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Sample records for californium nitrides

  1. Metabolism and toxicity of californium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolism of californium can be compared with that of other transplutonium elements. The most important points are as follows: a fast blood clearance and fast bone uptake more important than liver uptake, a relatively high urinary excretion and kidney retention. Blood clearance of californium can be compared with that of americium. Distribution of californium 252 nitrate after intramuscular injection in rats was studied. There are very few experimental data on acute or long term toxicity of californium. (28 references)

  2. Magnetism in californium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A SQUID-based magnetic susceptometer has been constructed for studying small radioactive samples at temperatures below 350 K and in magnetic fields up to 50 kilogauss. The device has been used to study californium (element 98) in a number of solid-state forms: the dhcp metal, several oxides (Cf2O3 in both the bcc and monoclinic structures, Cf7O12, CfO2 and BaCfO3), several monopnictides (CfN, CfAs and CfSb) and the trichloride (in both the hexagonal and orthorhombic structures). All of these materials were studied in polycrystalline form, and hexagonal CfCl3 was studied in single-crystal form as well. The susceptometer has the sensitivity to measure samples containing less than 10 micrograms of californium. The magnetic susceptibilities of all of the californium materials at temperatures above about 100 K are described well by the Curie-Weiss relationship. This behavior is consistent with the assumption that the magnetic 5f electrons are localized and that the paramagnetic behavior can be interpreted in terms of the properties of the free ion. The measured values of the effective paramagnetic moment, μ/sub eff/, for all the californium materials that were studied are reasonably consistent with theoretical values based on intermediate coupling models. All of the californium materials showed some indications of cooperative magnetic effects. The dhcp metal was observed to order ferromagnetically at 52 K, and all of the californium compounds studied showed signs of antiferromagnetic ordering, mostly at temperatures below 25 K. 91 refs., 50 figs., 19 tabs

  3. Californium Multiplier (CFX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of 252Cf as an economical high-intensity neutron source has made it possible to construct compact neutron irradiation devices with widespread applications. The simplest such device consists of a single 252Cf source within a moderating and shielding medium. Higher neutron flux levels can be attained either through the use of more 252Cf or through source multiplication by means of a subcritical uranium assembly. Although the use of larger 252Cf sources to achieve higher neutron flux is technically straightforward, an economic penalty is paid as the source strength is increased. Larger californium sources imply larger initial investments to cover the cost of source material and larger operating costs resulting from the decay of the 252Cf source. A Californium Multiplier, the CFX, which produces a flux enhancement of 30 when compared to a conventional moderated 252Cf system has been designed, licensed, built, and tested by IRT Corporation. Such systems are now available on a commercial basis for both neutron radiography and neutron activation analysis. The first commercial CFX system was installed at the Research Laboratories of Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, NY, in March 1975. This device, using 1 mg of 252Cf, is very stable and the neutron flux generated by the CFX is very reproducible. The performance characteristics of this system are summarized

  4. Californium--palladium metal neutron source material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, B.L.; Mosly, W.C. Jr.; Smith, P.K.; Albenesius, E.L.

    1974-01-22

    Californium, as metal or oxide, is uniformly dispersed throughout a noble metal matrix, provided in compact, rod or wire form. A solution of californium values is added to palladium metal powder, dried, blended and pressed into a compact having a uni-form distribution of californium. The californium values are decomposed to californium oxide or metal by heating in an inert or reducing atmosphere. Sintering the compact to a high density closes the matrix around the dispersed californium. The sintered compact is then mechanically shaped into an elongated rod or wire form. (4 claims, no drawings) (Official Gazette)

  5. Californium-252 Neutron Sources for Medical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Californium-252 neutron sources are being prepared to investigate the value of this radionuclide in diagnosing and treating diseases. A source resembling a cell-loaded radium needle was developed for neutron therapy. Since therapy needles are normally implanted in the body, very conservative design criteria were established to prevent leakage of radioactive. Methods are being developed to prepare very intense californium sources that could be used eventually for neutron radiography and for diagnosis by neutron activation analysis. This paper discusses these methods

  6. Californium Electrodepositions at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boll, Rose Ann [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Electrodepositions of californium isotopes were successfully performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the past year involving two different types of deposition solutions, ammonium acetate (NH4C2H3O2) and isobutanol ((CH3)2CHCH2OH). A californium product that was decay enriched in 251Cf was recovered for use in super-heavy element (SHE) research. This neutron-rich isotope, 251Cf, provides target material for SHE research for the potential discovery of heavier isotopes of Z=118. The californium material was recovered from aged 252Cf neutron sources in storage at ORNL. These sources have decayed for over 30 years, thus providing material with a very high 251Cf-to-252Cf ratio. After the source capsules were opened, the californium was purified and then electrodeposited using the isobutanol method onto thin titanium foils for use in an accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. Another deposition method, ammonium acetate, was used to produce a deposition containing 1.7 0.1 Ci of 252Cf onto a stainless steel substrate. This was the largest single electrodeposition of 252Cf ever prepared. The 252Cf material was initially purified using traditional ion exchange media, such as AG50-AHIB and AG50-HCl, and further purified using a TEVA-NH4SCN system to remove any lanthanides, resulting in the recovery of 3.6 0.1 mg of purified 252Cf. The ammonium acetate deposition was run with a current of 1.0 amp, resulting in a 91.5% deposition yield. Purification and handling of the highly radioactive californium material created additional challenges in the production of these sources.

  7. Historical review of californium-252 discovery and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving 252Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed

  8. Californium-252: a remarkable versatile radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Alexander, C.W.

    1995-10-10

    A product of the nuclear age, Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) has found many applications in medicine, scientific research, industry, and nuclear science education. Californium-252 is unique as a neutron source in that it provides a highly concentrated flux and extremely reliable neutron spectrum from a very small assembly. During the past 40 years, {sup 252}Cf has been applied with great success to cancer therapy, neutron radiography of objects ranging from flowers to entire aircraft, startup sources for nuclear reactors, fission activation for quality analysis of all commercial nuclear fuel, and many other beneficial uses, some of which are now ready for further growth. Californium-252 is produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and processed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), both of which are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The REDC/HFIR facility is virtually the sole supplier of {sup 252}Cf in the western world and is the major supplier worldwide. Extensive exploitation of this product was made possible through the {sup 252}Cf Market Evaluation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) [then the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)]. This program included training series, demonstration centers, seminars, and a liberal loan policy for fabricated sources. The Market Evaluation Program was instituted, in part, to determine if large-quantity production capability was required at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). Because of the nature of the product and the means by which it is produced, {sup 252}Cf can be produced only in government-owned facilities. It is evident at this time that the Oak Ridge research facility can meet present and projected near-term requirements. The production, shipment, and sales history of {sup 252}Cf from ORNL is summarized herein.

  9. Californium-252: a remarkable versatile radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A product of the nuclear age, Californium-252 (252Cf) has found many applications in medicine, scientific research, industry, and nuclear science education. Californium-252 is unique as a neutron source in that it provides a highly concentrated flux and extremely reliable neutron spectrum from a very small assembly. During the past 40 years, 252Cf has been applied with great success to cancer therapy, neutron radiography of objects ranging from flowers to entire aircraft, startup sources for nuclear reactors, fission activation for quality analysis of all commercial nuclear fuel, and many other beneficial uses, some of which are now ready for further growth. Californium-252 is produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and processed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), both of which are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The REDC/HFIR facility is virtually the sole supplier of 252Cf in the western world and is the major supplier worldwide. Extensive exploitation of this product was made possible through the 252Cf Market Evaluation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) [then the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)]. This program included training series, demonstration centers, seminars, and a liberal loan policy for fabricated sources. The Market Evaluation Program was instituted, in part, to determine if large-quantity production capability was required at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). Because of the nature of the product and the means by which it is produced, 252Cf can be produced only in government-owned facilities. It is evident at this time that the Oak Ridge research facility can meet present and projected near-term requirements. The production, shipment, and sales history of 252Cf from ORNL is summarized herein

  10. Californium-252 Neutron Therapy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Californium-252 brachytherapy, believed to be the most successful source for neutron therapy, gives most of the cures as well as long-term and complication-free survivals. Chinese radiation oncologists were interested in californium neutron therapy (Cf-NT) in the early 1980s, but 252Cf sources for medical use were not available in China until 1992 when a californium joint venture was established by the China Institute of Atomic Energy (Beijing) and the Research Institute for Nuclear Reactors (Dimitrovgrad) of Russia. In 1995, 25 seeds of 252Cf with a strength of 3 μg each were sent to China for preclinical investigation. Three years later, a high dose rate (HDR) 252Cf source was imported and transferred into a home-made remote after-loader for intracavitary treatment in Chongqing, and a clinical trail was started in February 1999. This is the first time that Cf-NT was performed for cancer patients in China. Since then, Cf-NT in China has developed rapidly. It is estimated that one-tenth of those radiation oncology centers with brachytherapy practice will be equipped with californium units in 5 yr. That means more than 30 units will be in use in hospitals. That is significant compared with other countries, but it is just one, on average, for each province or one per 40 million people in China. Progress also has been achieved in the 252Cf treatment delivery equipment. Preliminary clinical trails showed complete response observed in all cases treated, with a rapid clearance of tumors and mild reactions in normal tissues. The short-term results are quite encouraging. To deal with problems due to the demand for Cf-NT in China, attention should be paid to the following particulars: (1) A high-strength miniature source is needed for HDR/MDR interstitial therapy to extend the Cf-NT coverage. (2) Basic work on radiophysics and radiobiology needs to be done, including source calibration, clinical dosimetry, clinical RBE determination, and Cf-NT quality assurance

  11. Californium-252 sales and loans at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production and distribution in the United States of 252Cf has recently been consolidated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 252Cf Industrial Sales/Loan Program and the 252Cf University Load Program, which were formerly located at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), have been combined with the californium production and distribution activities of the Transuranium Element Production Program at ORNL. Californium-252 is sold to commercial users in the form of bulk californium oxide, palladium-californium alloy pellets, or alloy wires. Neutron source capsules, which are fabricated for loans to DOE or other US government agencies, are still available in all forms previously available. The consolidation of all 252Cf distribution activities at the production site is expected to result in better service to users. In particular, customers for neutrons sources will be ale to select from a wider range of neutron source forms, including custom designs, through a single contact point

  12. Californium-252 encapsulation at the Savannah River Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 1 g of the neutron-emitting isotope californium-252 has been encapsulated at SRL for worldwide medical, industrial, and research uses. Bulk sales packages have been prepared for the USDOE sales program since 1971. Doubly-encapsulated sources have been prepared for USDOE's market evaluation program since 1968. Californium-252 sources for loan and sales packages satisfy the criteria for Special Form Radioactive Material. Encapsulation is performed in special neutron-shielded containment facilities at SRL. Development of improved source and shipping package designs and processes is continuing. 17 figures

  13. Production, distribution and applications of californium-252 neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotope 252Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-yr half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 1011 neutrons s-1. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, land mines and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 yr of experience and by US Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the US government and to universities for educational, research and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations

  14. Production, distribution and applications of californium-252 neutron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R C; Knauer, J B; Balo, P A

    2000-01-01

    The radioisotope 252Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-yr half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10(11) neutrons s(-1). Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, land mines and unexploded military ordinance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 yr of experience and by US Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the US government and to universities for educational, research and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations. PMID:11003521

  15. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial

  16. Production of extra pure curium and californium preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparations of curium-244,245,248 and californium-249,252 are used for the production of ionizing radiation sources for different applications and fundamental nuclear-physical investigations, placing high requirements on the radiochemical and chemical purity of the preparations. Extraction chromatography using di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) as extractant was chosen to prepare extra pure curium and californium preparations. In order to identify the optimal conditions of Cm-Cf separation and to remove impurities from them (reagent and other impurities), investigations were performed into the effect of impurities (Na+, Ca2+, Al3+, Fe2+, Fe3+ taken as example), extractant and eluent concentration and solution flow rate on the efficiency of mutual purification of Cm and Cf. Both theoretical and experimental estimations were made of the maximum concentration at which the impurities do not affect the process. The conditions chosen allow mutual purification of milligram amounts of Cm and Cf from impurity elements at E(pur) =102 - 103 during a single chromatographic cycle (E(pur) =>103) using a column with 5 - 10 cm3 volume. In this case the production yield exceeds 98%. The purification of milligram amounts of curium and californium from fission products (lanthanides in general, cerium in particular) was performed in D2EHPA-decane-PbO2-HNO3 and D2EHPA-decane-DTPA-H3-Cit extraction chromatography systems. In order to establish the optimal conditions, the effect of [D2EHPA] and eluent on the mutual purification of Cm and Cf and on their purification from cerium and impurity elements was studied in the D2EHPA-decane-PbO2-HNO3 system. During a single chromatographic cycle the mutual purification factors of TPE and of their purification from impurity cations achieve 102-103, from cerium - E(pur) > 10. In the D2EHPA-decane-DTPA-H3Cit system, the effect of concentration of extractant and eluent pH on the efficiency of Cm and Cf purification from lanthanides was

  17. Prompt neutron spectrum of the spontaneous fission of californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The californium-252 spontaneous fission neutron spectrum was measured in the energy range of 0.01 to 10 MeV by the time-of-flight technique using various neutron detectors. The measurements of 252Cf neutron spectrum at energies of 0.01 to 5 MeV were performed as a function of fission fragment kinetic energy. The mean neutron spectrum energy in the range of 0.7 to 10 MeV was found from the results of measurements. The irregularity in the 252Cf neutron spectrum in the neutron energy range of less than 0.7 MeV compared to theoretical values is discussed. The mechanism of 252Cf neutron emission is also discussed on the basis of neutron yield angle measurements. 12 references

  18. Separation of californium from actinides and lanthanides in aqueous solution by electrochemical formation of amalgams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical reduction of transneptunium elements (Pu to Cf) and rare earths (Eu, Tm) from aqueous complexing solutions to amalgams was studied over a wide range of cathodic potentials in order to achieve optimal separation of californium. The reduction in acetate media (pH 4.5-4.6) at potentials around -1.7 to -1.9 V1 leads to a quantitative extraction of californium into the mercury phase, while more negative potentials are required for the reduction of the lighter transuranium elements and of the lanthanides. Hence, the optimal conditions for the separation of californium from the investigated actinides and lanthanides were determined. Separation factors α between 25 and 90 were found except in the case of Cf/Eu, where poor values (α varying from 7 to 12) were observed. More negative cathodic potentials decrease the selectivity of the reduction process. A similar study with lithium citrate solutions (pH ∝6) shows that satisfactory separation of californium from lighter and heavier actinides is achievable. A separation factor of 88 is obtained for Cf/Am at -1.98 V. The anodic stripping of mixed amalgams (Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, Tm and Cf) Hg in nitric and acetic acid soultions at potentials ranging from +0.1 to -0.7 V proceeds slowly and proved to be ineffective for the separation of californium from light actinides under conditions described. (orig.)

  19. On-line slurry analyses by californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In chemical processing technology on-line activation methods gain an increasing importance for process monitoring and control. A method is described according to which the different fluorspar contents at various strategic points of a flotation plant are determined through neutron activation by 100 μg californium-252. A continuous analytical system for onstream process control of slurries was designed and constructed. A compact facility, called SUSAC, allows continuous application of the method on an industrial scale. The main components of the SUSAC facility are the irradiation and measurement cells. The cells are equipped with multistage countercurrent stirrers ensuring a proper radial and vertical distribution of the sample. The hollow shaft of the stirrer of the irradiation cell houses the Cf-source. The NaI-detector has been installed in a recess in the bottom of the measuring cell. The volumes are 9 dm3 for the irradiation cell, 7.5 dm3 for the measuring cell, 1/2 dm3 for the vonnection line and 4 dm3 for feed and drainage lines including the pump. Investigations on the following topics are discussed: selection of stirrers, residence time, flow rate, pulp density, calibration measurements. (T.G.)

  20. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact 252Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with 252Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of 252Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a 252Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded 252Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy

  1. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Byrne, T.E. [Roane State Community College, Harriman, TN (United States); Miller, L.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  2. Proposed Californium-252 User Facility for Neutron Science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at ORNL has petitioned to establish a Californium-252 User Facility for Neutron Science for academic, industrial, and governmental researchers. The REDC Californium Facility (CF) stores the national inventory of sealed 252Cf neutron source for university and research loans. Within the CF, the 252Cf storage pool and two uncontaminated hot cells currently in service for the Californium Program will form the physical basis for the User Facility. Relevant applications include dosimetry and experiments for neutron tumor therapy; fast and thermal neutron activation analysis of materials; experimental configurations for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis; neutron shielding and material damage studies; and hardness testing of radiation detectors, cameras, and electronics. A formal User Facility simplifies working arrangements and agreements between US DOE facilities, academia, and commercial interests

  3. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Samantha K; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E; Stritzinger, Jared T; Green, Thomas D; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N; Knappenberger, Kenneth L; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A; DePrince, A Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J; Van Cleve, Shelley M; House, Jane H; Kikugawa, Naoki; Gallagher, Andrew; Arico, Alexandra A; Dixon, David A; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resultant complex with respect to that predicted for the free ion. We expand on this by characterizing the americium and curium analogues for comparison, and show that these pronounced effects result from a second transition in periodicity in the actinide series that occurs, in part, because of the stabilization of the divalent oxidation state. The metastability of californium(II) is responsible for many of the unusual properties of californium including the green photoluminescence. PMID:25880116

  4. Fissile analysis of Hanford waste using Californium Multiplier/Delayed Neutron Counter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of low-level (10 ng/g or lower) fissile material (mainly plutonium) in Hanford waste and process samples is becoming increasingly important. A system has been designed consisting of a Californium Multiplier (CFX) and a Delayed Neutron Counter (DNC) to characterize these samples. This report describes hardware and analytical capability of the CFX/DNC system

  5. Study of the shielding for spontaneous fission sources of Californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A shielding study is made to attenuate, until maximum permissible levels, the neutrons radiation and photons emitted by spontaneous fission coming from a source of Californium-252. The compound package by a database (Library DLC-23) and the ANISNW code is used, in it version for personal computer. (Author)

  6. Californium (252Cf) and its use as neutron source in science medicine and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radionuclides in science and nuclear techniques basically is related to unstable isotopes, which are produced from stable elements in nuclear reactor. Their specifications are various from view point of application . Using of physical and chemical properties of radionuclides in chemistry, for with marking the organic compounds we can exactly explain the mechanism of chemical reactions in medical, biology and bio-chemistry. In these cases the behaviour of radionuclides is very important and the selection of the suitable radionuclides is determined between the elements for investigation aims. The special specification of radio-nuclides analysis such as, half-life, kind of ray and energy should be considered with an special accuracy as well as the laws security regulations from view point of ray-protection should be completely observed mean time working these radio-nuclides. It should be considered that application of radio-isotopes is very important from their special specifications point of view. Applying the radionuclides from technology point of view in sciences and nuclear techniques aren't only limited to three analyses of α, β, and γ, but we can use the share of neutron which are produced from spli ting of heavy nucleus such as Californium252 as a neutron source in the depths of the sea and also determining the concentration of low quantity elements on moon and other spheres. The radioisotope of Californium252 is a neutron useful radiator for investigation in nuclear medical and technology because of automatically rapid split to 3.2% Californium252 radiates 1.34 * 109N/m in each mil/GH which suitable replacement for neutron sources based on (a, n) reaction, for example, Radium-Brellium or Amersium-Brellium. The energy distribution of radiated neutrons from analyzing of Californium252 like the spectrum of neutron which is produced from splitting of U235, Pu239 nucleus has the maximum energy in quantity, En=1 MeV in the range of 1.5 MeV. The

  7. Contribution to clinical dosimetry of californium 252 sources used at Gustave Roussy institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main characteristics of californium 252 sources are presented in the first part of the report. Dose measurements around Californium sources were performed with a pair of ionization multiplication chambers: the first one has an Aluminium wall and is filled with Argon, the second one a plastic tissue-equivalent gas. A set of experiments was performed in order to investigate the relative influence of beta rays on the response of both chambers. Besides the experimental work a computer program was written to calculate the dose distribution around the actual sources made of a series of small active sources placed in catheters. Theoretical data around small sources can be found in the litterature. The comparison between experimental results and theoretical ones has shown a good agreement. The computer program will be included as a sub-routine in the more general computer program used for patients treated with interstitial therapy

  8. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU Californium Shipping Container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU Californium Shipping Container was made in order to demonstrate its compliance with the regulations governing off-site shipment of packages that contain radioactive material. The evaluation encompassed five primary categories: structural integrity, thermal resistance, radiation shielding, nuclear criticality safety, and quality assurance. The results of this evaluation demonstrate that the container complies with the applicable regulations

  9. Emergence of californium as the second transitional element in the actinide series

    OpenAIRE

    Cary, Samantha K.; Vasiliu, Monica; Baumbach, Ryan E.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; GREEN, THOMAS D.; Diefenbach, Kariem; Cross, Justin N.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Silver, Mark A.; DePrince, A. Eugene; Polinski, Matthew J.; Van Cleve, Shelley M.; House, Jane H.; Kikugawa, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    A break in periodicity occurs in the actinide series between plutonium and americium as the result of the localization of 5f electrons. The subsequent chemistry of later actinides is thought to closely parallel lanthanides in that bonding is expected to be ionic and complexation should not substantially alter the electronic structure of the metal ions. Here we demonstrate that ligation of californium(III) by a pyridine derivative results in significant deviations in the properties of the resu...

  10. Measurements of integral cross sections in the californium-252 fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a low-scattering arrangement cross sections averaged over the californium-252 spontaneous fission neutron spectrum were measured. The reactions 27Al(n,α)46Ti, 47Ti, 48Ti(n,p), 54Fe,56Fe(n,p), 58Ni(n,p), 64Zn(n,p), 115In(n,n') were studied in order to obtain a consistent set of threshold detectors used in fast neutron flux density measurements. Overall uncertainties between 2 and 2.5% could be achieved; corrections due to neutron scattering in source and samples are discussed

  11. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs

  12. Spontaneous Partitioning of Californium from Curium: Curious Cases from the Crystallization of Curium Coordination Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cary, Samantha K.; Silver, Mark A.; Liu, Guokui; Wang, Jamie C.; Bogart, Justin A.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Arico, Alexandra A.; Hanson, Kenneth; Schelter, Eric J.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2015-12-07

    The reaction of 248CmCl3 with excess 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (DPA) under mild solvothermal conditions results in crystallization of the tris-chelate complex Cm(HDPA)3·H2O. Approximately half of the curium remains in solution at the end of this process, and evaporation of the mother liquor results in crystallization of the bis-chelate complex [Cm(HDPA)- (H2DPA)(H2O)2Cl]Cl·2H2O. 248Cm is the daughter of the α decay of 252Cf and is extracted in high purity from this parent. However, trace amounts of 249,250,251Cf are still present in all samples of 248Cm. During the crystallization of Cm(HDPA)3·H2O and [Cm(HDPA)(H2DPA)(H2O)2Cl]Cl·2H2O, californium(III) spontaneously separates itself from the curium complexes and is found doped within crystals of DPA in the form of Cf(HDPA)3. These results add to the growing body of evidence that the chemistry of californium is fundamentally different from that of earlier actinides.

  13. Molybdenum nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum nitride nanotubes were prepared by depositing nitride film on anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template by atomic layer deposition and then etching away the template with sodium hydroxide solution. The effect of deposition parameters on film growth and the properties of the nanotubes was investigated. The maximum depth of intrusion of the molybdenum nitride film into the AAO pores was found to be 20 μm, achieved with 7-second precursor pulses. Precursor diffusion into the AAO pores dominated over the intrusion. Three different architectures of molybdenum nitride nanotubes were isolated. Separated nanotubes were found when the template was etched in an ultrasonic bath, while bundling dominated when template etching was conducted without ultrasound. When the nitride-coated AAO template was mounted onto a steel plate before etching the nanotubes remained on the surface with the tips strongly intertwined

  14. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Michalski J; Burdyński K.; Wach P.; Łataś Z.

    2015-01-01

    Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dis...

  15. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostroumov, P. N., E-mail: ostroumov@anl.gov; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Pikin, A. I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz.

  16. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz

  17. Design of a homogeneous subcritical nuclear reactor based on thorium with a source of californium 252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the energy alternatives to fossil fuels which do not produce greenhouse gases is the nuclear energy. One of the drawbacks of this alternative is the generation of radioactive wastes of long half-life and its relation to the generation of nuclear materials to produce weapons of mass destruction. An option to these drawbacks of nuclear energy is to use Thorium as part of the nuclear fuel which it becomes in U233 when capturing neutrons, that is a fissile material. In this paper Monte Carlo methods were used to design a homogeneous subcritical reactor based on thorium. As neutron reflector graphite was used. The reactor core is homogeneous and is formed of 70% light water as moderator, 12% of enriched uranium UO2(NO3)4 and 18% of thorium Th(NO3)4 as fuel. To start the nuclear fission chain reaction an isotopic source of californium 252 was used with an intensity of 4.6 x 107 s-1. In the design the value of the effective multiplication factor, whose value turned out keff <1 was calculated. Also, the neutron spectra at different distances from the source and the total fluence were calculated, as well as the values of the ambient dose equivalent in the periphery of the reactor. (Author)

  18. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroumov, P N; Barcikowski, A; Dickerson, C A; Perry, A; Pikin, A I; Sharamentov, S I; Vondrasek, R C; Zinkann, G P

    2015-08-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz. PMID:26329185

  19. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide 252Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world's largest inventory of compact 252Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of ≤ 1011 neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 108 cm-2 s-1 at the sample. Total flux of ≥109 cm-2 s-1 is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the 252Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis

  20. Long-term effects of an intracavitary treatment with californium-252 on normal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About one hundred fifty swine were exposed to either radium-226 or californium-252 sources in the uterine cervix to determine an RBE for both acute and long-term effects. That value for early changes in the tissues at risk in the treatment of cervical cancer was between 6.2 and 6.8. The incidence of complications increased with time after exposure, especially among animals treated with 252Cf. Analysis of rectal injury showed that ulceration occurred frequently within a year postexposure at doses between 1600 and 2400 rad calculated at 2 cm lateral to the source midline. Fat necrosis and smooth muscle atrophy, resulting in a local rectal stricture, were delayed changes observed in some animals. The lower ureter was the site for a greater frequency of complications than the GI tract. Ureteral stricture often occurred at doses of 1200 rad from 252Cf and 7000 rad from 226Ra. Observation of delayed effects in the uterine-cervix in animals held up to 4 years postexposure indicate that the RBE for 252Cf may be increased to a value as high as 18, while repair may have even decreased it to about 5.6 in the rectum. Fifty swine are still being observed for long-term effects after doses above 800 rad from 252Cf and 5000 rad from 226Ra

  1. Manganese determination om minerals by activation analysis, using the californium-252 as a neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron Activation Analysis, using a Californium-252 neutron source, has been applied for the determination of manganese in ores such as pyrolusite, rodonite (manganese silicate)' and blending used in dry-batteries The favorable nuclear properties of manganese, such as high thermal neutron cross-section for the reaction 55Mn (n.gamma)56 Mn, high concentration of manganese in the matrix and short half - life of 56Mn, are an ideal combination for non-destructive analysis of manganese in ores. Samples and standards of manganese dioxide were irradiated for about 20 minutes, followed by a 4 to 15 minutes decay and counted in a single channel pulse-height discrimination using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. Counting time was equal to 10 minutes. The interference of nuclear reactions 56Fe(n,p)56Mn and 59 Co (n, α)56 were studied, as well as problems in connection with neutron shadowing during irradiation, gamma-rays attenuation during counting and influence of granulometry of samples. One sample,was also analysed by wet-chemical method (sodium bismuthate) in order to compare results. As a whole, i t was shown that the analytical method of neutron activation for manganese in ores and blending, is a method simple, rapid and with good precision and accuracy. (author)

  2. Five-year cure of cervical cancer treated using californium-252 neutron brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Female pelvic carcinoma is one of the common malignancies seen at the University of Kentucky Medical Center and often presents in an advanced stage. In 1976, the authors began to test californium-252 neutron brachytherapy (NT) for its efficacy for control of primary and recurrent advanced uterine, cervix, and vaginal cancers. The first protocol used was 5000-5500 rad of whole pelvis irradiation followed by 1-2 Cf-252 insertions using a single tandem placed in the utero-cervico-vaginal region. Of 27 patients with primary carcinomas treated, 10 are alive and well 5 year later (37%). Two of two recurrent tumors were locally controlled but failed later. These patients had advanced cervical, vaginal, or endometrial carcinomas. In 1977, a transitional year, treatment of only unfavorable stages and presentations with NT was initiated. Similar results were obtained with NT as compared to conventional photon therapy (PT). Further improvement in treatment results can be anticipated as NT brachytherapy is used for advanced cancer therapy by more effective treatment schedules and radiation doses. Cf-252 can be used as a radium substitute and achieved similar rates of tumor control and 5-year survivals. 21 references, 2 tables

  3. Uptake and distribution of californium-252 chloride administered intraperitoneally, intravenously or intratracheally and the effect of in vivo DTPA chelation on intratracheal instillation in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first phase of this investigation, comprising of three groups of animals, was designed to study the fate of californium-252 chloride administered intraperitoneally, intravenously or intratracheally. The second phase, which consisted of two groups of animals, was designed to examine the effectiveness of DTPA chelation therapy in accelerating the excretion and preventing the deposition of californium-252 chloride instilled into the lungs of rats. Immediately following the dose administration of 2 uCi of californium-252 chloride which was dissolved in 0.2 ml of 0.9% NaCl at pH 3.5, each rat was placed in a metabolism cage. Each rat in the first group of phase II was given intraperitoneal injection of CaNa3 DTPA (50 mg/kg) and each rat in the second group was given intraperitoneal injections of 0.9% NaCl. Injections of the DTPA or the NaCl sham were initiated immediately after the intratracheal administration of californium-252 chloride and were continued every three days until sacrifice. Following intraperitoneal, intravenous or intratracheal administration, the whole body retention of californium as a function of time was described by a three component exponential equation. For each mode of administration the short term component exhibited a biological half-life of between 5 and 10 hours; the intermediate component between 4 and 6 days; and the long term component between 200 and 300 days. The organ data obtained following intraperitoneal and intravenous administration were indistinguishable. On day one, the liver retained about 9% of the administered dose and the kidneys retained 2.4%. Retention for these organs decreased to about 1% by day 32. The femurs maintained an almost constant level of 4.5% of the injected dose over the 32 days. The lungs, spleen, heart, and testes showed significant retention of californium

  4. ENEA results in the international comparison organized by BIPM for the measurament of neutron fluxes of a Californium source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period between May 1978 and August 1984 under the auspices of Section III of CCEMRI of CIPM it has been carried out the international intercomparison of Californium neutron source emission rate. The previous intercomparison was based on Ra-Be (α -n) source measuraments, which took place between 1959 and 1965, and the results showed a total spread of +- 3%. Owing to the better accuracy achived over the following decade the Ra-Be intercomparison was no longer representative of the state of the art, therefore it was decided to arrange the intercomparison based on Californium which in the meantime reached a wide use in the world. Contributions to the intercomparison were received from fourteen laboratories representative of twelve Nations plus the BIPM. The results put into evidence a considerable advance on accuracy in the neutron source emission rate measuraments. The standard deviation of the residuals obtained from least square fit of normalized data resulted +- 0,57%. In the present report it is widely described the Manganese bath method used at ENEA, CRE Casaccia in Roma, and the experimental procedure followed for its absolute calibration. All measuraments are reported and analysed, including those effectuated for corrective factors determination. The final results obtained at ENEA for the circulated Californium source is (3,457 +- 0,013) 10*H7 neutron/s. The analysis of data from all partecipantes has been effectuated and concluded by J. Axton in March 1986 and the conclusions which have been showed in the present report put in evidence the satisfactory results achived by the ENEA

  5. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  6. Feasibility and market potential of protein determination of wheat using californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the feasibility of protein determination by capture gamma-ray analysis using californium-252 neutrons, an in-situ protein analysis system for use by grain handlers has been examined. Three 227 kilogram (approximately) lots of wheat were used to determine the amount of nitrogen present. Protein analyses by the Kjeldahl method were obtained from samples taken before and after the capture gamma-ray analyses. The 5.267-MeV gamma-ray was selected for use in this study as a compromise between efficiency and interference from other elements. The associated counting equipment was a multichannel analyzer with pulse shaping electronic and analysis computing equipment. A linear regression program was used to compare the regions of interest to the Kjeldahl protein averages. The counts composing each peak were summed and normalized using the total count of the hydrogen peak. The normalized nitrogen percentages indicate a significant correlation between the spectral regions and the Kjeldahl analyses. To a first approximation, the value of wheat is the wheat protein. At the present time, protein testing of wheat is destructive, cumbersome, and time-consuming as compared to the potential for capture gamma-ray analysis testing. Assuming that such a protein analysis unit can analyze 42 tonne of wheat per hour, over 120 units would be needed to monitor one-half the U.S. annual wheat production. A 0.5% improvement in processor realizations and grain throughput value of $167.00 per tonne will result in a projected savings of $150,000 per year per unit

  7. Oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and therapeutic gain factor (GF) for californium-252 at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential benefit of the introduction of californium-252 in interstitial and intracavitary therapy is related to the greater efficiency of its neutron emission against anoxic cancer cells. In that respect, the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) of the 252Cf emission has been determined for a continuous low dose rate irradiation. The biological system is growth inhibition in Vicia faba bean roots. A new Vicia faba ''BelB'' strain has been used, which better tolerates long periods (up to about 10 hours) of anoxia. In a first series of experiments, for a 252Cf (Dsub(n+γ)) dose rate of 0.11 Gy.h-1, an OER of 1.4+-0.1 was observed (the γ contribution Dγ to the total absorbed dose Dsub(n+γ) was 0.35 at the position of the root tips). In a second series of experiments, in somewhat different geometrical conditions with a 252Cf (Dsub(n+γ)) dose rate of 0.13 Gy.h-1, an OER of 1.5+-0.1 was observed (Dγ/Dsub(n+γ)=0.42). The OER values observed for similar irradiation times, with iridium-192 γ-rays, were 2.3+-0.2 and 2.6+-0.1 respectively, which leads to therapeutic gain factors (GF) of 1.6 and 1.7 respectively. These GF values are slightly lower than those previously obtained (GF=1.8) on the same system, with d(50)-Be p(75)-Be and 15 MeV neutron beams

  8. Application of TSH bioindicator for studying the biological efficiency of neutrons from californium-252 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effectiveness of neutrons from a Californium-252 source in the induction of various abnormalities in the Tradescantia clone 4430 stamen hair cells (TSH-assay) was studied. The special attention was paid to check whether any enhancement in effects caused by process of boron neutron capture is visible in the cells enriched with boron ions. Two chemicals (borax and BSH) were applied to introduce boron-10 ions into cells. Inflorescence, normal or pretreated with chemicals containing boron, were irradiated in the air with neutrons from a Cf-252 source at KAERI, Taejon, Korea. To estimate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the induction of gene mutations of the neutron beam under the study, Tradescantia inflorescences, without any chemical pretreatment, were irradiated with various doses of X-rays. The ranges of radiation doses used were 0-0.1 Gy in neutrons and 0-0.5 Gy in X-rays. After the time needed to complete the postirradiation repair Tradescantia cuttings were transferred to Cracow, where screening of gene and lethal; mutations, cell cycle alterations in somatic cells have been done, and dose response relationships were figured. The maximal RBE values were estimated in the range of 4.6-6.8. Alterations of RBE value were observed; from 6.8 to 7.8 in the case of plants pretreated with 240 ppm of B-10 from borax, and 4.6 to 6.1 in the case of 400 ppm of B-10 from BSH. Results showed a slight, although statistically insignificant increase in biological efficacy of radiation from the Cf-252 source in samples pretreated with boron containing chemicals. (author)

  9. Nitrogen Availability Of Nitriding Atmosphere In Controlled Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski J.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Parameters which characterize the nitriding atmosphere in the gas nitriding process of steel are: the nitriding potential KN, ammonia dissociation rate α and nitrogen availabilitymN2. The article discusses the possibilities of utilization of the nitriding atmosphere’s nitrogen availability in the design of gas nitriding processes of alloyed steels in atmospheres derived from raw ammonia, raw ammonia diluted with pre-dissociated ammonia, with nitrogen, as well as with both nitrogen and pre-dissociated ammonia. The nitriding processes were accomplished in four series. The parameters selected in the particular processes were: process temperature (T, time (t, value of nitriding potential (KN, corresponding to known dissociation rate of the ammonia which dissociates during the nitriding process (α. Variable parameters were: nitrogen availability (mN2, composition of the ingoing atmosphere and flow rate of the ingoing atmosphere (FIn.

  10. Divalent and trivalent gas-phase coordination complexes of californium: evaluating the stability of Cf(ii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, Phuong D; Shuh, David K; Sturzbecher-Hoehne, Manuel; Abergel, Rebecca J; Gibson, John K

    2016-08-01

    The divalent oxidation state is increasingly stable relative to the trivalent state for the later actinide elements, with californium the first actinide to exhibit divalent chemistry under moderate conditions. Although there is evidence for divalent Cf in solution and solid compounds, there are no reports of discrete complexes in which Cf(II) is coordinated by anionic ligands. Described here is the divalent Cf methanesulfinate coordination complex, Cf(II)(CH3SO2)3(-), prepared in the gas phase by reductive elimination of CH3SO2 from Cf(III)(CH3SO2)4(-). Comparison with synthesis of the corresponding Sm and Cm complexes reveals reduction of Cf(III) and Sm(III), and no evidence for reduction of Cm(III). This reflects the comparative 3+/2+ reduction potentials: Cf(3+) (-1.60 V) ≈ Sm(3+) (-1.55 V) ≫ Cm(3+) (-3.7 V). Association of O2 to the divalent complexes is attributed to formation of superoxides, with recovery of the trivalent oxidation state. The new gas-phase chemistry of californium, now the heaviest element to have been studied in this manner, provides evidence for Cf(II) coordination complexes and similar chemistry of Cf and Sm. PMID:27424652

  11. Hypoxic versus normoxic external-beam irradiation of cervical carcinoma combined with californium-252 neutron brachytherapy. Comparative treatment results of a 5-year randomized study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tačev, T.; Vacek, Antonín; Ptáčková, B.; Strnad, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 181, č. 5 (2005), s. 273-284. ISSN 0179-7158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : cervical carcinoma * hypoxyradiotherapy * californium-252 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.490, year: 2005

  12. Abnormal Nitride Morphologies upon Nitriding Iron-Based Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meka, Sai Ramudu; Mittemeijer, Eric Jan

    2013-06-01

    Nitriding of iron-based components is a very well-known surface engineering method for bringing about great improvement of the mechanical and chemical properties. An overview is presented of the strikingly different nitride morphologies developing upon nitriding iron-based alloy substrates. Observed abnormal morphologies are the result of intricate interplay of the thermodynamic and kinetic constraints for the nucleation and growth of both alloying element nitride particles in the matrix and iron nitrides at the surface of the substrate. Alloying elements having strong Me-N interaction, such as Cr, V, and Ti, precipitate instantaneously as internal Me-nitrides, thus allowing the subsequent nucleation and growth of "normal" layer-type iron nitride. Alloying elements having weak Me-N interaction, such as Al, Si, and Mo, and simultaneously having low solubility in iron nitride, obstruct/delay the nucleation and growth of iron nitrides at the surface, thus leading to very high nitrogen supersaturation over an extended depth range from the surface. Eventually, the nucleation and growth of "abnormal" plate-type iron nitride occurs across the depth range of high nitrogen supersaturation. On this basis, strategies can be devised for tuned development of specific nitride morphologies at the surface of nitrided components.

  13. Properties of minor actinide nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of the research on properties of minor actinide nitrides for the development of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle based on nitride fuel and pyrochemical reprocessing is described. Some thermal stabilities of Am-based nitrides such as AmN and (Am, Zr)N were mainly investigated. Stabilization effect of ZrN was cleary confirmed for the vaporization and hydrolytic behaviors. New experimental equipments for measuring thermal properties of minor actinide nitrides were also introduced. (author)

  14. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan;

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  15. Solving the Hydration Structure of the Heaviest Actinide Aqua Ion Known: The Californium(III) Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Auwer, Ch.; Guillaumont, D. [CEA Marcoule, Nucl Energy Div, Radiochem Proc Dept, SCPS LILA, 30 (France); Galbis, E.; Pappalardo, Rafael R.; Marcos Sanchez, E. [Univ Seville, Dept Quim Fis, E-41012 Seville (Spain); Hernandez-Cobos, J. [Inst Ciencias Fis, Cuernavaca 62251, Morelos (Mexico); Le Naour, C.; Simoni, E. [Univ Paris Sud, Inst Phys Nucl Orsay, Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    In summary, the first MC simulation of the trivalent cation of californium, based on an exchangeable hydrated ion-water intermolecular potential, has been shown to extend and improve the hydrated ion model. Likewise, the CfL{sub III}-edge EXAFS spectrum of an acidic 1 mm Cf(ClO{sub 4}){sub 3} aqueous solution recorded under optimized experimental conditions has greatly improved the signal/noise ratio of the only previously recorded spectrum. The comparison of the experimental EXAFS spectrum with the two computed ones, obtained from two different intermolecular potentials that predict eight (BP86) or nine (MP2) water molecules in the first coordination shell, leads to the conclusion that the lowest hydration number is preferred. Then, as Cf{sup III} is the heaviest actinide aqua ion for which there is experimental information, the actinide contraction is supported by the present study. (For U{sup III}, R{sub U-O}=2.56 Angstroms, and CN=9{+-}1; for Pu{sup III}, R{sub Pu-O}=2.51 Angstroms and CN=9{+-}1; for Cm{sup III}, R{sub Cm-O}=2.47 Angstroms and CN=9{+-}1). The role of the second hydration shell is important in defining the structure and dynamics of the Cf{sup III} aqua ion, but the contribution of second-shell water molecules to the EXAFS signal as back-scatters is marginal. Finally, this work gives an illustrative example of the benefits which can be achieved from the combination of experimental X-ray absorption spectroscopy and computer simulations. The usefulness of the simultaneous analysis of the results as well as the importance of the structural statistical average has been clearly demonstrated herein. Each technique independently was not adequate. We believe that this study traces out a still poorly explored combined methodology which may be extremely useful for many other complexes and chemical problems. A systematic theoretical and experimental examination of the other known actinide cations on the same basis should be undertaken to confirm the

  16. Sintering silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Levine, Stanley R. (Inventor); Sanders, William A. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Oxides having a composition of (Ba(1-x)Sr(x))O-Al2O3-2SiO2 are used as sintering aids for producing an improved silicon nitride ceramic material. The x must be greater than 0 to insure the formation of the stable monoclinic celsian glass phase.

  17. Hot pressing aluminum nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiment was performed on the hot pressing of aluminum nitride, using three kinds of powder which are: a) made by electric arc method, b) made by nitrifying aluminum metal powder, and c) made from alumina and carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. The content of oxygen of these powders was analyzed by activation analysis using high energy neutron irradiation. The density of hot pressed samples was classified into two groups. The high density group contained oxygen more than 3 wt. %, and the low density group contained about 0.5 wt %. Typical density vs. temperature curves have a bending point near 1,5500C, and the sample contains iron impurity of 0.5 wt. %. Needle crystals were found to grow near 1,5500C by VLS mechanism, and molten iron acts a main part of mechanism as a liquid phase. According to the above-mentioned curve, the iron impurity in aluminum nitride prevents densification. The iron impurity accelerates crystal growth. Advance of densification may be expected by adding iron impurity, but in real case, the densification is delayed. Densification and crystal growth are greatly accelerated by oxygen impurity. In conclusion, more efforts must be made for the purification of aluminum nitride. In the present stage, the most pure nitride powder contains about 0.1 wt. % of oxygen, as compared with good silicon carbide crystals containing only 10-5 wt. % of nitrogen. (Iwakiri, K.)

