated radionuclide transfer times to the outlets. Even though most ANDRA and IRSN geochemical analyses suggest a dominant diffusive transport across the COX between the underlying Dogger and overlying Oxfordian aquifers, few data point out the possible existence of local vertical connections across major tectonic structures. In order to select the most plausible options for the numerical modelling, IRSN compiled published studies and carried out fieldwork analysis to provide new data for its hydrogeological conceptual model. Relevant geological data can be considered both at the kilometre scale and at the metre scale. At the kilometre scale, the litho-stratigraphic scheme both for Dogger and Oxfordian series had previously been documented in the MHM area. Regional sedimentologic and diagenetic models are available for the Oxfordian aquifer and partially for the Dogger aquifer. Our fieldwork analysis complete these models thanks to new correlations pointed out during detailed iso-hyps mapping performed by G2R laboratory, southeast from the MHM area. Unlike the Kimmeridgian and COX sedimentary piles, which are

  4. Assessment of microbiological development in nuclear waste geological disposal: a geochemical modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esnault, Loic [ECOGEOSAFE, Technopole de l' Environnement Arbois-Mediterranee, 13545 Aix en Provence (France); Libert, Marie; Bildstein, Olivier [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTM/LMTE - 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2013-07-01

    Deep geological environments are very often poor or devoid of biodegradable organic molecules, but hydrogen could be an efficient energetic source to replace organic matter and promote redox processes such as reduction of O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Fe{sup 3+}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and CO{sub 2}. Moreover, the accessibility and availability of H{sub 2} and nutrients depend on gas/liquid permeability and their migration in the clay-stone porosity through the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). This study evaluates the spatial and temporal evolution of the geochemical conditions with regard to microbial development. The corrosion process in the argillite is investigated using numerical modeling over a period of 100,000 years. The development of bacterial biomass is estimated using potential redox reactions catalyzed by microorganisms and available nutrients. The simulations show that after the thermal peak (ca. 100-1000 years), physico-chemical conditions are favourable to support bacterial life. Relevant amounts of H{sub 2} and nutrients are released and migrate over the first 2 m of the argillite. Most of the biological redox process are localised close to the container where a high amount of magnetite is produced, providing Fe(III) (electron acceptor) that favours the development of iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). (authors)

  5. Diffusion of Cs, Ni, Pb, Se through MX80 bentonite and Bure argilite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedziorek, M.A.M.; Bourg, A.C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In order to isolate nuclear waste in repositories from the biosphere two characteristics are required from the confining environment: adsorption as high as possible and permeability as low as possible. In France, bentonite (MX80) and argillite from the Bure underground laboratories are the candidates for the near- and far-field barriers, respectively. To investigate interactive diffusive transport, we performed a series of diffusion experiments in experimental cells. 'Through' diffusion and 'in' diffusion protocols were followed and performed for a cocktail of Cs, Ni, Pb and Se, this under a variety of conditions susceptible of affecting adsorption and diffusive transport, i.e. solid density, water pH and ionic strength. For the argillite experiments the solution pH and solid density are controlled by the solid. The MX80 bentonite was pretreated according to the proposed experimental solution pH and ionic strength. The reservoirs (downstream for the 'through' diffusion experiments and upstream for the 'in' diffusion experiments were sampled at regular intervals and analyzed for the elements of interests. At the end of the experiments the solids were sliced and the elemental content analyzed. A series of results will be presented and preliminary interpretation proposed

  6. Formation of the gaseous phase of impurity elements from coal combustion at a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kizil'shtein, L.Ya.; Levchenko, S.V.; Peretyakt'ko, A.G.

    1991-01-01

    Data are reported on the distribution of impurity elements in their principal carriers: organic matter, iron sulfides, and clays. Tests with high-temperature combustion of coals and argillites indicate that elements associated with clay minerals largely remain in ash and slag. They do not pass to the gas phase - a factor to be considered in assessment of environmental impact from thermal power plants and specification of toxic concentration levels of impurity elements in coal

  7. TRANSITION FROM CARBONATE PLATFORM TO PELAGIC DEPOSITION (MID JURASSIC- LATE CRETACEOUS, VOURINOS MASSIF, NORTHERN GREECE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLAOS CARRAS

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A Jurassic- Cretaceous carbonate succession crops out along the Zyghosti Rema, Kozani (Northern Greece. The substratum consists of the ophiolitic succession of the Vourinos Massif (Pelagonian Domain: serpentinites tectonically overlain by basalts, with thin lenses of radiolarian cherts of middle Bathonian age. The contact with the overlying Jurassic limestones is tectonic. Eight informal units have been distinguished within the Mesozoic limestones, from the base upwards. (A bioclastic, intraclastic and oolitic packstone (Callovian- Oxfordian. (B bioclastic packstone and coral boundstone (Oxfordian . (C bioclastic and oncoidal wackestone with Clypeina jurassica (Oxfordian- Upper Kimmeridgian. (D (Upper Kimmeridgian- Portlandian: oncoidal packstone and rudstone (facies D1; intraclastic and bioclastic grainstone and packstone (facies D2; neptunian dykes with intraclastic and bioclastic wackestone and packstone filling (facies D3; neptunian dykes with Fe-Mn rich laterite filling and with pink silty filling of early Late Cretaceous age. An unconformity surface, due to emersion and erosion of the platform during the latest Jurassic- Early Cretaceous, is overlain by (E intraclastic, bioclastic packstone and grainstone (Cenomanian. (F massive body of debrites with coral, echinoderm, algae and rudist large clasts (facies F1 (Cenomanian; turbiditic beds of bioclastic, intraclastic and lithoclastic rudstone and grainstone (facies F2. (G thin bedded bioclastic mudstone and wackestone with planktonic foraminifers and radiolarians, alternating with turbiditic beds of bioclastic, intraclastic packstone and rudstone and with conglomeratic levels and slumped beds of the previous turbidites (upper Santonian- lower Campanian. (H: bioclastic packstone with planktonic foraminifers (facies H1 (lower Campanian - ?Maastrichtian; amalgamated turbiditic beds of bioclastic wackestone and packstone with planktonic foraminifers (facies H2; turbiditic beds of bioclastic

  8. Modelling glass alteration in an altered argillaceous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bildstein, O.; Trotignon, L.; Pozo, C.; Jullien, M.

    2007-01-01

    The long term behaviour of materials such as glass, steel and clay has been investigated in the context of deep geological disposal of radioactive wastes. The interactions between vitrified wastes, canister corrosion products (CPs) and clay are studied using a modified version of the reaction-transport code Crunch, especially looking at pH changes and possible cementation at the interface with the clayey materials. These perturbations may indeed affect the lifetime of glass matrix in deep repositories, e.g., high pH enhances the rate of glass alteration. This work focuses on the argillite of Bure. The calculations were performed at 323 K with a glass alteration rate switching from a high initial rate to a residual rate according to the sorption capacity of CPs. The time at which this sorption capacity is saturated is crucial to the system in terms of wastes package lifetime. The results show that the glass alteration imposes a high pH value at the interface with CPs and clay: up to a value of 9.2, compared to 7.3 which is the initial pH value in the argillite. Experimental data show that the rate of glass alteration is much higher in such pH conditions. For a R7T7-type glass, the rate is about five times higher at pH 9 than at pH 7. This pH perturbation migrates through the clayey domain as a result of the migration of mobile elements such as boron and sodium, and despite the existence of strong pH buffers in the argillite. The cementation of porosity at the interface between glass and clay is predicted by the model due to the massive precipitation of iron corrosion products and glass alteration products. At this point of the evolution of the system, the pH starts to decrease and the alteration rate of the glass could be significantly reduced. This porosity clogging effect is difficult to confirm by experiments especially since existing data on short term experiments tend to show a pervasive precipitation of silica in the domain instead of a localized precipitation

  9. Cs sorption to potential host rock of low-level radioactive waste repository in Taiwan: experiments and numerical fitting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsing-Hai; Chen, Chin-Lung; Ou, Lu-Yen; Wei, Yuan-Yaw; Chang, Fu-Lin; Teng, Shi-Ping

    2011-09-15

    A reliable performance assessment of radioactive waste repository depends on better knowledge of interactions between nuclides and geological substances. Numerical fitting of acquired experimental results by the surface complexation model enables us to interpret sorption behavior at molecular scale and thus to build a solid basis for simulation study. A lack of consensus on a standard set of assessment criteria (such as determination of sorption site concentration, reaction formula) during numerical fitting, on the other hand, makes lower case comparison between various studies difficult. In this study we explored the sorption of cesium to argillite by conducting experiments under different pH and solid/liquid ratio (s/l) with two specific initial Cs concentrations (100mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-4)mol/L and 0.01 mg/L, 7.5 × 10(-8)mol/L). After this, numerical fitting was performed, focusing on assessment criteria and their consequences. It was found that both ion exchange and electrostatic interactions governed Cs sorption on argillite. At higher initial Cs concentration the Cs sorption showed an increasing dependence on pH as the solid/liquid ratio was lowered. In contrast at trace Cs levels, the Cs sorption was neither s/l dependent nor pH sensitive. It is therefore proposed that ion exchange mechanism dominates Cs sorption when the concentration of surface sorption site exceeds that of Cs, whereas surface complexation is attributed to Cs uptake under alkaline environments. Numerical fitting was conducted using two different strategies to determine concentration of surface sorption sites: the clay model (based on the cation exchange capacity plus surface titration results) and the iron oxide model (where the concentration of sorption sites is proportional to the surface area of argillite). It was found that the clay model led to better fitting than the iron oxide model, which is attributed to more amenable sorption sites (two specific sorption sites along with larger site

  10. U-Pb (SHRIMP II) Age of zircons from ash tuffs of the upper vendian Chernyi Kamen formation (Sylvitsa group, Middle Urals)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronkin, Yu.L.; Grazhdankin, D.V.; Maslov, A.V.; Mizens, G.A.; Matukov, D.I.; Krupenin, M.T.; Petrov, G.A.; Lepikhina, O.P.; Kornilova, A.Yu.

    2006-01-01

    To make more precise the model of correlation of the Middle Urals western slope upper vendian layers with the White Sea remote layers one carried out the SHRIMP-II procedure base U-Pb-dating of the volcanogenic zircons from the ash tuffs and of the volcanogenic zircon enclosing argillites of the Middle Urals Chernyi Kamen formation. The obtained age value of the studied zircons equal to 557+-13 million years is in line with the geological data [ru

  11. Two-mica granites of northeastern Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D.E.; Kistler, R.W.; Friedman, I.; Van Loenen, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    The field settings are described and analytical data are presented for six two-mica granites from NE Nevada. High delta 18O and 87Sr/86Sr values indicate that all are S-type granite, derived from continental crust. The major element chemistry and accessory mineral contents of these rocks also are characteristic of S-type granites. Chemical, X ray, and other data are presented for the micas recovered from these granites. The muscovites are notably high in Fe2O3, FeO, and MgO. Except for one hydrobiotite, each of the biotites has an MgO content near 6.0 wt%. Two different types of two-mica granites are recognized in the area of this study. One type is distinguished by the presence of many biotite euhedra within muscovite phenocrysts and by an unusual suite of accessory minerals completely devoid of opaque oxides. This type probably resulted from anatexis of late Precambrian argillites under conditions of relatively low oxygen fugacity, along a line that roughly coincides with the westward disappearance of continental basement. In the other textural type of two-mica granite the micas are equigranular and there is a greater variety of accessory minerals. The magmatic evolution of this type also appears to reflect the influence of late Precambrian argillites; there may be age differences between the two types of two-mica granites.-Author

  12. Quaternary deposits and weathered bedrock material as a source of dangerous radon emissions in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersell Valter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The risk of dangerous radon emissions in Estonia is high, being among the highest in Europe. In almost 33 per cent of Estonian land area, the content of radon in soil-contained air exceeds the safe limit for unrestricted construction (50 kBq/m3. In such high radon-risk areas the concentration of radon in soil-contained air ranges from 50 to 400 kBq/m3, in a few cases reaching up to 2,100 kBq/m3 exceeding the permitted level for residential areas. The situation is particularly serious in the northernmost part of the country, where uranium-rich graptolite argillite (Dictyonema shale and the Obolus phosphorite are close to ground surface and their particles are constituent parts of Quaternary deposits. Radon emissions from bedrock have been investigated in detail, but to date Quaternary strata as a source of radon emissions are poorly studied. According to our measurements the highest concentrations of radon are related to tills containing clasts and fines of graptolite argillite and phosphorite. Glacial deposits include also granitoidal material, containing U, Th and K, which have been transported by glaciers from the outcrop areas of crystalline basement rocks in Finland and the Gulf of Finland. Due to weathering, outwash and repeated redeposition other genetic types are poorer in radioactive elements and they are weaker sources of radon.