  18. Design, construction, and characterization of a facility for neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252 as a neutron source is reported. Both internal and external target geometries are investigated. The facility designed for and used in this study is described. The external target geometry is found to be inappropriate because of the low thermal neutron flux at the sample location, which must be outside the biological shielding. The internal target geometry is found to have a sufficient thermal neutron flux, but an excessive gamma ray background. A water filled plastic facility, rather than the paraffin filled steel one used in this study, is suggested as a means of increasing flexibility and decreasing the beackground in the internal target geometry

  19. Contact damage of silicon nitride whisker-silicon nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of β-silicon nitride whiskers content on Hertzian contact damage in silicon nitride matrix prepared by tape casting and gas pressure sintering (GPS) is discussed. Hertzian indentations with different loads were applied to follow the evolution of damage in these whisker-reinforced composites. The morphology of contact damage was investigated by using optical microscopy, as well as electron microscopy. With increasing β-silicon nitride whiskers content in α-silicon nitride, the porosity of materials increased and the micro structure of matrix became finer. With decreasing grain size, the subsurface contact damage increased by increasing crack length. The samples with 2 mass % β-silicon nitride addition had showed shallow ring crack and quasi-plastic deformation. On the other hand, for sample with 10 mass % β-silicon nitride whisker added sample and coarse microstructures subsurface deformation was not observed. Copyright (2002) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  20. Optical characterization of gallium nitride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, Victoria

    2002-01-01

    Group III-nitrides have been considered a promising system for semiconductor devices since a few decades, first for blue- and UV-light emitting diodes, later also for high-frequency/high-power applications. Due to the lack of native substrates, heteroepitaxially grown III-nitride layers are usually

  1. Glow-discharge nitriding of gears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of glow-discharge nitriding of gear parts made of 30Kh2NMFA steel is introduced. The diffusion saturation is carried out in the atmosphere of dissociated ammonia at the temperature of 520-540 deg C and 200-800 Pa pressure for 16-40 h depending on the required thickness of the nitrided layer (0.2-0.5 mm). The structure of the nitrided metal is a layer of nitride compounds of the Fe4N type and diffusion zone enriched with nitrides. Glow-discharge nitrided parts with 600-650 HV strength retain certain wear resistance and fatigue strength as compared with gas nitriding

  2. Operational experience with the Argonne National Laboratory Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade facility and electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrasek, R.; Clark, J.; Levand, A.; Palchan, T.; Pardo, R.; Savard, G.; Scott, R.

    2014-02-01

    The Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the Argonne National Laboratory Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) facility provides low-energy and accelerated neutron-rich radioactive beams to address key nuclear physics and astrophysics questions. A 350 mCi 252Cf source produces fission fragments which are thermalized and collected by a helium gas catcher into a low-energy particle beam with a charge of 1+ or 2+. An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source functions as a charge breeder in order to raise the ion charge sufficiently for acceleration in the ATLAS linac. The ECR charge breeder has achieved stable beam charge breeding efficiencies of 10.1% for 23Na7+, 17.9% for 39K10+, 15.6% for 84Kr17+, and 12.4% for 133Cs27+. For the radioactive beams, a charge breeding efficiency of 11.7% has been achieved for 143Cs27+ and 14.7% for 143Ba27+. The typical breeding times are 10 ms/charge state, but the source can be tuned such that this value increases to 100 ms/charge state with the best breeding efficiency corresponding to the longest breeding times—the variation of efficiencies with breeding time will be discussed. Efforts have been made to characterize and reduce the background contaminants present in the ion beam through judicious choice of q/m combinations. Methods of background reduction are being investigated based upon plasma chamber cleaning and vacuum practices.

  3. Long-term effects of an intracavitary treatment with californium-252 on normal tissue. [Swine, /sup 226/Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Beamer, J.L.; Mahony, T.D.; Cross, F.T.; Lund, J.E.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1976-01-01

    About one hundred fifty swine were exposed to either radium-226 or californium-252 sources in the uterine cervix to determine an RBE for both acute and long-term effects. That value for early changes in the tissues at risk in the treatment of cervical cancer was between 6.2 and 6.8. The incidence of complications increased with time after exposure, especially among animals treated with /sup 252/Cf. Analysis of rectal injury showed that ulceration occurred frequently within a year postexposure at doses between 1600 and 2400 rad calculated at 2 cm lateral to the source midline. Fat necrosis and smooth muscle atrophy, resulting in a local rectal stricture, were delayed changes observed in some animals. The lower ureter was the site for a greater frequency of complications than the GI tract. Ureteral stricture often occurred at doses of 1200 rad from /sup 252/Cf and 7000 rad from /sup 226/Ra. Observation of delayed effects in the uterine-cervix in animals held up to 4 years postexposure indicate that the RBE for /sup 252/Cf may be increased to a value as high as 18, while repair may have even decreased it to about 5.6 in the rectum. Fifty swine are still being observed for long-term effects after doses above 800 rad from /sup 252/Cf and 5000 rad from /sup 226/Ra.

  4. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  5. Nitride fuel development in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitride fuel for ADS has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under a double strata fuel cycle concept. In this case the nitride fuel contains MA elements as a principal component and is diluted by inert materials in place of U, which is totally different from the fuel for power reactors. So the fuel fabrication manner, fuel properties and irradiation behaviour have to be investigated in detail as well as the treatment of spent fuel. Through the experimental R&D, technical feasibility of nitride fuel cycle for the transmutation of MA will be demonstrated

  6. Nitriding iron at lower temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, W P; Tao, N R; Wang, Z B; Lu, J; Lu, K

    2003-01-31

    The microstructure in the surface layer of a pure iron plate was refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation of the surface layer. The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the treated iron with the nanostructured surface layer were greatly enhanced, so that the nitriding temperature could be as low as 300 degrees C, which is much lower than conventional nitriding temperatures (above 500 degrees C). This enhanced processing method demonstrates the technological significance of nanomaterials in improving traditional processing techniques and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. PMID:12560546

  7. Study of the Active Screen Plasma Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; C. X. Li; H. Dong; T. Bell

    2004-01-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a novel nitriding process, which overcomes many of the practical problems associated with the conventional DC plasma nitriding (DCPN). Experimental results showed that the metallurgical characteristics and hardening effect of 722M24 steel nitrided by ASPN at both floating potential and anodic (zero) potential were similar to those nitrided by DCPN. XRD and high-resolution SEM analysis indicated that iron nitride particles with sizes in sub-micron scale were deposited on the specimen surface in AS plasma nitriding. These indicate that the neutral iron nitride particles, which are sputtered from the active screen and transferred through plasma to specimen surface, are considered to be the dominant nitrogen carder in ASPN. The OES results show that NH could not be a critical species in plasma nitriding.

  8. Reaction-bonded silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) has been characterized. The oxidation behaviour in air up to 15000C and 3000 h and the effects of static and cyclic oxidation on room-temperature strength have been studied. (orig./IHOE)

  9. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  10. Results with the electron cyclotron resonance charge breeder for the 252Cf fission source project (Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade) at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, a new radioactive beam facility for the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is nearing completion. The facility will use fission fragments from a 1 Ci 252Cf source; thermalized and collected into a low-energy particle beam by a helium gas catcher. In order to reaccelerate these beams, an existing ATLAS electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source was redesigned to function as an ECR charge breeder. Thus far, the charge breeder has been tested with stable beams of rubidium and cesium achieving charge breeding efficiencies of 9.7% into 85Rb17+ and 2.9% into 133Cs20+.

  11. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, R. R. M.; de Araújo, F. O.; da Costa, J. A. P.; A. de S. Brandim; de Brito, R. A.; Alves, C

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  12. Ab initio full-potential study of mechanical properties and magnetic phase stability of californium monopnictides (CfN and CfP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, S.; Bouhafs, B.

    2016-09-01

    Based on the first-principles methods, the structural, elastic, electronic, properties and magnetic ordering of californium monopnictides CfX (X = P) have been studied using the full-potential augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (FP-L/APW + lo) method within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The electronic exchange correlation energy is described by generalized gradient approximation GGA and GGA+U (U is the Hubbard correction). The GGA+U method is applied to the rare-earth 5f states. We have calculated the lattice parameters, bulk modulii and the first pressure derivatives of the bulk modulii. The elastic properties of the studied compounds are only investigated in the most stable calculated phase. In order to gain further information, we have calculated Young's modulus, shear modulus, anisotropy factor and Kleinman parameter by the aid of the calculated elastic constants. The results mainly show that californium monopnictides CfX (X = P) have an antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Density of states (DOS) and charge densities for both compounds are also computed in the NaCl (B1) structure.

  13. Corrosion of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion behaviour of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel grades AISI 304, 316 and 321 was studied at various temperatures. Certain plasma nitriding cycles included a post-oxidation treatment. The corrosion rates were measured using linear polarisation technique. Results showed that corrosion rate increased with the plasma nitriding temperature. Minimum deterioration occurred at 653K. (author). 2 tabs., 4 figs., 10 refs

  14. Ion nitridation - physical and technological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitridation, is a technique which allows the formation of a controlled thickness of nitrides in the surface of the material, using this material as the cathode in a low pressure glow discharge, which presents many advantages over the conventional method. A brief review of the ion nitriding technique, the physical fenomena involved, and we discuss technological aspects of this method, are presented. (Author)

  15. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  16. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiyanto A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with varying nitriding temperature and nitriding duration to see whether the model managed to successfully predict the nitrided layer thickness. This model predicted the coexistence of ε-Fe2-3N and γ΄-Fe4N under the present nitriding process parameters. After the validation process, it is proven that the mathematical model managed to predict the nitrided layer growth of the gas nitrided and plasma nitrided of AISI 316L SS up to high degree of accuracy.

  17. Mathematical Modelling of Nitride Layer Growth of Low Temperature Gas and Plasma Nitriding of AISI 316L

    OpenAIRE

    Triwiyanto A.; Zainuddin A.; Abidin K.A.Z; Billah M.A; Hussain P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper present mathematical model which developed to predict the nitrided layer thickness (case depth) of gas nitrided and plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel according to Fick’s first law for pure iron by adapting and manipulating the Hosseini’s model to fit the diffusion mechanism where nitrided structure formed by nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. The mathematical model later tested against various actual gas nitriding and plasma nitriding experimental results with ...

  18. Synthesis of chromium nitride powder by carbo-thermal nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine chromium nitride powders were synthesized by carbo-thermal nitriding from Cr2O3 and carbon black. Thermal nitriding reaction of Cr2O3 and carbon black mixture was investigated by TG-DTA. The products were identified by XRD. Cr3C2 and Cr2 (CN) were formed in the early stage of the reaction, but finally they changed into Cr2N and CrN. Lab-scale syntheses of Cr2N and CrN were carried out using an electric tube furnace. Cr2N was synthesized by firing the mixed powder at 1393 K for 1 hr under nitrogen and hydrogen mixed gas flow, whereas CrN was synthesized by sequentially nitriding of Cr2N at 1173 K. The both synthesized powders showed homogeneous morphology with narrow particle size distribution and average size of about 1 μm. Cr2N and CrN contained 11 and 20 % of nitrogen respectively, sub percents of oxygen and carbon. (author)

  19. Hydrodenitrogenation of pyridine over transition metal nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milad, I.K.; Smith, K.J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-11-01

    The use of transition metal nitrides (TMN) as catalysts for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) was discussed. A study was conducted in which a series of unsupported and supported Mo, Fe, W, Co, Nb, Cr, V and Ti nitrides were examined as catalysts for the HDN of pyridine at atmospheric pressure and 350 degrees C. The catalysts were prepared by temperature programmed nitridation of the metal oxide with NH{sub 3}. It was shown that a single nitride phase was present in each of the catalysts. The Mo nitride showed the greatest activity per gram of catalyst. Co and Fe nitrides showed the highest activities per surface area of the unsupported catalyst. Metal nitrides with lower heats of formation showed higher HDN activity. 1 tab.

  20. Homogeneous dispersion of gallium nitride nanoparticles in a boron nitride matrix by nitridation with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, Takafumi; Sekino, Tohru; Ando, Yoichi

    2010-07-01

    A Gallium Nitride (GaN) dispersed boron nitride (BN) nanocomposite powder was synthesized by heating a mixture of gallium nitrate, boric acid, and urea in a hydrogen atmosphere. Before heat treatment, crystalline phases of urea, boric acid, and gallium nitrate were recognized, but an amorphous material was produced by heat treatment at 400 degrees C, and then was transformed into GaN and turbostratic BN (t-BN) by further heat treatment at 800 degrees C. TEM obsevations of this composite powder revealed that single nanosized GaN particles were homogeneously dispersed in a BN matrix. Homogeneous dispersion of GaN nanoparticles was thought to be attained by simultaneously nitriding gallium nitrate and boric acid to GaN and BN with urea. PMID:21128417

  1. Anatomy of a controversy: Application of the Langevin technique to the analysis of the Californium-252 Source-Driven Noise Analysis method for subcriticality determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expressions for the power spectral density of the noise equivalent sources have been calculated explicitly for the (a) stochastic transport equation, (b) the one-speed transport equaton, (c) the one-speed P1 equations, (d) the one-speed diffusion equation and (e) the point kinetic equation. The stochastic nature of Fick's law in (d) has been emphasized. The Langevin technique has been applied at various levels of approximation to the interpretation of the Californium-252 Source-Driven Noise Analysis (CSDNA) experiment for determining the reactivity in subcritical media. The origin of the controversy surrounding this method has been explained. The foundations of the CSDNA method as a viable experimental technique to infer subcriticality from a measured ratio of power spectral densities of the outputs of two neutron detectors and a third external source detector has been examined by solving the one-speed stochastic diffusion equation for a point external Californium-252 source and two detectors in an infinite medium. The expression relating reactivity to the measured ratio of PSDs was found to depend implicitly on k itself. Through a numerical analysis fo this expression, the authors have demonstrated that for a colinear detector-source-detector configuration for neutron detectors far from the source, the expression for the subcritical multiplication factor becomes essentially insensitive to k, hence, demonstrating some possibility for the viability of this technique. However, under more realistic experimental conditions, i.e., for finite systems in which diffusion theroy is not applicable, the measurement of the subcritical multiplication factor from a single measured ratio of PSDs, without extensive transport calculations, remains doubtful

  2. Application of SCGE assay, classical cytogenetics and FISH for studying in vitro californium-252 neutrons irradiations and BSH pretreatment on human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, there has been observed a tendency to apply various energy neutrons for tumor therapy and particularly low energy neutrons from various sources, including californium-252 source, for cancer radiotherapy based on the neutron capture. In this study peripheral blood lymphocytes were used as a model for human cells and three methods were applied to assess the effectiveness of californium-252 neutrons irradiations in vitro in normal cells or pre-treated with compound enriched in B-10 ion. Human blood samples or isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with neutrons from isotopic 252Cf source at the Faculty of Nuclear Physics and Technics at University of Mining and Metallurgy (both neutron source and samples were placed in polyethylene block). Chemical pretreatment with BSH (Na210B12H11SH) was done to introduce boron-10 ion into cells in order to check any enhancement effect due to the process of boron neutron capture. Comet assay was done to investigate the DNA damage. Classical cytogenetics was applied to assess the frequencies of unstable aberrations (dicentrics and rings). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with probes for chromosomes 1, 4 (14.3% of whole genome) and pancentromeric probe was performed to evaluate the frequencies of stable aberrations. Linear (or close to linear) increase of DNA damage and aberration frequency was observed with dose of radiation both for lymphocytes untreated or pre-treated with BSH. Very little differences (statistically insignificant) due to radiation dose and BSH pretreatment were observed in the frequencies of SCEs detected in the second mitosis. There is no significant difference between boron pre-treated and not treated cells, and even slightly higher effects were observed in case of the highest dose without BSH pretreatment. The level of translocations observed is comparable with the frequencies of dicentrics and rings. (author)

  3. Internal nitride formation during gas-phase thermal nitridation of titanium

    OpenAIRE

    Ajikumar, PK; M. Kamruddin; Shankar, P; Gouda, Ramakrishna; Balamurugan, AK; Nithya, R.; Tyagi, AK; Jayaram, V; Biswas, SK; Raj, Baldev

    2009-01-01

    Titanium nitride surface layers were prepared by gas-phase thermal nitridation of pure titanium in an ammonia atmosphere at 1373 K for different times. In addition to the surface nitride layer, nitride/hydride formation was observed in the bulk of the specimen. The cross-section of the specimen was characterized by various techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and nanomechanical testing, ...

  4. PLASMA NITRIDING FOR IMPROVING WEAR RESISTANCE OF CABLE BOLT

    OpenAIRE

    SHAOQING NIU; SHUANGSUO YANG; YI LI

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of the cable bolt and increase its life-time during operation, plasma nitriding was employed to obtain a protective nitriding layer on its surface. The microstructure, phase constitution, microhardness and wear resistance of the nitriding layer were investigated. It was shown that continuous and dense nitriding layers were formed on the surface of the samples. The microhardness of the nitrided sample was enhanced by the formation of nitriding layer, whi...

  5. Silicon nitride-fabrication, forming and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article, which is a literature survey of the recent years, includes description of several methods for the formation of silicone nitride, and five methods of forming: Reaction-bonded silicon nitride, sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing and chemical vapour deposition. Herein are also included data about mechanical and physical properties of silicon nitride and the relationship between the forming method and the properties. (author)

  6. Property database of TRU nitride fuel

    OpenAIRE

    西 剛史; 荒井 康夫; 高野 公秀; 倉田 正輝

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to prepare a property database of nitride fuel needed for the fuel design of accelerator-driven system (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinide (MA). Nitride fuel of ADS is characterized by high content of Pu and MA as principal components, and addition of a diluent material such as ZrN. Experimental data or evaluated values from the raw data on properties Pu and MA nitrides, and nitride solid solutions containing ZrN are collected and summarized, which cover the...

  7. Plasmonic titanium nitride nanostructures for perfect absorbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Li, Wen-Wei; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Guan, Jianguo; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material.Renewable E......We propose a metamaterial based perfect absorber in the visible region, and investigate the performance of titanium nitride as an alternative plasmonic material. Numerical and experimental results reveal that titanium nitride performs better than gold as a plasmonic absorbing material...

  8. III-nitride blue microdisplays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype blue microdisplays have been fabricated from InGaN/GaN quantum wells. The device has a dimension of 0.5x0.5mm2 and consists of 10x10 pixels 12 μm in diameter. Emission properties such as electroluminescence spectra, output power versus forward current (L--I) characteristic, viewing angle, and uniformity have been measured. Due to the unique properties of III-nitride wide-band-gap semiconductors, microdisplays fabricated from III nitrides can potentially provide unsurpassed performance, including high-brightness/resolution/contrast, high-temperature/high-power operation, high shock resistance, wide viewing angles, full-color spectrum capability, long life, high speed, and low-power consumption, thus providing an enhancement and benefit to the present capabilities of miniature display systems

  9. Californium-252 neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major production programs for the Savannah River reactors and the High Flux Isotopes Reactor at Oak Ridge have made 252Cf one of the most available and, at the USAEC's sales price of $10/μg, one of the least-expensive isotopic neutron sources. Reactor production has totaled approximately 2 g, and, based on expected demand, an additional 10 g will be produced in the next decade. The approximately 800 mg chemically separated to date has been used to prepare over 600 neutron sources. Most, about 500, have been medical sources containing 1 to 5 μg of 252Cf plated in needles for experimental cancer therapy studies. The remainder have generally been point sources containing 10 μg to 12 mg of oxide for activation, well logging, or radiography uses. Bulk sources have also been supplied to the commercial encapsulators. The latest development has been the production of 252Cf cermet wire which can be cut into almost contamination-free lengths of the desired 252Cf content. Casks are available for transport of sources up to 50 mg. Subcritical assemblies have been developed to multiply the source neutrons by a factor of 10 to 40, and collimators and thermalizers have also been extensively developed to shape the neutron flux and energy distributions for special applications. (U.S.)

  10. Calculations of Nuclear Astrophysics and Californium Fission Neutron Spectrum Averaged Cross Section Uncertainties Using ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-fidelity Covariances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear astrophysics and californium fission neutron spectrum averaged cross sections and their uncertainties for ENDF materials have been calculated. Absolute values were deduced with Maxwellian and Mannhart spectra, while uncertainties are based on ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, JENDL-4.0 and Low-Fidelity covariances. These quantities are compared with available data, independent benchmarks, EXFOR library, and analyzed for a wide range of cases. Recommendations for neutron cross section covariances are given and implications are discussed

  11. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically......The nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding has been investigated using light microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Initially, the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x on a pure iron surface starts at grain boundaries meeting the surface, from where the nitride grains grow laterally into the iron...

  12. Microstructure analysis of the iron nitride thin films nitrided on the surface of machinery component materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On this study the ion nitriding process of the machinery component materials, which consist of the piston pen and the piston rings, have been conducted. Ion nitriding of the machinery component materials was performed for some variation of nitriding temperature, nitriding time and pressure of nitrogen gas using DC glow discharge. The optimum hardness of the piston pen samples was obtained at the nitriding temperature of 100°C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.6 mbar, and the hardness value increased approximately six times compared with the non nitrided samples; while the hardness value of the piston ring was increase approximately 2.6 time at the temperature nitriding of 100°C, the nitriding time of 3 hours and the nitrogen gas pressure of 1.2 mbar. To observe the micro-structure and elemental composition of iron nitride thin films formed on the surface of the samples was used SEM-EDAX, and the phase structure of iron nitride thin films was observed by using XRD. Based on the observations was known that a compound layer formed on the surface of samples containing different nitrogen and form the phase structure of γ-Fe4N, ε-Fe3N and ζ-Fe2N that have a very good mechanical properties. (author)

  13. Ion-beam nitriding of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, Joshua (Inventor); Hubbell, Theodore E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A surface of a steel substrate is nitrided without external heating by exposing it to a beam of nitrogen ions under low pressure, a pressure much lower than that employed for ion-nitriding. An ion source is used instead of a glow discharge. Both of these features reduce the introduction of impurities into the substrate surface.

  14. Synthesis of ternary nitrides by mechanochemical alloying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Zhu, J.J.; Lindelov, H.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2002-01-01

    nitrides by mechanochemical alloying of a binary transition metal nitride (MxN) with an elemental transition metal. In this way, we have been able to prepare Fe3Mo3N and Co3Mo3N by ball-milling of Mo2N with Fe and Co, respectively. The transformation sequence from the starting materials ( the binary...

  15. High hardness of alloyed ferrite after nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed layer-by layer structure and phase analyses of the diffusion layer of nitrided binary alloys of iron with aluminium, chromium, vanadium and titanium have been carried out by means of a complex technique. Transition d-metals (chromium, vanadium and titanium) raise to a greater degree the solubility of nitrogen in the α solid solution, sharply increases the hardness of ferrite and decrease the depth of the layer. Nitrided binary alloys of iron with chromium, vanadium and titanium are strengthened through precipitation from the nitrogen-saturated α-solid solution of nitrides of alloying elements TiN, VN and CrN of a structure B1. A maximum hardness of ferrite alloyed by chromium, vanadium and titanium is observed after nitriding at 550 deg C when the precipitated special nitrides are fully coherent with the α matrix

  16. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  17. III-nitride semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Zhe Chuan

    2006-01-01

    III-Nitride semiconductor materials - (Al, In, Ga)N - are excellent wide band gap semiconductors very suitable for modern electronic and optoelectronic applications. Remarkable breakthroughs have been achieved recently, and current knowledge and data published have to be modified and upgraded. This book presents the new developments and achievements in the field. Written by renowned experts, the review chapters in this book cover the most important topics and achievements in recent years, discuss progress made by different groups, and suggest future directions. Each chapter also describes the

  18. Electron spectroscopy of dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of electron spectroscopies in dilute nitride semiconductor research for both chemical analysis and the determination of electronic and lattice vibrational properties is described. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the nitrogen bonding configurations in dilute InNxSb1-x and InNxAs1-x alloys is presented. High resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS) of the plasmon excitations in InNxSb1-x is shown to provide information on the electronic properties of the material, before and after annealing. HREELS is also used to investigate the GaN-like phonon modes in GaNxAs1-x alloys

  19. Surface analysis in steel nitrides by using Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of iron nitride layer at low temperatures, 600-700 K, by Moessbauer spectroscopy is studied. These layers were obtained basically through two different processes: ion nitriding and ammonia gas nitriding. A preliminary study about post-discharge nitriding was made using discharge in hollow cathode as well as microwave excitation. The assembly of these chambers is also described. The analysis of the nitrided samples was done by CEMS and CXMS, aided by optical microscopy, and the CEMS and CXMS detectors were constructed by ourselves. We also made a brief study about these detectors, testing as acetone as the mixture 80% He+10% C H4 as detection gases for the use of CEMS. The surface analysis of the samples showed that in the ammonia gas process nitriding the nitrided layer starts by the superficial formation of an iron nitride rich nitrogen. By thermal evolution this nitride promotes the diffusion of nitrogen and the formation of other more stable nitrides. (author)

  20. Electrospun Gallium Nitride Nanofibers (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, Anamaris; Morales, Kristle; Ramos, Idalia; Campo, Eva; Santiago, Jorge J.

    2009-04-01

    The high thermal conductivity and wide bandgap of gallium nitride (GaN) are desirable characteristics in optoelectronics and sensing applications. In comparison to thin films and powders, in the nanofiber morphology the sensitivity of GaN is expected to increase as the exposed area (proportional to the length) increases. In this work we present electrospinning as a novel technique in the fabrication of GaN nanofibers. Electrospinning, invented in the 1930s, is a simple, inexpensive, and rapid technique to produce microscopically long ultrafine fibers. GaN nanofibers are produced using gallium nitrate and dimethyl-acetamide as precursors. After electrospinning, thermal decomposition under an inert atmosphere is used to pyrolyze the polymer. To complete the preparation, the nanofibers are sintered in a tube furnace under a NH3 flow. Both scanning electron microscopy and profilometry show that the process produces continuous and uniform fibers with diameters ranging from 20 to a few hundred nanometers, and lengths of up to a few centimeters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows the development of GaN nanofibers with hexagonal wurtzite structure. Future work includes additional characterization using transmission electron microscopy and XRD to understand the role of precursors and nitridation in nanofiber synthesis, and the use of single nanofibers for the construction of optical and gas sensing devices.

  1. Wear behaviour of plasma nitrided tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, M.U. [Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India). Research and Development Div.; Chakraborty, T.K. [Wire Rod Mill, Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India); Mohanty, O.N. [Research and Development Division, Tata Iron and Steel Co. Ltd., Jamshedpur (India)

    1999-09-01

    Plasma nitriding of three grades of tool steels, namely H13, D2 and a special purpose proprietary tool steel, referred to as L7', has been explored in an effort to enhance the working life of roll entry (RE) guides in wire rod rolling mill that are subjected to a complex wear mode including impact, sliding and rolling. In the case of H13 and D2 steels, plasma nitriding is found to improve the life of guide rolls by two to three times depending upon the type of tool steel. The working life of the guide rolls made from L7' steel, however, was observed to be lower after plasma nitriding due to softening of the substrate at plasma nitriding temperature. The cross-section normal to wear scar and the surface of worn-out rolls were characterised by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to understand the wear mechanisms. The SEM examination of worn-out surfaces revealed signatures for the adhesion, abrasion, delamination and tribochemical (oxidative) modes of wear. In the case of rolls without plasma nitriding, adhesion was one of the important causes of wear in all the tool steels. Delamination wear occurred in H13 steel and both delamination and microcutting modes of wear contributed to the overall damage in D2 steel rolls. L7' steel showed breaking of surface oxide film, indicating tribochemical wear. Plasma nitriding decreased the adhesive wear substantially. Delamination was found to be the primary mode of wear in nitrided H13 steel rolls. Abrasive wear contributed to damage in nitrided D2 steel rolls. Severe roll damage occurred in L7' steel, primarily by microcutting, due to softening during plasma nitriding. The working life of the rolls has been deliberated upon in the light of wear mechanisms observed in the different tool steels. (orig.)

  2. Friction Characteristics of Nitrided Layers on AISI 430 Ferritic Stainless Steel Obtained by Various Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan AYDIN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of plasma, gas and salt-bath nitriding techniques on the friction coefficient of AISI 430 ferritic stainless steel was studied in this paper. Samples were plasma nitrided in 80 % N2 + 20 % H2 atmosphere at 450 °C and 520 °C for 8 h at a pressure of 2 mbar, gas nitrided in NH3 and CO2 atmosphere at 570 °C for 13 h and salt-bath nitrided in a cyanide-cyanate salt-bath at 570 °C for 1.5 h. Characterisation of nitrided layers on the ferritic stainless steel was carried out by means of microstructure, microhardness, surface roughness and friction coefficient measurements. Friction characteristics of the nitrided layers on the 430 steel were investigated using a ball-on-disc friction-wear tester with a WC-Co ball as the counter-body under dry sliding conditions. Analysis of wear tracks was carried out by scanning electron microscopy. Maximum hardness and maximum case depth were achieved on the plasma nitrided sample at 520 ºC for 8 h. The plasma and salt-bath nitriding techniques significantly decreased the average surface roughness of the 430 ferritic stainless steel. The friction test results showed that the salt-bath nitrided layer had better friction-reducing ability than the other nitrided layers under dry sliding conditions. Furthermore, the friction characteristic of the plasma nitrided layer at 520 ºC was better than that of the plasma nitrided layer at 450 °C.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.1.3819

  3. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...... and thin-film glasses were used in the bonding experiments. Bond quality was evaluated using a tensile test on structured dies. The effect of oxygen-based pre-treatments of the nitride surface on the bond quality has been evaluated. Bond strengths up to 35 Nrmm2 and yields up to 100% were obtained....

  4. Atomic Resolution Microscopy of Nitrides in Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson

    2014-01-01

    MN and CrMN type nitride precipitates in 12%Cr steels have been investigated using atomic resolution microscopy. The MN type nitrides were observed to transform into CrMN both by composition and crystallography as Cr diffuses from the matrix into the MN precipitates. Thus a change from one precip...... layer between the crystalline nitride and ferrite matrix. Usually precipitates are described as having (semi) coherent or incoherent interfaces, but in this case it is more energetically favourable to create an amorphous layer instead of the incoherent interface....

  5. Californium interrogation prompt neutron (CIPN) instrument for non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel-Design concept and experimental demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzlova, D.; Menlove, H. O.; Rael, C. D.; Trellue, H. R.; Tobin, S. J.; Park, Se-Hwan; Oh, Jong-Myeong; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Kwon, In-Chan; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the first experimental demonstration of the Californium Interrogation Prompt Neutron (CIPN) instrument developed within a multi-year effort launched by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel Project of the United States Department of Energy. The goals of this project focused on developing viable non-destructive assay techniques with capabilities to improve an independent verification of spent fuel assembly characteristics. For this purpose, the CIPN instrument combines active and passive neutron interrogation, along with passive gamma-ray measurements, to provide three independent observables. This paper describes the initial feasibility demonstration of the CIPN instrument, which involved measurements of four pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies with different levels of burnup and two initial enrichments. The measurements were performed at the Post-Irradiation Examination Facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Institute in the Republic of Korea. The key aim of the demonstration was to evaluate CIPN instrument performance under realistic deployment conditions, with the focus on a detailed assessment of systematic uncertainties that are best evaluated experimentally. The measurements revealed good positioning reproducibility, as well as a high degree of insensitivity of the CIPN instrument's response to irregularities in a radial burnup profile. Systematic uncertainty of individual CIPN instrument signals due to assembly rotation was found to be orientation in the instrument.

  6. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Kumar; J Alphonsa; Ram Prakash; K S Boob; J Ghanshyam; P A Rayjada; P M Raole; S Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    In this paper an effort has been made to plasma nitride the ball bearing steel AISI 52100. The difficulty with this specific steel is that its tempering temperature (∼170–200°C) is much lower than the standard processing temperature (∼460–580°C) needed for the plasma nitriding treatment. To understand the mechanism, effect of heat treatment on the nitrided layer steel is investigated. Experiments are performed on three different types of ball bearing races i.e. annealed, quenched and quench-tempered samples. Different gas compositions and process temperatures are maintained while nitriding these samples. In the quenched and quench-tempered samples, the surface hardness has decreased after plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding of annealed sample with argon and nitrogen gas mixture gives higher hardness in comparison to the hydrogen–nitrogen gas mixture. It is reported that the later heat treatment of the plasma nitrided annealed sample has shown improvement in the hardness of this steel. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the dominant phases in the plasma nitrided annealed sample are (Fe2−3N) and (Fe4N), whereas in the plasma nitrided annealed sample with later heat treatment only -Fe peak occurs.

  7. Internal nitride formation during gas-phase thermal nitridation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium nitride surface layers were prepared by gas-phase thermal nitridation of pure titanium in an ammonia atmosphere at 1373 K for different times. In addition to the surface nitride layer, nitride/hydride formation was observed in the bulk of the specimen. The cross-section of the specimen was characterized by various techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectrometry and nanomechanical testing, and the mechanism of formation of these phases is discussed.

  8. Nitriding of Aluminum Extrusion Die: Effect of Die Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S. S.; Arif, A. F. M.; Yilbas, B. S.

    2010-04-01

    Nitriding of complex-shaped extrusion dies may result in non-uniform nitride layers and hence a required hardness may not be achieved in some regions of the bearing area. The present study is carried out to assess the effect of extrusion die profile on the characteristics and growth behavior of nitride layers so that the critical die design feature can be identified to enhance the uniformity of the nitride layer. For this purpose, AISI H13 steel samples have been manufactured with profiles similar to those of hot extrusion dies. The samples were then gas nitrided under controlled nitriding potential. The uniformity and depth of nitride layers have been investigated in terms of compound layer and total nitride case depth for selected die features. The results of this study indicated the need to include the effect of profile on the nitride layer for the optimal die design with improved service life.

  9. Method of nitriding refractory metal articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.; Omatete, Ogbemi O.; Young, Albert C.

    1994-01-01

    A method of nitriding a refractory-nitride forming metal or metalloid articles and composite articles. A consolidated metal or metalloid article or composite is placed inside a microwave oven and nitrogen containing gas is introduced into the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is heated to a temperature sufficient to react the metal or metalloid with the nitrogen by applying a microwave energy within the microwave oven. The metal or metalloid article or composite is maintained at that temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the article of metal or metalloid or composite to an article or composite of refractory nitride. In addition, a method of applying a coating, such as a coating of an oxide, a carbide, or a carbo-nitride, to an article of metal or metalloid by microwave heating.

  10. ALUMINUM NITRIDE AS A HIGH TEMPERATURE TRANSDUCER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature capabilities of bulk single crystal aluminum nitride are investigated experimentally. Temperatures in excess of 1100 deg. Celsius are obtained and held for eight hours. Variation in the performance of single crystal samples is demonstrated.

  11. Titanium nitride nanoparticles for therapeutic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2014-01-01

    Titanium nitride nanoparticles exhibit plasmonic resonances in the biological transparency window where high absorption efficiencies can be obtained with small dimensions. Both lithographic and colloidal samples are examined from the perspective of nanoparticle thermal therapy. © 2014 OSA....

  12. The Nitrogen-Nitride Anode.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2014-10-01

    Nitrogen gas N 2 can be reduced to nitride N -3 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt electrolyte. However, the direct oxidation of N -3 back to N 2 is kinetically slow and only occurs at high overvoltage. The overvoltage for N -3 oxidation can be eliminated by coordinating the N -3 with BN to form the dinitridoborate (BN 2 -3 ) anion which forms a 1-D conjugated linear inorganic polymer with -Li-N-B-N- repeating units. This polymer precipitates out of solution as Li 3 BN 2 which becomes a metallic conductor upon delithiation. Li 3 BN 2 is oxidized to Li + + N 2 + BN at about the N 2 /N -3 redox potential with very little overvoltage. In this report we evaluate the N 2 /N -3 redox couple as a battery anode for energy storage.

  13. Nitrogen-rich transition metal nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Salamat, Ashkan; Hector, Andrew L.; Kroll, Peter; McMillan, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    The solid state chemistry leading to the synthesis and characterization of metal nitrides with N:M ratios >1 is summarized. Studies of these compounds represent an emerging area of research. Most transition metal nitrides have much lower nitrogen contents, and they often form with non- or sub-stoichiometric compositions. These materials are typically metallic with often superconducting properties, and they provide highly refractory, high hardness materials with many technological applications...

  14. Progress in molecular uranium-nitride chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    King, David M.; Liddle, Stephen T

    2014-01-01

    The coordination, organometallic, and materials chemistry of uranium nitride has long been an important facet of actinide chemistry. Following matrix isolation experiments and computational characterisation, molecular, solution-based uranium chemistry has developed significantly in the last decade or so culminating most recently in the isolation of the first examples of long-sought terminal uranium nitride linkages. Herein, the field is reviewed with an emphasis on well-defined molecular spec...

  15. Surface modification of titanium by plasma nitriding

    OpenAIRE

    Myriam Pereira Kapczinski; Carlos Gil; Eder Julio Kinast; Carlos Alberto dos Santos

    2003-01-01

    A systematic investigation was undertaken on commercially pure titanium submitted to plasma nitriding. Thirteen different sets of operational parameters (nitriding time, sample temperature and plasma atmosphere) were used. Surface analyses were performed using X-ray diffraction, nuclear reaction and scanning electron microscopy. Wear tests were done with stainless steel Gracey scaler, sonic apparatus and pin-on-disc machine. The obtained results indicate that the tribological performance can ...

  16. Plasma nitriding of Al 99.5

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H. -Y; Stock, H.-R.; Mayr, P.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) is a very interesting ceramic because of its combination of properties such as high thermal stability, high hardness and an unusual combination of high thermal and low electrical conductivity. But it is very difficulty to obtain an AlN layer on the aluminium substrates by thermochemical nitriding process. Since a thin film of aluminium oxide existing on the surface of every aluminium substrate prevents the nitrogen atoms from diffusing into the aluminium lattice. Howev...

  17. Aluminum Nitride Sensors for Harsh Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Goericke, Fabian Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Harsh environment applications include high temperature, pressure and mechanical shock. Aluminum nitride is a strong ceramic material with very good high temperature survivability. It also has piezoelectric properties that can be used for sensing applications and it can be deposited with good control as thin polycrystalline film for the fabrication of micro-electromechanical systems. In this dissertation, optimized deposition parameters for aluminum nitride films and characterization techniqu...

  18. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Thelma Manning; Richard Field; Kenneth Klingaman; Michael Fair; John Bolognini; Robin Crownover; Carlton P. Adam; Viral Panchal; Eugene Rozumov; Henry Grau; Paul Matter; Michael Beachy; Christopher Holt; Samuel Sopok

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower ...

  19. Nucleation of iron nitrides during gaseous nitriding of iron; the effect of a preoxidation treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friehling, Peter B.; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2001-01-01

    grains. On prolonged nitriding, immediate nucleation at the surface of iron grains becomes possible. Calculated incubation times for the nucleation of gamma'-Fe4N1-x during nitriding are generally longer than those observed experimentally in the present work. The incubation time is reduced dramatically...

  20. Microstructural characterization of an AISI-SAE 4140 steel without nitridation and nitrided

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was micro structurally characterized an AISI-SAE 4140 steel before and after of nitridation through the nitridation process by plasma post-unloading microwaves through Optical microscopy (OM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) by means of secondary electrons and retrodispersed, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Energy dispersion spectra (EDS) and mapping of elements. (Author)

  1. Synthesis of Vanadium Nitride by a One Step Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sansan YU; Nianxin FU; Feng GAO; Zhitong SUI

    2007-01-01

    Vanadium nitrides were prepared via one step method of carbothermal reduction and nitridation of vanadium trioxide. Thermalgravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction were used to determine the reaction paths of vanadium carbide, namely the following sequential reaction: V2O3→V8C7 in higher temperature stage, the rule of vanadium nitride synthesized was established, and defined conditions of temperature for the production of the carbides and nitrides were determined. Vanadium oxycarbide may consist in the front process of carbothermal reduction of vanadium trioxide. In one step method for vanadium nitride by carbothermal reduction and nitridation of vanadium trioxide, the nitridation process is simultaneous with the carbothermal reduction. A one-step mechanism of the carbothermal reduction with simultaneous nitridation leaded to a lower terminal temperature in nitridation process for vanadium nitride produced, compared with that of carbothermal reduction process without nitridation. The grain size and shape of vanadium nitride were uniform, and had the shape of a cube. The one step method combined vacuum carborization and nitridation (namely two step method) into one process. It simplified the technological process and decreased the costs.

  2. Growth of epitaxial iron nitride ultrathin film on zinc-blende gallium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the growth of iron nitride on zinc-blende gallium nitride using molecular beam epitaxy. First, zinc-blende GaN is grown on a magnesium oxide substrate having (001) orientation; second, an ultrathin layer of FeN is grown on top of the GaN layer. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction is used to monitor the surface during growth, and a well-defined epitaxial relationship is observed. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy is used to reveal the epitaxial continuity at the gallium nitride-iron nitride interface. Surface morphology of the iron nitride, similar to yet different from that of the GaN substrate, can be described as plateau valley. The FeN chemical stoichiometry is probed using both bulk and surface sensitive methods, and the magnetic properties of the sample are revealed.

  3. Interaction between hydrogen and a nitrided layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ćwiek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is to reveal the influence of nitrided layer on 34CrAlNi7-10 steel to its susceptibility to hydrogen degradation. Investigation was carried out with the use of slow strain tensile rate test (SSRT.Design/methodology/approach: Nitriding was done in the nitrogen-hydrogen (or argon gas atmospheres with various hydrogen content, i. e. 0%, 30%, and 70%, at the glow discharge at temperature 560°C for 6 hrs. In order to estimate the degree of hydrogen degradation SSRT test was conducted on round smooth specimens 4 mm in diameter. Tests were performed at ambient temperature either in dry air or in 0.005 M H2SO4 solution. The applied strain rate was 10-6 s-1. Tests in acid solution were conducted under cathodic polarization with constant current densities: 0.1; 1; 5 and 10 mA/cm2. Fracture surfaces after SSRT test were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM to reveal a mode and mechanism of cracking.Findings: Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers to hydrogen entry into structural steel which decreases susceptibility of steel to hydrogen degradation. Hydrogen is mainly accumulated in a compact nitrides zone. Evidences of no increase in brittleness of nitrided layers with absorbed hydrogen were observed.Research limitations/implications: There is no possibility to perform direct observations of exact mechanism of hydrogen-assisted cracking so far. Further research should be taken to reveal the exact mechanism of increased plasticity of nitrided layer with absorbed hydrogen.Practical implications: Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers to hydrogen entry into structural steel utilized in aggressive environments, which could be potential sources of hydrogen charging of exploited steels.Originality/value: Plasma assisted nitriding provides the formation of thin compact nitride zone which protects high-strength steels against corrosion and hydrogen degradation. Evidences of no increase in brittleness of nitrided

  4. Biological Efficiency of Californium-252 Source Evaluated by Comet Assay, Classical Cytogenetics and FISH in Human Lymphocytes Irradiated without and with BSH Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological effectiveness of californium-252 source was evaluated after irradiations in vitro of normal or pre-treated with compound enriched in B-10 ion cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were used as a model for human cells. DNA and chromosomal damage were studied to compare biological effectiveness of irradiation. Human blood samples or isolated lymphocytes were irradiated with the isotopic source of 252Cf, at the Faculty of Physics and Nuclear Techniques at the University of Mining and Metallurgy (both neutron source and samples were placed in ''infinite'' polyethylene block). Chemical pretreatment with Na210B12H11SH (BSH) was performed to introduce boron-10 ion into cells in order to check any enhancement effect due to the process of boron neutron capture. Single cell gel electrophoresis also known as the Comet assay was done to investigate the DNA damage. Classical cytogenetic analysis was applied to assess the frequencies of unstable aberrations (dicentrics, rings and a centric fragments). To evaluate the frequencies of stable aberrations the fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with probes for chromosomes 1, 4 (14.3% of the whole genome) was performed. Linear (or close to linear) increase with radiation dose were observed for the DNA damage and aberration frequencies in lymphocytes both untreated or pre-treated with BSH. Levels of translocations evaluated for the whole genome were comparable with the frequencies of dicentrics and rings. No significant differences were detected due to radiation dose in the frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) detected in the second mitosis. No statistically significant differences were observed in various biological end-points between normal or boron pre-treated cells. (author)

  5. New amorphous interface for precipitate nitrides in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2014-01-01

    According to classical theories precipitate interfaces are described by their degree of coherency with the matrix, which affects their strengthening contribution. Investigations of nitride precipitate interfaces in 12% Cr steels with transmission electron microscopy have shown the nitrides to be...