  13. Peralkaline- and calc-alkaline-hosted volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits of the Bonnifield District, East-Central Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Foley, Nora K.; Slack, John E.; Koenig, Alan E.; Oscarson, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) Zn-Pb-Cu-Ag-Au deposits of the Bonnifield mining district formed during Late Devonian-Early Mississippian magmatism along the western edge of Laurentia. The largest deposits, Dry Creek and WTF, have a combined resource of 5.7 million tonnes at 10% Zn, 4% Pb, 0.3% Cu, 300 grams per tonne (g/t) Ag, and 1.6 g/t Au. These polymetallic deposits are hosted in high field strength element (HFSE)- and rare-earth element (REE)-rich peralkaline (pantelleritic) metarhyolite, and interlayered pyritic argillite and mudstone of the Mystic Creek Member of the Totatlanika Schist Formation. Mystic Creek metarhyolite and alkali basalt (Chute Creek Member) constitute a bimodal pair that formed in an extensional environment. A synvolcanic peralkaline quartz porphyry containing veins of fluorite, sphalerite, pyrite, and quartz intrudes the central footwall at Dry Creek. The Anderson Mountain deposit, located ~32 km to the southwest, occurs within calc-alkaline felsic to intermediate-composition metavolcanic rocks and associated graphitic argillite of the Wood River assemblage. Felsic metavolcanic rocks there have only slightly elevated HFSEs and REEs. The association of abundant graphitic and siliceous argillite with the felsic volcanic rocks together with low Cu contents in the Bonnifield deposits suggests classification as a siliciclastic-felsic type of VMS deposit. Bonnifield massive sulfides and host rocks were metamorphosed and deformed under greenschist-facies conditions in the Mesozoic. Primary depositional textures, generally uncommon, consist of framboids, framboidal aggregates, and spongy masses of pyrite. Sphalerite, the predominant base metal sulfide, encloses early pyrite framboids. Galena and chalcopyrite accompanied early pyrite formation but primarily formed late in the paragenetic sequence. Silver-rich tetrahedrite is a minor late phase at the Dry Creek deposit. Gold and Ag are present in low to moderate amounts in pyrite from all of

  14. The Cigeo project, Meuse/Haute-Marne reversible geological disposal facility for radioactive waste. Project Owner File, Public debate of 15 May to 15 October 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, Marie-Claude; Gonnot, Francois-Michel

    2013-07-01

    Andra is exploring several options for the disposal of low-level long-lived waste (LLW-LL). With the French Government's approval, in June 2008 Andra began looking around France for a site to build an LLW-LL repository. In late 2008 it provided the Government with a report analysing the geological, environmental and socio-economic aspects of the forty odd municipalities that expressed an interest in the project. After the withdrawal of the two municipalities chosen in 2009 to conduct geological investigations, the government asked Andra to re-explore the various management options for graphite and radium-bearing waste, focusing in particular on ways to manage these types of waste separately. The High Committee for Transparency and Information on Nuclear Safety (HCTISN) created a working group to provide feedback on the search for a site for LLW-LL. Andra submitted a report to the Government in late 2012. This report contains proposals for continuing the search and draw in particular on the HCTISN's recommendations. Contents: 1 - Radioactive waste (Sources, Types, Management, Waste to be disposed of at Cigeo, Cigeo's estimated disposal capacities, Where IS HLW and ILW-LL being stored until Cigeo is commissioned? 2 - Why deep geological disposal? (A 15-year research programme, Presentation and assessment of the research results, The public debate of 2005-2006, Deep geological disposal ratified by the 2006 Planning Act, The 2006 Planning Act: other areas of research complementary to deep geological disposal, The situation in other countries); 3 - Why the Meuse/Haute-Marne site? (Selection of the Meuse and Haute-Marne site to host an underground research laboratory, The geological formation in the Meuse and Haute-Marne site, Callovo-Oxfordian clay, Siting of Cigeo's installations); 4 - How will Cigeo operate? (The installations at Cigeo, Construction of Cigeo, Transport of waste packages, Operation of Cigeo, Closure of Cigeo); 5 - Safety at Cigeo

  15. Cement/clay interactions: feedback on the increasing complexity of modeling assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, Nicolas C.M.; Gaucher, Eric C.; Tournassat, Christophe; Gaboreau, Stephane; Vong, Chan Quang; Claret, F.; Munier, Isabelle; Cochepin, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    mineralogical transformations. In addition, the validation of some simplifying hypothesizes in previous approaches will be tackled. In the present paper, the following modeling cases are considered: - alkaline fluid (Dirichlet boundary condition) in contact with clay stone; - consideration of a cementitious medium (CEM I, pH 12.5); - introduction of alkaline cations (CEM I, pH 13.2); - consideration of zeolites as secondary phases; - transition from 1D Cartesian geometry to 1D radial; - incorporation of reaction kinetics; - investigation of a damaged zone (EDZ) around the drift; - feedback effect of mineralogical transformations on the porosity and then on diffusive transport. In these calculations the clay will be the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock. The constituent phases selected here are established according to the 'Chlorite(CCa2)/Illite(IMt2)' model proposed by Gaucher et al. (2009). The concrete system is modelled as an ordinary Portland cement (CEM I) consisting of portlandite, CSH with Ca/Si=1.6, ettringite, minor quantities of hydrotalcite and mono-carbo-aluminate as proposed by Blanc et al. (2010). (authors)

  16. Durability testing of an iodate-substituted hydroxyapatite designed for the conditioning of {sup 129}I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, Antoine [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, Laboratoire d' étude et de Développement de Matrices de Conditionnement, Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Grandjean, Agnes [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SPDE, Laboratoire des Procédés Supercritiques et de Décontamination, Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Laurencin, Danielle [Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier ICGM, UMR 5253 CNRS-UM-ENSCM, Université de Montpellier, Place E. Bataillon, CC1701, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Jollivet, Patrick [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, Laboratoire d' étude du Comportement à Long Terme, Centre de Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France); Rossignol, Sylvie [Groupe d' Etude des Matériaux Hétérogènes, CEC-GEMH-ENSCI, 12 rue de l' Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Campayo, Lionel, E-mail: lionel.campayo@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, Laboratoire d' étude et de Développement de Matrices de Conditionnement, Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols sur Cèze (France)

    2017-02-15

    The safe management of iodine coming from spent nuclear fuels by storage in deep geological repositories requires durable materials. For this purpose, we have recently developed an iodate-substituted hydroxyapatite (HA-CaI). In the present article, the chemical durability of this material is assessed as a function of leaching media and apatite stoichiometry. First, the maximum rate for iodine release was determined in unsaturated conditions leading to a congruent dissolution of HA-CaI. In these conditions, the forward rate was equal to 2 × 10{sup −2} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1} at 50 °C independently of apatite stoichiometry. During this regime, dissolution was controlled by surface reaction and diffusion phenomena. When concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions in solution increased, the system became saturated towards non-substituted hydroxyapatite Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2} and the rate of iodine release consecutively decreased. Consequently, tests were carried out to determine the behaviour of HA-CaI in such experimental conditions (saturated conditions), which were thought to be time-prevalent given the half-life of {sup 129}I (15.7 million years). During this regime, also called residual regime, iodine was released in the solution at a constant rate without being trapped in a secondary phase. The residual rate at 50 °C on the basis of iodine release was of 10{sup −4} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1} in an initially deionized water, and it fell by one order of magnitude (r = 10{sup −5} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1}) in a clay-equilibrated groundwater (hereafter called Callovo-oxfordian (COx) groundwater). This singular behaviour was ascribed to the presence of calcium in COx water. These preliminary results on the chemical durability of HA-CaI suggest that this material is a viable candidate as repository iodine waste form. - Highlights: • A two-step mechanism can account for the resistance to leaching in pure water of iodate

  17. Gas and water flow in an excavation-induced fracture network around an underground drift: A case study for a radioactive waste repository in clay rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Vaissière, Rémi; Armand, Gilles; Talandier, Jean

    2015-02-01

    The Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) surrounding a drift, and in particular its evolution, is being studied for the performance assessment of a radioactive waste underground repository. A specific experiment (called CDZ) was designed and implemented in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL) in France to investigate the EDZ. This experiment is dedicated to study the evolution of the EDZ hydrogeological properties (conductivity and specific storage) of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystone under mechanical compression and artificial hydration. Firstly, a loading cycle applied on a drift wall was performed to simulate the compression effect from bentonite swelling in a repository drift (bentonite is a clay material to be used to seal drifts and shafts for repository closure purpose). Gas tests (permeability tests with nitrogen and tracer tests with helium) were conducted during the first phase of the experiment. The results showed that the fracture network within the EDZ was initially interconnected and opened for gas flow (particularly along the drift) and then progressively closed with the increasing mechanical stress applied on the drift wall. Moreover, the evolution of the EDZ after unloading indicated a self-sealing process. Secondly, the remaining fracture network was resaturated to demonstrate the ability to self-seal of the COx claystone without mechanical loading by conducting from 11 to 15 repetitive hydraulic tests with monitoring of the hydraulic parameters. During this hydration process, the EDZ effective transmissivity dropped due to the swelling of the clay materials near the fracture network. The hydraulic conductivity evolution was relatively fast during the first few days. Low conductivities ranging at 10-10 m/s were observed after four months. Conversely, the specific storage showed an erratic evolution during the first phase of hydration (up to 60 days). Some uncertainty remains on this parameter due to volumetric strain during the

  18. Microbial investigations of deep geological compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsotti, V.; Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M.H.; Joulian, C.; Coulon, S.; Le Marrec, C.; Garrido, F.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Deep sedimentary rocks are now considered to contain a significant part of the total bacterial population, but are microbiologically unexplored. The drilling down to the base of the Triassic (1980 meters deep) in the geological formations of the eastern Paris Basin performed by ANDRA (EST433) in 2008 provides us a good opportunity to explore the deep biosphere. We conditioned and sub-sampled on the coring site, in as aseptic conditions as possible, the nine cores: two in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay, two in the Dogger, five in the Triassic compartments. In addition to storage at atmospheric pressure, a portion of the five Triassic samples was placed in a 190 bars pressurized bars chamber to investigate the influence of the conservation pressure factor on the found microflora. In parallel, in order to evaluate a potential bacterial contamination of the core by the drilling fluids, samples of mud just before each sample drilling were taken and analysed. The microbial exploration we started can be divided in two parts: - A cultural approach in different culture media for six metabolic groups to try to find microbial cells still viable. This type of experiment is difficult because of the small proportion of cultivable species, especially in these extreme environmental samples. - A molecular approach by direct extraction of genomic DNA from the geological samples to explore a larger biodiversity. Here, the limits are the difficulties to extract DNA from these low biomass containing rocks. The five Triassic samples were partly crushed in powder and inoculated in the six culture media with four NaCl concentrations, because this type of rock is known as saline or hyper-saline, and incubated at three temperatures: 30 deg. C, 55 deg. C under agitation and 70 deg. C. First results will be presented. The direct extraction of DNA needs a complete method optimisation to adapt existent procedures (using commercial kit and classical

  19. Mechanical behavior of an instrumented shotcrete drifts definitive lining in a 500 m deep clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zghondi, Jad; Armand, Gilles; Noiret, Aurelien

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. At the Meuse/Haute Marne Underground Research Laboratory (URL), Andra has developed a technical and scientific program to test excavation methods in a 500 m deep Callovo Oxfordian clay-stone to demonstrate feasibility of nuclear waste disposal Different types of drift excavations and reinforcements methods has been and will be tested at the URL,in order to evaluate the impact on the surrounding rock behavior, especially the EDZ, and to optimize the design of the reinforcement. At the beginning soft support has been used to let drifts converge, and from time to time the stiffness of support has been increase up to emplace gasketed pre-cast concrete segmental rings just after an open face tunneling excavation end of 2013. In this previous experiment, the target was to apply and on a short time a stiff reinforcement that can have a similar behavior as a pre-cast concrete ring. This paper will present the experimental layout, the measurement tools as well as the first results. The instrumented drift section 'BPE' is 15 m long and 6,3 m diameter; it was excavated by a BRH machine. The excavation sequence was realized with a one meter excavation pass. After each pass, a 10 cm layer of wet mixed fiber reinforced shotcrete was applied on the vault, and 45 cm on the counter vault. The vault 45 cm thickness was reached after three other layers added respectively while proceeding with the three following pass of excavation. Different kinds of measurements were carried out before, during and after excavation, in a way to evaluate the loading of the shotcrete reinforcement as well as the hydro-mechanical behavior of the host rock. Before the excavation of the drift, three standard diameter boreholes have been drilled around the planned drift. They have been equipped with pressure and deformation measurements in a way to monitor the hydro-mechanical impact of the excavation on the surrounding rock. While excavating, the

  20. Coupled transport and chemistry in clay stone studied by advective displacement: experiments and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landesman, C.; Grambow, B.; Bailly, C.; Ribet, S.; Perrigaud, K.; Baty, V.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication entered in this record. For assessing the mass transfer resistance of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock formation in case of implementing a nuclear waste repository, various strongly coupled processes need to be understood and quantified both in near and far field: multi-species diffusion/advection, mineral/pore water interaction, interaction with the waste matrix and engineered barrier material, radionuclide retention, colloid transport, pore water chemistry evolution etc. To study many of these processes in their interrelationship simultaneously, a series of high pressure stainless steel advection cell was designed and clay cores from different locations of different calcite and clay contents were machined to fit the inner diameter of the cells with a precision of 50 μm. After assembling, simulated oxygen free clay pore water with bromine tracer was pushed by a High Pressure pump through the reactor by a pressure of up 100 bars at temperatures between 20 and 90 deg. C and the out-flowing water was collected, protected from air and analyzed by ICP-MS, COT meter and ion chromatography in regular time intervals. The water flow rate was between 0.02 and 1.2 mL/ d, corresponding to a clay rock permeabilities between 10 -12 and 10 -14 m/s at 25 deg. C. Permeabilities increase with temperature as expected due to reduction of viscosity of water. The experiments last up to 2 years. The first drops of out flowing allow estimating the initial pore water composition. This is particular useful to assess mobile natural organic matter contents, Se concentrations and temperature effect on clay water composition. Results show that only very small organic molecules are mobile. Temperature had only little effect on water composition. After few months both tritiated (HTO) water and 36 Cl were added and from the evolution of the activities in the out flowing water dispersion coefficients and accessible

  1. The Jurassic of North-East Greenland: Jurassic dinoflagellate cysts from Hochstetter Forland, North-East Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecki, Stefan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Three sections in Hochstetter Forland, North-East Greenland, referred to the Jurassic Payer Dal and Bernbjerg Formations, have been analysed for dinoflagellate cysts. The dinoflagellate cysts,new finds of ammonites and previously recorded marine faunas form the basis for improved dating of the succession. The basal strata of the Payer Dal Formation at Kulhus is here dated as Late Callovian, Peltoceras athleta Chronozone, based on the presence of relatively abundant Limbicysta bjaerkei, Mendicodinium groenlandicum, Rhychoniopsis cladophora and Tubotuberella dangeardii in an otherwise poor Upper Callovian dinoflagellate assemblage. Ammoniteshave not been recorded from these strata. The upper Payer Dal Formation at Agnetesøelven is dated as Late Oxfordian, Amoeboceras glosense – Amoeboceras serratum Chronozones, based onthe presence of Sciniodinium crystallinum, together with Cribroperidinium granuligera and Stephanelytron sp. The age is in accordance with ammonites present in the uppermost part ofthe formation at Søndre Muslingebjerg. New ammonites in the Bernbjerg Formation at Agnetesøelven together with dinoflagellate cysts indicate an earliest Kimmeridgian age, Raseniacymodoce and Aulacostephanoides mutabilis Chronozones.The Upper Callovian dinoflagellate cysts from Hochstetter Forland belong to a local brackish to marginal marine assemblage, which only allows a fairly broad correlation to coeval assemblagesin central East Greenland. In contrast, the Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian assemblages are fully marine and can be correlated from Milne Land in central East Greenland via Hochstetter Forland to Peary Land in eastern North Greenland.

  2. Magnetic Viscosity for Cyclostratigraphic Logging of Argillaceous Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Tabbagh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility (MS is currently used as a directly representative proxy for the study of climatic variations, and for cyclostratigraphic studies. It depends on the concentration of magnetic minerals in the rocks, but does not allow identifying the magnetic minerals. In the case of argillaceous sediments, the paramagnetism of clay particles often plays a major role in determining the magnitude of their magnetic susceptibility, while the presence of ferrimagnetic iron oxides or sulfides cannot be assessedusing susceptibility measurements alone. Among the different methods that can be used to detect ferrimagnetic particles magnetic viscosity (MV characterizing the delay corresponding to the acquisition or loss of induced magnetization, has the same advantages as MS. Itsmeasurement is direct, rapid and has been proven to be very efficient in detecting the presence of secondary ferrimagnetic minerals in soils. A MV measurement technique was tested on cores taken from a borehole, in Callovian-Oxfordian formations in the eastern Paris Basin (France (Fig. 1. Although the MV values are very small, they have cyclic variations of which strongest values are found at the base of the Lower Oxfordian. These values, when correlated to MS,Gamma Ray (GR and a sequential interpretation of a borehole drilled close-by are found to be associated with the maximum clay fraction in the core samples, a MS maximum, and a major transgression event. Consequently, a significant increase in ferrimagnetic minerals can be associated with this event.