  6. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing; Current Status and Future Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.

    This contribution addresses the current understanding of gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Aspects of thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure development in iron and heat treatable steel will be explained. In these materials the nitrided/ nitrocarburized case can be subdivided in a...... compound layer consisting of iron (carbo-)nitrides and a diffusion zone, consisting of a dispersion of alloying element nitrides in ferrite. The compound layer provides beneficial tribological and corrosion performance, while the diffusion zone is responsible for improved fatigue performance. Furthermore...

  7. Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing; Current Status and Future Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution addresses the current understanding of gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburizing. Aspects of thermodynamics, kinetics and microstructure development in iron and heat treatable steel will be explained. In these materials the nitrided/ nitrocarburized case can be subdivided in a compound layer consisting of iron (carbo-)nitrides and a diffusion zone, consisting of a dispersion of alloying element nitrides in ferrite. The compound layer provides beneficial tribological and corrosi...

  8. Advancing liquid metal reactor technology with nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the use of nitride fuels in liquid metal fast reactors is presented. Past studies indicate that both uranium nitride and uranium/plutonium nitride possess characteristics that may offer enhanced performance, particularly in the area of passive safety. To further quantify these effects, the analysis of a mixed-nitride fuel system utilizing the geometry and power level of the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor as a reference is described. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  10. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate CN/CFe near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  11. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  12. Transition Metal Nitrides: A First Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    The present work describes the structural stability and electronic and mechanical properties of transition metal nitrides (TmNs: B1 cubic structure (cF8, Fm ‾ overline 3 m)) using first principles density functional theory (DFT) within generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The lattice constant of TmNs increases with increasing the atomic radii of the transition metals. Stability of the TmNs decreases from IVB to VIB groups due to increase in formation energy/atom. The bonding characteristics of these nitrides have been explained based on electronic density of states and charge density. All the TmNs satisfy Born stability criteria in terms of elastic constants except CrN and MoN that do not exist in equilibrium binary phase diagrams. The groups IVB and V-VIB nitrides are associated with brittle and ductile behaviour based on G/B ratios, respectively. The estimated melting temperatures of these nitrides exhibit reasonably good agreement with calculated with B than those of the C11 for all nitrides.

  13. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  14. Ceramics based on titanium nitride and silicon nitride sintered by SPS-method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Gerasimov, D. Yu; Evdokimov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    The dependences of the microstructure and physical and mechanical properties of ceramic mixtures Si3N4/TiN in the full range of mass ratios of the components. Was also investigated directly, and the process of sintering occurring during a physical or chemical processes, in particular, has been obtained and the hardness of the material density on the ratio of the conductive titanium nitride phase and a silicon nitride insulating phase with values above and below the percolation threshold. Also obtained was pure ceramics based on titanium nitride with high physical-mechanical characteristics (H = 21.5 GPa).

  15. Microstructural characterization of nitrided Timetal 834.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalewicz, T; Grogger, W; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A

    2006-09-01

    The microstructure of Timetal 834, in as-received condition and after nitriding under glow discharge has been examined by light microscopy and analytical transmission electorn microscopy (TEM) methods (SAED, EDS, EELS and EFTEM). The microstructure of the as-received alloy consists of the alpha phase and a small amount of the beta phase. Silicide precipitates (Zr5Si4) are present both inside the grains and at the grain boundaries. TEM investigations of cross-sectional thin foils allow for detailed analysis of the nitrided layer microstructure. It was found that the nitrided layer exhibits a graded character with continuously varying nitrogen content. The outermost sublayer consists of nanocrystals of delta-TiN. The following sublayers consist mainly of delta'-Ti2N and epsilon-Ti2N grains. The last sublayer, closest to the substrate, is identified as a nitrogen-rich alpha(N) solid solution containing up to 14 at% of nitrogen. PMID:17059528

  16. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... 10th Congress of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials....... for, the nitriding result is determined largely by kinetics. Nitriding kinetics are shown to be characterised by local near equilibria and stationary states at surfaces and interfaces, and the diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in the various phases, for which new data are presented. The necessary...

  17. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon-hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 (micro)m) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90-95% nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form

  18. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  19. Precipitate-Accommodated Plasma Nitriding for Aluminum Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patama Visittipitukul; Tatsuhiko Aizawa; Hideyuki Kuwahara

    2004-01-01

    Reliable surface treatment has been explored to improve the strength and wear resistance of aluminum alloy parts in automotives. Long duration time as well as long pre-sputtering time are required for plasma nitriding of aluminum or its alloys only with the thickness of a few micrometers. New plasma inner nitriding is proposed to realize the fast-rate nitriding of aluminum alloys. Al-6Cu alloy is employed as a targeting material in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this plasma nitriding. Mechanism of fast-rate nitriding process is discussed with consideration of the role of Al2Cu precipitates.

  20. The Moessbauer investigation in iron nitride/expanded graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We successfully prepared the composites possessed high magnetic properties and shielding effectiveness (SE) in RF band with the methods of loading iron nitride nanoparticles on expanded graphite (EG) by the gaseous reduction and nitridation. XRD measurement shows that the ferric phases changed in different nitridation temperature. The phase components of nanoparticles were analyzed in detail by the measurement of 57Fe Moessbauer spectra. The result shows that as the temperature increased, the Fe particles were gradually nitride until completely before 400℃ and the γ'-Fe4N was gradually converted to ε-FexN (2nitride after 400℃. (authors)

  1. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  2. Local heating with titanium nitride nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible.......We investigate the feasibility of titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles as local heat sources in the near infrared region, focusing on biological window. Experiments and simulations provide promising results for TiN, which is known to be bio-compatible....

  3. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1999-01-01

    As a prerequisite for predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron-based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present (even) the description of thermodynamic equilibrium of...... pure iron-nitrogen phases has not been achieved fully. It has been shown that taking into account ordering of nitrogen in the epsilon and gamma' iron-nitride phases, leads to an improved understanding of the Fe-N phase diagram. Although thermodynamics indicate the state the system strives for, the...

  4. Four Terminal Gallium Nitride MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veety, Matthew Thomas

    All reported gallium nitride (GaN) transistors to date have been three-terminal devices with source, drain, and gate electrodes. In the case of GaN MOSFETs, this leaves the bulk of the device at a floating potential which can impact device threshold voltage. In more traditional silicon-based MOSFET fabrication a bulk contact can be made on the back side of the silicon wafer. For GaN grown on sapphire substrates, however, this is not possible and an alternate, front-side bulk contact must be investigated. GaN is a III-V, wide band gap semiconductor that as promising material parameters for use in high frequency and high power applications. Possible applications are in the 1 to 10 GHz frequency band and power inverters for next generation grid solid state transformers and inverters. GaN has seen significant academic and commercial research for use in Heterojunction Field Effect Transistors (HFETs). These devices however are depletion-mode, meaning the device is considered "on" at zero gate bias. A MOSFET structure allows for enhancement mode operation, which is normally off. This mode is preferrable in high power applications as the device has lower off-state power consumption and is easier to implement in circuits. Proper surface passivation of seminconductor surface interface states is an important processing step for any device. Preliminary research on surface treatments using GaN wet etches and depletion-mode GaN devices utilizing this process are discussed. Devices pretreated with potassium pursulfate prior to gate dielectric deposition show significant device improvements. This process can be applied to any current GaN FET. Enhancement-mode GaN MOSFETs were fabricated on magnesium doped p-type Wurtzite gallium nitride grown by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) on c-plane sapphire substrates. Devices utilized ion implant source and drain which was activated under NH3 overpressure in MOCVD. Also, devices were fabricated with a SiO2 gate dielectric

  5. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal B. Dhungana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available With the end of Moore’s law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT, which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  6. Silicon nitride for photovoltaic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lipiński

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is to present the research results of silicon nitride SiNx films used for industrial silicon solar cells and for third generation solar cells.Design/methodology/approach: The SiNx films were deposited using RF- and LF-PECVD methods. The optical and structural properties were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry, XPS, FTIR spectroscopy and X-Ray reflectometry. The passivation properties were investigated by carriers lifetime measurements using a photoconductance decay (PCD technique. For the photovoltaics of third generation the multilayer structures of SiNx were deposited and annealed in order to obtain the silicon quantum superlattices. These structure were characterized by high-resolution TEM, GI-XRD, photoluminescence, Raman and SPV spectroscopy.Findings: It is shown that the layers deposited by LF PECVD have more profitable optical and electrical properties for industrial silicon solar cells than those deposited by RF PECVD. The other finding is that multi-layer structure of SiNx annealed at high temperature shows the properties of the new semiconductor with the gap energy broader then the gap of the silicon.Research limitations/implications: The maximal density of SiNx layers is equal to 2.6 g/cm3. It is too low to obtain high efficiency mc-Si cells. The deposition process should be further optimized. The other limitation is obtaining a regular structure of quantum superlattice composed of quantum dots with defined diameter and density which is a very difficult technological task. This work should be continued in the future.Practical implications: The results of SiNx investigation can be used to increase the efficiency of mc-Si solar cells. The results of multilayer SiNx investigations may be applied to a solar cells based on silicon QDs superlatice.

  7. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ε-Fe3N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ε-Fe3N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ε-Fe3N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system

  8. Study of the nitrides formation in the ionic nitriding process of zircaloy-2 zirconium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zircaloy and Zr-Sn alloys are used in nuclear techniques because they show a very low effective absorption section for neutrons and a high corrosion resistance. This paper shows that by ionic nitriding of Zircaloy type alloys, a structure is obtained that enhances the wear resistance. From the study of the N2/H2 ratio on the nitride quantity formed by ion nitriding of Zircaloy-2 alloy, it can be concluded that the gaseous mixtures with high nitrogen and hydrogen content used in discharge are not favourable in the nitride forming process. The optimum ratio is 1/1. The ZrN superficial layer hardness was checked according to the exposure time and to the layer thickness. (J.S.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Optimization of processing temperature in the nitridation process for the synthesis of iron nitride nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohith Vinod, K.; Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S., E-mail: balasuga@yahoo.com [National Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Madras, Chennai-600025 (India); Saravanan, P. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad-500058 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have demonstrated an effective strategy on the nitridation process to synthesize ε-Fe{sub 3}N nanoparticles (NPs) from the zero valent iron NPs as a starting material. The transformation of iron into iron nitride phase was systematically studied by performing the nitridation process at different processing temperatures. The phase, crystal structure was analyzed by XRD. Morphology and size of the ZVINPs and ε-Fe{sub 3}N NPs were analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Further, their room temperature magnetic properties were studied by using vibrating sample magnetometer and it revealed that the magnetic property of ε-Fe{sub 3}N is associated with ratio of Fe-N in the iron nitride system.

  10. Characterization and properties of highly adhesive titanium nitride and tungsten nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents results on the physical characteristics and mechanical properties of titanium nitride (TiN) and tungsten nitride (W2N) thin films grown by reactive DC magnetron sputtering. The films were deposited in a system with several magnetron modules of different sputtering materials suitable for deposition of single-layer metal nitride films and multilayer nitride coatings. The deposition conditions were optimized to obtain films with the highest adhesion to substrates of machine steel and sintered hard alloy. The adhesion of the films was measured in dependence on two principal process parameters: the nitrogen partial pressure in the magnetron discharge gas mixture of nitrogen and argon and the substrate temperature. The composition of the TiN films was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy. The microstructure and the crystallization trend of the films were studied by transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The hardness of the films was examined using standard measuring methods

  11. Styrene Aziridination by Iron(IV) Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Salvador B; Lee, Wei-Tsung; Dickie, Diane A; Scepaniak, Jeremiah J; Subedi, Deepak; Pink, Maren; Johnson, Michael D; Smith, Jeremy M

    2015-09-01

    Thermolysis of the iron(IV) nitride complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe≡N] with styrene leads to formation of the high-spin iron(II) aziridino complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)]. Similar aziridination occurs with both electron-rich and electron-poor styrenes, while bulky styrenes hinder the reaction. The aziridino complex [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)] acts as a nitride synthon, reacting with electron-poor styrenes to generate their corresponding aziridino complexes, that is, aziridine cross-metathesis. Reaction of [PhB(tBuIm)3Fe-N(CH2CHPh)] with Me3SiCl releases the N-functionalized aziridine Me3SiN(CH2CHPh) while simultaneously generating [PhB(tBuIm)3FeCl]. This closes a synthetic cycle for styrene azirdination by a nitride complex. While the less hindered iron(IV) nitride complex [PhB(MesIm)3Fe≡N] reacts with styrenes below room temperature, only bulky styrenes lead to tractable aziridino products. PMID:26179563

  12. Boron nitride nanosheets reinforced glass matrix composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saggar, Richa; Porwal, H.; Tatarko, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, SEP (2015), S26-S32. ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK155 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Boron nitride nanosheets * Borosilicate glass * Mechanical properties Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.163, year: 2014

  13. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  14. Gallium Nitride Crystals: Novel Supercapacitor Electrode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouzhi; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Changlong; Shao, Yongliang; Wu, Yongzhong; Lv, Jiaxin; Hao, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    A type of single-crystal gallium nitride mesoporous membrane is fabricated and its supercapacitor properties are demonstrated for the first time. The supercapacitors exhibit high-rate capability, stable cycling life at high rates, and ultrahigh power density. This study may expand the range of crystals as high-performance electrode materials in the field of energy storage. PMID:27007502

  15. Residual Stress Induced by Nitriding and Nitrocarburizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present chapter is devoted to the various mechanisms involved in the buildup and relief of residual stress in nitrided and nitrocarburized cases. The work presented is an overview of model studies on iron and iron-based alloys. Subdivision is made between the compound (or white) layer...

  16. Ammonothermal Growth of Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimputkar, Siddha

    Bulk, single crystal Gallium Nitride (GaN) crystals are essential for enabling high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices by providing arbitrarily oriented, high quality, large, single crystal GaN substrates. Methods of producing single crystals of sufficient size and quality at a rate that would enable successful commercialization has been a major focus for research groups and companies worldwide. Recent advances have demonstrated remarkable improvements, though high cost and lack of high volume production remain key challenges. Major investments in bulk GaN growth were made at UCSB with particular focus on the ammonothermal method. The existing lab was upgraded and a new facility was designed and built with improved experimental setups for ammonothermal growth of GaN. The facilities can simultaneously operate up to 15 reactors of differing designs and capabilities with the ability to grow crystals up to 2 inches in diameter. A novel in-situ technique was devised to investigate the growth chemistry which occurs at typical operating conditions of 3,000 atm and 600 °C. Improvements in ammonothermal GaN include improved growth rates for c-plane by a factor of four to 344 μm/day with an overall record growth rate of 544 μm/day achieved for the (112¯2) plane. Crystal qualities comparable to that of the seed crystal were achieved. Impurity concentrations for transition metals were consistently reduced by a factor of 100 to concentrations below 1017 atoms/cm3. Optical transparency was improved by significantly reducing the yellow coloration typically seen for ammonothermal GaN. Single crystal GaN was successfully grown on large seeds and a 1 inch x ½ inch x ½ inch GaN crystal was demonstrated. To better understand the growth chemistry, models were created for the decomposition of ammonia under growth conditions, with initial experiments performed using the designed in-situ setup to verify the model's accuracy. To investigate the surface morphology and

  17. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  18. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...... by replacement of the nitride ions with oxide ions in the molten carbonate electrolyte....

  19. Nitriding of Co–Cr–Mo alloy in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ning, E-mail: ningtang@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Li, Yunping, E-mail: lyping@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Koizumi, Yuichiro; Chiba, Akihiko, E-mail: a.chiba@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2014-06-01

    Using the results of a thermodynamic analysis, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy was successfully nitrided in nitrogen at temperatures of 1073–1473 K. The near-surface microstructure of the treated Co–Cr–Mo alloy was characterized using X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analyzer, and transmission electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicated that the highest nitriding efficiency was achieved at the treatment temperature of 1273 K, with the size and coverage of the nitride particles on sample's surface increasing with an increase in the treatment duration. After nitriding at 1273 K for 2 h, numerous nitride particles, consisting of an outer Cr{sub 2}N layer and an inner π phase layer, were formed on top of the nitrogen-containing γ phase, and some π phase also precipitated in the alloy matrix at the sub-surface level. - Highlights: • A Co–Cr–Mo alloy was successfully nitrided in nitrogen at 1073–1473 K. • The highest nitriding efficiency of the Co–Cr–Mo alloy was achieved at 1273 K. • Numerous nitride particles formed on sample's surface during nitriding at 1273 K. • The nitride particles consist of an outer Cr{sub 2}N layer and an inner π phase layer.

  20. Characteristics of the nitrided layer formed on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by high temperature nitriding assisted hollow cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • AISI 304 austenite steel was nitrided at high temperatures in short time. • It could critically reduce time compared with low temperature nitriding. • The nitrided layer was mainly composed of nitrogen expanded austenite. • It could improve pitting corrosion resistance in NaCl solution. - Abstract: A series of experiments have been conducted on AISI 304 stainless steel using a hollow cathode discharge assisted plasma nitriding apparatus. Specimens were nitrided at high temperatures (520–560 °C) in order to produce nitrogen expanded austenite phase within a short time. The nitrided specimen was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization and microhardness tester. The corrosion properties of nitrided samples were evaluated using anodic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. The nitrided layer was shown to consist of nitrogen expanded austenite and possibly a small amount of CrN precipitates and iron nitrides. The results indicated that rapid nitriding assisted hollow cathode discharge not only increased the surface hardness but also improved the corrosion resistance of the untreated substrate

  1. Low-temperature nitridation of Fe nanoparticles precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H; Lu, B; Lei, J P; Dong, X L

    2009-12-01

    Nitridation of Fe nanoparticle precursor was performed in a NH3 atmosphere at the temperatures of 473 K and 673 K for one hour. Fe nanoparticles precursor had a typical spherical shape with iron oxides shell and alpha-Fe core, which was obtained by an arc-discharge method. Up to date, the nitriding temperature of 473 K in present work was the lowest by thermal ammonolysis method because of the characteristics of the nano-sized particles. The resultant product after nitridation was a mixture of iron-nitrides (gamma'-Fe4N and epsilon-Fe3N) nanoparticles with homogeneous dispersion. The nitriding mechanism, oxidizing behaviors and magnetic properties of iron-nitride nanoparticles were measured and discussed. PMID:19908793

  2. An assessment of the thermodynamic properties of uranium nitride, plutonium nitride and uranium-plutonium mixed nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic properties such as vapour pressures, heat capacities and enthalpies of formation for UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s) are critically evaluated. The equations of the vapour pressures and the heat capacities for the three nitrides are assessed. Thermal functions, and thermodynamic functions for the formation of UN(s), PuN(s) and (U, Pu)N(s), are calculated

  3. Fabrication and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride powder by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) powder was fabricated prepared by the spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The effects of nitrided temperature on the phases, morphology and particle size distribution of hBN powder, were investigated. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectrum, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum and photoluminescence (PL) spectrum. UV-vis spectrum revealed that the product had one obvious band gap (4.7 eV) and PL spectrum showed that it had a visible emission at 457 nm (λex=230 nm). FESEM image indicated that the particle size of the synthesized hBN was mainly in the range of 0.5-1.5 μm in diameter, and 50-150 nm in thickness. The high-energy ball-milling process following 900 deg. C calcining process was very helpful to obtain fully crystallized hBN at lower temperature. - Graphical abstract: hBN powder was fabricated prepared by spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology. The results indicated that spray drying and calcining-nitriding technology assisted with high-energy ball-milling process following calcined process was a hopeful way to manufacture hBN powder with high crystallinity in industrial scale

  4. Preparation and study of the nitrides and mixed carbide-nitrides of uranium and of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed description is given of a simple method for preparing uranium and plutonium nitrides by the direct action of nitrogen under pressure at moderate temperatures (about 400 C) on the partially hydrogenated bulk metal. It is shown that there is complete miscibility between the UN and PuN phases. The variations in the reticular parameters of the samples as a function of temperature and in the presence of oxide have been used to detect and evaluate the solubility of oxygen in the different phases. A study has been made of the sintering of these nitrides as a function of the preparation conditions with or without sintering additives. A favorable but non-reproducible, effect has been found for traces of oxide. The best results were obtained for pure UN at 1600 C (96 per cent theoretical density) on condition that a well defined powder, was used. The criterion used is the integral width of the X-ray diffraction lines. The compounds UN and PuN are completely miscible with the corresponding carbides. This makes it possible to prepare carbide-nitrides of the general formula (U,Pu) (C,N) by solid-phase diffusion, at around 1400 C. The sintering of these carbide-nitrides is similar to that of the carbides if the nitrogen content is low; in particular, nickel is an efficient sintering agent. For high contents, the sintering is similar to that of pure nitrides. (author)

  5. Nitride semiconductors studied by atom probe tomography and correlative techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Optoelectronic devices fabricated from nitride semiconductors include blue and green light emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs). To design efficient devices, the structure and composition of the constituent materials must be well-characterised. Traditional microscopy techniques used to examine nitride semiconductors include transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). This thesis describes the study of nitride semiconductor materials using these tradi...

  6. Intragranular Chromium Nitride Precipitates in Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Torunn Hjulstad

    2012-01-01

    Intragranular chromium nitrides is a phenomenon with detrimental effects on material properties in superduplex stainless steels which have not received much attention. Precipitation of nitrides occurs when the ferritic phase becomes supersaturated with nitrogen and there is insufficient time during cooling for diffusion of nitrogen into austenite. Heat treatment was carried out at between 1060◦C and 1160◦C to study the materials susceptibility to nitride precipitation with...

  7. Research and development of nitride fuel cycle for TRU burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susuki, Y.; Ogawa, T.; Osugi, T.; Arai, Y.; Mukaiyama, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    The present status of the research and development of nitride fuel cycle for burning transuranium elements in actinide burner reactors and fast reactors at JAERI is described, especially focusing on the progress in the recent two years. The research and development cover fuel fabrication technology, property measurements such as thermal conductivity, basic irradiation tests at Japan Materials Testing Reactors(JMTR), electrorefining of actinide nitrides in fused salts, and the evaluation of mass balance in the reprocessing process of nitride fuel. (authors)

  8. Application Of Active Screen Method For Ion Nitriding Efficiency Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ogórek M.; Frączek T.; Skuza Z.

    2015-01-01

    Paper presents the research of austenitic steel AISI 304 after ion nitriding at 400°C and at t =4h, for the two different variants of samples distribution in the working plasma reactive chamber tube. In order to assess the effectiveness of ion nitriding variants emission spectroscopy – GDOES, surface hardness tests, microstructure research (LM) of nitrided layers were made. It has been found that the use of active screens increases the surface layer thickness and depth of nitrogen diffusion i...

  9. Plasma nitriding of AISI 304L and AISI 316L stainless steels: effect of time in the formation of S phase and the chromium nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma nitriding can improve hardness and wear resistance of austenitic stainless steels without losses in corrosion resistance. This fact relies on a nitrided layer constituted only by S phase, without chromium nitrides precipitation. In this work, the effect of nitriding time on phases formed on nitrided layer was investigated in two austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304L e AISI 316L. The samples were nitrided at 420 deg C, using a mixture of 60 % N2 and 40% H2, during 5, 7 and 9 hours. It was noted that chromium nitrides were formed on samples of AISI 304L, nitrided for 7 e 9 hours, while all nitrided samples of AISI 316L showed only formation of S phase. The nitrided layers were characterized using optical microscope and x-ray diffraction. (author)

  10. Investigation into some tribological properties of plasma nitrided hot-worked tool steel AISI H11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S.; Sahin, A.Z.; Said, S.A.M.; Nickel, J.; Coban, A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-04-01

    Interest in the tribological properties of plasma nitriding has increased substantially over the past years because plasma nitriding provides a high nitride depth and improved hard facing. The present study examines the tribological properties of AISI H11 plasma nitrided, hot-worked steel. Different nitriding temperatures and durations were considered. Characterization of the composite structures was investigated with wear tests, x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microhardness tests. The depth profile of the nitrided zone was measured using the nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) technique. Plasma nitriding affected the microhardness, wear properties, and morphology considerably. Increase in process temperature increased the nitride zone depth.

  11. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields. (author)

  12. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, J. A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P.

    2002-04-01

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields.

  13. Heterostructure field effect transistors based on nitride interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majewski, J.A.; Zandler, G.; Vogl, P. [Physics Department and Walter Schottky Institute, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2002-05-03

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they possess large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principles calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric fields. (author)

  14. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  15. Review of actinide nitride properties with focus on safety aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiol, Thierry [CEA Cadarache, St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arai, Yasuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    This report provides a review of the potential advantages of using actinide nitrides as fuels and/or targets for nuclear waste transmutation. Then a summary of available properties of actinide nitrides is given. Results from irradiation experiments are reviewed and safety relevant aspects of nitride fuels are discussed, including design basis accidents (transients) and severe (core disruptive) accidents. Anyway, as rather few safety studies are currently available and as many basic physical data are still missing for some actinide nitrides, complementary studies are proposed. (author)

  16. Quantum chemistry and atomistic simulations of solid nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Eck, Bernhard

    2000-01-01

    The present thesis covers, at first, the binary nitrides of the the 3d transition metals. Based on their electronic band structures and bonding analyses for the sodium chloride as well as the zinc blend structure type it is then determined why the early nitrides crystallize in the NaCl structure while Fe- and Co-nitride adopt the ZnS structure. Thereafter all stoichiometrically well-defined iron nitrides are theoretically investigated, in particular with respect to the influence of the nitrog...

  17. Development of pseudocapacitive molybdenum oxide–nitride for electrochemical capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thin film Mo oxide–nitride pseudocapacitive electrode was synthesized by electrodeposition of Mo oxide on Ti and a subsequent low-temperature (400 °C) thermal nitridation. Two nitridation environments, N2 and NH3, were used and the results were compared. Surface analyses of these nitrided films showed partial conversion of Mo oxide to nitrides, with a lower conversion percentage being the film produced in N2. However, the electrochemical analyses showed that the surface of the N2-treated film had better pseudocapacitive behaviors and outperformed that nitrided in NH3. Cycle life of the resultant N2-treated Mo oxide–nitride was also much improved over Mo oxide. A two-electrode cell using Mo oxide–nitride electrodes was demonstrated and showed high rate performance. - Highlights: • Mo(O,N)x was developed by electrodeposition and nitridation in N2 or NH3. • N2 treated Mo(O,N)x showed a capacitive performance superior to that treated by NH3. • The promising electrochemical performance was due to the formation of γ-Mo2N

  18. EXAFS investigation of low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2008-01-01

    Low temperature nitrided stainless steel AISI 316 flakes were investigated with EXAFS and X-ray diffraction analysis. The stainless steel flakes were transformed into a mixture of nitrogen expanded austenite and nitride phases. Two treatments were carried out yielding different overall nitrogen...... contents: (1) nitriding in pure NH3 and (2)nitriding in pure NH3 followed by reduction in H2. The majority of the Cr atoms in the stainless steel after treatment 1 and 2 was associated with a nitrogen–chromium bond distance comparable to that of the chemical compound CrN. The possibility of the occurrence...

  19. Investigation of surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Koyuncu, E.; F. Kahraman; Ö. Karadeniz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of paper is to investigate surface properties of high temperature nitrided titanium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: In this study, surface modification of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was made at various temperatures by plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding treatment was performed in 80% N2-20% H2 gas mixture, for treatment times of 2-15 h at the temperatures of 700-1000°C. Surface properties of plasma nitrided Ti6Al4V alloy were examined by metallographic inspection, ...

  20. Hydrogen permeability of nitrided stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface of a 316 stainless steel (316SS) specimen was nitrided by an electrochemical treatment in molten fluoride salt. Its hydrogen permeability was evaluated and compared with that of bare 316SS at temperature from 450degC to 650degC. When it was exposed to hydrogen pressure of 1.0 kPa from 450degC to 650degC, its permeability was 7.2×10-11 to 6.4×10-12 mol/sec.m.Pa1/2. The permeation flux was increased with temperature and the permeability is deviated from Sieverts' law around 450degC. It followed Sieverts' law and was similar to that of bare 316SS at elevated temperatures. This result suggested the surface nitriding increases solubility at low temperatures around 450degC. (author)

  1. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansilla, C.; Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.Th.M., E-mail: j.t.m.de.hosson@rug.nl

    2015-06-11

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The residual stress state was measured on the surface and also in cross-section, i.e. examining effects of the nitrogen concentration gradient. It is shown that an enhanced lateral resolution can be achieved when a novel multiple fitting approach is employed. The results presented show an overall agreement with stress profiles obtained by X-ray diffraction. Finite Element Modeling is used to explain the apparent discrepancies. A clear correlation between the residual stress and nitriding profiles has been found and the applicability of this method is shown in particular when stress gradients are present.

  2. Aluminum Reduction and Nitridation of Bauxite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhikuan; ZHANG Dianwei; XU Enxia; HOU Xinmei; DONG Yanling

    2007-01-01

    The application of bauxite with low Al2O3 content has been studied in this paper and β-SiAlON has been obtained from two kinds of bauxites (Al203 content 68.08 mass% and 46.30 mass% respectively) by aluminum reduction and nitridation method.The sequence of reactions has been studied using thermal analysis (TG-DTA),X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDS.Compared with carbon thermal reduction and nitridation of aluminosilicates employed presently,the reaction in the system of bauxite-Al-N2 occurs at lower temperature.β-SiAlON appears as one of the main products from 1573K and exists' stably in the range of the present experimental temperature.The microstructure of β-SiAlON obtained at 1773 K is short column with 5-10μm observed by SEM.

  3. Local residual stress measurements on nitride layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, local stresses in different nitrided maraging steel samples of high practical interest for industrial applications were studied through the so-called micro-slit milling method using a focused ion beam. The nitrogen concentration profiles were acquired by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The residual stress state was measured on the surface and also in cross-section, i.e. examining effects of the nitrogen concentration gradient. It is shown that an enhanced lateral resolution can be achieved when a novel multiple fitting approach is employed. The results presented show an overall agreement with stress profiles obtained by X-ray diffraction. Finite Element Modeling is used to explain the apparent discrepancies. A clear correlation between the residual stress and nitriding profiles has been found and the applicability of this method is shown in particular when stress gradients are present

  4. Atomic-layer deposition of silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Ooba, K

    1999-01-01

    Atomic-layer deposition (ALD) of silicon nitride has been investigated by means of plasma ALD in which a NH sub 3 plasma is used, catalytic ALD in which NH sub 3 is dissociated by thermal catalytic reaction on a W filament, and temperature-controlled ALD in which only a thermal reaction on the substrate is employed. The NH sub 3 and the silicon source gases (SiH sub 2 Cl sub 2 or SiCl sub 4) were alternately supplied. For all these methods, the film thickness per cycle was saturated at a certain value for a wide range of deposition conditions. In the catalytic ALD, the selective deposition of silicon nitride on hydrogen-terminated Si was achieved, but, it was limited to only a thin (2SiO (evaporative).

  5. Magnetron sputtering of thin nitride films

    OpenAIRE

    Kola, Prashanthi V

    1995-01-01

    The objective in this investigation was to design and commission a magnetron sputter deposition system and investigate the properties of hard coatings for mechanical and biomedical applications. The deposition of titanium (Ti) and titanium nitride (TiN) was undertaken as part of the commissioning tests and further work was conducted on the effect of the deposition parameters on the properties of TiN, specifically for biocompatible applications. A thorough understanding of the deposition proce...

  6. Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Metal Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lu Hua; Xing, Tan; Chen, Ying; Jones, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Although the high impermeability of graphene makes it an excellent barrier to inhibit metal oxidation and corrosion, graphene can form a galvanic cell with the underlying metal that promotes corrosion of the metal in the long term. Boron nitride (BN) nanosheets which have a similar impermeability could be a better choice as protective barrier, because they are more thermally and chemically stable than graphene and, more importantly, do not cause galvanic corrosion due to their electrical insu...

  7. Anomalous thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarraei, Alireza; Wang, Xiaonan

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics modeling to investigate the thermal properties of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride nanoribbons under uniaxial strain along their longitudinal axis. Our simulations predict that hexagonal boron nitride shows an anomalous thermal response to the applied uniaxial strain. Contrary to three dimensional materials, under uniaxial stretching, the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanoribbons first increases rather than decreasing until it reaches its peak value and then starts decreasing. Under compressive strain, the thermal conductivity of monolayer boron nitride ribbons monolithically reduces rather than increasing. We use phonon spectrum and dispersion curves to investigate the mechanism responsible for the unexpected behavior. Our molecular dynamics modeling and density functional theory results show that application of longitudinal tensile strain leads to the reduction of the group velocities of longitudinal and transverse acoustic modes. Such a phonon softening mechanism acts to reduce the thermal conductivity of the nanoribbons. On the other hand, a significant increase in the group velocity (stiffening) of the flexural acoustic modes is observed, which counteracts the phonon softening effects of the longitudinal and transverse modes. The total thermal conductivity of the ribbons is a result of competition between these two mechanisms. At low tensile strain, the stiffening mechanism overcomes the softening mechanism which leads to an increase in the thermal conductivity. At higher tensile strain, the softening mechanism supersedes the stiffening and the thermal conductivity slightly reduces. Our simulations show that the decrease in the thermal conductivity under compressive strain is attributed to the formation of buckling defects which reduces the phonon mean free path.

  8. Sliding wear behaviour of surface nitrided zirconia

    OpenAIRE

    Valle Chiro, Jorge Antonio; Mestra Rodríguez, Álvaro Miguel; García Marro, Fernando; Anglada Gomila, Marcos Juan

    2011-01-01

    Tetragonal polycrystalline zirconia stabilised with 3% molar yttria (3Y-TZP) has found wide applications in orthopaedics and dentistry because of its excellent mechanical properties (flexural strength above 1000 MPa, fracture toughness about 5 MPa·m1/2, hardness above 12 GPa) and biocompatibility. However, 3Y-TZP has a strong drawback: poor resistance to hydrothermal ageing also referred to as low temperature degradation (LTD). Nitriding of 3Y-TZP can make the surface resistance to L...

  9. Formation and Structure of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang ZHANG; Zongquan LI; Jin XU

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes were simply synthesized by heating well-mixed boric acid, urea and iron nitrate powders at 1000℃. A small amount of BN nanowires was also obtained in the resultants. The morphological and structural characters of the BN nanostructures were studied using transmission electron microscopy. Other novel BN nanostructures, such as Y-junction nanotubes and bamboo-like nanotubes, were simultaneously observed. The growth mechanism of the BN nanotubes was discussed briefly.

  10. Thermal conductivity of nanostructured boron nitride materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chengchun; Bando, Yoshio; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Xiaoxia; Golberg, Dmitri

    2006-06-01

    We have measured the thermal conductivity of bulky pellets made of various boron nitride (BN)-based nanomaterials, including spherical nanoparticles, perfectly structured, bamboo-like nanotubes, and collapsed nanotubes. The thermal conductivity strongly depends on the morphology of the BN nanomaterials, especially on the surface structure. Spherical BN particles have the lowest thermal conductivity while the collapsed BN nanotubes possess the best thermoconductive properties. A model was proposed to explain the experimental observations based on the heat percolation passage considerations. PMID:16722739

  11. Nitride phosphors and solid-state lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Rong-Jun; Hirosaki, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Introduction to Solid-State LightingBasics of Solid-State LightingBasics of White Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs)Applications of Solid-State LightingIntroduction to LuminescenceClassification of Optical ProcessesFundamentals of LuminescenceLuminescent CentersMeasurement of LuminescenceTraditional Phosphors in White LEDsRequirements for Phosphors in White LEDsClassification of PhosphorsPhotoluminescent Properties of Traditional PhosphorsNitride Phosphors i

  12. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  13. Nitride inclusions in titanium-containing high-nitrogen steel after solid-phase nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenkova, E. V.; Kadach, M. V.; Butskii, E. V.; Dorofievich, I. V.; Stomakhin, A. Ya.

    2015-09-01

    The principal possibility of production of sheet titanium-containing high-nitrogen steels without extreme harmful coarse nitride inclusions and their aggregates, which are characteristic of these compositions even at a relatively low (impurity) nitrogen content, is studied. To this end, the nitrogen content in the initial metal before its solidification is limited to the calculation level at which titanium nitrides are thermally unstable. Nitrogen is introduced in metal (08Cr18Ni12Ti steel) during its chemical thermal treatment in a nitrogen atmosphere at 1200°C. The nitrogen content in the finished metal is 0.4% (at 0.31% Ti). Studies in this direction are thought to be promising, since it is evident that the production of a metal of such a composition using the standard method of nitrogen introduction (in melt) is impossible. Scanning electron microscopy shows that titanium nitride particles in the finished metal are ≤0.5 μm in size.

  14. Wetting and infiltration of nitride bonded silicon nitride by liquid silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, V.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.

    2016-04-01

    Nitride bonded silicon nitride (NBSN) is a promising crucible material for the repeated use in the directional solidification of multicrystalline (mc) silicon ingots for photovoltaic applications. Due to wetting and infiltration, however, silicon nitride in its initial state does not offer the desired reusability. In this work the sessile drop method is used to systematically study the wetting and infiltration behavior of NBSN after applying different oxidation procedures. It is found that the wetting of the NBSN crucible by liquid silicon can be prevented by the oxidation of the geometrical surface. The infiltration of liquid silicon into the porous crucible can be suppressed by oxygen enrichment within the volume of the NBSN, i.e. at the pore walls of the crucibles. The realized reusability of the NBSN is demonstrated by reusing a NBSN crucible six times for the directional solidification of undoped multicrystalline silicon ingots.

  15. Microscopic modeling of nitride intersubband absorbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Ines; Allerman, A. A.; Wierer, J. J.; Moseley, M.; Skogen, E. J.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Vawter, G. A.

    III-nitride intersubband structures have recently attracted much interest because of their potential for a wide variety of applications ranging from electro-optical modulators to terahertz quantum cascade lasers. To overcome present simulation limitations we have developed a microscopic absorbance simulator for nitride intersubband devices. Our simulator calculates the band structure of nitride intersubband systems using a fully coupled 8x8 k.p Hamiltonian and determines the material response of a single period in a density-matrix-formalism by solving the Heisenberg equation including many-body and dephasing contributions. After calculating the polarization due to intersubband transitions in a single period, the resulting absorbance of a superlattice structure including radiative coupling between the different periods is determined using a non-local Green's-function formalism. As a result our simulator allows us to predict intersubband absorbance of superlattice structures with microscopically determined lineshapes and linewidths accounting for both many-body and correlation contributions. This work is funded by Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin.

  16. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  17. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain;

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...... specific. Often fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces to silicon or silicon dioxide to silicon surfaces is preferred, though Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding is indeed possible and practical for many devices as will be shown in this paper. We present an overview of existing knowledge on Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding and new...... results on bonding of thin and thick Si3N4 layers. The new results include high temperature bonding without any pretreatment, along with improved bonding ability achieved by thermal oxidation and chemical pretreatment. The bonded wafers include both unprocessed and processed wafers with a total silicon...

  18. Shock Syntheses of Novel Nitrides and Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Toshimori

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure spinel nitride of Si3N4 was discovered more than 10 years ago. Since then there have been many studies on the spinel nitrides and related materials including oxynitrides. We have developed shock synthesis method to investigate their structural, mechanical, chemical, physical, and optical properties. At the same time we tried to synthesize carbon nitrides from the organic substances. And later we extended to shock synthesis of ammonia through the Haber-Bosch reaction under shock in order to apply geochemical subjects related to the origin of life. The simplest amino acid of glycine, as well as animes (up to propylamine) and carboxylic acids (up to pentanoic acid), has been synthesized successfully in aqueous solutions through meteoritic impact reactions. Recently we are trying to make more complex biomolecules for implications of biomolecule formation for the origin of life through meteorite impacts on early Earth's ocean. These results of shock syntheses may imply significant contributions to materials science and Earth and planetary sciences. This research is collaborated with National Institute for Materials Science and Tohoku University.

  19. Heavy ion bombardment of silicates and nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several silicates, including α-quartz, zirconium silicate, thorium silicate, LiAlSiO4, a silicate glass and several nitrides, α and β Si3N4, AlN, ZrN as well as Si2N2O and ThO2, have been irradiated by 1019 to 1021 Krypton (3 MeV) ions/m2. The damaged powders of original particle size less than 5 μm, have been examined by x-ray diffraction and electron microscope methods. The silicates and Si2N2O become non-crystalline by 10 x 1019 ions/m2. The particles change shape, extending and bloating under prolonged irradiations of the order of 100 x 1019 ions/m2. Silicate glass also undergoes this irradiation creep process. The nitrides and ThO2 behave quite differently and even at fluences of 200 x 1019 x ions/m-2 the powders remain crystalline, retaining relatively sharp edges to the particles without exhibiting irradiation creep. This difference in behavior can be related to the nature of the framework crystal structures, flexible for the silicates with variable bond angles, rigid for the nitrides with fixed bond angles. This may explain the behavior of radioactive minerals not found in a metamict condition. (author)

  20. Development of compound layer of iron (carbo)nitrides during nitriding of steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratajski, J.; Tacikowski, J.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The composition and phase constitution of a compound layer developing during gaseous nitriding was investigated at 853 K for three commercial steels (AISI 120, 4340 and 1090) and Armco iron. The compound layers were characterised by light optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and electron probe...... microanalysis. The formation of the compound layer occurs along two distinct sequences: alpha-gamma prime-epsilon and/or alpha(theta)-epsilon2-gamma prime-epsilon1. The preferred sequence depends mainly on the chemical composition of steel and on the nitriding potential....

  1. Californium Recovery from Palladium Wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Jon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The recovery of 252Cf from palladium-252Cf cermet wires was investigated to determine the feasibility of implementing it into the cermet wire production operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center. The dissolution of Pd wire in 8 M HNO3 and trace amounts of HCl was studied at both ambient and elevated temperatures. These studies showed that it took days to dissolve the wire at ambient temperature and only 2 hours at 60°C. Adjusting the ratio of the volume of solvent to the mass of the wire segment showed little change in the kinetics of dissolution, which ranged from 0.176 mL/mg down to 0.019 mL/mg. A successful chromatographic separation of 153Gd, a surrogate for 252Cf, from Pd was demonstrated using AG 50x8 cation exchange resin with a bed volume of 0.5 mL and an internal diameter of 0.8 cm.

  2. Modeling the kinetics of the nitriding and nitrocarburizing of iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    1998-01-01

    The growth kinetics of the iron-nitride compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburizing of pure iron has been investigated for various temperatures and various combinations of imposed nitrogen and carbon activities. The results indicate that no local equilibrium occurs at the gas/solid inter...

  3. Limitations to band gap tuning in nitride semiconductor alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede;

    2010-01-01

    Relations between the band gaps of nitride alloys and their lattice parameters are presented and limits to tuning of the fundamental gap in nitride semiconductors are set by combining a large number of experimental data with ab initio theoretical calculations. Large band gap bowings obtained...

  4. Nitriding of super alloys for enhancing physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, A.

    1984-06-25

    The invention teaches the improvement of certain super alloys by exposing the alloy to an atmosphere of elemental nitrogen at elevated temperatures in excess of 750/sup 0/C but less than 1150/sup 0/C for an extended duration, viz., by nitriding the surface of the alloy, to establish barrier nitrides of the order of 25 to 100 micrometers thickness. These barrier

  5. Hydrogen charging of plasma nitrided steel in acid solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sobieszczyk

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper is evaluation of susceptibility of plasma nitrided structural steel to hydrogen absorption.Design/methodology/approach: Structural steel, nitrided at glow discharge in the gas mixture of various N2, H2, Ar content was subjected to cathodic hydrogen charging in acid solution simulating the aged engine oil. The effect of the nitrided layers on the hydrogen transport and on the irreversible trapping was evaluated by the measurements of the hydrogen permeation rate and by the vacuum extraction, respectively.Findings: In the presence of the not defected compact nitride layer, no hydrogen permeation through the steel has been stated under the experimental conditions. Absorbed hydrogen was accumulated within this layer.Research limitations/implications: Further research should be taken to evaluate the influence of compact nitride zone on hydrogen degradation under tensile stress.Practical implications: Plasma nitriding treatment could improve the properties of the low-alloy high-strength structural steels exploited in aggressive environments, which is especially important in the case of possible hydrogen charging of exploited steel.Originality/value: Using the atmosphere of the higher nitrogen to hydrogen ratio at plasma assisted nitriding provides the formation of thin compact nitride zone, highly protective against corrosion and hydrogen degradation.