  3. Corrigendum to "Decadal to millennial variations in water column parameters in pelagic marine environments of the Western Tethys (Carpathian realm) during Middle-Late Jurassic - Evidence from the radiolarian record" [Glob. Planet. Chang. 162 (2018) 148-162

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bąk, Marta; Bąk, Krzysztof; Michalik, Mariola

    2018-04-01

    The authors regret (Abstract. The causal link between changes in Middle-Late Jurassic radiolarian habitat group abundances, microfacies and water column conditions in the Western Tethys was studied based on the examination of siliceous limestones and cherts from the Tatra Mountains, Central Western Carpathians. Deposition occurred on a morphological high with incised pelagic sedimentation within a tropical zone. High-resolution quantitative analyses of millimetre-thick microlaminae show changes in microfacies constituents that most likely record the fluxes of nutrients and biological activity in superficial waters. Variability of radiolarian assemblages that are classified to represent (i) upwelling and (ii) stratified water taxa suggest successive changes in water conditions that fluctuated between periods of upwelling and periods of formation of a thick, stratified, warm superficial layer above a deep thermocline during middle Bajocian-late Oxfordian time. Such variations would be strongly influenced by ocean-atmosphere global circulation patterns, which are caused by pressure gradients and are the result of Walker circulation along the equatorial part of the Tethys and the Panthalassa Ocean, including the duration of El Niño-like and La Niña-like cycles, which affect sea surface temperature trends on decadal scales. The fluctuations in radiolarian assemblages in the sediments indicate that long-term palaeoceanographic changes occurred on multi-decadal to centennial-scales during the Bajocian, but lengthened in duration to millennial-scale during the Bathonian through the Oxfordian.)

  4. Iron-clay interactions under a thermal gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodin-Caumon, Marie-Camille; Mosser-Ruck, Regine; Randi, Aurelien; Cathelineau, Michel; Michau, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Repository in deep geological formations is considered as a possible solution for long-term high-level nuclear waste (HLW) management. The concept generally consists in a multiple barriers system including steel canister in a clay host rock. Heat and radiation emissions by HLW, corrosion of the canister and desaturation/re-saturation of the clay may affect the properties of the geological formation. In this context, the possible mineralogical evolutions of clays in contact with metal iron were studied in various conditions simulating those of HLW repository. Most of these studies were carried out at a constant temperature whereas the system will undergo a thermal gradient in time (progressive decrease of the temperature of the HLW with the decrease of its activity) and space (from the waste to the host rock). A thermal gradient may imply mass transport phenomena by convection and diffusion processes as a function of temperature, gradient intensity and the nature of the chemical elements. Here we show the effect of a thermal gradient in space on the interaction between the argillite from the ANDRA underground laboratory at Bure (Meuse/Haute-Marne) and metal iron. Tube-in-tube experiments were carried out. Argillite was put in two previously drilled platinum capsules (Diam. holes: 200 μm). Metal iron (powder and plate) was added in one of the Pt capsule. The Pt capsules were then loaded at the two ends of a gold tube. A fluid (H 2 O or a saline solution) was added and the gold tube was sealed and regularly pinched to form 5 precipitation niches. The iron/argillite mass ratio ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 and the fluid/argillite mass ratio was around 10. A thermal gradient 80 deg. C-150 deg. C or 150 deg. C-300 deg. C was applied to the tube during 3 and 6 months. The end of the gold tube with the Pt capsule containing iron was placed at the hot point (max. temperature 150 deg. C or 300 deg. C) or at the cold point (min

  5. Field examination of shale and argillite in northern Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, J.R.; Woodward, L.A.; Emanuel, K.M.; Keil, K.

    1981-12-01

    Thirty-two locales underlain by clay-rich strata ranging from Cambrian Pioche Shale to Mississippian Chainman Shale and equivalents were examined in northern Nye County, Nevada. The text of the report summarizes data for each stratigraphic unit examined. Checklists for tabulating field data at each locale are included in an appendix. Working guidelines used to evaluate the locales include a minimum thickness of 150 m (500 ft) of relatively pure clay-rich bedrock, subsurface depth between 150 m (500 ft) and 900 m (3000 ft), low topographic relief, low seismic and tectonic activity, and avoidance of areas with mineral resource production or potential. Field studies indicate that only the Chainman Shale, specifically in the central and northern parts of the Pancake Range, appears to contain sites that meet these guidelines

  6. The ophiolitic North Fork terrane in the Salmon River region, central Klamath Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, C.J.; Irwin, W.P.; Jones, D.L.; Saleeby, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The North Fork terrane is an assemblage of ophiolitic and other oceanic volcanic and sedimentary rocks that has been internally imbricated and folded. The ophiolitic rocks form a north-trending belt through the central part of the region and consist of a disrupted sequence of homogeneous gabbro, diabase, massive to pillowed basalt, and interleaved tectonitic harzburgite. U-Pb zircon age data on a plagiogranite pod from the gabbroic unit indicate that at least this part of the igneous sequence is late Paleozoic in age.The ophiolitic belt is flanked on either side by mafic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, limestone, bedded chert, and argillite. Most of the chert is Triassic, including much of Late Triassic age, but chert with uncertain stratigraphic relations at one locality is Permian. The strata flanking the east side of the ophiolitic belt face eastward, and depositional contacts between units are for the most part preserved. The strata on the west side of the ophiolitic belt are more highly disrupted than those on the east side, contain chert-argillite melange, and have unproven stratigraphic relation to either the ophiolitic rocks or the eastern strata.Rocks of the North Fork terrane do not show widespread evidence of penetrative deformation at elevated temperatures, except an early tectonitic fabric in the harzburgite. Slip-fiber foliation in serpentinite, phacoidal foliation in chert and mafic rocks, scaly foliation in argillite, and mesoscopic folds in bedded chert are consistent with an interpretation of large-scale anti-formal folding of the terrane about a north-south hinge found along the ophiolitic belt, but other structural interpretations are tenable. The age of folding of North Fork rocks is constrained by the involvement of Triassic and younger cherts and crosscutting Late Jurassic plutons. Deformation in the North Fork terrane must have spanned a short period of time because the terrane is bounded structurally above and below by Middle or Late

  7. Geology of the UE17e drill hole, Area 17, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodson, J.N.; Hoover, D.L.

    1979-03-01

    The UE17e drill hole, located at the northwest corner of Syncline Ridge, was cored from 3.05 m (10 ft) to a total depth of 914.4 m (3,000 ft) in unit J (Mississippian) of the Eleana (Devonian and Mississippian) to obtain samples for mineral, chemical, and physical-property analyses. UE17e penetrated 73.5 m (241 ft) of the quartzite subunit and 840.9 m (2,759 ft) of the argillite subunit of unit J. Less than 0.4 percent quartzite is present in the argillite subunit. Dips range from 12 0 to 18 0 . Twenty-three faults were observed in the core or on geophysical logs. Most of these faults affect only a few meters of the core and probably have displacements of a few meters. The majority of fractures are parallel to bedding planes. Fracture frequency ranges from 3.4 to 9.4 fractures per meter in the upper part of the cored interval and 1.4 to 5.9 fractures per meter in the lower part of the cored interval. The core index indicates that the lower part of the hole is more competent than the upper part. Lower competency in the upper part of the hole may be caused by weathering and/or near-surface stress relief. Physical, mechanical, and thermal property measurements indicate that bedding and fracturing are the major factors in variation of properties between samples. 17 figures, 10 tables

  8. The potential of high resolution ultrasonic in-situ methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, K.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the framework of geomechanical assessment of final repository underground openings the knowledge of geophysical rock parameters are of importance. Ultrasonic methods proved to be good geophysical tools to provide appropriate high resolution parameters for the characterisation of rock. In this context the detection and characterisation of rock heterogeneities at different scales, including the Excavation Damaged/disturbed Zone (EDZ/EdZ) features, play an important role. Especially, kinematic and dynamic parameters derived from ultrasonic measurements can be linked very close to rock mechanic investigations and interpretations. BGR uses high resolution ultrasonic methods, starting with emitted frequencies of about 1 kHz (seismic) and going up to about 100 kHz. The method development is going on and appropriate research and investigations are performed since many years at different European radioactive waste disposal related underground research laboratories in different potential host rocks. The most frequented are: Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Switzerland (Opalinus Clay, OPA), Underground Research Laboratory Meuse/Haute- Marne, France (Callovo-Oxfordian, COX), Underground Research Facility Mol, Belgium (Boom Clay, BC), Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden (granites), Rock Laboratory Grimsel, Switzerland (granites) and Asse salt mine, Germany (rock salt). The methods can be grouped into borehole based methods and noninvasive methods like refraction and reflection methods, which are performed in general from the drift wall. Additionally, as a combination of these both methods a sort of vertical seismic profiling (VSP) is applied. The best qualified method, or a combination of methods, have to be chosen according to the scientific questions and the local site conditions. The degree of spatial resolution of zones of interest or any kind of anomaly depends strongly on the distance of these objects to the ultrasonic

  9. Mineralogical, chemical, and petrographic analysis of selected rock samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    I. The majority of rocks examined from the NTS were found to be siltstones, varying from coarse into the very fine siltstone range, and containing > 60% quartz, usually much higher. Samples of the UEIL series of cores, in contrast, had a large clay mineral fraction, as well as some carbonate present. A few were intermediate silty claystones or argillites. Microphotographs are included to illustrate the variations in texture observed, while most of the data obtained are summarized in tabular form. II. Seven Michigan Salina evaporite specimens were analyzed

  10. Hf isotope evidence for variable slab input and crustal addition in basalts and andesites of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Troll, Valentin R.; Gamble, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    -Nd isotopes. Here we present new Hf isotope data for a selection of volcanic rocks and crustal lithologies fromthe Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), NewZealand and propose that the scatter in Hf-Nd isotopes indicates heterogeneity in the parental magmas prior to interactions with crustal lithologies. The observed......, whereas younger lavas have probably interacted more with mid- to shallow crustal meta-sedimentary greywacke-argillite lithologies of the Permian to Cretaceous composite Torlesse Terrane. Hf-Nd isotopic compositions of meta-igneous granulite xenoliths from Mt. Ruapehu are consistent with previous...

  11. Thermodynamics of hydration of MX80-Na. What are the best approaches for evaluating the thermodynamic properties of hydration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieillard, P.; Lassin, A.; Blanc, P.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaboreau, S.; Gaucher, E.C.; Denoyel, R.; Bloch, E.; Fialips, C.; Giffaut, E.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a waste disposal within clayey formations (Callovian-Oxfordian argillite) or using clayey barriers, the prediction of the long-term behavior requires the thermodynamic properties of clay minerals. It has been shown by Gailhanou et al. (submitted) that hydration reactions may have some dramatic consequences on the thermodynamic properties of clay minerals. Different theoretical models exist for extracting thermodynamic properties from water adsorption/desorption isotherms. The present work aims at investigating and comparing these methods, because they can provide very different results based on the assumptions of each models. First, three types of models are compared: 1) the Hill (1949) model based on heat of adsorption combined with adsorption isotherm, 2) the Jura and Hill (1951) model, based on the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, and 3) the BET theory. Both have been designed in order to describe surface sorption phenomena. For instance, they suppose that the number of sorption sites is constant during all the vapor sorption process (and at any relative humidity, P/P 0 ). The hydration reaction approach can also be used. Compared to the three previous models, it is not structurally constrained, except for mass balance considerations on the H 2 O component. It had been especially developed by Tardy and Touret, (1985) and modified into a solid solution model, first by Ransom and Helgeson, (1994). It relies simply on the reaction: Clay(dehydrated) + nH 2 O = Clay(hydrated).nH 2 O. The different families of models have been compared to experimental measurements performed on a sodic smectite MX80. The set of experiments includes a series of three adsorption/desorption isotherms obtained at 25, 45 and 60 C and a heat of adsorption combined with a adsorption isotherm obtained at 25 C. The heat of adsorption was derived from the 3 adsorption/desorption isotherms by using the different models. Then

  12. Preliminary assessment of shales and other argillaceous rocks in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.

    1981-01-01

    Shales and related clay-rich rock types throughout the conterminous United States are geologically characterized and evaluated on a regional basis relative to their promise as possible candidate rock sequences for the repository disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Only stratigraphic intervals or parts of them that are laterally persistent, consist of 75 m or more of shale, mudstone, or argillite, and lie at depths of 305 to 915 m below the land surface are included. The general properties of clay-rich rocks, as well as the several desirable characteristics that make them potentially attractive as disposal host candidates, are reviewed. Also discussed are the geologic factors that dictate the potential acceptability of any shale sequence relative to the regional subsurface distribution of units that meet the basic criteria of extent, thickness, and depth. Included in this context are the tectonic setting, geologic structure, seismicity, groundwater hydrology, mineralogy and content of organic matter, mineral resource potential of both the shales and the enclosing geologic basins, and any construction experience on underground openings, such as hydrocarbon-storage facilities. The clay-rich strata that appear to be promising on the basis of this evaluation are inventoried according to their occurrence and distribution within nine geologic-geomorphic regions throughout the country. Also considered are several, more localized occurrences of Precambrian argillites whose mineralogies make them a related yet separate group in comparison with the sedimentary strata already summarized. Topics for which data are insufficient or on which inadequate study has been conducted to date are also identified

  13. Iodine and selenium migration through argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasca, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Deep argillaceous formations are considered as potential host rock for high-level radioactive waste repository. Based on safety assessment calculations, active selenium ( 79 Se) and iodine ( 129 I) from high level radioactive waste might be ones of the major dose contributors due to their longevity and their anionic character. However, because of their high sensitivity to redox condition, a special attention to the oxidation state of these elements is required. A comparative study on the diffusion properties of selenium and iodine through argillaceous rocks was realized with the aim to determine the effects of both the redox conditions and the mineralogy on the migration of these two elements. For these purposes, we have studied two argillaceous rocks: Toarcian argillite from Tournemire (France) and Opalinus clay (OPA) from the Mont-Terri (Switzerland). The study of the iodide migration allowed to confirm the control on the iodide retention of both oxidized pyrite and natural organic matter. A kinetic control of the iodide sorption is also suspected. We focus the selenium study on the more oxidized species, Se(IV) and Se(VI). The Se(IV) migration is strongly dependant from oxido-reduction processes. Indeed, the Se(IV) diffusion experiments through Tournemire argillite and OPA indicated a significant reduction associated to Fe(II). The Se(VI) study evidenced a behavior dependant from the initial concentration: at the highest concentration, no significant retention was observed while the retention is significant at the lowest concentration. Furthermore, spectroscopic analyses tend to show a low Se(VI) reduction at the Fe contact. However, biotic origin cannot be excluded. (author)

  14. Preliminary geologic and geophysical data of the UE25a-3 exploratory drill hole, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, F.; Muller, D.C.; Morrison, J.N.

    1979-09-01

    The UE25a-3 drill hole, located in the Calico Hills area, was drilled as part of an effort to evaluate the Calico Hills area as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The purpose of the drill hole was to verify the existence of an intrusive crystalline body in the subsurface and to determine the stratigraphy, structure, and nature of fractures of the cored rocks. Cored samples were obtained for mineral, chemical, and material property analyses. Numerous high-angle faults and brecciated zones were intersected by the drill hole. The units cored were intensely fractured with fracture analysis of the core consisting of frequency of fractures, dips of fractures, open and closed (sealed) fractures and types of fracture sealing or coating material. Twenty-four hundred and thirty fractures, representing approximately 30 percent of the fractures present, indicate an average fracture frequency of 13.2 fractures per meter, predominantly high-angle dips with 66 percent of the fractures closed. Fractures in the argillite interval are sealed or coated predominantly with kaolinite, nacrite, and dickite. Calcite, chlorite, and magnetite are present in fractures in the altered argillite interval. Fractures in the marble interval are sealed or coated with calcite, dolomite, and ferruginous clay. The core index indicates that the lower half of the drilled interval is more competent than the upper half. Borehole geophysical logs were run by the Birdwell Division of Seismograph Service Corporation for geologic correlations and lithologic characterizations. The logs include: caliper, density, resistivity, spontaneous potential, Vibroseis, 3-D velocity, neutron, and gamma-ray logs

  15. In the heart of rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This educational document gives a presentation of the Andra underground research laboratory of Bure (Haute-Marne and Meuse, France) devoted to the study of the underground disposal of radioactive wastes. The document is presented in the form of a comics. It describes the geological setting of the laboratory, located in the eastern edge of the Paris basin, the properties of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay layer, the digging of the boreholes and galleries, the mine-by test and its instrumentation, the backfilling and sealing of the galleries and the reversibility of the burial of radioactive waste containers. (J.S.)

  16. In the heart of rock; Au coeur de la roche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    This educational document gives a presentation of the Andra underground research laboratory of Bure (Haute-Marne and Meuse, France) devoted to the study of the underground disposal of radioactive wastes. The document is presented in the form of a comics. It describes the geological setting of the laboratory, located in the eastern edge of the Paris basin, the properties of the Callovian-Oxfordian clay layer, the digging of the boreholes and galleries, the mine-by test and its instrumentation, the backfilling and sealing of the galleries and the reversibility of the burial of radioactive waste containers. (J.S.)

  17. M4FT-16LL080302052-Update to Thermodynamic Database Development and Sorption Database Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Glenn T. Seaborg Inst.. Physical and Life Sciences; Wolery, T. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Akima Infrastructure Services, LLC; Atkins-Duffin, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Global Security

    2016-08-16

    This progress report (Level 4 Milestone Number M4FT-16LL080302052) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within the Argillite Disposal R&D Work Package Number FT-16LL08030205. The focus of this research is the thermodynamic modeling of Engineered Barrier System (EBS) materials and properties and development of thermodynamic databases and models to evaluate the stability of EBS materials and their interactions with fluids at various physico-chemical conditions relevant to subsurface repository environments. The development and implementation of equilibrium thermodynamic models are intended to describe chemical and physical processes such as solubility, sorption, and diffusion.

  18. Diagenesis and transfers in fractured argillaceous environment: the Tournemire argillite (Aveyron, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyaud, J.B.

    2002-04-01

    The Tournemire experimental site (Aveyron, France) is located on the Western margin of the Causses basin, South of Massif Central, and is studied as natural analogue of a nuclear wastes disposal site by the French Institute for Nuclear Safety and Radioprotection (IRSN). It is situated inside a former railway tunnel passing through a lithified and fractured Toarcian shale formation, 200 m thick, covered by a 300 m thick limestone and dolomite aquifer. This work aims at characterizing the evolution of confinement capacities in the shale during its geological history. In the Causses basin, sedimentary dynamics are uncertain during Lower Cretaceous due to an important Cretaceous erosion event. The thermal history of the region was reconstructed to solve this problem, using geo-thermometers and geo-chrono-thermometers. Organic mater Tmax determined by Rock-Eval pyrolysis range from 433 to 440 deg C and indicate diagenetic condition consistent with oil window upper limit. Homogenization temperatures in two-phase aqueous inclusions measured between 80 and 120 deg. C, the occurrence of ordered mixed layer with illite content higher than 70%, and thermal resetting of apatite fission tracks agree with these conditions. Fission tracks data reveal the occurrence of an important and quick denudation beginning at about 120-110 Main the Causses area, consistent with the Durancian Isthmus formation in the SE basin. Tmax modelling supports the sedimentation of 800 to 1600 m thick deposits during Lower Cretaceous. Those sediments were removed during the erosion period that occurred between 110 and 90 Main the Causses basin. During Jurassic, a global extension phase induces subsidence in the Causses basin, and cause the shale burial. Another deformation phase, a compression phase, occurred during Eocene, owing to the Pyrenean orogeny. During extension, calcite veins crystallized at temperatures between 80 and 120 deg C from fluids evolved from marine water, whereas they crystallized at temperatures between 30 and 40 deg C from a fluid with a strong meteoric component during the compression. Affinities between shale cement and calcite veins in shale suggest carbon in calcite veins is buffered by the shale. In a N130 sinistral fault, the overlying Aaleman limestone contributes to some extent to the carbonate in calcite veins. This suggests the N130 sinistral fault could connect with the upper aquifer during compression. In the Toarcian shale, Fe content in calcite veins suggests calcite crystallized in reduced environment during both extension and compression. In Shale, mineral species do not vary near the N130 sinistral fault, though a slight decrease in Ca, Sr and carbonate concentrations in a metric zone on either side of the main fault plane suggests these elements are mobilized. A δ 18 O variation in the same zone confirms that the shale cement is partially recrystallized. Barium and zinc are accumulated in baryte and pyrite near the main fault plane. Slight variations in U and Th concentrations were observed but it is difficult to discriminate a sedimentary variation from a diagenetic remobilization. Very low U content in calcite veins indicate U is retained in shale, since shale constitutes a reduced and alkaline environment. A slight enrichment in heavy rare earth elements relatively to light rare earth elements, and the occurrence of a authigenic florencite suggest rare earth elements were mobilized in the metric zone on either side of the main fault plane. Confinement capacities are estimated in the Toarcian shale during the Eocene compression, tacking into account the connection of the N130 sinistral fault and the occurrence of a perturbed metric zone on either sides of this fault. (author)

  19. Construction of predictive models for radionuclide sorption applied to radioactive waste deep storage: an overview of the CEA research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophe Poinssot; Etienne Tevissen; Jacques Ly; Michael Descostes; Virginie Blin; Catherine Beaucaire; Florence Goutelard; Christelle Latrille; Philippe Jacquier

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Deep geological storage is studied in France as one of the three potential options for managing long lived nuclear waste in the framework of the 1991 Law. One of the key topics of research deals with the behaviour of radionuclides (RN) in the geological environment, focusing in particular on the retention at the solid/water interfaces (in the engineered barriers or within the host rock), the diffusion process within the rock as well as the coupling between chemistry and transport processes. The final aim is to develop validated and reliable long-term predictive migration models. These researches are mainly coping with Callovo-Oxfordian argilites and near field materials such as cement and bentonite. Research are dealing both with the near-field environment - which is characterised by its evolution with time in terms of temperature, Eh balance, water composition - and the far-field environment, the chemistry of which is assumed to be roughly constant. Modelling the global RN migration in geological disposal requires having models which are intrinsically able to account for the evolution of the physical and chemical conditions of the environment. From the standpoint of performance assessment it is then necessary to acquire thermodynamic descriptions of the retention processes in order to perform calculations of the reactive transport of radionuclides In a first approach, CEA is developing for more than 15 years experiments and modelling to derive reliable predictive models for the RN migration in the geological disposal. For this purpose, a specific approach entitled the Ion-Exchangers Theory IXT was developed. It allows first to characterise the intrinsic retention properties of the pure minerals, i.e. to get evidence about the mono or multi-site character of the surface, to quantify the site(s) concentration(s) and to study the relative affinity of major solutes generally present in natural waters. This work provided a broad data

  20. The Jurassic of Denmark and Greenland: The Upper Jurassic of Europe: its subdivision and correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeiss, Arnold

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In the last 40 years, the stratigraphy of the Upper Jurassic of Europe has received much attention and considerable revision; much of the impetus behind this endeavour has stemmed from the work of the International Subcommission on Jurassic Stratigraphy. The Upper Jurassic Series consists of three stages, the Oxfordian, Kimmeridgian and Tithonian which are further subdivided into substages, zones and subzones, primarily on the basis of ammonites. Regional variations between the Mediterranean, Submediterranean and Subboreal provinces are discussed and correlation possibilities indicated. The durations of the Oxfordian, Kimmeridgian and Tithonian Stages are reported to have been 5.3, 3.4 and 6.5 Ma, respectively. This review of the present status of Upper Jurassic stratigraphy aids identification of a number of problems of subdivision and definition of Upper Jurassic stages; in particular these include correlation of the base of the Kimmeridgian and the top of the Tithonian between Submediterranean and Subboreal Europe. Although still primarily based on ammonite stratigraphy, subdivision of the Upper Jurassic is increasingly being refined by the incorporation of other fossil groups; these include both megafossils, such as aptychi, belemnites, bivalves, gastropods, brachiopods, echinoderms, corals, sponges and vertebrates, and microfossils such as foraminifera, radiolaria, ciliata, ostracodes, dinoflagellates, calcareous nannofossils, charophyaceae, dasycladaceae, spores and pollen. Important future developments will depend on the detailed integration of these disparate biostratigraphic data and their precise combination with the abundant new data from sequence stratigraphy, utilising the high degree of stratigraphic resolution offered by certain groups of fossils. This article also contains some notes on the recent results of magnetostratigraphy and sequence chronostratigraphy.

  1. Kinematic analysis of melange fabrics: Examples and applications from the McHugh Complex, Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusky, T.M.; Bradley, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    Permian to Cretaceous melange of the McHugh Complex on the Kenai Peninsula, south-central Alaska includes blocks and belts of graywacke, argillite, limestone, chert, basalt, gabbro, and ultramafic rocks, intruded by a variety of igneous rocks. An oceanic plate stratigraphy is repeated hundreds of times across the map area, but most structures at the outcrop scale extend lithological layering. Strong rheological units occur as blocks within a matrix that flowed around the competent blocks during deformation, forming broken formation and melange. Deformation was noncoaxial, and disruption of primary layering was a consequence of general strain driven by plate convergence in a relatively narrow zone between the overriding accretionary wedge and the downgoing, generally thinly sedimented oceanic plate. Soft-sediment deformation processes do not appear to have played a major role in the formation of the melange. A model for deformation at the toe of the wedge is proposed in which layers oriented at low angles to ??1 are contracted in both the brittle and ductile regimes, layers at 30-45??to ??1 are extended in the brittle regime and contracted in the ductile regime, and layers at angles greater than 45??to ??1 are extended in both the brittle and ductile regimes. Imbrication in thrust duplexes occurs at deeper levels within the wedge. Many structures within melange of the McHugh Complex are asymmetric and record kinematic information consistent with the inferred structural setting in an accretionary wedge. A displacement field for the McHugh Complex on the lower Kenai Peninsula includes three belts: an inboard belt of Late Triassic rocks records west-to-east-directed slip of hanging walls, a central belt of predominantly Early Jurassic rocks records north-south directed displacements, and Early Cretaceous rocks in an outboard belt preserve southwest-northeast directed slip vectors. Although precise ages of accretion are unknown, slip directions are compatible with

  2. ASTER spectral analysis and lithologic mapping of the Khanneshin carbonatite volcano, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, John C.; Rowan, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data of the early Quaternary Khanneshin carbonatite volcano located in southern Afghanistan were used to identify carbonate rocks within the volcano and to distinguish them from Neogene ferruginous polymict sandstone and argillite. The carbonatitic rocks are characterized by diagnostic CO3 absorption near 11.2 μm and 2.31–2.33 μm, whereas the sandstone, argillite, and adjacent alluvial deposits exhibit intense Si-O absorption near 8.7 μm caused mainly by quartz and Al-OH absorption near 2.20 μm due to muscovite and illite.Calcitic carbonatite was distinguished from ankeritic carbonatite in the short wave infrared (SWIR) region of the ASTER data due to a slight shift of the CO3 absorption feature toward 2.26 μm (ASTER band 7) in the ankeritic carbonatite spectra. Spectral assessment using ASTER SWIR data suggests that the area is covered by extensive carbonatite flows that contain calcite, ankerite, and muscovite, though some areas mapped as ankeritic carbonatite on a preexisting geologic map were not identified in the ASTER data. A contact aureole shown on the geologic map was defined using an ASTER false color composite image (R = 6, G = 3, B = 1) and a logical operator byte image. The contact aureole rocks exhibit Fe2+, Al-OH, and Fe, Mg-OH spectral absorption features at 1.65, 2.2, and 2.33 μm, respectively, which suggest that the contact aureole rocks contain muscovite, epidote, and chlorite. The contact aureole rocks were mapped using an Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operator.A visible through short wave infrared (VNIR-SWIR) mineral and rock-type map based on matched filter, band ratio, and logical operator analysis illustrates: (1) laterally extensive calcitic carbonatite that covers most of the crater and areas northeast of the crater; (2) ankeritic carbonatite located southeast and north of the crater and some small deposits located within the crater; (3) agglomerate that

  3. Characterization and modeling of natural tracers' transfers through the argillites of Tournemire (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriarche, D.

    2001-01-01

    The French Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) is investigating the argillaceous formation of Tournemire (France) as a methodological underground laboratory for conducting research on the feasibility of deep geological repositories for radioactive waste in argilites. Because of the very low water content and hydraulic conductivity of the argilites, the migration through this media should be very low. The fluid flow regime and transport have been studied using natural tracers from the interstitial water. The deuterium and chloride of interstitial water have been chosen for their conservative behavior. After the development of a protocol for the chloride extraction from the water, and tests on the vacuum distillation method for the water extraction from the rock, systematic data acquisition has been performed on the argillaceous sequence of the massif and near the fracture areas. Both chloride and deuterium profiles suggest that transfers are mainly diffusive at the massif scale. But the profiles show an enrichment in delta D and delta 18 O of the interstitial solution in the area of one meter adjacent to a fracture compared to pore water of samples located at further distance. Therefore, these observations are suggesting that a second process could generate specific transfers, at the vicinity of faults. The hypothesis of the molecular diffusion as a dominant process for transport was successfully tested using a transport model, over periods of several tenth of millions years, taking into account geodynamical features of the region (such as tectonic and induced faults), and assuming that some variations of the tracer concentrations at the system boundaries occurred during the major climate-change periods. Even if tracers' transfers are mainly diffusive at the massif scale, they are or should have been affected by a second process causing heterogeneity of concentrations at the vicinity of faults. This process involves either, intrusion of salted solutions or internal transfers due to overpressures. (author)

  4. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Kim, Kunhwi; Houseworth, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The focus of research within the UFD Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer minerals and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of induced temperature rise caused by waste heat.