  6. Composition and microhardness of CAE boron nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with boron nitride produced by cathodic arc evaporation techniques.The films were applied on titanium and cemented carbide substrates. Their characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Knoop microhardness tests. Demonstrated are the high properties of two-phase films, containing β (cubic) and γ (wurtzitic) modifications of boron nitride. (author). 7 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  7. Synthesis of metal-nitrides using high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillaume, C; Serghiou, G [University of Edinburgh, School of Engineering and Electronics, Kings Buildings, Mayfield Road, EH9 3JL UK (United Kingdom); Morniroli, J P [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 8517, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille et Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Lille, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Frost, D J [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universitat Bayreuth, D-95440, Bayreuth (Germany)], E-mail: george.serghiou@ed.ac.uk

    2008-07-15

    Technologically, high density nitrides are showing promise for both ceramic and electronic applications. In a laser-heated diamond cell we prepare high density metal-nitrides by reaction of the nitrogen pressure medium with an elemental substrate. Two of our objectives are to develop criteria governing whether denser than ambient nitride phases will form, and to in particular establish the parameters required for synthesis in a multianvil press using elemental starting materials. We have already synthesized transition metal nitrides in a multianvil press using elemental starting materials, including hexagonal nickel nitride and alkali rhenium nitrides. Unlike previous metals, we also report that Cu does not form a nitride after heating with NaN{sub 3} at 2000 K and 20 GPa. Notably, Cu{sub 3}N is a semiconductor exhibiting weak directional bonds, whereas the immediately adjacent lower atomic number systems are metallic interstitial nitrides. We also briefly mention our work on processing high pressure and temperature recovered reaction products with focused ion beam methods for tailored characterization using electron microscopy.

  8. Surface characterization of a decarburized and nitrided steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calliari, Irene; Dabalà, Manuele; Zanesco, Marzia; Bernardo, Enrico; Olmi, Filippo; Vagelli, Gloria

    2006-08-01

    This article describes the effects of surface controlled decarburization on the structure of a nitrided steel. Samples of quenched and tempered 40CrMo4 steel were decarburized by air heat treatment (800-900 degrees C) at different depths and submitted to gaseous nitriding. The microstructure of surface layers after decarburization and nitriding were investigated by optical (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The nitrogen and carbon profiles in the diffusion layers were determined by a scanning electron microscope equipped with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (EPMA-WDS). The effect of nitriding was determined by microhardness measurements. The increasing of time and temperature of decarburization slightly affect the surface hardness values, while case hardness depths decrease. In all the specimens, the nitriding depth, as determined by the WDS nitrogen profile, is larger than the one determined by the hardness profile. PMID:16842649

  9. Design of nitride semiconductors for solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Nitride semiconductors are a promising class of materials for solar energy conversion applications, such as photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells. Nitrides can have better solar absorption and electrical transport properties than the more widely studied oxides, as well as the potential for better scalability than other pnictides or chalcogenides. In addition, nitrides are also relatively unexplored compared to other chemistries, so they provide a great opportunity for new materials discovery. This paper reviews the recent advances in the design of novel semiconducting nitrides for solar energy conversion technologies. Both binary and multinary nitrides are discussed, with a range of metal chemistries (Cu3N, ZnSnN2, Sn3N4, etc.) and crystal structures (delafossite, perovskite, spinel, etc.), including a brief overview of wurtzite III-N materials and devices. The current scientific challenges and promising future directions in the field are also highlighted.

  10. Radiofrequency cold plasma nitrided carbon steel: Microstructural and micromechanical characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → C38 carbon steel samples were plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge. → RF plasma treatment enables nitriding for non-heated substrates. → The morphological and chemical analyses show the formation of a uniform thickness on the surface of the nitrided C38 steel. → Nitrogen plasma active species diffuse into the samples and lead to the formation of FexN. → The increase in microhardness values for nitrided samples with plasma processing time is interpreted by the formation of a thicker nitrided layer on the steel surface. - Abstract: In this work, C38 carbon steel was plasma nitrided using a radiofrequency (rf) nitrogen plasma discharge on non-heated substrates. General characterizations were performed to compare the chemical compositions, the microstructures and hardness of the untreated and plasma treated surfaces. The plasma nitriding was carried out on non-heated substrates at a pressure of 16.8 Pa, using N2 gas. Surface characterizations before and after N2 plasma treatment were performed by means of the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Vickers microhardness measurements. The morphological and chemical analysis showed the formation of a uniform structure on the surface of the nitrided sample with enrichment in nitrogen when compared to untreated sample. The thickness of the nitride layer formed depends on the treatment time duration and is approximately 14 μm for 10 h of plasma treatment. XPS was employed to obtain chemical-state information of the plasma nitrided steel surfaces. The micromechanical results show that the surface microhardness increases as the plasma-processing time increases to reach, 1487 HV0.005 at a plasma processing time of 8 h.

  11. A chromium nitride/carbon nitride containing graphitic carbon nanocapsule hybrid as a Pt-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Lei; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Dongdong; Tian, Chungui; Feng, He; Ma, Jing; Fu, Honggang

    2015-08-11

    Chromium nitride nanoparticles supported on graphitic carbon nanocapsules containing carbon nitride (CrN/GC) have been synthesized by a solvothermal-assisted ion-exchange route. As a Pt-free catalyst, the CrN/GC hybrid exhibits superior activity, stability, methanol immunity and a dominant 4-electron pathway towards oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:26145711

  12. Hydrolysis of hafnium nitrides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrolysis of Hafnium Nitrides and Carbides. The hydrolytic behavior of Hafnium mononitride and monocarbide has been studied and compared with that of Titanium and Zirconium nitrides and carbides. In the case of hydrolysis of HfN the gaseous products were H2, N2 and a small amount of NO, and the liquid product was NH3, as in the case of TiN and ZrN. In isothermal hydrolysis the principal product was NH3 at temperatures lower than 8000C, which was replaced by N2 at temperatures higher than 9000C. In this respect HfN was similar to ZrN, but not to TiN which produced mainly N2 even by hydrolysis at 8000C. The products of hydrolysis of HfC were found to be CO, CO2, H2 and a small amount of CH4 also as in the case of TiC and ZrC. In the isothermal hydrolysis of HfC it was observed that a large amount of H2 evolved at the early stage of the hydrolysis while CO2 continued to evolve with some amount of H2 even after the ceasing of CO evolution. From analysis of the hydrolytic behavior the solid residue after the hydrolysis of HfC was considered to contain some waxes (Csub(n)Hsub(m)). It was suggested that the carbide of the element of smaller atomic number (Ti) would tend to form oxygen compounds (CO, CO2) while the carbide of the element of larger atomic number (Zr, Hf) hydrogen compounds(Csub(n)Hsub(m)), since ThC and UC formed only hydrocarbons and H2 by hydrolysis. This suggestion was also valid to nitride. (auth.)

  13. Effect of Plasma Nitriding on the Performance of WC-Co Cutting Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoglu, Ebru; Yilmaz, Safak; Gulmez, Turgut

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the effect of nitriding process parameters on the cutting performance of WC-Co tools. The cutting performance was measured by CNC machining of GG25 cast iron parts. The hardness and phase composition of nitrided layer were determined for different plasma nitriding temperatures and times. The hardness of the nitrided layer increased at all plasma nitrided conditions investigated. However, the machining performance of the cutting inserts varied in the range between a 60% increase and a 40% decrease after plasma nitriding. The maximum number of machined parts was seen when the insert was nitrided at 600 °C-4 h and at 500 °C-4 h.

  14. Effects of Nitrogen Gas Ratio on Nitride Layer and Microhardness of Tool Steel(SKH51) in Plasma Nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D.J.; Lee, H.R. [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea); Kwak, J.G. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea); Chung, U.C.; Cho, Y.R. [Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea)

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed DC-plasma nitriding has been applied to form nitride layer having only a diffusion layer. The discharge current with the variation of discharge gases is proportional to the intensity of N{sub 2}{sup +} peak in optical emission spectroscopy during the plasma nitriding. The discharge current, microhardness in surface of substrate and depth of nitride layer increased with the ratio of N{sub 2} to H{sub 2} gas in discharge gases. When the ratio of N{sub 2} to H{sub 2} is lower than 60% in the discharge gases, high microhardness value of 1100Hv nitride layer which contains no compound layer has been formed. (author). 20 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Ballistic thermoelectric properties in boron nitride nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhong-Xiang; Tang, Li-Ming; Pan, Chang-Ning; Chen, Qiao; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2013-10-01

    Ballistic thermoelectric properties (TPs) in boron nitride nanoribbons (BNNRs) are studied using the nonequilibrium Green's function atomistic simulation of electron and phonon transport. A comparative analysis for TPs between BNNRs and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is made. Results show that the TPs of BNNRs are better than those of GNRs stemming from the higher power factor and smaller thermal conductance of BNNRs. With increasing the ribbon width, the maximum value of ZT (ZTmax) of BNNRs exhibits a transformation from the monotonic decrease to nonlinear increase. We also show that the lattice defect can enhance the ZTmax of these nanoribbons strongly depending on its positions and the edge shape.

  16. Magnesium doping of boron nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Robert; Jordan, Kevin

    2015-06-16

    A method to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes incorporating magnesium diboride in their structure. In a first embodiment, magnesium wire is introduced into a reaction feed bundle during a BNNT fabrication process. In a second embodiment, magnesium in powder form is mixed into a nitrogen gas flow during the BNNT fabrication process. MgB.sub.2 yarn may be used for superconducting applications and, in that capacity, has considerably less susceptibility to stress and has considerably better thermal conductivity than these conventional materials when compared to both conventional low and high temperature superconducting materials.

  17. Reactive sputter deposition of boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of fully dense, boron targets for use in planar magnetron sources has lead to the synthesis of Boron Nitride (BN) films by reactive rf sputtering. The deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are characterized for composition using Auger electron spectroscopy, for chemical bonding using Raman spectroscopy and for crystalline structure using transmission electron microscopy. The deposition conditions are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. In particular, the growth of an adherent cubic BN coating requires 400--500 C substrate heating and an applied -300 V dc bias

  18. Boron nitride nanomaterials for thermal management applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Mohammed J; Song, Wei-Li; Wang, Ping; Lu, Fushen; Hou, Zhiling; Anderson, Ankoma; Maimaiti, Halidan; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-18

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNs) are analogous to their two-dimensional carbon counterparts in many materials properties, in particular, ultrahigh thermal conductivity, but also offer some unique attributes, including being electrically insulating, high thermal stability, chemical and oxidation resistance, low color, and high mechanical strength. Significant recent advances in the production of BNNs, understanding of their properties, and the development of polymeric nanocomposites with BNNs for thermally conductive yet electrically insulating materials and systems are highlighted herein. Major opportunities and challenges for further studies in this rapidly advancing field are also discussed. PMID:25652360

  19. Cathodoluminescence spectra of gallium nitride nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Chia-Chang; Li, Guan-Hua; Lin, Yuan-Ting; Chang, Ching-Wen; Wadekar, Paritosh; Chen, Quark Yung-Sung; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Tchernycheva, Maria; Julien, François Henri; Tu, Li-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Gallium nitride [GaN] nanorods grown on a Si(111) substrate at 720°C via plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy were studied by field-emission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence [CL]. The surface topography and optical properties of the GaN nanorod cluster and single GaN nanorod were measured and discussed. The defect-related CL spectra of GaN nanorods and their dependence on temperature were investigated. The CL spectra along the length of the individual GaN nanorod were also studie...

  20. Plasma-Activated Sintering of Aluminum Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, J. E.; Risbud, S. H.; Groza, J. R.; Yamazaki, K.

    1993-10-01

    The use of a new plasma- activated sintering (PAS) process to densify aluminum nitride (AIN) powders to nearly full theoretical density (97 to >99%) in 5 to 10 min was investigated. The process consists of a pulse activation step, followed by sintering at 1730 to 1800 °C using resistance heating in carbon dies. Submicron size (~0.44 μm) AIN powders of low oxygen content (submicron grain structure (~0.77 μm) with no apparent pores or intergranular phases. X- ray powder diffraction revealed no secondary crystalline phases.

  1. Low-dimensional boron nitride nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Pakdel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review, a concise research history of low-dimensional boron nitride (BN nanomaterials followed by recent developments in their synthesis, morphology, properties, and applications are presented. Seventeen years after the initial synthesis of BN nanotubes, research on BN nanomaterials has developed far enough to establish them as one of the most promising inorganic nanosystems. In this regard, it is envisaged that the unique properties of low-dimensional BN systems, such as superb mechanical stiffness, high thermal conductivity, wide optical bandgap, strong ultraviolet emission, thermal stability and chemical inertness will play a key role in prospective developments.

  2. Nitride and carbide preforms for infiltration process

    OpenAIRE

    A. Twardowska; Nowak, R; P. Kurtyka; B. Smuk; M. Podsiadło; L. Jaworska; N. Sobczak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Infiltration of molten metals into porous ceramic preforms is the only technique suitable for the fabrication of high volume fraction of ceramic materials in MMCs. The most popular material for porous preforms is Al2O3 because of its low cost. Infiltration process generates thermal stresses in the Al2O3 preforms. The thermal shock resistance of Al2O3 is lower than for Si3N4 or Al2O3/TiC+TiN materials. The aim of this study is to obtain the nitride and carbide base preforms material f...

  3. Ion nitriding; Proceedings of the International Conference, Cleveland, OH, Sept. 15-17, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The present conference discusses plasma-assisted surface coating/modification processes, the applications to date of ion nitriding, the effects of nitrogen on metal surfaces, ion nitriding mechanisms in Cr, Al and Cr + Al-containing 1040 steel, ion nitriding of Al and its alloys, life enhancement for forging dies, novel anode plasma nitriding developments, and a comparative study of the pulsed and dc ion-nitriding behavior in specimens with blind holes. Also discussed are the influence of heating method on ion nitriding, surface hardening of marage steels by ion nitriding without core hardness reduction, plasma nitriding of nodular cast iron sput gears, NbN composites for superconductors, the carburization of tungsten in a glow discharge methane plasma, economic considerations concerning plasma nitriding, and the corrosion properties obtained by ion nitriding.

  4. Behaviour of nitrided layers subjected to influence of hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ćwiek

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this paper is evaluation of behaviour of plasma nitrided layers subjected to influence of internal and external hydrogen. Properties of nitrided layers like: hydrogen permeation and trapping, fracture mode, and plasticity were examined.Design/methodology/approach: Structural low-alloy steel was nitrided at glow discharge in the gas mixture of various N2, H2, and Ar content. Samples with nitrided layers were subjected to cathodic hydrogen charging in acid solution simulating the aged engine oil hydrogenating environment. The effect of the nitrided layers on the hydrogen transport and on the irreversible trapping was evaluated by the measurements of the hydrogen permeation rate and by the vacuum extraction, respectively. Surfaces with modified layers were examined with the use of a scanning electron microscope (SEM before and after hydrogen permeation tests. Slow strain rate test (SSRT on samples with and without nitrided layers was carried out in hydrogen generating environment. After SSRT fracture mode and plasticity of nitrided layers were examined with SEM.Findings: In the presence of the not defected compact nitride layer, no hydrogen permeation through the steel has been stated under the experimental conditions. Influence of hydrogen content in working atmosphere, i.e. internal hydrogen, was found. Absorbed hydrogen, i.e. external hydrogen, was accumulated within this layer.Research limitations/implications: There is no possibility to perform direct observations of exact mechanism of hydrogen-assisted cracking so far. Further research should be taken to reveal the exact mechanism of increased plasticity of nitrided layer with absorbed hydrogen.Practical implications: Plasma nitrided layers are effective barriers to hydrogen entry into structural steel utilised in aggressive environments, which is especially important in the case of possible hydrogen charging of exploited steel.Originality/value: Using the atmosphere of the higher

  5. Ammonia Decomposition over Bimetallic Nitrides Supported on γ-Al2O3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Shan LU; Xiao Nian LI; Yi Feng ZHU; Hua Zhang LIU; Chun Hui ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    A series of monometallic nitrides and bimetallic nitrides were prepared by temperature-programmed reaction with NH3. The effects of Co, Ni and Fe additives and the synergic action between Fe, Co, Ni and Mo on the ammonia decomposition activity were investigated. TPR-MS, XRD were also carried out to obtain better insight into the structure of the bimetallic nitride. The results of ammonia decomposition activity show that bimetallic nitrides are more active than monometallic nitrides or bimetallic oxides.

  6. ION NITRIDING AND THE INFLUENCE OF THE PROPERTIES OF THE STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    BAYCIK, Handan

    2002-01-01

    The nitriding performed to change the chemical composition of the surface is the method of a thermochemical surface hardening. Fine, hard nitrided case consist of two zones at the surface; The outer one white layer (compound layer), the inner one diffusion layer. The nitriding methods are determined at three groups as gas, salt and ion nitriding. Gas nitriding process is performed using ammonia. The nitrogen decompositing from the ammonia gas reacts with the iron and the alloy elements of the...

  7. Electronic structure and mechanical properties of plasma nitrided ferrous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structures of the near-surface regions of two different nitrided steels (AISI 316 and 4140) were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectron groups from all main chemical elements involved were addressed for steel samples with implanted-N concentrations in the range 16-32 at.%. As the implanted-N concentrations were increased, rather contrasting behaviors were observed for the two kinds of steel. The N1s photoelectrons had spectral shifts toward lower (nitrided AISI 316) or higher (nitrided AISI 4140) binding energies, whereas the Fe2p3/2 photoelectron spectrum remains at a constant binding energy (nitrided AISI 316) or shifts toward higher binding energies (AISI 4140). These trends are discussed in terms of the metallic nitride formation and the overlapping of atomic orbitals. For nitrided AISI 316, a semi-classical approach of charge transfer between Cr and N is used to explain the experimental facts (formation of CrN), while for nitrided AISI 4140 we propose that the interaction between orbitals 4s from Fe and 2p from N promotes electrons to the conduction band increasing the electrical attraction of the N1s and Fe2p electrons in core shells (formation of FeNx). The increase in hardness of the steel upon N implantation is attributed to the localization of electrons in specific bonds, which diminishes the metallic bond character.

  8. Microstructural characterization of pulsed plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The low temperature pulsed plasma nitrided layer of 316 SS was studied. → The plastic deformation induced in the austenite due to nitriding is characterized by EBSD at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → Nanomechanical properties of the nitride layer was investigated by nanoindentation at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → High hardness, high nitrogen concentration and high dislocation density is detected in the nitride layer. → The hardness and nitrogen concentration decreased sharply beyond the nitride layer. - Abstract: Pulsed plasma nitriding (PPN) treatment is one of the new processes to improve the surface hardness and tribology behavior of austenitic stainless steels. Through low temperature treatment (<440 deg. C), it is possible to obtain unique combinations of wear and corrosion properties. Such a combination is achieved through the formation of a so-called 'extended austenite phase'. These surface layers are often also referred to as S-phase, m-phase or γ-phase. In this work, nitrided layers on austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L (SS316L) were examined by means of a nanoindentation method at different loads. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the S-phase at different depths were studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the layer showed a high amount of plasticity induced in the layer during its formation. XRD results confirmed the formation of the S-phase, and no deleterious CrN phase was detected.

  9. Microstructural characterization of pulsed plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgari, M. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Barnoush, A., E-mail: a.barnoush@matsci.uni-sb.de [Saarland University, Saarbruecken (Germany); Johnsen, R. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Hoel, R. [MOTecH Plasma Company, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} The low temperature pulsed plasma nitrided layer of 316 SS was studied. {yields} The plastic deformation induced in the austenite due to nitriding is characterized by EBSD at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). {yields} Nanomechanical properties of the nitride layer was investigated by nanoindentation at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). {yields} High hardness, high nitrogen concentration and high dislocation density is detected in the nitride layer. {yields} The hardness and nitrogen concentration decreased sharply beyond the nitride layer. - Abstract: Pulsed plasma nitriding (PPN) treatment is one of the new processes to improve the surface hardness and tribology behavior of austenitic stainless steels. Through low temperature treatment (<440 deg. C), it is possible to obtain unique combinations of wear and corrosion properties. Such a combination is achieved through the formation of a so-called 'extended austenite phase'. These surface layers are often also referred to as S-phase, m-phase or {gamma}-phase. In this work, nitrided layers on austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L (SS316L) were examined by means of a nanoindentation method at different loads. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the S-phase at different depths were studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the layer showed a high amount of plasticity induced in the layer during its formation. XRD results confirmed the formation of the S-phase, and no deleterious CrN phase was detected.

  10. Thermal stability of laser-produced iron nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Carpene, E.; Landry, F.; Lieb, K.-P.; Schaaf, P.

    2001-04-01

    Laser nitriding is a very efficient method to improve the mechanical properties, surface hardness, corrosion, and wear resistance of iron and steel, with the advantages of a high nitrogen concentration, fast treatment, and accurate position control, and without any undesired heating effect on the substrate. However, the stability of laser-produced iron nitrides is still under investigation. This article reports investigations of the thermal stability of these iron nitrides upon annealing treatments, which were conducted both in vacuum and air. The phase and elemental composition of the nitride layers were deduced from conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, resonant nuclear reaction analysis, and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction. The surface hardness was measured by the nanoindentation method. In laser-nitrided iron, two critical temperatures are found: at 523 K the predominant iron-nitride phase changes from the γ/ɛ to the γ' phase. When the temperature exceeds 773 K, all of the nitrogen has escaped from the surface layer. For annealing in air the nitrogen escapes completely already at 673 K, where a thick oxide layer has formed. Stainless steel proved to be more stable than iron, and even up to 973 K no new phases or oxides were produced, here, also, only at 973 K the nitrogen content decreased significantly. Therefore, laser-nitrided stainless steel is well suited for applications.

  11. Characterization of plasma nitrided layers produced on sintered iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Alves Fontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma nitriding is a thermo-physical-chemical treatment process, which promotes surface hardening, caused by interstitial diffusion of atomic nitrogen into metallic alloys. In this work, this process was employed in the surface modification of a sintered ferrous alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses, and wear and microhardness tests were performed on the samples submitted to ferrox treatment and plasma nitriding carried out under different conditions of time and temperature. The results showed that the nitride layer thickness is higher for all nitrided samples than for ferrox treated samples, and this layer thickness increases with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature is a more significant variable. The XRD analysis showed that the nitrided layer, for all samples, near the surface consists in a mixture of γ′-Fe4N and ɛ-Fe3N phases. Both wear resistance and microhardness increase with nitriding time and temperature, and temperature influences both the characteristics the most.

  12. Phase Transformations During the Low-Temperature Nitriding of AISI 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Gu, Tan; Qiu, Shaoyu; Wang, Jun; Xiong, Ji; Fan, Hongyuan

    2015-02-01

    Liquid nitriding of type AISI 2205 duplex stainless steel was conducted at 723 K (450 °C), using one type of novel low-temperature liquid chemical thermo-treatment. The transformation of the nitrided surface microstructure was systematically studied. Experimental results revealed that a nitrided layer formed on the sample surface with the thickness ranging from 3 to 28 μm, depending on nitriding time. After the 2205 duplex stainless steel was subjected to liquid nitriding 723 K (450 °C) for less than 8 hours, the pre-existing ferrite region on the surface transformed into the expanded austenite (S phase) by the infusion of nitrogen atoms, most of which stay in the interstitial sites. Generally, the dominant phase of the nitrided layer was the expanded austenite. When the nitriding time prolonged up to 16 hours, some pre-existing ferrite in expanded austenite was decomposed and ɛ-nitride precipitated subsequently. When the treatment time went up to 40 hours, large amount of ɛ-nitride and CrN precipitates were observed in the pre-existing ferritic region in the expanded austenite. Furthermore, many nitrides precipitated from the pre-austenite region. Acicular nitride was identified by transmission electron microscopy. The thickness of the nitrided layer increased with increasing nitriding time. The growth of the nitrided layer is mainly due to nitrogen diffusion in accordance with the expected parabolic rate law. Liquid nitriding effectively increased the surface hardness of 2205 duplex stainless steel by a factor of 3.

  13. Thermodynamics, kinetics and process control of nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mittemeijer, Eric J.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    1997-01-01

    As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibri...... 10th Congress of the International Federation for Heat Treatment and Surface Engineering held in Brighton, UK on 1-5 September 1996. (C) 1997 The Institute of Materials.......As a prerequisite for the predictability of properties obtained by a nitriding treatment of iron based workpieces, the relation between the process parameters and the composition and structure of the surface layer produced must be known. At present, even the description of thermodynamic equilibrium...... AL Delft, The Netherlands; Professor Mittemeijer is now also at the Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Seestrasse 92, D-70174 Stuttgart, Germany and Professor Somers is now in the Division of Metallurgy, Technical University of Denmark, Bldg 204, DK 2800, Lyngby, Denmark. Contribution to the...

  14. Local Heating with Lithographically Fabricated Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Ndukaife, Justus C.; Naik, Gururaj V.;

    2013-01-01

    Titanium nitride is considered a promising alternative plasmonic material and is known to exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances within the near-infrared biological transparency window. Here, local heating efficiencies of disk-shaped nanoparticles made of titanium nitride and gold are...... compared in the visible and near-infrared regions numerically and experimentally with samples fabricated using e-beam lithography. Results show that plasmonic titanium nitride nanodisks are efficient local heat sources and outperform gold nanodisks in the biological transparency window, dispensing the need...

  15. Preparation of Ultra-fine Aluminum Nitride in Thermal Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    漆继红; 罗义文; 印永祥; 代晓雁

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-fine aluminum nitride has been synthesized by the evaporation of aluminum powder at atmospheric-pressure nitrogen plasma in a hot-wall reactor. The average size of aluminum nitride particle is 0.11μm measured by scanning electric mirror (SEM), and the purity is at least over 90% evaluated by X-Ray diffraction (XRD). The conversion of Al powder to aluminum nitride is strongly depended on the injection of NH3. Typical experimental parameters such as the feed rate of raw material, the flow rate of ammonia and the position of injecting aluminum powder into the reactor are given.

  16. High efficiency III-nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mary; Koleske, Daniel; Cho, Jaehee; Zhu, Di; Noemaun, Ahmed; Schubert, Martin F; Schubert, E. Fred

    2013-05-28

    Tailored doping of barrier layers enables balancing of the radiative recombination among the multiple-quantum-wells in III-Nitride light-emitting diodes. This tailored doping enables more symmetric carrier transport and uniform carrier distribution which help to reduce electron leakage and thus reduce the efficiency droop in high-power III-Nitride LEDs. Mitigation of the efficiency droop in III-Nitride LEDs may enable the pervasive market penetration of solid-state-lighting technologies in high-power lighting and illumination.

  17. TEM studies of the nitrided Ni-Ti surface layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelatko, J; Paczkowski, P; Wierzchoń, T; Morawiec, H

    2006-09-01

    The structure of surface layer, obtained on the nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloy after nitriding under glow discharge conditions at temperatures 700 or 800 degrees C, was investigated. The structural characterization of the intruded layer was performed on cross-sectional thin foils by the use of the transmission and scanning electron microscopes. The obtained results show that the nitrided layers consist mainly of the nanocrystalline TiN phase and small amount of Ti(2)N. Between the nitrided layers and beta-NiTi matrix an intermediate Ti(2)Ni phase layer was observed. PMID:17059538

  18. Application Of Active Screen Method For Ion Nitriding Efficiency Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogórek M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the research of austenitic steel AISI 304 after ion nitriding at 400°C and at t =4h, for the two different variants of samples distribution in the working plasma reactive chamber tube. In order to assess the effectiveness of ion nitriding variants emission spectroscopy – GDOES, surface hardness tests, microstructure research (LM of nitrided layers were made. It has been found that the use of active screens increases the surface layer thickness and depth of nitrogen diffusion into austenitic steel 304.

  19. Monolithic Gyroidal Mesoporous Mixed Titanium–Niobium Nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous transition metal nitrides are interesting materials for energy conversion and storage applications due to their conductivity and durability. We present ordered mixed titanium–niobium (8:2, 1:1) nitrides with gyroidal network structures synthesized from triblock terpolymer structure-directed mixed oxides. The materials retain both macroscopic integrity and mesoscale ordering despite heat treatment up to 600 °C, without a rigid carbon framework as a support. Furthermore, the gyroidal lattice parameters were varied by changing polymer molar mass. This synthesis strategy may prove useful in generating a variety of monolithic ordered mesoporous mixed oxides and nitrides for electrode and catalyst materials. PMID:25122534

  20. Synthesis of hollow carbon nitride microspheres by an electrodeposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollow carbon nitride microspheres have been synthesized using a novel liquid phase electrodeposition technique. The microspheres are composed of numerous nanoparticles with size of about 5-30 nm. The diameters of the spheres range from 800 nm to 1.1 μm, and shell thickness is about 80-250 nm. This is the first attempt to synthesize carbon nitride with specific nanostructure by the electrodeposition method, which is proved to be facile and effective, and can be performed in an atmospheric environment and at a rather low temperature. The hollow carbon nitride may have potential applications as lubrication, catalysis, biomolecule adsorption, drug delivery, electronic materials, etc. in the future.

  1. A high Tc superconductor bolometer on a silicon nitride membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Stefan; Elwenspoek, Miko; Gui, Chengqun; Nivelle, de, M.J.M.E.; De, Vries; Korte, de, N.; Bruijn, Marcel P.; Wijnbergen, Jan J.; Michalke, Wolfgang; Steinbeiss, Erwin; Heidenblut, Torsten; Schwierzi, Bernard

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a high-Tc GdBa2Cu3O7-¿ superconductor bolometer positioned on a 2× 2-mm2 1-¿m-thick silicon nitride membrane. The bolometer structure has an effective area of 0.64 mm2 and was grown on a specially developed silicon-on-nitride (SON) layer. This layer was made by direct bonding of silicon nitride to silicon after chemical mechanical polishing. The operation temperature of the bolometer is 85 K. A thermal conductance G=3.3·10...

  2. Characteristics of Au/PZT/TiO2/Nitride/Si structure capacitors with ICP nitride treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the characteristics of PZT/TiO2 ferroelectric gate stack capacitors with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) nitridation were investigated for field effect transistor (FET)-type Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM) applications. If a high accumulation capacitance is to be had, the ICP nitridation time needs to be optimized. While a short ICP treatment time results in thermal oxide growth due to lack of nitrogen, a long nitridation time causes a nitride layer which is too thick. Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO2(40 nm)/Nitride/Si (MeFINS) structure capacitors show a memory window (ΔV) of 1.6 V under ±3-V operation while Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO2(40 nm)/Si (MeFIS) capacitors without nitride treatment exhibit a small memory window of 0.6 V. At the same time, the capacitance of the MeFINS device is almost twice that of the MeFIS capacitor. This result implies that the ICP nitride treatment suppresses the formation of a low dielectric constant interfacial SiOx layer and alleviates the series capacitance problem

  3. Characteristics of Au/PZT/TiO{sub 2}/Nitride/Si structure capacitors with ICP nitride treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Hyung Seob; Kim, Tae Ho; Jeon, Chang Bae; Lee, Jae Gab; Kim, Ji Young [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of PZT/TiO{sub 2} ferroelectric gate stack capacitors with Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) nitridation were investigated for field effect transistor (FET)-type Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM) applications. If a high accumulation capacitance is to be had, the ICP nitridation time needs to be optimized. While a short ICP treatment time results in thermal oxide growth due to lack of nitrogen, a long nitridation time causes a nitride layer which is too thick. Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO{sub 2}(40 nm)/Nitride/Si (MeFINS) structure capacitors show a memory window ({delta}V) of 1.6 V under {+-}3-V operation while Au/PZT(200 nm)/TiO{sub 2}(40 nm)/Si (MeFIS) capacitors without nitride treatment exhibit a small memory window of 0.6 V. At the same time, the capacitance of the MeFINS device is almost twice that of the MeFIS capacitor. This result implies that the ICP nitride treatment suppresses the formation of a low dielectric constant interfacial SiO{sub x} layer and alleviates the series capacitance problem.

  4. Beryllium decorated armchair boron nitride nanoribbon: A new planar tetracoordinate nitride containing system with enhanced conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang; Hu, Hong; Ding, Yihong

    2014-07-01

    In this Letter, a new kind of planar tetracoordinate nitride (ptN) structure is obtained via Be-decorated armchair boron nitride nanoribbon (aBNNR). The high stability of such a ptN system is confirmed by both global minimization and molecular dynamical simulation at 1500 K. The results suggest that this Be-decorated aBNNR will be a thermally stable material. The electronic property of aBNNR is significantly increased after the addition of Be atoms to the edges and the band gap decreases as the width of the ribbon decreases. Our Letter posits a new and potentially stable and useful BNNR and augments the literature on ptN.

  5. Thin films of aluminum nitride and aluminum gallium nitride for cold cathode applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, A. T.; Christman, J. A.; Bremser, M. D.; Ward, B. L.; Davis, R. F.; Nemanich, R. J.

    1997-10-01

    Cold cathode structures have been fabricated using AlN and graded AlGaN structures (deposited on n-type 6H-SiC) as the thin film emitting layer. The cathodes consist of an aluminum grid layer separated from the nitride layer by a SiO2 layer and etched to form arrays of either 1, 3, or 5 μm holes through which the emitting nitride surface is exposed. After fabrication, a hydrogen plasma exposure was employed to activate the cathodes. Cathode devices with 5 μm holes displayed emission for up to 30 min before failing. Maximum emission currents ranged from 10-100 nA and required grid voltages ranging from 20-110 V. The grid currents were typically 1 to 104 times the collector currents.

  6. Preparation of carbon-nitride bulk samples in the presence of seed carbon-nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure was developed for preparing bulk carbon-nitride crystals from polymeric α-C3N4.2 at high pressure and high temperature in the presence of seeds of crystalline carbon-nitride films prepared by using a high-voltage discharge plasma combined with pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target. The samples were evaluated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Notably, XPS studies of the film composition before and after thermobaric treatments demonstrated that the nitrogen composition in the α-C3N4.2 material, which initially contained more than 58 % nitrogen, decreased during the annealing process and reached a common, stable composition of ∼ 45 %. The thermobaric experiments were performed at 10 - 77 kbar and 350 - 1200 .deg. C.

  7. Effective Duration of Gas Nitriding Process on AISI 316L for the Formation of a Desired Thickness of Surface Nitrided Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Hassan R. S.; Yusoff Syafiq A.; Zainuddin Azman; Hussain Patthi; Ismail Mokhtar; Abidin Kamal

    2014-01-01

    High temperature gas nitriding performed on AISI 316L at the temperature of 1200°C. The microstructure of treated AISI 316L samples were observed to identify the formation of the microstructure of nitrided surface layer. The grain size of austenite tends to be enlarged when the nitriding time increases, but the austenite single phase structure is maintained even after the long-time solution nitriding. Using microhardness testing, the hardness values drop to the center of the samples. The incr...

  8. Fabrication of Aluminum Gallium Nitride/Gallium Nitride MESFET And It's Applications in Biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alur, Siddharth

    Gallium Nitride has been researched extensively for the past three decades for its application in Light Emitting Diodes (LED's), power devices and UV photodetectors. With the recent developments in crystal growth technology and the ability to control the doping there has been an increased interest in heterostructures formed between Gallium nitride and it's alloy Aluminium Gallium Nitride. These heterostructures due to the combined effect of spontaneous and piezoelectric effect can form a high density and a high mobility electron gas channel without any intentional doping. This high density electron gas makes these heterostructures ideal to be used as sensors. Gallium Nitride is also chemically very stable. Detection of biomolecules in a fast and reliable manner is very important in the areas of food safety and medical research. For biomolecular detection it is paramount to have a robust binding of the probes on the sensor surface. Therefore, in this dissertation, the fabrication and application of the AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors for the detection of DNA and Organophosphate hydrolase enzyme is discussed. In order to use these AlGaN/GaN heterostructures as biological sensors capable of working in a liquid environment photodefinable polydimethyl-siloxane is used as an encapsulant. The immobilization conditions for a robust binding of thiolated DNA and the catalytic receptor enzyme organophosphate hydrolase on gold surfaces is developed with the help of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. DNA and OPH are detected by measuring the change in the drain current of the device as a function of time.

  9. Fabrication of carbide and nitride pellets and the nitride irradiations Niloc 1 and Niloc 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides the relatively well-known advanced LMFBR mixed carbide fuel an advanced mixed nitride is also an attractive candidate for the optimised fuel cycle of the European Fast Reactor, but the present knowledge about the nitride is still insufficient and should be raised to the level of the carbide. For such an optimised fuel cycle the following general conditions have been set up for the fuel: (i) the burnup of the optimised MN and MC should be at least 15 a/o or even beyond, at moderate linear ratings of less than 75 kW/m (ii) the fuel will be used in a He-bonding pin concept and (iii) as far as available an advanced economic pellet fabrication method should be employed. (iv) The fuel structure must contain 15 - 20% porosity in order to accomodate the fission product swelling at high burnup. This report gives a comprehensive description of fuel and pellet fabrication and characterization, irradiation, and post-irradiation examination. From the results important conclusions can be drawn about future work on nitrides

  10. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  11. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined. PMID:26724023

  12. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined

  13. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  14. Humidity-dependent stability of amorphous germanium nitrides fabricated by plasma nitridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the stability of amorphous germanium nitride (Ge3N4) layers formed by plasma nitridation of Ge(100) surfaces using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. We have found that humidity in the air accelerates the degradation of Ge3N4 layers and that under 80% humidity condition, most of the Ge-N bonds convert to Ge-O bonds, producing a uniform GeO2 layer, within 12 h even at room temperature. After this conversion of nitrides to oxides, the surface roughness drastically increased by forming GeO2 islands on the surfaces. These findings indicate that although Ge3N4 layers have superior thermal stability compared to the GeO2 layers, Ge3N4 reacts readily with hydroxyl groups and it is therefore essential to take the best care of the moisture in the fabrication of Ge-based devices with Ge3N4 insulator or passivation layers

  15. Design of a homogeneous subcritical nuclear reactor based on thorium with a source of californium 252; Diseno de un reactor nuclear subcritico homogeneo a base de Torio con una fuente de Californio 252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado H, C. E.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Sajo B, L., E-mail: ce_delgado89@hotmail.com [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: One of the energy alternatives to fossil fuels which do not produce greenhouse gases is the nuclear energy. One of the drawbacks of this alternative is the generation of radioactive wastes of long half-life and its relation to the generation of nuclear materials to produce weapons of mass destruction. An option to these drawbacks of nuclear energy is to use Thorium as part of the nuclear fuel which it becomes in U{sup 233} when capturing neutrons, that is a fissile material. In this paper Monte Carlo methods were used to design a homogeneous subcritical reactor based on thorium. As neutron reflector graphite was used. The reactor core is homogeneous and is formed of 70% light water as moderator, 12% of enriched uranium UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} and 18% of thorium Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} as fuel. To start the nuclear fission chain reaction an isotopic source of californium 252 was used with an intensity of 4.6 x 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}. In the design the value of the effective multiplication factor, whose value turned out k{sub eff} <1 was calculated. Also, the neutron spectra at different distances from the source and the total fluence were calculated, as well as the values of the ambient dose equivalent in the periphery of the reactor. (Author)

  16. Manganese determination om minerals by activation analysis, using the californium-252 as a neutron source; Determinacao de manganes em minerios, por analise por ativacao, usando californio-252 como fonte de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Antonio

    1976-07-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis, using a Californium-252 neutron source, has been applied for the determination of manganese in ores such as pyrolusite, rodonite (manganese silicate)' and blending used in dry-batteries The favorable nuclear properties of manganese, such as high thermal neutron cross-section for the reaction {sup 55}Mn (n.gamma){sup 56} Mn, high concentration of manganese in the matrix and short half - life of {sup 56}Mn, are an ideal combination for non-destructive analysis of manganese in ores. Samples and standards of manganese dioxide were irradiated for about 20 minutes, followed by a 4 to 15 minutes decay and counted in a single channel pulse-height discrimination using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. Counting time was equal to 10 minutes. The interference of nuclear reactions {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn and {sup 59} Co (n, {alpha}){sup 56} were studied, as well as problems in connection with neutron shadowing during irradiation, gamma-rays attenuation during counting and influence of granulometry of samples. One sample,was also analysed by wet-chemical method (sodium bismuthate) in order to compare results. As a whole, i t was shown that the analytical method of neutron activation for manganese in ores and blending, is a method simple, rapid and with good precision and accuracy. (author)

  17. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  18. Protection against arc erosion of 316 stainless steel by plasma source nitridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of surface nitridation of 316 SS on protection against arc erosion and on suppression of plasma cooling were investigated by using thermal shock loading of 75 J/cm2. The volume loss by arcing was remarkably reduced by nitridation to about 1/6. Meanwhile, the mass loss increased by nitridation to about 4 times as much as for the non-nitrided sample. It was understood by XMA analysis of the nitrided sample before and after arcing that the increased mass loss was mainly due to nitrogens released from the nitrided sample by arcing. The nitrided to non-nitrided ratio of the total radiated power of impurities released from the samples by arcing was roughly estimated to be about 0.47 despite the increase of the mass loss by nitridation. (orig.)

  19. Physics of wurtzite nitrides and oxides passport to devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a survey of the current state of the art of a special class of nitrides semiconductors, Wurtzite Nitride and Oxide Semiconductors. It includes properties, growth and applications. Research in the area of nitrides semiconductors is still booming although some basic materials sciences issues were solved already about 20 years ago. With the advent of modern technologies and the successful growth of nitride substrates, these materials currently experience a second birth. Advanced new applications like light-emitters, including UV operating LEDs, normally on and normally off high frequency operating transistors are expected. With progress in clean room technology, advanced photonic and quantum optic applications are envisioned in a close future. This area of research is fascinating for researchers and students in materials science, electrical engineering, chemistry, electronics, physics and biophysics. This book aims to be the ad-hoc instrument to this active field of research.

  20. Thermo-chemical modelling of uranium-free nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A production process for americium-bearing, uranium-free nitride fuels was modelled using the newly developed ALCHYMY thermochemical database. The results suggested that the practical difficulties with yield and purity are of a kinetic rather than a thermodynamical nature. We predict that the immediate product of the typical decarburisation step is not methane, but hydrogen cyanide. HCN may then undergo further reactions upon cooling, explaining the difficulty in observing any carbophoric molecules in the gaseous off stream. The thermal stability of nitride fuels in different environments was also estimated. We show that sintering of nitride compounds containing americium should be performed under nitrogen atmosphere in order to the avoid the excessive losses of americium reported from sintering under inert gas. Addition of nitrogen in small amounts to fuel pin filling gas also appears to significantly improve the in-pile stability of transuranium nitride fuels. (author)

  1. Research of functional properties of nitride ion-plasma coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaulina, O. Yu; Ovechkin, B. B.; Papchenko, A. V.; Shvagrukova, E. V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the influence of ion-plasma coatings with the use of nitrogen (N), zirconium nitride (ZrN), titanium-aluminum nitride (Ti,Al)N and titanium nitride and zirconium nitride by-layer (TiN+ZrN - eight layers) on the properties of steel 65X13. The main functional properties of the coatings are determined: microhardness, nanohardness, Young's modulus and corrosion resistance. It is shown that all the types of coatings allow increasing the physical and mechanical characteristics of instrument steel 65X13. Hardness and wear-resistance, depending on the type of the deposited coating, increase from 1, 5 to 4 times, corrosion resistance increases by tens times.

  2. ECR plasma assisted nitridation of high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional industrial nitridation techniques for tool steel include DC plasma and gas phase reactions. Nitridation by Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma (ECR) of N2 + H2 has yielded higher case depth of nitrided layer on tool steel in lower time as compared to Industrial nitridation. This is mainly due to the higher energies as well as densities of ions in ECR plasma. The substrates were mounted on a heater held in the upstream of the N2 + H2 plasma zone. The heater and correspondingly the samples were heated for temperatures 450 deg and 550 deg. during plasma treatment. A negative bias of -300 V with respect to the chamber was given to the sample. The samples were treated for a time of 90 minutes

  3. Charge-tunable indium gallium nitride quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Teng, Chu-Hsiang; Ku, Pei-Cheng; Deng, Hui

    2016-02-01

    III-Nitride quantum dots have emerged as a new chip-scale system for quantum information science, which combines electrical and optical interfaces on a semiconductor chip that is compatible with noncryogenic operating temperatures. Yet most work has been limited to optical excitations. To enable single-spin-based quantum optical and quantum information research, we demonstrate here quantized charging in optically active, site-controlled III-nitride quantum dots. Single-electron charging was confirmed by the voltage dependence of the energy, dipole moment, fine structures, and polarization properties of the exciton states in the quantum dots. The fundamental energy structures of the quantum dots were identified, including neutral and charged excitons, fine structures of excitons, and A and B excitons. The results lay the ground for coherent control of single charges in III-nitride quantum dots, opening a door to III-nitride-based spintronics and spin-qubit quantum information processing.

  4. Optical absorption of boron nitride nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical absorption spectra have been measured for hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), rhombohedral BN(rh-BN), and material obtained by laser vaporization of BN target under a nitrogen atmosphere and contained single-wall BN-nanotubes. Band gap of the BN materials was found to have a value of 6.0-6.3 eV. The spectra of h -BN and vaporized material exhibited a peak at ∝5.5 eV, moreover, the latter sample showed an absorption band around 4.5 eV. The vaporized material has been fractionated to the BN-platelets and single-wall BN-nanotubes. Absorption peaks, located bellow the bottom of the conductance band, were found to be characteristics of thin BN-platelets and they could be attributed to defects in BN network. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing. PMID:26501751

  6. Gallium Nitride Room Temperature α Particle Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallium Nitride (GaN) room temperature α particle detectors are fabricated and characterized, whose device structure is Schottky diode. The current-voltage (I – V) measurements reveal that the reverse breakdown voltage of the detectors is more than 200 V owing to the consummate fabrication processes, and that the Schottky barrier and ideal factor of the detectors are 0.64 eV and 1.02, respectively, calculated from the thermionic transmission model. 241Am α particles pulse height spectra from the GaN detectors biased at −8 V is obviously one Gauss peak located at channel 44 with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 15.87 in channel. One of the main reasons for the relatively wider FWHM is that the air between the detectors and isotope could widen the spectrum

  7. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  8. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarov, M., E-mail: mihcu@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Pedersen, H., E-mail: henke@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Högberg, H., E-mail: hanho@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Filippov, S., E-mail: stafi@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Engelbrecht, J.A.A., E-mail: Japie.Engelbrecht@nmmu.ac.za [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); O' Connel, J., E-mail: jacques.oconnell@gmail.com [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Henry, A., E-mail: anne.henry@liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-04-15

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp{sup 2}-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  9. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K; Aluru, Narayana R

    2016-04-28

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems. PMID:27131542

  10. Hexagonal boron nitride and water interaction parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanbin; Wagner, Lucas K.; Aluru, Narayana R.

    2016-04-01

    The study of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) in microfluidic and nanofluidic applications at the atomic level requires accurate force field parameters to describe the water-hBN interaction. In this work, we begin with benchmark quality first principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations on the interaction energy between water and hBN, which are used to validate random phase approximation (RPA) calculations. We then proceed with RPA to derive force field parameters, which are used to simulate water contact angle on bulk hBN, attaining a value within the experimental uncertainties. This paper demonstrates that end-to-end multiscale modeling, starting at detailed many-body quantum mechanics and ending with macroscopic properties, with the approximations controlled along the way, is feasible for these systems.

  11. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp2-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  12. Thermal tuners on a Silicon Nitride platform

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, Daniel; Baños, Rocío; Doménech, José David; Sánchez, Ana M; Cirera, Josep M; Mas, Roser; Sánchez, Javier; Durán, Sara; Pardo, Emilio; Domínguez, Carlos; Pastor, Daniel; Capmany, José; Muñoz, Pascual

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the design trade-offs for the implementation of small footprint thermal tuners on silicon nitride are presented, and explored through measurements and supporting simulations of a photonic chip based on Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. Firstly, the electrical properties of the tuners are assessed, showing a compromise between compactness and deterioration. Secondly, the different variables involved in the thermal efficiency, switching power and heater dimensions, are analysed. Finally, with focus on exploring the limits of this compact tuners with regards to on chip component density, the thermal-cross talk is also investigated. Tuners with footprint of 270x5 {\\mu}m 2 and switching power of 350 mW are reported, with thermal-cross talk, in terms of induced phase change in adjacent devices of less than one order of magnitude at distances over 20 {\\mu}m. Paths for the improvement of thermal efficiency, power consumption and resilience of the devices are also outlined

  13. Pure and doped boron nitride nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Terrones

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available More than ten years ago, it was suggested theoretically that boron nitride (BN nanotubes could be produced. Soon after, various reports on their synthesis appeared and a new area of nanotube science was born. This review aims to cover the latest advances related to the synthesis of BN nanotubes. We show that these tubes can now be produced in larger amounts and, in particular, that the chemistry of BN tubes appears to be very important to the production of reinforced composites with insulating characteristics. From the theoretical standpoint, we also show that (BN-C heteronanotubes could have important implications for nanoelectronics. We believe that BN nanotubes (pure and doped could be used in the fabrication of novel devices in which pure carbon nanotubes do not perform very efficiently.

  14. Multifractal characteristics of titanium nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ţălu Ştefan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a multi-scale microstructural characterization of three-dimensional (3-D micro-textured surface of titanium nitride (TiN thin films prepared by reactive DC magnetron sputtering in correlation with substrate temperature variation. Topographical characterization of the surfaces, obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM analysis, was realized by an innovative multifractal method which may be applied for AFM data. The surface micromorphology demonstrates that the multifractal geometry of TiN thin films can be characterized at nanometer scale by the generalized dimensions Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α. Furthermore, to improve the 3-D surface characterization according with ISO 25178-2:2012, the most relevant 3-D surface roughness parameters were calculated. To quantify the 3-D nanostructure surface of TiN thin films a multifractal approach was developed and validated, which can be used for the characterization of topographical changes due to the substrate temperature variation.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of boron nitrides nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new synthesis for the production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) from boron powder, ammonium nitrate and hematite tube furnace CVD method. The samples were subjected to some characterization techniques as infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and transmission. By analyzing the results can explain the chemical reactions involved in the process and confirm the formation of BNNT with several layers and about 30 nanometers in diameter. Due to excellent mechanical properties and its chemical and thermal stability this material is promising for various applications. However, BNNT has received much less attention than carbon nanotubes, it is because of great difficulty to synthesize appreciable quantities from the techniques currently known, and this is one of the main reasons this work.(author)

  16. CEMS of nitride coatings in agressive environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzel, D. [University of Ljubljana, J. Stefan Institute (Slovenia); Agudelo, A.C.; Gancedo, J.R. [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC (Spain); Lakatos-Varsanyi, M. [Eoetvoes University, Department of Physical Chemistry (Hungary); Marco, J.F. [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC (Spain)

    1998-12-15

    The corrosion properties of single layered TiN and CrN films have been compared to bi-layered and multi-layered Ti/TiN films. XPS has showed that in humid SO{sub 2} atmosphere the best corrosion properties have been achieved by a multi-layered Ti/TiN coating. Cyclic voltammetry in acetate buffer has been applied to measure the porousity and corrosion resistance of coatings. The best results have been achieved by multi-layered Ti/TiN and CrN films. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to study the changes in the interface Fe/TiN during thermal treatment in UHV. It has been shown that the amount of iron nitrides in the interface increases with increasing temperature.

  17. CEMS of nitride coatings in agressive environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion properties of single layered TiN and CrN films have been compared to bi-layered and multi-layered Ti/TiN films. XPS has showed that in humid SO2 atmosphere the best corrosion properties have been achieved by a multi-layered Ti/TiN coating. Cyclic voltammetry in acetate buffer has been applied to measure the porousity and corrosion resistance of coatings. The best results have been achieved by multi-layered Ti/TiN and CrN films. Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to study the changes in the interface Fe/TiN during thermal treatment in UHV. It has been shown that the amount of iron nitrides in the interface increases with increasing temperature

  18. Optical processes in dilute nitrides Semiconductors; Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Potter, R J

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the narrow bandgap semiconductor alloys known as dilute nitrides. The initial part of this project was concerned with characterisation of chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) grown samples so that growth techniques could be refined. Early samples show evidence of structural/compositional disorder resulting from the large miscibility gap induced by nitrogen. Non-equilibrium growth was employed to overcome this, eventually resulting in improved material. In the second part of this project, steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence, along with photomodulated reflectance were employed to investigate the optical properties of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown GalnNAs, GaNAs and InGaAs quantum wells (QWs). Low temperature results show evidence of carrier localization, which was interpreted in terms of structural/compositional fluctuations induced by the nitrogen incorporation. Poor photoluminescence efficiency and rapid decay of emission kinetics indicate the presence of strong non-radi...

  19. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C2N4H4), melamine (C3N6H6), and melem (C6N10H6), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Nitride and Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szpunar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electronic thermal conductivity of alternative fuels like uranium nitride and uranium carbide. We evaluate the electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, by combining first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations with semiclassical correlations. The electronic structure of UN and UC was calculated using Quantum Espresso code. The spin polarized calculations were performed for a ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments on uranium lattice and magnetic moment in UC was lower than in UN due to stronger hybridization between 2p electrons of carbon and 5f electrons of uranium. The nonmagnetic electronic structure calculations were used as an input to BolzTrap code that was used to evaluate the electronic thermal conductivity. It is predicted that the thermal conductivity should increase with the temperature increase, but to get a quantitative agreement with the experiment at higher temperatures the interaction of electrons with phonons (and electron-electron scattering needs to be included.

  1. Laser ablation of molecular carbon nitride compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D., E-mail: d.fischer@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwinghammer, K. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany); Sondermann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Lau, V.W.; Mannhart, J. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lotsch, B.V. [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Munich, LMU, Butenandtstr. 5-13, 81377 Munich (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM) and Center for Nanoscience (CeNS), 80799 Munich (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a method for the preparation of thin films on sapphire substrates of the carbon nitride precursors dicyandiamide (C{sub 2}N{sub 4}H{sub 4}), melamine (C{sub 3}N{sub 6}H{sub 6}), and melem (C{sub 6}N{sub 10}H{sub 6}), using the femtosecond-pulsed laser deposition technique (femto-PLD) at different temperatures. The depositions were carried out under high vacuum with a femtosecond-pulsed laser. The focused laser beam is scanned on the surface of a rotating target consisting of the pelletized compounds. The resulting polycrystalline, opaque films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared, Raman, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, SEM, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry measurements. The crystal structures and optical/spectroscopic results of the obtained rough films largely match those of the bulk materials.

  2. Gas nitriding of high vanadium steels—experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Henrik; Ågren, John

    2004-09-01

    Four experimental high vanadium alloys were gas nitrided in an ammonia-nitrogen atmosphere. The microstructure and concentration gradients have been investigated by means of several techniques. The nitriding process has been tentatively simulated using the DICTRA software. A precise process simulation does not seem possible at present; the reason for this is discussed. Instead, bounds for the carbon and nitrogen concentration profiles were obtained by applying different simulation conditions.

  3. Low temperature gaseous nitriding and carburising of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2005-01-01

    for temperatures (783 K. The case developed by thermochemical treatment was examined using reflected light microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and microhardness testing. Both nitriding and carburising led to the development of expanded austenite in the surface adjacent zone, irrespective of the...... phase constitution of the substrate. A two step process, consisting of carburising followed by nitriding, provides great flexibility with regard to adjusting the hardness–depth profile....

  4. Cubic boron nitride- a new material for ultracold neutron application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the Fermi potential of cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultra cold neutron source at the TRIGA reactor, Mainz using the time of flight method (TOF). The investigated samples have a Fermi potential of about 300 neV. Because of its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride could be used as suitable coating for insulator in storage chambers of future EDM projects. This talk presents recent results and an outlook on further investigations.

  5. LASER GAS NITRIDING OF TITANIUM AND TITANIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. DAI; Hou, S. Q.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in many fields due to some of their characteristics such as light density, high strength, and excellent corrosion resistance. However, poor mechanical performances limit their practical applications. Laser gas nitriding is a promising method used to improve the surface properties of components. Recent developments on laser gas nitriding of titanium and titanium alloys are reviewed. The processing parameters have important effects on the resulting c...

  6. The Microstructure of Tool Steel after Low Temperature Ion Nitriding

    OpenAIRE

    Zagonel, L. F.; Mittemeijer, E. J.; Alvarez, F.

    2012-01-01

    The microstructural development in H13 tool steel upon nitriding by an ion beam process was investigated. The nitriding experiments were performed at a relatively low temperature of about 400\\deg C and at constant ion beam energy (400 eV) of different doses in a high-vacuum preparation chamber; the ion source was fed with high purity nitrogen gas. The specimens were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning and transmission electron...

  7. Characterization of plasma nitrided layers produced on sintered iron

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Alves Fontes; Ricardo Gomes Pereira; Frederico Augusto Pires Fernandes; Luiz Carlos Casteletti; Pedro Augusto de Paula Nascente

    2014-01-01

    Plasma nitriding is a thermo-physical-chemical treatment process, which promotes surface hardening, caused by interstitial diffusion of atomic nitrogen into metallic alloys. In this work, this process was employed in the surface modification of a sintered ferrous alloy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and wear and microhardness tests were performed on the samples submitted to ferrox treatment and plasma nitriding carried out under different conditions of ...

  8. Steel nitriding optimization through multi-objective and FEM analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pasquale Cavaliere; Angelo Perrone; Alessio Silvello

    2016-01-01

    Steel nitriding is a thermo-chemical process leading to surface hardening and improvement in fatigue properties. The process is strongly influenced by many different variables such as steel composition, nitrogen potential, temperature, time, and quenching media. In the present study, the influence of such parameters affecting physic-chemical and mechanical properties of nitride steels was evaluated. The aim was to streamline the process by numerical–experimental analysis allowing defining the...

  9. Discharges in N2 flowing gas for steel surface nitriding

    OpenAIRE

    Ricard, A.

    1989-01-01

    Modelling of plasma reactors for steel surface nitriding has been achieved in discharge and post-discharge conditions of N2 flowing gas. Diagnostics and calculations have been focused on the N2(X, V) vibrational molecules and N atoms which are the most populated long living species. It has been demonstrated that these neutral active species produce steel surface nitriding with the same characteristics than classical ion processes : composition and depth of γ'Fe4N and N diffusion coating follo...

  10. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Zorn, Gilad; MIGONNEY, Véronique; Castner, David G.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulf...

  11. Four-Wave Mixing in Silicon-Rich Nitride Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitrovic, Miranda; Guan, Xiaowei; Ji, Hua; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in silicon-rich nitride waveguides which are a promising alternative to silicon for nonlinear applications. The obtained conversion efficiency reaches -13.6 dB while showing no significant nonlinear loss.......We demonstrate four-wave mixing wavelength conversion in silicon-rich nitride waveguides which are a promising alternative to silicon for nonlinear applications. The obtained conversion efficiency reaches -13.6 dB while showing no significant nonlinear loss....

  12. Research of nanocomposite structure of boron nitride at proton radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Borodin, Yuri Viktorovich; Ermolaev, D. S.; Pak, V.; Zhang, K.

    2016-01-01

    Using roentgen diffraction and electron microscopy, the influence of nanosecond irradiation by ion beams of high energy on forming of self-organized nanoblocks in near surface's layers of boron nitride (BN) has been studied. It was shown that low temperature transitions from hexagonal to wrutz boron nitrides is associated with changes of shape and sizes of self-organized particles consisting the nanoblocks. We have calculated the parameters of nanoblocks using the meanings of interplane dista...

  13. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Guler, Urcan; Kildishev, Alexander V; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M

    2014-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window. With dimensions optimized for efficient cellular uptake, the nanoparticles demonstrate a high photothermal conversion efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional degree of freedom for surface functionalization.

  14. Corrosion behavior of tantalum and its nitride in alkali solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Deyuan; LIN Qin; FEI Qinyong; ZHAO Haomin; KANG Guangyu; GENG Man

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of tantalum and its nitrides in stirring NaOH solutions was researched by potenfiostatic method, cyclic voltammetry and XPS. The results showed that the corrosion products were composed of Ta2O5 and NaTaO3.The corrosion reaction formula of tantalum and its nitrides was written according to cyclic volt-ampere curves. The electric charge transfer coefficient and the electric charge transfer number were calculated.

  15. Nitrogen Atom Transfer From High Valent Iron Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2015-10-14

    This report describes the synthesis and reactions of high valent iron nitrides. Organonitrogen compounds such as aziridines are useful species for organic synthesis, but there are few efficient methods for their synthesis. Using iron nitrides to catalytically access these species may allow for their synthesis in an energy-and atom-efficient manner. We have developed a new ligand framework to achieve these goals as well as providing a method for inducing previously unknown reactivity.

  16. Vertical transport in graphene-hexagonal boron nitride heterostructure devices

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Bruzzone; Demetrio Logoteta; Gianluca Fiori; Giuseppe Iannaccone

    2015-01-01

    Research in graphene-based electronics is recently focusing on devices based on vertical heterostructures of two-dimensional materials. Here we use density functional theory and multiscale simulations to investigate the tunneling properties of single- and double-barrier structures with graphene and few-layer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) or hexagonal boron carbon nitride (h-BC2N). We find that tunneling through a single barrier exhibit a weak dependence on energy. We also show that in double...

  17. Numerical investigation of silicon nitride trench waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Huang, Yuewang; Torun, Rasul; Rahman, Shah; Atasever, Tuva C.; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2015-08-01

    We numerically investigated optical properties, including evanescent intensity ratio (EIR), effective refractive index (Neff), dispersion coefficient (D), and mode area (Aeff) of the silicon nitride trench waveguides fabricated by using conventional lithography. The waveguides are etched 3 μm deep with potassium hydroxide for triangle and trapezoidal waveguides, which is then followed by 3 μm thermal oxidation and 725 nm silicon nitride deposition. The waveguide with 725 nm thickness has an EIR peak of 0.025 when its bottom width Wbtm equals 0.65 μm. A thinner waveguide has higher evanescent intensity ratio, which can be used in sensing applications. The locations of EIR peaks correspond to the quasi-TM and TE mode boundary. Narrower waveguides mainly support quasi-TM modes, whereas wider waveguides can support only TE modes. As the waveguide width increases, higher orders of TE modes emerge. In addition, a boundary of TE single mode and multimode can also be linearly curve fitted, according to the starting points of TE higher modes, in order to provide the single mode condition of the waveguide. The waveguide dispersion can be engineered to be in the anomalous region while at the same time remain close to zero. The waveguide with 725 nm thickness and 0.2 μm bottom width has its anomalous dispersion region between the wavelength of 1356 nm and 1462 nm. The mode area decreases with increasing waveguide width. This is the first time we have studied the mode properties of trench waveguides systematically. The waveguide will find more applications in sensing and nonlinear fields with the help of this mode analysis.

  18. Gallium Nitride Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Min, E-mail: mlu2006@sinano.ac.c [Su zhou Institute of Nano-technology and Nano-bionics, CAS, Su zhou 215125 (China); Zhang Guoguang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Fu Kai; Yu Guohao [Su zhou Institute of Nano-technology and Nano-bionics, CAS, Su zhou 215125 (China); Su Dan; Hu Jifeng [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Gallium Nitride nuclear batteries with Ni-63 are demonstrated for the first time. {yields} Open circuit voltage of 0.1 V and conversion efficiency of 0.32% have been obtained. {yields} The limited performance is due to thin effective energy deposition layer. {yields} The output power is expected to greatly increase with growing thick GaN films. -- Abstract: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries (GNBB) are demonstrated in our work for the first time. GaN films are grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and then GaN Schottky diodes are fabricated by normal micro-fabrication process. Nickel with mass number of 63 ({sup 63}Ni), which emits {beta} particles, is loaded on the GaN Schottky diodes to achieve GNBB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) are carried out to investigate the crystal quality for the GaN films as grown. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics shows that the GaN Schottky diodes are not jet broken down at -200 V due to consummate fabrication processes, and the open circuit voltage of the GNBB is 0.1 V and the short circuit current density is 1.2 nA cm{sup -2}. The limited performance of the GNBB is due to thin effective energy deposition layer, which is only 206 nm to absorb very small partial energy of the {beta} particles because of the relatively high dislocation density and carrier concentration. However, the conversion efficiency of 0.32% and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 29% for the GNBB have been obtained. Therefore, the output power of the GNBB are expected to greatly increase with growing high quality thick GaN films.

  19. Gallium Nitride Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Gallium Nitride nuclear batteries with Ni-63 are demonstrated for the first time. → Open circuit voltage of 0.1 V and conversion efficiency of 0.32% have been obtained. → The limited performance is due to thin effective energy deposition layer. → The output power is expected to greatly increase with growing thick GaN films. -- Abstract: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries (GNBB) are demonstrated in our work for the first time. GaN films are grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and then GaN Schottky diodes are fabricated by normal micro-fabrication process. Nickel with mass number of 63 (63Ni), which emits β particles, is loaded on the GaN Schottky diodes to achieve GNBB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) are carried out to investigate the crystal quality for the GaN films as grown. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics shows that the GaN Schottky diodes are not jet broken down at -200 V due to consummate fabrication processes, and the open circuit voltage of the GNBB is 0.1 V and the short circuit current density is 1.2 nA cm-2. The limited performance of the GNBB is due to thin effective energy deposition layer, which is only 206 nm to absorb very small partial energy of the β particles because of the relatively high dislocation density and carrier concentration. However, the conversion efficiency of 0.32% and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 29% for the GNBB have been obtained. Therefore, the output power of the GNBB are expected to greatly increase with growing high quality thick GaN films.

  20. Wide-bandwidth silicon nitride membrane microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian T.; Bernstein, Jonathan J.

    1997-09-01

    Small, low cost microphones with high sensitivity at frequencies greater than 20 KHz are desired for applications such as ultrasonic imaging and communication links. To minimize stray capacitance between the microphone and its amplifier circuit, process compatibility between the microphone and on-chip circuitry is also desired to facilitate integration. In this work, we have demonstrated micromachined microphones packaged with hybrid JFET amplifier circuitry with frequency response extending to 100 KHz, and voltage sensitivity of approximately 2.0 mV/Pa from 100 Hz to 10 KHz, and 16.5 mV/Pa at 30 KHz with a bias voltage of 8.0 V. The microphones are fabricated with membranes and fixed backplates made of low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride. Because the maximum temperature of the fabrication process is 300 degrees Celsius, microphones may be built on silicon wafers from any commercial CMOS foundry without affecting transistor characteristics, allowing integration with sophisticated amplifier circuitry. Low stress silicon nitride deposition was used to produce membranes up to 2.0 mm diameter and 0.5 micrometer thickness with plus or minus 0.10 micrometer flatness. The excellent planarity of both the diaphragm and the backplate, combined with a narrow sense gap (approximately 2 micrometers) results in high output capacitance (up to 6.0 pF). The high output capacitance results in noise spectral density which is approximately 3x lower than silicon diaphragms microphones previously fabricated by the authors. Diaphragms with corrugations were fabricated to relive tensile stress, to increase deflection per unit pressure and to increase deflection linearity with pressure.

  1. Consistency Improvement of some steel types by plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma nitriding is a powerful technique for modifying the phase-structure of the material surface layers, which affect the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of material. The effect of plasma nitriding on the surface properties of three types of steel (low carbon, AISI-304 and H13 (hardened)) has been investigated. The steel samples were plasma nitrided in vacuum of 10-1Pa with gas mixture of (N2, H2) at 530 Centigrade degree for a duration of 14 hours. Vickers microhardness measurements and XRD phase analysis of the treated and untreated samples were carried out. The diffraction patterns of treated steels revealed that new phases of γ-Fe4N, ε-Fe3N and (Fe,Cr)2N were formed. The maximum treated depths were about 5, 6 and 45 μm for low carbon, AISI-304 and H13 (hardened) nitrided steel respectively. The microhardness was increased by about 150%, 200% and 140% for low carbon, AISI-304 and H13 nitrided samples respectively. This increase in surface hardness could be attributed to formation of new nitride phases. (authors)

  2. High-temperature nitridation of Ni-Cr alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodentsov, A. A.; Gülpen, J. H.; Cserháti, C.; Kivilahti, J. K.; van Loo, F. J. J.

    1996-01-01

    The nitriding behavior of nickel-chromium alloys was investigated at 1398 K over the range 1 to 6000 bar of external nitrogen pressure. The morphology of the nitrided zone depends on the concentration of chromium in the initial alloy and the N2 pressure (fugacity) applied upon the system. The transition from CrN to Cr2N precipitation was observed within the reaction zone after nitriding at 100 to 6000 bar of N2 when the chromium content in the initial alloys was 28.0 at. pct or higher. It is shown that the ternary phase π (Cr10Ni7N3) is formed in this system at 1273 K. through a peritectoid reaction between Cr2N and nickel solid solution and becomes unstable above 1373 K. The thermodynamic evaluation of the Ni-Cr-N system was performed and phase equilibria calculated. Evidence for “up hill” diffusion of nitrogen near the reaction front during the internal nitridation of Ni-Cr alloys at 1398 K was found. It was attributed to the relative instability of chromium nitrides and strong Cr-N interaction in the matrix of the Ni-based solid solution within the nitrided zone.

  3. NITROGEN POTENTIAL DURING ION NITRIDING PROCESS IN GLOW-DISCHARGE PLASMA

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlov, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers problems on regulation of phase composition of a nitrided layer during gas and ion nitriding process in a glow-discharge. It has been established that  available models for control of nitrided layer structure with the help of nitriding index (nitrogen potential) can not be applied for nitriding process in the glow-discharge. Principal difference of the ion nitriding from the gas one is in the fact that chemically active nitrogen is formed in the discharge zone (cathode lay...

  4. Microscopic investigation of pitting corrosion in plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UNS 31603 austenitic stainless steel was nitrided using different techniques, and pitting corrosion resistance was analysed in a chloride solution. All nitriding techniques, LEII, PI. and convectional DC nitriding produced a nitrided layer called S phase which is corrosion resistant. Pits morphology and layer structure was investigated using optical and electronic microscopy, SEM-FIB, EDS, and a 3D reconstruction of a pit was assessed using FIB tomography. It was concluded that pits are initiated in MnS inclusions and a channel was generated passing through the nitrided layer, connecting the steel with the electrolyte. Base alloy dissolution was observed beneath the nitrided layer.

  5. Study of reactions between uranium-plutonium mixed oxide and uranium nitride and between uranium oxide and uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of combustible elements which is a mixture of uranium nitride and uranium-plutonium oxide could be used for Quick Neutrons Reactors. Three different studies have been made on the one hand on the reactions between uranium nitride (UN) and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide (U,Pu)O2, on the other hand on these between UN and uranium oxide UO2. They show a sizeable reaction between nitride and oxide for the studied temperatures range (1573 K to 1973 K). This reaction forms a oxynitride compound, MOx Ny with M=U or M=(U,Pu), whose crystalline structure is similar to oxide's. Solubility of nitride in both oxides is studied, as the reaction kinetics. (TEC). 32 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs

  6. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarifah, Ratna Dewi, E-mail: syarifah.physics@gmail.com; Suud, Zaki, E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better.

  7. The prospect of uranium nitride (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN) for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design study of small Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) core loaded with uranium nitride fuel (UN) and mixed nitride fuel (UN-PuN), Pa-231 as burnable poison, and Americium has been performed. Pa-231 known as actinide material, have large capture cross section and can be converted into fissile material that can be utilized to reduce excess reactivity. Americium is one of minor actinides with long half life. The objective of adding americium is to decrease nuclear spent fuel in the world. The neutronic analysis results show that mixed nitride fuel have k-inf greater than uranium nitride fuel. It is caused by the addition of Pu-239 in mixed nitride fuel. In fuel fraction analysis, for uranium nitride fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 45% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 45% moderator. In case of UN-PuN fuel, the optimum volume fractions are 30% fuel fraction, 10% cladding and 60% coolant/ moderator. The addition of Pa-231 as burnable poison for UN fuel, enrichment U-235 5%, with Pa-231 1.6% has k-inf more than one and excess reactivity of 14.45%. And for mixed nitride fuel, the lowest value of reactivity swing is when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 8% with Pa-231 0.4%, the excess reactivity value 13,76%. The fuel pin analyze for the addition of Americium, the excess reactivity value is lower than before, because Americium absorb the neutron. For UN fuel, enrichment U-235 8%, Pa-231 1.6% and Am 0.5%, the excess reactivity is 4.86%. And for mixed nitride fuel, when enrichment (U-235+Pu) 13%, Pa-231 0.4% and Am 0.1%, the excess reactivity is 11.94%. For core configuration, it is better to use heterogeneous than homogeneous core configuration, because the radial power distribution is better

  8. EDITORIAL: Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors Non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung; Kneissl, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Throughout the history of group-III-nitride materials and devices, scientific breakthroughs and technological advances have gone hand-in-hand. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the discovery of the nucleation of smooth (0001) GaN films on c-plane sapphire and the activation of p-dopants in GaN led very quickly to the realization of high-brightness blue and green LEDs, followed by the first demonstration of GaN-based violet laser diodes in the mid 1990s. Today, blue InGaN LEDs boast record external quantum efficiencies exceeding 80% and the emission wavelength of the InGaN-based laser diode has been pushed into the green spectral range. Although these tremenduous advances have already spurred multi-billion dollar industries, there are still a number of scientific questions and technological issues that are unanswered. One key challenge is related to the polar nature of the III-nitride wurtzite crystal. Until a decade ago all research activities had almost exclusively concentrated on (0001)-oriented polar GaN layers and heterostructures. Although the device characteristics seem excellent, the strong polarization fields at GaN heterointerfaces can lead to a significant deterioration of the device performance. Triggered by the first demonstration non-polar GaN quantum wells grown on LiAlO2 by Waltereit and colleagues in 2000, impressive advances in the area of non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors and devices have been achieved. Today, a large variety of heterostructures free of polarization fields and exhibiting exceptional electronic and optical properties have been demonstrated, and the fundamental understanding of polar, semipolar and non-polar nitrides has made significant leaps forward. The contributions in this Semiconductor Science and Technology special issue on non-polar and semipolar nitride semiconductors provide an impressive and up-to-date cross-section of all areas of research and device physics in this field. The articles cover a wide range of

  9. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  10. Nitriding of iron-based ternary Fe–V–Si alloy: The precipitation process of separate nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron-based ternary Fe–V–Si and binary Fe–Si alloy specimens were nitrided in a NH3/H2 gas mixture at 580 °C (853 K) with a nitriding potential of rN = 0.1 atm−1/2 until nitrogen saturation in the specimens was achieved. In contrast to previously investigated iron-based ternary Fe–Al–Cr and Fe–Ti–Cr alloys, no so-called “mixed” nitrides developed in the Fe–V–Si alloy. Instead, in the first stage, all vanadium precipitated as crystalline VN and, subsequently, all silicon precipitated as amorphous Si3N4. Moreover, the precipitation rate of Si3N4 in the nitrided ternary Fe–V–Si alloy was much lower than in the binary Fe–Si alloy nitrided under identical conditions. This much lower Si3N4-precipitation rate is attributed to the presence of first precipitated VN: coherency strains caused by the (semi-) coherent VN precipitates interact with the strain fields surrounding the Si3N4 precipitates and are obstacles to the movement of dislocations necessarily introduced in the ferrite matrix by growing Si3N4 precipitates. This interpretation is supported by additional experiments, in which the first precipitated VN platelets were coarsened by annealing before subsequent nitriding led to, now much faster, Si3N4 precipitation

  11. Microstructural and tribological characterization of plasma- and gas-nitrided 2Cr13 steel in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma- and gas-nitrided 2Cr13 samples were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and microhardness testing techniques. Nitrogen concentration profiles in the cross-sections of the nitrided samples were obtained by glow discharge optical spectroscopy (GDOS). Residual stress profiles along depth of the nitrided samples were measured using an X-ray stress tester. The tribological behaviour of the plasma- and the gas-nitrided samples in vacuum was investigated in order to analyse the effect of nitriding on wear resistance of the 2Cr13 steel. The results show the tribological properties of the 2Cr13 steel in vacuum are improved considerably by plasma nitriding and gas nitriding resulted from microstructure modification and surface hardening during nitriding. The plasma-nitrided samples have better wear resistance than the gas-nitrided samples under 30 N, while the gas-nitrided samples have higher wear resistance under 90 N. With increasing normal load from 30 N to 90 N, the wear mechanism shows a transition from mild adhesive and abrasive wear to severe adhesive or even delamination wear. The plasma-nitrided sample has thicker compound layer than the gas-nitrided sample, resulting that it exhibits more intensive delamination under high load of 90 N.

  12. First principles calculations of interstitial and lamellar rhenium nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, G., E-mail: gerardo@cnyn.unam.mx [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico); Tiznado, H.; Reyes, A.; Cruz, W. de la [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Nanociencias y Nanotecnologia, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada Baja California (Mexico)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible structures of rhenium nitride as a function of composition are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The alloying energy is favorable for rhenium nitride in lamellar arrangements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by magnetron sputtering are metastable variations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structures produced by high-pressure high-temperature are stable configurations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The lamellar structures are a new category of interstitial dissolutions. - Abstract: We report here a systematic first principles study of two classes of variable-composition rhenium nitride: i, interstitial rhenium nitride as a solid solution and ii, rhenium nitride in lamellar structures. The compounds in class i are cubic and hexagonal close-packed rhenium phases, with nitrogen in the octahedral and tetrahedral interstices of the metal, and they are formed without changes to the structure, except for slight distortions of the unit cells. In the compounds in class ii, by contrast, the nitrogen inclusion provokes stacking faults in the parent metal structure. These faults create trigonal-prismatic sites where the nitrogen residence is energetically favored. This second class of compounds produces lamellar structures, where the nitrogen lamellas are inserted among multiple rhenium layers. The Re{sub 3}N and Re{sub 2}N phases produced recently by high-temperature and high-pressure synthesis belong to this class. The ratio of the nitrogen layers to the rhenium layers is given by the composition. While the first principle calculations point to higher stability for the lamellar structures as opposed to the interstitial phases, the experimental evidence presented here demonstrates that the interstitial classes are synthesizable by plasma methods. We conclude that rhenium nitrides possess polymorphism and that the two-dimensional lamellar structures might represent an emerging class of materials

  13. Imitators of plutonium and americium in a mixed uranium- plutonium nitride fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, S. N.; Shornikov, D. P.; Tarasov, B. A.; Baranov, V. G.; Burlakova, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Uranium nitride and mix uranium nitride (U-Pu)N is most popular nuclear fuel for Russian Fast Breeder Reactor. The works in hot cells associated with the radiation exposure of personnel and methodological difficulties. To know the main physical-chemical properties of uranium-plutonium nitride it necessary research to hot cells. In this paper, based on an assessment of physicochemical and thermodynamic properties of selected simulators Pu and Am. Analogues of Pu is are Ce and Y, and analogues Am - Dy. The technique of obtaining a model nitride fuel based on lanthanides nitrides and UN. Hydrogenation-dehydrogenation- nitration method of derived powders nitrides uranium, cerium, yttrium and dysprosium, held their mixing, pressing and sintering, the samples obtained model nitride fuel with plutonium and americium imitation. According to the results of structural studies have shown that all the samples are solid solution nitrides rare earth (REE) elements in UN.

  14. Electroless plating of thin gold films directly onto silicon nitride thin films and into micropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Julie C; Karawdeniya, Buddini Iroshika; Bandara, Y M Nuwan D Y; Velleco, Brian D; Masterson, Caitlin M; Dwyer, Jason R

    2014-07-23

    A method to directly electrolessly plate silicon-rich silicon nitride with thin gold films was developed and characterized. Films with thicknesses coating planar, curved, and line-of-sight-obscured silicon nitride surfaces. PMID:24999923

  15. Nitride and carbide preforms for infiltration process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Twardowska

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Infiltration of molten metals into porous ceramic preforms is the only technique suitable for the fabrication of high volume fraction of ceramic materials in MMCs. The most popular material for porous preforms is Al2O3 because of its low cost. Infiltration process generates thermal stresses in the Al2O3 preforms. The thermal shock resistance of Al2O3 is lower than for Si3N4 or Al2O3/TiC+TiN materials. The aim of this study is to obtain the nitride and carbide base preforms material for the infiltration process of molten aluminium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: The method of obtaining the silicon nitride and oxide-carbonitride porous preform for the infiltration process is the free sintering process. Some of selected properties of this material are presented. The preforms were produced by the mixing of ceramic powders with organic binders, followed by forming, drying and firing. Ceramic preforms of 65% porosity were produced. Microscopic investigations revealed good joints between the ceramic particles.Findings: The material consist of the base component (90 wt.% of α-Si3N4, 5 wt.% of Al2O3, 5 wt.% of Y2O3, which were mixed with 40 wt.% of polyethylene glycol 6000 (mixed in Turbula porosity is 25.7 %. The higher value of porosity 66.6% was obtained for material with 20 wt.% tylose. The grain size of Si3N4 and method of the mixtures preparing (mixing with or without milling have the significant influence on compacts’ porosity. For 68 wt.% Al2O3, 2 wt.% ZrO2 and 30 wt.% Ti(C,N with addition of glycol 6000, the value of porosity is 67%. α-Si3N4 material produced shows strong bonding with aluminium and AlSi11 aluminium alloy.Practical implications: Pressureless infiltration of molten metals into ceramics is the most cost-effective approach to liquid-metal processing of MMCs. Metal matrix composites are applied widely in aircraft production technologies and defence technology.Originality/value: Compared to widely used alumina

  16. Nitriding of iron-based alloys : residual stresses and internal strain fields

    OpenAIRE

    Vives Díaz, Nicolás

    2007-01-01

    Different iron-chromium alloys (4, 8, 13 and 20 wt.% Cr) were nitrided in NH3/H2 gas mixtures at 580 ºC. The nitrided microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction, light microscopy, hardness measurements and scanning electron microscopy. Composition depth-profiles of the nitrided zone were determined by electron probe microanalysis. Various microstructures develop, depending on the nitriding conditions and the alloy composition (chromium content). The initial development of coherent, ...

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Propertiesof a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced ActivationFerritic/Martensitic Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; SHA, WEI; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-01-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic micro...

  18. DFT Studies on Electronic Structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ming; HUANG Chun-Hui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the configurations of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes with BNC2 composition were optimized by ROHF method. According to the density functional theory, the electronic structures of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were calculated by DFT/ROB3LYP method. By analyzing the energy gap, density of electronic state and bonding maps of atoms, the conductive properties of Boro-Nitride-Carbon nanotubes were obtained, and compared with those of carbon nanotubes and other Boro-Nitride nanotubes.

  19. Evaluation of plasma nitriding efficiency of titanium alloys for medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Frączek, T.; Olejnik, M.; Tokarz, A.

    2009-01-01

    The surface layers obtained on selected titanium alloys, used in medicine, by the nitriding under glow discharge condition were investigated. The results concern of: α- titanium alloy Grade 2 and α + β alloys Grade 5 and Grade 5 ELI nitrided in temperature below 873 K. The nitriding experiments were performed in a current glow-discharge furnace JON-600 with assisting of unconventional methods. After nitriding surface layers were characterised by surface microhardness measuremen...

  20. Modeling and Simulation of Thermochemical Heat Treatment Processes: A Phase Field Calculation of Nitriding in Steel.

    OpenAIRE

    Tijani, Yakub Adesoga

    2008-01-01

    In order to provide greater improvements in material performance with respect to hardness, fatigue, wear resistance and corrosion resistance, among other mechanical properties, nitrogen is commonly introduced on steel surface at elevated temperature. Such enhancement, referred to as nitriding, results in the diffusion of nitrogen into the steel with development of continuous layers of iron-based nitrides and precipitation of alloying-element nitrides, depending on the nitriding kinetics.Up ti...

  1. The choice of the optimal temperature and time parameters of gas nitriding of steel

    OpenAIRE

    Dhafer, Wadee Al-Rekaby; Kostyk, Viktoriia; Kostyk, Kateryna; Glotka, Alexandr; Chechel, Mykola

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of the gas nitriding process allows solving the problems of control of process parameters, prediction of outcomes and development of various treatment conditions, which is quite an urgent issue today. The research was aimed at selecting the optimum temperature and time parameters of gas nitriding of 38Сr2MoAl steel. Optical and electron microscopy showed that the diffusion layer after gas nitriding in the ammonia environment is the nitrided case and the region of interna...

  2. Evanescent field phase shifting in a silicon nitride waveguide using a coupled silicon slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Asger Sellerup; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Green, William M. J.

    An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration.......An approach for electrical modulation of low-loss silicon nitride waveguides is proposed, using a silicon nitride waveguide evanescently loaded with a thin silicon slab. The thermooptic phase-shift characteristics are investigated in a racetrack resonator configuration....

  3. Molecular dynamics studies of the bonding properties of amorphous silicon nitride coatings on crystalline silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, K.T.; Lamers, M.P.W.E.; Weeber, A. W.; Harding, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present molecular dynamics simulations of silicon nitride, both in bulk and as an interface to crystalline silicon. We investigate, in particular, the bonding structure of the silicon nitride and analyze the simulations to search for de- fective geometries which have been identified as potential charge carrier traps when silicon nitride forms an interface with silicon semiconductors. The simulations reveal how the bonding patterns in silicon nitride are dependent upon the sto...

  4. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  5. The melting parameters of high-temperature nonmetallic nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ranges of temperatures and pressures for the existence of condensed boron, aluminum, and silicon nonmetallic nitrides in thermodynamic equilibrium with an ambient gas were calculated on the basis of reference data. The melting parameters of the high-temperature nitrides mentioned above were investigated experimentally in the nitrogen pressure range of 5200 MPa. The 99% purity nitride samples were prepared in the form of 4 x 4-mm plates with a thickness of 1 mm. The surfaces of samples were heated with stationary laser beam and analyzed by X-ray technique. The brightness temperature of nonmetallic nitrides was measured at 0.633-μm wavelength using the optical pyrometry method. The apparent melting temperatures were found from the analysis of heating and cooling thermograms. Based on the available literature data on normal spectral emmissivity, the true melting temperatures of nonmetallic nitrides were estimated as 3370 K for BN, 3025 K for AlN, and 2775 K for Si3N4

  6. Formation and nitridation of vanadium-aluminum intermetallic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewalter, H; Bock, W; Kolbesen, B O

    2002-10-01

    V(5)Al(8) and V(3)Al intermetallics have been formed by interdiffusion, by annealing of sputtered V/Al-multilayers at 700 degrees C in vacuo; sapphire (102) was used as substrate. The V/Al intermetallics were nitridated in NH(3) at 900 degrees C for 1 min by RTP (rapid thermal processing). The samples were investigated with XRD (X-ray diffraction), SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry), and AFM (atomic force microscopy). A 5-10 nm thick AlN film (001 textured) was formed by nitridation of V(5)Al(8) (110 textured) and 2-3% nitrogen was incorporated in the V(5)Al(8) bulk. Nitridation of V(3)Al resulted in the formation of VN and AlN. Direct nitridation of V/Al-multilayers showed that near the surface nitridation is faster than intermixing of the V and Al layers. The capability of VN as diffusion barrier for Al could also be shown. PMID:12397502

  7. Cytotoxic evaluation of silicon nitride-based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon nitride-based ceramics are potential candidates as materials for orthopedic implants due to their chemical stability associated with suitable fracture toughness and propitious tribologic characteristics. Therefore, in this work, dense silicon nitride components are investigated considering their suitability as biomaterials. Initially, two different compositions of silicon nitride were considered, using ytterbium, yttrium and aluminum oxides as sintering aids. The materials were sintered in a carbon resistance furnace under nitrogen atmosphere and were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in order to characterize the microstructure. Indentation method was applied in order to obtain hardness and fracture toughness measurements, and in vitro test of cytotoxicity was performed for a preliminary biological evaluation. A microstructure composed of grains of beta-silicon nitride distributed in a secondary phase was observed. The samples achieved fracture toughness values of 5 MPa m1/2 and Vickers hardness values of 13 GPa. Since a nontoxic behavior has been observed during the cytotoxicity tests with the samples, this finding suggests that silicon nitride-based ceramic can be used as a material for clinical applications

  8. UN2−x layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN2−x. • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN2−x. TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed

  9. UN{sub 2−x} layer formed on uranium metal by glow plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Zhong [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Hu, Yin [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Chen, Lin [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621907 (China); Luo, Lizhu [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Liu, Kezhao, E-mail: liukz@hotmail.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China); Lai, Xinchun, E-mail: lai319@yahoo.com [Science and Technology on Surface Physics and Chemistry Laboratory, P.O. Box 718-35, Mianyang 621907 (China)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • We used a very simple method to prepare nitride layer on uranium metal surface. • This modified layer is nitrogen-rich nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. • TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains. • XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence in the nitride. - Abstract: Glow plasma nitriding is a simple and economical surface treatment method, and this technology was used to prepare nitride layer on the surface of uranium metal with thickness of several microns. The composition and structure of the nitride layer were analyzed by AES and XRD, indicating that this modified layer is nitrogen-rich uranium nitride, which should be written as UN{sub 2−x}. TEM images show the nitride layer is composed of nano-sized grains, with compact structure. And XPS analysis indicates there is uranium with abnormal low valence existing in the nitride. After the treated uranium storage in air for a long time, oxygen just entered the surface several nanometers, showing the nitride layer has excellent oxidation resistance. The mechanism of nitride layer formation and low valence uranium appearance is discussed.