  5. Investigation of Coupled Processes and Impact of High Temperature Limits in Argillite Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, Kunhwi [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The focus of research within the UFD Campaign is on repository-induced interactions that may affect the key safety characteristics of an argillaceous rock. These include thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process interactions that occur as a result of repository construction and waste emplacement. Some of the key questions addressed in this report include the development of fracturing in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) and THMC effects on the near-field argillaceous rock and buffer minerals and petrophysical characteristics, particularly the impacts of induced temperature rise caused by waste heat.

  6. Thermodynamic of hydration of a Wyoming montmorillonite saturated with Ca, Mg, Na and K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieillard, P.; Blanc, P.; Gailhanou, H.; Gaboreau, S.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of a disposal within clayey formations (Callovo-Oxfordian argillite) or using clayey barriers, the assessment of the long-term behavior of clay materials by geochemical modeling, requires thermodynamic properties of clay minerals. The Thermochimie database has been created by ANDRA in 1996 in order to provide coherent thermodynamic data of many minerals of interests with regards to this context, such as clay minerals. However, the thermodynamic properties of clay minerals, which govern the stability of these minerals in solution are still poorly understood. Indeed, there is little experimental data available in the literature concerning the hydration of smectites. On the other hand, it is not possible to acquire all the experimental thermodynamic hydration properties of clay minerals involved in natural systems or likely to be in the implementation of a deep disposal. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the thermodynamic hydration properties of a clay mineral. By considering the following reaction: Smectite nm H 2 O Smectite (0 H 2 O) + nm H 2 O (l), the hydration of smectite is calculated from an equilibrium condition involving anhydrous and hydrous components in which nm is the maximal number of moles of water in the fully hydrated end-member. By using a solid-solution formalism, the variation of the hydration state of a smectite with temperature or [H 2 O] can be possible. Analysis of experimental data indicates that solid solutions of hydrous and anhydrous smectite components at 25 deg. C and 1 bar are not ideal but can be expressed in terms of regular solution theory by considering the excess molal enthalpy of mixing (Hxs), the excess molal entropy of mixing (Sxs) and excess molal Gibbs free energy of mixing (Gxs) for binary solid solutions of homologous hydrous and anhydrous smectite components expressed in terms of Margules parameters W1 and W2. A compilation of measurements of

  7. New ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs from the European Lower Cretaceous demonstrate extensive ichthyosaur survival across the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Fischer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ichthyosauria is a diverse clade of marine amniotes that spanned most of the Mesozoic. Until recently, most authors interpreted the fossil record as showing that three major extinction events affected this group during its history: one during the latest Triassic, one at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary (JCB, and one (resulting in total extinction at the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary. The JCB was believed to eradicate most of the peculiar morphotypes found in the Late Jurassic, in favor of apparently less specialized forms in the Cretaceous. However, the record of ichthyosaurs from the Berriasian-Barremian interval is extremely limited, and the effects of the end-Jurassic extinction event on ichthyosaurs remains poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on new material from the Hauterivian of England and Germany and on abundant material from the Cambridge Greensand Formation, we name a new ophthalmosaurid, Acamptonectes densus gen. et sp. nov. This taxon shares numerous features with Ophthalmosaurus, a genus now restricted to the Callovian-Berriasian interval. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates that Ophthalmosauridae diverged early in its history into two markedly distinct clades, Ophthalmosaurinae and Platypterygiinae, both of which cross the JCB and persist to the late Albian at least. To evaluate the effect of the JCB extinction event on ichthyosaurs, we calculated cladogenesis, extinction, and survival rates for each stage of the Oxfordian-Barremian interval, under different scenarios. The extinction rate during the JCB never surpasses the background extinction rate for the Oxfordian-Barremian interval and the JCB records one of the highest survival rates of the interval. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There is currently no evidence that ichthyosaurs were affected by the JCB extinction event, in contrast to many other marine groups. Ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs remained diverse from their rapid radiation in the Middle

  8. Laboratory studies of radionuclide distributions between selected groundwaters and geologic media. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    During FY-1980, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory contributions to the Waste/Rock Interactions Technology program were primarily in the areas of migration-rate studies using crushed rock, whole core, and fractured core columns; parametric studies of variables which may influence radionuclide sorption-desorption behavior; and initial studies of actinide chemistry in near-neutral solutions and Eh control. Batch experiments in both air and a controlled atmosphere (nitrogen, less than or equal to 0.2 ppM oxygen, less than or equal to 20 ppM carbon dioxide) for the sorption of several radionuclides on granite and argillite were completed. These data also provided informaton on the effects of other parameters, such as particle size and contact time. All nine elements studied had different sorption ratios for argillite when measured under the controlled atmosphere than when measured in air, except possibly for americium where any effect was smaller than the standard deviations. As expected, strontium, cesium, and barium are least affected by the presence or absence of oxygen and carbon dioxide. Columns of crushed rock and solid and cracked cores were used to study the migration of radionuclides through such materials. In general, sorption ratios measured by batch techniques are 2 to 3 times greater than those for columns; however, a wide variation in behavior was observed, depending upon the element and the mineralogy. Work has begun on a system wherein traced groundwater is circulated through a crushed rock column; this should provide a link between the usual, single-pass, crushed rock columns and the batch experiments. Materials characterization has continued, and techniques for the determination of Fe(II) in silicate rocks and groundwater have been made operational. Work on the fundamental solution chemistry of the actinides has been started

  9. Experimental characterization of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Meuse/Haute-Marne argilites; Caracterisation experimentale du comportement hydromecanique des argilites de Meuse/Haute-Marne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escoffier, S

    2002-04-01

    Within the framework of a feasibility study of underground radioactive waste repository the experimental characterization of the coupled behavior of the host layer is of first importance. This work concerns the experimental characterization in laboratory of the poro-elastic behavior of argillite which constitutes the host layer of the future underground laboratory of ANDRA located at the limit of the Meuse/Haute-Marne. The theoretical approach is the Mechanics of Porous Media defined by Coussy [1991] which has the advantage of providing a formulation of the behavior laws using measurable parameters in laboratory. The difficulties or the feasibility of the characterization tests of these rocks coupled behavior are related to their very low permeability which requires an adaptation of the experimental devices initially used on more permeable rocks. Initially a synthesis on the knowledge of the poro-elastic parameters of Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite is given. Thereafter a first approach of the use of the studies of sensitivity as tools of decision-making aid is proposed. The experimental difficulties encountered by the various experimenters are illustrated by the diversity of the experimental choices, the test duration or by the results disparity. Because of economic, political and ecological stake, the studies of sensitivity could make it possible to direct the experimental efforts by giving indications on the dominating parameters in the coupled behavior of a rock. In the second time after the presentation of the test results of physical characterization 3 types of tests are described: permeability test (pulse test), determination of Biot coefficient under odometric loading and isotropic drained test. The complexity of these tests is related to the attack of the experimental limits. They are presented in detail: theoretical recalls, experimental set up, experimental protocol, unfolding and test results. (author)

  10. Experimental characterization of the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Meuse/Haute-Marne argilites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escoffier, S.

    2002-04-01

    Within the framework of a feasibility study of underground radioactive waste repository the experimental characterization of the coupled behavior of the host layer is of first importance. This work concerns the experimental characterization in laboratory of the poro-elastic behavior of argillite which constitutes the host layer of the future underground laboratory of ANDRA located at the limit of the Meuse/Haute-Marne. The theoretical approach is the Mechanics of Porous Media defined by Coussy [1991] which has the advantage of providing a formulation of the behavior laws using measurable parameters in laboratory. The difficulties or the feasibility of the characterization tests of these rocks coupled behavior are related to their very low permeability which requires an adaptation of the experimental devices initially used on more permeable rocks. Initially a synthesis on the knowledge of the poro-elastic parameters of Meuse/Haute-Marne argillite is given. Thereafter a first approach of the use of the studies of sensitivity as tools of decision-making aid is proposed. The experimental difficulties encountered by the various experimenters are illustrated by the diversity of the experimental choices, the test duration or by the results disparity. Because of economic, political and ecological stake, the studies of sensitivity could make it possible to direct the experimental efforts by giving indications on the dominating parameters in the coupled behavior of a rock. In the second time after the presentation of the test results of physical characterization 3 types of tests are described: permeability test (pulse test), determination of Biot coefficient under odometric loading and isotropic drained test. The complexity of these tests is related to the attack of the experimental limits. They are presented in detail: theoretical recalls, experimental set up, experimental protocol, unfolding and test results. (author)

  11. Fieldwork and catalogue of samples collected in Polan, September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulsen, N.; Drewniak, A.; Glowniak, E.; Ineson, J.; Matyja, B.A.; Merta, T.; Wierzbowski, A.

    1995-12-31

    This report lists the collection of samples taken during the field work of the EFP-95 Project, named `The Polish Middle to Late Jurassic Epicratonic basin, stratigraphy, facies and basin history` (short title: Jurrasic basin study, Poland) in Poland, August 7-20, 1995. The samples were collected for palynological studies, and/or sedimentaological studies, and/or source rock studies, and/or reservoir rock characteristics. Prepared samples (slides etc.) are stored in the collections of the GEUS, and remaining rock-material at the store of the GEUS. Field work with collection of samples for palynological studies has been carried earlier in 1988 and at the Oxfordian and Kimmeridgian Joint Working Groups Meeting 1992. (au)

  12. Palynology of the middle jurassic lower graben sand formation of the U-1 well, Danish Central Trough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelstad, T.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-one sidewall core samples from the lower 56 metres of the Lower Graben Sand Formation in the U-1 well are described with respect to their kerogen content and microflora in order to gain a better understanding of the depositional environment and the age relations. Based on e.g. the inconsistent dinoflagellate cyst occurrences, marginal marine conditions are concluded. The dinoglagellate cyst Pareodinia prolongata, Acanthaulax senta, Scriniodinium crystallinum, Energlynia acollaris, Wanaea thysanota and Hystrichogonyaulax cladophora and the recovered playnomorph assemblage in general permit an age determination as follows: 21 m Collovian undifferentiated, 7.9 latest Middle Callovian - earliest Late Callovian, 6.1 m latest Late Callovian and 21 m latest Late Callovian. - earliest Early Oxfordian.

  13. Reservoirs and petroleum systems of the Gulf Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    This GIS product was designed to provide a quick look at the ages and products (oil or gas) of major reservoir intervals with respect to the different petroleum systems that have been identified in the Gulf Coast Region. The three major petroleum source-rock systems are the Tertiary (Paleocene-Eocene) Wilcox Formation, Cretaceous (Turonian) Eagle Ford Formation, and Jurassic (Oxfordian) Smackover Formation. The ages of the reservoir units extend from Jurassic to Pleistocene. By combining various GIS layers, the user can gain insights into the maximum extent of each petroleum system and the pathways for petroleum migration from the source rocks to traps. Interpretations based on these data should improve development of exploration models for this petroleum-rich province.

  14. Dissolution kinetics of purified and synthetic smectites at 25°C and PH∼9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marty, Nicolas C.M.; Tournassat, Christophe; Gaucher, Eric C.; Chino, Daisuke; Sato, Tsutomu; Villieras, Frederic; Giffaut, Eric; Cama, Jordi; Soler, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Mineral rate laws that account for the kinetics of dissolution/precipitation of clays and other minerals are used in reactive transport codes to simulate and evaluate the evolution of geochemical conditions in the near-field of high level radioactive waste (HLW) in deep geological repositories. Smectite is the main component in the compacted bentonite used in the Multi-barrier system to lower permeability. As a consequence, molecular diffusion becomes the main mechanism of mass transport, and dissolution and precipitation reactions take place in close-to-equilibrium conditions. Nonetheless, in the reactive transport codes, databases utilized mainly incorporate rate laws derived at far-from- equilibrium conditions, which are not representative of near-field and far-field conditions of concrete-clay or iron-clay interfaces. Hence, there is an important need to derive kinetic rate laws that allow extrapolation of mineral dissolution/precipitation as a function of the solution saturation state (i.e., Gibbs free energy, ΔG r ). Once the effect of the environmental variables, such as pH, T and ΔG r , etc. exert on smectite dissolution is discerned, evaluation of the evolution of geochemical conditions in the HLW repository is carried out using reactive transport codes that couple the rate laws with transport equations. Several studies related dissolution of natural smectites with pH, and just a few dealt with the rate dependency on Gibbs free energy. The present study aims at estimating dissolution rates of montmorillonite in conditions as close as possible to those expected in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, i.e. pH∼7.2 and 25 deg. C. Dissolution kinetics of two montmorillonites (natural Na-montmorillonite purified from MX80 and synthetic smectite) were investigated by means of flow-through experiments and solution-chemistry data obtained. The calculated rates were based on release of Si, Al and Mg and normalized

  15. Comparing flows to a tunnel for single porosity, double porosity and discrete fracture representations of the EDZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, I.; Swift, B.; Hoch, A.; Wendling, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Andra is studying the Callovo-Oxfordian mud-stones, located at a depth of approximately 500 m beneath the borders of the Meuse and the Haute-Marne Departements, in order to assess the feasibility of constructing a repository for radioactive waste in this low-permeability geological formation. The construction of a repository will lead to the formation of a zone adjacent to the repository (the Excavation Damaged Zone, or EDZ) in which the rock suffers mechanical damage. In the EDZ, fractures and cracks will develop, and therefore the hydraulic properties (including the permeability) will be different from those of the undamaged rock. There are some experimental data which, despite significant uncertainties, allow a conceptual model of the fractures to be defined. The objectives of this study were: - To develop a Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) model of the EDZ; - To derive effective properties for both single continuum and Multiple Interacting Continua (MINC) models from the DFN model; and - To use the various models to simulate desaturation of the rock during the operational phase of the repository, and subsequent re-saturation of a tunnel post-closure (a period of thousands of years). The approaches to modelling flow and transport in fractured systems fall into two rough classes: DFN models; and continuum models. DFN models account explicitly for the effects of individual fractures on fluid flow and solute transport, and usually do not consider the interaction between the fractures and the rock matrix. Continuum models may be single continuum, double continuum or MINC. Single continuum models are applicable when the interaction between the fractures and the rock matrix is sufficient to establish a local equilibrium. Double continuum models account for the two interacting systems (i.e. fractures and rock matrix) by conceptualising each as a continuum occupying the entire domain. An exchange function describes mass

  16. Comparative EPMA and μXRF methods for mapping micro-scale distribution of iodine in bio-carbonates of the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey formation at Bure, Eastern part of the Paris Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerouge, C.; Claret, F.; Wille, G.; Beny, C.; Gaucher, E.C.; Tournassat, C.; Denecke, M.A.; Falkenberg, G.; Ramboz, C.; Giffaut, E.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A pluri-disciplinary approach was applied on carbonate shells of the Callovian-Oxfordian (160 Ma) clayey formation from the ANDRA Underground Research Laboratory at Bure. The overall aim of this natural analog investigation was to define the iodine speciation and immobilization mechanisms by carbonates in a natural carbonate-bearing clayey formation. In this study, sequential chemical extraction data have shown that ∼66 % of the low iodine content of the clay stone (1-5 ppm) is associated with the carbonate fraction and ∼33 % with organic matter. EPMA analyses have been performed on detrital and different generations of diagenetic carbonates observed in thin sections and have provided evidence of low and heterogeneously distributed iodine contents measured in bio-clasts (up to 1300 ppm), but also in less amounts in diagenetic euhedral calcite and dolomite (up to 620 ppm). EPMA analyses to measure iodine is especially challenging due to spectral interference between calcium K and iodine L emission lines and to the relatively high detection limits (∼150 ppm). We therefore applied a synchrotron micro-focused beam at energies above the I K absorption in the present study. Two entire and centimeter-sized shells, a bivalve and a brachiopod (Rhynchonella) were separated in a clay stone sample from Gallery level of the URL at Bure. They were cut along two perpendicular directions to obtain thin polished sections of the bio-clast shells. A dry polishing procedure was performed to avoid any partial dissolution of calcite and done by hand to avoid any heating and volatilization of iodine. Combined results from optical microscopy, SEM, cathodoluminescence and infra-red spectrometry performed on both bio-clasts showed that the Rhynchonella shell has a well-preserved organic structure and dominantly consists of bio-calcite, whereas the bivalve shell is entirely recrystallized into diagenetic calcite, with inclusions of

  17. Sediment geology and halokinetic processes in the Upper Jurassic of Konrad mine, Bleckenstedter Mulde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottomann, A.