  10. Synthesis and reactivity of aluminium nitride obtained by action of ammonia on alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aluminium nitride is a ceramic with potential nuclear applications because of its exceptional structural resistance to neutrons. To improve quality and reactivity a new preparation process by reaction between ammonia and alumina is presented. The aluminium nitride thus obtained, white colored, is pure and its reactivity gives an useful product for a lot of synthesis in the area of nitrided ceramics and glasses

  11. Synthesis and reactivity of aluminium nitride obtained by action of ammonia on alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocherulle, J.; Guyader, J.; Verdier, P.; Laurent, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Aluminium nitride is a ceramic with potential nuclear applications because of its exceptional structural resistance to neutrons. To improve quality and reactivity a new preparation process by reaction between ammonia and alumina is presented. The aluminium nitride thus obtained, white colored, is pure and its reactivity gives an useful product for a lot of synthesis in the area of nitrided ceramics and glasses.

  12. Explosion of lithium-thionyl-chloride battery due to presence of lithium nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennesø, E.; Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2015-01-01

    atmospheric nitrogen to produce lithium nitride. Nodules of lithium nitride were found to be present on the lithium foil in other cells of the accident batch. The investigation attributed the explosion to the formation of porous lithium nitride during intermediate storage and a violent exothermal...

  13. Effective Duration of Gas Nitriding Process on AISI 316L for the Formation of a Desired Thickness of Surface Nitrided Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Hassan R. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High temperature gas nitriding performed on AISI 316L at the temperature of 1200°C. The microstructure of treated AISI 316L samples were observed to identify the formation of the microstructure of nitrided surface layer. The grain size of austenite tends to be enlarged when the nitriding time increases, but the austenite single phase structure is maintained even after the long-time solution nitriding. Using microhardness testing, the hardness values drop to the center of the samples. The increase in surface hardness is due to the high nitrogen concentration at or near the surface. At 245HV, the graph of the effective duration of nitriding process was plotted to achieve the maximum depth of nitrogen diffuse under the surface. Using Sigma Plot software best fit lines of the experimental result found and plotted to find out effective duration of nitriding equation as Y=1.9491(1-0.7947x, where Y is the thickness of nitrided layer below the surface and X is duration of nitriding process. Based on this equation, the duration of gas nitriding process can be estimated to produce desired thickness of nitrided layer.

  14. Ceramic processing of boron nitride insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel pin simulators (FPS) are the prime elements of several test facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experimental facilities are used to conduct out-of-reactor thermal-hydraulic and mechanical interaction safety tests for both light-water and breeder reactor programs. The FPS units simulate the geometry, heat flux profiles, and operational capabilities of a reactor core element under steady-state and transient conditions. They are subjected to temperatures as high as 16000C (29000F) and power levels as high as 57.5 kW/m (17.5 kW/ft) as well as severe thermal stresses during transient tests. The insulating material in the narrow annulus between the heating coil and the FPS sheath is subjected to very rigorous conditions. Accuracy of the reactor safety test information and validity of the test data depend on the heat flux uniformity under all test conditions and on the reliable operation of all fuel pin simulators and their internal thermocouples. Boron nitride (BN), because of its high degree of chemical inertness combined with its relatively unique properties of high thermal conductivity and low electrical conductivity, is the most suitable insulating material for FPS. The important BN properties, thermal conductivity and electrical resistance, are strongly influenced by crystallite orientation and by impurities. The article describes new BN powder processing techniques, which optimize these properties

  15. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  16. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing

  17. Plasmonic enhancement of photoluminescence from aluminium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Chris; Stewart, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) films were grown on c-plane sapphire wafers by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) under aluminium-rich conditions. The excess aluminium (Al) accumulated on the surface of the films as micro-scale droplets 1-10 μm in size, and as Al nanoparticles with diameters in the range 10-110 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements were performed on the AlN samples using a 193 nm Excimer laser as the excitation source. Prior to PL measurements the wafers were cleaved in half. One half of each wafer was submitted to a 10 min treatment in H3PO4 heated to 70 °C to remove the excess Al from the film surface. The remaining half was left in the as-deposited condition. The mean intensities of the near-band-edge PL peaks of the as-deposited samples were 2.0-3.4 times higher compared to the samples subjected to the H3PO4 Al-removal treatment. This observation motivated calculations to determine the optimal Al surface nanosphere size for plasmonic enhancement of PL from AlN. The PL enhancement was found to peak for an Al nanosphere radius of 15 nm, which is within the range of the experimentally-observed Al nanoparticle sizes.

  18. Hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Siyuan

    2015-03-01

    Uniaxial materials whose axial and tangential permittivities have opposite signs are referred to as indefinite or hyperbolic media. While hyperbolic responses are normally achieved with metamaterials, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) naturally possesses this property due to the anisotropic phonons in the mid-infrared. Using scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy, we studied polaritonic phenomena in hBN. We performed infrared nano-imaging of highly confined and low-loss hyperbolic phonon polaritons in hBN. The polariton wavelength was shown to be governed by the hBN thickness according to a linear law persisting down to few atomic layers [Science, 343, 1125-1129 (2014)]. Additionally, we carried out the modification of hyperbolic response in heterostructures comprised of a mononlayer graphene deposited on hBN. Electrostatic gating of the top graphene layer allows for the modification of wavelength and intensity of hyperbolic phonon polaritons in bulk hBN. The physics of the modification originates from the plasmon-phonon coupling in the hyperbolic medium. Furthermore, we demonstrated the ``hyperlens'' for subdiffractional imaging and focusing using a slab of hBN.

  19. Fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Justin A., E-mail: jabriggs@stanford.edu [Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 348 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Naik, Gururaj V.; Baum, Brian K.; Dionne, Jennifer A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Petach, Trevor A.; Goldhaber-Gordon, David [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    CMOS-compatible fabrication of plasmonic materials and devices will accelerate the development of integrated nanophotonics for information processing applications. Using low-temperature plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), we develop a recipe for fully CMOS-compatible titanium nitride (TiN) that is plasmonic in the visible and near infrared. Films are grown on silicon, silicon dioxide, and epitaxially on magnesium oxide substrates. By optimizing the plasma exposure per growth cycle during PEALD, carbon and oxygen contamination are reduced, lowering undesirable loss. We use electron beam lithography to pattern TiN nanopillars with varying diameters on silicon in large-area arrays. In the first reported single-particle measurements on plasmonic TiN, we demonstrate size-tunable darkfield scattering spectroscopy in the visible and near infrared regimes. The optical properties of this CMOS-compatible material, combined with its high melting temperature and mechanical durability, comprise a step towards fully CMOS-integrated nanophotonic information processing.

  20. Surface properties of nitrided layer on AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel produced by high temperature plasma nitriding in short time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang, E-mail: metalytu@163.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yantai University, Qingquan Road 32, Yantai 264005 (China); Wang, Zhuo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yantai University, Qingquan Road 32, Yantai 264005 (China); Wang, Liang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian Maritime University, Linghai Road 1, Dalian 116026 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The 8 μm nitrided layer was produced on the surface of AISI 316L stainless steel by plasma nitrided at high temperatures (540 °C) within 1 h. • The nitrided layer consisted of nitrogen expanded austenite and possibly a small amount of free-CrN and iron nitrides. • It could critically reduce processing time compared with low temperature nitriding. • High temperature plasma nitriding could improve pitting corrosion resistance of the substrate in 3.5% NaCl solution. - Abstract: It has generally been believed that the formation of the S phase or expanded austenite γ{sub N} with enough thickness depends on the temperature (lower than 480 °C) and duration of the process. In this work, we attempt to produce nitrogen expanded austenite layer at high temperature in short time. Nitriding of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was carried out at high temperatures (>520 °C) for times ranging from 5 to 120 min. The microstructures, chemical composition, the thickness and the morphology of the nitrided layer, as well as its surface hardness, were investigated using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness tester. The corrosion properties of the untreated and nitrided samples were evaluated using anodic polarization tests in 3.5% NaCl solution. The results confirmed that nitrided layer was shown to consist of γ{sub N} and a small amount of free-CrN and iron nitrides. High temperature plasma nitriding not only increased the surface hardness but also improved the corrosion resistance of the austenitic stainless steel, and it can critically reduce processing time compared with low temperature nitriding.

  1. Conductivity of materials made of aluminum nitride and silicon nitride mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbatov, A. G.; Kamyshov, V. M.

    1978-01-01

    To establish the possible mechanism for conductivity in aluminum nitride a study was made of the electric conductivity of pure AlN and its mixtures with silicon nitride at different temperatures and partial pressures of nitrogen in the gas phase. The thermoelectromotive force was also measured. The experiments used polycrystalline samples of cylindrical shape 18 mm in diameter made of powders by hot pressing in graphite press molds at a temperature of 1973-2273 K and pressure 1,470,000 n/sqm. The items obtained by this method had porosity not over 5%. After pressing, the samples were machined to remove carbon from the surface, and were annealed in a stream of dry ammonia for 10 h at a temperature of 1273-1373 K. Electric conductivity was measured according to the bridge scheme on an alternating current of frequency 10 kHz. In order to guarantee close contact of the platinum electrodes with the surface of the samples, a thin layer of platinum was sprayed on them. Experiments were conducted in the temperature interval 1273-1573 K with a half hour delay at each assigned temperature with heating and cooling.

  2. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarnowska, Elżbieta [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Borowski, Tomasz [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Sowińska, Agnieszka [Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Pathology Department, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland); Lelątko, Józef [Silesia University, Faculty of Computer Science and Materials Science, 75 Pułku Piechoty 1A, 41-500 Chorzów (Poland); Oleksiak, Justyna; Kamiński, Janusz; Tarnowski, Michał [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wierzchoń, Tadeusz, E-mail: twierz@inmat.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications.

  3. Structure and properties of nitrided surface layer produced on NiTi shape memory alloy by low temperature plasma nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Low temperature plasma nitriding process of NiTi shape memory alloy is presented. • The possibility of treatment details of sophisticated shape. • TiN surface layer has diffusive character. • TiN surface layer increases corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. • Produced TiN layer modify the biological properties of NiTi alloy. - Abstract: NiTi shape memory alloys are used for bone and cardiological implants. However, on account of the metallosis effect, i.e. the release of the alloy elements into surrounding tissues, they are subjected to various surface treatment processes in order to improve their corrosion resistance and biocompatibility without influencing the required shape memory properties. In this paper, the microstructure, topography and morphology of TiN surface layer on NiTi alloy, and corrosion resistance, both before and after nitriding in low-temperature plasma at 290 °C, are presented. Examinations with the use of the potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods were carried out and show an increase of corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution after glow-discharge nitriding. This surface titanium nitride layer also improved the adhesion of platelets and the proliferation of osteoblasts, which was investigated in in vitro experiments with human cells. Experimental data revealed that nitriding NiTi shape memory alloy under low-temperature plasma improves its properties for bone implant applications

  4. Elastic properties of indium nitrides grown on sapphire substrates determined by nano-indentation: In comparison with other nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichiro Yonenaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The hardness of wurtzite indium nitride (α-InN films of 0.5 to 4 μm in thickness was measured by the nano-indentation method at room temperature. After investigation of crystalline quality by x-ray diffraction, the hardness and Young’s modulus were determined to be 8.8 ± 0.4 and 184 ± 5 GPa, respectively, for the In (0001- and N ( 000 1 ̄ -growth faces of InN films. The bulk and shear moduli were then derived to be 99 ± 3 and 77 ± 2 GPa, respectively. The Poisson’s ratio was evaluated to be 0.17 ± 0.03. The results were examined comprehensively in comparison with previously reported data of InN as well as those of other nitrides of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride. The underlying physical process determining the moduli and hardness was examined in terms of atomic bonding and dislocation energy of the nitrides and wurtzite zinc oxide.

  5. Electron microscopy of gallium nitride growth on polycrystalline diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transmission and scanning electron microscopy were used to examine the growth of gallium nitride (GaN) on polycrystalline diamond substrates grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy with a low-temperature aluminium nitride (AlN) nucleation layer. Growth on unmasked substrates was in the (0001) orientation with threading dislocation densities ≈7 × 109 cm−2. An epitaxial layer overgrowth technique was used to reduce the dislocation densities further, by depositing silicon nitride stripes on the surface and etching the unmasked regions down to the diamond substrate. A re-growth was then performed on the exposed side walls of the original GaN growth, reducing the threading dislocation density in the overgrown regions by two orders of magnitude. The resulting microstructures and the mechanisms of dislocation reduction are discussed. (paper)

  6. Low-Temperature Nitriding by Means of SMAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.P. Tong; H.W. Zhang; N.R. Tao; Z.B. Wang; J. Lu; K. Lu

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure in the surface layer of iron and steel samples can be refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation to the surface layer.The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the as-treated samples with the nanostructured surface layer is greatly enhanced so that the nitriding temperatures can be reduce to 300 ~ 400 ℃ regions. This enhanced processing method demonstrates both the technological significance of nanomaterials in advancing the traditional processing techniques, and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. This article reviews the present state of the art in this field. The microstructure and properties of SMAT samples nitrided will be summarized. Further considerations of the development and applications of this new technique will also be presented.

  7. Transition Metal Nitrides for Electrocatalytic Energy Conversion: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Junfeng; Xie, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Electrocatalytic energy conversion has been considered as one of the most efficient and promising pathways for realizing energy storage and energy utilization in modern society. To improve electrocatalytic reactions, specific catalysts are needed to lower the overpotential. In the search for efficient alternatives to noble metal catalysts, transition metal nitrides have attracted considerable interest due to their high catalytic activity and unique electronic structure. Over the past few decades, numerous nitride-based catalysts have been explored with respect to their ability to drive various electrocatalytic reactions, such as the hydrogen evolution reaction and the oxygen evolution reaction to achieve water splitting and the oxygen reduction reaction coupled with the methanol oxidation reaction to construct fuel cells or rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. This Minireview provides a brief overview of recent progress on electrocatalysts based on transition metal nitrides, and outlines the current challenges and future opportunities. PMID:26494184

  8. Design, Control and in Situ Visualization of Gas Nitriding Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Ratajski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor, with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process.

  9. Spectroscopic characterization of nanocrystalline chromium nitride (CrN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangamma, G; Sairam, T N; Dash, S; Rajalakshmi, M; Kamruddin, M; Mittal, V K; Narasimhan, S V; Arora, A K; Sundar, C S; Tyagi, A K; Raj, Baldev

    2007-03-01

    Nanocrystalline chromiuim nitride has been synthesised by direct gas phase nitridation of nanocrystalline chromia at 1100 degrees C in ammonia-atmosphere. XRD of this material showed formation of single phase CrN with particle size around 20 nm. AFM studies showed particle distribution along with some soft agglomerated nanostructures. Nanocrystalline Cr2O3 and partially-as well as fully--converted nanocrystalline CrN were also investigated using various spectroscopic techniques like XPS, FT-IR, and Raman for gaining insight into the conversion pathways. Spectroscopic investigations of these materials clearly indicate that complete conversion of CrN occurs by nitriding at 1100 degrees C for 4 hrs. The salient spectroscopic features of these nanocrystalline materials with respect to their microcrystalline counterparts are discussed. PMID:17450861

  10. Design, control and in situ visualization of gas nitriding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratajski, Jerzy; Olik, Roman; Suszko, Tomasz; Dobrodziej, Jerzy; Michalski, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of time, as well as possibilities to predict the properties of nitrided layers. For in situ visualization of the growth of the nitrided layer, computer procedures were developed which make use of the results of the correlations of direct and differential voltage and time runs of the process result sensor (magnetic sensor), with the proper layer growth stage. Computer procedures make it possible to combine, in the duration of the process, the registered voltage and time runs with the models of the process. PMID:22315536

  11. Symmetric organization of self-assembled carbon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for creating 'flower-like' nanostructures of carbon nitride is described that involves the self-assembly of nanocrystals following laser ablation of a solid graphite target immersed in aqueous ammonia solution. The primary nanocrystals possess rod-like symmetry, and then self-assemble upon drying to form nanoleaf or nanopetal shaped structures. Samples were characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), x-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The analyses confirmed their composition to be consistent with that of crystalline β-phase carbon nitride. The morphologies of the carbon nitride nanostructures depended strongly on the synthesis conditions and upon the conditions under which the aqueous suspension of ablated particles were dried

  12. Pressureless sintered silicon carbide tailored with aluminium nitride sintering agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the influence of aluminium nitride on the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Pressureless sintering was achieved at 2000 degrees C for 5 min with the additions of boron carbide together with carbon of 1 wt% and 6 wt%, respectively, and a content of aluminium nitride between 0 and 10 wt%. Sintered samples present relative densities higher than 92%. The sintered microstructure was found to be greatly modified by the introduction of aluminium nitride, which reflects the influence of nitrogen on the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation. The toughness of sintered sample was not modified by AlN incorporation and is relatively low (around 2.5 MPa m1/2). Materials exhibited transgranular fracture mode, indicating a strong bonding between SiC grains. (authors)

  13. Investigations of nitride fuels for fast reactors in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitride fuel allows to improve characteristics of fast power reactors in a part of physics, safety and economics. The researches of last years conducted at IPPE have shown that the following features could be achieved in an optimized fast reactor with sodium coolant and nitride fuel, what meets have the modern requirements to advanced nuclear installations: - zero reactivity excess per fuel burn-up ensuring any refueling interval; - zero value of sodium void reactivity effect (SVRE) at sodium loss; - possibility to use the special technology without separation of uranium, plutonium and minor actinides. The technology should improve fuel cycle economics and ensure proliferation resistance. The core basic design of the BN-800 reactor and the design proposals for the advanced BN-1800 reactor core have been developed. In both designs the mixed nitride fuel is supposed to be used: UPuN for first loading, UPuN + MA for next loadings. One of problem of advanced reactor designs is the problem of reliable nitride pins. At realization of researches the shortage of data on nitrides properties, on irradiation behavior of nitrides is felt. The domestic experience on irradiation behavior of nitride covers the followings: - Two loadings of the BR-10 reactor with UN (660 fuel pins and 590 fuel pins). All fuel pins are helium-bonded. Maximum burn-up ∼9 at%, maximum linear rating - 45 KW/m, maximum fuel temperature 1175 K, pellet density - 85-94%. - The BOR-60 reactor: 1) tens pins with UN, maximum burn-up more than 8 at%, maximum fuel temperature - 1775 K; 2) few pins with UPuN, maximum burn-up 4 at%, 8.95 at%, maximum fuel temperature - 2475 K, 1750K, accordingly, pellet density - 85-86 %. All pins are helium-bonded. At the moment 4 helium-bonded pins with mixed nitrides with increased Pu content (45 % and 60 %) are irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor within the frame of joint Russian-French experiment BORA-BORA. Planned maximum burn-up - 11 at%, maximum fuel temperature no more

  14. Thermally grown thin nitride films as a gate dielectric

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, H C; Hwang, T K; Lee, K R

    1998-01-01

    High-quality very thin films ( <=6 nm) of silicon nitride were thermally grown in ammonia atmosphere with an IR (Infrared) gold image furnace. As-grown nitride film was analyzed using AES(Auger Emission Spectroscopy). Using MIS (Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor) devices, the growth rate was calculated using CV (Capacitance-Voltage) measurements and various electrical characteristics were obtained using CV, IV (Current-Voltage), trapping, time-dependent breakdown, high-field stress, constant current injection stress and dielectric breakdown techniques. These characteristics showed that very thin thermal silicon nitride films can be used as gate dielectrics for future highly scaled-down ULSI (Ultra Large Scale Integrated) devices, especially for EEPROM (Electrically Erasable and Programmable ROM)'s.

  15. Nanoparticle plasmonics: going practical with transition metal nitrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urcan Guler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Promising designs and experimental realizations of devices with unusual properties in the field of plasmonics have attracted a great deal of attention over the past few decades. However, the high expectations for realized technology products have not been met so far. The main complication is the absence of robust, high performance, low cost plasmonic materials that can be easily integrated into already established technologies such as microelectronics. This review provides a brief discussion on alternative plasmonic materials for localized surface plasmon applications and focuses on transition metal nitrides, in particular, titanium nitride, which has recently been shown to be a high performance refractory plasmonic material that could replace and even outperform gold in various plasmonic devices. As a material compatible with biological environments and the semiconductor industry, titanium nitride possesses superior properties compared to noble metals such as high temperature durability, chemical stability, corrosion resistance, low cost and mechanical hardness.

  16. Active Control of Nitride Plasmonic Dispersion in the Far Infrared.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaner, Eric A.; Dyer, Gregory Conrad; Seng, William Francis; Bethke, Donald Thomas; Grine, Albert Dario,; Baca, Albert G.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate plasmonic structures in nitride-based materials for far-infrared (IR) applications. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the GaN/AlGaN material system, much like metal- dielectric structures, is a patternable plasmonic medium. However, it also permits for direct tunability via an applied voltage. While there have been proof-of-principle demonstrations of plasma excitations in nitride 2DEGs, exploration of the potential of this material system has thus far been limited. We recently demonstrated coherent phenomena such as the formation of plasmonic crystals, strong coupling of tunable crystal defects to a plasmonic crystal, and electromagnetically induced transparency in GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs at sub-THz frequencies. In this project, we explore whether these effects can be realized in nitride 2DEG materials above 1 THz and at temperatures exceeding 77 K.

  17. Ion beam nitriding of single and polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycrystalline and single crystalline [orientations (001) and (011)] AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was implanted at 400 deg. C with 1.2 keV nitrogen ions using a high current density of 0.5 mA cm-2. The nitrogen distribution profiles were determined using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). The structure of nitrided polycrystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using glancing incidence and symmetric x-ray diffraction (XRD) while the structure of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel samples was analyzed using x-ray diffraction mapping of the reciprocal space. For identical treatment conditions, it is observed that the nitrogen penetration depth is larger for the polycrystalline samples than for the single crystalline ones. The nitrogen penetration depth depends on the orientation, the being more preferential for nitrogen diffusion than . In both type of samples, XRD analysis shows the presence of the phase usually called 'expanded' austenite or γN phase. The lattice expansion depends on the crystallographic plane family, the (001) planes showing an anomalously large expansion. The reciprocal lattice maps of the nitrided single crystalline stainless steel demonstrate that during nitriding lattice rotation takes place simultaneously with lattice expansion. The analysis of the results based on the presence of stacking faults, residual compressive stress induced by the lattice expansion, and nitrogen concentration gradient indicates that the average lattice parameter increases with the nitrided layer depth. A possible explanation of the anomalous expansion of the (001) planes is presented, which is based on the combination of faster nitriding rate in the (001) oriented grains and the role of stacking faults and compressive stress

  18. Grafting titanium nitride surfaces with sodium styrene sulfonate thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Gilad; Migonney, Véronique; Castner, David G

    2014-09-01

    The importance of titanium nitride lies in its high hardness and its remarkable resistance to wear and corrosion, which has led to its use as a coating for the heads of hip prostheses, dental implants and dental surgery tools. However, the usefulness of titanium nitride coatings for biomedical applications could be significantly enhanced by modifying their surface with a bioactive polymer film. The main focus of the present work was to graft a bioactive poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) (pNaSS) thin film from titanium nitride surfaces via a two-step procedure: first modifying the surface with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and then grafting the pNaSS film from the MPS modified titanium through free radical polymerization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were used after each step to characterize success and completeness of each reaction. The surface region of the titanium nitride prior to MPS functionalization and NaSS grafting contained a mixture of titanium nitride, oxy-nitride, oxide species as well as adventitious surface contaminants. After MPS functionalization, Si was detected by XPS, and characteristic MPS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. After NaSS grafting, Na and S were detected by XPS and characteristic NaSS fragments were detected by ToF-SIMS. The XPS determined thicknesses of the MPS and NaSS overlayers were ∼1.5 and ∼1.7 nm, respectively. The pNaSS film density was estimated by the toluidine blue colorimetric assay to be 260 ± 70 ng/cm(2). PMID:25280842

  19. Thermodynamic basis for nitridation of high-heat metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzed were the results of thermodynamic calculations of the nitriding of refractory metals. It was shown that the solid solution range can be expanded by dissolving the nitrogen atmosphere with an inert gas or lowering the total pressure of the system. It is thermodynamically possible to obtain a diffusion layer without the nitride zone by keeping the pressure at 1 atm for W, and by dissolving and raising the temperature of the atmosphere for Mo and Cr. Dissolving the atmosphere and varying the pressure are the means for controlling the phase composition ([n]sub(Cr), Cr2N or CrN) of the layer on the surface of Cr. Nitriding in ammonia atmosphere at increased total pressure expands the range of existence of the solid solution. Dissolving ammonia with an inert gas expands the range of existence of the nitrides, and dissolving with hydrogen, the range of existence of the solid solution. Dissolving ammonia by an inert gas shifts the equilibrium of the ammonia decomposition in the direction of its greater dissociation, and, therefore, in the direction of greater nitrogen potential of the atmosphere. In nitriding in ammonia atmosphere control of the phase composition of the layer is thermodynamically possible only on the surface of W, V, Mo and Cr by varying the degree of dissociation of ammonia, by dissolving the atmosphere with hydrogen at increased pressures in the system. On the remaining refractory metals (Nb, Ta, Ti, Zr, Hf), the obtaining of a layer without the nitride zone requires the total pressure in the system to be increased over 105 atm, which is practically impossible

  20. Characterization of nitrided silicon-silicon dioxide interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Alessandri, M.; Brazzelli, D. [and others

    2000-07-01

    A newly-developed technique for the simultaneous characterization of the oxide-silicon interface properties and of bulk impurities was used for a systematic study of the nitridation process of thin oxides. This technique is based upon surface recombination velocity measurements, and does not require the formation of a capacitor structure, so it is very suitable for the characterization of as-grown interfaces. Oxides grown both in dry and in wet environments were considered, and nitridation processes in N{sub 2}O and in NO were compared to N{sub 2} annealing processes. The effect of nitridation temperature and duration were also studied, and RTO/RTN processes were compared to conventional furnace nitridation processes. Surface recombination velocity was correlated with nitrogen concentration at the oxide-silicon interface obtained by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) measurements. Surface recombination velocity (hence surface state density) decreases with increasing nitrogen pile-up at the oxide-silicon interface, indicating that in nitrided interfaces surface state density is limited by nitridation. NO treatments are much more effective than N{sub 2}O treatments in the formation of nitrogen-rich interface layer and, as a consequence, in surface state reduction. Surface state density was measured in fully processed wafers before and after constant current stress. After a complete device process surface states are annealed out by hydrogen passivation, however they are reactivated by the electrical stress, and surface state results after stress were compared with data of surface recombination velocity in as-processed wafers.

  1. Formation of niobium nitride by rapid thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelkort, C.; Lewalter, H.; Warbichler, P.; Hofer, F.; Bock, W.; Kolbesen, B. O.

    2001-09-01

    The formation of group V transition metal nitride films by means of rapid thermal processing (RTP) has been investigated. Here we focus on the nitridation of niobium films of 200-500 nm thickness in the temperature range from 500 to 1100°C under laminar flow of molecular nitrogen or ammonia. The nitride phases formed were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were carried out on samples of selected experiments to provide more detailed information about the initial stages of nitride formation and the microstructure of the films. A classical formation sequence of nitride phases was observed with increasing nitrogen content in the order: α-Nb(N)→β-Nb 2N→γ-Nb 4N 3→δ'-NbN→Nb 5N 6. Furthermore, oxide enriched regions were discovered inside the metal films. These turned out to be formed mainly in the nitride sequence between the a-αNb(N) and β-Nb 2N-phases at the Nb/SiO 2 interface due to a reaction of the Nb with the SiO 2 layer of the silicon substrates on which the films had been deposited. The SiO 2 layer acts as diffusion barrier for nitrogen but also as source for oxygen, according to SNMS and TEM/EELS studies, resulting in the formation of Nb-oxides and/or oxynitrides at the Nb/SiO 2 interface.

  2. Preparation and characterization of morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites from filter paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morph-genetic aluminum nitride/carbon composites with cablelike structure were prepared from filter paper template through the surface sol-gel process and carbothermal nitridation reaction. The resulting materials have a hierarchical structure originating from the morphology of cellulose paper. The aluminum nitride/carbon composites have the core-shell microstructure, the core is graphitic carbon, and the shell is aluminum nitride nanocoating formed by carbothermal nitridation reduction of alumina with the interfacial carbon in nitrogen atmosphere. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscope were employed to characterize the structural morphology and phase compositions of the final products

  3. Irradiation test of U-free nitride fuel and progress of pyro chemistry in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI has proposed the double-strata fuel cycle for transmutation of long-lived minor actinides (MAs). The transmutation system is a Pb-Bi cooled subcritical accelerator-driven system (ADS) with MAs nitride fuel. Nitride fuel has the advantage of accommodating various MAs with a wide range of composition besides superior thermal and neutronic properties. This paper concerns the status of the irradiation test of U-free nitride fuel and recent progress of pyrochemical process for nitride fuel in JAERI. Typical characteristics of nitride fuel for the irradiation test and the present schedule are described in addition to recent experimental results relating to pyro-chemistry. (author)

  4. Low-temperature approach to synthesize iron nitride from amorphous iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Wang, Huamin; Zhang, Minghui; Su, Ming; Li, Wei; Tao, Keyi

    2008-02-18

    Iron nitride was prepared by a nitridation reaction in NH 3 using amorphous iron as precursor. The precursor was prepared at ambient temperature through the process of reducing ferrous sulfate by potassium borohydride, followed by the nitridation at different temperatures. The nitridation reaction occurred at 548 K, and -Fe 2-3N was formed at 573 K. The reaction temperature was much lower than that using crystallized iron because of the characteristics of the amorphous materials. The existence of a small quantity of boron (1.6 wt.%) improved the stability of the amorphous precursor, which guaranteed an amorphous iron precursor at nitriding temperatures in excess of 548 K. PMID:18198828

  5. Effect of mineralizer on the nitridation of sialon-bonded silicon carbide products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a mineralizer, magnesium silicate, on the nitridation of compacts consisting of silicon, clay, silica and silicon carbide was examined in terms of their reaction depth, density, porosity, phase composition and microstructure. It was found that addition of mineralizer slowed down the nitridation significantly. The kinetic process of isothermal nitridation in the presence of magnesium silicate obeys a parabolic rate law. Otherwise it obeys a linear rate law. The results suggest that nitrogen transportation is the limiting step during nitridation when mineralizer is added. The mechanism of nitridation is discussed in terms of phase composition and microstructure. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  6. Synthesis of uranium, iron and manganese nitrides for use as catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of uranium, iron and manganese nitrides and their use for the hydrogen generation from the cracking of ammonia is described. From the practical and economic point of view it is allowed to conclude that the uranium nitride as a catalyst is highly efficient and operates at lower temperature than the iron and manganese nitrides. With the uranium nitride and yield > 99% for the thermal decomposition of ammonia was reached at 550 deg C. This operation temperature is lower than the correspondent from the iron and manganese nitrides, used as commercial catalysts. (author)

  7. The compression creep behaviour of silicon nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison has been made of the compression creep characteristics of samples of reaction-bonded and hot-pressed silicon nitride, a sialon and silicon carbide. In addition, the effects of factors such as oxide additions and fabrication variables on the creep resistance of reaction-bonded material and the influence of dispersions of SiC particles on the creep properties of hot-pressed silicon nitride have been considered. For the entire range of materials examined, the creep behaviour appears to be determined primarily by the rate at which the development of grain boundary microcracks allows relative movement of the crystals to take place. (author)

  8. Development of high-thermal-conductivity silicon nitride ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    You Zhou; Hideki Hyuga; Dai Kusano; Yu-ichi Yoshizawa; Tatsuki Ohji; Kiyoshi Hirao

    2015-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) with high thermal conductivity has emerged as one of the most promising substrate materials for the next-generation power devices. This paper gives an overview on recent developments in preparing high-thermal-conductivity Si3N4 by a sintering of reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN) method. Due to the reduction of lattice oxygen content, the SRBSN ceramics could attain substantially higher thermal conductivities than the Si3N4 ceramics prepared by the conventional ga...

  9. Silicon nitride ceramics for bio-structural applications

    OpenAIRE

    Bellosi, Alida

    2009-01-01

    Notwithstanding the good combination of mechanical and tribological properties, the suitability of silicon nitride for application as prosthesis in bone substitution is still controversial. This study aims to design and produce different silicon nitride-based ceramics. (two monolithics 90.0 vol% Si3N4 + 10.0 vol% bioglass, and 91.3vol%Si3N4 + 8.7vol%MgO, and a composite 65.0 vol% (93wt% Si3N4 + 2 wt%Al2O3+5wt%Y2O3) + 35.0vol%TiN ) and to test the materials. Besides microstructure and mechanic...

  10. Communication: Water on hexagonal boron nitride from diffusion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S.; Ma, Ming; Michaelides, Angelos, E-mail: angelos.michaelides@ucl.ac.uk [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Alfè, Dario [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratories, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Despite a recent flurry of experimental and simulation studies, an accurate estimate of the interaction strength of water molecules with hexagonal boron nitride is lacking. Here, we report quantum Monte Carlo results for the adsorption of a water monomer on a periodic hexagonal boron nitride sheet, which yield a water monomer interaction energy of −84 ± 5 meV. We use the results to evaluate the performance of several widely used density functional theory (DFT) exchange correlation functionals and find that they all deviate substantially. Differences in interaction energies between different adsorption sites are however better reproduced by DFT.

  11. Surface nitride formation in N-implanted Cr-steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen-implanted steels of different composition (mainly a variable chromium content) and structure have been studied by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and conversion electron Moessbauer scattering (CEMS). For every given composition and structure, the relationship between a parameter measuring the amount of iron nitride produced and the nitrogen dose retained in the near-surface region is found to be almost linear with a nearly constant positive slope. The dose threshold for iron nitride formation increases with increasing chromium content and defect concentration in the matrix. (author)

  12. Fabrication of sinterable silicon nitride by injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, C. L.; French, K.; Neil, J. T.

    1982-01-01

    Transformation of structural ceramics from the laboratory to production requires development of near net shape fabrication techniques which minimize finish grinding. One potential technique for producing large quantities of complex-shaped parts at a low cost, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material. Binder selection methodology, compounding of ceramic and binder components, injection molding techniques, and problems in binder removal are discussed. Strength, oxidation resistance, and microstructure of sintered silicon nitride fabricated by injection molding is discussed and compared to data generated from isostatically dry-pressed material.

  13. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 (le) X (le) 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  14. Colloidal Plasmonic Titanium Nitride Nanoparticles: Properties and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guler, Urcan; Suslov, Sergey; Kildishev, Alexander V.; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir M.

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties of colloidal plasmonic titanium nitride nanoparticles are examined with an eye on their photothermal and photocatalytic applications via transmission electron microscopy and optical transmittance measurements. Single crystal titanium nitride cubic nanoparticles with an average...... size of 50 nm, which was found to be the optimum size for cellular uptake with gold nanoparticles [1], exhibit plasmon resonance in the biological transparency window and demonstrate a high absorption efficiency. A self-passivating native oxide at the surface of the nanoparticles provides an additional...... degree of freedom for surface functionalization. The titanium oxide shell surrounding the plasmonic core can create new opportunities for photocatalytic applications....

  15. CONFIRM: Collaboration on Nitride Fuel Irradiation and Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium free nitride fuels are investigated as a potential fuel applied to waste transmutation in accelerator driven systems. In the European 5. FP CONFIRM project, four (Pu,Zr)N helium bonded fuel pins will be fabricated at PSI and then irradiated to high burnup at Studsvik in 2003/2004. (Am,Zr)N pellets will be manufactured and characterised at ITU. In addition, nitride safety analysis and fuel modelling is performed at KTH, AEA-T, CEA and BNFL. In the present contribution, the work program of CONFIRM is reviewed. Some initial results from activities on safety analysis and fuel modelling are also presented. (author)

  16. Inter-layer potential for hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leven, Itai; Azuri, Ido; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-03-01

    A new interlayer force-field for layered hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) based structures is presented. The force-field contains three terms representing the interlayer attraction due to dispersive interactions, repulsion due to anisotropic overlaps of electron clouds, and monopolar electrostatic interactions. With appropriate parameterization, the potential is able to simultaneously capture well the binding and lateral sliding energies of planar h-BN based dimer systems as well as the interlayer telescoping and rotation of double walled boron-nitride nanotubes of different crystallographic orientations. The new potential thus allows for the accurate and efficient modeling and simulation of large-scale h-BN based layered structures.

  17. Communication: Water on hexagonal boron nitride from diffusion Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite a recent flurry of experimental and simulation studies, an accurate estimate of the interaction strength of water molecules with hexagonal boron nitride is lacking. Here, we report quantum Monte Carlo results for the adsorption of a water monomer on a periodic hexagonal boron nitride sheet, which yield a water monomer interaction energy of −84 ± 5 meV. We use the results to evaluate the performance of several widely used density functional theory (DFT) exchange correlation functionals and find that they all deviate substantially. Differences in interaction energies between different adsorption sites are however better reproduced by DFT

  18. Structure, Mechanics and Synthesis of Nanoscale Carbon and Boron Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Steven G.

    This thesis is divided into two parts. In Part I, we examine the properties of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride. We begin with an introduction to the theory of elastic sheets, where the stretching and bending modes are considered in detail. The coupling between stretching and bending modes is thought to play a crucial role in the thermodynamic stability of atomically-thin 2D sheets such as graphene. In Chapter 2, we begin by looking at the fabrication of suspended, atomically thin sheets of graphene. We then study their mechanical resonances which are read via an optical transduction technique. The frequency of the resonators was found to depend on their temperature, as was their quality factor. We conclude by offering some interpretations of the data in terms of the stretching and bending modes of graphene. In Chapter 3, we look briefly at the fabrication of thin sheets of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. We examine the structure of the sheets using transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively). We then show a technique by which one can make sheets suspended over a trench with adjustable supports. Finally, DC measurements of the resistivity of the sheets in the temperature range 600 -- 1400 C are presented. In Chapter 4, we study the folding of few-layer graphene oxide, graphene and boron nitride into 3D aerogel monoliths. The properties of graphene oxide are first considered, after which the structure of graphene and boron nitride aerogels is examined using TEM and SEM. Some models for their structure are proposed. In Part II, we look at synthesis techniques for boron nitride (BN). In Chapter 5, we study the conversion of carbon structures of boron nitride via the application of carbothermal reduction of boron oxide followed by nitridation. We apply the conversion to a wide variety of morphologies, including aerogels, carbon fibers and nanotubes, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In the latter chapters, we look at the

  19. Process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a process for producing wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride comprising the steps of: [A] preparing an intimate mixture of powdered boron oxide, a powdered metal selected from the group consisting of magnesium or aluminum, and a powdered metal azide; [B] igniting the mixture and bringing it to a temperature at which self-sustaining combustion occurs; [C] shocking the mixture at the end of the combustion thereof with a high pressure wave, thereby forming as a reaction product, wurtzitic or cubic boron nitride and occluded metal oxide; and, optionally [D] removing the occluded metal oxide from the reaction product. Also disclosed are reaction products made by the process described

  20. Synthesis and Optimization of the Sintering Kinetics of Actinide Nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drryl P. Butt; Brian Jaques

    2009-03-31

    Research conducted for this NERI project has advanced the understanding and feasibility of nitride nuclear fuel processing. In order to perform this research, necessary laboratory infrastructure was developed; including basic facilities and experimental equipment. Notable accomplishments from this project include: the synthesis of uranium, dysprosium, and cerium nitrides using a novel, low-cost mechanical method at room temperature; the synthesis of phase pure UN, DyN, and CeN using thermal methods; and the sintering of UN and (Ux, Dy1-x)N (0.7 ≤ X ≤ 1) pellets from phase pure powder that was synthesized in the Advanced Materials Laboratory at Boise State University.

  1. Proceedings of the symposium on nitride fuel cycle technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of the Symposium of Nitride Fuel Cycle Technology, which was held on July 28, 2004, at the Tokai Research Establishment of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The purpose of this symposium is to exchange information and views on nitride fuel cycle technology among researchers from foreign and domestic organizations, and to discuss the recent and future research activities. The topics in the symposium are Present State of the Technology Development in the World and Japan, Fabrication Technology, Property Measurement and Pyrochemical Process. The intensive discussion was made among 53 participants. This report consists of 2 papers as invited presentations and 12 papers as contributed papers. (author)

  2. Nanostructuring for nitride light-emitting diodes and opticalcavities

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Kwai-hei.; 李攜曦.

    2013-01-01

    The group of III-V semiconductors is emerging as highly attractive materials for a wide range of applications, particularly the gallium nitride family of alloys. Undoubtedly, the development of nitride-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs) represented a quantum leap in the advancement of optoelectronics. The timely arrival of InGaN blue LEDs enable full-color mixing with existing red and green LEDs based on AlInGaP and GaP alloys respectively, promoting the progress of so...

  3. Boron-nitride coated nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenduez, G. [Orta Dogu Teknik Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, I. [Tuerkiye Atom Enerjisi Kurumu, Ankara (Turkey); Durmazucar, H.H. [Cumhuriyet Univ., Sivas (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    Pure urania- and urania-gadolinia-containing fuel pellets were coated with boron nitride (BN) to improve the physical and neutronic properties of the fuel. The BN coating seems to have a technological advantage over zirconium-diboride coating. The BN is chemically inert, corrosion resistant, withstands rapid temperature changes, and has a high thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity, the gadolinia content can be lowered in the fuel by coating it with BN. In fact, the existence of two burnable absorbers in a fuel introduces desired nuclear properties since gadolinia is a fast-burning and boron a slow-burning element. The BN was deposited on fuel from two different sources, (a) from the reaction of boron trichloride (BCl{sub 3}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) at 875 K and (b) from the decomposition of trimethylamine borate complex at 1200 K. The infrared and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of BN from both precursors agreed with the available data in the literature. However BN powder from borane complex had a shifted XRD peak due to the presence of carbonaceous material in the structure. The BN powder-coated fuels were heated to 1400, 1525, and 1600 K to sinter the BN. The examination under scanning electron microscope showed that grainy, rod-shaped and layered BN coatings were achieved. Rod-shaped structures were usually seen on gadolinia fuels. The increased thickness of coating favors the formation of a glassy looking layer. The BN from a borane complex seems to form a layered structure more easily than the BN from BCl{sub 3}. The BN coated the surface of the fuels, and it did not penetrate into the fuels.

  4. Boron-nitride coated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure urania- and urania-gadolinia-containing fuel pellets were coated with boron nitride (BN) to improve the physical and neutronic properties of the fuel. The BN coating seems to have a technological advantage over zirconium-diboride coating. The BN is chemically inert, corrosion resistant, withstands rapid temperature changes, and has a high thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity, the gadolinia content can be lowered in the fuel by coating it with BN. In fact, the existence of two burnable absorbers in a fuel introduces desired nuclear properties since gadolinia is a fast-burning and boron a slow-burning element. The BN was deposited on fuel from two different sources, (a) from the reaction of boron trichloride (BCl3) and ammonia (NH3) at 875 K and (b) from the decomposition of trimethylamine borate complex at 1200 K. The infrared and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of BN from both precursors agreed with the available data in the literature. However BN powder from borane complex had a shifted XRD peak due to the presence of carbonaceous material in the structure. The BN powder-coated fuels were heated to 1400, 1525, and 1600 K to sinter the BN. The examination under scanning electron microscope showed that grainy, rod-shaped and layered BN coatings were achieved. Rod-shaped structures were usually seen on gadolinia fuels. The increased thickness of coating favors the formation of a glassy looking layer. The BN from a borane complex seems to form a layered structure more easily than the BN from BCl3. The BN coated the surface of the fuels, and it did not penetrate into the fuels

  5. Discontinuous Inter-Granular Separations (DIGS) in the Gas Nitride Layer of ISS Race Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figert, John; Dasgupta, Rajib; Martinez, James

    2010-01-01

    The starboard solar alpha rotary joint (SARJ) race ring on the International space station (ISS) failed due to severe spalling of the outer diameter, 45 degree (outer canted) nitrided surface. Subsequent analysis at NASA-KSC revealed that almost all of the debris generated due to the failure was nitrided 15-5 stainless steel. Subsequent analysis of the nitride control coupons (NCC) at NASA-JSC revealed the presence of discontinuous inter-granular separations (DIGS) in the gas nitride layer. These DIGS were present in the inter-granular networking located in the top 2 mils of the nitride layer. The manufacturer's specification requires the maximum white structure to be 0.0003 inches and intergranular networking below the allowable white structure depth to be cause for rejection; a requirement that the NCCs did not meet. Subsequent testing and analysis revealed that lower DIGS content significantly lowered the probability of nitride spalling in simulated, dry condition runs. One batch of nitride samples with DIGS content similar to the port SARJ (did not fail on orbit) which exhibited almost no nitride spalling after being run on one test rig. Another batch of nitride samples with DIGS content levels similar to the starboard SARJ exhibited significant nitride spalling on the same test rig with the same load under dry conditions. Although DIGS were not the root cause of starboard race ring failure, testing indicates that increased DIGS reduced the robustness of the gas nitride layer under dry operating conditions.

  6. Templateless Infrared Heating Process for Fabricating Carbon Nitride Nanorods with Efficient Photocatalytic H2 Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Jun; Qian, Dong-Jin; Chen, Meng

    2015-11-18

    The bottom-up fabrication of carbon nitride nanorods is realized through the direct infrared heating of dicyandiamide. The approach requires no templates or extra organics. The controlled infrared heating has a major influence on the morphology of the obtained carbon nitrides. The precursors assemble into carbon nitride nanorods at low power levels, and they grow into nanoplates at high power levels. The formation mechanism of the carbon nitride nanorods is proposed to be a kinetically driven process, and the photocatalytic activity of the carbon nitride nanorods prepared at 50% power for hydrogen evolution is about 2.9 times that of carbon nitride nanoplates at 100% power. Structural, optical, and electronic analysis demonstrates that the enhancement is primarily attributed to the elimination of structural defects and the improved charge-carrier separation in highly condensed and oriented carbon nitride nanorods. PMID:26501184

  7. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of gas nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitelea, I; Dimian, E; Bordeaşu, I; Crăciunescu, C

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasonic cavitation erosion experiments were performed on Ti-6Al-4V alloys samples in annealed, nitrided and nitrided and subsequently heat treated state. The protective oxide layer formed as a result of annealing and heat treatment after nitriding is eliminated after less than 30 min cavitation time, while the nitride layer lasts up to 90 min cavitation time. Once the protective layer is removed, the cavitation process develops by grain boundary erosion, leading to the expulsion of grains from the surface. The gas nitrided Ti-6Al-4V alloy, forming a TixN surface layer, proved to be a better solution to improve the cavitation erosion resistance, compared to the annealed and nitrided and heat treated state, respectively. The analysis of the mean depth of erosion rate at 165 min cavitation time showed an improvement of the cavitation erosion resistance of the nitrided samples of up to 77% higher compared to the one of the annealed samples. PMID:24500067

  8. Ion-nitriding of Maraging steel (250 Grade) for Aeronautical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion nitriding is one of the surface modification processes to obtain better wear resistance of the component. Maraging steel (250 Grade) is used to manufacture a critical component in the control surface of a combat aircraft. This part requires high strength and good wear resistance. Maraging steels belong to a new class of high strength steels with the combination of strength and toughness that are among the highest attainable in general engineering alloys. Good wear resistance is achieved by ion-nitriding (also called as plasma nitriding or glow discharge nitriding) process of case nitriding. Ion-nitriding is a method of surface hardening using glow discharge technology to introduce nascent (elemental) nitrogen to the surface of a metal part for subsequent diffusion into the material. In the present investigation, ion-nitriding of Maraging steel (250 grade) is carried out at 4500C and its effect on microstructure and various properties is discussed

  9. Wear Beahaviour of Nitrided Microstructures of AlSl H13 Dies for Hot Extrusion of Aluminium

    OpenAIRE

    Kugler, G.; Turk, R.; Večko-Pirtovšek, T.; M. Terčelj

    2006-01-01

    Nitriding of bearing surfaces on dies (tools, AISI H13) for hot extrusion of aluminium is technologically a very sensitive process with regard to achieving a constant quality of the nitrided layers. This study was based on the analysis of microstructure on dies with intentionally prepared deep and narrow gaps which were nitrided by various manufacturers of equipment for gas and ionic nitriding. The manufacturers chose their own nitriding parameters in order to achieve an optimal wear resistan...

  10. Nitriding of Fe–Cr–Al alloys: nitride precipitation and phase transformations

    OpenAIRE

    Clauß, Arno Rainer

    2008-01-01

    Nitriding of the ternary iron-based alloy Fe–1.5wt.%Cr–1.5wt.%Al (i.e. Fe–1.6at.%Cr–3.1at.%Al) leads to the precipitation of mixed, cubic, rock-salt structure type Cr1-xAlxN precipitates. These precipitates are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, which would involve precipitation of cubic, rock-salt structure type CrN and hexagonal, wurtzite structure type AlN. The mixed, cubic, rock-salt structure type Cr1-xAlxN precipitates develop because diffusion of Cr and Al in ferrite, as compared to dif...

  11. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of indium nitride and indium gallium nitride materials for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybus, Elaissa

    The objective of the proposed research is to establish the technology for material growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and fabrication of indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride (InxGa1-xN/GaN) heterojunction solar cells. InxGa1-xN solar cells have the potential to span 90% of the solar spectrum, however there has been no success with high indium (In) incorporation and only limited success with low In incorporation InxGa1-xN. Therefore, this present work focuses on 15--30% In incorporation leading to a bandgap value of 2.3--2.8 eV. This work will exploit the revision of the indium nitride (InN) bandgap value of 0.68 eV, which expands the range of the optical emission of nitride-based devices from ultraviolet to near infrared regions, by developing transparent In xGa1-xN solar cells outside the visible spectrum. Photovoltaic devices with a bandgap greater than 2.0 eV are attractive because over half the available power in the solar spectrum is above the photon energy of 2.0 eV. The ability of InxGa1-xN materials to optimally span the solar spectrum offers a tantalizing solution for high-efficiency photovoltaics. This work presents results confirming the revised bandgap of InN grown on germanium (Ge) substrates and the effects of oxygen contamination on the bandgap. This research adds to the historical discussion of the bandgap value of InN. Using the metal modulated epitaxy (MME) technique in a new, ultra-clean refurbished MBE system, an innovative growth regime is established where In and Ga phase separation is diminished by increasing the growth rate for In xGa1-xN. The MME technique modulates the metal shutters with a fixed duty cycle while maintaining a constant nitrogen flux and proves effective for improving crystal quality and p-type doping. InxGa 1-xN/GaN heterojunction solar cells require p-type doping to create the p-n subcell collecting junction, which facilitates current collection through the electrostatic field created by spatially separated ionized

  12. Characterization of nitrides in an AISI 1010 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was characterized the phase formation in the 1010 carbon steel nitrided in a plasma reactor nearby to eutectoid point. The microstructure and identification of these ones were evaluated by Optical microscopy (OM), Dilatometry and X-ray diffraction (XRD). (Author)

  13. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program: Gaseous Nitridation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Suplinskas G. DiBona; W. Grant

    2001-10-29

    Textron has developed a mature process for the fabrication of continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) tubes for application in the aluminum processing and casting industry. The major milestones in this project are System Composition; Matrix Formulation; Preform Fabrication; Nitridation; Material Characterization; Component Evaluation

  14. BORON NITRIDE CAPACITORS FOR ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONIC DEVICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Badi; D. Starikov; C. Boney; A. Bensaoula; D. Johnstone

    2010-11-01

    This project fabricates long-life boron nitride/boron oxynitride thin film -based capacitors for advanced SiC power electronics with a broad operating temperature range using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique. The use of vapor deposition provides for precise control and quality material formation.

  15. Crystallographic phases and magnetic properties of iron nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron nitride films, including single phase films of α-FeN (expanded bcc Fe), γ′-Fe4N, ε-Fe3−xN (0 ≤ x ≤ 1), and γ″-FeN, were sputtered onto AlN buffered glass substrates. It was found possible to control the phases in the films merely by changing the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition. The magnetization decreased with increased nitrogen concentration and dropped to zero when the N:Fe ratio was above 0.5. The experimental results, along with spin polarized band calculations, have been used to discuss and analyze the magnetic properties of iron nitrides. It has been demonstrated that in addition to influencing the lattice constant of the various iron nitrides, the nearest N atoms have a significant influence on the exchange splitting of the Fe atoms. Due to the hybridization of Fe-3d and N-2p states, the magnetic moment of Fe atoms decreases with an increase in the number of nearest neighbor nitrogen atoms. - Highlights: • Single phase γ′-Fe4N, ε-Fe3−xN, and γ″-FeN films were obtained using dc sputtering. • The phases in iron nitride films can be controlled by the nitrogen partial pressure. • The nearest N neighbors have a significant influence on the exchange splitting of Fe

  16. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...

  17. Graphene and Boron Nitride: Members of Two Dimensional Material Family

    OpenAIRE

    Riaz, Ibtsam

    2012-01-01

    Name of University: University of ManchesterCandidate full name: Ibtsam RiazDegree Title: Doctor of Philosophy in the Faculty of Engineering and Physical sciencesThesis Title: Graphene and Boron Nitride: Members of Two Dimensional Material FamilyDate: 18-JAN-2012

  18. Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Janet; Hull, David; Gorican, Dan

    2005-01-01

    Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted large amounts of attention. Both materials have potentially unique and significant properties which may have important structural and electronic applications in the future. However of even more interest than their similarities may be the differences between carbon and boron nanotubes. Whilt boron nitride nanotubes possess a very high modulus similaar to CNT, they are also more chemically and thermally inert. Additionally BNNT possess more uniform electronic properties, having a uniform band gap of approximately 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductin to conductor behavior. Boron Nitride nanotubes have been synthesized by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistently producing a reliable product has proven difficult. Progress in synthesis of 1-2 gram sized batches of Boron Nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.

  19. Microstructural evolution during nitriding, finite element simulation and experimental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassani-Gangaraj, S.M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Meccanica, Via La Masa, 1, 20156 Milano (Italy); Guagliano, M., E-mail: mario.guagliano@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Meccanica, Via La Masa, 1, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    A finite element simulation of nitriding is proposed in this paper, using the analogy between diffusion and heat conduction, to overcome the shortcomings of the classical internal oxidation model in predicting the kinetics of layer growth and nitrogen distribution during nitriding. To verify the model, a typical gas nitriding has been carried out on an axisymmetric specimen. Treated specimen has been characterized using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. It was found that the so-called diffusion zone can be divided into two parts with different influence on the mechanical characteristics including residual stress and hardening. First layer which is a two phase region of ferritic matrix and γ′ (Fe{sub 4}N) makes further improvement with respect to the second layer which is a solid solution of nitrogen in ferrite. The formation of that two phase region, which is not predicted by classical model, can be efficiently recognized by the proposed model. It is also proved that the model has the ability to consider the geometry dependency of layer growth and formation in nitriding.

  20. Size effects in band gap bowing in nitride semiconducting alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede;

    2011-01-01

    Chemical and size contributions to the band gap bowing of nitride semiconducting alloys (InxGa1-xN, InxAl1-xN, and AlxGa1-xN) are analyzed. It is shown that the band gap deformation potentials of the binary constituents determine the gap bowing in the ternary alloys. The particularly large gap...

  1. Second-harmonic generation in substoichiometric silicon nitride layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecora, Emanuele; Capretti, Antonio; Miano, Giovanni; Dal Negro, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Harmonic generation in optical circuits offers the possibility to integrate wavelength converters, light amplifiers, lasers, and multiple optical signal processing devices with electronic components. Bulk silicon has a negligible second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility owing to its crystal centrosymmetry. Silicon nitride has its place in the microelectronic industry as an insulator and chemical barrier. In this work, we propose to take advantage of silicon excess in silicon nitride to increase the Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) efficiency. Thin films have been grown by reactive magnetron sputtering and their nonlinear optical properties have been studied by femtosecond pumping over a wide range of excitation wavelengths, silicon nitride stoichiometry and thermal processes. We demonstrate SHG in the visible range (375 - 450 nm) using a tunable 150 fs Ti:sapphire laser, and we optimize the SH emission at a silicon excess of 46 at.% demonstrating a maximum SHG efficiency of 4x10-6 in optimized films. Polarization properties, generation efficiency, and the second order nonlinear optical susceptibility are measured for all the investigated samples and discussed in terms of an effective theoretical model. Our findings show that the large nonlinear optical response demonstrated in optimized Si-rich silicon nitride materials can be utilized for the engineering of nonlinear optical functions and devices on a Si chip.

  2. Heterostructures for Increased Quantum Efficiency in Nitride LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Robert F. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2010-09-30

    Task 1. Development of an advanced LED simulator useful for the design of efficient nitride-based devices. Simulator will contain graphical interface software that can be used to specify the device structure, the material parameters, the operating conditions and the desired output results. Task 2. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on the microstructure, defect concentration, mechanical stress and strain and IQE of controlled changes in the chemistry and process route of deposition of the buffer layer underlying the active region of nitride-based blue- and greenemitting LEDs. Task 3. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on the physical properties including polarization and IQE of controlled changes in the geometry, chemistry, defect density, and microstructure of components in the active region of nitride-based blue- and green-emitting LEDs. Task 4. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence on IQE of novel heterostructure designs to funnel carriers into the active region for enhanced recombination efficiency and elimination of diffusion beyond this region. Task 5. Theoretical and experimental investigations regarding the influence of enhanced p-type doping on the chemical, electrical, and microstructural characteristics of the acceptor-doped layers, the hole injection levels at Ohmic contacts, the specific contact resistivity and the IQE of nitride-based blue- and green-emitting LEDs. Development and optical and electrical characterization of reflective Ohmic contacts to n- and p-type GaN films.

  3. Material evaluation program, high-temperature nitriding environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcy, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a program conducted to evaluate materials for construction of a space shuttle hydrazine monopropellant gas generator are presented. The program was designed to select those materials that maintain the properties of strength and ductility after exposure to an 1800 F nitriding environment for 1000 hours.

  4. Bone tissue response to plasma-nitrided titanium implant surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Prado FERRAZ

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A current goal of dental implant research is the development of titanium (Ti surfaces to improve osseointegration. Plasma nitriding treatments generate surfaces that favor osteoblast differentiation, a key event to the process of osteogenesis. Based on this, it is possible to hypothesize that plasma-nitrided Ti implants may positively impact osseointegration. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo bone response to Ti surfaces modified by plasma-nitriding treatments. Material and Methods Surface treatments consisted of 20% N2 and 80% H2, 450°C and 1.5 mbar during 1 h for planar and 3 h for hollow cathode. Untreated surface was used as control. Ten implants of each surface were placed into rabbit tibiae and 6 weeks post-implantation they were harvested for histological and histomorphometric analyses. Results Bone formation was observed in contact with all implants without statistically significant differences among the evaluated surfaces in terms of bone-to-implant contact, bone area between threads, and bone area within the mirror area. Conclusion Our results indicate that plasma nitriding treatments generate Ti implants that induce similar bone response to the untreated ones. Thus, as these treatments improve the physico-chemical properties of Ti without affecting its biocompatibility, they could be combined with modifications that favor bone formation in order to develop new implant surfaces.

  5. Advances and directions of ion nitriding/carburizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1989-01-01

    Ion nitriding and carburizing are plasma activated thermodynamic processes for the production of case hardened surface layers not only for ferrous materials, but also for an increasing number of nonferrous metals. When the treatment variables are properly controlled, the use of nitrogenous or carbonaceous glow discharge medium offers great flexibility in tailoring surface/near-surface properties independently of the bulk properties. The ion nitriding process has reached a high level of maturity and has gained wide industrial acceptance, while the more recently introduced ion carburizing process is rapidly gaining industrial acceptance. The current status of plasma mass transfer mechanisms into the surface regarding the formation of compound and diffusion layers in ion nitriding and carbon build-up ion carburizing is reviewed. In addition, the recent developments in design and construction of advanced equipment for obtaining optimized and controlled case/core properties is summarized. Also, new developments and trends such as duplex plasma treatments and alternatives to dc diode nitriding are highlighted.

  6. Compositional analysis of silicon oxide/silicon nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meziani Samir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen, amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx:H abbreviated SiNx films were grown on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD in parallel configuration using NH3/SiH4 gas mixtures. The mc-Si wafers were taken from the same column of Si cast ingot. After the deposition process, the layers were oxidized (thermal oxidation in dry oxygen ambient environment at 950 °C to get oxide/nitride (ON structure. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX were employed for analyzing quantitatively the chemical composition and stoichiometry in the oxide-nitride stacked films. The effect of annealing temperature on the chemical composition of ON structure has been investigated. Some species, O, N, Si were redistributed in this structure during the thermal oxidation of SiNx. Indeed, oxygen diffused to the nitride layer into Si2O2N during dry oxidation.

  7. Atomistic models of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride from first principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.; De Groot, R.A.; De Wijs, G.A.; Zeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H), with equal concentrations of Si and N atoms (x=1), for two considerably different densities (2.0 and 3.0 g/cm3). Densities and hydrogen concentration were chosen according to experimental data. Using first-principle

  8. Atomistic models of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride from first principles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.; Groot, R.A. de; Wijs, G.A. de; Zeman, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H), with equal concentrations of Si and N atoms (x=1), for two considerably different densities (2.0 and 3.0 g/cm3). Densities and hydrogen concentration were chosen according to experimental data. Using first-principle

  9. Microstructural evolution during nitriding, finite element simulation and experimental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A finite element simulation of nitriding is proposed in this paper, using the analogy between diffusion and heat conduction, to overcome the shortcomings of the classical internal oxidation model in predicting the kinetics of layer growth and nitrogen distribution during nitriding. To verify the model, a typical gas nitriding has been carried out on an axisymmetric specimen. Treated specimen has been characterized using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. It was found that the so-called diffusion zone can be divided into two parts with different influence on the mechanical characteristics including residual stress and hardening. First layer which is a two phase region of ferritic matrix and γ′ (Fe4N) makes further improvement with respect to the second layer which is a solid solution of nitrogen in ferrite. The formation of that two phase region, which is not predicted by classical model, can be efficiently recognized by the proposed model. It is also proved that the model has the ability to consider the geometry dependency of layer growth and formation in nitriding.

  10. Boron nitride elastic and thermal properties. Irradiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anisotropy of boron nitride (BN) and especially thermal and elastic properties were studied. Specific heat and thermal conductivity between 1.2 and 300K, thermal conductivity between 4 and 350K and elastic constants C33 and C44 were measured. BN was irradiated with electrons at 77K and with neutrons at 27K to determine properties after irradiation

  11. Hardness and thermal stability of cubic silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Kragh, Flemming; Frost, D. J.;

    2001-01-01

    The hardness and thermal stability of cubic spinel silicon nitride (c-Si3N4), synthesized under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions, have been studied by microindentation measurements, and x-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively The phase at ambient...

  12. Development of compound layer during nitriding and nitrocarburising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A. J.

    The development of the compound layer during gaseous nitriding and nitrocarburising of Fe-based material is described. The first nucleation of the compound layer at the surface depends on the competition between dissociation of ammonia and the removal nitrogen from the surface by solid state...

  13. Synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride graphene-like few layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, S.; Toury, B.; Journet, C.; Brioude, A.

    2014-06-01

    Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction.Self-standing highly crystallized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) mono-, bi- and few-layers have been obtained for the first time via the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route by adding lithium nitride (Li3N) micropowders to liquid-state polyborazylene (PBN). Incorporation of Li3N as a crystallization promoter allows the onset of crystallization of h-BN at a lower temperature (1200 °C) than under classical conditions (1800 °C). The hexagonal structure was confirmed by both electron and X-ray diffraction. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01017e

  14. Dispersion engineering silicon nitride waveguides for broadband nonlinear frequency conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Epping, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigated nonlinear frequency conversion of optical wavelengths using integrated silicon nitride (Si3N4) waveguides. Two nonlinear conversion schemes were considered: seeded four-wave mixing and supercontinuum generation. The first—seeded four-wave mixing—is investigated by a n

  15. Hydrogen Effect on Nanomechanical Properties of the Nitrided Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnoush, Afrooz; Asgari, Masoud; Johnsen, Roy; Hoel, Rune

    2013-02-01

    In situ electrochemical nanoindentation is used to examine the effect of electrochemically charged hydrogen on mechanical properties of the nitride layer on low-alloy 2.25Cr-1Mo martensitic structural steel. By application of this method, we were able to trace the changes in the mechanical properties due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen to different depths within the compound and diffusion layers. The results clearly show that the hydrogen charging of the nitriding layer can soften the layer and reduce the hardness within both the compound and the diffusion layers. The effect is completely reversible and by removal of the hydrogen, the hardness recovers to its original value. The reduction in hardness of the nitride layer does not correlate to the nitrogen concentration, but it seems to be influenced by the microstructure and residual stress within the compound and diffusion layers. Findings show that nitriding can be a promising way to control the hydrogen embrittlement of the tempered martensitic steels.

  16. Compressibility and thermal expansion of cubic silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Lindelov, H.; Gerward, Leif;

    2002-01-01

    The compressibility and thermal expansion of the cubic silicon nitride (c-Si3N4) phase have been investigated by performing in situ x-ray powder-diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation, complemented with computer simulations by means of first-principles calculations. The bulk...

  17. MEASUREMENT OF THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY OF REACTION BONDED SILICON NITRIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, J.-J.; Jaymes, M.; Cantarel, M.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of samples of reaction bonded silicon nitride from different sources, was measured using the ETCA solar furnace. Two measurement methods, suitable for use with this type of equipment, allowed the different material origins to be determined. This installation accepts relatively large samples which are therefore representative of the bulk material.

  18. The fate of nitrogen upon reprocessing of nitride fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadibi-Olschewski, N.; Glatz, J.P.; Bokelund, H. (CEC, JRC, European Inst. for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany)); Leroy, M.J.F. (EHICS, 67 - Strasbourg (France). Lab. de Chimie Minerale et Analytique)

    1992-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dissolution behaviour of nitride fuels in nitric acid. One problem in employing nitrides as fuels is the formation of radiotoxic [sup 1]4 C upon irradiation of natural nitrogen. The use of [sup 1]5 N-enriched fuels would avoid this drawback. Using [sup 1]5 N-enriched uranium nitrides or [sup 1]5 N-enriched nitric acid, two methods were developed to measure the influence of the dissolution parameters, nitric acid temperature and concentration, on the [sup 1]5 N/[sup 1]4 N ratios of the nitrogen, nitrogen oxides and ammonium ions utilizing a coupled gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. This work confirms that the first dissolution step is the oxidation of UN with HNO[sub 3] to form NH[sup +] [sub 4] and HNO[sub 2] and that HNO[sub 2] has a catalytic role in the dissolution to form other products. Ammonium is the only species which contains nitrogen with the same isotopic composition as the uranium nitride. (orig.).

  19. Development of high-thermal-conductivity silicon nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nitride (Si3N4 with high thermal conductivity has emerged as one of the most promising substrate materials for the next-generation power devices. This paper gives an overview on recent developments in preparing high-thermal-conductivity Si3N4 by a sintering of reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SRBSN method. Due to the reduction of lattice oxygen content, the SRBSN ceramics could attain substantially higher thermal conductivities than the Si3N4 ceramics prepared by the conventional gas-pressure sintering of silicon nitride (SSN method. Thermal conductivity could further be improved through increasing the β/α phase ratio during nitridation and enhancing grain growth during post-sintering. Studies on fracture resistance behaviors of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that they possessed high fracture toughness and exhibited obvious R-curve behaviors. Using the SRBSN method, a Si3N4 with a record-high thermal conductivity of 177 Wm−1K−1 and a fracture toughness of 11.2 MPa m1/2 was developed. Studies on the influences of two typical metallic impurity elements, Fe and Al, on thermal conductivities of the SRBSN ceramics revealed that the tolerable content limits for the two impurities were different. While 1 wt% of impurity Fe hardly degraded thermal conductivity, only 0.01 wt% of Al caused large decrease in thermal conductivity.

  20. On production of niobium nitrides from steam and gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of investigation of the process of high-pure niobium nitride production via reduction of niobium pentachloride by hydrogen in nitrogen presence are presented. Two types of units were used: one with heating of base by direct current transmission and other with high frequency heating of base by VChG-1/0.44 generator

  1. Estimation of tribological anticorrosion properties of impregnated nitriding layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper is described aim, experimental and test result of tribological anticorrosion properties of thin nitriding layer (12.5 μm) obtained on 45 steel grade in controlled gas-nitriding process (570oC, 4 h) impregnated with oil-based formulations, containing corrosion inhibitor BS-43, modified with tribological additives based on ashen organometallic compounds as well as ash-free organic compounds. It was stated, that tribological additives does not influence, in fact, on behaviour of corrosion resistance of nitriding layers impregnated with oil-base formulations mainly connected with inhibitor BS-43. Synergy of tribological additive and corrosion inhibitor is however more visible in modelling of wear resistance of nitriding layer. The influence nature of tribological additives in combination with corrosion inhibitor BS-43 is dependent on their kind and as result improves or worsens the wear resistance by friction. Hence in choice of impregnated formulation, which is enable to accomplish of tribological anticorrosion requirements, determined, above all, tribological additive. (author)

  2. Development of Simplified Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Ichiki, Ryuta; Maeda, Akihide; Yamanouchi, Kenta; Akamine, Shuichi; Kanazawa, Seiji; Oita University Team

    2015-09-01

    Nitriding treatment is one of the surface hardening technologies, applied to dies and automobile components. In recent industry, low-pressure nitriding treatment using vacuum system is mainstream. On the other hand, we have originally developed an atmospheric-pressure plasma nitriding which do not need vacuum system. However we needed an air-tight container to purge residual oxygen and external heater to control treatment temperature. To make this technique practical, we addressed to construct a simplified treatment system, where treatment temperature is controlled by thermal plasma itself and oxygen purging is achieved by a simple cover. This means that any air-tight container and external heater is not necessary. As a result, surface temperature is controlled by changing treatment gap from nozzle tip to steel surface. We succeeded in controlling well thickness of hardened layer by adjusting treatment temperature even in such a simplified system. In the conference, we also discuss experimental results for hardening complex shaped materials by using our simplified nitriding.

  3. The design, fabrication, and testing of corrugated silicon nitride diaphragms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, Patrick R.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride corrugated diaphragms of 2 mm×2 mm×1 ¿m have been fabricated with 8 circular corrugations, having depths of 4, 10, or 14 ¿m. The diaphragms with 4-¿m-deep corrugations show a measured mechanical sensitivity (increase in the deflection over the increase in the applied pressure) which

  4. Neutronic performance of uranium nitride composite fuels in a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Survey and sensitivity assembly level studies for uranium nitride composite fuels. • Composites harden the neutron spectrum and decrease the worth of control rods. • Moderator temperature coefficient is more negative, soluble boron coefficient is less negative. • Similar equilibrium core power peaking and reactivity coefficient when compared to UO2. • Illustrates “do no harm” in evaluation of candidate accident tolerant fuels. - Abstract: Uranium mononitride (UN) based composite nuclear fuels may have potential benefits in light water reactor applications, including enhanced thermal conductivity and increased fuel density. However, uranium nitride reacts chemically when in contact with water, especially at high temperatures. To overcome this challenge, several advanced composite fuels have been proposed with uranium nitride as a primary phase. The primary nitride phase is “shielded” from water by a secondary phase, which would allow the potential benefits of nitride fuels to be realized. This work is an operational assessment of four different candidate composite materials. We considered uranium dioxide (UO2) and UN base cases and compared them with the candidate composite UN-based fuels. The comparison was performed for nominal conditions in a reference PWR with Zr-based cladding. We assessed the impact of UN porosity on the operational performance, because this is a key sensitivity parameter. As composite fuels, we studied UN/U3Si5, UN/U3Si2, UN/UB4, and UN/ZrO2. In the case of UB4, the boron content is 100% enriched in 11B. The proposed zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) phase is cubic and yttria-stabilized. In all cases UN is the primary phase, with small fractions of U3Si5, U3Si5, UB4, or ZrO2 as a secondary phase. In this analysis we showed that two baseline nitride cases at different fractions of theoretical density (0.8 and 0.95) generally bound the neutronic performance of the candidate composite fuels. Performance was comparable with

  5. Grain refinement by boron nitride; Gefuegemodifizierung durch Bornitrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, F.W.; Guenther, A.; Phan-Tan, T.; Kruessel, T.; Wilk, P. [Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde der Universitaet Hannover, Struktur- und Biomedizinwerkstoffe, Garbsen (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Grain refinement of magnesium alloys aims at better deformation behaviour, higher strength and improved corrosion resistance. Besides mechanical treatment like pressing, it is possible to refine the grainsize by using nucleation materials. Whereas calcium and rare earth elements are already widely used, the use of boron nitride offers a cheap alternative to refine grains of magnesium aluminum alloys. The effect is achieved by the reaction of boron nitride with aluminum which cracks the chemical compound to form aluminum nitride with the nitrogen while boron is forming different magnesium borides. These two compounds both exhibit very high melting points and are stable in this environment so that they can act as seed crystals. Because boron nitride shows a bad wettability to metal molds, it would float on top of the mold. Therefore, it is necessary to produce pellets out of boron nitride and aluminum powder to improve contact to the mold and enhance reaction velocity. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Durch die Kornfeinung von Magnesiumlegierungen wird das Ziel einer Festigkeitssteigerung, einer verbesserten Umformbarkeit und einer erhoehten Korrosionsbestaendigkeit verfolgt. Neben mechanischen Loesungswegen (Strangpressen etc.) besteht die Moeglichkeit legierungstechnisch durch den Einsatz keimbildender Stoffe eine Kornfeinung zu erzielen. Neben dem Einsatz von Kalzium oder Seltenen Erden bietet Bornitrid eine kostenguenstige Moeglichkeit eine Kornfeinung fuer aluminiumhaltige Magnesiumlegierungen zu erzeugen. Die Kornfeinung beruht dabei auf der Reaktion des Bornitrids mit dem Aluminium in der Schmelze, durch welche das Bornitrid zersetzt wird und mit dem freiwerdenden Stickstoff zu Aluminiumnitrid reagiert, waehrend sich das Bor mit Magnesium zu Magnesiumboriden verbindet. Bei beiden Produkten handelt es sich um hochschmelzende, in dieser Umgebung stabile Verbindungen, die als Kristallisationskeime wirken koennen. Die Zugabe des

  6. Ionic nitriding of high chromium martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martensitic stainless steels are used in industrial applications where resistance to corrosion and mechanical resistance are needed simultaneously. These steels are normally used in tempering and annealing condition which gives them hardnesses of 500 and 600 HV (about 54 HRC). Ionic nitriding is an assisted diffusion technique that has recently been successfully applied to harden austenitic stainless steels without reducing their resistance to corrosion. The application with AISI 420 martensitic steels has not given good results yet, because in most cases, it affects their corrosion resistance. This work presents the results of the pulsed nitriding of martensitic steels with a higher chrome content, such as the M340 and M333 Boehler steels and they are compared with the same materials after tempering and annealing, without nitriding. The influence of the variations in the parameters of the process, such as the percentage of active time in the pulsed wave, partial nitrogen pressure, current density and effective tension in the microstructure, hardness and wear and corrosion resistance was studied. The microstructure was studied with an optic microscope; the wear resistance with abrasion tests following ASTM G-65 and corrosion with 100 hour long saline haze tests, in a device built according to ASTM B117. Hardness was found to rise to values of 1000 to 1350 HV in all the steels after ionic nitriding, the modified layers oscillated from 3 to 15 microns. As a result, wear resistance also increased, with differences depending on the microstructure and the thickness of the modified layer. However, corrosion resistance was not good, except in the case of the M333 steel test piece with less hardness and a less thick nitrided layer without a noticeable interphase (au)

  7. Reprocessing of spent nitride fuel by chemical dissolution in molten salt: Results on plutonium nitride containing inert matrix materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid solutions of actinide mono-nitrides have been proposed as a candidate fuel of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinides (MA). The pyrochemical process has several advantages over the wet process such as PUREX in the case of treating spent nitride fuel with large decay heat and fast neutron emission, and recovering highly enriched 15N. In the present study, the chemical dissolution of PuN, (PuxZr1-x)N and PuN+TiN, with CdCl2 in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt were investigated to confirm the possibility of the chemical dissolution process of spent nitride fuel. The plutonium nitrides, PuN, (PuxZr1-x)N and PuN+TiN, were dissolved by the reaction with CdCl2 in LiCl- KCl eutectic melt at 823 K and most of Pu was recovered into the molten salt. On the other hand, most of ZrN and TiN were not dissolved and remained as undissolved residues. (authors)

  8. Synthesis of graphitic carbon nitride by reaction of melamine and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Graphitic carbon nitrides by CVD of melamine and uric acid on alumina. → The building blocks of carbon nitrides are heptazine nuclei. → Composite particles with alumina core and carbon nitride coating. - Abstract: Graphitic carbon nitrides were synthesized starting from melamine and uric acid. Uric acid was chosen because it thermally decomposes, and reacts with melamine by condensation at temperatures in the range of 400-600 deg. C. The reagents were mixed with alumina and subsequently the samples were treated in an oven under nitrogen flux. Alumina favored the deposition of the graphitic carbon nitrides layers on the exposed surface. This method can be assimilated to an in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Infrared (IR) spectra, as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, are in accordance with the formation of a graphitic carbon nitride with a structure based on heptazine blocks. These carbon nitrides exhibit poor crystallinity and a nanometric texture, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The thermal degradation of the graphitic carbon nitride occurs through cyano group formation, and involves the bridging tertiary nitrogen and the bonded carbon, which belongs to the heptazine ring, causing the ring opening and the consequent network destruction as inferred by connecting the IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results. This seems to be an easy and promising route to synthesize graphitic carbon nitrides. Our final material is a composite made of an alumina core covered by carbon nitride layers.

  9. Wear and isothermal oxidation kinetics of nitrided TiAl based alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵斌; 吴建生; 孙坚

    2002-01-01

    Gas nitridation of TiAl based alloys in an ammonia atmosphere was c arried out. The evaluation of the surface wear resistance was performed to compare with those of the non-nitrided alloys. It is concluded that high temperature nitridation raised wear resistance of TiAl based alloys markedly. The tribol ogical behaviors of the nitrided alloys were also discussed. The oxidation kinetics of the nitrided TiAl based alloys were investigated at 800~1000 ℃ in hot air. It is concluded that nitridation is detrimental to the oxidation resistance of TiAl based alloys under the present conditions. The nitrided alloys exhibit increased oxidizing rate with the prolongation of nitridation time at 800 ℃. However, alloys nitrided at 940 ℃ for 50 hdisplay a sign of better oxidat ion resistance than the other nitrided alloys at more severe oxidizing conditions. The parabolic rate law is considered as the basis of the data processing and interpretation of the mass gainvs time data. As a comparison with it, attempts were made to fit the data with the power law. The oxidation kinetic parameter kn, kp and n were measured and the trends were discussed.

  10. Synthesis of high purity gallium nitride powders and growth and characterization of aluminum nitride and gallium nitride bulk single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkas, Cengiz Mustafa

    Single crystalline platelets of aluminum nitride (AlN) ≤ 1 mm thick have been grown within the range 1950-2250sp°C on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates via sublimation-recondensation in a resistively heated graphite furnace. The source material was sintered AlN. A maximum growth rate of 500 mum/hr was achieved at 2150sp°C and a source-to-seed separation of 4 mm. Crystals grown at high temperatures ranged in color from blue to green due to the incorporation of Si and C from the SiC substrates; those grown at lower temperatures were colorless and transparent. Secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) results showed approximately a two order of magnitude decrease in the concentrations of these two impurities in the transparent crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed low densities of line and planar defects and a strain free material. The synthesis of high purity, single phase GaN powders was accomplished in a hot wall tube furnace via (1) the reaction of Ga(l) with ammonia (NHsb3) and (2) the conversion of Gasb2Osb3(s). Polyhedra of various shapes were obtained from both processes; some rod-shaped crystals were also observed in the material derived from Gasb2Osb3. The GaN powders produced via the first route were characterized via XRD technique. The diffraction data revealed the material to be single phase with a = 3.1891 A, c = 5.1855 A, in space group P6sb3mc, Z = 2 and Dsb{x} = 6.0886 gr/cmsp3. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a particle size distribution in the ground material between 1 and 5 mum with most of the particles being {≈}1{mu}m. The data obtained in this study was chosen to be the new standard for the powder diffraction pattern for this material by the International Center for Diffraction Data. Single crystals of GaN up to 3 mm in length were grown by sublimation of pellets of this material under an NHsb3 flow. Typical green densities were 50 to 60% of theoretical density

  11. Heavy ion ERD of oxy-nitride and nitride films with a position-sensitive gas ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The atomic composition of materials and thin films can be quantitatively profiled as function of sample depth with heavy ion elastic recoil detection (ERD). When using a high-energy, heavy incident beam, such as 200MeV gold ions, the sensitivity is similar for all elements and better than 0.1 atomic percent. A prime application of heavy ion ERD is the analysis of silicon oxy-nitride and gallium nitride films, which are developed for a variety of opto-electronic applications. The technique can simultaneously resolve all chemical elements in these films including hydrogen, which is often present as a contaminant. This presentation reports on detailed studies of oxy-nitride and nitride films using heavy ion ERD carried out at the 14UD pelletron accelerator at the Australian National University. For films thinner than about 1 μm, the substrate interface can be resolved and, assuming uniformity, the film composition can be directly obtained by normalizing the measured yield for each element with the corresponding recoil cross-sections. Deviations from uniformity are evident from the corresponding energy spectra. By calibrating these spectra using known stopping powers, depth-information may be obtained and possible variations of the composition can be quantified. The concentration change at the interface between substrate and film can be studied individually for each element. A major obstacle in the ERD analysis of nitride films, is their radiation sensitivity, which generally results in the depletion of the nitrogen and hydrogen content during exposure to the incident beam. Using a position-sensitive gas ionization detectors with large acceptance angle, such beam-induced sample modification can be minimized. Residual desorption was found to be linear with incident fluence and can thus be reliably corrected

  12. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy of scandium nitride on silicon carbide and gallium nitride surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scandium nitride (ScN) is a group IIIB transition metal nitride semiconductor with numerous potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices due to close lattice matching with gallium nitride (GaN). However, prior investigations of ScN have focused primarily on heteroepitaxial growth on substrates with a high lattice mismatch of 7%–20%. In this study, the authors have investigated ammonia (NH3) gas source molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-GSMBE) of ScN on more closely lattice matched silicon carbide (SiC) and GaN surfaces (3-GSMBE conditions of 10−5–10−4 Torr NH3 and 800–1050 °C where selected for initial investigation. In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ Rutherford backscattering measurements showed all ScN films grown using these conditions were stoichiometric. For ScN growth on 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° carbon rich surfaces, the observed attenuation of the XPS Si 2p and C 1s substrate core levels with increasing ScN thickness indicated growth initiated in a layer-by-layer fashion. This was consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of 100–200 nm thick films that revealed featureless surfaces. In contrast, ScN films grown on 3C-SiC (111)-(3 × 3) and 3C-SiC (100)-(3 × 2) silicon rich surfaces were found to exhibit extremely rough surfaces in SEM. ScN films grown on both 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° and 2H-GaN (0001)-(1 × 1) epilayer surfaces exhibited hexagonal (1 × 1) low energy electron diffraction patterns indicative of (111) oriented ScN. X-ray diffraction ω-2θ rocking curve scans for these same films showed a large full width half maximum of 0.29° (1047 arc sec) consistent with transmission electron microscopy images that revealed the films to be poly-crystalline with columnar grains oriented at ≈15° to the [0001] direction of the 6H-SiC (0001) substrate. In-situ reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements determined the band-gap for

  13. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy of scandium nitride on silicon carbide and gallium nitride surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Scandium nitride (ScN) is a group IIIB transition metal nitride semiconductor with numerous potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices due to close lattice matching with gallium nitride (GaN). However, prior investigations of ScN have focused primarily on heteroepitaxial growth on substrates with a high lattice mismatch of 7%–20%. In this study, the authors have investigated ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas source molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-GSMBE) of ScN on more closely lattice matched silicon carbide (SiC) and GaN surfaces (<3% mismatch). Based on a thermodynamic analysis of the ScN phase stability window, NH{sub 3}-GSMBE conditions of 10{sup −5}–10{sup −4} Torr NH{sub 3} and 800–1050 °C where selected for initial investigation. In-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ex-situ Rutherford backscattering measurements showed all ScN films grown using these conditions were stoichiometric. For ScN growth on 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° carbon rich surfaces, the observed attenuation of the XPS Si 2p and C 1s substrate core levels with increasing ScN thickness indicated growth initiated in a layer-by-layer fashion. This was consistent with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of 100–200 nm thick films that revealed featureless surfaces. In contrast, ScN films grown on 3C-SiC (111)-(3 × 3) and 3C-SiC (100)-(3 × 2) silicon rich surfaces were found to exhibit extremely rough surfaces in SEM. ScN films grown on both 3C-SiC (111)-(√3 × √3)R30° and 2H-GaN (0001)-(1 × 1) epilayer surfaces exhibited hexagonal (1 × 1) low energy electron diffraction patterns indicative of (111) oriented ScN. X-ray diffraction ω-2θ rocking curve scans for these same films showed a large full width half maximum of 0.29° (1047 arc sec) consistent with transmission electron microscopy images that revealed the films to be poly-crystalline with columnar grains oriented at ≈15° to the [0001] direction of the

  14. Carbide and nitride fuels for advanced burner reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Under the U.S. fast reactor program, reference and alternative 1000 MWth Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts were developed using ternary metallic (U-TRU-Zr) and mixed oxide (UO2+TRUO2) fuels. Recently, mixed carbide and nitride fuels have been considered as fast reactor fuels on the basis of their high density, compatibility with coolant, high melting temperature, and excellent thermal conductivity although they are ceramic fuel like a mixed oxide fuel. Thus, the performance of the ABR core loaded with carbide and nitride fuels was evaluated in this study with an expectation that the carbide and nitride fuels can mitigate disadvantages of both metallic and oxide fuels in the ABR: favorable passive safety features in a severe accident compared to the oxide core, a higher discharge burnup compared to the metallic core, and a potential to increase thermal efficiency. All calculations performed in this study were focused on the neutronics characteristics, although the fabrication and irradiation experiences for carbide and nitride fuels are limited and some problems were observed in the reprocessing and irradiation of these fuels. The mixed monocarbide and mixed mononitride fuels were selected as the alternative fuel forms and the ABR core concepts with these fuels were developed based on the reference 1000 MWth ABR core concepts. For consistency, the potential design goals used in the reference ABR core concepts were also employed in this study: a 1000 MWth power rating, medium TRU conversion ratio of ∼0.75, a compact core, one-year operational cycle length at least with a capacity factor of 90%, sufficient shutdown margin with a limited maximum single control assembly fault, and possible use of either metallic or any ceramic fuels in the same core layout. The core layout and outer assembly dimensions of the reference 1000 MWth ABR core were kept, but the intra assembly design parameters were varied to maximize the discharge burnup within the

  15. Nanodefects in ultrahard crystalline cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubic boron nitride (cBN), the second hardest known material after diamond, exhibits high thermal conductivity and an excellent ability to be n or p doped, which makes it a strong candidate for the next generation of high-temperature micro optical and micro electronic devices. According to recent studies, cBN exhibits a better resistance to radiation damage than diamond, which suggests potential applications in extreme radiation environments. Crystalline cBN powders of up to 0.5 mm linear size is obtained in a similar way as diamond, by catalytic conversion of hexagonal BN (hBN) to cBN at even higher pressures (> 5GPa) and temperatures (∼ 1900 K). Considering the essential role played by the nanodefects (point defects and impurities) in determining its physical properties, it is surprising how limited is the amount of published data concerning the properties of nanodefects in this material, especially by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the most powerful method for identification and characterization of nanodefects in both insulators and semiconductors. This seems to be due mainly to the absence of natural cBN gems and the extreme difficulties in producing even mm3 sized synthetic crystals. We shall present our recent EPR studies on cBN crystalline powders, performed in a broad temperature range from room temperature (RT) down to 1.2 K on several sorts of large size cBN powder grits of yellow and amber color for industrial applications. Previous multifrequency (9.3 GHz and 95 GHz) EPR studies of brown to black cBN crystallites prepared with excess of boron, resulted in the discovery of two new types of paramagnetic point defects with different spectral properties, called the D1 and D2 centers. Our X(9.3 GHz)-band EPR investigations resulted in the observation in amber cBN crystalline powders of a spectrum with a strong temperature dependence of the lineshape. It was found that for high and low temperatures, respectively, the numerical

  16. Nitriding treatment of reduced activation ferritic steel as functional layer for liquid breeder blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of functional layers such as a tritium permeation barrier and an anti-corrosion layer is the essential technology for the development of a molten salt type self cooled fusion blanket. In the present study, the characteristics of a nitriding treatment on a reduced activation ferritic steel, JLF-1 (Fe-9Cr-2W-0.1C) as the functional layer were investigated. The steel surface was nitrided by an ion nitriding treatment or a radical nitriding treatment. The nitridation characteristic of the steel surface was made clear based on the thermodynamic stability. The thermal diffusivity, the hydrogen permeability and the chemical stability in the molten salt Flinak were investigated. The results indicated that the nitriding treatment can improve the compatibility in the Flinak without the decrease of the thermal diffusivity, though there was little improvement as the hydrogen permeation barrier. (author)

  17. Preparation and characterization of boron nitride/carbon fiber composite with high specific surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron nitride can be used as a good catalyst carrier because of its high thermal conductivity and chemical stability. However, a high specific surface area of boron nitride is still desirable. In this work, a carbon fiber composite coated with boron nitride villous nano-film was prepared, and was also characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. The results indicated that the carbon fibers were covered by uniform villous boron nitride films whose thickness was about 150 - 200 nm. The specific surface area of the boron nitride/carbon fiber composite material was 96 m2 g-1, which was markedly improved compared with conventional boron nitride materials. (orig.)