    1991-01-01

    The Konrad mine is the only North German mine that is located in the Upper Jurassic. Lithologically, the sediment rock of the mine is not the same as in the rest of the Jurassic of Niedersachsen. The rock strata of the Bleckenstein trough are a special kind of facies. The report attempts to describe the effects of halokinetic movements on facies distribution. It describes the sedimentary and diagenetic, history of the whole Oxfordian and parts of the Kimmeridgian in the mine field on the basis of selected underground roadways. This necessitates a sufficient number of test points and sampled material. Sampling and mapping were carried out in the mine between January and July 1989. (orig.). 43 figs., 3 tabs [de

  18. Current status of crushed rock and whole rock column studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vine, E.N.; Daniels, W.R.; Rundberg, R.S.; Thompson, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements on a large number of crushed rock columns of tuff, granite, and argillite are discussed. The isotopes 85 Sr, 137 Cs, 133 Ba, 141 Ce, 152 Eu, /sup 95m/Tc, and 233 U were used. Flow rates were varied from approx. 30 to approx. 30000 m/y. Other parameters studied include isotope concentration and atmosphere. The sorption ratios calculated were compared with batch sorption ratios on the same samples. Methods of studying the movement of radionuclides through whole rock cores are described. The problems associated with sealing the cores to prevent leaking along the exterior surface and one possible solution are discussed. The strontium sorption ratio obtained by elution of one solid tuff core is compared with the batch and crushed rock column sorption ratios

  19. Generic Crystalline Disposal Reference Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott Leroy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chu, Shaoping [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-20

    A generic reference case for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste in crystalline rock is outlined. The generic cases are intended to support development of disposal system modeling capability by establishing relevant baseline conditions and parameters. Establishment of a generic reference case requires that the emplacement concept, waste inventory, waste form, waste package, backfill/buffer properties, EBS failure scenarios, host rock properties, and biosphere be specified. The focus in this report is on those elements that are unique to crystalline disposal, especially the geosphere representation. Three emplacement concepts are suggested for further analyses: a waste packages containing 4 PWR assemblies emplaced in boreholes in the floors of tunnels (KBS-3 concept), a 12-assembly waste package emplaced in tunnels, and a 32-assembly dual purpose canister emplaced in tunnels. In addition, three failure scenarios were suggested for future use: a nominal scenario involving corrosion of the waste package in the tunnel emplacement concepts, a manufacturing defect scenario applicable to the KBS-3 concept, and a disruptive glaciation scenario applicable to both emplacement concepts. The computational approaches required to analyze EBS failure and transport processes in a crystalline rock repository are similar to those of argillite/shale, with the most significant difference being that the EBS in a crystalline rock repository will likely experience highly heterogeneous flow rates, which should be represented in the model. The computational approaches required to analyze radionuclide transport in the natural system are very different because of the highly channelized nature of fracture flow. Computational workflows tailored to crystalline rock based on discrete transport pathways extracted from discrete fracture network models are recommended.

  20. Ecohydrological Consequences of Critical Zone Structure in the Franciscan Formation, Northern California Coast Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, W. J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Dawson, T. E.; Lovill, S.; Rempe, D.

    2016-12-01

    Water availability regulates ecosystem function, particularly in seasonally dry climates where lack of moisture in the growing season acts as an ecological bottleneck. Water within hillslopes is extracted by plants during transpiration and also delivered to streams to support baseflow for riparian ecosystems and human use. How water is stored and then released from hillslopes is strongly influenced by the structure of the critical zone (CZ) that emerges from the complex interaction of lithology, climate, and tectonics. Here we show how contrasting CZ development has extreme ecohydrological consequences in the seasonally dry climate of the Northern California Coast Ranges. To explore how the CZ transmits and stores water, we studied hydrologic dynamics at two sites with similar climate across belts of the Franciscan Formation in the Eel River CZO. We monitored plant water use, precipitation inputs and stream runoff, groundwater and vadose zone moisture dynamics and documented near-surface hydraulic conductivity and runoff-generation processes. We investigated CZ structure via boreholes and geophysical methods. We find that CZ thickness determines the extent to which hillslopes `shed' or `store' wet season precipitation, and fundamentally controls the structure of plant communities and summer low-flows. In a climate where winter precipitation regularly exceeds 2000 mm, the thin CZ of the sheared argillite matrix Central belt rapidly fills, resulting in wet-season saturation overland flow that drives flashy winter runoff in channels that then quickly run dry in the early summer. The maximum unsaturated moisture storage of approximately 200 mm is sufficient to host an ecologically diverse yet sparsely forested oak savanna. In contrast, the thick CZ of the interbedded argillite and greywacke Coastal belt stores up to 600 mm of winter precipitation in the unsaturated zone and a seasonal groundwater system within fractured bedrock provides year-round flow to channels

  1. Lower Paleozoic deep-water facies of the Medfra area, central Alaska: A section in Geologic studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Julie A.; Bradley, Dwight C.; Harris, Anita G.; Repetski, John E.

    1999-01-01

    Deep-water facies, chiefly hemipelagic deposits and turbidites, of Cambrian through Devonian age are widely exposed in the Medfra and Mt. McKinley quadrangles. These strata include the upper part of the Telsitna Formation (Middle-Upper Ordovician) and the Paradise Fork Formation (Lower Silurian-Lower Devonian) in the Nixon Fork terrane, the East Fork Hills Formation (Upper Cambrian-Lower Devonian) in the East Fork subterrane of the Minchumina terrane, and the chert and argillite unit (Ordovician) and the argillite and quartzite unit (Silurian- Devonian? and possibly older) in the Telida subterrane of the Minchumina terrane.In the western part of the study area (Medfra quadrangle), both hemipelagic deposits and turbidites are largely calcareous and were derived from the Nixon Fork carbonate platform. East- ern exposures (Mt. McKinley quadrangle; eastern part of the Telida subterrane) contain much less carbonate; hemipelagic strata are mostly chert, and turbidites contain abundant rounded quartz and lesser plagioclase and potassium feldspar. Deep-water facies in the Medfra quadrangle correlate well with rocks of the Dillinger terrane exposed to the south (McGrath quadrangle), but coeval strata in the Mt. McKinley quadrangle are compositionally similar to rocks to the northeast (Livengood quadrangle). Petrographic data thus suggest that the Telida subterranes presently defined is an artificial construct made up of two distinct sequences of disparate provenance.Restoration of 90 and 150 km of dextral strike-slip on the Iditarod and Farewell faults, respectively, aligns the deep-water strata of the Minchumina and Dillinger terranes in a position east of the Nixon Fork carbonate platform. This restoration supports the interpretation that lower Paleozoic rocks in the Nixon Fork and Dillinger terranes, and in the western part of the Minchumina terrane (East Fork subterrane and western part of the Telida subterrane), formed along a single continental margin. Rocks in the

  2. Depth geological model building: application to the 3D high resolution 'ANDRA' seismic block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mari, J.L.; Yven, B.

    2012-01-01

    separation, static corrections, velocity analysis and pre-stack time migration. After migration, a model-based inversion (a priori impedance model obtained from well data) provides a 3D impedance block. No well being located in the 3D area, additional 2D lines have been recorded to calibrate 3D data on 3 wells situated outside of the 3D area. The time-to-depth conversion (by Bayesian Kriging) of 10 seismic horizons has been done and the time-to-depth conversion model has been computed in order to perform the depth conversion of any seismic block. Figure 1 is an example of the results obtained with the in-line 405 of the 3D seismic block. Figure 1 (left) shows the acoustic impedance distribution both in the 0.28 - 0.43 s time interval and in the 500 - 750 m depth interval after time- to-depth conversion. The low values of acoustic impedance are associated with the target interval situated between the top of Lower Oxfordian and the top of the Carbonated Dogger. Figure also shows the density distribution in the same depth interval. The density section has been flattened at the top of the White Kimmeridgian limestones and the histograms of the density values have been computed for different depth intervals. Figure 1 on the left shows the results: - between the top of White Kimmeridgian limestones and the top of Beaumont dolomites. On the histogram, 3 modes can be observed. - between the top of Lower Oxfordian and the top of carbonated Dogger. It is the depth interval associated with the geological target. On the histogram, 1 single mode is observed. The average density is 2.38 g/cm 3 and the associated standard deviation is 0.03 g/cm 3 . - between the top and the base of carbonated Dogger. On the histogram, 1 single mode is observed. The average density is 2.66 g/cm 3 and the associated standard deviation is 0.06 g/cm 3 . We have demonstrated the benefit of combining time-to-depth conversion of seismic horizons by Bayesian kriging, consistent seismic velocity model and acoustic

  3. Modeling of thermal evolution of near field area around single pit mode nuclear waste canister disposal in soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajpai, R.K.; Verma, A.K.; Maheshwar, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Soft rocks like argillites/shales are under consideration worldwide as host rock for geological disposal of vitrified as well as spent fuel nuclear waste. The near field around disposed waste canister at 400-500m depth witnesses a complex heat field evolution due to varying thermal characteristics of rocks, coupling with hydraulic processes and varying intensity of heat flux from the canister. Smooth heat dissipation across the rock is desirable to avoid buildup of temperature beyond design limit (100 °C) and resultant micro fracturing due to thermal stresses in the rocks and intervening buffer clay layers. This also causes enhancement of hydraulic conductivity of the rocks, radionuclide transport and greater groundwater ingress towards the canister. Hence heat evolution modeling constitutes an important part of safety assessment of geological disposal facilities

  4. Regional Geologic Evaluations for Disposal of HLW and SNF: The Pierre Shale of the Northern Great Plains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Frank Vinton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelley, Richard E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-14

    The DOE Spent Fuel and Waste Technology (SWFT) R&D Campaign is supporting research on crystalline rock, shale (argillite) and salt as potential host rocks for disposal of HLW and SNF in a mined geologic repository. The distribution of these three potential repository host rocks is limited to specific regions of the US and to different geologic and hydrologic environments (Perry et al., 2014), many of which may be technically suitable as a site for mined geologic disposal. This report documents a regional geologic evaluation of the Pierre Shale, as an example of evaluating a potentially suitable shale for siting a geologic HLW repository. This report follows a similar report competed in 2016 on a regional evaluation of crystalline rock that focused on the Superior Province of the north-central US (Perry et al., 2016).

  5. Multiple sources of selenium in ancient seafloor hydrothermal systems: Compositional and Se, S, and Pb isotopic evidence from volcanic-hosted and volcanic-sediment-hosted massive sulfide deposits of the Finlayson Lake District, Yukon, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Leybourne, Matthew I.; Peter, Jan M.; Scott, Steven D.; Cousens, Brian; Eglington, Bruce M.

    2013-09-01

    Volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) and volcanic-sediment-hosted massive sulfide (VSHMS; i.e., hosted by both volcanic and sedimentary rocks) deposits in the Finlayson Lake District, Yukon, Canada, provide a unique opportunity to study the influence of seafloor and sub-seafloor hydrothermal processes on the formation of Se-poor (GP4F VHMS deposit; 7 ppm Se average), intermediate (Kudz Ze Kayah—KZK VHMS deposit; 200 ppm Se average), and Se-enriched (Wolverine VSHMS deposit; 1100 ppm Se average) mineralization. All three deposits are hosted by mid-Paleozoic (˜360-346 Ma) felsic volcanic rocks, but only the Wolverine deposit has voluminous coeval carbonaceous argillites (black shales) in the host rock package. Here we report the first application of Se isotope analyses to ancient seafloor mineralization and use these data, in conjunction with Pb and S isotope analyses, to better understand the source(s) and depositional process(es) of Se within VHMS and VSHMS systems. The wide range of δ82Se (-10.2‰ to 1.3‰, relative to NIST 3149), δ34S (+2.0‰ to +12.8‰ CDT), and elevated Se contents (up to 5865 ppm) within the Wolverine deposit contrast with the narrower range of δ82Se (-3.8‰ to -0.5‰), δ34S (9.8‰ to 13.0‰), and lower Se contents (200 ppm average) of the KZK deposit. The Wolverine and KZK deposits have similar sulfide depositional histories (i.e., deposition at the seafloor, with concomitant zone refining). The Se in the KZK deposit is magmatic (leaching or degassing) in origin, whereas the Wolverine deposit requires an additional large isotopically negative Se source (i.e. ˜-15‰ δ82Se). The negative δ82Se values for the Wolverine deposit are at the extreme light end for measured terrestrial samples, and the lightest observed for hypogene sulfide minerals, but are within calculated equilibrium values of δ82Se relative to NIST 3149 (˜30‰ at 25 °C between SeO4 and Se2-). We propose that the most negative Se isotope values at the

  6. National assessment board for research and the studies into the management of radioactive waste and materials instituted by the law no.2006-739 of June 28, 2006 - Assessment report No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duplessy, Jean-Claude; Baechler, Jean; Berest, Pierre; Brechet, Yves; Deconinck, Frank; Laurent, Maurice; Ledoux, Emmanuel; Leroy, Maurice; Percebois, Jacques; Roure, Francois; Thegerstroem, Claes; Kerboul, Claire; Tissot, Bernard; Jouvance, Chantal; Ledoux, Florence

    2011-11-01

    The law provides that long-term management of long-lived, high-level waste comprises two aspects, which are not mutually exclusive: the partitioning and transmutation of the actinides present in spent fuel from nuclear reactors, and the geological disposal of long-lived high- and intermediate-level waste. This report is organised to reflect the two complementary aspects of R and D on the management of radioactive waste and materials: partitioning and transmutation (chapter 1), and the storage and disposal of LLHL and LLIL waste (chapter 2). In 2011 the Board decided to go into detail on the subject of the potential impact of transmutation of actinides on the disposal of the waste produced in the future, in a set of reactors suitable for multi-recycling. This question is dealt with in two chapters of the report. The Board continues to observe the overall international situation (chapter 3), and this year devoted an entire hearing to the different visions of the nuclear cycle held throughout the world. This hearing took place a few weeks before the accident in Fukushima. Contents: Chapter 1 - Partitioning and transmutation: scientific and technical context; transmutation and multi-recycling (Three important actinides potentially concerned by transmutation: Plutonium, Americium, Curium; Transmutation rate); demonstration tools; scenarios; ASTRID prototype (Core, Cooling and conversion, Designs and materials for Astrid); Reprocessing and fabrication of fuel (Experience and lessons learned; Pilot reprocessing facility for Astrid); transmutation in ADS; transmutation and disposal (Radiotoxicity of the inventory; Residual thermal power in LLHL waste); other scenarios; conclusion; Chapter 2 - disposal and storage: introduction; inventory; ZIRA (Contributions of the new 3D geophysics campaign; Knowledge of lithostratigraphic variations in the Callovo-Oxfordian layer; Knowledge of regional and local hydrogeology; Hydrogeological modelling situation); ZIIS - Integration of

  7. Pore water pressure response to small and large openings in argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garitte, B.; Gens, A.; Vaunat, J.; Armand, G.; Conil, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the last decade an important amount of piezometers have been installed in the Bure Underground Rock Laboratory (URL) in the vicinity of ongoing works involving gallery excavations and drilling of boreholes and alveoles both in the major and minor stress directions. Relatively far field piezometers (placed one to four diameters from the excavation wall) showed a qualitatively consistent response at different scales. Here, we investigate whether the pore water pressure response around openings of different scales may be up-scaled. An attempt is made to find a common set of parameters that explains quantitatively the rock response at the different scales. The mechanisms underlying the pore water pressure response around an underground opening are twofold. The first class of mechanisms is usually associated with nearly undrained behaviour and the related pore water pressure changes are induced by the stress redistribution triggered by the creation of the tunnel opening causing a reorientation of the principal stresses and influenced by the initial stress anisotropy. These pore water pressure changes are closely linked to the mechanical constitutive law of the rock and to the damage zone around the opening. The second class of mechanisms is related to the drainage of excess pore water pressure relative to a state governed by the atmospheric water pressure condition prescribed at gallery wall and the water flow law, usually Darcy's. Strong anisotropy effects on the hydraulic response of Callovo-Oxfordian Clay can be observed with reference to Figure 1 that shows the pore pressure response to the drilling of a 150 mm-diameter borehole performed to install a heater for the TER thermal experiment. The borehole is aligned with the major horizontal principal stress. Therefore, in principle, the stress state should be approximately isotropic in a cross section of the borehole. As a matter of fact, however, a degree of

  8. National assessment board for research and the studies into the management of radioactive waste and materials instituted by the law no.2006-739 of June 28, 2006 - Assessment report No. 5; Commission nationale d'evaluation des recherches et etudes relatives a la gestion des matieres et des dechets radioactifs instituee par la loi no. 2006-739 du 28 juin 2006 - Rapport d'evaluation No. 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duplessy, Jean-Claude; Baechler, Jean; Berest, Pierre; Brechet, Yves; Deconinck, Frank; Laurent, Maurice; Ledoux, Emmanuel; Leroy, Maurice; Percebois, Jacques; Roure, Francois; Thegerstroem, Claes; Kerboul, Claire; Tissot, Bernard; Jouvance, Chantal; Ledoux, Florence

    2011-11-15

    The law provides that long-term management of long-lived, high-level waste comprises two aspects, which are not mutually exclusive: the partitioning and transmutation of the actinides present in spent fuel from nuclear reactors, and the geological disposal of long-lived high- and intermediate-level waste. This report is organised to reflect the two complementary aspects of R and D on the management of radioactive waste and materials: partitioning and transmutation (chapter 1), and the storage and disposal of LLHL and LLIL waste (chapter 2). In 2011 the Board decided to go into detail on the subject of the potential impact of transmutation of actinides on the disposal of the waste produced in the future, in a set of reactors suitable for multi-recycling. This question is dealt with in two chapters of the report. The Board continues to observe the overall international situation (chapter 3), and this year devoted an entire hearing to the different visions of the nuclear cycle held throughout the world. This hearing took place a few weeks before the accident in Fukushima. Contents: Chapter 1 - Partitioning and transmutation: scientific and technical context; transmutation and multi-recycling (Three important actinides potentially concerned by transmutation: Plutonium, Americium, Curium; Transmutation rate); demonstration tools; scenarios; ASTRID prototype (Core, Cooling and conversion, Designs and materials for Astrid); Reprocessing and fabrication of fuel (Experience and lessons learned; Pilot reprocessing facility for Astrid); transmutation in ADS; transmutation and disposal (Radiotoxicity of the inventory; Residual thermal power in LLHL waste); other scenarios; conclusion; Chapter 2 - disposal and storage: introduction; inventory; ZIRA (Contributions of the new 3D geophysics campaign; Knowledge of lithostratigraphic variations in the Callovo-Oxfordian layer; Knowledge of regional and local hydrogeology; Hydrogeological modelling situation); ZIIS - Integration of

  9. EDZ and permeability in clayey rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levasseur, Severine; Collin, Frederic; Charlier, Robert; Besuelle, Pierre; Chambon, Rene; Viggiani, Cino

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Deep geological layers are being considered as potential host rocks for the high level radioactivity waste disposals. During drilling in host rocks, an excavated damaged zone - EDZ is created. The fluid transmissivity may be modified in this damaged zone. This paper deals with the permeability evolution in relation with diffuse and/or localized crack propagation in the material. We mainly focus on argillaceous rocks and on some underground laboratories: Mol URL in Boom clay, Bure URL in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and Mont-Terri URL in Opalinus clay. First, observations of damage around galleries are summarized. Structure of damage in localized zone or in fracture has been observed at underground gallery scale within the excavation damaged zone (EDZ). The first challenge for a correct understanding of all the processes occurring within the EDZ is the characterization at the laboratory scale of the damage and localization processes. The observation of the initiation and propagation of the localized zones needs for advanced techniques. X-ray tomography is a non-destructive imaging technique that allows quantification of internal features of an object in 3D. If mechanical loading of a specimen is applied inside a X-ray CT apparatus, successive 3D images at different loading steps show the evolution of the specimen. However, in general volumetric strain in a shear band is small compared to the shear strain and, unfortunately, in tomographic images grey level is mainly sensitive to the local mass density field. Such a limitation has been recently overcome by complementing X-ray tomography with 3D Volumetric Digital Image Correlation (V-DIC) which allows the determination of the full strain tensor field. Then it is possible to further explore the progression of localized deformation in the specimen. The second challenge is the robust modelling of the strain localized process. In fact, modelling the damage process with finite

  10. Dielectric heating. Industrial applications; Chauffage dielectrique. Applications industrielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussy, G. [Nancy-1 Univ. Henri Poincare, Dir. de Recherche 54 (France); Rochas, J.F. [Societe Sairem, 75 - Paris (France); Oberlin, C. [Electricite de France (EDF), Div. de Recherche, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-11-01

    The heating of insulating or badly power conducting products using high frequency (HF) electromagnetic waves and microwaves (MW) is used in several industrial applications. This article presents some examples of conventional or recent applications of dielectric heating in the industry: 1 - selection criteria between HF and MW heating systems; 2 - HF applications: traditional applications (wood forming and sticking, welding of thermoplastic materials, drying of textile materials, correction of the humidity profile in the paper industry, end-baking of biscuits in the food industry), recent applications (over-moulding of automotive glazing materials, gluing and moulding of plastic parts in the automotive industry, drying of the coating of textile ropes), innovative applications; 3 - microwave applications: traditional applications (moderating of frozen meat by 915 MHz microwaves, drying of coatings on polystyrene or sand core models for foundry, pre-vulcanization of rubber sections, 2450 MHz pasteurization of pumpable products with morsels), examples of recent applications (continuous dehydration in vacuum, MW assisted granulator-dryers in the pharmaceutical industry, decontamination of hospital wastes), examples of innovative applications in the chemical sector, applications in progress; 4 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  11. Some clastic rocks as parent rocks in beech forests of Brezovica - Južni Kučaj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joksimović Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available On the large forest areas, where the measures of soil quality improvement are absent or rarely undertaken, the rocks are the sources of a great number of elements in plant nutrition and one of the factors affecting the contents of some elements in plants. The aim of the study is to determine the differences in the contents of Cu, Zn, Mn, Ni, Fe, Cd, Co, Pb and Cr in the beech leaves developed in the same climate conditions, on morphologically similar terrains, composed of different types of sedimentary rocks. This paper presents the study results of the contents of the above elements in argillites, sandstones (grauwackes and microconglomerates occurring as the parent rocks in high beech forests in the region of GJ Bogovina (Brezovica Južni Kučaj and in the leaves of beech developed on these rocks.

  12. Evidence of discontinuous and continuous gas migration through undisturbed and self-sealed Cox clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, C. A.; M'Jahad, S.; Skoczylas, F.; Talandier, J.; Ghayaza, M.

    2012-01-01

    it is a long-lasting procedure, it allows to assess both gas migration modes at the sample outlet (i.e. discontinuous or continuous). In our laboratory, by using the step-by-step method under in situ confining stresses (5 to 12 MPa), and argon as gas, former studies have mainly investigated discontinuous gas passage for vertical, horizontal or inclined cores from the Bure site. A number of samples was self-sealed, mainly those from horizontal or inclined cores. Variations by one order of magnitude have been recorded between results on horizontal and inclined cores or vertical cores. While GBP values range from 1.26 MPa and up to 3 MPa for the first test series on vertical cores, it is almost an order of magnitude lower for the second test series (horizontal or inclined cores), with values ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 MPa. This difference is mainly associated to gas passage through self-sealed fractures, in relation with clay transverse anisotropy. Indeed, COx clay-stone is a sedimentary indurated clay, composed of sub-horizontal diagenetic bedding planes: whenever GBP tests are performed along the bedding planes, lower values may be expected (due to a greater number of sealed cracks, created during sample preparation) rather than when performing GBP experiments perpendicularly to the bedding planes. Despite this extensive research, which was backed by numerical simulations of homogeneous media with LML and EDF-ASTER codes, several scientific questions remain. In particular, argillite self-sealing or undisturbed states may display different gas migration properties: it is expected that undisturbed matter will let gas pass at higher pressure than if self-sealed. Also, the discontinuous gas migration mode may be related to diffusion or capillary snap off, or to both phenomena. And discontinuous breakthrough does not suffice to describe fully the gas migration phenomena through undisturbed or self-sealed argillite, for it occurs distinctly from continuous passage and gas

  13. 3D hydro-mechanical homogenization and equivalent continuum properties of a fractured porous clay-stone around a gallery: application to the damaged and fractured zone at the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ababou, Rachid; Canamon, Israel; Poutrel, Adrien

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The present work focuses on 3D homogenization, or 'up-scaling', of coupled Hydro-Mechanical (HM) equations and coefficients in a water-filled fractured and fissured porous clay rock. The parameters used in the up-scaling calculations correspond to the Meuse / Haute-Marne (MHM) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) located at Bure and operated by ANDRA (France). We focus on the fractured zone around a cylindrical excavation (gallery 'GMR') located in the Callovo-Oxfordian formation, a thick 130 m clay-stone layer between depths 400 m and 600 m. For up-scaling, we take into account two different sets of hydraulic and mechanical parameters: (i) the permeability and the stiffness coefficients of the intact porous matrix, and (ii) the crack properties, including their apertures, their hydraulic transmissivity (Darcy/Poiseuille), and their specific normal/shear stiffnesses. The geometry of cracks is summarized below. We consider two different types of 'cracks': (I) relatively small decimeter-scale 'dense fractures'; and (II) large distinct shear fractures organized in a 'chevron' pattern. A synthetic set comprising both the 'dense fractures' and the 'large fractures' is generated in 3D. Each subset is generated as follows: I. A statistical isotropic system of small fractures ('fissures'), consisting of isotropically oriented planar discs, with random diameters, apertures, and positions. All statistics are radially inhomogeneous, e.g., density decreases away from the wall. II. A periodic set of large curved fractures, organized along the axis of the gallery in a 'chevron' pattern. Each curved fracture is individually modelled as a parametric conoidal surface. Each surface is then discretized as a set of triangular patches. The local HM coefficients of the water-filled porous rock, with dense near-wall fractures and large distinct 'chevron' fractures, are homogenized using a quasi-linear superposition approach. This leads

  14. Geologic Map of the Weaverville 15' Quadrangle, Trinity County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, William P.

    2009-01-01

    terrane is faulted against the west edge of the Central Metamorphic terrane, and its northerly trend is disrupted by major left-lateral offsets along generally west-northwest-trending faults. The serpentinized peridotite-gabbro complex that forms the western base of the terrane is the Permian North Fork ophiolite, which to the east is overlain by broken formation of mafic-volcanic rocks, red chert, siliceous tuff, argillite, minor limestone, and clastic sedimentary rocks. The chert and siliceous tuff contain radiolarians of Permian and Mesozoic ages, and some are as young as Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian). Similar Pliensbachian radiolarians are found in Franciscan rocks of the Coast Ranges. The Eastern Hayfork terrane is broken formation and melange of mainly chert, sandstone, argillite, and various exotic blocks. The cherts yield radiolarians of Permian and Triassic ages but none of clearly Jurassic age. Limestone bodies of the Eastern Hayfork terrane contain Permian microfaunas of Tethyan affinity. The Western Hayfork terrane, exposed only in a small area in the southwestern part of the quadrangle, consists dominantly of mafic tuff and dark slaty argillite. Sparse paleontologic data indicate a Mesozoic age for the strata. The terrane includes small bodies of diorite that are related to the nearby Wildwood pluton of Middle Jurassic age and probably are related genetically to the stratified rocks. The terrane is interpreted to be the accreted remnants of a Middle Jurassic volcanic arc. Shortly after intrusion by Shasta Bally batholith (approx. 136 Ma), much of the southern half of the Weaverville quadrangle was overlapped by Lower Cretaceous, dominantly Hauterivian, marine strata of the Great Valley sequence, and to a lesser extent later during Oligocene and (or) Miocene time by fluvial and lacustrine deposits of the Weaverville Formation. This map of the Weaverville Quadrangle is a digital rendition of U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Field

  15. Applicant Perspectives on the Otolaryngology Residency Application Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-09

    ndorsing, Suggestion No.(%) (n=98) Establish a hard cap on the number of applications 43 (43.8) altov:ed per applicant Increase information and...Applicants are overall amenable to a hard cap on applicationsApplicants are interested in being part of the solution to the problem References...better the chances of match·ng. Alch Otoo1yngo/ Head~:< Surg_ 2008: 4 34(10)·1038. 3. Christophel JJ. Levine PA Too much of .a good thing . lAMA

  16. Effect of desaturation and re-saturation on shale in underground galleries; Effets de la desaturation et de la resaturation sur l'argilite dans les ouvrages souterrains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Q.T

    2006-03-15

    The aim of this thesis is to characterize by experimental and numerical approaches the hydric, mechanical and hydro-mechanical effects due to the desaturation and re-saturation of the Eastern argillite, host rock of the Bure site, future underground radioactive waste disposal facility. Experimental and numerical approaches for the characterization of hydric transfers in argilites are presented. A simple identification method is proposed which uses the determination of the linearized hydric diffusivity from weight measurements performed on samples (thin tubes and plates) submitted to humidity steps according to a desaturation-re-saturation cycle. The hydric transfer is nonlinear. In order to interpret this phenomenon, a non-linear numerical model is established which takes into account the physical phenomena (hydraulic conduction, vapor diffusion, phase change..). The evolution of the physical and mechanical behaviour of the argillaceous rock with respect to the imposed humidity is then analyzed according to a desaturation-re-saturation cycle by successive steps. The hydric deformation, the velocity of ultrasonic waves propagation, the elastic properties, the rupture characteristics and the delayed phenomena depend on the hydric state of the material. The desaturation and re-saturation influence on a scale model of tunnel is analyzed. Thick tubes parallel or perpendicular to the stratification are used to show up the anisotropy of the rock. These tubes are submitted to hydric loads by blowing air with variable hygrometry through their center hole. A nonlinear poro-elastic model is used to interpret the anisotropic hydro-mechanical phenomena observed. It is shown that hydric loads can lead to the rupture of test samples which follow the anisotropic directions of the rock and which can be interpreted by the hydro-mechanical model as a violation of a rupture criterion in total pulling stress. Finally, numerical calculations for the phenomena generated by desaturation

  17. Effect of desaturation and re-saturation on shale in underground galleries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, Q.T.

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this thesis is to characterize by experimental and numerical approaches the hydric, mechanical and hydro-mechanical effects due to the desaturation and re-saturation of the Eastern argillite, host rock of the Bure site, future underground radioactive waste disposal facility. Experimental and numerical approaches for the characterization of hydric transfers in argilites are presented. A simple identification method is proposed which uses the determination of the linearized hydric diffusivity from weight measurements performed on samples (thin tubes and plates) submitted to humidity steps according to a desaturation-re-saturation cycle. The hydric transfer is nonlinear. In order to interpret this phenomenon, a non-linear numerical model is established which takes into account the physical phenomena (hydraulic conduction, vapor diffusion, phase change..). The evolution of the physical and mechanical behaviour of the argillaceous rock with respect to the imposed humidity is then analyzed according to a desaturation-re-saturation cycle by successive steps. The hydric deformation, the velocity of ultrasonic waves propagation, the elastic properties, the rupture characteristics and the delayed phenomena depend on the hydric state of the material. The desaturation and re-saturation influence on a scale model of tunnel is analyzed. Thick tubes parallel or perpendicular to the stratification are used to show up the anisotropy of the rock. These tubes are submitted to hydric loads by blowing air with variable hygrometry through their center hole. A nonlinear poro-elastic model is used to interpret the anisotropic hydro-mechanical phenomena observed. It is shown that hydric loads can lead to the rupture of test samples which follow the anisotropic directions of the rock and which can be interpreted by the hydro-mechanical model as a violation of a rupture criterion in total pulling stress. Finally, numerical calculations for the phenomena generated by desaturation

  18. Predictive modelling of an excavation test in indurated clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garitte, B.; Vaunat, J.; Gens, A.; Vietor, T.

    2010-01-01

    constitutive laws that describe the various phenomena under consideration. The density of the solid and the density of the water are dependent on the total mean pressure and the water pressure, respectively and the advective water flux is described by an anisotropic Darcy's law. Finally, the mechanical behaviour is modelled using an anisotropic linear elastic constitutive law that relates the medium deformation with the effective stress (σ'=σ-b.p w , where σ is total stress, b is the Biot coefficient and p w the water pressure). The simulated pore water pressure evolution is presented for two points at 1 m from the niche wall, in a transversal section at 16.5 m from the gallery centre (points B1 and B2) for 4 different computations. B1 lies in the direction of the major stress and B2 in the direction of the minor stress. F an is a 'full' anisotropic computation, considering anisotropy of stress, stiffness and permeability (E 1 = 1.33*E 2 = 4000 MPa). ISO is an isotropic simulation. In E an and in S an , all properties are considered isotropic except the mechanical constitutive law (E1 = 2*E2 = 6000 MPa) and the stress state, respectively. Long before the arrival of the gallery, ISO and S an do not predict significant pore water pressure changes in contrast to the computations that consider an anisotropic constitutive model. The changes are strongest in the case of F an and are consistent with observations in similar tests performed in Callovo-Oxfordian Clay. After the passage of the shaft, pore water pressure keeps increasing in the minor stress direction whereas it decreases in the major stress direction. A future stage of modelling must incorporate the reduction of stiffness and the increase in permeability cause by rock damage. The result will likely be a lower magnitude of the pore water pressure increments and an acceleration of drainage processes

  19. Applicant Perspectives on the Otolaryngology Residency Application Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Matthew; Pingree, Christian; Laury, Adrienne M; Bowe, Sarah N

    2017-08-01

    It has been nearly 25 years since medical students were queried regarding their perspectives on otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OHNS) residency selection. Understanding this viewpoint is critical to improving the current application process. To evaluate the perceptions of 2016 OHNS residency applicants regarding the application process and offer suggestions for reform. In this cross-sectional study of anonymous online survey data, a 14-question survey was designed based on resources obtained from a computerized PubMed, Ovid, and GoogleScholar database search of the English language from January 1, 1990, through December 31, 2015, was conducted using the following search terms: (medical student OR applicant) AND (application OR match) AND otolaryngology. The survey was administered to 2016 OHNS residency applicants to examine 4 primary areas: current attitudes toward the match, effect of the new Otolaryngology Program Directors Organization personal statement mandate, sources of advice and information, and suggestions for improvement. In January 2016, an email was sent to 100 program directors asking them to distribute the survey to current OHNS applicants at their institution. One follow-up reminder email was sent in February 2016. A link to the survey was posted on the Otomatch.com homepage on January 28, 2016, with the last response received on March 28, 2016. Survey responses regarding the residency application process. A total of 150 of 370 residency applicants (40.5%) responded to the survey. Of these, 125 respondents (90.6%) noted applying to programs in which they had no specific interest simply to improve their chances of matching. Applicants intended to apply to more programs than they actually did (63.6 vs 60.8; r = 0.19; 95% CI, -0.03 to 0.40). Program directors advised fewer applications than other sources; however, 58 respondents (38.7%) did not receive advice from a program director. A total of 121 respondents (80.7%) found online program

  20. Fundamental approach to the analysis of radionuclide transport resulting from fluid flow through jointed media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.

    1981-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental basis is being developed for analysis of radionuclide transport in jointed geologic media. Batch equilibration and rate experiments involving samples of Eleana argillite and Tertiary silicic tuffs in contact with solutions containing Cs, Sr or Pm indicated that most radionuclide sorption is associated with the surfaces of very small intergranular regions and that the rate of sorption is controlled by diffusion of the nuclides into such regions. Based on these experimental results, the continuity equations for radionuclides in the mobile and immobile phases were reduced to a model analogous to Rosen's equations for packed beds and were solved similarly to Rosen's solutions. Using the model and experimental data, limited radionuclide transport analyses were made which indicated that important parameters controlling transport include the intergranular porosity and nuclide penetration depth, fracture plate spacing and length, fluid velocity, and sorption distribution coefficient

  1. Geology, physical properties, and surface effects at Discus Thrower Site, Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, W.J.; Miller, C.H.; Dodge, H.W. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Geologic studies in connection with Project Discus Thrower have furnished detailed stratigraphic and structural information about northwestern Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site. The Paleozoic rocks consist of a lower carbonate sequence, argillite of the Eleana Formation, and an upper carbonate sequence. The distribution of these rocks suggests that both top and bottom of the Eleana are structural contacts, probably thrusts or reverse faults. The overlying tuff includes several units recognized in the subsurface, such as the Fraction Tuff and tuff of Redrock Valley. Other units recognized include bedded tuff associated with the Grouse Canyon Member of Belted Range Tuff, and the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members of the Timber Mountain Tuff. The Timber Mountain and Grouse Canyon are extensively altered to montmorillonite (a swelling clay), possibly as a result of ponding of alkaline water. The overlying alluvium locally contains at the base a clayey, tuffaceous sandstone

  2. Influence of coupling phenomena on the transport through compacted clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosanne, M.; Koudina, N.; Adler, P.M. [IPGP, Paris (France); Tevissen, E. [ANDRA, Dept. Etude-Experimentation et Calcul, Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2001-07-01

    Our principal motivation was to study the influence of the coupling phenomena on transport through compacted clays. Coupled transports may occur when a pressure gradient {nabla}P, and electrical field E and a concentration gradient {nabla}C interact. These three gradients induce three fluxes. A flow is generated characterized by the seepage velocity U; a solute flux J{sub L} and a current density I are generated. Close to equilibrium, when the gradients are not to large, the problem is linear and the fluxes are linear functions of the gradients. A first series of experiments was performed with argillite to determine the diagonal properties, i.e., permeability, conductivity, and diffusion coefficient. In a second series of experiments, the voltage resulting from an imposed concentration gradient between two reservoirs separated by a clay sample was systematically measured; this corresponds to the coefficient L{sub 13}. (orig.)

  3. Inventories of organic materials and complexing agents in intermediate-level long-lived parcels (Report PNGMDR 2013-2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This report presents an inventory of organic materials and of complexing agents they may produce within parcels of alpha wastes which are to be produced or are being currently produced. The report proposes the results of campaigns of measurements of degassing, and comparison with results of modelling studies. The assessment of degassing rates of parcels of alpha wastes is completed by an assessment of hydrogen produced by radiolysis of interstitial water within the concrete container. Thus, after a presentation of the main parcels used by the CEA for intermediate-level long-lived wastes, and of an inventory of wastes containing organic materials, this report describes the consequences of radiolysis on polymers, and describes the objectives of R and D studies. It reports measurements and presents simulation tools for heterogeneous wastes, homogeneous wastes, production of water-soluble degradation products, and transfer and adsorption of these products in the storage site argillite

  4. Application architecture for .NET designing applications and services

    CERN Document Server

    Microsoft. Redmond

    2003-01-01

    Get expert architectural and design-level guidance for building distributed solutions with the Microsoft® .NET Framework-learning how to synthesize your knowledge of application development, servers, and infrastructure and business requirements. This guide assumes you are familiar with .NET component development and the basic principles of a layered distributed application design. It examines architectural issues and solution design for a range of project stakeholders-whether you build and design applications and services, recommend appropriate technologies and products for applications and s

  5. Comparing Web Applications with Desktop Applications: An Empirical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, many desktop applications have been ported to the world wide web in order to reduce (multiplatform) development, distribution and maintenance costs. However, there is little data concerning the usability of web applications, and the impact of their usability on the total cost...... of developing and using such applications. In this paper we present a comparison of web and desktop applications from the usability point of view. The comparison is based on an empirical study that investigates the performance of a group of users on two calendaring applications: Yahoo!Calendar and Microsoft...... Calendar. The study shows that in the case of web applications the performance of the users is significantly reduced, mainly because of the restricted interaction mechanisms provided by current web browsers....

  6. Language Modelling for Collaborative Filtering: Application to Job Applicant Matching

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt , Thomas; Gonard , François; Caillou , Philippe; Sebag , Michèle

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper addresses a collaborative retrieval problem , the recommendation of job ads to applicants. Specifically, two proprietary databases are considered. The first one focuses on the context of unskilled low-paid jobs/applicants; the second one focuses on highly qualified jobs/applicants. Each database includes the job ads and applicant resumes together with the collaborative filtering data recording the applicant clicks on job ads. The proposed approach, called LA...

  7. Water Retention Capacity of Argillite from the VE Test - Phase II at Mont Terri: Effect of Ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villar, M. V.; Fernandez, A. M.; Melon, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The VE (ventilation) test carried out at the Mont Terri underground laboratory in Switzerland intended to evaluate in situ the behaviour of a consolidated clay formation when subjected to alternate periods of flow of wet and dry air during several months. For that, a 10-m gallery was excavated in the Opalinus Clay formation and carefully instrumented. Before and after a second ventilation phase boreholes were drilled. Samples were taken from the drill cores and were analysed from mineralogical and geochemical points of view. Also, the retention curves of these samples were determined in the laboratory following drying paths performed under free volume conditions at 20 degree centigrade, what is the content of this report. Although there are not large differences in the WRC of samples taken from different boreholes, at different distances from the gallery wall or before or after ventilation, those samples taken near the gallery wall and after ventilation tend to show a higher water retention capacity. This has been correlated to the higher salinity of the pore water of these samples, what increases their osmotic suction. This effect is attenuated towards high suctions. (Author) 10 refs

  8. Water Retention Capacity of Argillite from the VE Test - Phase II at Mont Terri: Effect of Ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar, M. V.; Fernandez, A. M.; Melon, A. M.

    2009-10-12

    The VE (ventilation) test carried out at the Mont Terri underground laboratory in Switzerland intended to evaluate in situ the behaviour of a consolidated clay formation when subjected to alternate periods of flow of wet and dry air during several months. For that, a 10-m gallery was excavated in the Opalinus Clay formation and carefully instrumented. Before and after a second ventilation phase boreholes were drilled. Samples were taken from the drill cores and were analysed from mineralogical and geochemical points of view. Also, the retention curves of these samples were determined in the laboratory following drying paths performed under free volume conditions at 20 degree centigrade, what is the content of this report. Although there are not large differences in the WRC of samples taken from different boreholes, at different distances from the gallery wall or before or after ventilation, those samples taken near the gallery wall and after ventilation tend to show a higher water retention capacity. This has been correlated to the higher salinity of the pore water of these samples, what increases their osmotic suction. This effect is attenuated towards high suctions. (Author) 10 refs.