  18. Evolution of residual stresses during short time nitriding of 33CrMoV12-9 steel grade

    OpenAIRE

    FALLOT, Guillaume; Jegou, Sébastien; Barrallier, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of residual stresses during short time gas nitriding of 33CrMoV12-9 steel grade is studied. It aims understanding the influence of nitriding parameters (temperature T and nitriding potential Kn) on the generation and evolution of residual stresses in the very first stage of nitriding. The samples are gas nitrided using a thermobalance during 2h30 and 5 hours for various temperatures and nitriding potentials. Residual stress analyses are carried out by laboratory X-ray diffraction.

  19. Microscopic investigation of pitting corrosion in plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel; Mikroskopische Untersuchung von Lochkorrosion an plasmanitriertem austenitischem rostfreiem Stahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalada, Lisandro; Simison, Silvia N. [Univ. of Mar del Plata (Argentina). Faculty of Engineering; Bruehl, Sonia P. [National Univ. of Technology, Concepcion del Uruguay (Argentina). Surface Engineering Group

    2014-10-01

    UNS 31603 austenitic stainless steel was nitrided using different techniques, and pitting corrosion resistance was analysed in a chloride solution. All nitriding techniques, LEII, PI. and convectional DC nitriding produced a nitrided layer called S phase which is corrosion resistant. Pits morphology and layer structure was investigated using optical and electronic microscopy, SEM-FIB, EDS, and a 3D reconstruction of a pit was assessed using FIB tomography. It was concluded that pits are initiated in MnS inclusions and a channel was generated passing through the nitrided layer, connecting the steel with the electrolyte. Base alloy dissolution was observed beneath the nitrided layer.

  20. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN, with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  1. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    OpenAIRE

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa; Francisco Odolberto de Araújo; José Alzamir Pereira da Costa; Antonio Maia de Oliveira; Mineia Sampaio Melo; Clodomiro Alves Junior

    2012-01-01

    AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN), with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  2. Structure and Properties of Burnished and Nitrided AISI D2 Tool Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel TOBOŁA; Witold BROSTOW; Kazimierz CZECHOWSKI; Piotr RUSEK; Iwona WRONSKA

    2015-01-01

    D2 belongs to traditional steels, frequently used in metalworking industry. Shot peening and nitriding are known to improve the wear resistance of D2. In this work we focus on processes of slide burnishing and industrial low temperature gas nitriding. The D2 steel specimens were first subjected to heat treatments (HT) prescribed by the manufacturer, turning (T), then burnishing (B) and nitriding (N). The reason for turning was achieving appropriate surface roughness. Deformation induced in sl...

  3. Optomechanical and Crystallization Phenomena Visualized with 4D Electron Microscopy: Interfacial Carbon Nanotubes on Silicon Nitride

    OpenAIRE

    Flannigan, David J.; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-01-01

    With ultrafast electron microscopy (UEM), we report observation of the nanoscopic crystallization of amorphous silicon nitride, and the ultrashort optomechanical motion of the crystalline silicon nitride at the interface of an adhering carbon nanotube network. The in situ static crystallization of the silicon nitride occurs only in the presence of an adhering nanotube network, thus indicating their mediating role in reaching temperatures close to 1000 °C when exposed to a train of laser pulse...

  4. Metallurgical response of an AISI 4140 steel to different plasma nitriding gas mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Adão Felipe Oliveira Skonieski; Giovanni Rocha dos Santos; Thomas Karl Hirsch; Alexandre da Silva Rocha

    2013-01-01

    Plasma nitriding is a surface modification process that uses glow discharge to diffuse nitrogen atoms into the metallic matrix of different materials. Among the many possible parameters of the process, the gas mixture composition plays an important role, as it impacts directly the formed layer's microstructure. In this work an AISI 4140 steel was plasma nitrided under five different gas compositions. The plasma nitriding samples were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscop...

  5. Surface modification of austenitic steel by various glow-discharge nitriding methods

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Borowski; Bogusława Adamczyk-Cieślak; Agnieszka Brojanowska; Krzysztof Kulikowski; Tadeusz Wierzchoń

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen intensive research on modifying glow-discharge nitriding processes. One of the most commonly used glow-discharge methods includes cathodic potential nitriding (conventional method), and active screen plasma nitriding. Each of these methods has a number of advantages. One very important, common feature of these techniques is full control of the microstructure, chemical and phase composition, thickness and the surface topography of the layers formed. Another advantage inc...

  6. Research on Abrasives in the Chemical Mechanical Polishing Process for Silicon Nitride Balls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Silicon nitride (Si 3N 4) has been the main material for balls in ceramic ball bearings, for its lower density, high strength, high hardness, fine thermal stability and anticorrosive, and is widely used in various fields, such as high speed and high temperature areojet engines, precision machine tools and chemical engineer machines. Silicon nitride ceramics is a kind of brittle and hard material that is difficult to machining. In the traditional finishing process of silicon nitride balls, balls are lapped...

  7. NITROGEN POTENTIAL DURING ION NITRIDING PROCESS IN GLOW-DISCHARGE PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kozlov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems on regulation of phase composition of a nitrided layer during gas and ion nitriding process in a glow-discharge. It has been established that  available models for control of nitrided layer structure with the help of nitriding index (nitrogen potential can not be applied for nitriding process in the glow-discharge. Principal difference of the ion nitriding from the gas one is in the fact that chemically active nitrogen is formed in the discharge zone (cathode layer and its mass-transfer is carried out in the form of an active particle flow (ions, atoms, molecules which directed to the metal surface.Interrelation of chemical discharge activity with such characteristics of nitriding steel as nitrogen solubility in  α-solid solution and  coefficient diffusion during ion nitriding in low-discharge plasma. It has been shown that regulation of the nitride layer structure during ion nitriding is reached due to changes in nitrogen flow density in plasma. While supporting the flow at the level of nitrogen solubility in  one phase or another (α, γ′  it is possible to obtain the nitrided layer consisting only of α-solid solution or γ′-nitride layer and diffusion sub-layer. Moreover a specific range of nitrogen flow density values exists for every steel grade where it is possible to ensure a limiting nitrogen concentration in α-solid solution and the γ′-layer characterized by low diffusion  mobility is not formed on the surface.

  8. Laser Nitrided and TiN Coated Ti-6Al-4V Alloy surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mana , Omar

    2011-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in aerospace industry due to their low density and high toughness to mass ratios. However, the wear resistance of the titanium alloys is poor and requires surface treatment for the effective usage. One of the methods to improve the surface properties is to nitride the surface forming the nitride rich compounds in the surface region. Titanium nitrides provide the hard surfaces and improve the tribological properties of the surface. The gas assisted laser nitridi...

  9. Si doped and undoped chromium nitride coatings : a comparative study of physical properties

    OpenAIRE

    CUNHA L.; Moura, C.

    2011-01-01

    Chromium nitride and silicon doped chromium nitride thin films have been deposited by r.f. reactive magnetron sputtering. This study corresponds to the investigation of the influence of processing parameters and of the addition of silicon on the chromium nitride matrix on the properties of the produced films. The characterization of the coatings was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nano-indentation experiments. Results concerning the crystalline phases, crystal orientation/texture...

  10. Microstructure of boron nitride coated on nuclear fuels by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three nuclear fuels, pure urania, 5% and 10% gadolinia containing fuels were coated with boron nitride to improve nuclear and physical properties. Coating was done by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique by using boron trichloride and ammonia. The specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Boron nitride formed a grainy structure on all fuels. Gadolinia decreased the grain size of boron nitride. The fractal dimensions of fragmentation and of area-perimeter relation were determined. (orig.)

  11. Microstructure of boron nitride coated on nuclear fuels by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmazucar, H.H. [Cumhuriyet Univ., Sivas (Turkey). Kimya Muehendisligi Boeluemue; Guenduez, G. [Kimya Muehendisligi Boeluemue, Orta Dogu Teknik Ueniversitesi, Ankara 06531 (Turkey); Toker, C. [Elektrik-Elektronik Muehendisligi Boeluemue, Orta Dogu Teknik Ueniversitesi, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)

    1998-08-03

    Three nuclear fuels, pure urania, 5% and 10% gadolinia containing fuels were coated with boron nitride to improve nuclear and physical properties. Coating was done by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique by using boron trichloride and ammonia. The specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Boron nitride formed a grainy structure on all fuels. Gadolinia decreased the grain size of boron nitride. The fractal dimensions of fragmentation and of area-perimeter relation were determined. (orig.) 19 refs.

  12. Mathematical Model of Prediction of Nitrogen Pickup in Nitriding Process of Low Carbon Ferromanganese

    OpenAIRE

    Ghali, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Low carbon ferromanganese was nitrided through gas-solid reaction. The nitriding process has been carried out on lab scale at temperature range 800°C–950°C at different nitrogen pressures. Temperature, time, and partial nitrogen pressure of nitriding process of fine low carbon ferromanganese were investigated. Nitrogen content, in weight percent, was more than 9%. MATLAB software was used to derive mathematical model to predict nitrogen content as a function of temperature and nitrogen pressu...

  13. Bands, bonds, and polarizations in nitrides - from electronic orbitals to electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key property of the nitrides is the fact that they posses large spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization fields that allow a significant tailoring of the carrier dynamics and optical properties of nitride devices. In this paper, based on first-principle calculations of structural and electronic properties of bulk nitrides and their heterostructure, we investigate the potential of this novel material class for modern device applications by performing self-consistent Monte Carlo simulations. Our studies reveal that the nitride based electronic devices have characteristics that predispose them for high power and high frequency applications. We demonstrate also that transistor characteristics are favourably influenced by the internal polarization induced electric field. (author)

  14. Turbostratic boron nitride coated on high-surface area metal oxide templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Brorson, M.;

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride coatings on high-surface area MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray powder diffraction. The metal oxide templates were coated with boron nitride using a simple nitridation in a flow of ammonia starting from ammonium...... borate adsorbed on MgAl2O4 or gamma-Al2O3. This procedure resulted in the formation of a turbostratic boron nitride film with a thickness of a few individual BN layers....

  15. Tribology of nitriding layer, TiN coatings and their complex on AISI D2 steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ke-sheng; ZHANG De-yuan; DONG Ding-fu

    2004-01-01

    The sliding wear and impact wear resistances of D2 steel with nitriding layer, PVD titanium nitride coating and their duplex treatment were investigated. The experimental results suggest that the duplex treatment has the best sliding and impact wear resistances under experimental conditions. And the wear resistance of PVD titanium nitride is better than that of nitriding. The impact wear resistance and wear mechanism of all three surface layers remain unchanged under impact load of 0.2 J or 1 J. All samples end with the same symptom of flaking.

  16. Gas nitriding and subsequent oxidation of Ti-6Al-4V alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Bok; Pohrelyuk, Iryna; Yaskiv, Oleh; Lee, Jae Chun

    2012-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V alloys consisting of α-Ti grains and intergranular β-Ti islands were nitrided at 850°C for 1 to 12 h under a nitrogen pressure of 1 Pa. With increasing nitriding time, the Ti-N compound layer became thicker, and the α-Ti diffusion zone containing dissolved nitrogen became wider. In the Ti-N compound layer, the initially formed Ti2N became TiN as the nitriding progressed. The nitride layers were oxidized to rutile-TiO2 after oxidation at 700°C for 10 h in air. PMID:22221679

  17. Life Enhancement of Hot-Forging Dies by Plasma-Nitriding

    OpenAIRE

    ÇAPA, Mehmet; TAMER, Muzaffer; GÜLMEZ, Turgut; BODUR, Cengiz Tahir

    2000-01-01

    Hot-forging dies, made of AISI-H13 hot-work tool steel, were plasma-nitrided in order to improve the surface properties of the material. A diffusion layer without the white layer was formed on the material by controlling the nitriding parameters: vacuum pressure, temperature, N2 / H2 ratio and DC bias potential. The nitriding time was varied from 2 to 16 hours. Micro-hardness measurements were performed on the surface and through the diffusion layer for each nitrided material. Optical microsc...

  18. Nitride coating enhances endothelialization on biomedical NiTi shape memory alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Raluca; Luculescu, Catalin; Cimpean, Anisoara; Marx, Philippe; Gordin, Doina-Margareta; Gloriant, Thierry

    2016-05-01

    Surface nitriding was demonstrated to be an effective process for improving the biocompatibility of implantable devices. In this study, we investigated the benefits of nitriding the NiTi shape memory alloy for vascular stent applications. Results from cell experiments indicated that, compared to untreated NiTi, a superficial gas nitriding treatment enhanced the adhesion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), cell spreading and proliferation. This investigation provides data to demonstrate the possibility of improving the rate of endothelialization on NiTi by means of nitride coating. PMID:26952473

  19. Plasma-nitriding and characterization of FeAl40 iron aluminide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to plasma-nitriding of a B2 FeAl40 aluminide was investigated in this work using varying temperatures, times and gas mixtures. The microstructure of the plasma-nitrided cases were fully characterized using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, as well as microhardness testing. Based on the experimental results, the observed abnormal growth kinetics of the nitride case formed at 700 °C was investigated and a model was put forward to understand the mechanism involved in the formation of wave-like line features within the nitride cases

  20. Evaluation of plasma nitriding efficiency of titanium alloys for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frączek

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface layers obtained on selected titanium alloys, used in medicine, by the nitriding under glow discharge condition were investigated. The results concern of: α- titanium alloy Grade 2 and α + β alloys Grade 5 and Grade 5 ELI nitrided in temperature below 873 K. The nitriding experiments were performed in a current glow-discharge furnace JON-600 with assisting of unconventional methods. After nitriding surface layers were characterised by surface microhardness measurements, chemical depth profiles, microhardness depth profiles and wear resistance tests.

  1. Scanning tunneling microscopy of initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) surface with radical nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) with radical nitrogen at a substrate temperature of 850degC using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). It is found that the thin oxide layer suppresses the changes of original Si step structures during nitridation, and this effect critically depends on the growth conditions of the oxide layer. Comparison of the nitride island morphology to the case of the clean surface suggests that the migration of the precursor during nitridation is suppressed by the oxygen in the layer. (author)

  2. Continuous SiC-fiber reinforcement of reaction bonded silicon nitride (RBSN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the reinforcement of RBSN by carbon-coated SiC continous fibers (SCS-6, Textron). The comparison of conventional long-time nitridation with a newly developed short-time nitridation procedure shows that the former procedure causes partial fiber degradation whereas the fibers of the latter remain stable. Composites produced via short-time nitridation exhibit favourable stress-strain behaviour due to optimized fiber/matrix bonding. Stress values corresponding to the failure of short-time nitridized composites increased linearly with the fiber content up to about 850 MPa at of 19 vol.%. (orig.)

  3. Gas nitriding and subsequent oxidation of Ti-6Al-4V alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Dong Bok; Pohrelyuk, Iryna; Yaskiv, Oleh; Lee, Jae Chun

    2012-01-01

    Ti-6Al-4V alloys consisting of α-Ti grains and intergranular β-Ti islands were nitrided at 850°C for 1 to 12 h under a nitrogen pressure of 1 Pa. With increasing nitriding time, the Ti-N compound layer became thicker, and the α-Ti diffusion zone containing dissolved nitrogen became wider. In the Ti-N compound layer, the initially formed Ti2N became TiN as the nitriding progressed. The nitride layers were oxidized to rutile-TiO2 after oxidation at 700°C for 10 h in air.

  4. Scanning tunneling microscopy of initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) surface with radical nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, R; Ikeda, H; Sakashita, M; Sakai, A; Yasuda, Y; Nakatsuka, O; Zaima, S

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) with radical nitrogen at a substrate temperature of 850degC using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). It is found that the thin oxide layer suppresses the changes of original Si step structures during nitridation, and this effect critically depends on the growth conditions of the oxide layer. Comparison of the nitride island morphology to the case of the clean surface suggests that the migration of the precursor during nitridation is suppressed by the oxygen in the layer. (author)

  5. Preparation of high-pressure phase boron nitride films by physical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, P W; Zhao, Y N; Li, D M; Liu, H W; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure phases boron nitride films together with cubic, wurtzic, and explosive high-pressure phases, were successfully deposited on the metal alloy substrates by tuned substrate radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The percentage of cubic boron nitride phase in the film was about 50% as calculated by Fourier transform infrared measurements. Infrared peak position of cubic boron nitride at 1006.3 cm sup - sup 1 , which is close to the stressless state, indicates that the film has very low internal stress. Transition electron microscope micrograph shows that pure cubic boron nitride phase exits on the surface of the film. The growth mechanism of the BN films was also discussed.

  6. Nitride passivation of the interface between high-k dielectrics and SiGe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ direct ammonia (NH3) plasma nitridation has been used to passivate the Al2O3/SiGe interfaces with Si nitride and oxynitride. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the buried Al2O3/SiGe interface shows that NH3 plasma pre-treatment should be performed at high temperatures (300 °C) to fully prevent Ge nitride and oxynitride formation at the interface and Ge out-diffusion into the oxide. C-V and I-V spectroscopy results show a lower density of interface traps and smaller gate leakage for samples with plasma nitridation at 300 °C

  7. Tunable Band Gap of Boron Nitride Interfaces under Uniaxial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Elizane; Manhabosco, Taise; de Oliveira, Alan; Batista, Ronaldo

    2013-03-01

    In this work we show, by means of a density functional theory formalism, that the interaction between hydrogen terminated boron nitride surfaces gives rise to a metallic interface with free carries of opposite sign at each surface. A band gap can be induced by decreasing the surface separation. The size of the band gap changes continuously from zero up to 4.4 eV with decreasing separation, which is understood in terms of the interaction between surface states.Due to the high thermal conductivity of cubic boron nitride and the coupling between band gap and applied pressure, such tunable band gap interfaces may be used in high stable electronic and electromechanical devices. In addition, the spacial separation of charge carries at the interface may lead to photovoltaic applications. The authors thank tha brazilian agencies Fapemig, CNPq and Capes

  8. Active metal brazing of different metals to aluminium nitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years aluminium nitride ceramics for substrates, coolers and components have found more applications in micro- and power electronics. Aluminium nitride ceramic with high thermal conductivity, small CTE and good thermal shock resistance is used in aeronautical equipment as well as in drive systems of undergrounds and high speed trains. Different metals and alloys can be bonded to AIN by the so-called 'AMB-process'. The bonding mechanism is based on the use of so-called active metals like Ti, Zr, Hf. Copper conductor lines can be brazed onto AIN-substrates and components, resistor sheets can be applied on ceramic water coolers and a couple of other metals and alloys like tantalium, titanium, KOVAR and steel can be attached to AIN-ceramics by active brazing. Processing, analytical aspects and some special applications will be discussed. (author)

  9. Chemical preparation and shock wave compression of carbon nitride precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two synthetic routes have been developed to produce high-molecular-weight organic precursors containing a high weight fraction of nitrogen. One of the precursors is a pyrolysis residue of melamine-formaldehyde resin. The second precursor is the byproduct of an unusual low-temperature combustion reaction of tetrazole and its sodium salt. These precursors have been shock compressed under typical conditions for diamond and wurtzite boron nitride synthesis in an attempt to recover a new ultrahard carbon nitride. The recovered material has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction, FTIR, and Raman microprobe analysis. Diamond is present in the recovered material. This diamond is well ordered relative to diamond shock synthesized from carbonaceous starting materials

  10. Radio frequency plasma nitriding of aluminium at higher power levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitriding of aluminium 2011 using a radio frequency plasma at higher power levels (500 and 700 W) and lower substrate temperature (500 deg. C) resulted in higher AlN/Al2O3 ratios than obtained at 100 W and 575 deg. C. AlN/Al2O3 ratios derived from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis (and corroborated by heavy ion elastic recoil time of flight spectrometry) for treatments preformed at 100 (575 deg. C), 500 (500 deg. C) and 700 W (500 deg. C) were 1.0, 1.5 and 3.3, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that plasma nitrided surfaces obtained at higher power levels exhibited much finer nodular morphology than obtained at 100 W

  11. Investigations on the characterization of ion implanted hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradi, E.; Naidoo, S. R.; Erasmus, R. M.; Julies, B.; Derry, T. E.

    2013-07-01

    The effect of ion implantation on hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is studied herein. We use boron as an ion of choice to introduce radiation damage into h-BN, at fluences ranging from 1 × 1014-1 × 1016 ions/cm2 and implantation energy ranges from 40 to 160 keV. The thermal dependence is also investigated by varying the annealing temperature from room temperature to 400 °C after implantation. Raman spectroscopy showed Raman active defects one of which is possibly related to the formation of cubic boron nitride nanocrystals (nc-BN) within the implanted range. The relationship of these defect induced Raman active peaks was investigated by varying the implantation parameters. The preliminary Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) results also are reported briefly.

  12. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse;

    boron nitride we may obtain a deeper understanding of the effect of bonding on the total density. We report here a thorough investigation of the charge density of cubic boron nitride with a detailed modelling of the inner atom charge density. By combining high resolution powder X-ray diffraction data...... has been obtained. The displacement parameters reported here are significantly lower than those previously reported, stressing the importance of an adequate description of the core density. The charge transfer from boron to nitrogen clearly affects the inner electron density, which is evident from...... theoretical as well as experimental result. The redistribution of electron density will, if not accounted for, result in increased thermal parameters. It is estimated that 1.7-2 electrons is transferred from boron to nitrogen. [1]: N. Bindzus, T. Straasø, N. Wahlberg, J. Becker, L. Bjerg, N. Lock, A...

  13. Nitridation of silicon /111/ - Auger and LEED results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, J. F.; Schrott, A. G.; Fain, S. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Clean silicon (111) (7x7) surfaces at up to 1050 C have been reacted with nitrogen ions and neutrals produced by a low energy ion gun. The LEED patterns observed are similar to those previously reported for reaction of silicon (111) (7x7) with NH3. The nitrogen KLL peak exhibits no shift or change in shape with nitride growth. At the same time the magnitude of the elemental silicon LVV peak at 92 eV decreases progressively as a new peak at 84 eV increases. The position of both peaks appears to be independent of the degree of nitridation. Since the Auger spectra are free of oxygen and other impurities, these features can be attributed only to silicon, nitrogen, and their reaction products. Characteristic features of the Auger spectra are related to LEED observations and to the growth of microcrystals of Si3N4.

  14. Magnetism induced by electrochemical nitriding on an austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Watanabe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The surface of a Fe-Ni-Cr Alloy (SUS316L plate was electrochemically nitrided in molten LiF-KF salt including Li3N at 873K. The crystal structure changed from fcc structure to bct structure with nitrogen introduction. The Nitrogen diffusion layers were predominately formed at nitrogen concentration of 23 at%. The nitriding process drastically also changed its magnetic property from non-magnetic to ferromagnetic. The magnetic field of 20 kOe saturated the magnetic moment with its magnetization of 81 emu/g at 10K. The anisotropic magnetization is ascertained. Based on CrN formation and Cr extraction from the original Fe-Ni-Cr system, the induced ferromagnetism was discussed.

  15. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by boron ink annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu Hua; Chen, Ying; Glushenkov, Alexey M

    2010-03-12

    Ball-milling and annealing is one effective method for the mass production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). We report that the method has been modified to a boron (B) ink annealing method. In this new process, the nanosize ball-milled B particles are mixed with metal nitrate in ethanol to form an ink-like solution, and then the ink is annealed in nitrogen-containing gas to form nanotubes. The new method greatly enhances the yield of BNNTs, giving a higher density of nanotubes. These improvements are caused by the addition of metal nitrate and ethanol, both of which can strongly boost the nitriding reaction, as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis. The size and structure of BNNTs can be controlled by varying the annealing conditions. This high-yield production of BNNTs in large quantities enables the large-scale application of BNNTs. PMID:20154372

  16. Ultra-low threshold gallium nitride photonic crystal nanobeam laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report exceptionally low thresholds (9.1 μJ/cm2) for room temperature lasing at ∼450 nm in optically pumped Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanobeam cavity structures. The nanobeam cavity geometry provides high theoretical Q (>100 000) with small modal volume, leading to a high spontaneous emission factor, β = 0.94. The active layer materials are Indium Gallium Nitride (InGaN) fragmented quantum wells (fQWs), a critical factor in achieving the low thresholds, which are an order-of-magnitude lower than obtainable with continuous QW active layers. We suggest that the extra confinement of photo-generated carriers for fQWs (compared to QWs) is responsible for the excellent performance

  17. Thermal conductivity of boron carbide-boron nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that because of their preferred orientation, the addition of boron nitride dispersions to hot-pressed boron carbide was found to result in a considerable degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity of the resulting composite, indicated by an increase in the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 3 at the highest boron nitride volume fractions of this study, and a decrease in the thermal conductivity parallel to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 2. The composite data were found to be below the values expected from composite theory, which may represent indirect evidence for the existence of an interfacial thermal barrier

  18. Thin boron nitride nanotubes formed during annealing in ammonia gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We present a mechano-thermal process to synthesis thin boron nitride nanotubes of diameter around 7 nanometers. They were produced by mechanical milling of amorphous boron powder at ambient temperature, followed by thermal annealing in ammonia gas. High energy ball milling creates a precursor containing a high density of nanocrystalline BN seeds and fine particles of metal catalyst. Nanotubes grow out from the milled boron powder during subsequent annealing. The novelty of this approach lies in the formation of the thin BN nanotubes by annealing in ammonia gas instead of nitrogen gas. The boron nitride nanotubes produced have a well-defined crystalline structure and there is no iron within them. If nitrogen gas is used, thicker nanotubes of diameter in the range of 20-100 nm were obtained and iron was more likely to be found inside the nanotubes. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  19. Silicon nitride passivated bifacial Cz-silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, L. [Institute of Semiconductor Electronics, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstr. 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Solland Solar Cells GmbH, Bohr 12, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Windgassen, H.; Baetzner, D.L. [Institute of Semiconductor Electronics, RWTH Aachen University, Sommerfeldstr. 24, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bitnar, B.; Neuhaus, H. [Deutsche Cell GmbH, Berthelsdorfer Str. 111a, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    A new process for all silicon nitride passivated silicon solar cells with screen printed contacts is analysed in detail. Since the contacts are fired through the silicon nitride layers on both sides, the process is easy to adapt to industrial production. The potential and limits of the presented bifacial design are simulated and discussed. The effectiveness of the presented process depends strongly on the base doping of the substrate, but only the open circuit voltage is affected. The current is mainly determined by the rear surface passivation properties. Thus, using a low resistivity (<1.5{omega}cm) base material higher efficiencies compared to an aluminium back surface field can be achieved. (author)

  20. Synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes by boron ink annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball-milling and annealing is one effective method for the mass production of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). We report that the method has been modified to a boron (B) ink annealing method. In this new process, the nanosize ball-milled B particles are mixed with metal nitrate in ethanol to form an ink-like solution, and then the ink is annealed in nitrogen-containing gas to form nanotubes. The new method greatly enhances the yield of BNNTs, giving a higher density of nanotubes. These improvements are caused by the addition of metal nitrate and ethanol, both of which can strongly boost the nitriding reaction, as revealed by thermogravimetric analysis. The size and structure of BNNTs can be controlled by varying the annealing conditions. This high-yield production of BNNTs in large quantities enables the large-scale application of BNNTs.

  1. Silicon Nitride Waveguides for Plasmon Optical Trapping and Sensing Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Qiancheng; Huang, Yuewang; Capolino, Filippo; Boyraz, Ozdal

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon nitride trench waveguide deposited with bowtie antennas for plasmonic enhanced optical trapping. The sub-micron silicon nitride trench waveguides were fabricated with conventional optical lithography in a low cost manner. The waveguides embrace not only low propagation loss and high nonlinearity, but also the inborn merits of combining micro-fluidic channel and waveguide together. Analyte contained in the trapezoidal trench channel can interact with the evanescent field from the waveguide beneath. The evanescent field can be further enhanced by plasmonic nanostructures. With the help of gold nano bowtie antennas, the studied waveguide shows outstanding trapping capability on 10 nm polystyrene nanoparticles. We show that the bowtie antennas can lead to 60-fold enhancement of electric field in the antenna gap. The optical trapping force on a nanoparticle is boosted by three orders of magnitude. A strong tendency shows the nanoparticle is likely to move to the high field strength region,...

  2. Microstructural characterisation of silicon nitride-bonded silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructure of a commercial silicon nitride-bonded silicon carbide ceramic composite, formed via the nitridation of Si powder-SiC preforms, has been characterised by transmission electron microscopy. A mechanism combining reaction bonding and liquid-phase sintering is proposed to describe the development and observed morphology of the microstructure of the bonding matrix, which comprises predominantly phases based on Si2N2O and β-Si3N4 and an amorphous phase. Qualitative microanalysis of amorphous matrix regions has revealed significant concentrations of oxygen, aluminium and calcium, with Al also being detected in both of the surrounding cyrstalline phases. It is thus suggested that the principal constituents of the matrix are in fact O' and β' sialons. (orig.)

  3. Neutron induced degradation in nitrided pyrogenic field oxide MOS capacitors

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidya, S J; Shaikh, A M; Chandorkar, A N

    2002-01-01

    Neutron induced oxide charge trapping and generation of interface states in MOS capacitors with pyrogenic and nitrided pyrogenic field oxides have been studied. In order to assess the damage due to neutrons alone, it is necessary to account for the damage produced by the accompanying gamma rays from neutron radiation. This is done by measuring the intensity of gamma radiation accompanying neutrons at different neutron fluences at the irradiation position. MOS capacitor structures were subjected to neutron radiation in a swimming pool type of reactor. Other samples from the same batch were then subjected to an equivalent dose of gamma radiation from a Co sup 6 sup 0 source. The difference in the damage observed was used to characterize the damage caused by neutrons. It is observed that neutrons, though uncharged, are capable of causing ionization damage. This damage is found to be significant when the radiation is performed under biased conditions. Nitridation in different ambients is found to improve the radi...

  4. Silicon Nitride Windows for Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ring, E. A.; Peckys, D. B.; Dukes, M. J.; Baudoin, J. P.; de Jonge, N.

    2011-01-01

    Silicon microchips with thin electron transparent silicon nitride windows provide a sample support that accommodates both light-, and electron microscopy of whole eukaryotic cells in vacuum or liquid, with minimum sample preparation steps. The windows are robust enough that cellular samples can be cultured directly onto them, with no addition of a supporting film, and no need to embed or section the sample, as is typically required in electron microscopy. By combining two microchips, a microf...

  5. Charge carrier transport properties in layer structured hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, T. C.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2014-10-01

    Due to its large in-plane thermal conductivity, high temperature and chemical stability, large energy band gap (˜ 6.4 eV), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has emerged as an important material for applications in deep ultraviolet photonic devices. Among the members of the III-nitride material system, hBN is the least studied and understood. The study of the electrical transport properties of hBN is of utmost importance with a view to realizing practical device applications. Wafer-scale hBN epilayers have been successfully synthesized by metal organic chemical deposition and their electrical transport properties have been probed by variable temperature Hall effect measurements. The results demonstrate that undoped hBN is a semiconductor exhibiting weak p-type at high temperatures (> 700 °K). The measured acceptor energy level is about 0.68 eV above the valence band. In contrast to the electrical transport properties of traditional III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, the temperature dependence of the hole mobility in hBN can be described by the form of μ ∝ (T/T0)-α with α = 3.02, satisfying the two-dimensional (2D) carrier transport limit dominated by the polar optical phonon scattering. This behavior is a direct consequence of the fact that hBN is a layer structured material. The optical phonon energy deduced from the temperature dependence of the hole mobility is ħω = 192 meV (or 1546 cm-1), which is consistent with values previously obtained using other techniques. The present results extend our understanding of the charge carrier transport properties beyond the traditional III-nitride semiconductors.

  6. Development of the microstructure of the silicon nitride based ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Bressiani J. C.; Izhevskyi V.; Bressiani Ana H. A.

    1999-01-01

    Basic regularities of silicon nitride based materials microstructure formation and development in interrelation with processing conditions, type of sintering additives, and starting powders properties are discussed. Models of abnormal or exaggerated grain growth are critically reassessed. Results of several model experiments conducted in order to determine the most important factors directing the microstructure formation processes in RE-fluxed Si3N4 ceramics are reviewed. Existing data on the...

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes as a reinforcement for brittle matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tatarko, Peter; Grasso, S.; Porwal, H.; Saggar, Richa; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 14 (2014), s. 3339-3349. ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Amorphous borosilicate glass * Boron nitride nanotubes * Composite * Toughening mechanisms * Scratch resistance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  8. Nanoporous Carbon Nitride: A High Efficient Filter for Seawater Desalination

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weifeng; Yang, Yanmei; Zhou, Hongcai; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-01-01

    The low efficiency of commercially-used reverse osmosis (RO) membranes has been the main obstacle in seawater desalination application. Here, we report the auspicious performance, through molecular dynamics simulations, of a seawater desalination filter based on the recently-synthesized graphene-like carbon nitride (g-C2N) [Nat. Commun., 2015, 6, 6486]. Taking advantage of the inherent nanopores and excellent mechanical properties of g-C2N filter, highly efficient seawater desalination can be...

  9. On new allotropes and nanostructures of carbon nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Bojdys, Michael Janus

    2010-01-01

    In the first section of the thesis graphitic carbon nitride was for the first time synthesised using the high-temperature condensation of dicyandiamide (DCDA) – a simple molecular precursor – in a eutectic salt melt of lithium chloride and potassium chloride. The extent of condensation, namely next to complete conversion of all reactive end groups, was verified by elemental microanalysis and vibrational spectroscopy. TEM- and SEM-measurements gave detailed insight into the well-defined morpho...

  10. Modelling of residual stress profiles in plasma nitrided tool steel

    OpenAIRE

    PODGORNIK, Bojan; Leskovšek, Vojteh; NOLAN;, D

    2015-01-01

    Residual stresses may be present in engineering components as an unintended consequence of manufacturing processes, but they may also be introduced deliberately to beneficial effect during surface engineering procedures. Plasma nitriding and nitrocarburizing are such processes of particular importance for tool steel components used in tool, die and machine applications. These processes afford significant advantages, such as greatly improved wear and corrosion resistance, as well as fatigue st...

  11. Beryllium nitride thin film grown by reactive laser ablation

    OpenAIRE

    G. Soto; Diaz, J.A.; Machorro, R.; Reyes-Serrato, A.; de la Cruz, W.

    2001-01-01

    Beryllium nitride thin films were grown on silicon substrates by laser ablating a beryllium foil in molecular nitrogen ambient. The composition and chemical state were determined with Auger (AES), X-Ray photoelectron (XPS) and energy loss (EELS) spectroscopies. A low absorption coefficient in the visible region, and an optical bandgap of 3.8 eV, determined by reflectance ellipsometry, were obtained for films grown at nitrogen pressures higher than 25 mTorr. The results show that the reaction ...

  12. Gallium nitride and GaN:Eu nanocrystalline luminescent powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, G.A.H. [Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California, C.P. 22860 (Mexico)

    2008-01-15

    In this study, we report on the fabrication and luminescent properties of pure and europium-doped gallium nitride (GaN) powders obtained by means of two different chemical methods. Firstly, GaN and GaN:Eu microcrystalline powders were successfully prepared by using the combustion synthesis of metallic nitrates as the precursors (method A). By using a second processing route, GaN and (Ga{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x})N powders are synthesized from metallic oxides (method B) yielding directly nanocrystalline-phase gallium nitride and Eu-doped gallium nitride luminescent materials. In the present work, we report two excellent methods to produce nanocrystalline or microcrystalline gallium nitride (GaN) and Eu-doped GaN powders with different Eu concentrations. The GaN:Eu materials were characterized by photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements showing strong luminescence due to f-f transition lines within Eu{sup 3+}({sup 4}f {sub 6}) electron emission configuration. Furthermore we present a crystallographic characterization conducted by X-ray diffraction (XRD), luminescence properties including photoluminescence and local cathodoluminescence spectra and monochromatic imaging at low-temperature to detect the areas from where the emission is originated within the GaN:Eu grains. Our results show that (Ga {sub 0.95}Eu{sub 0.05})N powders are cathodoluminescent with the main emission occurring at {lambda}=611 nm which is originated from the {sup 5}D{sub 0}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions within the Eu {sup 3+} electronic levels. Low-temperature monochromatic cathodoluminescence images taken on microcrystalline powders (produced by method A), indicate that the main emission at {lambda}=611 nm is originated within nanocrystalline areas of the GaN:Eu{sup 3+} microcrystalline grains. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Design, Control and in Situ Visualization of Gas Nitriding Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Ratajski; Roman Olik; Tomasz Suszko; Jerzy Dobrodziej; Jerzy Michalski

    2009-01-01

    The article presents a complex system of design, in situ visualization and control of the commonly used surface treatment process: the gas nitriding process. In the computer design conception, analytical mathematical models and artificial intelligence methods were used. As a result, possibilities were obtained of the poly-optimization and poly-parametric simulations of the course of the process combined with a visualization of the value changes of the process parameters in the function of tim...

  14. Nitriding behavior of Ni and Ni-based binary alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Fonovic, Matej

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous nitriding is a prominent thermochemical surface treatment process which can improve various properties of metallic materials such as mechanical, tribological and/or corrosion properties. This process is predominantly performed by applying NH3+H2 containing gas atmospheres serving as the nitrogen donating medium at temperatures between 673 K and 873 K (400 °C and 600 °C). NH3 decomposes at the surface of the metallic specimen and nitrogen diffuses into the surface adjacent region of th...

  15. Plasma Nitriding of Surface Mo-Enriched Sintered Iron

    OpenAIRE

    Bendo, T.; Pavanati, H. C.; Klein, A.N.; A. E. Martinelli; A. M. Maliska

    2011-01-01

    Plain iron samples produced by powder metallurgy were submitted to a single thermal cycle involving plasma-assisted sintering and simultaneous surface alloying with Mo followed by nitriding using a plasma reactor. The microstructural characterization of the samples was carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy in addition to X-ray diffraction. Microhardness tests were also performed. EDX line profiles of the concentration of Mo from the surface to the bulk of the sintered sample...

  16. Delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in a stirred media mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scalable process for delamination of hexagonal boron nitride in an aqueous solution of the non-ionic surfactant TWEEN85 using a stirred media mill is presented. The size of the ZrO2 beads used as grinding media governs the dimensions of the ground boron nitride particles as atomic force microscopic investigations (AFM) reveal: the mean flakes thickness decreases from 3.5 to 1.5 nm and the ratio between mean flake area and mean flake thickness increases from 2,200 to 5,800 nm if the grinding media size is reduced from 0.8 to 0.1 mm. This result shows that a high number of stress events in combination with low stress energy (small grinding media) facilitate delamination of the layered material whereas at high stress energies in combination with a low number of stress events (large grinding media) breakage of the layers dominates over delamination. The results of particle height analyses by AFM show that few-layer structures have been formed by stirred media milling. This result is in agreement with the layer thickness dependence of the delamination energy for hexagonal boron nitride. The concentration of nanoparticles remaining dispersed after centrifugation of the ground suspension increases with grinding time and with decreasing grinding media size. After 5 h of grinding using 0.1 mm ZrO2 grinding media the yield of nanoparticle formation is about 5 wt%. The nanoparticles exhibit the typical Raman peak for hexagonal boron nitride at 1,366 cm−1 showing that the in-plane order in the milled platelets is remained.

  17. Study of aluminum nitride precipitation in Fe- 3%Si steel

    OpenAIRE

    F.L. Alcântara; Barbosa, R; Cunha, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    For good performance of electrical steels it is necessary a high magnetic induction and a low power loss when submitted to cyclic magnetization. A fine dispersion of precipitates is a key requirement in the manufacturing process of Fe- 3%Si grain oriented electrical steel. In the production of high permeability grain oriented steel precipitate particles of copper and manganese sulphides and aluminium nitride delay normal grain growth during primary recrystallization, causing preferential grow...

  18. Characterisation of chromium nitride films produced by PVD techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Barata, A.; CUNHA L.; Moura, C.

    2001-01-01

    Chromium nitride thin films have been deposited on stainless steel substrates by r.f. reactive magnetron sputtering. The influence of process parameters such as substrate bias and partial pressure of reactive gas have been investigated. The characterisation of the coatings was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy (RS) and nano-indentation experiments. These studies allow to analyse the influence of deposition parameters in crystal phases, crystal orientationytextu...

  19. Method for forming monolayer graphene-boron nitride heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Peter Werner; Sutter, Eli Anguelova

    2016-08-09

    A method for fabricating monolayer graphene-boron nitride heterostructures in a single atomically thin membrane that limits intermixing at boundaries between graphene and h-BN, so as to achieve atomically sharp interfaces between these materials. In one embodiment, the method comprises exposing a ruthenium substrate to ethylene, exposing the ruthenium substrate to oxygen after exposure to ethylene and exposing the ruthenium substrate to borazine after exposure to oxygen.

  20. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths