WorldWideScience

Sample records for californium nitrates

  1. Californium-252 progress, report No. 7, April 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1971-12-31

    This report contains discusses of the following topics on Californium-252: First sales of californium-252; encapsulation services discussed; three new participants in market evaluation program; summer training programs to use californium; Californium-252 shipping casks available; Californium-252 questions and answers, radiotherapy; neutron radiography; natural resources exploration; nuclear safeguards; process control; dosimetry; neutron radiography; neutron shielding; and nuclear safeguards.

  2. Historical review of californium-252 discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, D. H.

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving (252)Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed.

  3. Californium-252: a remarkable versatile radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Alexander, C.W.

    1995-10-10

    A product of the nuclear age, Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) has found many applications in medicine, scientific research, industry, and nuclear science education. Californium-252 is unique as a neutron source in that it provides a highly concentrated flux and extremely reliable neutron spectrum from a very small assembly. During the past 40 years, {sup 252}Cf has been applied with great success to cancer therapy, neutron radiography of objects ranging from flowers to entire aircraft, startup sources for nuclear reactors, fission activation for quality analysis of all commercial nuclear fuel, and many other beneficial uses, some of which are now ready for further growth. Californium-252 is produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and processed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), both of which are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The REDC/HFIR facility is virtually the sole supplier of {sup 252}Cf in the western world and is the major supplier worldwide. Extensive exploitation of this product was made possible through the {sup 252}Cf Market Evaluation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) [then the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)]. This program included training series, demonstration centers, seminars, and a liberal loan policy for fabricated sources. The Market Evaluation Program was instituted, in part, to determine if large-quantity production capability was required at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). Because of the nature of the product and the means by which it is produced, {sup 252}Cf can be produced only in government-owned facilities. It is evident at this time that the Oak Ridge research facility can meet present and projected near-term requirements. The production, shipment, and sales history of {sup 252}Cf from ORNL is summarized herein.

  4. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-10-03

    The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10{sup 11} neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells The radioisotope {sup 252}Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6- year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory(ORNL). DOE sells {sup 252}Cf to commercial

  5. Unusual structure, bonding and properties in a californium borate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polinski, Matthew J.; Garner, Edward B.; Maurice, Rémi; Planas, Nora; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Parker, T. Gannon; Cross, Justin N.; Green, Thomas D.; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Van Cleve, Shelley M.; Depmeier, Wulf; Gagliardi, Laura; Shatruk, Michael; Knappenberger, Kenneth L.; Liu, Guokui; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, Lynda; Dixon, David A.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2014-03-23

    The participation of the valence orbitals of actinides in bonding has been debated for decades. Recent experimental and computational investigations demonstrated the involvement of 6p, 6d and/or 5f orbitals in bonding. However, structural and spectroscopic data, as well as theory, indicate a decrease in covalency across the actinide series, and the evidence points to highly ionic, lanthanide-like bonding for late actinides. Here we show that chemical differentiation between californium and lanthanides can be achieved by using ligands that are both highly polarizable and substantially rearrange on complexation. A ligand that suits both of these desired properties is polyborate. We demonstrate that the 5f, 6d and 7p orbitals are all involved in bonding in a Cf(III) borate, and that large crystal-field effects are present. Synthetic, structural and spectroscopic data are complemented by quantum mechanical calculations to support these observations.

  6. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase activity, protein production and carbohydrate biosynthesis in response to potassium and sodium ... due to the positive effects of potassium on the enzyme activity, sugars transport, water and nutrient transport, protein synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism.

  7. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Byrne, T.E. [Roane State Community College, Harriman, TN (United States); Miller, L.F. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  8. Nitrate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  9. Differential nitrate accumulation, nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... biosynthesis. Carbohydrate metabolism produces both the carbon skeletons and ferredoxin for nitrate assimilation. Inhibition of photosynthesis prevents the production of the reduced ferredoxin required for nitrite reduction in chloroplasts, which leads to nitrate and nitrite accumulation (Commichau et al., ...

  10. Apparatus for the measurement of total body nitrogen using prompt neutron activation analysis with californium-252.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, A; Hannan, W J; Smith, M A; Tothill, P

    1988-01-01

    Details of clinical apparatus designed for the measurement of total body nitrogen (as an indicator of body protein), suitable for the critically ill, intensive-care patient are presented. Californium-252 radio-isotopic neutron sources are used, enabling a nitrogen measurement by prompt neutron activation analysis to be made in 40 min with a precision of +/- 3.2% for a whole body dose equivalent of 0.145 mSv. The advantages of Californium-252 over alternative neutron sources are discussed. A comparison between two irradiation/detection geometries is made, leading to an explanation of the geometry adopted for the apparatus. The choice of construction and shielding materials to reduce the count rate at the detectors and consequently to reduce the pile-up contribution to the nitrogen background is discussed. Salient features of the gamma ray spectroscopy system to reduce spectral distortion from pulse pile-up are presented.

  11. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU Californium Shipping Container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Box, W.D.; Shappert, L.B.; Seagren, R.D.; Klima, B.B.; Jurgensen, M.C.; Hammond, C.R.; Watson, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU Californium Shipping Container was made in order to demonstrate its compliance with the regulations governing off-site shipment of packages that contain radioactive material. The evaluation encompassed five primary categories: structural integrity, thermal resistance, radiation shielding, nuclear criticality safety, and quality assurance. The results of this evaluation demonstrate that the container complies with the applicable regulations.

  12. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  13. Ipso Nitration. Regiospecific Nitration via Ipso Nitration Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-20

    borohydride in methanol followed by vacuum evaporation and low temperature liquid-liquid extraction . As a com- plementary method, means of preparing 1,4...or phenyl acetate. The reaction is formally an elimination of the elements of nitrous acid and has been characterized as an El-like elimination...diastereomeric adducts formed by nitration of furfural diacetate and methyl furoate with acetyl nitrate. The solvolytic chemistry of these adducts has been

  14. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources of...

  15. Nitrate accumulation in spinach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steingröver, Eveliene Geertruda

    1986-01-01

    Leafy vegetables, like spinach, may contain high concentrations of nitrate. In the Netherlands, about 75% of mean daily intake of nitrate orginates from the consumption of vegatables. Hazards to human health are associated with the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Acute nitrite poisoning causes

  16. Application of TSH bioindicator for studying the biological efficiency of neutrons from californium-252 source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebulska-Wasilewska, A.; Rekas, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Kim, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The effectiveness of neutrons from a Californium-252 source in the induction of various abnormalities in the Tradescantia clone 4430 stamen hair cells (TSH-assay) was studied. The special attention was paid to check whether any enhancement in effects caused by process of boron neutron capture is visible in the cells enriched with boron ions. Two chemicals (borax and BSH) were applied to introduce boron-10 ions into cells. Inflorescence, normal or pretreated with chemicals containing boron, were irradiated in the air with neutrons from a Cf-252 source at KAERI, Taejon, Korea. To estimate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the induction of gene mutations of the neutron beam under the study, Tradescantia inflorescences, without any chemical pretreatment, were irradiated with various doses of X-rays. The ranges of radiation doses used were 0-0.1 Gy in neutrons and 0-0.5 Gy in X-rays. After the time needed to complete the postirradiation repair Tradescantia cuttings were transferred to Cracow, where screening of gene and lethal; mutations, cell cycle alterations in somatic cells have been done, and dose response relationships were figured. The maximal RBE values were estimated in the range of 4.6-6.8. Alterations of RBE value were observed; from 6.8 to 7.8 in the case of plants pretreated with 240 ppm of B-10 from borax, and 4.6 to 6.1 in the case of 400 ppm of B-10 from BSH. Results showed a slight, although statistically insignificant increase in biological efficacy of radiation from the Cf-252 source in samples pretreated with boron containing chemicals. (author)

  17. Study of the shielding for spontaneous fission sources of Californium-252; Estudio de blindaje para fuentes de fision espontanea de Californio-252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila R, I

    1991-06-15

    A shielding study is made to attenuate, until maximum permissible levels, the neutrons radiation and photons emitted by spontaneous fission coming from a source of Californium-252. The compound package by a database (Library DLC-23) and the ANISNW code is used, in it version for personal computer. (Author)

  18. Ammonium nitrate explosion hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negovanović Milanka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate (AN primarily is used as a fertilizer but it is also very important compound in the production of industrial explosives. The application of ammonium nitrate in the production of industrial explosives was related with the early era of Nobel dynamite and widely increased with the appearance of blasting agents such as ANFO and Slurry, in the middle of the last Century. Throughout the world millions of tons of ammonium nitrate are produced annually and handled without incident. Although ammonium nitrate generally is used safely, accidental explosions involving AN have high impact resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. The paper presents the basic properties of ammonium nitrate as well as hazards in handling of ammonium nitrate in order to prevent accidents. Several accidents with explosions of ammonium nitrate resulted in catastrophic consequences are listed in the paper as examples of non-compliance with prescribed procedures.

  19. Simulation and design of an electron beam ion source charge breeder for the californium rare isotope breeder upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Dickerson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An electron beam ion source (EBIS will be constructed and used to charge breed ions from the californium rare isotope breeder upgrade (CARIBU for postacceleration into the Argonne tandem linear accelerator system (ATLAS. Simulations of the EBIS charge breeder performance and the related ion transport systems are reported. Propagation of the electron beam through the EBIS was verified, and the anticipated incident power density within the electron collector was identified. The full normalized acceptance of the charge breeder with a 2 A electron beam, 0.024π  mm mrad for nominal operating parameters, was determined by simulating ion injection into the EBIS. The optics of the ion transport lines were carefully optimized to achieve well-matched ion injection, to minimize emittance growth of the injected and extracted ion beams, and to enable adequate testing of the charge bred ions prior to installation in ATLAS.

  20. Extraction of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides from Californium Campaign Rework Solution Using TODGA-based Solvent Extraction System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benker, Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delmau, Laetitia Helene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dryman, Joshua Cory [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report presents the studies carried out to demonstrate the possibility of quantitatively extracting trivalent actinides and lanthanides from highly acidic solutions using a neutral ligand-based solvent extraction system. These studies stemmed from the perceived advantage of such systems over cationexchange- based solvent extraction systems that require an extensive feed adjustment to make a low-acid feed. The targeted feed solutions are highly acidic aqueous phases obtained after the dissolution of curium targets during a californium (Cf) campaign. Results obtained with actual Cf campaign solutions, but highly diluted to be manageable in a glove box, are presented, followed by results of tests run in the hot cells with Cf campaign rework solutions. It was demonstrated that a solvent extraction system based on the tetraoctyl diglycolamide molecule is capable of quantitatively extracting trivalent actinides from highly acidic solutions. This system was validated using actual feeds from a Cf campaign.

  1. Cloning and nitrate induction of nitrate reductase mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Dewdney, Julia; Kleinhofs, Andris; Goodman, Howard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate is the major source of nitrogen taken from the soil by higher plants but requires reduction to ammonia prior to incorporation into amino acids. The first enzyme in the reducing pathway is a nitrate-inducible enzyme, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1). A specific polyclonal antiserum raised against purified barley nitrate reductase has been used to immunoprecipitate in vivo labeled protein and in vitro translation products, demonstrating that nitrate induction increases nitrate reductase p...

  2. Beyond Californium-A Neutron Generator Alternative for Dosimetry and Instrument Calibration in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Roman K; Mozhayev, Andrey V; Murphy, Mark K; Thompson, Alan K

    2017-09-01

    Evaluations of neutron survey instruments, area monitors, and personal dosimeters rely on reference neutron radiations, which have evolved from the heavy reliance on (α,n) sources to a shared reliance on (α,n) and the spontaneous fission neutrons of californium-252 (Cf). Capable of producing high dose equivalent rates from an almost point source geometry, the characteristics of Cf are generally more favorable when compared to the use of (α,n) and (γ,n) sources or reactor-produced reference neutron radiations. Californium-252 is typically used in two standardized configurations: unmoderated, to yield a fission energy spectrum; or with the capsule placed within a heavy-water moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum that is generally considered more appropriate for evaluating devices used in nuclear power plant work environments. The U.S. Department of Energy Cf Loan/Lease Program, a longtime origin of affordable Cf sources for research, testing and calibration, was terminated in 2009. Since then, high-activity sources have become increasingly cost-prohibitive for laboratories that formerly benefited from that program. Neutron generators, based on the D-T and D-D fusion reactions, have become economically competitive with Cf and are recognized internationally as important calibration and test standards. Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are jointly considering the practicality and technical challenges of implementing neutron generators as calibration standards in the U.S. This article reviews the characteristics of isotope-based neutron sources, possible isotope alternatives to Cf, and the rationale behind the increasing favor of electronically generated neutron options. The evaluation of a D-T system at PNNL has revealed characteristics that must be considered in adapting generators to the task of calibration and testing where accurate determination of a dosimetric quantity is

  3. Californium-252 Brachytherapy Combined With External-Beam Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Long-Term Treatment Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Xin; Qian Chengyuan; Qing Yi; Zhao Kewei; Yang Zhengzhou; Dai Nan; Zhong Zhaoyang; Tang Cheng; Li Zheng; Gu Xianqing; Zhou Qian; Feng Yan; Xiong Yanli; Shan Jinlu [Cancer Center, Research Institute of Surgery and Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Wang Dong, E-mail: dongwang64@hotmail.com [Cancer Center, Research Institute of Surgery and Daping Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To observe, by retrospective analysis, the curative effects and complications due to californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 1999 to December 2007, 696 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB to IIIB) were treated with {sup 252}Cf-ICBT in combination of EBRT. Of all, 31 patients were at Stage IB, 104 at IIA, 363 at IIB, 64 at IIIA, and 134 at IIIB. Californium-252 ICBT was delivered at 7-12 Gy per insertion per week, with a total dose of 29-45 Gy to reference point A in three to five insertions. The whole pelvic cavity was treated with 8-MV X-ray external irradiation at 2 Gy per fraction, four times per week. After 16-38 Gy of external irradiation, the center of the whole pelvic field was blocked with a 4-cm-wide lead shield, with a total external irradiation dose of 44-56 Gy. The total treatment course was 5 to 6 weeks. Results: Overall survival rate at 3 and 5 years for all patients was 76.0% and 64.9%, respectively. Disease-free 3- and 5-year survival rates of patients were 71.2% and 58.4%, respectively. Late complications included vaginal contracture and adhesion, radiation proctitis, radiation cystitis, and inflammatory bowel, which accounted for 5.8%, 7.1%, 6.2%, and 4.9%, respectively. Univariate analysis results showed significant correlation of stage, age, histopathologic grade, and lymph node status with overall survival. Cox multiple regression analysis showed that the independent variables were stage, histopathologic grade, tumor size, and lymphatic metastasis in all patients. Conclusion: Results of this series suggest that the combined use of {sup 252}Cf-ICBT with EBRT is an effective method for treatment of cervical cancer.

  4. Agricultural nitrate pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anker, Helle Tegner

    2015-01-01

    Despite the passing of almost 25 years since the adoption of the EU Nitrates Directive, agricultural nitrate pollution remains a major concern in most EU Member States. This is also the case in Denmark, although a fairly strict regulatory regime has resulted in almost a 50 per cent reduction...... in nitrogen leaching since the mid-80s. Nevertheless, further effort is needed, particularly in ecologically sensitive areas. This article discusses different regulatory approaches – and in particular the need for a differentiated nitrate regulation tailored to meet site-specific ecological demands – from...... of the mandatory specification standards of the Nitrates Directive combined with additional instruments to address the need for severe restrictions on fertiliser use or cultivation practices in the most ecologically vulnerable areas....

  5. Nitration of petroleum porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailova, R.V.; Aksenov, V.S.; Isobayev, M.D.; Numanov, I.U.

    1983-01-01

    The reaction of nitration of demetallized porphyrins (Pr) from oils from the Kichik Bel deposit is studied and an attempt is made to evaluate the reactivity of the meso and pyrrole positions in the porphyrine system and to note the ways to produce new, promising chemical substances on the basis of the oil. The fractions isolated and chromatographically purified were analyzed through an electron absorption spectroscopy method. The demetallization of the vanadylporphyrines was conducted by orthophosphoric acid. A concentrate of demetallized porphyrines, liberated from impurities through a method of tower chromatography in Al203, was used for the nitration. A number of nitrating agents were tested, including concentrated HNO3, HNO3 plus CH5COOH (polar), HNO3 plus H2SO4. A proton magnetic resonance (PMR) and spectroscopic method showed that a mole of the porphyrines in the concentrate on the average contains 2 pyrrole and 3 to 4 unsubstituted mesopositions.

  6. Long-term effects of an intracavitary treatment with californium-252 on normal tissue. [Swine, /sup 226/Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Beamer, J.L.; Mahony, T.D.; Cross, F.T.; Lund, J.E.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1976-01-01

    About one hundred fifty swine were exposed to either radium-226 or californium-252 sources in the uterine cervix to determine an RBE for both acute and long-term effects. That value for early changes in the tissues at risk in the treatment of cervical cancer was between 6.2 and 6.8. The incidence of complications increased with time after exposure, especially among animals treated with /sup 252/Cf. Analysis of rectal injury showed that ulceration occurred frequently within a year postexposure at doses between 1600 and 2400 rad calculated at 2 cm lateral to the source midline. Fat necrosis and smooth muscle atrophy, resulting in a local rectal stricture, were delayed changes observed in some animals. The lower ureter was the site for a greater frequency of complications than the GI tract. Ureteral stricture often occurred at doses of 1200 rad from /sup 252/Cf and 7000 rad from /sup 226/Ra. Observation of delayed effects in the uterine-cervix in animals held up to 4 years postexposure indicate that the RBE for /sup 252/Cf may be increased to a value as high as 18, while repair may have even decreased it to about 5.6 in the rectum. Fifty swine are still being observed for long-term effects after doses above 800 rad from /sup 252/Cf and 5000 rad from /sup 226/Ra.

  7. Yttrium Nitrate mediated Nitration of Phenols at room temperature in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rapid nitration of electron rich phenols using Y(NO₃)₃.6H₂O in glacial acetic acid at room temperature was observed with good yield. The method allows nitration of phenols without oxidation, and isolation of nitration product in a rapid and simple way. The described method is selective for phenols.

  8. 4-Methoxyanilinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajer Rahmouni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C7H10NO+·NO3−, crystallized with two p-ansidinium cations and two nitrate anions in the asymmetric unit. As well as Columbic and van der Waals forces, moleucles interact via multiple bifurcated N—H...O hydrogen bonds that help consolidate the crystal packing, resulting in a three-dimensional network.

  9. 4-Methoxybenzylammonium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Umarani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title salt, C8H12NO+·NO3−, the 4-methoxybenzylammonium cation lies in the mirror plane m of space group Pnma and is thus planar by symmetry. The nitrate anion is also planar by symmetry, with an N...;O group in the mirror plane and one O atom in a general position. The dihedral angle between the benzene ring and the planar nitrate anion is constrained to be exactly 90°, because of the relative special positions for both ions. In the crystal, the cations are connected to the anions by C—H...O, C—H...N, N—H...N and N—H...O hydrogen bonds. Further, the crystal structure also features two C—H...π interactions involving the benzene ring of the cation, forming a three-dimensional network.

  10. Nitrate in drinking water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Sigsgaard, Torben

    Annual nationwide exposure maps for nitrate in drinking water in Denmark from the 1970s until today will be presented based on the findings in Schullehner & Hansen (2014) and additional work on addressing the issue of private well users and estimating missing data. Drinking water supply in Denmark...... is highly decentralized and fully relying on simple treated groundwater. At the same time, Denmark has an intensive agriculture, making groundwater resources prone to nitrate pollution. Drinking water quality data covering the entire country for over 35 years are registered in the public database Jupiter....... In order to create annual maps of drinking water quality, these data had to be linked to 2,852 water supply areas, which were for the first time digitized, collected in one dataset and connected to the Jupiter database. Analyses of the drinking water quality maps showed that public water supplies...

  11. Nitrates and nitrites intoxications’ management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Trif

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The study pointed out the major sources for clinical and subclinical intoxications with nitrates/nitrites (drinking water and nitrates containing fertilizers, circumstances that determine fertilizers to became sources of intoxication (excessive fertilization/consecutive high level of nitrates in fodders, free access of animals to the fertilizers, administration into the diet instead of natrium chloride, factors that determine high nitrates accumulation in fodders despite optimal fertilization (factors related to the plants, soil, clime, harvest methods, storage, agrotechnical measures, nitrates/nitrites toxicity (over 45 ppm nitrates in drinking water, over 0.5 g nitrate/100 g D.M fodder/diet, the factors that influence nitrates/nitrites toxicity ( species, age, rate of feeding, diet balance especially energetically, pathological effects and symptoms (irritation and congestions on digestive tract, resulting diarrhoea, transformation of hemoglobin into methemoglobin determining severe respiratory insufficiency, vascular collapse, low blood pressure inthe acute nitrates intoxication; hypotiroidism, hypovitaminosis A, reproductive disturbances(abortion, low rate of fertility, dead born offspring, diarrhoea and/or respiratory insufficiency in new born e.g. calves, immunosuppression, decrease of milk production in chronic intoxication. There were presented some suggestions concerning management practices to limit nitrate intoxication (analyze of nitrates/nitrites in water and fodders, good management of the situation of risk ,e .g. dilution of the diet with low nitrate content fodders, feeding with balanced diet in energy, protein, minerals and vitamins, accommodation to high nitrate level diet, avoid grazing one week after a frost period, avoid feeding chop green fodders stored a couple of days, monitoring of health status of animals fed with fodders containing nitrates at risk level, a.o..

  12. Ab initio full-potential study of mechanical properties and magnetic phase stability of californium monopnictides (CfN and CfP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amari, S., E-mail: siham_amari@yahoo.fr [Faculté des Sciences de la Nature et de la Vie, Université Hassiba Benbouali, Chlef, 02000 (Algeria); Bouhafs, B. [Laboratoire de Modélisation et Simulation en Sciences des Matériaux, Université Djillali Liabès de Sidi Bel-Abbés, Sidi Bel-Abbés, 22000 (Algeria)

    2016-09-15

    Based on the first-principles methods, the structural, elastic, electronic, properties and magnetic ordering of californium monopnictides CfX (X = P) have been studied using the full-potential augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (FP-L/APW + lo) method within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The electronic exchange correlation energy is described by generalized gradient approximation GGA and GGA+U (U is the Hubbard correction). The GGA+U method is applied to the rare-earth 5f states. We have calculated the lattice parameters, bulk modulii and the first pressure derivatives of the bulk modulii. The elastic properties of the studied compounds are only investigated in the most stable calculated phase. In order to gain further information, we have calculated Young’s modulus, shear modulus, anisotropy factor and Kleinman parameter by the aid of the calculated elastic constants. The results mainly show that californium monopnictides CfX (X = P) have an antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Density of states (DOS) and charge densities for both compounds are also computed in the NaCl (B1) structure.

  13. Nitrate biosensors and biological methods for nitrate determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohail, Manzar; Adeloju, Samuel B

    2016-06-01

    The inorganic nitrate (NO3‾) anion is present under a variety of both natural and artificial environmental conditions. Nitrate is ubiquitous within the environment, food, industrial and physiological systems and is mostly present as hydrated anion of a corresponding dissolved salt. Due to the significant environmental and toxicological effects of nitrate, its determination and monitoring in environmental and industrial waters are often necessary. A wide range of analytical techniques are available for nitrate determination in various sample matrices. This review discusses biosensors available for nitrate determination using the enzyme nitrate reductase (NaR). We conclude that nitrate determination using biosensors is an excellent non-toxic alternative to all other available analytical methods. Over the last fifteen years biosensing technology for nitrate analysis has progressed very well, however, there is a need to expedite the development of nitrate biosensors as a suitable alternative to non-enzymatic techniques through the use of different polymers, nanostructures, mediators and strategies to overcome oxygen interference. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Min [Department of Oncology, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Xu Hongde [Cancer Center, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua [Department of Oncology, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Liu Jianren, E-mail: liujianren0571@hotmail.com [Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  15. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly...... and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate...... storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described...

  16. Evaluation of nitrate destruction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kurath, D.E.; Guenther, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-03-30

    A wide variety of high nitrate-concentration aqueous mixed [radioactive and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous] wastes are stored at various US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These wastes will ultimately be solidified for final disposal, although the waste acceptance criteria for the final waste form is still being determined. Because the nitrates in the wastes will normally increase the volume or reduce the integrity of all of the waste forms under consideration for final disposal, nitrate destruction before solidification of the waste will generally be beneficial. This report describes and evaluates various technologies that could be used to destroy the nitrates in the stored wastes. This work was funded by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development, through the Chemical/Physical Technology Support Group of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program. All the nitrate destruction technologies will require further development work before a facility could be designed and built to treat the majority of the stored wastes. Several of the technologies have particularly attractive features: the nitrate to ammonia and ceramic (NAC) process produces an insoluble waste form with a significant volume reduction, electrochemical reduction destroys nitrates without any chemical addition, and the hydrothermal process can simultaneously treat nitrates and organics in both acidic and alkaline wastes. These three technologies have been tested using lab-scale equipment and surrogate solutions. At their current state of development, it is not possible to predict which process will be the most beneficial for a particular waste stream.

  17. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  18. 4-Methoxybenzamidinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Irrera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The title salt, C8H11N2O+·NO3−, was synthesized by a reaction between 4-methoxybenzamidine (4-amidinoanisole and nitric acid. The asymmetric unit comprises a non-planar 4-methoxybenzamidinium cation and a nitrate anion. In the cation, the amidinium group has two similar C—N bond lengths [1.302 (3 and 1.313 (3 Å] and its plane forms a dihedral angle of 32.66 (5° with the mean plane of the benzene ring. The nitrate–amidinium ion pair is not planar, as the dihedral angle between the planes defined by the CN2+ and NO3− units is 19.28 (6°. The ionic components are associated in the crystal via N—H...O hydrogen bonds, resulting in a three-dimensional network.

  19. Some History of Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  20. Yttrium Nitrate mediated Nitration of Phenols at room temperature in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mg(NO3)2,6 VO(NO3)3, Fe(NO3)3, (Me4N)NO3, Ph2. PCl/I2/AgNO3,7 and Zirconyl Nitrate8 were used as the source of nitronium ion. However, these methods need extra reagents such as solid acid or ionic liquids and heating condition. Therefore, finding a green nitration method at ambient temperature is highly desirable.

  1. Nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by eukaryotic microbes

    OpenAIRE

    Anja eKamp; Signe eHøgslund; Nils eRisgaard-Petersen; Peter eStief

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players l...

  2. Nitration Reactions of Ethyl Centralite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    seront utilisees dans les etudes de stabilite du vieillissement accglgre des poudres ä canon. (NC) ABSTRACT Preliminary experiments are described where...quantity for definite characterization. Detailed examination by thin layer chromato- graphy of residues from nitration experiments, however

  3. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not exceed...

  4. Nitrate metabolism in the gromiid microbial universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Cedhagen, Tomas

    Eukaryotic nitrate respiration supported by intracellular nitrate storages contributes substantially to the nitrogen cycle. Research focus is currently directed towards two phyla: Foraminifera and diatoms, but the widespread Gromia in the Rhizaria may be another key organism. These giant protists...... to the findings of eukaryotic mediated nitrate reduction in some foraminifera and diatoms, nitrate respiration in gromiids seems to be mediated by bacterial endosymbionts. The role of endobionts in nitrate accumulating eukaryotes is of fundamental importance for understanding the evolutionary path...

  5. Sodium nitrate ingestion increases skeletal muscle nitrate content in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyakayiru, Jean; Kouw, Imre W K; Cermak, Naomi M; Senden, Joan M; van Loon, Luc J C; Verdijk, Lex B

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate ([Formula: see text]) ingestion has been shown to have vasoactive and ergogenic effects that have been attributed to increased nitric oxide (NO) production. Recent observations in rodents suggest that skeletal muscle tissue serves as an endogenous [Formula: see text] "reservoir." The present study determined [Formula: see text] contents in human skeletal muscle tissue in a postabsorptive state and following ingestion of a sodium nitrate bolus (NaNO 3 ). Seventeen male, type 2 diabetes patients (age 72 ± 1 yr; body mass index 26.5 ± 0.5 kg/m 2 ; means ± SE) were randomized to ingest a dose of NaNO 3 (NIT; 9.3 mg [Formula: see text]/kg body wt) or placebo (PLA; 8.8 mg NaCl/kg body wt). Blood and muscle biopsy samples were taken before and up to 7 h following [Formula: see text] or placebo ingestion to assess [Formula: see text] [and plasma nitrite ([Formula: see text])] concentrations. Additionally, basal plasma and muscle [Formula: see text] concentrations were assessed in 10 healthy young (CON-Y; age 21 ± 1 yr) and 10 healthy older (CON-O; age 75 ± 1 yr) control subjects. In all groups, baseline [Formula: see text] concentrations were higher in muscle (NIT, 57 ± 7; PLA, 61 ± 7; CON-Y, 80 ± 10; CON-O, 54 ± 6 µmol/l) than in plasma (NIT, 35 ± 3; PLA, 32 ± 3; CON-Y, 38 ± 3; CON-O, 33 ± 3 µmol/l; P ≤ 0.011). Ingestion of NaNO 3 resulted in a sustained increase in plasma [Formula: see text], plasma [Formula: see text], and muscle [Formula: see text] concentrations (up to 185 ± 25 µmol/l) in the NIT group (time effect P nitrate ingestion is usually limited to the changes observed in plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations. The present investigation assessed the skeletal muscle nitrate content in humans during the postabsorptive state, as well as following dietary nitrate ingestion. We show that basal nitrate content is higher in skeletal muscle tissue than in plasma and that ingestion of a dietary nitrate bolus strongly increases both plasma

  6. Nitrate reduction functional genes and nitrate reduction potentials persist in deeper estuarine sediments. Why?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J; Dong, Liang F; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J; Nedwell, David B

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon...

  7. The relationship between the nitrogen and nitrate content and nitrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interrelationships between the nitrate-N and nitrogen content and dry matter yield of Midmar ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum cv. Midmar) were investigated. Data were collected from N fertility trials, from two seasons (1985 and 1987) on four soil sites (Metz, Griffin, Clovelly and Katspruit) with N fertilizer rates ranging from 0 ...

  8. Efficiency of nitrate uptake in spinach : impact of external nitrate concentration and relative growth rate on nitrate influx and efflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Steege, MW; Stulen, [No Value; Wiersema, PK; Posthumus, F; Vaalburg, W

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of nitrate influx and efflux in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L., cv. Subito), was studied in short-term label experiments with N-13- and N-15-nitrate. Nitrate fluxes were examined in relation to the N demand for growth, defined as relative growth rate (RGR) times plant N concentration.

  9. 2,5-Dimethylanilinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajda Smirani

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In the title salt, C8H12N+·NO3−, all non-H atoms of the cation lie on mirror planes. The nitrate counteranion has m symmetry and acts as a hydrogen-bond acceptor of N—H...O hydrogen bonds, connecting the cations and anions into layers running parallel to the ab plane.

  10. Nitrate Removal from Ground Water: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Archna; Surinder K. Sharma; Ranbir Chander Sobti

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate contamination of ground water resources has increased in Asia, Europe, United States, and various other parts of the world. This trend has raised concern as nitrates cause methemoglobinemia and cancer. Several treatment processes can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that biological denitrification is more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis and ion ex...

  11. Plasma nitrate and nitrite are increased by a high nitrate supplement, but not by high nitrate foods in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Gary D.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Dove, Robin W.; Beavers, Daniel; Presley, Tennille; Helms, Christine; Bechtold, Erika; King, S. Bruce; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of dietary nitrate on the nitrate/nitrite/NO (nitric oxide) cycle in older adults. We examined the effect of a 3-day control diet vs. high nitrate diet, with and without a high nitrate supplement (beetroot juice), on plasma nitrate and nitrite kinetics, and blood pressure using a randomized four period cross-over controlled design. We hypothesized that the high nitrate diet would show higher levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite and blood pressure compared to the control diet, which would be potentiated by the supplement. Participants were eight normotensive older men and women (5 female, 3 male, 72.5±4.7 yrs) with no overt disease or medications that affect NO metabolism. Plasma nitrate and nitrite levels and blood pressure were measured prior to and hourly for 3 hours after each meal. The mean daily changes in plasma nitrate and nitrite were significantly different from baseline for both control diet+supplement (p<0.001 and =0.017 for nitrate and nitrite, respectively) and high nitrate diet+supplement (p=0.001 and 0.002), but not for control diet (p=0.713 and 0.741) or high nitrate diet (p=0.852 and 0.500). Blood pressure decreased from the morning baseline measure to the three 2 hr post-meal follow-up time-points for all treatments, but there was no main effect for treatment. In healthy older adults, a high nitrate supplement consumed at breakfast elevated plasma nitrate and nitrite levels throughout the day. This observation may have practical utility for the timing of intake of a nitrate supplement with physical activity for older adults with vascular dysfunction. PMID:22464802

  12. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Maíra Bidart; Groll, Andrea Von; Fissette, Krista; Palomino, Juan Carlos; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Martin, Anandi

    2012-01-01

    We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA) for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) using sodium nitrate (NaNO3) in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3) as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB. PMID:24031916

  13. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Macedo, Ma?ra Bidart; Groll, Andrea Von; Fissette, Krista; Palomino, Juan Carlos; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Martin, Anandi

    2012-01-01

    We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA) for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) using sodium nitrate (NaNO3) in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3) as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB.

  14. Nitrate tolerance impairs nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jørn Bech; Boesgaard, Søren; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    1996-01-01

    Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized......Nitrates, Nitrate tolerence, Nitric oxide, acetylcholine, N-acetylcholine, N-acetylcysteine, L-NAME, Rat, Anesthetized...

  15. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... Commission are contained in USITC Publication 4249 (August 2011), entitled Ammonium Nitrate from Russia...

  16. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the suspended investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia... investigation on ammonium nitrate from Russia would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material...

  17. Nitrate Removal from Ground Water: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate contamination of ground water resources has increased in Asia, Europe, United States, and various other parts of the world. This trend has raised concern as nitrates cause methemoglobinemia and cancer. Several treatment processes can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that biological denitrification is more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis and ion exchange. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes which can be effectively used for denitrifying ground water as well as industrial water.

  18. Dietary nitrate supplementation and exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew M

    2014-05-01

    Dietary nitrate is growing in popularity as a sports nutrition supplement. This article reviews the evidence base for the potential of inorganic nitrate to enhance sports and exercise performance. Inorganic nitrate is present in numerous foodstuffs and is abundant in green leafy vegetables and beetroot. Following ingestion, nitrate is converted in the body to nitrite and stored and circulated in the blood. In conditions of low oxygen availability, nitrite can be converted into nitric oxide, which is known to play a number of important roles in vascular and metabolic control. Dietary nitrate supplementation increases plasma nitrite concentration and reduces resting blood pressure. Intriguingly, nitrate supplementation also reduces the oxygen cost of submaximal exercise and can, in some circumstances, enhance exercise tolerance and performance. The mechanisms that may be responsible for these effects are reviewed and practical guidelines for safe and efficacious dietary nitrate supplementation are provided.

  19. 5-Chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seik Weng Ng

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinium cation in the the title ion pair, C9H7ClNO+·NO3−, is approximately coplanar with the nitrate anion [dihedral angle = 16.1 (1°]. Two ion pairs are hydrogen bonded (2 × O—H...O and 2 × N—H...O about a center of inversion, generating an R44(14 ring.

  20. 2-Amino-5-chloropyridinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Zaouali Zgolli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The title structure, C5H6ClN2+·NO3−, is held together by extensive hydrogen bonding between the NO3− ions and 2-amino-5-chloropyridinium H atoms. The cation–anion N—H...O hydrogen bonds link the ions into a zigzag- chain which develops parallel to the b axis. The structure may be compared with that of the related 2-amino-5-cyanopyridinium nitrate.

  1. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Paulot

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL atmospheric model (AM3. Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 % or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %. Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005–0.008. In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061–0.010 in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., −40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia. This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  2. Californium-252 neutron intracavity brachytherapy alone for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma: A definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanli; Shan, Jinlu; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Kewei; Chen, Shu; Xu, Wenjing; Zhou, Qian; Yang, Mei; Lei, Xin

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the 4-year results of 32 patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma treated solely with californium-252 (Cf-252) neutron intracavity brachytherapy (ICBT). Patients were solicited into the study from January 2008 to June 2011. All the patients had refused surgery or surgery was contraindicated. The patients were treated with Cf-252 neutron ICBT using a novel 3.5-cm diameter off-axis 4-channel intrarectal applicator designed by the authors. The dose reference point was defined on the mucosa surface, with a total dose of 55–62 Gy-eq/4 f (13–16 Gy-eq/f/wk). All the patients completed the radiotherapy in accordance with our protocol. The rectal lesions regressed completely, and the acute rectal toxicity was mild (≤G2). The 4-year local control, overall survival, disease-free survival, and late complication (≥G2) rates were 96.9%, 90.6%, 87.5% and 15.6%, respectively. No severe late complication (≥G3) occurred. The mean follow-up was 56.1 ± 16.0 months. At the end of last follow-up, 29 patients remained alive. The mean survival time was 82.1 ± 2.7 months. Cf-252 neutron ICBT administered as the sole treatment (without surgery) for patients with T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma is effective with acceptable late complications. Our study and method offers a definitive anal sphincter-preserving radiotherapy for T1N0 low-lying rectal adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:28094790

  3. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  4. Nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cover all of the possible uses, warnings, side effects, or interactions with other medicines and vitamin or herbal supplements. ... you should check with your doctor. Common side effects: Dizziness Headaches Flushing of your face and neck Upset stomach or throwing up Low ...

  5. [Relationship between vegetable nutrition and nitrate content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huihe; Wang, Zhengyin; Li, Baozhen

    2004-09-01

    Nitrate accumulation in vegetables, which related well to vegetable nutrition, becomes one of the limiting factors of non-pollution vegetables production. Preference to nitrate is the nutritional characteristic of vegetables. Nitrate is absorbed by vegetables through high-affinity transport system (HATS) and low-affinity transport system (LATS), and is reduced and transformed under the effect of such essential elements as molybdenum, manganese, iron, copper, sulphur and phosphorus. In this paper, the effects of essential elements on nitrate absorption and reductive transform were reviewed, and the relationships of nitrate accumulation in vegetables with vegetable nutrition of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and mid-and microelements as well as with balanced fertilization were discussed. The research keys in the field were prospected for controlling nitrate accumulation, improving vegetables' quality and producing non-pollution vegetables.

  6. Nitrate contamination of groundwater and its countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Hisayoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The inevitable increases of food production and energy consumption with an increase in world population become main causes of an increase of nitrate load to the environment. Although nitrogen is essential for the growth of animal and plant as a constituent element of protein, excessive nitrate load to the environment contaminates groundwater resources used as drinking water and leads to seriously adverse effects on the health of man and livestock. In order to clarify the problem of nitrate contamination of groundwater and search a new trend of technology development from the viewpoint of environment remediation and protection, the present paper has reviewed adverse effects of nitrate on human health, the actual state of nitrogen cycle, several kinds of nitrate sources, measures for reducing nitrate level, etc. (author)

  7. Groundwater Head Control of Catchment Nitrate Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolff, A.; Schmidt, C.; Rode, M.; Fleckenstein, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Elevated nutrient fluxes from agricultural catchments affect downstream water resources. A method to assess nutrient fluxes is the evaluation of the export regime. The export regime classifies the relation between concentration and discharge and integrates mobilization as well as retention processes. Solutes can be exported chemostatically (variance of concentration regimes of nitrate in a series of neighboring sub-catchments of the Central German River Bode catchment. We found an accretion pattern of nitrate with increasing concentration when discharge is increasing and thus a chemodynamic export regime. Here we follow a nested approach and have a closer look at the controls of nitrate export in the small (1.4 km2) headwater catchment of the Sauerbach stream. The Sauerbach catchment is dominated by agricultural land use and is characterized by tile drains. We hypothesize that discharge as well as nitrate export is controlled by the groundwater head variability over time. To that end we follow a joint data analysis of discharge, groundwater heads and nitrate concentrations in groundwater, tile drains and surface water. At the gauging station the nitrate export is chemodynamic exhibiting the typical accretion pattern also found at the larger scale. Our data analysis shows that nitrate export regime is in two ways controlled by the depth to groundwater and the groundwater head variability: Discharge increases with increasing groundwater heads due to the activation of tile drains. On the other hand, depth to groundwater and passage through the unsaturated zone is the major control of aquifer nitrate concentration. At wells with larger depth to groundwater nitrate concentrations are significantly lower than at more shallow wells indicating retention processes in the unsaturated zone. Therefore the concentration in the stream increases with increasing heads since the activated tiles drain shallow groundwater with higher nitrate concentrations. We can thus show that the

  8. Nitrate removal from water by ion exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Nujić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High concentrations of nitrate in water, both in surface and in groundwater, is a consequence of geological composition of soil or human activity. Increased concentrations of nitrate in drinking water is a serious hazard to human health, causing abnormalities such as cancerous growth in human digestion system, while excessive nitrate intake via drinking water can cause methemoglobinemia in infants. Furthermore, the presence of nitrate in aquifers can stimulate eutrophication, which compromise the growth of algae and depletion of dissolved oxygen. Natural and chemical fertilizers in crop production, detergent manufacturing, uncontrolled land discharge of municipal wastewater, and industrial wastes have been identified as the main sources of nitrate in water sources. Nitrate is a stable, highly soluble ion that is difficult to remove by conventional water treatment methods such as coagulation and flocculation. The ion exchange is the most widely used procedure for removing nitrate from water. In this research the possibility of removing nitrate from water was examined by using commercial ion exchangers: Duolite A7 and Relite A490, respectively. The influence of the initial concentration of nitrate (10, 50 and 100 mg/l, the contact time (15 - 1440 min and the mass of the ion exchanger (0.1 to 0.6 g was also examined.

  9. Measurement of isoprene nitrates by GCMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Graham P.; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D.; Bew, Sean P.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2016-09-01

    According to atmospheric chemistry models, isoprene nitrates play an important role in determining the ozone production efficiency of isoprene; however this is very poorly constrained through observations as isoprene nitrates have not been widely measured. Measurements have been severely restricted largely due to a limited ability to measure individual isoprene nitrate isomers. An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods are described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Five of the primary isoprene nitrates which formed in the presence of NOx by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the Master Chemical Mechanism are identified using known isomers on two column phases and are fully separated on the Rtx-200 column. Three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of isoprene with the nitrate radical (NO3) are identified after synthesis from the already identified analogous hydroxy nitrate. A Tenax adsorbent-based trapping system allows the analysis of the majority of the known hydroxy and carbonyl primary isoprene nitrates, although not the (1,2)-IN isomer, under field-like levels of humidity and showed no impact from typical ambient concentrations of NOx and ozone.

  10. Nitrate reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marietou, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) gain their energy by coupling the oxidation of organic substrate to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Several SRBs are able to use alternative terminal electron acceptors to sulfate such as nitrate. Nitrate-reducing SRBs have been isolated from a diverse range of environments. In order to be able to understand the significance of nitrate reduction in SRBs, we need to examine the ecology and physiology of the nitrate-reducing SRB isolates. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. 4-Methoxy-N,N′-diphenylbenzamidinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata S. Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title salt N,N′-diphenyl-4-methoxybenzamidinium nitrate, C20H19N2O+·NO3−, comprises two independent N,N′-diphenyl-4-methoxybenzamidinium cations and two nitrate anions. The crystal structure features N—H...O hydrogen bonds and C—H...O contacts responsible for the packing.

  12. Spectrophotometric Determination of Nitrate and Phosphate Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-04-09

    Apr 9, 2013 ... for drinking, it must meet certain physical, chemical and microbiological criteria set by international organizations such as World Health. Organization (APHA, 1989). Nitrate is a family of chemical compounds containing atoms of nitrogen and oxygen occurring naturally. Nitrate is critical to the continuation of.

  13. Nitrate dynamics in artificially drained nested watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billy, C.; Birgand, F.; Sebilo, M.; Billen, G.; Tournebize, J.; Kao, C.

    There is concern that subsurface drainage, by destroying or by-passing active denitrification areas, may prevent nitrate retention processes and enhance nitrate contamination of surface water by agriculture. To address this question, we studied the flow and concentration signatures of drainage waters and their transformations in a series of 5 nested watersheds, from 1 to 100 km 2 area, in the Brie region near Paris (France). At all scales, nitrate concentrations are generally higher during the winter drainage season compared to the low flow periods (late spring to early fall). High nitrate concentrations characterizing drainage waters are visible at the 1st, 2nd and 3rd stream order but are “diluted” by surface runoff from forested zones and buffered by groundwater contributions. The analysis of nitrate chemographs and nitrate budgets established for the different nested watersheds show significant nitrogen retention. Isotopic measurements indicate that the nitrate pool is enriched in δ 15N- NO3- as its concentration decreases. Direct estimation of benthic denitrification with benthic chambers allowed concluding that benthic denitrification is not the only retention mechanism and that “underground” denitrification, affecting nitrate on its way from the base of the root zone down to the limit of the river bed, may in fact dominate nitrogen retention processes even in this intensively drained watershed.

  14. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Brian D; Boorjian, Stephen A; Ziegelmann, Matthew J; Joyce, Daniel D; Linder, Brian J

    2016-09-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000-2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%-0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2-4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis.

  15. Spectrophotometric Determination of Nitrate in Vegetables Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: A rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrate in vegetables is described. The method is based on the measurement of the absorbance of yellow sodium nitrophenoxide formed via the reaction of phenol with the vegetable-based nitrate in presence of sulphuric acid.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrate in vegetables using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of nitrate in vegetables is described. The method is based on the measurement of the absorbance of yellow sodium nitrophenoxide formed via the reaction of phenol with the vegetable-based nitrate in presence of sulphuric acid. The analytical ...

  17. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., killing hundreds and injuring thousands at the U.S. embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi... Congress has aided in evaluating many of the approaches contained in this NPRM. The Department's report can... will address the definition of ammonium nitrate. Congress has defined ammonium nitrate for purposes of...

  18. The crystal structure of urea nitrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, Sybolt; Feil, D.

    1969-01-01

    The structure of urea nitrate has been solved, by the use of three-dimensional X-ray data. Data were collected using Cu Ke and Mo K0~ radiations. The structure consists of layers with urea and nitrate groups held together by hydrogen bonds. The positions of all hydrogen atoms were found. The final R

  19. Process for preparing concentrated byproduct nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rado, T.A.

    1988-07-12

    This patent describes a process for preparing a concentrated aqueous solution of ammonium nitrate, further containing sulfate ions and a substantially reduced portion of calcium ions from a dilute aqueous waste stream. The stream is characterized by having a neutral pH and containing ammonium nitrate and sulfate ions and calcium ions.

  20. Microglass spheres in ammonium nitrate explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Kazakov; G. Turesheva; Olga Golovchenko; N. Bergeneva; R. Seisembayev

    2010-01-01

    Developed consisting the explosive ammonium nitrate, paraffin and mikrosteklosfer. Due to the input of the explosive paraffin increased water resistance of explosives to 60 minutes. By entering into the explosive mikrosteklosfers been improved caking indices, since steklomikrosfers and paraffin was formed seal between the granules of ammonium nitrate.

  1. Microglass spheres in ammonium nitrate explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kazakov

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Developed consisting the explosive ammonium nitrate, paraffin and mikrosteklosfer. Due to the input of the explosive paraffin increased water resistance of explosives to 60 minutes. By entering into the explosive mikrosteklosfers been improved caking indices, since steklomikrosfers and paraffin was formed seal between the granules of ammonium nitrate.

  2. The contributions of nitrate uptake and efflux to isotope fractionation during algal nitrate assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsh, K. L.; Trull, T. W.; Sigman, D. M.; Thompson, P. A.; Granger, J.

    2014-05-01

    In order to strengthen environmental application of nitrate N and O isotopes, we measured the N and O isotopic fractionation associated with cellular nitrate uptake and efflux in the nitrate-assimilating marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We isolated nitrate uptake and efflux from nitrate reduction by growing the cells in the presence of tungsten, which substitutes for molybdenum in assimilatory nitrate reductase, yielding an inactive enzyme. After growth on ammonium and then N starvation, cells were exposed to nitrate. Numerical models fit to the evolution of intracellular nitrate concentration and N and O isotopic composition yielded distinct N isotope effects (15ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux (2.0 ± 0.3‰ and 1.2 ± 0.4‰, respectively). The O isotope effects (18ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux were indistinguishable (2.8 ± 0.6‰), yielding a ratio of O to N isotopic fractionation for uptake of 1.4 ± 0.4 and for efflux of 2.3 ± 0.9. The 15ɛ for nitrate uptake can account for at most 40% of the organism-level N isotope effect (15ɛorg) measured in laboratory studies of T. weissflogii and in the open ocean (typically 5‰ or greater). This observation supports previous evidence that most isotope fractionation during nitrate assimilation is due to intracellular nitrate reduction, with nitrate efflux allowing the signal to be communicated to the environment. An O to N fractionation ratio (18ɛorg:15ɛorg) of ˜1 has been measured for nitrate assimilation in algal cultures and linked to the N and O isotope effects of nitrate reductase. Our results suggest that the ratios of O to N fractionation for both nitrate uptake and efflux may be distinct from a ratio of 1, to a degree that could cause the net 18ɛorg:15ɛorg to rise appreciably above 1 when 15ɛorg is low (e.g., yielding a ratio of 1.1 when 15ɛorg is 5‰). However, field and culture studies have consistently measured nearly equivalent fractionation of N and O isotopes in

  3. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content...... of total dissolved ions in the NO3- free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low concentrations. Possible electron donors...

  4. Respiratory Nitrate Ammonification by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz-García, Claribel; Murray, Alison E.; Klappenbach, Joel A.; Stewart, Valley; Tiedje, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Anaerobic cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown with nitrate as the sole electron acceptor exhibited sequential reduction of nitrate to nitrite and then to ammonium. Little dinitrogen and nitrous oxide were detected, and no growth occurred on nitrous oxide. A mutant with the napA gene encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase deleted could not respire or assimilate nitrate and did not express nitrate reductase activity, confirming that the NapA enzyme is the sole nitrate reductase. Hence,...

  5. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-01-01

    ...s. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including...

  6. The effects of dietary nitrate, pH and temperature on nitrate reduction in the human oral cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Bojić Danijela V.; Bojić Aleksandar Lj.; Perović Jelica M.

    2004-01-01

    Dietary nitrate is metabolized to nitrite by bacterial flora on the posterior surface of the tongue leading to increased salivary nitrite concentrations. In the acidic environment in the stomach, nitrite forms nitrous acid, a potent nitro sating agent. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dietary nitrate, pH and temperature on nitrate reduction in the human oral cavity. Nitrate reduction was monitored by nitrate reduction assay based on incubation of nitrate test solutions in t...

  7. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Cui; Qu, Ruijuan; Liang, Jinyan; Yang, Xi

    2010-11-01

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  8. Nitrate dry deposition measurements with surrogate surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiang

    Nitrate dry deposition is one of the most important topics in the study of the dry deposition of acidic and acidifying substances. This study measured nitrate dry deposition to (1) a water surface sampler (WSS) which was recently developed in the Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, (2) a Nylasorb filter on a knife-edge surrogate surface and (3) a greased strip on a knife-edge surrogate surface. Airborne nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HNO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations were also measured concurrently with the flux measurements. These measurements were then used to evaluate the utility of using surrogate surfaces, and in particular the WSS, to measure nitrate dry deposition. The nitrogen containing species that may be responsible for nitrate dry deposition to the WSS include nitrogen monoxide (NO), NO2, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4+), HNO2,/ HNO3, and particulate nitrate. Theoretical calculations and experiments showed that HNO3 and particulate nitrate appear to be the major nitrate contributors to the water surface sampler. Nitrate dry deposition to the water surface, Nylasorb filter and the greased strip were measured during the daytime in June and July 1995 and during both the day and night time in September and October 1995. The results showed that during the daytime in June and July the average nitrate dry deposition to the WSS (36.28 mg/m2-day) was much higher than that to the Nylasorb filter (14.04 mg/m2-day). However, during September and October there is no statistically significant difference in nitrate deposition flux between the WSS (average 4.59 mg/m2-day for the nighttime and 10.58 mg/m2-day for the daytime) and the Nylasorb filter (average 4.53 mg/m2-day for the nighttime and 8.87 mg/m2-day). A set of three experiments showed that particulate nitrate fluxes measured with the greased strip were underestimated due to the loss of volatile particulate

  9. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik, E-mail: csyoo@wsu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164 (United States)

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  10. Technical Report on Hydroxylamine Nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlow, Donald G. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Felt, Rowland E. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Agnew, Steve [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Barney, G. Scott [B& W Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States); McKibben, J. Malvyn [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Garber, Robert [Parallax Inc., Rocklin, CA (United States); Lewis, Margie [Parallax Inc., Rocklin, CA (United States)

    1998-02-01

    This report presents the chemical properties and safe conditions for handling and storing solutions of hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN, NH2OH•HNO3 or NH3OH+) in nitric acid (HNO3). Section 1.0 summarizes the accidents experienced within the Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex involving HAN or hydroxylamine sulfate (HAS), a chemical with similar properties. Section 2.0 describes past and current uses of HAN by DOE, the U.S. Military and foreign countries. Section 3.0 presents the basic chemistry of HAN, including chemical reaction and energy content equations. Section 4.0 provides experience and insights gained from previous uncontrolled reactions involving HAN and experimental data from Hanford & Savannah River Site (SRS). This information was used to develop safe conditions for the storage and handling of HAN as presented in Section 5.0. Section 6.0 summarizes recommendations for safe facility operations involving HAN and future research needs.

  11. 77 FR 65532 - Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice of Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation: Notice... the antidumping duty order on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (ammonium nitrate) from the... Administrative Review: Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate (Ammonium Nitrate) from the Russian Federation...

  12. Mechanisms of Peroxynitrite Mediated Nitration of Tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate were investigated with the CBS-QB3 method. Either the protonation of peroxynitrite, or a reaction with carbon dioxide gives a reactive peroxide intermediate. Peroxynitrous acid mediated nitration of phenol occurs via the unimolecular decomposition to give nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Nitrosoperoxycarbonate also undergoes unimolecular decomposition to give carbonate and nitrogen dioxide radicals. The reactions of tyrosine with the hydroxyl or carbonate radicals give a phenoxy radical intermediate. The reaction of the nitrogen dioxide with this radical intermediate followed by tautomerization gives nitrated tyrosine in both cases. According to CBS-QB3 calculations, the rate-limiting step for the nitration of phenol is the decomposition of peroxynitrous acid or of nitrosoperoxycarbonate. PMID:19374346

  13. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 2011-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2011 to 2013. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  14. [Nitrate concentrations in tap water in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoria, Isidro; Maraver, Francisco; Sánchez-Valverde, Félix; Armijo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    To determine nitrate concentrations in drinking water in a sample of Spanish cities. We used ion chromatography to analyze the nitrate concentrations of public drinking water in 108 Spanish municipalities with more than 50,000 inhabitants (supplying 21,290,707 potential individuals). The samples were collected between January and April 2012. The total number of samples tested was 324. The median nitrate concentration was 3.47 mg/L (range: 0.38-66.76; interquartile range: 4.51). The water from 94% of the municipalities contained less than 15 mg/L. The concentration was higher than 25mg/L in only 3 municipalities and was greater than 50mg/L in one. Nitrate levels in most public drinking water supplies in municipalities inhabited by almost half of the Spanish population are below 15 mg/L. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitrate Waste Treatment Sampling and Analysis Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Patrick Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Terrence Kerwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2017-07-05

    This plan is designed to outline the collection and analysis of nitrate salt-bearing waste samples required by the New Mexico Environment Department- Hazardous Waste Bureau in the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (Permit).

  16. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface...... conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root...... the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface...

  17. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  18. Mechanisms of Peroxynitrite Mediated Nitration of Tyrosine

    OpenAIRE

    Gunaydin, Hakan; Houk, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrous acid or nitrosoperoxycarbonate were investigated with the CBS-QB3 method. Either the protonation of peroxynitrite, or a reaction with carbon dioxide gives a reactive peroxide intermediate. Peroxynitrous acid mediated nitration of phenol occurs via the unimolecular decomposition to give nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Nitrosoperoxycarbonate also undergoes unimolecular decomposition to give carbonate and nitrogen dioxide radicals. Th...

  19. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ~4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT.

  20. A search for nitrates in Martian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Monica M.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-03-01

    Martian atmospheric nitrogen is highly enriched in N-15; nitrates formed by interaction of the atmosphere with the Martian regolith should therefore also be characterized by an elevated delta N-15 value. A search has been made for nitrates in two Martian meteorites, in order to determine the extent of possible regolith-atmosphere interaction. Shock-produced glass from the Elephant Moraine (EET) A79001 shergottite (E1,149) and a water-soluble extract from Nakhla were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and stepped combustion-stable isotope mass spectrometry. FTIR of both meteorites had features at 1375/cm and 1630/cm, consistent with nitrates. On account of their low thermal stability, nitrates break down at temperatures below 600 C; in this temperature range, E1,149 yeilded approximately 1250 ppb nitrogen with delta N-15 -8 +/- 5%. If this nitrogen is from a nitrate, then it cannot be distinquished from terrestial salts by its isotopic composition. The water-soluble extract from Nakhla also released nitrogen at low temperatures, approximately 17 ppb with delta N-15 approximately -11 +/- 4%. Since Nakhla is an observed 'fall', this is unlikely to be a terrestial weathering product. Nitrates apparently occur in E1,149 and Nakhla, but in very low abundance, and their origin is unclear. The isotopic composition of the salts, which is within the range of that proposed for Martian magmatic volatiles, is far removed from that of nitrogen in the present-day Martian atmosphere. If the nitrates are Martian in origin, they did not form in recent times from reactions involving atmospheric gases. Rather, the nitrates could be the result of an earlier episode of atmospheric interaction with the regolith, or with implantation of magmatic volatiles introduced during degassing.

  1. Multiple mechanisms of nitrate sensing by Arabidopsis nitrate transceptor NRT1.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouguyon, E; Brun, F; Meynard, D; Kubeš, M; Pervent, M; Leran, S; Lacombe, B; Krouk, G; Guiderdoni, E; Zažímalová, E; Hoyerová, K; Nacry, P; Gojon, A

    2015-03-02

    In Arabidopsis the plasma membrane nitrate transceptor (transporter/receptor) NRT1.1 governs many physiological and developmental responses to nitrate. Alongside facilitating nitrate uptake, NRT1.1 regulates the expression levels of many nitrate assimilation pathway genes, modulates root system architecture, relieves seed dormancy and protects plants from ammonium toxicity. Here, we assess the functional and phenotypic consequences of point mutations in two key residues of NRT1.1 (P492 and T101). We show that the point mutations differentially affect several of the NRT1.1-dependent responses to nitrate, namely the repression of lateral root development at low nitrate concentrations, and the short-term upregulation of the nitrate-uptake gene NRT2.1, and its longer-term downregulation, at high nitrate concentrations. We also show that these mutations have differential effects on genome-wide gene expression. Our findings indicate that NRT1.1 activates four separate signalling mechanisms, which have independent structural bases in the protein. In particular, we present evidence to suggest that the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated forms of NRT1.1 at T101 have distinct signalling functions, and that the nitrate-dependent regulation of root development depends on the phosphorylated form. Our findings add to the evidence that NRT1.1 is able to trigger independent signalling pathways in Arabidopsis in response to different environmental conditions.

  2. Nitrate Adsorption on Clay Kaolin: Batch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Mohsenipour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soils possessing kaolin, gibbsite, goethite, and hematite particles have been found to have a natural capacity to attenuate pollution in aqueous phase. On the other hand, the hydroxyl group in soil increases anion exchange capacity under a low pH condition. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate effects of kaolin on nitrate reduction under acidic condition. In order to analyze the kaolin adsorption behaviour under various conditions, four different concentrations of nitrate, 45, 112.5, 225, and 450 mgNO3-/L, with a constant pH equal to 2, constant temperature equal to 25°C, and exposure period varying from 0 to 150 minutes were considered. The capacity of nitrate adsorption on kaolin has also been studied involving two well-known adsorption isotherm models, namely, Freundlich and Longmuir. The results revealed that approximately 25% of the nitrate present in the solution was adsorbed on clay kaolin. The laboratory experimental data revealed that Freundlich adsorption isotherm model was more accurate than Longmuir adsorption model in predicting of nitrate adsorption. Furthermore, the retardation factor of nitrate pollution in saturated zone has been found to be approximately 4 in presence of kaolin, which indicated that kaolin can be used for natural scavenger of pollution in the environment.

  3. Trace nitrate in oxic waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafiriou, O. C.; Ball, L. A.; Hanley, Q.

    1992-08-01

    We describe a modified (Garside, 1982, Marine Chemistry, 11, 159-167) nitrite method that permits measurements down to subnanomolar concentrations and present datafrom Atlantic and Carribean deepwater profiles for comparison with a published Pacific section. This important intermediate in the nitrogen cycle was detected in all samples. Concentrations were consistently lowest (0.1-0.4 nM) in oligotrophic surface waters. Below 1 km, carribean and Southwest Sargasso sea nitrite concentrations were 0.4-1 nM, decreasing with increasing depth; reported Pacific [NO 2] averages are several times higher. Profiles in the upper kilometer beneath the classical primary nitrate maximum (PNM) were qualitatively similar, exhibiting a smooth supra-exponential drop with depth to vvalues of ˜1-4 nM at 1 km. Then nitrite inventory in this "tail" of the PNM above 1 km with 1 nM ≤[NO 2]≤50 nM roughly equals that in the classical PNM. Significant differences among profiles in the 0.1-1 km regionn are observed, consistent with nitrite pool turnover of 3-7 days estimated from Redfield stoichiometry and tritium-helium ages. Thus seasonal and/or regional variations in factors altering the nitrite production-consumption balance, rather than transport, seem to be responsible for nitrite variability. Nitrite profiles with anomalous midwater or near-bottom fine structure, including multi-point maxima and minima, were found along the Venezuelan continental margin and at ≈ 13°N. These featurers are tentatively ascribed to boundary effects, as hydrographic and circumstantial evidence suggests that these waters interacted previously with the bottom.

  4. Californium-252 Program Equipment Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattin, Fred Rhea [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Kenton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ezold, Julie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-12-01

    To successfully continue the 252Cf production and meet the needs of the customers, a comprehensive evaluation of the Building 7920 processing equipment was requested to identify equipment critical to the operational continuity of the program.

  5. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  6. An unexpected truth: increasing nitrate loading can decrease nitrate export from watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarizadeh Bardsiri, A.; Grant, S. B.; Rippy, M.

    2015-12-01

    The discharge of anthropogenic nitrate (e.g., from partially treated sewage, return flows from agricultural irrigation, and runoff from animal feeding operations) to streams can negatively impact both human and ecosystem health. Managing these many point and non-point sources to achieve some specific end-point—for example, reducing the annual mass of nitrate exported from a watershed—can be a challenge, particularly in rapidly growing urban areas. Adding to this complexity is the fact that streams are not inert: they too can add or remove nitrate through assimilation (e.g., by stream-associated plants and animals) and microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions that occur in streambed sediments (e.g., respiration, ammonification, nitrification, denitrification). By coupling a previously published correlation for in-stream processing of nitrate [Mulholland et al., Nature, 2008, 452, 202-205] with a stream network model of the Jacksons Creek watershed (Victoria, Australia) I demonstrate that managing anthropogenic sources of stream nitrate without consideration of in-stream processing can result in a number of non-intuitive "surprises"; for example, wastewater effluent discharges that increase nitrate loading but decrease in-stream nitrate concentrations can reduce the mass of nitrate exported from a watershed.

  7. Relationships between nitrate uptake and nitrate reductase activity in Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-NR IgG fragments obtained after papain digestion of polyclonal antibodies gave the positive immunological reaction with both, a soluble and plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase. Anti-NR antibody as well as IgG fragments almost totally inhibited the nitrate reductase activity in cytosol proving a crossreaction of antibody with the catalytic site of a soluble NR. Anti-NR IgG fragments, but not undigested polyclonal antibodies affected the activity of the nitrate reductase associated with plasma membranes. Discrepancy in the action of intact antibodies and fragments obtained after they digestion were interpreted as a consequence of same differences in the ability of those molecules to the penetration through the membrane. Undigested anti-NR antibody have no effect on the nitrate uptake by intact plants, as well as by the right-side plasma membrane vesicles. On the other hand, IgG fragments of polyclonal antibodies abolished almost totally the nitrate uptake in the case of intact seedlings, but have only slight effect on the N03 uptake in plasma membranes. On the basis of above findings, some relations between nitrate uptake and its assimilation inside the cell are suggested. Since IgG fragments only slightly changed the N03 absorption in vesicles whereas the activity of plasmalemma associated nitrate reductase was strongly repressed, we concluded that the PM-NR is not structurally involved in the nitrate transport through the membrane.

  8. Dependence of nitrate-induced oxalate accumulation on nitrate reduction in rice leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hua; Jiang, Linrong; Liu, Ee; Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Fang; Peng, Xinxiang

    2008-06-01

    Oxalate, a common constituent in many plants, is known to play important functional roles in plants. However, excess levels of oxalate in edible parts of plants adversely affect their quality as food. Understanding the regulatory mechanism in plants, particularly in food crops, is of both scientific and practical significance. While a number of studies have shown that nitrate can efficiently induce oxalate accumulation in plants, how it elicits such an effect is not well understood. This study aimed to gain a further insight into the mechanism underlying the nitrate-induced oxalate accumulation. Nitrate-N efficiently caused oxalate accumulation in rice leaves, depending on the nitrate concentrations and treatment time. In contrast, same nitrogen molar levels of the other N forms such as nitrite, ammonium, glutamate and urea either had no effect on the accumulation or even reduced the oxalate level. When glutamate, glutamine, asparate and asparagine were added into the nutrient solution that already contained saturating concentration of nitrate, both oxalate levels and NR activity were correspondingly decreased. In all of these modes of treatment, the change in NR activity was positively paralleled to that in oxalate levels. For a further confirmation, we generated the transgenic rice plants with a NR interference gene introduced. The result further demonstrated that in the transgenic plants, unlike in wild-type plants, oxalate was no longer able to accumulate in response to the nitrate treatment even though the endogenous nitrate levels were substantially elevated. Taken together, our results suggest that the nitrate-induced oxalate accumulation in rice leaves is dependent on the NR-catalyzed nitrate reduction, rather than on nitrate itself or nitrite reduction or its downstream metabolites.

  9. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or without

  10. The influence of Glyceria maxima and nitrate input on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The influence of nitrate addition and the presence of Glyceria maxima (reed sweetgrass) on the composition and nitrate metabolism of the dissimilatory nitrate-reducing bacterial community was investigated. Anoxic freshwater sediment was incubated in pots with or without G. maxima and with or

  11. [Can nitrates lead to indirect toxicity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, M

    2007-09-01

    For many years, nitrates have been used, at low dosages, as an additive in salted food. New laws have been promulgated to limit their concentration in water due to increased levels found in soils, rivers and even the aquifer. Although nitrate ions themselves have not toxic properties, bacterial reduction into nitrite ions (occurring even in aqueous medium) can lead to nitrous anhydride, which in turn generates nitrosonium ions. Nitrosium ions react with secondary amine to give nitrosamines, many of which are cancer-inducing agents at very low doses. Opinions on this toxicity are clear-cut and difficult to reconcile. In fact, increased levels are due, in a large part, to the use of nitrates as fertiliéers but also to bacterial transformation of human and animal nitrogenous wastes such as urea.

  12. Excess nitrate loads to coastal waters reduces nitrate removal efficiency: mechanism and implications for coastal eutrophication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunau, Mirko; Voss, Maren; Erickson, Matthew; Dziallas, Claudia; Casciotti, Karen; Ducklow, Hugh

    2013-05-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems are becoming increasingly nitrogen-saturated due to anthropogenic activities, such as agricultural loading with artificial fertilizer. Thus, more and more reactive nitrogen is entering streams and rivers, primarily as nitrate, where it is eventually transported towards the coastal zone. The assimilation of nitrate by coastal phytoplankton and its conversion into organic matter is an important feature of the aquatic nitrogen cycle. Dissolved reactive nitrogen is converted into a particulate form, which eventually undergoes nitrogen removal via microbial denitrification. High and unbalanced nitrate loads to the coastal zone may alter planktonic nitrate assimilation efficiency, due to the narrow stochiometric requirements for nutrients typically shown by these organisms. This implies a cascade of changes for the cycling of other elements, such as carbon, with unknown consequences at the ecosystem level. Here, we report that the nitrate removal efficiency (NRE) of a natural phytoplankton community decreased under high, unbalanced nitrate loads, due to the enhanced recycling of organic nitrogen and subsequent production and microbial transformation of excess ammonium. NRE was inversely correlated with the amount of nitrate present, and mechanistically controlled by dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and organic carbon (Corg) availability. These findings have important implications for the management of nutrient runoff to coastal zones. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Silver nitrate masquerading as a radiopaque foreign body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Claragh; Canney, Mark; Murphy, Adrian; Regan, Padraic

    2007-04-01

    Silver nitrate is commonly used as a method of chemical cauterization to areas of hypergranulation. We report two cases wherein silver nitrate in the hand was misinterpreted radiologically as foreign bodies.

  14. Generation of nitryl chloride from chlorotrimethylsilane-acetyl nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    amyl nitrate does not yield NO2Cl with silicon reagent. However, acetyl nitrate reacts successfully with chlorotrimethylsi- lane to give nitryl chloride, which is characterized by its UV spectrum. If it is generated in presence of ketoximes ...

  15. The effect of prolonged dietary nitrate supplementation on atherosclerosis development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsch, Elke; Theelen, Thomas L.; Janssen, Ben J. A.; Briede, Jacco J.; Haenen, Guido R.; Senden, Joan M. G.; van Loon, Lucas J. C.; Poeze, Martijn; Bierau, Jörgen; Gijbels, Marion J.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Sluimer, Judith C.

    2016-01-01

    Short term dietary nitrate or nitrite supplementation has nitric oxide (NO)-mediated beneficial effects on blood pressure and inflammation and reduces mitochondrial oxygen consumption, possibly preventing hypoxia. As these processes are implicated in atherogenesis, dietary nitrate was hypothesized

  16. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... benefits of enabling AN Agents to provide AN Purchasers' identity verification information directly to... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ammonium Nitrate Security Program Manager, U.S. Department of Homeland... additional information on public meeting facilities, information on access to those facilities for...

  17. Modular Regiospecific Synthesis of Nitrated Fatty Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hock, Katharina J.; Grimmer, Jennifer; Göbel, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous nitrated fatty acids are an important class of signaling molecules. Herein a modular route for the efficient and regiospecific preparation of nitrooleic acids as well as various analogues is described. The approach is based on a simple set of alkyl halides as common building blocks...

  18. EFFECT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EFFECT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS ON FERTILIZATION. AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE SEA URCHIN,. PARECHINUS ANGULOSUS. P. J. GREENWOOD & A. C. BROWN. Department o/Zoology, University o/Cape Town. ASTRACT. Eggs and sperm of Parechinus have been placed in sea water containing 1, ...

  19. Standoff Raman measurement of nitrates in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadate, S.; Kassu, A.; Farley, C. W.; Sharma, A.; Hardisty, J.; Lifson, Miles T. K.

    2011-09-01

    The identification and real time detection of explosives and hazardous materials are of great interest to the Army and environmental monitoring/protection agencies. The application and efficiency of the remote Raman spectroscopy system for real time detection and identification of explosives and other hazardous chemicals of interest, air pollution monitoring, planetary and geological mineral analysis at various standoff distances have been demonstrated. In this paper, we report the adequacy of stand-off Raman system for remote detection and identification of chemicals in water using dissolved sodium nitrate and ammonium nitrate for concentrations between 200ppm and 5000ppm. Nitrates are used in explosives and are also necessary nutrients required for effective fertilizers. The nitrates in fertilizers are considered as potential sources of atmospheric and water pollution. The standoff Raman system used in this work consists of a 2-inch refracting telescope for collecting the scattered Raman light and a 785nm laser operating at 400mW coupled with a small portable spectrometer.

  20. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, Tommy

    2012-01-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribut......This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded...

  1. Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

    1999-05-03

    This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

  2. Spectrophotometric Determination of Nitrate in Vegetables Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MIKE HORSFALL

    The method is based on the measurement of the absorbance of yellow sodium nitrophenoxide formed ... The high concentration of nitrogen in soil may lead to ... nitrate-nitrogen. The reaction is quantitative and analogous to that reported by Tanaka et al. (1982). JASEM ISSN 1119-8362. All rights reserved. J. Appl. Sci.

  3. Spectrophotometric Determination of Nitrate and Phosphate Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve drinking water samples from boreholes were collected from various sampling sites around the vicinity of Kura irrigated farmlands using polythene plastic containers and were analysed for the nitrate and phosphate levels using uV – visible spectrophotometer. From the results, it was found that all the samples had ...

  4. Nitrate induced anaemia in home dialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvadori, M.; Martinelli, F.; Comparini, L.; Bandini, S.; Sodi, A.

    1985-01-01

    Many home dialysis patients in Florence and the surrounding area suddenly showed an unusual anaemia. All used a softener for water treatment. They demonstrated methaemoglobinaemia, Heinz bodies and reduction in plasma haptoglobin indicating Hb oxidation. Tap water analysis showed excessive nitrates. The substitution of the softeners with deionisers solved this important and unusual clinical problem.

  5. Nitrate Salt Surrogate Blending Scoping Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-13

    Test blending equipment identified in the “Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing”. Determine if the equipment will provide adequate mixing of zeolite and surrogate salt/Swheat stream; optimize equipment type and operational sequencing; impact of baffles and inserts on mixing performance; and means of validating mixing performance

  6. The Path to Nitrate Salt Disposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-16

    The topic is presented in a series of slides arranged according to the following outline: LANL nitrate salt incident as thermal runaway (thermally sensitive surrogates, full-scale tests), temperature control for processing, treatment options and down selection, assessment of engineering options, anticipated control set for treatment, and summary of the overall steps for RNS.

  7. Evidence for a plasma-membrane-bound nitrate reductase involved in nitrate uptake of Chlorella sorokiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischner, R.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-nitrate-reductase (NR) immunoglobulin-G (IgG) fragments inhibited nitrate uptake into Chlorella cells but had no affect on nitrate uptake. Intact anti-NR serum and preimmune IgG fragments had no affect on nitrate uptake. Membrane-associated NR was detected in plasma-membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The PM-associated NR was not removed by sonicating PM vesicles in 500 mM NaCl and 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and represented up to 0.8% of the total Chlorella NR activity. The PM NR was solubilized by Triton X-100 and inactivated by Chlorella NR antiserum. Plasma-membrane NR was present in ammonium-grown Chlorella cells that completely lacked soluble NR activity. The subunit sizes of the PM and soluble NRs were 60 and 95 kDa, respectively, as determined by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis and western blotting.

  8. Simultaneous removal of nitrate and hydrogen sulfide by autotrophic denitrification in nitrate-contaminated water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongjie; Chen, Nan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping; Li, Miao

    2018-02-23

    Nitrate contamination is a risk to human health and may cause eutrophication, whereas H 2 S is an undesirable constituent in biogas. In order to better understand denitrification using gaseous H 2 S as electron donor, this study investigated denitrification at different molar ratios of sulfur and nitrogen (S/N ratios) and H 2 S dosages. Although nitrate continued to decrease, a lag in sulfate generation was observed, implying the generation of sulfide oxidizing intermediates, which accumulated even though nitrate was in excess at lower S/N ratios of 0.19 and 0.38. More addition of H 2 S could result in a longer lag of sulfate generation. Before depletion of dissolved sulfide, denitrification could proceed with little nitrite accumulation. High throughout sequencing analysis identified two major genera, Thiobacillus and Sulfurimonas, that were responsible for autotrophic denitrification. The simultaneous removal of nitrate and H 2 S using a wide range of concentrations could be able to be achieved.

  9. Impact of Sulfide on Nitrate Conversion in Eutrophic Nitrate-Rich Marine Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwermer, Carsten U.; Krieger, Bärbel; Lavik, Gaute

    2006-01-01

    and Environmental Sciences, Volcani Research Center, Bet-Dagan, Israel Multiple anaerobic processes are responsible for carbon mineralization in eutrophic nitrate-rich marine environments (e.g., upwelling areas, estuaries, and aquacultures), involving electron acceptors from both the nitrogen and sulfur cycle....... The interaction of these processes is less understood. Our aim was to investigate the functional interaction of nitrate reduction, denitrification and sulfate reduction in an anaerobic marine sludge. We hypothesize that sulfide (from sulfate reduction) (i) causes incomplete denitrification, and (ii) directs......, at the highest sulfide concentration tested (1.6 mM), only 22% and 20% of the nitrate added were converted to N2 and ammonium, respectively, while N2O became the main end product (56%). These findings were corroborated by pure culture experiments with nitrate-reducing and denitrifying isolates from the sludge...

  10. Benefits of Safer Drinking Water: The Value of Nitrate Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Crutchfield, Stephen R.; Cooper, Joseph C.; Hellerstein, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Nitrates in drinking water, which may come from nitrogen fertilizers applied to crops, are a potential health risk. This report evaluates the potential benefits of reducing human exposure to nitrates in the drinking water supply. In a survey, respondents were asked a series of questions about their willingness to pay for a hypothetical water filter, which would reduce their risk of nitrate exposure. If nitrates in the respondent's drinking water were to exceed the EPA minimum safety standard,...

  11. Identification of nitrate sources and discharge-depending nitrate dynamics in a mesoscale catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Christin; Strachauer, Ulrike; Brauns, Mario; Musolff, Andreas; Kunz, Julia Vanessa; Brase, Lisa; Tarasova, Larisa; Merz, Ralf; Knöller, Kay

    2017-04-01

    During the last decades, nitrate concentrations in surface and groundwater have increased due to land use change and accompanying application of fertilizer in agriculture as well as increased atmospheric deposition. To mitigate nutrient impacts on downstream aquatic ecosystems, it is important to quantify potential nitrate sources, instream nitrate processing and its controls in a river system. The objective of this project is to characterize and quantify (regional) scale dynamics and trends in water and nitrogen fluxes of the entire Holtemme river catchment in central Germany making use of isotopic fingerprinting methods. Here we compare two key date sampling campaigns in 2014 and 2015, with spatially highly resolved measurements of discharge at 23 sampling locations including 11 major tributaries and 12 locations at the main river. Additionally, we have data from continuous runoff measurements at 10 locations operated by the local water authorities. Two waste water treatment plants contribute nitrogen to the Holtemme stream. This contribution impacts nitrate loads and nitrate isotopic signatures depending on the prevailing hydrological conditions. Nitrogen isotopic signatures in the catchment are mainly controlled by different sources (nitrified soil nitrogen in the headwater and manure/ effluents from WWTPs in the lowlands) and increase with raising nitrate concentrations along the main river. Nitrate loads at the outlet of the catchment are extremely different between both sampling campaigns (2014: NO3- = 97 t a-1, 2015: NO3- = 5 t a-1) which is associated with various runoff (2014: 0.8 m3 s-1, 2015: 0.2 m3 s-1). In 2015, the inflow from WWTP's raises the NO3- loads and enriches δ18O-NO3 values. Generally, oxygen isotope signatures from nitrate are more variable and are controlled by biogeochemical processes in concert with the oxygen isotopic composition of the ambient water. Elevated δ18O-NO3 in 2015 are most likely due to higher temperatures and lower

  12. Molten nitrate salt technology development status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

    1981-03-01

    Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

  13. Selective Nitrate Binding in Competitive Hydrogen Bonding Solvents: Do Anion–π Interactions Facilitate Nitrate Selectivity?**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Michelle M.; Zakharov, Lev N.

    2013-01-01

    New tripodal urea receptors demonstrate preferential binding of anions over competitive hydrogen bonding solvents. 1H NMR titrations in 10% DMSO-d6/CDCl3 show a higher affinity for nitrate over the halides for the fluorinated receptor, which is lost when the fluorines are removed. An “anion–π” interaction between the nitrate and the π-system of the ethynyl-substituted arene is proposed as the source of this selectivity. PMID:23939999

  14. Mammalian nitrate biosynthesis: mouse macrophages produce nitrite and nitrate in response to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuehr, D.J.; Marletta, M.A.

    1985-11-01

    Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitrate biosynthesis was studied in LPS-sensitive C3H/He and LPS-resistant C3H/HeJ mice. Intraperitoneal injection of 15 ..mu..g of LPS led to a temporary 5- to 6-fold increase in blood nitrate concentration in the C3H/He strain. Levels of nitrate excreted in the urine were also increased. In contrast, no increase was observed in the C3H/HeJ strain with LPS injections up to 175 ..mu..g. Furthermore, thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages from C3H/He, but not from C3H/HeJ mice, produced nitrite (60%) and nitrate (40%) when cultured with LPS (10 ..mu..g/ml). T-lymphocyte addition/depletion experiments showed the presence of T cells enhanced this response. However, LPS did not cause nitrite or nitrate production in cultures of spleen lymphocytes from either strain. LPS-induced nitrate synthesis was also observed with nude mice and CBA/N mice, indicating that neither functional T lymphocytes nor LPS-responsive B lymphocytes were required for the response in vivo. This was consistent with the in vitro results showing macrophages alone were competent. Mycobacterium bovis infection of C3H/He and C3H/HeJ mice resulted in a large increase in nitrate production over the course of the infection for both strains, suggesting T-lymphocyte-mediated activation of macrophages as a potent stimulus for nitrate biosynthesis. The synthesis of nitrite is significant in that it can directly participate in the endogenous formation of nitrosamines and may also be involved in some aspect of the chemistry of cytotoxicity.

  15. Occurrence of elevated nitrate in groundwaters of Krishna delta, India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrate concentrations were measured in the groundwater samples of Krishna delta, India. The results indicate a large variation of nitrate from 10 - 135 mg/l. In 79 groundwater samples, about 39% shows high nitrate contents (>50 mg/l), which is more than the permissible limits in drinking water. In north Krishna delta 49% ...

  16. Nitrate removal by electro-bioremediation technology in Korean soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jeong-Hee [Korea Electro technology Research Institute, Electric Power Research Division, Electrokinetics Research Group, 70 Boolmosangil, Changwon, 641-120 (Korea, Republic of); Maruthamuthu, Sundaram, E-mail: biocorrcecri@gmail.com [Korea Electro technology Research Institute, Electric Power Research Division, Electrokinetics Research Group, 70 Boolmosangil, Changwon, 641-120 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Goo; Ha, Tae-Hyun [Korea Electro technology Research Institute, Electric Power Research Division, Electrokinetics Research Group, 70 Boolmosangil, Changwon, 641-120 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jeong-Hyo, E-mail: jhbae@keri.re.kr [Korea Electro technology Research Institute, Electric Power Research Division, Electrokinetics Research Group, 70 Boolmosangil, Changwon, 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The nitrate concentration of surface has become a serious concern in agricultural industry through out the world. In the present study, nitrate was removed in the soil by employing electro-bioremediation, a hybrid technology of bioremediation and electrokinetics. The abundance of Bacillus spp. as nitrate reducing bacteria were isolated and identified from the soil sample collected from a greenhouse at Jinju City of Gyengsangnamdo, South Korea. The nitrate reducing bacterial species were identified by 16 s RNA sequencing technique. The efficiency of bacterial isolates on nitrate removal in broth was tested. The experiment was conducted in an electrokinetic (EK) cell by applying 20 V across the electrodes. The nitrate reducing bacteria (Bacillus spp.) were inoculated in the soil for nitrate removal process by the addition of necessary nutrient. The influence of nitrate reducers on electrokinetic process was also studied. The concentration of nitrate at anodic area of soil was higher when compared to cathode in electrokinetic system, while adding bacteria in EK (EK + bio) system, the nitrate concentration was almost nil in all the area of soil. The bacteria supplies electron from organic degradation (humic substances) and enhances NO{sub 3}{sup -} reduction (denitrification). Experimental results showed that the electro-bio kinetic process viz. electroosmosis and physiological activity of bacteria reduced nitrate in soil environment effectively. Involvement of Bacillus spp. on nitrification was controlled by electrokinetics at cathode area by reduction of ammonium ions to nitrogen gas. The excellence of the combined electro-bio kinetics technology on nitrate removal is discussed.

  17. Nitrate in ground water of Beed City of Maharashtra (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Raheem, Shaikh; Husain, Sayyed; Farooqui, Mazahar

    2013-10-01

    An attempt was made to investigate the water pollution caused by nitrate in the ground water of Beed City of Maharashtra inIndia. The samples were collected randomly at different time periods from different places of Beed City and analysed for nitrate contents. The level of nitrate was found high and above permissible limit in the groundwater of the city.

  18. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balk, Melike; Laverman, A.M.; Keuskamp, Joost A.; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought

  19. Nitrate concentration in drinking water supplies in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elevated levels of nitrate in drinking water have been associated with adverse health effects. Most susceptible to nitrate toxicity are infants under six months of age and pregnant women. This study assesses the nitrate concentration of 48 randomly selected wells in an urban-slum setting in Ibadan South East Local ...

  20. Nitrate pollution of Neogene alluvium aquifer in Morogoro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concern over nitrate pollution of groundwater in integrated water quality management has been growing recently. The levels of nitrate in wells from septic tanks and urban agriculture with nitrogen fertilizers application may increase the potential groundwater pollution by nitrate. The purpose of this study was to determine the ...

  1. A nitrate sensitive planar optode; performance and interferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2015-01-01

    We present a newly developed nitrate sensitive planar optode. It exhibits a linear response to nitrate from 1 to 50 mM at pH 8.0, a fast response time below 10 s and a good lifetime, allowing for fast two dimensional nitrate measurements over long periods of time. Interference from nitrite...

  2. Measuring nitrate and nitrite concentrations in vegetables, fruits in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrosamine is derived from nitrate and it seems as one of the factors and causes of gastrointestinal cancer in adults and Methemoglobinemia (blue baby syndrome). Eighty percent of nitrate enters to the body through vegetables and fruits, so in this study nitrate concentration in available vegetables and fruits at Shiraz was ...

  3. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phenol is nitrated regioselectively by fuming nitric acid inside the cages of faujasite zeolites (dependent on the loading level) and a remarkable orthoselectivity is observed in solid state nitration. Toluene and chlorobenzene also containing ortho-/para-orienting substituents, undergo faster nitration, though the ...

  4. Nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L. [RUST - Clemson Technical Center, Anderson, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. A process to reduce the nitrates to ammonia has been developed at ORNL. This technology creates a sludge lower in nitrates. This report describes stabilization possibilities of the sludge.

  5. Seasonal Distribution of Nitrate and Nitrite Levels in Eleme Abattoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    should be periodic evaluation of nitrate and nitrite levels in the area. @ JASEM .... Table 6: Comparison of the levels of Nitrate and Nitrite in Surface and Groundwater in the Dry Season with WHO (1988) Standards. Unaffected ... Table 7: Calculated Ratios of Nitrate and Nitrite to WHO (1988) Guideline values. Season Ratios ...

  6. Nitrate concentration in greenhouse lettuce: a modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seginer, I.; Buwalda, F.; Straten, van G.

    1998-01-01

    A simple two-state-variable model was developed to describe the nitrate concentration in lettuce when nitrate supply is unlimited. A central element of the model is a negative correlation between the concentrations of soluble carbohydrates and nitrate in the cell sap, a correlation which reflects

  7. Headache characteristics during the development of tolerance to nitrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, I; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Olesen, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in nitrate-induced headache and in spontaneous migraine attacks. Organic nitrates act as prodrugs for NO and headache is a predominant adverse effect of nitrates but often disappears during continuous treatment. Insight...

  8. Optimum conditions for cotton nitrate reductase extraction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    nitrate transformation into nitrite (µg of NO2. -/min/g F.W) is observed when incubation period of enzyme is short (1 to 5 min). Key words: Extraction, dosage, nitrate reductase activity, callus, cotton. INTRODUCTION. Nitrate reductase (EC. 1.7.99.4) is an oxidoreductase enzyme involved in nitrogen assimilation in plant. It.

  9. 78 FR 32690 - Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... COMMISSION Certain Ammonium Nitrate From Ukraine Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... antidumping duty order on certain ammonium nitrate from Ukraine would be likely to lead to continuation or... Publication 4396 (May 2013), entitled Certain Ammonium Nitrate from Ukraine: Investigation No. 731-TA-894...

  10. FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

    1962-06-26

    A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

  11. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium... the provisions of this section. (a) Sodium nitrate-urea complex is a clathrate of approximately two...

  12. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  13. Manganese determination om minerals by activation analysis, using the californium-252 as a neutron source; Determinacao de manganes em minerios, por analise por ativacao, usando californio-252 como fonte de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Antonio

    1976-07-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis, using a Californium-252 neutron source, has been applied for the determination of manganese in ores such as pyrolusite, rodonite (manganese silicate)' and blending used in dry-batteries The favorable nuclear properties of manganese, such as high thermal neutron cross-section for the reaction {sup 55}Mn (n.gamma){sup 56} Mn, high concentration of manganese in the matrix and short half - life of {sup 56}Mn, are an ideal combination for non-destructive analysis of manganese in ores. Samples and standards of manganese dioxide were irradiated for about 20 minutes, followed by a 4 to 15 minutes decay and counted in a single channel pulse-height discrimination using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. Counting time was equal to 10 minutes. The interference of nuclear reactions {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn and {sup 59} Co (n, {alpha}){sup 56} were studied, as well as problems in connection with neutron shadowing during irradiation, gamma-rays attenuation during counting and influence of granulometry of samples. One sample,was also analysed by wet-chemical method (sodium bismuthate) in order to compare results. As a whole, i t was shown that the analytical method of neutron activation for manganese in ores and blending, is a method simple, rapid and with good precision and accuracy. (author)

  14. Design of a homogeneous subcritical nuclear reactor based on thorium with a source of californium 252; Diseno de un reactor nuclear subcritico homogeneo a base de Torio con una fuente de Californio 252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado H, C. E.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Sajo B, L., E-mail: ce_delgado89@hotmail.com [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: One of the energy alternatives to fossil fuels which do not produce greenhouse gases is the nuclear energy. One of the drawbacks of this alternative is the generation of radioactive wastes of long half-life and its relation to the generation of nuclear materials to produce weapons of mass destruction. An option to these drawbacks of nuclear energy is to use Thorium as part of the nuclear fuel which it becomes in U{sup 233} when capturing neutrons, that is a fissile material. In this paper Monte Carlo methods were used to design a homogeneous subcritical reactor based on thorium. As neutron reflector graphite was used. The reactor core is homogeneous and is formed of 70% light water as moderator, 12% of enriched uranium UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} and 18% of thorium Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} as fuel. To start the nuclear fission chain reaction an isotopic source of californium 252 was used with an intensity of 4.6 x 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}. In the design the value of the effective multiplication factor, whose value turned out k{sub eff} <1 was calculated. Also, the neutron spectra at different distances from the source and the total fluence were calculated, as well as the values of the ambient dose equivalent in the periphery of the reactor. (Author)

  15. Sodium nitrate supplementation does not enhance performance of endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bescós, Raúl; Ferrer-Roca, Ventura; Galilea, Pedro A; Roig, Andreu; Drobnic, Franchek; Sureda, Antoni; Martorell, Miquel; Cordova, Alfredo; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2012-12-01

    Supplementation with inorganic nitrate has been suggested to be an ergogenic aid for athletes as nitric oxide donor. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ingestion of inorganic sodium nitrate benefits well-trained athletes performing a 40-min exercise test in laboratory conditions. In addition, we investigated the effect of this supplement on plasma levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and in nitrated proteins. Thirteen trained athletes participated in this randomized, double-blind, crossover study. They performed a 40-min cycle ergometer distance-trial test after two 3-d periods of dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate (10 mg·kg of body mass) or placebo. Concentration of plasma nitrate (256 ± 35 μM) and nitrite (334 ± 86 nM) increased significantly (P nitrate supplementation compared with placebo (nitrate: 44 ± 11 μM; nitrite: 187 ± 43 nM). In terms of exercise performance, there were no differences in either the mean distance (nitrate: 26.4 ± 1.1 km; placebo: 26.3 ± 1.2 km; P = 0.61) or mean power output (nitrate: 258 ± 28 W; placebo: 257 ± 28 W; P = 0.89) between treatments. Plasma ET-1 increased significantly (P nitrate (4.0 ± 0.8 pg·mL) and placebo (2.4 ± 0.4 pg·mL) conditions. This increase was significantly greater (P nitrate group. Levels of nitrated proteins did not differ between treatments (nitrate: preexercise, 91% ± 23%; postexercise, 81% ± 23%; placebo: preexercise, 95% ± 20%; postexercise, 99% ± 19%). Sodium nitrate supplementation did not improve a 40-min distance-trial performance in endurance athletes. In addition, concentration of plasma ET-1 increased significantly after exercise after supplementation with sodium nitrate.

  16. Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Selectivity, physicochemical and biological consequences, denitration and proteomics methods for the identification of tyrosine-nitrated proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abello, N.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; Postma, D.S; Bischoff, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) is a post-translational modification occurring under the action of a nitrating agent. Tyrosine is modified in the 3-position of the phenolic ring through the addition of a nitro group (NO2). In the present article, we review the main nitration reactions and elucidate

  17. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B T Wittbrodt

    Full Text Available Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique.

  18. Understanding nitrate assimilation and its regulation in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Llamas, Angel; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation is a key process for nitrogen (N) acquisition in green microalgae. Among Chlorophyte algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has resulted to be a good model system to unravel important facts of this process, and has provided important insights for agriculturally relevant plants. In this work, the recent findings on nitrate transport, nitrate reduction and the regulation of nitrate assimilation are presented in this and several other algae. Latest data have shown nitric oxide (NO) as an important signal molecule in the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of nitrate reductase and inorganic N transport. Participation of regulatory genes and proteins in positive and negative signaling of the pathway and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of nitrate assimilation, as well as those involved in Molybdenum cofactor synthesis required to nitrate assimilation, are critically reviewed.

  19. Silver nanoparticles can attenuate nitrative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Zuberek

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We have reported previously that glucose availability can modify toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs via elevation of antioxidant defence triggered by increased mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we examined the effect of glucose availability on the production of reactive nitrogen species in HepG2 cells and modification of nitrative stress by AgNPs. We found that lowering the glucose concentration increased expression of genes coding for inducible nitric oxide syntheas, NOS2 and NOS2A resulting in enhanced production of nitric oxide. Surprisingly, AgNPs decreased the level of nitric oxide accelerated denitration of proteins nitrated by exogenous peroxynitrite in cells grown in the presence of lowered glucose concentration, apparently due to further induction of protective proteins.

  20. Analysis of nitrate reductase mRNA expression and nitrate reductase activity in response to nitrogen supply

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Kavoosi; Sadegh Balotf; Homeira Eshghi; Hasan Hasani

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is one of the major sources of nitrogen for the growth of plants. It is taken up by plant roots and transported to the leaves where it is reduced to nitrite in the. The main objective of this research was to investigate stimulatory effects of sodium nitrate, potassium nitrate, ammonia and urea on the production/generation of the nitrate reductase mRNA in Triticum aestivum plants. The plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 21 days and then starved in a media without nitrat...

  1. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah eKorte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB. In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702, as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605 that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance.

  2. Isomers of nitric acid and chlorine nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, M.P.; Francl, M.M.; Rowland, F.S.; Hehre, W.J.

    1988-09-22

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations at the HF/6-31G* and MP2/6-31G* levels have been performed on nitric acid and chlorine nitrate. Equilibrium geometries and electric dipole moments obtained from the MP2/6-31G* calculations are in good agreement with the respective experimental values, normal-mode (harmonic) vibrational frequencies and frequency shifts due to isotopic substitution calculated at this level support the most recent gas-phase infrared assignments for chlorine nitrate but suggest a reversal in the assignment of v/sub 5/ and v/sub 6/ for nitric acid. Calculations at the same levels of theory were also performed on peroxynitrous acid (HOONO) and chlorine peroxynitrite (ClOONO). The former is found to be 35 kcal/mol less stable than nitric acid at the MP2/6-31G* level; chlorine peroxynitrite is 30 kcal/mol higher in energy than chlorine nitrate. The possible role of these high-energy isomers in atmospheric processes is discussed.

  3. Habitual Dietary Nitrate Intake in Highly Trained Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonvik, Kristin L; Nyakayiru, Jean; van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Wardenaar, Floris C; van Loon, Luc J C; Verdijk, Lex B

    2017-04-01

    Although beetroot juice, as a nitrate carrier, is a popular ergogenic supplement among athletes, nitrate is consumed through the regular diet as well. We aimed to assess the habitual dietary nitrate intake and identify the main contributing food sources in a large group of highly trained athletes. Dutch highly trained athletes (226 women and 327 men) completed 2-4 web-based 24-hr dietary recalls and questionnaires within a 2- to 4-week period. The nitrate content of food products and food groups was determined systematically based on values found in regulatory reports and scientific literature. These were then used to calculate each athlete's dietary nitrate intake from the web-based recalls. The median[IQR] habitual nitrate intake was 106[75-170] mg/d (range 19-525 mg/d). Nitrate intake correlated with energy intake (ρ = 0.28, p athletes (12.8[9.2-20.0] vs 9.4[6.2-13.8] mg/MJ; p athletes (150[88-236] vs 114[61-183] g/d; p athletes was 106 mg, with large interindividual variation. Dietary nitrate intake was strongly associated with the intake of vegetables. Increasing the intake of nitrate-rich vegetables in the diet might serve as an alternative strategy for nitrate supplementation.

  4. Growing patterns to produce 'nitrate-free' lettuce (Lactuca sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croitoru, Mircea Dumitru; Muntean, Daniela-Lucia; Fülöp, Ibolya; Modroiu, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Vegetables can contain significant amounts of nitrate and, therefore, may pose health hazards to consumers by exceeding the accepted daily intake for nitrate. Different hydroponic growing patterns were examined in this work in order to obtain 'nitrate-free lettuces'. Growing lettuces on low nitrate content nutrient solution resulted in a significant decrease in lettuces' nitrate concentrations (1741 versus 39 mg kg(-1)), however the beneficial effect was cancelled out by an increase in the ambient temperature. Nitrate replacement with ammonium was associated with an important decrease of the lettuces' nitrate concentration (from 1896 to 14 mg kg(-1)) and survival rate. An economically feasible method to reduce nitrate concentrations was the removal of all inorganic nitrogen from the nutrient solution before the exponential growth phase. This method led to lettuces almost devoid of nitrate (10 mg kg(-1)). The dried mass and calcinated mass of lettuces, used as markers of lettuces' quality, were not influenced by this treatment, but a small reduction (18%, p < 0.05) in the fresh mass was recorded. The concentrations of nitrite in the lettuces and their modifications are also discussed in the paper. It is possible to obtain 'nitrate-free' lettuces in an economically feasible way.

  5. Nitrate removal using Brevundimonas diminuta MTCC 8486 from ground water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, S; Selvakumar, R; Sathishkumar, M; Swaminathan, K; Lakshmanaperumalsamy, P; Singh, A; Jain, S K

    2009-01-01

    Brevundimonas diminuta MTCC 8486, isolated from marine soil of coastal area of Trivandrum, Kerala, was used for biological removal of nitrate from ground water collected from Kar village of Pali district, Rajasthan. The organism was found to be resistance for nitrate up to 10,000 mg L(-1). The optimum growth conditions for biological removal of nitrate were established in batch culture. The effect of carbon sources on nitrate removal was investigated using mineral salt medium (MSM) containing 500 mg L(-1) of nitrate to select the most effective carbon source. Among glucose and starch as carbon source, glucose at 1% concentration increased the growth (182+/-8.24 x 10(4) CFU mL(-1)) and induced maximum nitrate reduction (86.4%) at 72 h. The ground water collected from Kar village, Pali district of Rajasthan containing 460+/-5.92 mg L(-1) of nitrate was subjected to three different treatment processes in pilot scale (T1 to T3). Higher removal of nitrate was observed in T2 process (88%) supplemented with 1% glucose. The system was scaled up to 10 L pilot scale treatment plant. At 72 h the nitrate removal was observed to be 95% in pilot scale plant. The residual nitrate level (23+/-0.41 mg L(-1)) in pilot scale treatment process was found to be below the permissible limit of WHO.

  6. Management of Nitrate m Groundwater: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmed

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture may cause nitrate and other chemicals to enter into groundwater systems. Nitrate in drinking water is considered a health hazard. A study was conducted to assess the extent of nitrate pollution of groundwater caused by agriculture and to evaluate the possibility of using the LEACHN model to manage nitrate entry into groundwater of agricultural areas of Al-Batinah, which is the most important agricultural region of Oman. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed to assess the problem and to detect possible trends. Soil sampling and analyses were done to demonstrate the difference in the nitrate concentration in agricultural and non-agricultural soils. A questionnaire survey was conducted to gather information on agricultural practices, fertilizer input, and other possible sources of nitrate pollution. Results from the study show that 23% of groundwater samples have a concentration of nitrate-N concentration of 10 mg/l and 34% samples exceed 8 mg/l. Agricultural soils have higher levels of nitrate compared to non- agricultural soils. Results also demonstrate that nitrate levels in groundwater in Al-Batinah are rising. Application of the ‘LEACHN’ model demonstrated its suitability for use as a management tool to reduce nitrate leaching to groundwater by controlling fertilizer and water input.

  7. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: a hidden source of nitrite?

    KAUST Repository

    Balk, Melike

    2015-03-02

    Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests. The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden by the presence of active nitrite-reducing microorganisms under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  8. Nitrate ammonification in mangrove soils: A hidden source of nitrite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melike eBalk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reduction is considered to be a minor microbial pathway in the oxidation of mangrove-derived organic matter due to a limited supply of nitrate in mangrove soils. At a limited availability of this electron acceptor compared to the supply of degradable carbon, nitrate ammonification is thought to be the preferential pathway of nitrate reduction. Mangrove forest mutually differ in their productivity, which may lead to different available carbon to nitrate ratios in their soil. Hence, nitrate ammonification is expected to be of more importance in high- compared to low-productive forests.The hypothesis was tested in flow-through reactors that contain undisturbed mangrove soils from high-productive Avicennia germinans and Rhizophora mangle forests in Florida and low-productive Avicennia marina forests in Saudi Arabia. Nitrate was undetectable in the soils from both regions. It was assumed that a legacy of nitrate ammonification would be reflected by a higher ammonium production from these soils upon the addition of nitrate. Unexpectedly, the soils from the low-productive forests in Saudi Arabia produced considerably more ammonium than the soils from the high-productive forests in Florida. Hence, other environmental factors than productivity must govern the selection of nitrate ammonification or denitrification. A rather intriguing observation was the 1:1 production of nitrite and ammonium during the consumption of nitrate, more or less independent from sampling region, location, sampling depth, mangrove species and from the absence or presence of additional degradable carbon. This 1:1 ratio points to a coupled production of ammonium and nitrite by one group of nitrate-reducing microorganisms. Such a production of nitrite will be hidden under the nitrate-limited conditions of most mangrove forest soils.

  9. Impact of ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate on tadpoles of Alytes obstetricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garriga, Núria; Montori, A; Llorente, G A

    2017-07-01

    The presence of pesticides, herbicides and fertilisers negatively affect aquatic communities in general, and particularly amphibians in their larval phase, even though sensitivity to pollutants is highly variable among species. The Llobregat Delta (Barcelona, Spain) has experienced a decline of amphibian populations, possibly related to the reduction in water quality due to the high levels of farming activity, but also to habitat loss and alteration. We studied the effects of increasing ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate levels on the survival and growth rate of Alytes obstetricans tadpoles under experimental conditions. We exposed larvae to increasing concentrations of nitrate and ammonium for 14 days and then exposed them to water without pollutants for a further 14 days. Only the higher concentrations of ammonium (>33.75 mg/L) caused larval mortality. The growth rate of larvae was reduced at ≥22.5 mg/L NH 4 + , although individuals recovered and even increased their growth rate once exposure to the pollutant ended. The effect of nitrate on growth rate was detected at ≥80 mg/L concentrations, and the growth rate reduction in tadpoles was even observed during the post-exposure phase. The concentrations of ammonium with adverse effects on larvae are within the range levels found in the study area, while the nitrate concentrations with some adverse effect are close to the upper range limit of current concentrations in the study area. Therefore, only the presence of ammonium in the study area is likely to be considered of concern for the population of this species, even though the presence of nitrate could cause some sublethal effects. These negative effects could have an impact on population dynamics, which in this species is highly sensitive to larval mortality due to its small clutch size and prolonged larval period compared to other anuran amphibians.

  10. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  11. Using Nitrate Isotopes to Distinguish Pathways along which Unprocessed Atmospheric Nitrate is Transported through Forests to Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyen, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    Evaluation of natural abundance oxygen and nitrogen isotopes in nitrate has revealed that atmospheric deposition of nitrate to forests sometimes has direct effects on the timing and magnitude of stream nitrate concentrations. Large amounts of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate have sometimes been found in streams during snowmelt and stormflow events. Despite increasing evidence that unprocessed atmospheric nitrate may be transported without biological processing to streams at various times and multiple locations, little has been reported about specific hydrological processes. I synthesized research findings from a number of studies in which nitrate isotopes have been measured over the past decade. Unprocessed nitrate may predominate in surficial soil waters after rainfall and snowmelt events relative to nitrate that originated from nitrification. Although transport to deep groundwater may be important in the most nitrogen saturated catchments, the transport of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate along shallow subsurface flowpaths is likely more important in many moderately N-polluted ecosystems, which predominate in the northeastern USA where most of my study sites are located. The presence of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate in surficial soils was linked to stream nitrate concentrations when large amounts of unprocessed nitrate were occasionally routed along lateral, shallow subsurface flowpaths during stormflow events. During these events, water tables rose to saturate shallow-depth soils. When catchments were drying or dryer, atmospheric nitrate was completely consumed by biological processing as flowpaths shifted from lateral to vertical transport through soils. The source areas of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate were usually limited to soils that were adjacent to streams, with little to no near-surface saturation and transport of unprocessed nitrate from more distal hillslope positions. The occasional large amounts of unprocessed atmospheric nitrate in soil water

  12. Seasonal variations in nitrate content, total nitrogen, and nitrate reductase activities of macrophytes from a chalk stream in Upper Bavaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, A; Kaiser, R

    1986-07-01

    11 macrophytic species from a groundwater influenced chalk stream in Upper Bavaria were investigated during a period of one year in order to determine differences in the endogenous nitrate content, in total nitrogen content and in nitrate reductase activity (NRA). Nitrate concentrations of different plants taken from the same site of the river varied by a factor of approximately 103. A maximum of 1,958 μmol NO 3- g-1 dry w. could be measured in the petioles of Nasturtium officinale, which accounts for 12% of plant dry w. Very high values were also found in Callitriche obtusangula and Veronica angallis-aquatica. In comparison to the ambient water, mean accumulation rates of up to 131 could be found. In Fontinalis antipyretica, the plant poorest in nitrate, the ratio was only 1.24:1. Elodea canadensis belonged to a group of plants having very low nitrate concentrations. Since NRA was very low too, it is assumed that nitrogen nutrition of this species depends rather on ammonia than on nitrate. With a few exceptions nitrate content of different plant organs varied markedly. In general they were lowest in leaves and highest in shoot axes. Appreciable amounts of nitrate were also found in the roots of plants. No correlation could be found between endogenous nitrate content and NRA. In contrast to endogenous nitrate content and NRA, total nitrogen concentrations of the plants did not differ significantly.

  13. Evaluating Ecosystem Services for Reducing Groundwater Nitrate Contamination: Nitrate Attenuation in the Unsaturated and Saturated Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrates are the most common type of groundwater contamination in agricultural regions. Environmental policies targeting nitrates have focused on input control (e.g., restricted fertilizer application), intermediate loads control (e.g., reduce nitrate leached from crop fields), and final loads control (e.g., reduce catchment nitrate loads). Nitrate loads can be affected by hydrological processes in both unsaturated and saturated zones. Although many of these processes have been extensively investigated in literature, they are commonly modeled as exogenous to farm management. A couple of recent studies by scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory show that in some situations nitrate attenuation processes in the unsaturated/saturated zone, particularly denitrification, can be intensified by certain management practices to mitigate nitrate loads. Therefore, these nitrate attenuation processes can be regarded as a set of ecosystem services that farmers can take advantage of to reduce their cost of complying with environmental policies. In this paper, a representative California dairy farm is used as a case study to show how such ecosystem attenuation services can be framed within the farm owner's decision-making framework as an option for reducing groundwater nitrate contamination. I develop an integrated dynamic model, where the farmer maximizes discounted net farm profit over multiple periods subject to environmental regulations. The model consists of three submodels: animal-waste-crop, hydrologic, and economic model. In addition to common choice variables such as irrigation, fertilization, and waste disposal options, the farmer can also endogenously choose from three water sources: surface water, deep groundwater (old groundwater in the deep aquifer that is not affected by farm effluent in the short term), and shallow groundwater (drainage water that can be recycled via capture wells at the downstream end of the farm). The capture wells not only

  14. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Meusinger, Carl; Erbland, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [" Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis...... in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate (15N, 17O, and 18O) provide...... additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters...

  15. Impact of weather variability on nitrate leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Karl; Premrov, Alina; Hackett, Richard; Coxon, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    The loss of nitrate (NO3 - N) to water via leaching and overland flow contributes to eutrophication of freshwaters, transitional and near coastal waters with agriculture contributing significantly to nitrogen (N) loading to these water. Environmental regulations, such as the Nitrates and Water Framework Directives, have increased constraints on farmers to improve N management in regions at risk of NO3--N loss to water. In addition, farmers also have to manage their systems within a changing climate as the imapcts of climate change begin to impact resulting in more frequent extreme events such as floods and droughts. The objective of this study was to investigate the link between weather volatility and the concentration of leached NO3--N spring barley. Leaching was quantified under spring barley grown on a well-drained, gravelly sandy soil using ceramic cup samplers over 6 drainage years under the same farming practices and treatments. Soil solution NO3--N concentrations under spring barley grown by conventional inversion ploughing and reduced tillage were compared to weather parameters over the period. Weather was recorded at a national Met Eireann weather station on site. Soil solution NO3--N varied significantly between years. Within individual years NO3--N concentrations varied over the drainage season, with peak concentrations generally observed in the autumn time, decreasing thereafter. Under both treatments there was a three-fold difference in mean annual soil solution NO3--N concentration over the 6 years with no change in the agronomic practices (crop type, tillage type and fertiliser input). Soil solution nitrate concentrations were significantly influenced by weather parameters such as rainfall, effective drainage and soil moisture deficit. The impact of climate change in Ireland could lead to increased NO3--N loss to water further exacerbating eutrophication of sensitive estuaries. The increased impact on eutrophication of waters, related to climatic

  16. 4-[(2-Hydroxybenzylamino]pyridinium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Gao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The planes of the aromatic rings in the cation of the title salt, C12H13N2O+·NO3−, are twisted along the –CH2—NH– single bond by 75.3 (1°. In the crystal, the phenol O, amine N and pyridinium N atoms are hydrogen-bond donors to the O atoms of the nitrate counter-ions. These hydrogen bonds lead to the formation of a layer in the crystal.

  17. Difficulties in the Nitrates Directive Implementation in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    MIHĂIESCU Tania; R. MIHĂIESCU; Antonia ODAGIU

    2010-01-01

    The EU Nitrates Directive (Council Directive 91/676/EEC) forms an integrate part of the Water FrameworkDirective and is one of the key instruments in the protection of waters against agricultural pressures [6]. The NitratesDirective aims to protect water quality across Europe by reducing water pollution caused or induced by nitrates fromagricultural sources and by promoting the use of good agricultural practices. Implementation of this directive hasproved to be a major challenge for Member St...

  18. Implementation of the eu nitrates directive in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    BİLGİN YILDIRIM, Hatice; DEMİR, Süleyman

    2012-01-01

    The EU Nitrates Directive is of a prime importance in respect of sustaining the natural resources for the reduction and prevention of nitrate pollution resulting from agricultural activities, and it constitutes an integral part of the EU Water Framework Directive. Accepted by the European Council in 1991, the directive entered into force being published in Official Gazette in 2004 in Turkey as “Regulation on the Protection of Waters against Pollution Caused by Nitrates from Agricultural Sourc...

  19. Micromachined Amperometric Nitrate Sensor with an Anion Permeable Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dohyun; Goldberg, Ira; Judy, J W

    2004-01-01

    A nitrate-sensing system that consists of a micromachined sensor substrate, anion-permeable membrane, integrated microfluidic channels, and standard fluidic connectors has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested. Our microsensor was designed for in-situ monitoring of nitrate concentrations in ground water. A silver electrode was patterned for amperometric nitrate detection. An electrochemically oxidized silver electrode was used as a reference electrode. Microfluidic channels were fa...

  20. Immobilization of nitrate reductase onto epoxy affixed silver nanoparticles for determination of soil nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Veena; Hooda, Vinita

    2015-08-01

    Epoxy glued silver nanoparticles were used as immobilization support for nitrate reductase (NR). The resulting epoxy/AgNPs/NR conjugates were characterized at successive stages of fabrication by scanning electron microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The immobilized enzyme system exhibited reasonably high conjugation yield (37.6±0.01 μg/cm(2)), with 93.54±0.88% retention of specific activity. Most favorable working conditions of pH, temperature and substrate concentration were ascertained to optimize the performance of epoxy/AgNPs/NR conjugates for soil nitrate quantification. The analytical results for soil nitrate determination were consistent, reliable and reproducible. Minimum detection limit of the method was 0.05 mM with linearity from 0.1 to 11.0 mM. The % recoveries of added nitrates (0.1 and 0.2 mM) wereEpoxy/AgNPs bound NR had a half-life of 18 days at 4 °C and retained 50% activity after 15 reuses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nitrate removal using natural clays modified by acid thermoactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Duran, C. J.; Sun Kou, M. R.; Lopez, T.; Azamar-Barrios, J. A.; Aguilar, D. H.; Domínguez, M. I.; Odriozola, J. A.; Quintana, P.

    2007-04-01

    Groundwater pollution by nitrates is a widespread problem in many locations in the world. The underground aquatic mantle of the Peninsula of Yucatan is highly vulnerable due to its karstic nature. Adsorption methods are a good choice for nitrate elimination. In this work, a natural calcium bentonite was modified by acid thermoactivation with HCl and H 2SO 4, and tested as a media for nitrate removal in an aqueous solution. The nitrate concentration in the solution was measured by FT-IR, using the Lambert-Beer law. Clay characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction and FT-IR spectroscopy; surface area was measured by the BET method.

  2. Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

    1991-09-01

    The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

  3. Oxygen exchange between nitrate molecules during nitrite oxidation by Nitrobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpirito, A A; Hooper, A B

    1986-08-15

    During oxidation of nitrite, cells of Nitrobacter winogradskyi are shown to catalyze the active exchange of oxygen atoms between exogenous nitrate molecules (production of 15N16/18O3- during incubation of 14N16/18O3-, 15N16O3-, and 15N16O2- in H216O). Little, if any, exchange of oxygens between nitrate and water also occurs (production of 15N16/18O3- during incubation of 15N16O3- and 14N16O2- in H218O). 15N species of nitrate were assayed by 18O-isotope shift in 15N NMR. Taking into account the O-exchange reactions which occur during nitrite oxidation, H2O is seen to be the source of O in nitrate produced by oxidation of nitrite by N. winogradskyi. The data do not establish whether the nitrate-nitrate O exchange is catalyzed by nitrite oxidase (H2O + HNO2----HNO3 + 2H+ + 2e-) or nitrate reductase (HNO3 + 2H+ + 2e-----HNO2 + H2O) or both enzymes in consort. The nitrate-nitrate exchange reaction suggests the existence of an oxygen derivative of a H2O-utilizing oxidoreductase.

  4. Significant accumulation of nitrate in Chinese semi-humid croplands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junyu; Gu, Baojing; Schlesinger, William H.; Ju, Xiaotang

    2016-04-01

    Soil nitrate is important for crop growth, but it can also leach to groundwater causing nitrate contamination, a threat to human health. Here, we report a significant accumulation of soil nitrate in Chinese semi-humid croplands based upon more than 7000 samples from 141 sites collected from 1994 to 2015. In the 0-4 meters depth of soil, total nitrate accumulation reaches 453 ± 39, 749 ± 75, 1191 ± 89, 1269 ± 114, 2155 ± 330 kg N ha-1 on average in wheat, maize, open-field vegetables (OFV), solar plastic-roofed greenhouse vegetables (GHV) and orchard fields, respectively. Surprisingly, there is also a comparable amount of nitrate accumulated in the vadose-zone deeper than 4 meters. Over-use of N fertilizer (and/or manure) and a declining groundwater table are the major causes for this huge nitrate reservoir in the vadose-zone of semi-humid croplands, where the nitrate cannot be denitrified due to the presence of oxygen and lack of carbon sources. Future climatic change with more extreme rainfall events would increase the risk of accumulated nitrate moving downwards and threatening groundwater nitrate contamination.

  5. Is nitrate an endocrine active compound in fish?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, M. P.; Kinnberg, Karin Lund; Bjerregaard, Poul

    were exposed to nitrate and nitrite from hatch to sexual maturation (60 d) and sex ratio and vitellogenin concentrations were determined. Juvenile brown trout were exposed in a short-term experiment and the concentrations of vitellogenin were determined. The sex ratio in zebrafish was not affected......Nitrate and nitrite taken up into fish may be reduced to NO which is known to be a signalling compound in the organism contributing to the regulation of i.e. steroid synthesis. Exposure of male rats to nitrate and nitrite results in reduced plasma concentrations of testosterone (also nitrate...

  6. NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY DURING HEAT SHOCK IN WINTER WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimenko S.B.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are the basic source of nitrogen for the majority of plants. Absorption and transformation of nitrates in plants are determined by external conditions and, first of all, temperature and light intensity. The influence of the temperature increasing till +40 0С on activity of nitrate reductase was studied. It is shown, that the rise of temperature was accompanied by sharp decrease of activity nitrate reductase in leaves of winter wheat, what, apparently, occurred for the account deactivations of enzyme and due to its dissociation.

  7. Does the evidence about health risks associated with nitrate ingestion warrant an increase of the nitrate standard for drinking water?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Nigel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several authors have suggested that it is safe to raise the health standard for nitrate in drinking water, and save money on measures associated with nitrate pollution of drinking water resources. The major argument has been that the epidemiologic evidence for acute and chronic health effects related to drinking water nitrate at concentrations near the health standard is inconclusive. With respect to the chronic effects, the argument was motivated by the absence of evidence for adverse health effects related to ingestion of nitrate from dietary sources. An interdisciplinary discussion of these arguments led to three important observations. First, there have been only a few well-designed epidemiologic studies that evaluated ingestion of nitrate in drinking water and risk of specific cancers or adverse reproductive outcomes among potentially susceptible subgroups likely to have elevated endogenous nitrosation. Positive associations have been observed for some but not all health outcomes evaluated. Second, the epidemiologic studies of cancer do not support an association between ingestion of dietary nitrate (vegetables and an increased risk of cancer, because intake of dietary nitrate is associated with intake of antioxidants and other beneficial phytochemicals. Third, 2–3 % of the population in Western Europe and the US could be exposed to nitrate levels in drinking water exceeding the WHO standard of 50 mg/l nitrate, particularly those living in rural areas. The health losses due to this exposure cannot be estimated. Therefore, we conclude that it is not possible to weigh the costs and benefits from changing the nitrate standard for drinking water and groundwater resources by considering the potential consequences for human health and by considering the potential savings due to reduced costs for nitrate removal and prevention of nitrate pollution.

  8. Regulation of transcript level and synthesis of nitrate reductase by phytochrome and nitrate in turions of Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenroth, K J; Oelmüller, R; Schuster, C; Mohr, H

    1992-11-01

    Control by light and nitrate of the appearance of nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) in the turions of Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schieiden was investigated during the pre-germination phase, i.e. up to 120 h after the transfer from after-ripening to germination conditions. Turions are particularily suited for this type of coaction study since control of nitrate uptake by light and long-distance transport of nitrate do not play a role. Control of NR gene expression was mainly studied between 72 and 120 h after transfer to germination conditions (phase II of the pre-germination process). It was found that the effect of light on NR appearance is exerted via phytochrome. The light effect on enzyme synthesis was only observed in the presence of nitrate. On the other hand, in darkness, the NR level decreased to almost zero even in the presence of an optimum supply of nitrate. It is concluded that in phase II a coaction of light (phytochrome) and nitrate is required to bring about NR synthesis. However, when nitrate was applied to turions - following a dark incubation without nitrate - the turions responded to nitrate even in darkness with strong NR synthesis. This response was augmented by light. The highest transcript levels were observed in the presence of both factors, light and nitrate. As a single factor, light was more effective in stimulating the transcript level than nitrate. However, no correlation between the transcript level and the rate of enzyme synthesis was observed. This is consistent with the previous conclusion (Schuster et al. 1988, Planta 174, 426-432) that in higher plants control at the transcript level is only coarse and does not determine quantitatively the output at the level of enzyme protein.

  9. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in

  10. Chlorination and nitration of soy isoflavones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, B J; Patel, R P; Kirk, M; Jackson, P L; Muccio, D; Darley-Usmar, V M; Barnes, S

    1999-08-15

    Diets enriched in soy foods containing a high concentration of isoflavonoids are associated with a decrease in the incidence of several chronic inflammatory diseases. Studies with experimental models of diseases, such as atherosclerosis, suggest that these effects can be ascribed to the biological properties of the isoflavones. Since the isoflavones and tyrosine have structural similarities and modifications to tyrosine by inflammatory oxidants such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) have been recently recognized, we hypothesized that the isoflavones also react with HOCl and ONOO(-). Using an in vitro approach, we demonstrate in the present study that the isoflavones genistein, daidzein, and biochanin-A can be chlorinated and nitrated by these oxidants. These reactions were investigated using high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance. In the reaction with HOCl, both mono- and dichlorinated derivatives of genistein and biochanin-A are formed, whereas with daidzein only a monochlorinated derivative was detected. The reaction between genistein or daidzein and ONOO(-) yielded a mononitrated product. However, no nitrated product was detected with biochanin-A. Furthermore, the reaction between genistein and sodium nitrite and HOCl yielded a chloronitrogenistein derivative, as well as a dichloronitrogenistein derivative. These results indicate that the ability of the isoflavones to react with these oxidant species depends on their structure and suggest that they could be formed under conditions where these reactive species are generated under pathological conditions. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  11. Assessing the Role of Sewers and Atmospheric Deposition as Nitrate Contamination Sources to Urban Surface Waters using Stable Nitrate Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, M. T.; Elliott, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Excess nitrate (NO3-) contributes to the overall degraded quality of streams in many urban areas. These systems are often dominated by impervious surfaces and storm sewers that can route atmospherically deposited nitrogen, from both wet and dry deposition, to waterways. Moreover, in densely populated watersheds there is the potential for interaction between urban waterways and sewer systems. The affects of accumulated nitrate in riverine and estuary systems include low dissolved oxygen, loss of species diversity, increased mortality of aquatic species, and general eutrophication of the waterbody. However, the dynamics of nitrate pollution from each source and it’s affect on urban waterways is poorly constrained. The isotopes of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate have been proven effective in helping to distinguish contamination sources to ground and surface waters. In order to improve our understanding of urban nitrate pollution sources and dynamics, we examined nitrate isotopes (δ15N and δ18O) in base- and stormflow samples collected over a two-year period from a restored urban stream in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (USA). Nine Mile Run drains a 1,600 hectare urban watershed characterized by 38% impervious surface cover. Prior work has documented high nitrate export from the watershed (~19 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). Potential nitrate sources to the watershed include observed sewer overflows draining directly to the stream, as well as atmospheric deposition (~23 kg NO3- ha-1 yr-1). In this and other urban systems with high percentages of impervious surfaces, there is likely minimal input from nitrate derived from soil or fertilizer. In this presentation, we examine spatial and temporal patterns in nitrate isotopic composition collected at five locations along Nine Mile Run characterized by both sanitary and combined-sewer cross-connections. Preliminary isotopic analysis of low-flow winter streamwater samples suggest nitrate export from Nine Mile Run is primarily influenced by

  12. Difference between Burley Tobacco and Flue-Cured Tobacco in Nitrate Accumulation and Chemical Regulation of Nitrate and TSNA Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yafei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs are harmful carcinogens, with nitrate as a precursor of their formation. Nitrate content is considerably higher in burley tobacco than in flue-cured tobacco, but little has been reported on the differences between types of nitrate accumulation during development. We explored nitrate accumulation prior to harvest and examined the effects of regulatory substances aimed at decreasing nitrate and TSNA accumulation. In growth experiments, nitrate accumulation in burley and flue-cured tobacco initially increased but then declined with the highest nitrate content observed during a fast-growth period. When treating tobacco crops with molybdenum (Mo during fast growth, nitrate reductase activity in burley tobacco increased significantly, but the NO3-N content decreased. These treatments also yielded significant reductions in NO3-N and TSNA contents. Therefore, we suggest that treatment with Mo during the fast-growth period and a Mo-Gfo (Mo-glufosinate combination at the maturity stage is an effective strategy for decreasing nitrate and TSNAs during cultivation.

  13. Effect of Sodium Nitrate and Nitrate Reducing Bacteria on Methane Production and Fermentation with Buffalo Rumen Liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Pillanatham Civalingam Sakthivel; Devki Nandan Kamra; Neeta Agarwal; Lal Chandra Chaudhary

    2012-01-01

    Nitrate can serve as a terminal electron acceptor in place of carbon dioxide and inhibit methane emission in the rumen and nitrate reducing bacteria might help enhance the reduction of nitrate/nitrite, which depends on the type of feed offered to animals. In this study the effects of three levels of sodium nitrate (0, 5, 10 mM) on fermentation of three diets varying in their wheat straw to concentrate ratio (700:300, low concentrate, LC; 500:500, medium concentrate, MC and 300:700, high conce...

  14. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, B.; Luster, J.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Shrestha, J.; Graf Pannatier, E.

    2012-11-01

    Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3-) contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N) transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1-3 days of inundation) and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source. Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm) over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation) and N output (leaching) to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater. Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the field capacity (FC). In subsoils with high FCs and VWC near FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol L-1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha-1 yr-1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3- ha-1 yr-1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11% to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  15. Coupled jump rotational dynamics in aqueous nitrate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Puja; Yashonath, Subramanian; Bagchi, Biman

    2016-12-21

    A nitrate ion (NO3-) with its trigonal planar geometry and charges distributed among nitrogen and oxygen atoms can couple to the extensive hydrogen bond network of water to give rise to unique dynamical characteristics. We carry out detailed atomistic simulations and theoretical analyses to investigate these aspects and report certain interesting findings. We find that the nitrate ions in aqueous potassium nitrate solution exhibit large amplitude rotational jump motions that are coupled to the hydrogen bond rearrangement dynamics of the surrounding water molecules. The jump motion of nitrate ions bears certain similarities to the Laage-Hynes mechanism of rotational jump motions of tagged water molecules in neat liquid water. We perform a detailed atomic-level investigation of hydrogen bond rearrangement dynamics of water in aqueous KNO3 solution to unearth two distinct mechanisms of hydrogen bond exchange that are instrumental to promote these jump motions of nitrate ions. As observed in an earlier study by Xie et al., in the first mechanism, after breaking a hydrogen bond with nitrate ion, water forms a new hydrogen bond with a water molecule, whereas the second mechanism involves just a switching of hydrogen bond between the two oxygen atoms of the same nitrate ion (W. J. Xie et al., J. Chem. Phys. 143, 224504 (2015)). The magnitude as well as nature of the reorientational jump of nitrate ion for the two mechanisms is different. In the first mechanism, nitrate ion predominantly undergoes out-of-plane rotation, while in the second mechanism, in-plane reorientation of NO3- is favourable. These have been deduced by computing the torque on the nitrate ion during the hydrogen bond switching event. We have defined and computed the time correlation function for coupled reorientational jump of nitrate and water and obtained the associated relaxation time which is also different for the two mechanisms. These results provide insight into the relation between the coupled

  16. Dietary nitrate and blood pressure: evolution of a new nutrient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Ann; Bescos, Raul

    2017-05-17

    Dietary nitrate is mainly obtained from vegetables, especially green leafy vegetables and beetroot. As a result of early research, dietary nitrate is currently viewed as a contaminant linked to increased risks of stomach cancer and methaemoglobinaemia. Consequently, nitrate levels are restricted in certain vegetables and in water supplies to ensure exposure levels remain below an acceptable daily intake of 3·7 mg/kg per d. The average nitrate intake in the UK is approximately 70 mg/d, although some population groups, such as vegetarians, may consume three times that amount. However, recent studies in the last decade suggest that dietary nitrate can significantly reduce systolic blood pressure via the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. A small, downward shift in systolic blood pressure across the population could significantly reduce the incidence of hypertension and mortality from CVD such as stroke. Interestingly, vegetarians tend to have lower levels of blood pressure than omnivores and epidemiological studies suggest that vegetarians have lower risks of CVD. Recent evidence is mainly focused on the acute effects of dietary nitrate supplementation and there is a lack of data looking at the chronic effects of high nitrate consumption in humans. Nevertheless, due to potential health benefits, some authors are recommending that nitrate should be considered as a nutrient necessary for health, rather than as a contaminant which needs to be restricted. This review will discuss the emerging role of dietary nitrate in the control of blood pressure and whether there is sufficient evidence to state that nitrate is a 'new' nutrient.

  17. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (wherein polynitration is a serious handicap to selective nitration) in zeolite environment is not explored. With these goals in mind, we have reported17 recently regioselective nitration of phenol inside the cages/channels of zeolite media using fuming nitric acid. In our attempts to delineate the mechanism in detail and also to ...

  18. The role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jacklyn; Patterson, Amanda J; MacDonald-Wicks, Lesley; McEvoy, Mark

    2017-12-01

    CVD is the leading cause of death worldwide, a consequence of mostly poor lifestyle and dietary behaviours. Although whole fruit and vegetable consumption has been consistently shown to reduce CVD risk, the exact protective constituents of these foods are yet to be clearly identified. A recent and biologically plausible hypothesis supporting the cardioprotective effects of vegetables has been linked to their inorganic nitrate content. Approximately 60-80 % inorganic nitrate exposure in the human diet is contributed by vegetable consumption. Although inorganic nitrate is a relatively stable molecule, under specific conditions it can be metabolised in the body to produce NO via the newly discovered nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. NO is a major signalling molecule in the human body, and has a key role in maintaining vascular tone, smooth muscle cell proliferation, platelet activity and inflammation. Currently, there is accumulating evidence demonstrating that inorganic nitrate can lead to lower blood pressure and improved vascular compliance in humans. The aim of this review is to present an informative, balanced and critical review of the current evidence investigating the role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in the development, prevention and/or treatment of CVD. Although there is evidence supporting short-term inorganic nitrate intakes for reduced blood pressure, there is a severe lack of research examining the role of long-term nitrate intakes in the treatment and/or prevention of hard CVD outcomes, such as myocardial infarction and cardiovascular mortality. Epidemiological evidence is needed in this field to justify continued research efforts.

  19. Predicting SOA from organic nitrates in the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic nitrates have been identified as an important component of ambient aerosol in the Southeast United States. In this work, we use the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to explore the relationship between gas-phase production of organic nitrates and their subsequ...

  20. Nitrate and nitrite in biology, nutrition and therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lundberg, J.O.; van Faassen, E.E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071100938; Gladwin, M.T.; Ahluwalia, A.; Benjamin, N.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate and nitrite from endogenous or dietary sources are metabolized in vivo to nitric oxide (NO) and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is emerging as an important mediator of blood flow regulation, cell signaling, energetics and tissue responses to hypoxia.

  1. CU(II): catalyzed hydrazine reduction of ferric nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karraker, D.G.

    1981-11-01

    A method is described for producing ferrous nitrate solutions by the cupric ion-catalyzed reduction of ferric nitrate with hydrazine. The reaction is complete in about 1.5 hours at 40/sup 0/C. Hydrazoic acid is also produced in substantial quantities as a reaction byproduct.

  2. Biological nitrate removal from synthetic wastewater using a fungal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of lignocellulosic fungi, capable of cellulase and/or xylanase production, were isolated from soil to be used for cellulose degradation and nitrate removal from nitrate-rich wastewater in simple one-stage anaerobic bioreactors containing grass cuttings as source of cellulose. The fungal consortium, consisting of six ...

  3. Nitrate, Nitrite, and Ammonium Variability in Drinking Water Distribution Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullehner, Jörg; Stayner, Leslie; Hansen, Birgitte

    2017-03-09

    Accurate assessments of exposure to nitrate in drinking water is a crucial part of epidemiological studies investigating long-term adverse human health effects. However, since drinking water nitrate measurements are usually collected for regulatory purposes, assumptions on (1) the intra-distribution system variability and (2) short-term (seasonal) concentration variability have to be made. We assess concentration variability in the distribution system of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium, and seasonal variability in all Danish public waterworks from 2007 to 2016. Nitrate concentrations at the exit of the waterworks are highly correlated with nitrate concentrations within the distribution net or at the consumers' taps, while nitrite and ammonium concentrations are generally lower within the net compared with the exit of the waterworks due to nitrification. However, nitrification of nitrite and ammonium in the distribution systems only results in a relatively small increase in nitrate concentrations. No seasonal variation for nitrate, nitrite, or ammonium was observed. We conclude that nitrate measurements taken at the exit of the waterworks are suitable to calculate exposures for all consumers connected to that waterworks and that sampling frequencies in the national monitoring programme are sufficient to describe temporal variations in longitudinal studies.

  4. Seasonal Distribution of Nitrate and Nitrite Levels in Eleme Abattoir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study deals with the seasonal distribution of nitrate (NO3) and nitrite (NO2) levels in Eleme Abattoir environment. Samples of soil, surface water and groundwater were collected from areas unaffected and those affected by abattoir activities. For the soils from the affected area and control points respectively, nitrate levels ...

  5. Ginger-supplemented diet ameliorates ammonium nitrate-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was designed to evaluate the capacity of ginger to repair the oxidative stress induced by ammonium nitrate. 50 male rats were divided into 5 groups; they underwent an oral treatment of ammonium nitrate and/or ginger (N mg/kg body weight + G% in diet) during 30 days. Group I served as control (C); ...

  6. Nitrate leaching and pesticide use in energy crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe

    2006-01-01

    Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well.......Nitrate leaching measured below willow and miscanthus is very low from the established crops. Pesticide use in energy crops is low as well....

  7. Nitrite and nitrate determinations in plasma: a critical evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moshage, H.; Kok, B.; Huizenga, J. R.; Jansen, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma nitrite and nitrate determinations are increasingly being used in clinical chemistry as markers for the activity of nitric oxide synthase and the production of nitric oxide radicals. However, a systematic evaluation of the determination of nitrite and nitrate in plasma has not been performed.

  8. State of nitrate pollution in groundwater in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maherry, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of nitrate concentrations in South and southern Africa is not a new subject (Tredoux and Talma, 2006, Tredoux et al., 2004), with the publication of a nitrate distribution map in 2001. However, these studies were constrained by the amount...

  9. Removal of phosphate and nitrate from aqueous solution using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was the removal of phosphate and nitrate by sodium alginate seagrass (Cymodocea rotundata) beads from aqueous solutions. The adsorption characteristics of phosphate and nitrate on the seagrass beads were optimized under different operational parameters like adsorbent dosage, initial ...

  10. Nitration of Substituted Phenols by Different Efficient Heterogeneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    sulphate (III) and 4) silica sulphuric acid (IV) in CH2Cl2 at room temperature and high yields. Optimum conditions for theses systems and the regioselectivities of the reactions are reported. KEYWORDS. Nitration, nitrophenols, sodium nitrate, oxalic acid dihydrate, sodium hydrogen sulphate, aluminum hydrogen sulphate, ...

  11. determination of nitrite, nitrate and total nitrogen in vegetable samples

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The above colour reaction system has been applied successfully for the determination of nitrite, nitrate and total nitrogen in vegetable samples. Unreduced samples give direct measure for nitrite whilst reduction of samples by copperized-cadmium column gives total nitrogen content and their difference shows nitrate content ...

  12. Determination of Nitrate Concentrations in Dutsin-MA Fadama Land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical analysis of water from Dutsinma Fadama Land was conducted for ten consecutive months (January to October) using Spectrophotometric measurement, to determine the level of nitrate in the water. The result of the study showed that the level of nitrate exceeded WHO recommended value in all the sampling sites.

  13. Nitrate-nitrogen removal with small-scale reverse osmosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nitrate-nitrogen concentration in water supplied to clinics in Limpopo Province is too high to be fit for human consumption (35 to 75 mg/ℓ NO3-N). Therefore, small-scale technologies (reverse osmosis, ion-exchange and electrodialysis) were evaluated for nitrate-nitrogen removal to make the water potable (< 10 mg/ℓ ...

  14. Removal of Nitrate From Aqueous Solution Using Rice Chaff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Nitrate is largely dissolved in the surface and ground water, due to its high solubility. Continual uptake of nitrite through drinking water can lead to problems and diseases (such as blue baby for humans, especially children. Objectives The aim of this study was to develop a new and inexpensive method for the removal of nitrate from water. In this regard, the possibility of using chaff for removal of nitrate from aqueous solutions was studied and the optimum operating conditions of nitrate removal was determined. Materials and Methods This is a cross-sectional study conducted in laboratory scale. The UV spectrophotometer at a wavelength of maximum absorbance (220 nm was used to determine the nitrate concentration. The effect of pH, amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time were investigated. Results The result of this study revealed that chaff as an absorbent could remove nitrate from solutions, and the efficiency of adsorption increased as contact time increased from 5 to 30 minutes, amount of chaff increased from 1 to 3 g, temperature increased in a range of 300 - 400°C and the amount of pH decreased from 10 to 3. The maximum adsorption rate was around pH 3 (53.14%. Conclusions It was shown that the removal efficiency of nitrate was directly proportional to the amount of chaff, temperature, and contact time but inversely to the pH. This study showed that nitrate removal by chaff is a promising technique.

  15. Diatoms respire nitrate to survive dark and anoxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamp, Anja; de Beer, Dirk; Nitsch, Jana L.

    2011-01-01

    +, indicating dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammo- nium (DNRA). DNRA is an anaerobic respiration process that is known mainly from prokaryotic organisms, and here shown as dis- similatory nitrate reduction pathway used by a eukaryotic photo- troph. Similar to large sulfur bacteria and benthic foraminifera...

  16. Spatial assessment of animal manure spreading and groundwater nitrate pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Infascelli

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate concentration in groundwater has frequently been linked to non-point pollution. At the same time the existence of intensive agriculture and extremely intensive livestock activity increases the potential for nitrate pollution in shallow groundwater. Nitrate used in agriculture could cause adverse effects on human and animal health. In order to evaluate the groundwater nitrate pollution, and how it might evolve in time, it is essential to develop control systems and to improve policies and incentives aimed at controlling the amount of nitrate entering downstream water systems. The province of Caserta in southern Italy is characterized by high levels of animal manure loading. A comparison between manure nitrogen production and nitrate concentration in groundwater was carried out in this area, using geostatistical tools and spatial statistics. The results show a discrepancy between modelling of nitrate leaching and monitoring of the groundwater and, moreover, no spatial correlation between nitrogen production in livestock farms and nitrate concentration in groundwater, suggesting that producers are not following the regulatory procedures for the agronomic use of manure. The methodology developed in this paper could be applied also in other regions in which European Union fertilization plans are not adequately followed.

  17. Light-induced protein nitration and degradation with HONO emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusel, Hannah; Elshorbany, Yasin; Kuhn, Uwe; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Kampf, Christopher J.; Li, Guo; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Lelieveld, Jos; Pöschl, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Su, Hang; Ammann, Markus; Cheng, Yafang

    2017-10-01

    Proteins can be nitrated by air pollutants (NO2), enhancing their allergenic potential. This work provides insight into protein nitration and subsequent decomposition in the presence of solar radiation. We also investigated light-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from protein surfaces that were nitrated either online with instantaneous gas-phase exposure to NO2 or offline by an efficient nitration agent (tetranitromethane, TNM). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) were used as model substances for proteins. Nitration degrees of about 1 % were derived applying NO2 concentrations of 100 ppb under VIS/UV illuminated conditions, while simultaneous decomposition of (nitrated) proteins was also found during long-term (20 h) irradiation exposure. Measurements of gas exchange on TNM-nitrated proteins revealed that HONO can be formed and released even without contribution of instantaneous heterogeneous NO2 conversion. NO2 exposure was found to increase HONO emissions substantially. In particular, a strong dependence of HONO emissions on light intensity, relative humidity, NO2 concentrations and the applied coating thickness was found. The 20 h long-term studies revealed sustained HONO formation, even when concentrations of the intact (nitrated) proteins were too low to be detected after the gas exchange measurements. A reaction mechanism for the NO2 conversion based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics is proposed.

  18. Effect of nitrate on anaerobic azo dye reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirik, Kevser; Kitiş, Mehmet; Çinar, Özer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of nitrate on anaerobic color removal efficiencies. For this aim, anaerobic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) fed with a simulated textile effluent including Remazol Brilliant Violet 5R azo dye was operated with a total cycle time of 12 h, including anaerobic (6 h) and aerobic cycles (6 h). Microorganism grown under anaerobic phase of the reactor was exposed to different amounts of competitive electron acceptor (nitrate) and performance of the system was determined by monitoring color removal efficiency, nitrate removal, nitrite formation and removal, oxidation reduction potential, color removal rate, chemical oxygen demand (COD), specific anaerobic enzyme (azo reductase) and aerobic enzyme (catechol 1,2 dioxygenase), and formation and removal of aromatic amines. Variations of population dynamics of microorganisms exposed to various amount of nitrate were identified by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). It was found that nitrate has adverse effect on anaerobic color removal efficiency and color removal was achieved after denitrification process was completed. It was found that nitrate stimulates the COD removal efficiency and accelerates the COD removal in the first hour of anaerobic phase. About 90 % total COD removal efficiencies were achieved in which microorganism exposed to increasing amount of nitrate. Population dynamics of microorganisms exposed to various amount of nitrate were changed and diversity was increased.

  19. Distribution of nitrate in the water resources of Pakistan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    Full Length Research Paper. Distribution of nitrate in the water resources of. Pakistan. Muhammad Aslam Tahir* and Hifza Rasheed. Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources, Islamabad, Pakistan. Accepted 8 September, 2008. Water quality monitoring activities have recognized the nitrate contamination in the ...

  20. Biochemistry of protein tyrosine nitration in cardiovascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluffo, Gonzalo; Radi, Rafael

    2007-07-15

    Several pathologies of the cardiovascular system are associated with an augmented production of nitric oxide and/or superoxide-derived oxidants and/or alteration in the antioxidant detoxification pathways that lead to nitroxidative stress. One important consequence of these reactive intermediates at the biochemical level is the nitration of protein tyrosines, which is performed through either of two of the relevant nitration pathways that operate in vivo, namely peroxynitrite and heme peroxidase-dependent nitration. Proteins nitrated at tyrosine residues have been detected in several compartments of the cardiovascular system. In this review a selection of nitrated proteins in plasma (fibrinogen, plasmin, Apo-1), vessel wall (Apo-B, cyclooxygenase, prostaglandin synthase, Mn-superoxide dismutase) and myocardium (myofibrillar creatine kinase, alpha-actinin, sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase) are analyzed in the context of cardiovascular disease. Nitration of tyrosine can affect protein function, which could directly link nitroxidative stress to the molecular alterations found in disease. While some proteins are inactivated by nitration (e.g. Mn-SOD) others undergo a gain-of-function (e.g. fibrinogen) that can have an ample impact on the pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. Nitrotyrosine is also emerging as a novel independent marker of cardiovascular disease. Pharmacological strategies directed towards inhibiting protein nitration will assist to shed light on the relevance of this post-translational modification to human cardiovascular pathology.

  1. Occurrence and Toxicological Significance of Nitrate and Nitrite in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine and evaluate the levels of nitrate and nitrite in some commercial infant formula in view of the health implications of these factors. Method: Nitrate and nitrite, which may create significant health problems in infants, were determined in four commercial infant formula. The public health and toxicological ...

  2. determination of nitrate concentrations in dutsin-ma fadama land

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... However, children under one year of age and pregnant women are at risk for adverse effects. Records have shown that infants are typically exposed to unsafe levels of nitrate in drinking water when it is used to make up formula milk or other types of feeds. In older children and adults, nitrate is absorbed and.

  3. Distribution and Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Kansas Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Kansas is primarily an agricultural state. Irrigation water and fertilizer use data show long- term increasing trends. Similarly, nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater show long-term increases and exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 mg/l in many areas. A statistical analysis of nitrate-N data collected for local and regional studies in Kansas from 1990 to 1998 (747 samples found significant relationships between nitrate-N concentration with depth, age, and geographic location of wells. Sources of nitrate-N have been identified for 297 water samples by using nitrogen stable isotopes. Of these samples, 48% showed fertilizer sources (+2 to +8 and 34% showed either animal waste sources (+10 to +15 with nitrate-N greater than 10 mg/l or indication that enrichment processes had occurred (+10 or above with variable nitrate-N or both. Ultimate sources for nitrate include nonpoint sources associated with past farming and fertilization practices, and point sources such as animal feed lots, septic systems, and commercial fertilizer storage units. Detection of nitrate from various sources in aquifers of different depths in geographically varied areas of the state indicates that nonpoint and point sources currently impact and will continue to impact groundwater under current land uses.

  4. Nitration of phenolic compounds and oxidation of hydroquinones ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    agrochemicals, perfumes, and plastics.1–3 Traditionally, the nitration of aromatic rings was accomplished with mixed concentrated nitric-sulfuric acids. This reaction is notoriously unselective for nitration of substituted aromatic compounds such as phenols and anilines because they may be oxidized or polynitrated under.

  5. Anoxic Activated Sludge Monitoring with Combined Nitrate and Titrimetric Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B.; Gernaey, Krist; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental procedure for anoxic activated sludge monitoring with combined nitrate and titrimetric measurements is proposed and evaluated successfully with two known carbon sources, (-)acetate and dextrose. For nitrate measurements an ion-selective nitrate electrode is applied to allow...... for frequent measurements, and thereby the possibility for detailed determination of the denitrification biokinetics. An internal nitrate electrode calibration is implemented in the experiments to avoid the often-encountered electrode drift problem. It was observed that the best experimental design...... was with the carbon source in excess, since excess nitrate provoked nitrite build-up thereby complicating the data interpretation. A conceptual model could quantitatively describe the experimental observations and thus link the experimentally measured proton production with the consumption of electron acceptor...

  6. 76 FR 23569 - Termination of the Suspension Agreement on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... International Trade Administration Termination of the Suspension Agreement on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium... (``AD'') Investigation on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate from the Russian Federation (``the... determine whether imports of solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from Russia were...

  7. Thermal Decomposition of Nitrated Tributyl Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paddleford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Hou, Y.; Barefield, E.K.; Tedder, D.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I. [Georgia Institute of Technology, GA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Contact between tributyl phosphate and aqueous solutions of nitric acid and/or heavy metal nitrate salts at elevated temperatures can lead to exothermic reactions of explosive violence. Even though such operations have been routinely performed safely for decades as an intrinsic part of the Purex separation processes, several so-called ``red oil`` explosions are known to have occurred in the United States, Canada, and the former Soviet Union. The most recent red oil explosion occurred at the Tomsk-7 separations facility in Siberia, in April 1993. That explosion destroyed part of the unreinforced masonry walls of the canyon-type building in which the process was housed, and allowed the release of a significant quantity of radioactive material.

  8. Removal of gadolinium nitrate from heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilde, E.W.

    2000-03-22

    Work was conducted to develop a cost-effective process to purify 181 55-gallon drums containing spent heavy water moderator (D2O) contaminated with high concentrations of gadolinium nitrate, a chemical used as a neutron poison during former nuclear reactor operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These drums also contain low level radioactive contamination, including tritium, which complicates treatment options. Presently, the drums of degraded moderator are being stored on site. It was suggested that a process utilizing biological mechanisms could potentially lower the total cost of heavy water purification by allowing the use of smaller equipment with less product loss and a reduction in the quantity of secondary waste materials produced by the current baseline process (ion exchange).

  9. The effect of nitrate on ethylene biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang-Hun, E-mail: lee323@alumni.purdue.edu [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, 225 South University St., West Lafayette, 47907-2093 IN (United States); Li, Congna; Heber, Albert J. [Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, 225 South University St., West Lafayette, 47907-2093 IN (United States)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ethylene biofiltration strongly depends on nitrate concentrations and media types. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine reduced N supply can increase ethylene removals in biofilters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perlite medium is better for ethylene biofiltration than activated carbon medium. - Abstract: This study investigated the effects of filter media types and nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) concentrations in nutrient solutions on C{sub 2}H{sub 4} biofiltration. A new nutrient solution with zero NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration was supplied to two perlite-bed biotrickling filters, two perlite-bed biofilters, and two GAC (Granular Activated Carbon)-bed biofilters, while the other with 2 g L{sup -1} of NO{sub 3}{sup -} was used for the other two GAC biofilters. All reactors underwent a total test duration of over 175 days with an EBRT (Empty Bed Residence Time) of 30 s, inlet gas flow rate of 7 L min{sup -1}, and inlet C{sub 2}H{sub 4} concentrations of 20-30 mg m{sup -3}. NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration and media type significantly affected the C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies in all types of biofiltration. The perlite media with no NO{sub 3}{sup -} achieved C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies 10-50% higher than the others. A NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration as high as 2 g L{sup -1} in the original nutrient solution may act as an inhibitor that suppresses the growth or activity of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} degraders. In addition, the perlite media resulted in higher C{sub 2}H{sub 4} removal efficiencies than GAC media, because the hydrophilic surface of the perlite leads to a higher moisture content and thus to favorable microbial growth.

  10. Tyrosine-Nitrated Proteins: Proteomic and Bioanalytical Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batthyány, Carlos; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Lima, Analía; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    "Nitroproteomic" is under active development, as 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins constitutes a footprint left by the reactions of nitric oxide-derived oxidants that are usually associated to oxidative stress conditions. Moreover, protein tyrosine nitration can cause structural and functional changes, which may be of pathophysiological relevance for human disease conditions. Biological protein tyrosine nitration is a free radical process involving the intermediacy of tyrosyl radicals; in spite of being a nonenzymatic process, nitration is selectively directed toward a limited subset of tyrosine residues. Precise identification and quantitation of 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins has represented a "tour de force" for researchers. Recent Advances: A small number of proteins are preferential targets of nitration (usually less than 100 proteins per proteome), contrasting with the large number of proteins modified by other post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and, notably, S-nitrosation. Proteomic approaches have revealed key features of tyrosine nitration both in vivo and in vitro, including selectivity, site specificity, and effects in protein structure and function. Identification of 3-nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and mapping nitrated residues is challenging, due to low abundance of this oxidative modification in biological samples and its unfriendly behavior in mass spectrometry (MS)-based technologies, that is, MALDI, electrospray ionization, and collision-induced dissociation. The use of (i) classical two-dimensional electrophoresis with immunochemical detection of nitrated proteins followed by protein ID by regular MS/MS in combination with (ii) immuno-enrichment of tyrosine-nitrated peptides and (iii) identification of nitrated peptides by a MIDAS™ experiment is arising as a potent methodology to unambiguously map and quantitate tyrosine-nitrated proteins in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 313-328.

  11. Proteome responses to nitrate in bioethanol production contaminant Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Adauto Gomes Barbosa; Pestana-Calsa, Maria Clara; de Morais, Marcos Antonio; Calsa, Tercilio

    2014-06-02

    Dekkera bruxellensis is an industrially relevant yeast, especially in bioethanol production. The capacity of D. bruxellensis to assimilate nitrate can confer advantages of this yeast over Saccharomyces cerevisiae at industrial conditions. In the present work we present the consequences of nitrate assimilation, using ammonium as reference, to the proteomics of D. bruxellensis. Thirty-four protein spots were overproduced in nitrate medium and were identified by MS-TOF/TOF analysis and were putatively identified by using local Mascot software. Apart from the overexpression of genes of nitrate metabolism, ATP synthesis and PPP and TCA pathways previously reported, cultivation on nitrate induced overproduction of glycolytic enzymes, which corroborate the high energy demand and NADH availability for nitrate assimilation. Overproduction of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) protein was also observed. Proteomic profile of D. bruxellensis cultivated in nitrate and described in the present work agrees with the hypothesis of metabolic flux regulation, making available the energy in the form of NADH to support nitrate assimilation. This work contributes with an initial picture of proteins presenting differential accumulation in industrial contaminant yeast, in strict association with possible metabolic responses to nitrate as sole nitrogen source in cultivation medium. The present study investigated the gene expression at translational level of yeast D. bruxellensis for nitrate assimilation. This study corroborated with biological models that consider the ability to assimilate this nitrogen source confers advantages on this yeast during the fermentation process industry. However, larger studies are needed in this way as our group is investigating new proteins under LC-MS/MS approach. Together, these studies will help in understanding the operation of networks and cellular regulation of the process of assimilation of nitrogen sources for the D. bruxellensis, unravelling new aspects of

  12. Isoprene oxidation by nitrate radical: alkyl nitrate and secondary organic aerosol yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Rollins

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Alkyl nitrates and secondary organic aerosol (SOA produced during the oxidation of isoprene by nitrate radicals has been observed in the SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber chamber. A 16 h dark experiment was conducted with temperatures at 289–301 K, and maximum concentrations of 11 ppb isoprene, 62.4 ppb O3 and 31.1 ppb NOx. We find the yield of nitrates is 70±8% from the isoprene + NO3 reaction, and the yield for secondary dinitrates produced in the reaction of primary isoprene nitrates with NO3 is 40±20%. We find an effective rate constant for reaction of NO3 with the group of first generation oxidation products to be 7×10−14 molecule−1 cm3 s−1. At the low total organic aerosol concentration in the chamber (max=0.52 μg m−3 we observed a mass yield (ΔSOA mass/Δisoprene mass of 2% for the entire 16 h experiment. However a comparison of the timing of the observed SOA production to a box model simulation of first and second generation oxidation products shows that the yield from the first generation products was <0.7% while the further oxidation of the initial products leads to a yield of 14% (defined as ΔSOA/Δisoprene2x where Δisoprene2x is the mass of isoprene which reacted twice with NO3. The SOA yield of 14% is consistent with equilibrium partitioning of highly functionalized C5 products of isoprene oxidation.

  13. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN COTTON BURR COMPOST, MULCH COMPOST, AND PEAT: MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL USE FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted batch tests on the nature and kinetics of removal of added nitrate in cotton burr compost, mulch compost, and sphagnum peat that may be potentially used in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for groundwater nitrate remediation. A rigorous steam autoclaving protocol (...

  14. Nitrate chemistry in the snow and atmosphere at Summit, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fibiger, D. L.; Hastings, M. G.; Dibb, J. E.; Nenes, A.; Chen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrate deposition to snow surfaces results from reactions of NOx (NO + NO2) with oxidants to produce HNO3. There has been enormous interest in using the isotopic composition of nitrate in ice cores to trace past NOx chemistry and sources. With the rapid cycling of NO and NO2, the oxygen isotopic signal reflects the oxidants that NOx reacts with to form nitrate, while the nitrogen isotopes could contain information about the NOx sources. In two spring/summer field seasons at Summit, Greenland (May-June 2010 and 2011), surface snow was collected at high time resolution and was measured for the complete N and O isotopic composition of nitrate. The oxygen isotopes (δ18O and Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52*δ18O) display the same very strong linear relationship (Δ17O = 0.46 * δ18O - 6.9, R2 = 0.9) in both seasons. This relationship indicates that there is very little photolysis of the nitrate at Summit and an unaltered nitrate signal is preserved in the snowpack. In addition, a suite of atmospheric measurements was made at Summit and none of the constituents measured show any correlation with concentration or isotopes of nitrate in the snow. This indicates that local chemistry is not contributing significantly to the nitrate in the snow. The combination of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes provides a richer picture of the data. There are three nitrate signatures that contribute to total nitrate deposition to Summit in both seasons. These sources can be described by the following isotopic compositions: δ15N, Δ17O, δ18O (per mil vs. air N2 or VSMOW): (1) -8, 27, 74 (2) 6, 40, 100 and (3) 16, 0, 23. While the same three nitrate sources are contributing in the two years, there is a very different balance of importance in 2010 compared to 2011. With limited source δ15N data it is difficult to assign each point to a specific NOx source, however the complete isotopic composition, atmospheric measurements and differences between the two seasons allow for tentative source

  15. The Nitrate App: Enhancing nutrient best management practice adoption and targeting via instantaneous, on-farm nitrate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozemeijer, J.; De Geus, D.; Ekkelenkamp, R.

    2016-12-01

    Sociological surveys suggest that farmers understand that agriculture contributes to nutrient pollution but the same surveys also indicate that in the absence of on-farm nitrate data, farmers assume someone else is causing the problem. This tendency to overestimate our own abilities is common to all of us and often described as "Lake Wobegon Syndrome" after the mythical town where "where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average." We developed the Nitrate App for smartphones to enable farmers and citizens to collect and share nitrate concentration measurements. The app accurately reads and interprets nitrate test strips, directly displays the measured concentration, and gives the option to share the result. The shared results are immediately visualised in the online Delta Data Viewer. Within this viewer, user group specific combinations of background maps, monitoring data, and study area characteristics can be configured. Through the Nitrate App's mapping function project managers can more accurately target conservation practices to areas with the highest nitrate concentrations and loads. Furthermore, we expect that the actual on-farm data helps to overcome the "Lake Wobegon Effect" and will encourage farmers to talk to specialists about the right nutrient best management practices (BMP's) for their farm. After implementing these BMP's, the farmers can keep monitoring to evaluate the reduction in nitrate losses. In this presentation, we explain the Nitrate App technology and present the results of the first field applications in The Netherlands. We expect this free to download app to have wide transferability across watershed projects worldwide focusing on nitrate contamination of groundwater or surface water. Its simple design requires no special equipment outside of the nitrate test strips, a reference card, and a smartphone. The technology is also transferable to other relevant solutes for which test strips

  16. Nitrate in groundwater of the United States, 1991-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Karen R.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Rupert, Michael G.; Dubrovsky, Neil M.

    2010-01-01

    An assessment of nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the United States indicates that concentrations are highest in shallow, oxic groundwater beneath areas with high N inputs. During 1991-2003, 5101 wells were sampled in 51 study areas throughout the U.S. as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. The well networks reflect the existing used resource represented by domestic wells in major aquifers (major aquifer studies), and recently recharged groundwater beneath dominant land-surface activities (land-use studies). Nitrate concentrations were highest in shallow groundwater beneath agricultural land use in areas with well-drained soils and oxic geochemical conditions. Nitrate concentrations were lowest in deep groundwater where groundwater is reduced, or where groundwater is older and hence concentrations reflect historically low N application rates. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to identify the relative importance of N inputs, biogeochemical processes, and physical aquifer properties in explaining nitrate concentrations in groundwater. Factors ranked by reduction in sum of squares indicate that dissolved iron concentrations explained most of the variation in groundwater nitrate concentration, followed by manganese, calcium, farm N fertilizer inputs, percent well-drained soils, and dissolved oxygen. Overall, nitrate concentrations in groundwater are most significantly affected by redox conditions, followed by nonpoint-source N inputs. Other water-quality indicators and physical variables had a secondary influence on nitrate concentrations.

  17. Implementation of the eu nitrates directive in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice BİLGİN YILDIRIM

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The EU Nitrates Directive is of a prime importance in respect of sustaining the natural resources for the reduction and prevention of nitrate pollution resulting from agricultural activities, and it constitutes an integral part of the EU Water Framework Directive. Accepted by the European Council in 1991, the directive entered into force being published in Official Gazette in 2004 in Turkey as “Regulation on the Protection of Waters against Pollution Caused by Nitrates from Agricultural Sources.” As of this date, works on harmonization have been intensely continued. The works brought together multiple organizations that are notable in terms of waterworks and ensured informatory exchange through the contributions of the EU member states. Approaching to the finalization of its harmonization process, Turkey will proclaim its country either a “border to border nitrate-sensitive zone” or “nitrate vulnerable zone” in order to issue the secondary legislations required by the Nitrates Directive in accordance with these approaches. This paper covers the current works conducted with regard to the implementation of the Nitrates Directive and it has been prepared aiming at inviting attentions to the current and possible complications in the implementation process.

  18. Predicting ground water nitrate concentration from land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kristin K; Vogel, Richard M

    2005-01-01

    Ground water nitrate concentrations on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, were analyzed to assess the effects of land use on ground water quality. Exploratory data analysis was applied to historic ground water nitrate concentrations to determine spatial and temporal trends. Maximum likelihood Tobit and logistic regression analyses of explanatory variables that characterize land use within a 1000-foot radius of each well were used to develop predictive equations for nitrate concentration at 69 wells. The results demonstrate that historic nitrate concentrations downgradient from agricultural land are significantly higher than nitrate concentrations elsewhere. Tobit regression results demonstrate that the number of septic tanks and the percentages of forest, undeveloped, and high-density residential land within a 1000-foot radius of a well are reliable predictors of nitrate concentration in ground water. Similarly, logistic regression revealed that the percentages of forest, undeveloped, and low-density residential land are good indicators of ground water nitrate concentration > 2 mg/L. The methodology and results outlined here provide a useful tool for land managers in communities with shallow water tables overlain with highly permeable materials to evaluate potential effects of development on ground water quality.

  19. Circuit Design for Sensor Detection Signal Conditioner Nitrate Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robeth Manurung

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate is one of macro nutrients very important for agriculture. The availability of nitrate in soil is limited because it is very easy to leaching by rain, therefore nitrate could be contaminated ground water by  over-process of fertilizer. This process could also produce inefficiency in agriculture if it happened continuesly without pre-analysis of farm field. The answer those problems, it is need to develop the ion sensor system to measure concentrations of nitrat in soil. The system is consist of nitrate ion sensor device, signal conditioning and data acquisition circuit. The design and fabrications of signal conditioning circuit which integrated into ion nitrate sensor system and will apply for agriculture. This sensor has been used amperometric with three electrodes configuration: working, reference  and auxiliarry; the ion senstive membrane has use conductive polymer. The screen printing technique has been choosen to fabricate electrodes and deposition technique for ion sensitive membrane is electropolymerization. The characterization of sensor has been conducted using nitrate standard solution with range of concentration between 1 µM–1 mM. The characterization has shown that sensor has a good response with cureent output between 2.8–4.71 µA, liniearity factor is 99.65% and time response 250 second.

  20. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions below Danish forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Gundersen, Per

    1999-01-01

    Nitrate in the soil water below the root zone is a pre-condition for nitrate leaching, and it indicates loss of nutrients from the forest ecosystem. Nitrate leaching may potentially cause eutrophication of surface water and contamination of ground water. In order to evaluate the extent of nitrate...... leaching in relation to land-use, a national monitoring programme has established sampling routines in a 7x7 km grid including 111 points in forests. During winters of 1986-1993, soil samples were obtained from a depth of 0-25, 25-50, 50-75 and 75-100 cm. Nitrate concentrations in soil solutions were...... determined by means of a 1 M KCl extraction. The influence of forest size, forest-type, soil-type, tree species and sampling time on the nitrate concentrations was analysed in a statistical model. The analysis focused on data from depth 75-100 cm, as nitrate is considered potentially lost from the ecosystem...

  1. Isoprene nitrates: preparation, separation, identification, yields, and atmospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Lockwood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene is an important atmospheric volatile organic compound involved in ozone production and NOx (NO+NO2 sequestration and transport. Isoprene reaction with OH in the presence of NO can form either isoprene hydroxy nitrates ("isoprene nitrates" or convert NO to NO2 which can photolyze to form ozone. While it has been shown that isoprene nitrate production can represent an important sink for NOx in forest impacted environments, there is little experimental knowledge of the relative importance of the individual isoprene nitrate isomers, each of which has a different fate and reactivity. In this work, we have identified the 8 individual isomers and determined their total and individual production yields. The overall yield of isoprene nitrates at atmospheric pressure and 295 K was found to be 0.070(+0.025/−0.015. Three isomers, representing nitrates resulting from OH addition to a terminal carbon, represent 90% of the total IN yield. We also determined the ozone rate constants for three of the isomers, and have calculated their atmospheric lifetimes, which range from ~1–2 h, making their oxidation products likely more important as atmospheric organic nitrates and sinks for nitrogen.

  2. Reduction of nitrate by bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haiyan; Xiu, Zongming; Chen, Jiawei; Cao, Wenping; Guo, Yifei; Li, Tielong; Jin, Zhaohui

    2012-09-01

    Bimetallic Fe/Ni nanoparticles were synthesized and their nitrate reduction capacity was studied. Nitrate (354 mg L(-1), equal to 5.71 mmol L(-1)) reduction was performed using Fe/Ni nanoparticles with various Ni contents (1.0, 5.0, 10 and 20%) in an unbuffered condition. Optimum nitrate reduction rate (1.03 +/- 0.087 x 10(-4) mol x min(-1) x greduc(-1)) was obtained with 5.0% nano-scale Fe/Ni, while only 25% nitrate (1.05 +/- 0.091 x 10(-5) mol x min(-1) x greduc(-1)) was transformed by nano-scale Fe(0) within the same reaction time, which means that these bimetallic nanoparticles are obviously more reactive than monometallic nano-scale Fe(0). For this bimetallic system a near-neutral initial pH (6.5) is more favourable than an acidic condition (2.0 and 4.0). Relatively air-stable nano-scale Fe/Ni particles were developed by slowly aging them for 22 h and exhibited similar reactivity to freshly synthesized nano-scale Fe(0). Although undesirable transformation of nitrate (91.0 +/- 0.37%) to ammonium was observed in this study, Fe/Ni particles showed a much higher nitrate reduction rate and an optimum reduction rate at near-neutral pH, which may have important implications for nitrate-contaminated site remediation.

  3. Sodium nitrate decreases agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Jess; White, Cullen; Grow, Wade A

    2016-05-01

    Humans are exposed to nitrate predominantly through diet with peak plasma concentrations within an hour after ingestion, but additional exposure is obtained from the environment, and minimally through de novo synthesis. Higher nitrate consumption has been associated with methemoglobinemia, spontaneous abortions, atherosclerosis, myocardial ischemia, septic and distressed lung, inflammatory bowel disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and neural tube defects. However, skeletal muscle development has not been examined. C2C12 skeletal muscle cell cultures were maintained, myoblasts were fused into myotubes, and then cultures were exposed to motor neuron derived agrin to enhance acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Untreated cultures were compared with cultures exposed to sodium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 10 ng/mL-100 μg/mL. The results reported here demonstrate that 1 μg/mL sodium nitrate was sufficient to decrease the frequency of agrin-induced AChR clustering without affecting myotube formation. In addition, concentrations of sodium nitrate of 1 μg/mL or 100 μg/mL decreased gene expression of the myogenic transcription factor myogenin and AChR in correlation with the agrin-induced AChR clustering data. These results reveal that sodium nitrate decreases the frequency of agrin-induced AChR clustering by a mechanism that includes myogenin and AChR gene expression. As a consequence sodium nitrate may pose a risk for skeletal muscle development and subsequent neuromuscular synapse formation in humans.

  4. Nitrate pollution of groundwater by pit latrines in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Templeton

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pit latrines are one of the most common forms of onsite sanitation facilities in many developing countries. These latrines are suitable as a means of isolating human waste, however, conditions within pits often lead to nitrification of the contained waste. In areas with a near-surface aquifer, the potential for nitrate pollution arising from pit latrines cannot be ignored. In this study, site visits were made to three densely populated, peri-urban areas near three West African cities (Dakar, Abidjan, Abomey-Calavi to gather relevant information about the latrines in use and the soil and groundwater underneath the sites. Modelling was then conducted to demonstrate the potential for nitrate pollution of the groundwater from the latrines in such settings. The depth from the bottom of the pits to the water table was considered as 5, 10 or 30 m, to represent the range of aquifer depths at the study sites. Nitrate half-lives ranging from 500 to 1500 days were considered, and time scales from 6 months to several years were modelled. The results highlighted the high likelihood of nitrate pollution of groundwater reaching levels exceeding the World Health Organization guideline value for nitrate in drinking water of 50 mg/L after as short a period as two years for the aquifer situated 5 m below the pits, when considering moderate to long nitrate half-lives in the subsurface. Careful siting of latrines away from high water table areas, more frequent pit emptying, or switching to urine diversion toilets may be effective solutions to reduce nitrate passage from pit latrines into groundwater, although these solutions may not always be applicable, because of social, technical and economic constraints. The study highlights the need for more reliable data on the typical nitrate concentrations in pit latrines and the nitrate half-life in different subsurface conditions.

  5. Probability-based nitrate contamination map of groundwater in Kinmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Wuing; Wang, Yeuh-Bin; Jang, Cheng-Shin

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater supplies over 50% of drinking water in Kinmen. Approximately 16.8% of groundwater samples in Kinmen exceed the drinking water quality standard (DWQS) of NO3 (-)-N (10 mg/L). The residents drinking high nitrate-polluted groundwater pose a potential risk to health. To formulate effective water quality management plan and assure a safe drinking water in Kinmen, the detailed spatial distribution of nitrate-N in groundwater is a prerequisite. The aim of this study is to develop an efficient scheme for evaluating spatial distribution of nitrate-N in residential well water using logistic regression (LR) model. A probability-based nitrate-N contamination map in Kinmen is constructed. The LR model predicted the binary occurrence probability of groundwater nitrate-N concentrations exceeding DWQS by simple measurement variables as independent variables, including sampling season, soil type, water table depth, pH, EC, DO, and Eh. The analyzed results reveal that three statistically significant explanatory variables, soil type, pH, and EC, are selected for the forward stepwise LR analysis. The total ratio of correct classification reaches 92.7%. The highest probability of nitrate-N contamination map presents in the central zone, indicating that groundwater in the central zone should not be used for drinking purposes. Furthermore, a handy EC-pH-probability curve of nitrate-N exceeding the threshold of DWQS was developed. This curve can be used for preliminary screening of nitrate-N contamination in Kinmen groundwater. This study recommended that the local agency should implement the best management practice strategies to control nonpoint nitrogen sources and carry out a systematic monitoring of groundwater quality in residential wells of the high nitrate-N contamination zones.

  6. Enhancement of nitrate reductase activity by benzyladenine in Agrostemma githago

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kende, H.; Hahn, H.; Kays, S.E.

    1971-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity in excised embryos of Agrostemma githago increases in response to both NO/sub 3//sup -/ and cytokinins. Discussed was whether cytokinins affected nitrate reductase activity directly or through NO/sub 3//sup -/, either by amplifying the effect of low endogenous NO/sub 3//sup -/ levels, or by making NO/sub 3//sup -/ available for induction from a metabolically inactive compartment. Nitrate reductase activity was enhanced on the average by 50% after 1 hour of benzyladenine treatment. In some experiments, the cytokinin response was detectable as early as 30 minutes after addition of benzyladenine. Nitrate reductase activity increased linearly for 4 hours and began to decay 13 hours after start of the hormone treatment. When embryos were incubated in solutions containing mixtures of NO/sub 3//sup -/ and benzyladenine, additive responses were obtained. The effects of NO/sub 3//sup -/ and benzyladenine were counteracted by abscisic acid. The increase in nitrate reductase activity was inhibited at lower abscisic acid concentrations in embryos which were induced with NO/sub 3//sup -/, as compared to embryos treated with benzyladenine. Casein hydrolysate inhibited the development of nitrate reductase activity. The response to NO/sub 3//sup -/ was more susceptible to inhibition by casein hydrolysate than the response to the hormone. When NO/sub 3//sup -/ and benzyladenine were withdrawn from the medium after maximal enhancement of nitrate reductase activity, the level of the enzyme decreased rapidly. Nitrate reductase activity increased again as a result of a second treatment with benzyladenine but not with NO/sub 3//sup -/. At the time of the second exposure to benzyladenine, no NO/sub 3//sup -/ was detectable in extracts of Agrostemma embryos. This is taken as evidence that cytokinins enhance nitrate reductase activity directly and not through induction by NO/sub 3//sup -/. 11 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Nitrate-Regulated Glutaredoxins Control Arabidopsis Primary Root Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Kurt; Walters, Laura A; Cooper, Andrew M; Olvera, Jocelyn G; Rosas, Miguel A; Rasmusson, Allan G; Escobar, Matthew A

    2016-02-01

    Nitrogen is an essential soil nutrient for plants, and lack of nitrogen commonly limits plant growth. Soil nitrogen is typically available to plants in two inorganic forms: nitrate and ammonium. To better understand how nitrate and ammonium differentially affect plant metabolism and development, we performed transcriptional profiling of the shoots of ammonium-supplied and nitrate-supplied Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. Seven genes encoding class III glutaredoxins were found to be strongly and specifically induced by nitrate. RNA silencing of four of these glutaredoxin genes (AtGRXS3/4/5/8) resulted in plants with increased primary root length (approximately 25% longer than the wild type) and decreased sensitivity to nitrate-mediated inhibition of primary root growth. Increased primary root growth is also a well-characterized phenotype of many cytokinin-deficient plant lines. We determined that nitrate induction of glutaredoxin gene expression was dependent upon cytokinin signaling and that cytokinins could activate glutaredoxin gene expression independent of plant nitrate status. In addition, crosses between "long-root" cytokinin-deficient plants and "long-root" glutaredoxin-silenced plants generated hybrids that displayed no further increase in primary root length (i.e. epistasis). Collectively, these findings suggest that AtGRXS3/4/5/8 operate downstream of cytokinins in a signal transduction pathway that negatively regulates plant primary root growth in response to nitrate. This pathway could allow Arabidopsis to actively discriminate between different nitrogen sources in the soil, with the preferred nitrogen source, nitrate, acting to suppress primary root growth (vertical dimension) in concert with its well-characterized stimulatory effect on lateral root growth (horizontal dimension). © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Magnesium nitrate attenuates blood pressure rise in SHR rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilskersts, Reinis; Kuka, Janis; Liepinsh, Edgars; Cirule, Helena; Gulbe, Anita; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Dambrova, Maija

    2014-01-01

    The administration of magnesium supplements and nitrates/nitrites decreases arterial blood pressure and attenuates the development of hypertension-induced complications. This study was performed to examine the effects of treatment with magnesium nitrate on the development of hypertension and its complications in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. Male SHR rats with persistent hypertension at the age of 12-13 weeks were allocated to two groups according to their arterial blood pressure. Rats from the control group received purified water, while the experimental animals from the second group received magnesium nitrate dissolved in purified water at a dose of 50 mg/kg. After four weeks of treatment, blood pressure was measured, the anatomical and functional parameters of the heart were recorded using an ultrasonograph, vascular reactivity was assayed in organ bath experiments and the cardioprotective effects of magnesium nitrate administration was assayed in an ex vivo experimental heart infarction model. Treatment with magnesium nitrate significantly increased the nitrate concentration in the plasma (from 62 ± 8 μmol/l to 111 ± 8 μmol/L), and attenuated the increase in the arterial blood pressure. In the control and magnesium nitrate groups, the blood pressure rose by 21 ± 3 mmHg and 6 ± 4 mmHg, respectively. The administration of magnesium nitrate had no effect on the altered vasoreactivity, heart function or the size of the heart infarction. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that magnesium nitrate effectively attenuates the rise in arterial blood pressure. However, a longer period of administration or earlier onset of treatment might be needed to delay the development of complications due to hypertension.

  9. Modelling nitrate transport and turnover in a lowland catchment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wriedt, Gunter; Rode, Michael

    2006-08-01

    SummaryNitrate transport in groundwater dominated lowland catchment systems is influenced by complex and spatially distributed physical and chemical interactions. A modelling approach was developed combining a distributed soil nitrogen model with a three-dimensional groundwater model and a reactive transport model linking nitrate turnover and availability of reaction partners such as pyrite and organic matter. The modelling approach was applied to a hypothetical case study based on data from the pleistocene lowland catchment "Schaugraben" (20 km 2) in the North of Saxony-Anhalt, with focus on the investigation of interactions of spatially distributed transport and chemical processes. The modelling approach could successfully simulate transport and turnover of nitrate in a groundwater dominated catchment. The advancement of the nitrate front and the corresponding depletion of pyrite as well as the distribution of seepage fluxes and nitrate concentrations in seepage water in the channel system showed distinct spatial variation. Surface water nitrate concentrations corresponding to the average soil leachate concentrations were not completely reached after a simulation period of 200 years for a conservative transport simulation. Under reactive conditions, about 80% of the nitrate was lost due to denitrification. Given a uniformly distributed input of nitrate, drain loads developed in a sigmoidal curve defined only by travel time distribution. The average travel time was 93 years. A distributed input of nitrate resulted in reduction of travel time to 80 years due to the different arrangement of source areas and flow. The modelling approach is a step towards bridging the gap between simple large scale models and detailed small scale studies, maintaining process orientation while allowing to consider landscape heterogeneity.

  10. Effect of Ammonium Nitrate on Nanoparticle Size Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalyana C. Pingali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate was added to the spraying solution as a foaming agent to reduce the particle size of nanoparticles synthesized in the spray-pyrolysis process. Ammonium nitrate was effective in breaking the aerosol droplet size and generating nanoparticles that were of approximately one order-of-magnitude (from 200 to 20 nm smaller diameter than those created in the absence of ammonium nitrate in the feed solution. This technique makes it possible to control the particle diameter of metallic nanoparticles below 20 nm.

  11. Temperature dependent terahertz properties of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Abdur; Azad, Abul; Moore, David

    Terahertz spectroscopy has been demonstrated as an ideal nondestructive method for identifying hazardous materials such as explosives. Many common explosives exhibit distinct spectral signatures at terahertz range (0.1-6.0 THz) due to the excitations of their low frequency vibrational modes. Ammonium nitrate (AN), an easily accessible oxidizer often used in improvised explosive, exhibits strong temperature dependence. While the room temperature terahertz absorption spectrum of AN is featureless, it reveals distinct spectral features below 240 K due to the polymorphic phase transition. We employed terahertz time domain spectroscopy to measure the effective dielectric properties of AN embedded in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder. The dielectric properties of pure AN were extracted using three different effective medium theories (EMT), simple effective medium approach, Maxwell-Garnett (MG) model, and Bruggeman (BR) model. In order to understand the effect of temperature on the dielectric properties, we varied the sample temperature from 5K to 300K. This study indicates presence of additional vibrational modes at low temperature. These results may greatly enhance the detectability of AN and facilitate more accurate theoretical modeling.

  12. Reaction of lanthanide nitrates with macrocyclic amidoacylhydrazones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinka, E.V.; Bondarev, M.L.; Bel' tyukova, S.V.; Poleuktov, N.S.; Nazarenko, N.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper deals with a study of the reaction of neodymium and europium nitrates with 3,5,14,16-tetraazasubstituted dibenzo (d,j) (1,2,6,9,13,14) hexaazahexadeca-2,4,10,12-tetraene-7,8,15,16-tetraones. The authors carried out the investigations by means of conductimetry, UV luminescence, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy. Conductimetric titrations of the neodymium complexes were carried out on an OK-102/1 conductimeter. The luminescence spectra of the europium ion in the region of the /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 1/ and /sup 5/D/sub 0/ ..-->.. /sup 7/F/sub 2/ transitions (550-620 nm) were recorded on an ISP-51 spectrograph with an FEP-1 photoelectric attachment, using excitation by an SVD-120A mercury quartz lamp. The UV spectra of solutions of the compounds and the IR spectra of the solid substances in KBr disks were recorded on SpecordUViS and UR-20 spectrophotometers, respectively, and the mass spectra on a Varian Mat-112 spectrometer.

  13. Solid state phase transition and vapor pressure studies in ammonium nitrate-potassium nitrate binary system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Wen-Ming

    The solid-state phase transitions in ammonium nitrate (NH4NO 3) and potassium nitrate (KNO3) solid solutions and the equilibrium NH4NO3-KNO3 (AN-KN) phase diagram have been determined. The phase transitions and phase diagram were determined by using the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and high temperature X-ray diffractometry. Samples of several different compositions were made for these analyses in a special "Dry Room" with very low humidity. In the X-ray diffraction experiments, the samples were heated on Pt-Rh strip and LaB6 or Si was added for internal calibration. Equilibrium phase diagram was also calculated by using the "FactSage" computer program. A single (AN III) phase region without any phase transitions between 293 to 373 K was observed for compositions between 5 to 25wt% KNO3 in NH4NO3 that is critical for air bag gas generators. The higher temperature KNO3 (KN I) phase has a wide stability range, from 100%KNO3 to 20%KNO3 solution. There is one eutectic, two eutectoids, and two peritectoids in this phase diagram. Two newly discovered solid-state phases were found in the mid-composition range of AN-KN solid solutions. Details of phase equilibria and lattice expansions during heating have been determined. Phase diagram calculations show a reasonable match of the phase boundaries. The total vapor pressures as well as the average molecular weights of pure ammonium nitrate and 16% KNO3 solid solution were measured at various temperatures by the torsion-Knudsen effusion method. The partial pressures of NH4NO3 (PNH4NO 3), NH3 (PNH3), and HNO3 (PHNO 3) have also been determined.

  14. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 89. Alkali Metal Nitrates. Part 2. Sodium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysseltová, Jitka; Zbranek, Vladimír; Skripkin, Mikhail Yurievich; Sawada, Kiyoshi; Tepavitcharova, Stefka

    2017-03-01

    The solubility data at 1 bar or saturation pressure for sodium nitrate are reviewed. Where appropriate, binary, ternary, and multicomponent systems are critically evaluated. The solubility results were obtained in water or aqueous solutions. All data were critically examined for their reliability. The best values were selected on the basis of critical evaluations and presented in tabular form. Fitting equations and plots are also provided. The quantities, units, and symbols used are in accord with IUPAC recommendations. The original data have been reported and, if necessary, transferred into the units and symbols recommended by IUPAC. The literature on solubility data was researched through 2014.

  15. Deprotection of oximes using urea nitrate under microwave irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A new mild and efficient method for the cleavage of oximes to carbonyl compounds using readily available urea nitrate in acetonitrile-water (95 : 5), under microwave irradiation within 2 min, in good yields is reported.

  16. The effect of farmyard manure and calcium ammonium nitrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of farmyard manure and calcium ammonium nitrate fertilisers on micronutrient density (iron, zinc, manganese, calcium and potassium) and seed yields of solanium villosum (black nightshade) and cleome gynandra (cat whiskers) on uetric nitisol.

  17. Treatment of otitis externa with miconazole nitrate - A comparative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emphasized. Eighty-five patients with otitis externa were treated with one of two preparations between August 1980 and April 1982 - 54 were treated with a cream containing miconazole nitrate and hydrocortisone (Daktacort; Janssen) and 31 with a ...

  18. Reevaluation of nitrate and nitrite levels in the human intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saul, R L; Kabir, S H; Cohen, Z; Bruce, W R; Archer, M C

    1981-06-01

    Analyses of human fecal and ileostomy samples by a method that is insensitive and free from interferences indicate that nitrate and nitrite levels in the intestine are lower than reported previously. Fecal nitrate and nitrite concentrations ranged from 0 to 14 mumol/kg (0 to 0.9 ppm) and 5 to 19 mumol/kg (0.3 to 0.9 ppm), respectively. Ileostomy samples contained from 0 to 7 mumol/kg (0 to 0.4 ppm) and 0 to 15 mumol/kg (0 to 0.7 ppm) for nitrate and nitrite, respectively. We also showed that, when deliberately added to feces samples, nitrate and nitrite were destroyed during a two-hr incubation period in a reaction that depended on the presence of microorganisms. The results suggest that conditions in the lower gastrointestinal tract favor denitrification, not nitrification as had been proposed previously.

  19. Treatment miconazole of otitis nItrate externa with

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    emphasized. Eighty-five patients with otitis externa were treated with one of two preparations between August 1980 and April 1982. -. 54 were treated with a cream containing miconazole nitrate and hydrocortisone (Daktacort;. Janssen) and 31 with a ...

  20. Genotoxic Effect of Atrazine, Arsenic, Cadmium and Nitrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ATZ), Cadmium (Cd), Arsenic (As) and Nitrate (NO3) have both estrogenic activity and carcinogenic potential. Atrazine has clastogenic effects and may also act as tumor promoter as it induces the aromatase enzyme. Arsenic and Cadmium ...

  1. Thioploca spp: filamentous sulfur bacteria with nitrate vacuoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Gallardo, VA

    1999-01-01

    communities of large Thioploca species live along the Pacific coast of South America and in other upwelling areas of high organic matter sedimentation with bottom waters poor in oxygen and rich in nitrate. Each cell of these thioplocas harbors a large liquid vacuole which is used as a storage for nitrate...... with a concentration of lip to 506 mM. The nitrate is used as an electron acceptor for sulfide oxidation and the bacteria may grow autotrophically or mixotrophically using acetate or other organic molecules as carbon source. The filaments stretch up into the overlying seawater, from which they take up nitrate......, and then glide down 5-15 cm deep into the sediment through their sheaths to oxidize sulfide formed by intensive sulfate reduction. New major occurrences have bren found in recent years, both in lakes and in the ocean, and have stimulated the interest in these fascinating bacteria. (C) 1999 Federation of European...

  2. Heterogeneous Reaction gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Raimo S.; Chu, Liang T.; Leu, Ming-Taun

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reaction of gaseous chlorine nitrate and solid sodium chloride was investigated over a temperature range of 220 - 300 K in a flow-tube reactor interfaced with a differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  3. Nitrate leaching from short-hydroperiod floodplain soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Huber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown the importance of riparian zones to reduce nitrate (NO3 contamination coming from adjacent agricultural land. Much less is known about nitrogen (N transformations and nitrate fluxes in riparian soils with short hydroperiods (1–3 days of inundation and there is no study that could show whether these soils are a N sink or source. Within a restored section of the Thur River in NE Switzerland, we measured nitrate concentrations in soil solutions as an indicator of the net nitrate production. Samples were collected along a quasi-successional gradient from frequently inundated gravel bars to an alluvial forest, at three different depths (10, 50 and 100 cm over a one-year period. Along this gradient we quantified N input (atmospheric deposition and sedimentation and N output (leaching to create a nitrogen balance and assess the risk of nitrate leaching from the unsaturated soil to the groundwater. Overall, the main factor explaining the differences in nitrate concentrations was the field capacity (FC. In subsoils with high FCs and VWC near FC, high nitrate concentrations were observed, often exceeding the Swiss and EU groundwater quality criterions of 400 and 800 μmol L−1, respectively. High sedimentation rates of river-derived nitrogen led to apparent N retention up to 200 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in the frequently inundated zones. By contrast, in the mature alluvial forest, nitrate leaching exceeded total N input most of the time. As a result of the large soil N pools, high amounts of nitrate were produced by nitrification and up to 94 kg N-NO3 ha−1 yr−1 were leached into the groundwater. Thus, during flooding when water fluxes are high, nitrate from soils can contribute up to 11% to the total nitrate load in groundwater.

  4. Real-time continuous nitrate monitoring in Illinois in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Kelly L.; Terrio, Paul J.; Straub, Timothy D.; Roseboom, Donald; Johnson, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    Many sources contribute to the nitrogen found in surface water in Illinois. Illinois is located in the most productive agricultural area in the country, and nitrogen fertilizer is commonly used to maximize corn production in this area. Additionally, septic/wastewater systems, industrial emissions, and lawn fertilizer are common sources of nitrogen in urban areas of Illinois. In agricultural areas, the use of fertilizer has increased grain production to meet the needs of a growing population, but also has resulted in increases in nitrogen concentrations in many streams and aquifers (Dubrovsky and others, 2010). The urban sources can increase nitrogen concentrations, too. The Federal limit for nitrate nitrogen in water that is safe to drink is 10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) (http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/basicinformation/nitrate.cfm, accessed on May 24, 2013). In addition to the concern with nitrate nitrogen in drinking water, nitrogen, along with phosphorus, is an aquatic concern because it feeds the intensive growth of algae that are responsible for the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico. The largest nitrogen flux to the waters feeding the Gulf of Mexico is from Illinois (Alexander and others, 2008). Most studies of nitrogen in surface water and groundwater include samples for nitrate nitrogen collected weekly or monthly, but nitrate concentrations can change rapidly and these discrete samples may not capture rapid changes in nitrate concentrations that can affect human and aquatic health. Continuous monitoring for nitrate could inform scientists and water-resource managers of these changes and provide information on the transport of nitrate in surface water and groundwater.

  5. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. STRIETELMEIER; M. ESPINOSA

    2001-01-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), extremely inexpensive, and easy to replace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels was discharged from this plant for many years. Recently, the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated in 1999 to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mM nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  6. Study of Nitration and Oxidation in Oxynitrogen Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    electrochemical studies in nitric acid, we have demonstrated the first electrochemical synthesis of TNT. The process takes place at room temperature in NO&/HlOI...included tasks on the fundamentals of the nitration mechanism in both the gas and condensed phases and tasks in electrochemical synthesis of...order rate constant for the nitration of p- nitrotoluene " strument equipped with an external 2H lock and a temperature oatoler. with the fractional

  7. REMEDIATION OF NITRATE-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER USING A BIOBARRIER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. STRIETELMEIR; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    A biobarrier system has been developed for use in remediating shallow alluvial groundwater. This barrier is made from highly porous materials that are relatively long-lasting, carbon-based (to supply a limiting nutrient in nitrate destruction, in most cases), and extremely inexpensive and easy to emplace. In a series of laboratory studies, we have determined the effectiveness of this barrier at destroying nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater from Mortandad Canyon at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This groundwater was obtained from a monitoring well, MCO-5, which is located in the flowpath of the discharge waters from the LANL Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). Water with elevated nitrate levels has been discharged from this plant for many years, until recently when the nitrate levels have been brought under the discharge limits. However, the historical discharge has resulted in a nitrate plume in the alluvial groundwater in this canyon. The LANL Multi-Barrier project was initiated this past year to develop a system of barriers that would prevent the transport of radionuclides, metals, colloids and other contaminants, including nitrate and perchlorate, further down the canyon in order to protect populations down-gradient. The biobarrier. will be part of this Multi-Barrier system. We have demonstrated the destruction of nitrate at levels up to 6.5-9.7 mhl nitrate (400-600 mg/L), and that of perchlorate at levels of about 4.3 {micro}M perchlorate (350 ppb). We have quantified the populations of microorganisms present in the biofilm that develops on the biobarrier. The results of this research will be discussed along with other potential applications of this system.

  8. Shock compression of water and solutions of ammonium nitrate

    OpenAIRE

    Morley, Michael James

    2011-01-01

    Modern mining explosives employ solutions of ammonium nitrate, where the solution is the oxidising component of a fuel/oxidiser mixture. This thesis is primarily concerned with the shock response of water and of aqueous solutions of ammonium nitrate. Of particular interest are the temperatures induced through shock compression. An experimental facility, using a single stage gas gun in the ‘plate impact’ configuration, is described, along with associated experimental diagnostics. Measurements ...

  9. Occurrence of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater aquifers: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisante, Eliapenda; Muzuka, Alfred N. N.

    2017-03-01

    More than 25 % of Tanzanian depends on groundwater as the main source of water for drinking, irrigation and industrial activities. The current trend of land use may lead to groundwater contamination and thus increasing risks associated with the usage of contaminated water. Nitrate is one of the contaminants resulting largely from anthropogenic activities that may find its way to the aquifers and thus threatening the quality of groundwater. Elevated levels of nitrate in groundwater may lead to human health and environmental problems. The current trend of land use in Tanzania associated with high population growth, poor sanitation facilities and fertilizer usage may lead to nitrate contamination of groundwater. This paper therefore aimed at providing an overview of to what extent human activities have altered the concentration of nitrate in groundwater aquifers in Tanzania. The concentration of nitrate in Tanzanian groundwater is variable with highest values observable in Dar es Salaam (up to 477.6 mg/l), Dodoma (up to 441.1 mg/l), Tanga (above 100 mg/l) and Manyara (180 mg/l). Such high values can be attributed to various human activities including onsite sanitation in urban centres and agricultural activities in rural areas. Furthermore, there are some signs of increasing concentration of nitrate in groundwater with time in some areas in response to increased human activities. However, reports on levels and trends of nitrate in groundwater in many regions of the country are lacking. For Tanzania to appropriately address the issue of groundwater contamination, a deliberate move to determine nitrate concentration in groundwater is required, as well as protection of recharge basins and improvement of onsite sanitation systems.

  10. Molecular recognition of nitrated fatty acids by PPAR[gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Jifeng; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Martynowski, Dariusz; Garcia-Barrio, Minerva T.; Kovach, Amanda; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Baker, Paul R.S.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Chen, Y. Eugene; Xu, H. Eric (Pitt); (Michigan); (Van Andel); (Morehouse-MED)

    2010-03-08

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and adipocyte differentiation, and it is activated by oxidized and nitrated fatty acids. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPAR{gamma} ligand binding domain bound to nitrated linoleic acid, a potent endogenous ligand of PPAR{gamma}. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis of PPAR{gamma} discrimination of various naturally occurring fatty acid derivatives.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Sensitivity Analysis of Urea Nitrate (UN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    vi INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. 1 1. Introduction Urea nitrate (UN) is a high explosive obtained from the combination of urea and nitric acid...HNO3). Due to its simple composition, ease of manufacture, and higher detonation parameters than ammonium nitrate , it has become one of the... explosives of choice among terrorist organizations.1–4 UN is readily formed by treating a solution of urea in water with concentrated nitric acid. The

  12. Nitrates and nitrites content of water boreholes and packaged water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitrate and nitrite levels were determined in forty-three water samples obtained from different locations in Calabar using colorimetric methods. Twenty-three of these samples were packaged water while twenty were borehole water. Nitrate levels were found to be 24.28 ± 9.30μg/ml and 34.57 ± 14.56µ/ml for packaged water ...

  13. The acute toxicity of lead nitrate on Daphnia magna Straus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the acute toxicity of lead nitrate (Pb(NO3)2) to Daphnia magna Straus was investigated in a static bioassay. After 24 h the mobility of daphnids were examined and immobile ones were counted. The 24 h EC50 of lead nitrate to D. magna was found as 0.44 mg/L. According to Behrens-Karber method the 24 h ...

  14. The acute toxicity of lead nitrate on Daphnia magna Straus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... In this study the acute toxicity of lead nitrate (Pb(NO3)2) to Daphnia magna Straus was investigated in a static bioassay. After 24 h the mobility of daphnids were examined and immobile ones were counted. The 24 h EC50 of lead nitrate to D. magna was found as 0.44 mg/L. According to Behrens-Karber ...

  15. Determination of nitrate and nitrite content of Turkish cheeses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of nitrate and nitrite were determined in 185 samples of Turkish cheese having high consumption rate. All cheese samples contained nitrate and its level in Turkish white cheese produced from cow's and sheep's milk were found between 0.92 - 22.40 (mean 8.96±4.93) mg/kg and 0.47 - 23.68 (mean 12.35±6.28) ...

  16. Nitrate, Nitrite and ascorbic acid content of commercial and home ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contents of nitrate, nitrite and ascorbic acid were determined in four samples of commercial and fifteen samples of home - prepared complementary infant foods common in Nigeria. The nitrate and nitrite values of the commercial food samples ranged from 3.1– 3.9mgNO3- N/100g and 5.0 - 16.0ug N02 - N/100g ...

  17. Determination of nitrate, nitrite, N- nitrosamines, cyanide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nitrate, nitrite, N- nitrosamines and ascorbic acid content as well as the levels of cyanide in eight brands of fruit juices and twelve brands of sachet water commonly marketed and consumed in Nigeria were estimated. The mean values of nitrate ranged from 2.29±0.05 to 16.50±1.21 mg/L for the juices and 0.64±0.21 to ...

  18. The oral bioavailability of nitrate from vegetables investigated in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers AC; Kortboyer JM; Schothorst RC; Sips AJAM; Cleven RFMJ; Meulenbelt J; VIC; LBM; ARO; LAC

    2000-01-01

    The major source of human nitrate exposure comes from vegetables. Several studies were performed to estimate the total daily dietary nitrate intake based on the nitrate contents of food and drinking water. However, only nitrate that is absorbed from the gastro-intestinal tract may contribute to

  19. 76 FR 39847 - Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation; Final Results of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... International Trade Administration Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation; Final... investigation on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from the Russian Federation...: Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation, 64 FR 45236 (August 19, 1999). On...

  20. Tidal pumping facilitates dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanling; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Liu, Zhanfei; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Xianbiao; Yin, Guoyu; Gao, Juan; Yu, Chendi; Wang, Rong; Jiang, Xiaofen

    2016-02-17

    Intertidal marshes are alternately exposed and submerged due to periodic ebb and flood tides. The tidal cycle is important in controlling the biogeochemical processes of these ecosystems. Intertidal sediments are important hotspots of dissimilatory nitrate reduction and interacting nitrogen cycling microorganisms, but the effect of tides on dissimilatory nitrate reduction, including denitrification, anaerobic ammonium oxidation and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, remains unexplored in these habitats. Here, we use isotope-tracing and molecular approaches simultaneously to show that both nitrate-reduction activities and associated functional bacterial abundances are enhanced at the sediment-tidal water interface and at the tide-induced groundwater fluctuating layer. This pattern suggests that tidal pumping may sustain dissimilatory nitrate reduction in intertidal zones. The tidal effect is supported further by nutrient profiles, fluctuations in nitrogen components over flood-ebb tidal cycles, and tidal simulation experiments. This study demonstrates the importance of tides in regulating the dynamics of dissimilatory nitrate-reducing pathways and thus provides new insights into the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and other elements in intertidal marshes.

  1. Nitrate removal with lateral flow sulphur autotrophic denitrification reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaomei; Shao, Mingfei; Li, Ji; Xie, Chuanbo

    2014-01-01

    An innovative lateral flow sulphur autotrophic denitrification (LFSAD) reactor was developed in this study; the treatment performance was evaluated and compared with traditional sulphur/limestone autotrophic denitrification (SLAD) reactor. Results showed that nitrite accumulation in the LFSAD reactor was less than 1.0 mg/L during the whole operation. Denitrification rate increased with the increased initial alkalinity and was approaching saturation when initial alkalinity exceeded 2.5 times the theoretical value. Higher influent nitrate concentration could facilitate nitrate removal capacity. In addition, denitrification efficiency could be promoted under an appropriate reflux ratio, and the highest nitrate removal percentage was achieved under reflux ratio of 200%, increased by 23.8% than that without reflux. Running resistance was only about 1/9 of that in SLAD reactor with equal amount of nitrate removed, which was the prominent excellence of the new reactor. In short, this study indicated that the developed reactor was feasible for nitrate removal from waters with lower concentrations, including contaminated surface water, groundwater or secondary effluent of municipal wastewater treatment with fairly low running resistance. The innovation in reactor design in this study may bring forth new ideas of reactor development of sulphur autotrophic denitrification for nitrate-contaminated water treatment.

  2. Nitrate from agriculture: moving from uncertain data to operational responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Alwyn; Bieroza, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    The Nitrates Directive (91/676/EEC) is designed to protect waters against nitrate pollution from agricultural sources. It requires Member States to identify waters which are, or could become, polluted by nitrates and to designate as Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs) all land draining to those waters and contributing to the pollution. To meet these requirements, Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) have commissioned reviews that designated NVZs in 1993, 1998, 2002, 2008 and 2013. The designation methods used have evolved over this time and have been developed with the close involvement of farming and water company representatives and with advice and guidance from a number of independent external technical experts. The monitoring network and methods change frequently and methods need to be developed which are robust enough to cope with gaps in data, both geographical and temporal. This project is aimed at investigating new approaches for identifying waters that are at risk of nitrate pollution and the land that drains to these and builds on a large body of evidence supporting understanding of nitrate in the environment. The work will demonstrate to Defra and to the wider community that the most cost efficient and appropriate methods to designate NVZ areas for groundwater and surface water are used.

  3. A Review of Nitrate and Nitrite Toxicity in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Jamal Hosseini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural advancement and population growth have prompted increases in food supplies, and higher crop yields have been made possible through the application of fertilizers. Large quantities of livestock and poultry on farms, along with the accumulation of biomass and agricultural residues, can cause contamination of ground water resources and other water sanitation concerns in both developing and developed countries. Nitrate is mainly used as a fertilizer in agriculture, and because of its high solubility in water, it can create biological problems in the environment. High usage of nitrite in the food industry as a preservative, flavor enhancer, antioxidant, and color stabilizing agent can cause human exposure to this toxic compound. Nitrite is 10 times as toxic as nitrate in humans. Nitrate is converted to nitrite and nitrosamine compounds in the human stomach, which can lead to bladder cancer. In this review, sources of nitrate and nitrite exposure were investigated. Furthermore, the review evaluates standard levels of nitrate and nitrite in different foods, and acceptable daily doses of these compounds in various countries. Finally, we discuss valid methods of nitrate and nitrite identification and removal in foods.

  4. Correlation between nitrate contamination and ground water pollution potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shafiul H; Kehew, Alan E; Passero, Richard N

    2003-01-01

    AQUIPRO, a PC-based method, was used to assess aquifer vulnerability using digital water well logs. The AQUIPRO model is a parameter/factor weighting system for rating the pollution potential of an aquifer. This method uses the well depth, as well as the clay and partial clay thickness in a well, to generate pollution potential scores. In this model, aquifer protection increases as the AQUIPRO vulnerability scores increase and ground water pollution potential decreases. Computerized water well records of 2435 domestic wells with partial chemistry data were used to determine the ground water pollution potential of Kalamazoo County, Michigan. Theoretically, low AQUIPRO pollution potential scores should have more frequent occurrences of ground water contamination events than areas with high AQUIPRO scores with similar land-use, well construction, and well densities. The relative AQUIPRO scores were compared with the frequency of occurrences of nitrate-N in ground water wells. The average nitrate-N concentrations within each relative AQUIPRO vulnerability scores category were also compared. The results indicate that domestic wells containing 5 mg/L or more nitrate-N showed a positive correlation between the frequency of occurrences of nitrate-N and relative decrease of AQUIPRO (r2 = 0.99) vulnerability scores. In other words, as the ground water pollution potential increases, the occurrence frequency of nitrate-N also increases. Furthermore, the results show that as the relative AQUIPRO (r2 = 0.96) vulnerability scores decrease, the mean nitrate-N concentrations also increase.

  5. Spatially distributed lateral nitrate transport at the catchment scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, Fred B; Franko, Uwe; Rode, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In river catchments, N transformation and storage processes during lateral transport are important in controlling N loads of surface waters. There is a lack of approaches which capture lateral flows and associated N transformation in a spatially distributed way. The aim of this paper is to develop a new conceptual N transport and transformation model which simulates the lateral nitrate transport in subsurface flow from the source area to the receiving water body. The developed tool is based on the object modeling system (OMS) framework and consists of the analytical spatially distributed hydrological model J2000, the nitrate recharge model Meta Candy and a new groundwater N routing component. Nitrate degradation in groundwater is calculated stoichiometrically according to a predefined amount on oxidizable substrate. The new modeling approach was tested in a small agricultural lower mountain range catchment of Thuringia, Germany. The calibration of the N model using a 4-yr period showed reasonable results for nitrate load calculations with a Nash and Sutcliff coefficient of 0.78. The 3-yr validation period produced Nash-Sutcliff (NS) values of 0.75. There was a clear relationship of the goodness-of-fit between the hydrological simulations and the nitrate concentration calculations. Due to short residence times of the interflow nitrate degradation was restricted to slow base flow components. The new approach can be used to target N source areas within a catchment and assess the impact of these source areas on the N load of surface waters in a spatially distributed manner.

  6. Potential testicular toxicity of sodium nitrate in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Hamdy A A; Mansour, Ahmed M; Abo-Salem, Osama M; Abd-Ellah, Hala F; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2010-02-01

    Nitrate is a common contaminant in groundwater aquifers. Current study aimed at evaluating the potential testicular toxicity of sodium nitrate in rats. Sodium nitrate was given orally to rats at doses of 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg/day for 60 consecutive days. Sperm count and motility, daily sperm production and testis weight were significantly decreased specially at high doses. Testicular activity of lactate dehydrogenase-X, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and acid phosphatase were inhibited in a dose-related manner. Lipid peroxides and hydrogen peroxide production were significantly increased in all treated animals. This was accompanied by inhibition of testicular activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. Fifty mg/kg of sodium nitrate did not significantly alter catalase or glutathione reductase activity. Glutathione was significantly decreased by sodium nitrate in a dose-related manner. The decrease in sperm count and motility and daily sperm production was confirmed by histopathological studies which indicated chromatolysis, pyknosis and necrosis in spermatocytes. In conclusion, subchronic exposure of rats to sodium nitrate results in testicular toxicity as evidenced by decreased sperm count and motility, daily sperm production and testis weight, inhibited activity of enzyme markers of spermatogenesis and induction of histopathological changes. These effects are attributed, at least partly, to testicular oxidative stress. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The Effect of Nitrate Levels and Harvest Times on Fe, Zn, Cu, and K, Concentrations and Nitrate Reductase Activity in Lettuce and Spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gheshlaghi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leafy vegetables are considered as the main sources of nitrate in the human diet. In order to investigate the effect of nitrate levels and harvest times on nitrate accumulation, nitrate reductase activity, concentrations of Fe, Zn, Cu and K in Lettuce and Spinach and their relation to nitrate accumulation in these leafy vegetables, two harvest times (29 and 46 days after transplanting, two vegetable species of lettuce and spinach and two concentrations of nitrate (10 and 20 mM were used in a hydroponics greenhouse experiment with a completely randomized design and 3 replications. Modified Hoagland and Arnon nutrient solutions were used for the experiment. The results indicated that by increasing nitrate concentration of solution, nitrate accumulation in roots and shoots of lettuce and spinach increased significantly (P ≤ 0.05, and the same trend was observed for the nitrate reductase activity in the shoots of the two species. Increasing the nitrate concentrations of solution, reduced the shoot dry weight and the concentration of Fe and Cu in both species, where as it increased the K and Zn concentrations in the shoots of the two species in each both harvest times, the nitrate accumulation increased, but the nitrate reductase activity decreased in the shoots of the two species over the course of the growth. The Concentration of Fe, Cu and K decreased in the shoots of lettuce and the spinach with the time, despite the increase in Zn concentration in the shoots. The results also indicated that increasing nitrate concentrations of solution to the levels greater than the plant capacity for reduction and net uptake of nitrate, leads to the nitrate accumulation in the plants. Nitrate accumulation in plant tissue led to decreases in fresh shoot yield and Fe and Cu concentrations and nitrate reductase activities in both lettuce and spinach.

  8. Petroleum production: nitrates for the offshore mining; Production petroliere: les nitrates au service de l'exploitation offshore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, V.

    2003-03-01

    This paper is a short presentation of the adaptation of nitrates by Statoil and Norsk Hydro to the exploration and production. This process will allow a higher extraction of crude in better conditions. (A.L.B.)

  9. Differential excitation spectroscopy for detection of common explosives: ammonium nitrate and urea nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Boyd V.; Cox, Jason M.; Miller, Michael A.; Hunter, Richard V.; Van Bastian, Levi; Harrison, Paul; Walters, William P.

    2015-05-01

    Differential Excitation Spectroscopy (DES) is a new pump-probe detection technique (patent-pending) which characterizes molecules based on a multi-dimensional parameterization of the rovibrational excited state structure, pump and probe interrogation frequencies, as well as the lifetimes of the excited states. Under appropriate conditions, significant modulation of the ground state can result. DES results provide a unique, simple mechanism to probe various molecules. In addition, the DES multi-dimensional parameterization provides an identification signature that is highly unique and has demonstrated high levels of immunity from interferents, providing significant practical value for high-specificity material identification. Ammonium nitrate (AN) and urea nitrate (UN) are both components commonly used in IEDs; the ability to reliably detect these chemicals is key to finding, identifying and defeating IEDs. AN and UN are complicated materials, having a number of different phases and because they are molecular crystals, there are a number of different types of interactions between the constituent atoms which must be characterized in order to understand their DES behavior. Ab initio calculations were performed on both AN and UN for various rovibrational states up to J' ≤ 3 and validated experimentally, demonstrating good agreement between theory and experiment and the very specific responses generated.

  10. Monitoring of nitrate content of vegetable crops in Uzhgorod district

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Mykaylo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our research was to conduct a monitoring study of nitrate content in plant products of Uzhgorod district and to accomplish comparative analysis of the survey results in different periods of crop ripening. Selection of vegetable samples was carried out in Uzhgorod district in the early spring and summer periods. Determination of the nitrate content was performed using an ion-selective method at the Chemical and Toxicological Department of the Regional State Veterinary Medicine Laboratory in the Transcarpathian region of Ukraine. Vegetables were tested for nitrate content using the ion-selective method with the laboratory ion meter AI-123. Core investigation samples were crushed and homogenized. A 10.0 g weight of the investigated product, which was prepared according to MIR № 5048-89, was placed in a flat-bottomed or a conical flask, which was then filled with 50 cm3 potassium alumens solution and shaken in a shaking-machine for 5 minutes and then transferred into a measuring glass. The nitrate weight fraction in milligrams per kilogram was obtained together with the weight concentration value of nitrate ions in solution. For our study we selected vegetables grown in both public and private gardens of Uzhgorod district, namely: common onions, radishes, garden parsley, cucumbers, tomatoes, bell peppers, white cabbages, carrots and table beets. 25 samples were selected for each type of vegetable. Nitrate content was determined in the early spring growing period (from February 9 to May 27, 2011 and in the summer growing period (from June 3 to September 28, 2011, because in these particular periods we recorded the most frequent cases of food poisoning from nitrates among the population of the region. A clear trend has been traced towards increasing the nitrate content in food plant production, at levels which exceed the maximum permissible concentration (MPC. The results of our research demonstrate that the nitrate content exceeded the

  11. Quantifying an aquifer nitrate budget and future nitrate discharge using field data from streambeds and well nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Troy E.; Genereux, David P.; Solomon, D. Kip; Farrell, Kathleen M.; Mitasova, Helena

    2016-11-01

    Novel groundwater sampling (age, flux, and nitrate) carried out beneath a streambed and in wells was used to estimate (1) the current rate of change of nitrate storage, dSNO3/dt, in a contaminated unconfined aquifer, and (2) future [NO3-]FWM (the flow-weighted mean nitrate concentration in groundwater discharge) and fNO3 (the nitrate flux from aquifer to stream). Estimates of dSNO3/dt suggested that at the time of sampling (2013) the nitrate storage in the aquifer was decreasing at an annual rate (mean = -9 mmol/m2yr) equal to about one-tenth the rate of nitrate input by recharge. This is consistent with data showing a slow decrease in the [NO3-] of groundwater recharge in recent years. Regarding future [NO3-]FWM and fNO3, predictions based on well data show an immediate decrease that becomes more rapid after ˜5 years before leveling out in the early 2040s. Predictions based on streambed data generally show an increase in future [NO3-]FWM and fNO3 until the late 2020s, followed by a decrease before leveling out in the 2040s. Differences show the potential value of using information directly from the groundwater—surface water interface to quantify the future impact of groundwater nitrate on surface water quality. The choice of denitrification kinetics was similarly important; compared to zero-order kinetics, a first-order rate law levels out estimates of future [NO3-]FWM and fNO3 (lower peak, higher minimum) as legacy nitrate is flushed from the aquifer. Major fundamental questions about nonpoint-source aquifer contamination can be answered without a complex numerical model or long-term monitoring program.

  12. Physiology and interaction of nitrate and nitrite reduction in Staphylococcus carnosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Neubauer, H; Götz, F.

    1996-01-01

    Staphylococcus carnosus reduces nitrate to ammonia in two steps. (i) Nitrate was taken up and reduced to nitrite, and nitrite was subsequently excreted. (ii) After depletion of nitrate, the accumulated nitrite was imported and reduced to ammonia, which again accumulated in the medium. The localization, energy gain, and induction of the nitrate and nitrite reductases in S. carnosus were characterized. Nitrate reductase seems to be a membrane-bound enzyme involved in respiratory energy conserva...

  13. Quantification of naphazoline nitrate by UV-spectrophoto-metry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Panasenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main tasks of pharmaceutical chemistry – medical drugs study. Spectrophotometry is widely used in studying of the structure and composition (complexes, dyes, analytical reagents, etc. of various compounds. It widely used for qualitative and quantitative determination of substances (determination of elements traces in metals, alloys, technical facilities. The dependence between substance structure and its electronic spectrum is being studied by many researchers till nowadays. The aim of this work was to highlight the issues of naphazoline quantify definition techniques by the UV-spectrophotometry. According to the existing methods of quality control (MQC, naphazoline nitrate is a substance quantitatively determined by acid-base titration among a mixture of anhydrous acetic acid and acetic anhydride. Titration is carried out with a solution of 0,1 M perchloric acid (indicator - crystal violet. To check the quality of nasal drops nafazoline nitrate MQC is recommended UV-spectrophotometry: drug is dissolved in boric acid solution (20 g/l as the reference solution used solution pharmacopoeia standard sample substance nafazoline nitrate. The character of UV-spectra of the nafazoline nitrate in solvents of different polarity (water, 95% ethanol, 0,1 M NaOH, 0,1 M HCl, 5M H2SO4, was defined and studied. Standard sample of nafazoline nitrate was obtained from the State Enterprise "Scientific and Expert Pharmacopoeia Centre Ukraine". In order to study UV-spectra nafazoline nitrate spectrophotometer SPECORD 200-222U214 (Germany was used. UV-spectrum of nafazoline nitrate in water and 95% ethanol are characterized by two maxima at 270 and 280 nm. Absorption band of nafazoline nitrate in 0, 1 M sodium hydroxide has two maxima at 271 and 280 nm, and in 0, 1 M solution of hydrochloric acid and 5 M solution of sulfuric acid maxima coincide with the maxima spectrum of the drug in water, 95% ethanol. In order to avoid errors associated with

  14. Microbial response to nitrate treatment in offshore oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boedtker, Gunhild

    2009-07-01

    North Sea oil reservoirs are often injected with deaerated sea water in order to enhance oil recovery. The high sulphate content of sea water combined with the anoxic conditions stimulates growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the water injection system and the reservoir. SRB produce the highly toxic and corrosive gas hydrogen sulphide (HZS) during anaerobic respiration with sulphate. Accumulation of HZS leads to corrosion and reservoir souring, which may result in reduced gas quality, separation problems and increased maintenance costs. Biocides have traditionally been used to prevent SRB activity in North Sea oil fields. During the last decade, however, the environmentally sound method of nitrate treatment has replaced biocides on several fields. The method is based on shifting the microbial activity from sulphate reduction to nitrate reduction by introducing nitrate as an alternative electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration. Results presented in the current thesis show that nitrate treatment has resulted in long-term inhibition of SRB activity and a reduction in corrosion of up to 40% in sea water injection systems at the Veslefrikk and Gullfaks oil fields. Molecular analysis (PCR-DGGE) of pipeline biofilm from Veslefrikk showed that sulphide-oxidizing nitrate-reducing bacteria (NR-SOB) constituted the major metabolic group during nitrate treatment, and that the bacterial community composition remained stable during years. Reduction in sulphide produced from the Gullfaks field showed that nitrate treatment was effective also at reservoir level. Analysis of back flowed injection water from a nitrate-treated Statfjord reservoir showed that heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (hNRB) constituted the major metabolic group, and that the in situ HZS level was 10 fold lower than experienced during biocides treatment and 100 fold lower than experienced during produced water reinjection (PWRI). At the Norne oil field oxic sea water is injected along with

  15. Nitrate reduction in water by aluminum alloys particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zunsheng; Hu, Qing; Qi, Weikang; Tang, Yang; Wang, Wei; Wan, Pingyu; Chao, Jingbo; Yang, Xiao Jin

    2017-07-01

    Nano zero-valent iron (NZVI) particles have been extensively investigated for nitrate reduction in water. However, the reduction by NZVI requires acidic pH conditions and the final product is exclusively ammonium, leading to secondary contamination. In addition, nanomaterials have potential threats to environment and the transport and storage of nanomaterials are of safety concerns. Aluminum, the most abundant metal element in the earth's crust, is able to reduce nitrate, but the passivation of aluminum limits its application. Here we report Al alloys (85% Al) with Fe, Cu or Si for aqueous nitrate reduction. The Al alloys particles of 0.85-0.08 mm were inactivate under ambient conditions and a simple treatment with warm water (45 °C) quickly activated the alloy particles for rapid reduction of nitrate. The Al-Fe alloy particles at a dosage of 5 g/L rapidly reduced 50 mg-N/L nitrate at a reaction rate constant (k) of 3.2 ± 0.1 (mg-N/L)1.5/min between pH 5-6 and at 4.0 ± 0.1 (mg-N/L)1.5/min between pH 9-11. Dopping Cu in the Al-Fe alloy enhanced the rates of reduction whereas dopping Si reduced the reactivity of the Al-Fe alloy. The Al alloys converted nitrate to 20% nitrogen and 80% ammonium. Al in the alloy particles provided electrons for the reduction and the intermetallic compounds in the alloys were likely to catalyze nitrate reduction to nitrogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating the source of streamwater nitrate using d15N and d18O in nitrate in two watersheds in New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda H. Pardo; Carol Kendall; Jennifer Pett-Ridge; Cecily C.Y. Chang; Cecily C.Y. Chang

    2004-01-01

    The natural abundance of nitrogen and oxygen isotopes in nitrate can be a powerful tool for identifying the source of nitrate in streamwater in forested watersheds, because the two main sources of nitrate, atmospheric deposition and microbial nitrification, have distinct d18O values. Using a simple mixing model, we estimated the relative fractions in streamwater...

  17. Analytical Characterization of the Thorium Nitrate Stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, CH

    2003-12-30

    For several years, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been supporting the Defense Logistics Agency-Defense National Stockpile Center with stewardship of a thorium nitrate (ThN) stockpile. The effort for fiscal year 2002 was to prepare a sampling and analysis plan and to use the activities developed in the plan to characterize the ThN stockpile. The sampling was performed in June and July 2002 by RWE NUKEM with oversight by ORNL personnel. The analysis was performed by Southwest Research Institute of San Antonio, Texas, and data validation was performed by NFT, Inc., of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Of the {approx} 21,000 drums in the stockpile, 99 were sampled and 53 were analyzed for total metals composition, radiological constituents (using alpha and gamma spectrometry), and oxidizing characteristics. Each lot at the Curtis Bay Depot was sampled. Several of the samples were also analyzed for density. The average density of the domestic ThN was found to be 1.89 {+-} 0.08 g/cm{sup 3}. The oxidizer test was performed following procedures issued by the United Nations in 1999. Test results indicated that none of the samples tested was a Division 5.1 oxidizer per Department of Transportation definition. The samples were analyzed for total metals following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency methods SW-846-6010B and 6020 (EPA 2003) using a combination of inductively coupled plasma--atomic emission spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma--mass spectroscopy techniques. The results were used to compare the composition of the eight Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals present in the sample (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, mercury, selenium, and silver) to regulatory limits. None of the samples was found to be hazardous for toxicity characteristics. The radiological analyses confirmed, when possible, the results obtained by the inductively coupled plasma analyses. These results--combined with the historical process knowledge acquired on the material

  18. Nitrates in SNCs: Implications for the nitrogen cycle on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Monica M.; Wright, I. P.; Franchi, I. A.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Nitrogen is the second most abundant constituent of the Martian atmosphere, after CO2, present at a level of ca. 2.7 percent. Several authors have hypothesized that earlier in the planet's history, nitrogen was more abundant, but has been removed by processes such as exospheric loss from the atmosphere. However, an alternative sink for atmospheric nitrogen is the regolith; model calculations have predicted that, via the formation of NOx, HNO2 and HNO3 in the lower layers of the Martian atmosphere, the regolith might trap nitrite and nitrate anions, leading to the build-up of involatile nitrates. Integrated over 4.5 x 10(exp 9) yr, such a mechanism would contribute the equivalent of a layer of nitrates up to 0.3 cm thick distributed across the Martian surface. Features in thermal emission spectra of the surface of Mars have been interpreted tentatively as emanating from various anions (carbonates, bicarbonates, sulphates, etc.), and the presence of nitrates has also been addressed as a possibility. The identification of carbonates in SCN meteorites has allowed inferences to be drawn concerning the composition and evolution of the Martian atmosphere in terms of its carbon isotope systematics; if nitrites, nitrates, or other nitrogen-bearing salts could be isolated from SNC's, similar conclusions might be possible for an analogous nitrogen cycle. Nitrates are unstable, being readily soluble in water, and decomposed at temperatures between 50 C and 600 C, depending on composition. Any nitrates present in SNC's might be removed during ejection from the planet's surface, passage to Earth, or during the sample's terrestrial history, by weathering etc. The same might have been said for carbonates, but pockets of shock-produced glass (lithology C) from within the EET A79001 shergottite and bulk samples of other SNC contain this mineral, which did apparently survive. Nitrates occurring within the glassy melt pockets of lithology C in EET A79001 might likewise be protected

  19. Seasonal Variations of Nitrate Concentrations In Agricultural Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C.; Aquilina, L.; Gascuel-Odoux, C.; Molénat, J.; Ruiz, L.

    Nitrate concentrations in streams of agricultural catchments with impervious bedrock often present an interannual variability (due to landuse changes) and a seasonal one. Usually seasonal variations are characterised by high concentrations in winter and low in summer. Some catchments may present intermediate or inverse cycles (high con- centrations in summer). Two hypothesis to explain classical variations of nitrate con- centrations in streams exist: (i) the availibility of nitrate in the soil for leaching and (ii) the temporal variations of the nitrate-rich shallow groundwater. The aim of this study is to explain the occurence of classical or inverse scheme of seasonal variations by testing these two existing hypothesis and proposing an alternative one for inverse cycles. Two catchments with different seasonal variations (KERRIEN catchment : normal cycle, and KERBERNEZ catchment : inverse cycle), located in the South Western French Brittany, were instrumented in 2001 with a set of 22 piezometers in- stalled at different depths and located along the hillslope. The water table dynamic and chemestry (nitrate, chloride, carbon, Rare Earth Elements,...) had been measured weekly during one year. The shallow groundwater of the Kerrien catchment is char- acterised by two lateral domains with a temporal stability of concentrations : the bot- tom land, constantly denitrified, and the upper domain with nitrate concentrations around 60 mg.L(-1) . The Kerbernez catchment is characterised by two vertical domains with a temporal rise of concentrations : the upper domain with nitrate concen- trations around 60 mg.L(-1) , as the Kerrien catchment, and a deeper compartment, with concentrations excedeed 100 to 120 mg.L(-1) of nitrate. On the Kerrien catchment, the classical cycle is due to the most important contribution of the shal- low groundwater in winter. The inverse cycle of the Kerbernez catchment may be due to the most important contribution of the deep compartment in

  20. Potential Radon-222 Emissions from the Thorium Nitrate Stockpile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.W.

    2003-09-04

    The Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC), a field level activity of the Defense Logistics Agency, has stewardship of a stockpile of thorium nitrate that has been in storage for decades. The thorium nitrate stockpile was produced from 1959 to 1964 for the Atomic Energy Commission and previously has been under the control of several federal agencies. The stockpile consists of approximately 7 million pounds of thorium nitrate crystals (hydrate form) stored at two depot locations in the United States (75% by weight at Curtis Bay, Maryland, and 25% by weight at Hammond, Indiana). The material is stored in several configurations in over 21,000 drums. The U.S. Congress has declared the entire DNSC thorium nitrate stockpile to be in excess of the needs of the Department of Defense. Part of DNSC's mission is to safely manage the continued storage, future sales, and/or disposition of the thorium nitrate stockpile. Historically, DNSC has sold surplus thorium nitrate to domestic and foreign companies, but there is no demand currently for this material. Analyses conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2001 demonstrated that disposition of the thorium nitrate inventory as a containerized waste, without processing, is the least complex and lowest-cost option for disposition. A characterization study was conducted in 2002 by ORNL, and it was determined that the thorium nitrate stockpile may be disposed of as low-level waste. The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was used as a case study for the disposal alternative, and special radiological analyses and waste acceptance requirements were documented. Among the special radiological considerations is the emission of {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn from buried material. NTS has a performance objective on the emissions of radon: 20 pCi m{sup -2} sec{sup -1} at the surface of the disposal facility. The radon emissions from the buried thorium nitrate stockpile have been modeled. This paper presents background information and

  1. Influence of carbon source on nitrate removal by nitrate-tolerant Klebsiella oxytoca CECT 4460 in batch and chemostat cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinar, G.; Ramos, J.L. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Granada (Spain); Kovarova, K.; Egli, T. [Swiss Federal Inst. for Environmental Science and Technology, Duebendorf (Switzerland). Dept. of Microbiology

    1998-08-01

    The nitrate-tolerant organism Klebsiella oxytoca CECT-4460 tolerates nitrate at concentrations up to 1 M and is used to treat wastewater with high nitrate loads in industrial wastewater treatment plants. The authors studied the influence of the C source (glycerol or sucrose or both) on the growth rate and the efficiency of nitrate removal under laboratory conditions. With sucrose as the sole C source the maximum specific growth rate was 0.3 h{sup {minus}1}, whereas with glycerol it was 0.45 h{sup {minus}1}. In batch cultures K. oxytoca cells grown on sucrose or glycerol were able to immediately use sucrose as a sole C source, suggesting that sucrose uptake and metabolism were constitutive. In contrast, glycerol uptake occurred preferentially in glycerol-grown cells. Independent of the preculture conditions, when sucrose and glycerol were added simultaneously to batch cultures, the sucrose was used first, and once the supply of sucrose was exhausted, the glycerol was consumed. Utilization of nitrate as an N source occurred without nitrite of ammonium accumulation when glycerol was used, but nitrite accumulated when sucrose was used. In chemostat cultures K. oxytoca CECT 4460 efficiently removed nitrate without accumulation of nitrite or ammonium when sucrose, glycerol, or mixtures of these two C sources were used. The growth yields and the efficiencies of C and N utilization were determined at different growth rates in chemostat cultures. Regardless of the C source, yield carbon (Y{sub C}) ranged between 1.3 and 1.0 g (dry weight) per g of sucrose C or glycerol C consumed. Regardless of the specific growth rate and the C source, yield nitrogen (Y{sub N}) ranged from 17.2 to 12.5 g (dry weight) per g of nitrate N consumed.

  2. Antiinflammatory actions of inorganic nitrate stabilize the atherosclerotic plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khambata, Rayomand S.; Ghosh, Suborno M.; Rathod, Krishnaraj S.; Thevathasan, Tharssana; Filomena, Federica; Xiao, Qingzhong; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2017-01-01

    Reduced bioavailable nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in the enhanced leukocyte recruitment reflective of systemic inflammation thought to precede and underlie atherosclerotic plaque formation and instability. Recent evidence demonstrates that inorganic nitrate (NO3−) through sequential chemical reduction in vivo provides a source of NO that exerts beneficial effects upon the cardiovascular system, including reductions in inflammatory responses. We tested whether the antiinflammatory effects of inorganic nitrate might prove useful in ameliorating atherosclerotic disease in Apolipoprotein (Apo)E knockout (KO) mice. We show that dietary nitrate treatment, although having no effect upon total plaque area, caused a reduction in macrophage accumulation and an elevation in smooth muscle accumulation within atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE KO mice, suggesting plaque stabilization. We also show that in nitrate-fed mice there is reduced systemic leukocyte rolling and adherence, circulating neutrophil numbers, neutrophil CD11b expression, and myeloperoxidase activity compared with wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show in both the ApoE KO mice and using an acute model of inflammation that this effect upon neutrophils results in consequent reductions in inflammatory monocyte expression that is associated with elevations of the antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10. In summary, we demonstrate that inorganic nitrate suppresses acute and chronic inflammation by targeting neutrophil recruitment and that this effect, at least in part, results in consequent reductions in the inflammatory status of atheromatous plaque, and suggest that this effect may have clinical utility in the prophylaxis of inflammatory atherosclerotic disease. PMID:28057862

  3. Nitrates in drinking water: relation with intensive livestock production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarino, M; Quatto, P

    2015-01-01

    An excess of nitrates causes environmental pollution in receiving water bodies and health risk for human, if contaminated water is source of drinking water. The directive 91/676/ CEE [1] aims to reduce the nitrogen pressure in Europe from agriculture sources and identifies the livestock population as one of the predominant sources of surplus of nutrients that could be released in water and air. Directive is concerned about cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry and their territorial loads, but it does not deal with fish farms. Fish farms effluents may contain pollutants affecting ecosystem water quality. On the basis of multivariate statistical analysis, this paper aims to establish what types of farming affect the presence of nitrates in drinking water in the province of Cuneo, Piedmont, Italy. In this regard, we have used data from official sources on nitrates in drinking water and data Arvet database, concerning the presence of intensive farming in the considered area. For model selection we have employed automatic variable selection algorithm. We have identified fish farms as a major source of nitrogen released into the environment, while pollution from sheep and poultry has appeared negligible. We would like to emphasize the need to include in the "Nitrate Vulnerable Zones" (as defined in Directive 91/676/CEE [1]), all areas where there are intensive farming of fish with open-system type of water use. Besides, aquaculture open-system should be equipped with adequate downstream system of filtering for removing nitrates in the wastewater.

  4. Summary of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Geoffrey Wayne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leonard, Philip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hartline, Ernest Leon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tian, Hongzhao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    High Explosives Science and Technology (M-7) completed all required formulation and testing of Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) surrogates on April 27, 2016 as specified in PLAN-TA9-2443 Rev B, "Remediated Nitrate Salt (RNS) Surrogate Formulation and Testing Standard Procedure", released February 16, 2016. This report summarizes the results of the work and also includes additional documentation required in that test plan. All formulation and testing was carried out according to PLAN-TA9-2443 Rev B. The work was carried out in three rounds, with the full matrix of samples formulated and tested in each round. Results from the first round of formulation and testing were documented in memorandum M7-J6-6042, " Results from First Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing." Results from the second round of formulation and testing were documented in M7-16-6053 , "Results from the Second Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Surrogate Formulation and Testing." Initial results from the third round were documented in M7-16-6057, "Initial Results from the Third Round of Remediated Nitrate Salt Formulation and Testing."

  5. Removal of nitrate and phosphate from aqueous solutions by microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Sayadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of microalgae Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgaris to remove nitrate and phosphate in aqueous solutions. Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgar is microalgae was collected in 1000 ml of municipal water and KNO3, K2HPO4 was added as sources of nitrate and phosphate in three different concentrations (0.25, 0.35 and 0.45g/L. During the growth period, the concentration of nitrate and phosphate was recorded at 1, 4, 6 and 8 days. The highest nitrate removal on the 8 day for Chlorella vulgaris was 89.80% at the treatment of 0.25g/L and for Spirulina platensis was 81.49% at the treatment of 0.25g/L. The highest phosphate removal for Spirulina platensis was 81.49% at the treatment of 0.45g/L and for Chlorella vulgaris was 88% at the treatment of 0.45g/L. The statistical results showed that the amount of phosphate and nitrate removal during different time periods by Chlorella vulgaris depicted a significant difference at P

  6. Nitrate and ammonia as nitrogen sources for deep subsurface microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heini eKutvonen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the N-utilizing bacterial community in anoxic brackish groundwater of the low and intermediate level nuclear waste repository cave in Olkiluoto, Finland, at 100 m depth using 15N-based stable isotope probing (SIP and enrichment with 14/15N-ammonium or 14/15N-nitrate complemented with methane. 28 days of incubation at 12°C increased the concentration of bacterial 16S rRNA and nitrate reductase (narG gene copies in the substrate amended microcosms simultaneously with a radical drop in the overall bacterial diversity and OTU richness. Hydrogenophaga/Malikia were enriched in all substrate amended microcosms and Methylobacter in the ammonium and ammonium+methane supplemented microcosms. Sulfuricurvum was especially abundant in the nitrate+methane treatment and the unamended incubation control. Membrane-bound nitrate reductase genes (narG from Polarimonas sp. were detected in the original groundwater, while Burkholderia, Methylibium and Pseudomonas narG genes were enriched due to substrate supplements. Identified amoA genes belonged to Nitrosomonas sp. 15N-SIP revealed that Burkholderiales and Rhizobiales clades belonging to the minority groups in the original groundwater used 15N from ammonium and nitrate as N source indicating an important ecological function of these bacteria, despite their low number, in the groundwater N cycle in Olkiluoto bedrock system.

  7. Comparison of Nitrate Attenuation Characterization Methods for Groundwater Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, K. C.; Jordan, F. L.; Glenn, E. P.; Waugh, J.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2008-12-01

    Nitrate released from a former uranium mine tailings stockpile has contaminated groundwater near Monument Valley, Arizona. The results of previous studies suggest that nitrate attenuation is occurring at the site, but the feasibility of using natural attenuation as a remediation strategy remains uncertain. This investigation characterized the occurrence and rate of natural attenuation at the site using several methods. Spatial and temporal nitrate concentration data collected from a transect of monitoring wells located along the plume centerline were analyzed to evaluate overall rates of natural attenuation. The occurrence and rate of denitrification was evaluated through microcosm experiments, nitrogen isotopic fractionation analysis, and solute transport modeling. First-order rate coefficients calculated for each method were comparable. The composite natural attenuation rate coefficient was larger than the denitrification rate coefficient, which suggests that a combination of biological decay and dispersion/diffusion processes control nitrate attenuation at the site. Model simulations were conducted to estimate the time required for nitrate concentrations in the plume to decrease to 10 mg/L under existing conditions, which was approximately 150 years. Additional simulations were conducted to assess the potential reduction in cleanup time that would result from implementing enhanced denitrification via either methanol or ethanol injection. The results indicated that cleanup would be attained in approximately one-third the time estimated for natural attenuation.

  8. Nitrate reduction by green rusts modified with trace metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongyun; Batchelor, Bill; Won, Chanhee; Chung, Jinwook

    2012-02-01

    A kinetic study of nitrate reduction by green rust (GR), a group of layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxide solids, was performed using a batch reactor system. The reduction rate of nitrate by GRs was affected by the anion content in the interlayer of GRs. GR containing F(-) (GR-F) showed the fastest reduction rate while GR-SO(4) showed 9 times slower reaction rate than GR-F. The addition of 1mM Pt or Cu to GR that contained 85 mM Fe(II) improved the reduction kinetics of nitrate by up to 200 times. Pt was an effective activating agent for all GRs. The sequential step reaction model that we proposed appropriately simulated the experimental data. The fastest nitrate reduction by GR-F with Pt was achieved at pH 9 among 7.5 to 11. At that condition, 1mM nitrate transformed completely into ammonium within 23 min. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluating simultaneous chromate and nitrate reduction during microbial denitrification processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Chen, Xueming; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-02-01

    Sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification and heterotrophic denitrification have been demonstrated to be promising technological processes for simultaneous removal of nitrate NO3(-) and chromate (Cr (VI)), two common contaminants in surface and ground waters. In this work, a mathematical model was developed to describe and evaluate the microbial and substrate interactions among sulfur oxidizing denitrifying organism, methanol-based heterotrophic denitrifiers and chromate reducing bacteria in the biofilm systems for simultaneous nitrate and chromate removal. The concomitant multiple chromate reduction pathways by these microbes were taken into account in this model. The validity of the model was tested using experimental data from three independent biofilm reactors under autotrophic, heterotrophic and mixotrophic conditions. The model sufficiently described the nitrate, chromate, methanol, and sulfate dynamics under varying conditions. The modeling results demonstrated the coexistence of sulfur-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria and heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria in the biofilm under mixotrophic conditions, with chromate reducing bacteria being outcompeted. The sulfur-oxidizing denitrifying bacteria substantially contributed to both nitrate and chromate reductions although heterotrophic denitrifying bacteria dominated in the biofilm. The mixotrophic denitrification could improve the tolerance of autotrophic denitrifying bacteria to Cr (VI) toxicity. Furthermore, HRT would play an important role in affecting the microbial distribution and system performance, with HRT of higher than 0.15 day being critical for a high level removal of nitrate and chromate (over 90%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Spatially distributed nitrate reduction potential in the saturated zone in till areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Lausten

    The topic of this PhD study was modeling of spatially distributed nitrate transport and reduction at catchment scale, which is of interest in order to delineate so-called nitrate sensitive and nitrate robust areas with respectively low and high nitrate reduction potential. The research firstly...... into the uncertainty on the estimated nitrate reduction potentials and evaluated on the predictive capability of catchment scale models. Among other results, the study found that geological uncertainty give rise to large uncertainty on the predicted nitrate reduction at grid scale, but the uncertainty decreased...... predictive capabilities. The main outcome from this PhD research was that nitrate sensitive and nitrate robust areas can be predicted using a physically-based distributed model, but since catchment models most often lack predictive capabilities at grid scale the uncertainty on the estimated nitrate reduction...

  11. The changing trend in nitrate concentrations in major aquifers due to historical nitrate loading from agricultural land across England and Wales from 1925 to 2150

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L., E-mail: lei.wang@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Stuart, M.E.; Lewis, M.A. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Ward, R.S. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Skirvin, D. [ADAS UK Ltd., Pendeford House, Pendeford Business Park, Wobaston Road, Wolverhampton WV9 5AP (United Kingdom); Naden, P.S. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom); Collins, A.L. [Sustainable Soils and Grassland Systems Department, Rothamsted Research, North Wyke, Okehampton EX20 2SB (United Kingdom); Ascott, M.J. [British Geological Survey, Maclean Building, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Nitrate is necessary for agricultural productivity, but can cause considerable problems if released into aquatic systems. Agricultural land is the major source of nitrates in UK groundwater. Due to the long time-lag in the groundwater system, it could take decades for leached nitrate from the soil to discharge into freshwaters. However, this nitrate time-lag has rarely been considered in environmental water management. Against this background, this paper presents an approach to modelling groundwater nitrate at the national scale, to simulate the impacts of historical nitrate loading from agricultural land on the evolution of groundwater nitrate concentrations. An additional process-based component was constructed for the saturated zone of significant aquifers in England and Wales. This uses a simple flow model which requires modelled recharge values, together with published aquifer properties and thickness data. A spatially distributed and temporally variable nitrate input function was also introduced. The sensitivity of parameters was analysed using Monte Carlo simulations. The model was calibrated using national nitrate monitoring data. Time series of annual average nitrate concentrations along with annual spatially distributed nitrate concentration maps from 1925 to 2150 were generated for 28 selected aquifer zones. The results show that 16 aquifer zones have an increasing trend in nitrate concentration, while average nitrate concentrations in the remaining 12 are declining. The results are also indicative of the trend in the flux of groundwater nitrate entering rivers through baseflow. The model thus enables the magnitude and timescale of groundwater nitrate response to be factored into source apportionment tools and to be taken into account alongside current planning of land-management options for reducing nitrate losses. - Highlights: • An approach to modelling groundwater nitrate at the national scale is presented. • The long time-lag for nitrate in the

  12. Nitrate and nitrite content of human, formula, bovine, and soy milks: implications for dietary nitrite and nitrate recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Norman G; Ghannam, Janine S; Garg, Harsha K; Berens, Pamela D; Bryan, Nathan S

    2011-12-01

    Estimation of nitrate and nitrite concentrations of milk sources may provide insight into potential health risks and benefits of these food sources for infants, children, and adults. The World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive consumption of human milk for the first 6 months of life. Human milk is known to confer significant nutritional and immunological benefits for the infant. Consumption of formula, cow's, and soy milk may be used as alternatives to human milk for infants. We sought to estimate potential exposure to nitrate and nitrite in human, formula, bovine, and soy milk to inform total dietary exposure estimates and recommendations. Using sensitive quantitative methodologies, nitrite and nitrate were analyzed in different samples of milk. Human milk concentrations of colostrum (expressed days 1-3 postpartum; n=12), transition milk (expressed days 3-7 postpartum; n=17), and mature milk (expressed >7 days postpartum; n=50) were 0.08 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.19 mg/100 mL nitrate, 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.52 mg/100 mL nitrate, and 0.001 mg/100 mL nitrite and 0.3 mg/100 mL nitrate, respectively, revealing that the absolute amounts of these anions change as the composition of milk changes. When expressed as a percentage of the World Health Organization's Acceptable Daily Intake limits, Silk® Soy Vanilla (WhiteWave Foods, Broomfield, CO) intake could result in high nitrate intakes (104% of this standard), while intake of Bright Beginnings Soy Pediatric® formula (PBM Nutritionals, Georgia, VT) could result in the highest nitrite intakes (383% of this standard). The temporal relationship between the provision of nitrite in human milk and the development of commensal microbiota capable of reducing dietary nitrate to nitrite supports a hypothesis that humans are adapted to provide nitrite to the gastrointestinal tract from birth. These data support the hypothesis that the high concentrations of

  13. Reduction of nitrate and nitrite salts under hydrothermal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foy, B.R.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Wilmanns, E.; McInroy, R.; Ely, J.; Robinson, J.M.; Buelow, S.J.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of reducing nitrate/nitrite salts under hydrothermal conditions for the treatment of aqueous mixed wastes stored in the underground tanks at the Department of Energy site at Hanford, Washington was studied. The reduction of nitrate and nitrite salts by reaction with EDTA using a tank waste simulant was examined at temperatures between 623K and 800K and pressures between 0.6 and 1.2 kbar. Continuous flow reactors were used to determine kinetics and products of reactions. All reactions were studied under pressures high enough to produce single phase conditions. The reactions are rapid, go to completion in less than a minute, and produce simple products, such as carbonate, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide gases. The experimental results demonstrate the ability of chemical reactions under hydrothermal conditions to reduce the nitrate and nitrite salts and destroy organic compounds in the waste mixtures.

  14. A field diagnostic test for the improvised explosive urea nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Joseph; Klein, Asne; Tamiri, Tsippy; Shloosh, Yael; Abramovich-Bar, Sara

    2005-05-01

    A sensitive, specific and simple color test for the improvised explosive urea nitrate is described. It is based on the formation of a red pigment upon the reaction between urea nitrate and p-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (p-DMAC) under neutral conditions. Urea itself, which is the starting material for urea nitrate, does not react with p-DMAC under the same conditions. Other potential sources of false positive response e.g., common fertilizers, medications containing the urea moiety and various amines, do not produce the red pigment with p-DMAC. Exhibits collected from 10 terrorist cases have been tested with p-DMAC. The results were in full agreement with those obtained by instrumental techniques including GC/MS, XRD and IR.

  15. Colorimetric detection of urea nitrate: the missing link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, Rinat; Almog, Joseph

    2011-05-20

    Traces of the improvised explosive urea nitrate can be characterized by a sensitive colorimetric reaction with p-dimethylaminocinnamalaldehyde (p-DMAC, UN-1 reagent). As recently shown, the dark red product has a structure of a protonated Schiff base. The unprotonated free base, previously postulated in the literature to be the colored product, was now prepared and fully characterized. It shows totally different spectroscopic properties from the dark red compound. Similarly, the analogous free base of the reaction between urea nitrate and the one-vinyl shorter reagent, p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde, was synthesized and characterized. Similar differences between the free and protonated forms were observed. The protonated Schiff base spontaneously decomposes to the free base over time. This study provides the missing link in the elucidation of the colorimetric reaction between urea nitrate and UN-1. Both colored products show characteristics of typical acid-base indicators. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Particulate organic nitrates: Sampling and night/day variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Platz, J.; Granby, K.

    1998-01-01

    Atmospheric day and night concentrations of particulate organic nitrates (PON) and several other air pollutants were measured in the summer 1995 over an open-land area in Denmark. The sampling of PON was evaluated comparing 24 h samples with two sets of 12 h samples. These results indicate...... that the observed low contribution of PON to NO, is real and not the result of an extensive loss during the sampling. Empirical relationships between the vapour pressure and chemical formula of organic compounds were established in order to evaluate the gas/particle distribution of organic nitrates. A positive...... correlation between the PON to NO, ratio and the inverse temperature may indicate that the organic nitrates associated with particles also may be present in the gas phase. The deserved day and nighttime levels of PON were of the same magnitude, although the day to night ratio vaned from 0.4 to 4.4. (C) 1998...

  17. High pressure Raman spectra of monoglycine nitrate single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, J. O.; Moura, G. M.; Dos Santos, A. O.; Lima, R. J. C.; Freire, P. T. C.; Façanha Filho, P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Single crystal of monoglycine nitrate has been studied by Raman spectroscopy under high pressures up to 5.5 GPa. The results show changes in lattice modes in the pressure ranges of 1.1-1.6 GPa and 4.0-4.6 GPa. The first change occurs with appearance of bands related to the lattice modes as well as discontinuity in the slope of dΩ/dP of these modes. Moreover, bands associated with the skeleton of glycine suggest that the molecule undergoes conformational modifications. The appearance of a strong band at 55 cm- 1 point to a second phase transition associated with the lattice modes, while the internal modes remain unchanged. These anomalies are probably due to rearrangement of hydrogen bonds. Additionally, decompression to ambient pressure shows that the phase transitions are reversible. Finally, the results show that the nitrate anions play an important role on the stability of the monoglycine nitrate crystal.

  18. Glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis of oxide ceramic powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chick, L.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Maupin, G.D.; Bates, J.L.; Thomas, L.E.; Exarhos, G.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1990-09-01

    A new combustion synthesis method, the glycine-nitrate process, has been used to prepare oxide ceramic powders, including substituted chromite and manganite powders of high quality. A precursor was prepared by combining glycine with metal nitrates in their appropriate stoichiometric ratios in an aqueous solution. The precursor was heated to evaporate excess water, yielding a viscous liquid. Further heating to about 180[degrees]C caused the precursor liquid to autoignite. Combustion was rapid and self-sustaining, with flame temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1450[degrees]C. The chromite product was compositionally homogeneous with a specific surface area of 32 m[sup 2]/g, while the manganite product was composed of two distinct phases with a 23 m[sup 2]/g surface area after calcination. When compared to similar compositions made using the amorphous citrate process, glycine-nitrate-produced powders had greater compositional uniformity, lower residual carbon levels and smaller particle sizes.

  19. Mass-balance model for predicting nitrate in ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpter, Michael H.; Donohue, John J.; Rapacz, Michael V.

    1990-01-01

    A mass-balance accounting model can be used to guide the management of septic systems and fertilizers to control the degradation of ground-water quality in zones of an aquifer that contribute water to public-supply wells. The nitrate concentration of the mixture in the well can be predicted for steady-state conditions by calculating the concentration that results from the total weight of nitrogen and total volume of water entering the zone of contribution to the well. These calculations will allow water-quality managers to predict the nitrate concentrations that would be produced by different types and levels of development, and to plan development accordingly. Computations for different development schemes provide a technical basis for planners and managers to compare water-quality effects and to select alternatives that limit nitrate concentration in wells.

  20. Cyclopentadienyl complexes of hafnium and zirconium containing nitrate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minacheva, M.Kh.; Brajnina, Eh.M.; Klemenkova, Z.S.; Lokshin, B.V.; Nikolaeva, T.D.; Zhdanov, S.I.; Petrovskij, P.V. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Ehlementoorganicheskikh Soedinenij)

    1983-06-01

    New types of monocyclopentadienyl nitrate complexes of zirconium and hafnium CpHf(DBM)(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ and CpHfCl/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)x4H/sub 2/O (DBM = dibenzoylmethane residue) are synthesized. CpMCl/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/) dichlorides are formed during the reaction of CpM(chel)/sub 2/Cl and HNO/sub 3/ as a result of the interaction of the extracted HCl with the CpM(chel)/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/) exchange product. A supposition is made about the non-ionic character of the metal-nitrate bonds and the bidentate character of the nitrate ligands in Cp/sub 2/M(NO/sub 3/)Cl on the base of studying the electric conductivity, IR- and Raman spectra.

  1. Assessing bottled water nitrate concentrations to evaluate total drinking water nitrate exposure and risk of birth defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, Peter J; Brender, Jean D; Romitti, Paul A; Kantamneni, Jiji R; Crawford, David; Sharkey, Joseph R; Shinde, Mayura; Horel, Scott A; Vuong, Ann M; Langlois, Peter H

    2014-12-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies of maternal exposure to drinking water nitrate did not account for bottled water consumption. The objective of this National Birth Defects Prevention Study (NBDPS) (USA) analysis was to assess the impact of bottled water use on the relation between maternal exposure to drinking water nitrate and selected birth defects in infants born during 1997-2005. Prenatal residences of 1,410 mothers reporting exclusive bottled water use were geocoded and mapped; 326 bottled water samples were collected and analyzed using Environmental Protection Agency Method 300.0. Median bottled water nitrate concentrations were assigned by community; mothers' overall intake of nitrate in mg/day from drinking water was calculated. Odds ratios for neural tube defects, limb deficiencies, oral cleft defects, and heart defects were estimated using mixed-effects models for logistic regression. Odds ratios (95% CIs) for the highest exposure group in offspring of mothers reporting exclusive use of bottled water were: neural tube defects [1.42 (0.51, 3.99)], limb deficiencies [1.86 (0.51, 6.80)], oral clefts [1.43 (0.61, 3.31)], and heart defects [2.13, (0.87, 5.17)]. Bottled water nitrate had no appreciable impact on risk for birth defects in the NBDPS.

  2. The identification of the nitrate assimilation related genes in the novel Bacillus megaterium NCT-2 accounts for its ability to use nitrate as its only source of nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weiwei; Lu, Wei; Liu, Qunlu; Zhi, Yuee; Zhou, Pei

    2014-03-01

    Bacillus megaterium NCT-2 is a novel bacterium that can utilize nitrate as its only nitrogen source for growth.The nitrate assimilation related genes that are involved in this process would be expected to be crucial. However, little is known about the genomic background of this bacterium,let alone the sequences of the nitrate assimilation related genes. In order to further investigate the nitrate assimilation function of the NCT-2, genome sequencing was performed.After obtaining the fine map of the NCT-2 genome, which was submitted to the NCBI GenBank (AHTF00000000), the sequences of the nitrate assimilation related genes (the nitrate reductase electron transfer subunit nasB and the nitrate reductase catalytic subunit nasC, the nitrite reductase [NAD(P)H]large subunit nasD and the nitrite reductase [NAD(P)H] small subunit nasE, and the glutamine synthetase glnA) were identified.Multiple alignments were performed to find out the sequence identities of the nitrate assimilation related genes to that of their similar species. Through KEGG signaling mapping search, the nitrate assimilation related genes were revealed to be located in the nitrogen metabolism signaling pathway. The putative 3D protein structures of these genes were modeled by SWISS MODEL, and shown to be highly similar to the nitrate assimilation related genes in the PDB database. Finally, the sequence validity of the nitrate assimilation related genes was verified by PCR with specifically designed primers.

  3. NITRATE IN LEAFY GREEN VEGETABLES AND ESTIMATED INTAKE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brkić, Danijel; Bošnir, Jasna; Bevardi, Martina; Bošković, Andrea Gross; Miloš, Sanja; Lasić, Dario; Krivohlavek, Adela; Racz, Aleksandar; Ćuić, Ana Mojsović; Trstenjak, Natalija Uršulin

    2017-01-01

    Vegetarian diets are rich in vegetables. Green leafy vegetables are foods that contain considerable amounts of nitrate, which can have both positive and negative effects on the human body. Their potential carcinogenicity and toxicity have been proven, particularly after the reduction of nitrate to nitrite itself or just serving as a reactant with amines and/or amides in the formation of N-nitroso compounds -N-nitrosamines and other nitrogen compounds which may have high levels of nitrate. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference, considering the location and seasonal sampling period, in the level of nitrate in certain types of green vegetables, all in order to be able to assess their intake, and possible impact on human health, especially knowing that exposure to nitrate can be potentially higher for vegetarian population group. For this purpose, the sampling of 200 different leafy green vegetables was conducted, all of which could be found in free sale in the Republic of Croatia. The sampling was conducted during two seasonal periods - the spring and autumn period. In the springtime, lettuce (sem), spinach (pinacho), kale (kale), chard (mangel) and cabbage (brassica) were sampled, and in autumn lettuce, spinach, kale, chard and arugula. Samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. The results from the spring sampling phase were in the range of 603 mg/kg for cabbage - 972 mg/kg for chard, and for autumn phase of 1.024 mg/kg for chard to 4.354 mg/kg for the arugula. The results showed that there were significant differences (p vegetables contain significant amounts of nitrate in their composition, which represents relatively significant, but still acceptable intake into the human body.

  4. Removal of Nitrate from Groundwater by Anoxic Biological Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Hajar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available    Groundwater pollution by  nitrate is considered as an important problem that must be addressed because many of the populations experiencing a big shortage of drinking water. In this study, the anoxic biological reactor is used to remove nitrates from groundwater. In this reactor,  bacteria convert nitrate to nitrogen under anoxic conditions and  lack of availability of nutrients  to get the necessary energy.     Five types of membrane bio-pregnant carrier within the reactor namely:  activated carbon (1-3 mm, granules of polyethylene (thickness of 3 mm X 4 mm Dia., bentonite (0.5-1 mm,  red wood (2X2X2 cm  and black sand (0.6 - 1.2 mm are employed. Four types nutrients namely:   Four types of carbonate which are: ethanol, molasses, glucose and acetic acid with the addition of sodium ortho phosphate dihydrogen (NaH2PO4 are used.     Laboratory results showed that the use of activated carbon gave the best results with respect to the removal of nitrates. The results indicated also that  acetic acid and molasses are the best nutrients for the reduction of nitrate ions. However, molasses may cause deposits on the inside walls of pipes and pumps.     The removal  efficiency of nitrate reached to 92% when using molasses and reached  to 99.7%  for acetic acid while it reached 54% when using glucose.

  5. Using nitrate to quantify quick flow in a karst aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Barbara J; Garner, Bradley D

    2009-01-01

    In karst aquifers, contaminated recharge can degrade spring water quality, but quantifying the rapid recharge (quick flow) component of spring flow is challenging because of its temporal variability. Here, we investigate the use of nitrate in a two-endmember mixing model to quantify quick flow in Barton Springs, Austin, Texas. Historical nitrate data from recharging creeks and Barton Springs were evaluated to determine a representative nitrate concentration for the aquifer water endmember (1.5 mg/L) and the quick flow endmember (0.17 mg/L for nonstormflow conditions and 0.25 mg/L for stormflow conditions). Under nonstormflow conditions for 1990 to 2005, model results indicated that quick flow contributed from 0% to 55% of spring flow. The nitrate-based two-endmember model was applied to the response of Barton Springs to a storm and results compared to those produced using the same model with delta(18)O and specific conductance (SC) as tracers. Additionally, the mixing model was modified to allow endmember quick flow values to vary over time. Of the three tracers, nitrate appears to be the most advantageous because it is conservative and because the difference between the concentrations in the two endmembers is large relative to their variance. The delta(18)O-based model was very sensitive to variability within the quick flow endmember, and SC was not conservative over the timescale of the storm response. We conclude that a nitrate-based two-endmember mixing model might provide a useful approach for quantifying the temporally variable quick flow component of spring flow in some karst systems.

  6. Characterization of the improvised explosive urea nitrate using electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiri, Tsippy

    2005-01-01

    Mass spectra of urea nitrate were measured in electrospray ionization and in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization in the negative mode. In both ionization methods two characteristic adduct ions containing the intact molecule [urea nitrate+NO3]- and [urea nitrate+HNO3+NO3]- are shown. The structure of the two adduct ions was deduced using measurements of isotopically labeled urea nitrate. Collision-induced dissociation measurements of the adduct ions show typical losses enabling the identification of urea nitrate in trace amounts. Using these methods urea nitrate was identified in real cases. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression....... Located in the cytosol, nitrate reductase obtains its reductant not from photosynthesis but from carbohydrate catabolism. This relationship prompted us to investigate the indirect role that light might play, via photosynthesis, in the regulation of nitrate reductase gene expression. We show that sucrose...

  8. Estimated Dietary Intake of Nitrite and Nitrate in Swedish Children

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study examined the intake of nitrate and nitrite in Swedish children. Daily intake estimates were based on a nationwide food consumption survey (4-day food diary) and nitrite/nitrate content in vegetables, fruit, cured meat and water. The mean intake of nitrite from cured meat among 2259 children studied was 0.013, 0.010 and 0.007 mg kg-1 body weight day-1 in age groups 4, 8-9 and 11-12, respectively. Among these age groups, three individuals (0.1% of the studied chil...

  9. Oxygen Isotopic composition of nitrate trapped in Vostok ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarino, J.; Michalski, G.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2001-05-01

    It is well known that NOx plays a key role in the mediation of the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Our ability to model and understand pre-industrial atmospheric chemistry is mainly limited by our lack of knowledge of past NOx emissions. For years, the hope was that HNO3 trapped in ice cores would probe NOx emissions the during glacial/interglacial climate oscillations. However, it was soon realized that post depositional effects in the snow pack obscure the original atmospheric signal of this end product of NOx oxidation. So far, none of the concentration profiles of nitrate obtained from ice cores has been used to constrain NOx emissions. Recent observations of the oxygen isotopic composition of nitrate have opened a possible new way to link the nitrate ice core profile and past atmospheric chemistry. For \\17O, thermodynamic, kinetic, and equilibrium isotope effects dictate that δ 17O = .52 x δ 18O . Certain photochemical processes violate this rule due to quantum effects and are quantified by Δ 17O = δ 17O -.52 x δ 18O which are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). Atmospheric nitrates have now been measured and have been found to have a large MIF; Δ 17O ~ 29 ‰ and a small range +/- 2‰ . The large variations in δ 18O of atmospheric nitrate are due to mass dependent fractions from transport and source ratios, and do not effect the Δ 17O. In addition, post depositional fractionations associated with remobilization (condensation/evaporation, phase changes .) in the snow pack are processes known for years to be mass dependent processes. The Δ 17O can then be used as a conservative trace of atmospheric nitrate deposition and chemistry. Experiments performed in our lab show that the oxygen isotopic anomaly of nitrate derives from the ozone-NOx catalytic cycle. During this process, the ozone transfer to the NOx inscribes its unique isotopic signature. Antarctic soils have a Δ 17O ~ 30 ‰ , acknowledging they are purely atmospheric in

  10. Electrochemical reduction of nitrate in the presence of an amide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrates in aqueous solutions thereof in the presence of amides to gaseous nitrogen (N.sub.2) is described. Generally, electrochemical reduction of NO.sub.3 proceeds stepwise, from NO.sub.3 to N.sub.2, and subsequently in several consecutive steps to ammonia (NH.sub.3) as a final product. Addition of at least one amide to the solution being electrolyzed suppresses ammonia generation, since suitable amides react with NO.sub.2 to generate N.sub.2. This permits nitrate reduction to gaseous nitrogen to proceed by electrolysis. Suitable amides include urea, sulfamic acid, formamide, and acetamide.

  11. A bioinspired iron catalyst for nitrate and perchlorate reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Courtney L; Park, Yun Ji; Matson, Ellen M; Gordon, Zachary; Fout, Alison R

    2016-11-11

    Nitrate and perchlorate have considerable use in technology, synthetic materials, and agriculture; as a result, they have become pervasive water pollutants. Industrial strategies to chemically reduce these oxyanions often require the use of harsh conditions, but microorganisms can efficiently reduce them enzymatically. We developed an iron catalyst inspired by the active sites of nitrate reductase and (per)chlorate reductase enzymes. The catalyst features a secondary coordination sphere that aids in oxyanion deoxygenation. Upon reduction of the oxyanions, an iron(III)-oxo is formed, which in the presence of protons and electrons regenerates the catalyst and releases water. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN UREA TERHADAP PENINGKATAN PENCEMARAN NITRIT DAN NITRAT DALAM TANAH (Influence of Addition of Urea to Increased Pollution of Nitrite and Nitrate in The Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Mawaddah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Nitrat dan nitrit merupakan sumber nitrogen bagi tanaman. Nitrogen sangat diperlukan tanaman untuk pertumbuhan dan perkembangan. Bentuk-bentuk nitrogen di lingkungan mengalami transformasi sebagai bagian dari siklus nitrogen seperti nitrifikasi dan denitrifikasi. Apabila kadar nitrogen dalam tanah rendah, maka urea digunakan sebagai sumber nitrogen. Perubahan urea menjadi nitrit atau nitrat pada beberapa sampel tanah perlu diketahui. Kadar nitrit dan nitrat yang tinggi dapat meningkatkan pencemaran di dalam tanah. Sampel tanah yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah tanah pasir, tanah sawah, tanah pupuk kompos dan tanah pupuk kandang. Analisis nitrit dan nitrat dilakukan dengan menggunakan pereaksi asam p-amino benzoat (PABA yang dikopling dengan N-naftiletilendiamin (NEDA dan reduktor spongy cadmium. Sebelum digunakan untuk analisis nitrit dan nitrat, metode divalidasi terlebih dahulu. Hasil validasi metode analisis nitrit dan nitrat dengan pereaksi PABA/NEDA menunjukkan persentase perolehan kembali masing-masing antara 87,15–100,8% untuk nitrit dan 88,16–105,7% untuk nitrat. Setelah ditambah urea sebesar 0,66 g.kg-1 ke dalam tanah, konsentrasi nitrit dan nitrat pada semua sampel tanah mengalami peningkatan. Dari penelitian ini diketahui bahwa peningkatan kadar nitrit dan nitrat setelah ditambahkan urea sangat dipengaruhi oleh kondisi tanah.   ABSTRACT Nitrate and nitrite were sources of nitrogen for plants. Nitrogen is indispensable for the growth and development of plants. The forms of nitrogen in the environment undergoes a transformation as part of the nitrogen cycle like nitrification and denitrification. If nitrogen level in the soil is low, urea is used as a source of nitrogen. Changes of urea into nitrite or nitrate in some of soil samples need to be known. The levels of nitrite and nitrate are high can increase pollution in the soil. Some of soil samples which is used in this research were sandy soil, paddy soil

  13. The fate of N-15-nitrate in healthy and declining Phragmites australis stands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijburg, J.W.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The dissimilatory nitrate-reducing processes, denitrification, and dissimilatory nitrate-reduction to ammonium were studied in freshwater lake sediments within healthy and degrading Phragmites australis (reed) stands. The samples from the healthy vegetation site contained roots and rhizomes. Cores

  14. Spatial and temporal analysis of the nitrate concentrations in groundwater for South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maherry, A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available associated with agricultural stock farming. The Northern Cape Province, in particular the Kalahari has elevated nitrate levels, but a distinct lack of recent sampling may mask the extent of the current spatial distribution of nitrate concentrations...

  15. 78 FR 35258 - Solid Agricultural Grade Ammonium Nitrate from Ukraine: Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-12

    ... solid, fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'' or ``subject merchandise'') products, whether prilled, granular or in other solid form, with or without additives or coating, and with a bulk...

  16. In situ nitrate from groundwater using freely available carbon material at an industrially polluted site

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Israel, S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available concentrations, nitrate in drinking water can be toxic to infants and young animals. In situ treatment could be a robust and effective technique for removal of nitrate, iron and manganese....

  17. Contamination des eaux de puits traditionnels par les nitrates sur le ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    30 juin 2014 ... Objectif : La contamination des eaux souterraines par les nitrates ... Methodology and Results: the origin of nitrate water from traditional wells of Lobo's watershed was ..... avec celles faites par Hudak (1999) au Texas et Liu et.

  18. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the.

  19. Investigation of paramagnetic saturation in lanthanum manganese nitrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flokstra, Jakob; Meijer, H.C.; Bots, G.J.C.; Verheij, W.A.; van der Marel, L.C.

    1973-01-01

    Paramagnetic saturation of lanthanum manganese nitrate, La2Mn3(NO3)12·24H2O, has been investigated at liquid He temperatures in a static as well as a dynamical way. With the aid of the molecular-field theory the Casimir and Du Pré dispersion and absorption curves are adapted explicitly to the

  20. Aqueous Nitrate Recovery Line at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finstad, Casey Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This powerpoint is part of the ADPSM Plutonium Engineering Lecture Series, which is an opportunity for new hires at LANL to get an overview of work done at TA55. It goes into detail about the aqueous nitrate recovery line at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  1. Profiling the origin of ammonium nitrate: proof-of-principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carol-Visser, J.; Farmache, M.A.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    In many Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) the main charge consists of ammonium nitrate (AN). For forensic reasons, screening for the origin of AN is of importance. By assessing specifi c characteristics, diff erent AN batches can be profi led, in this way providing extra information which could

  2. Three model systems measure oxidation/nitration damage caused ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Diseases activate the innate immune response which causes ancillary damage to the human body. Peroxynitrite. (OONO–) or its carbon dioxide derivatives cause oxidation/nitration and hence mutation to various body poly- mers e.g. DNA, RNA, protein, lipids and sugars. The control of the ancillary damage can come from ...

  3. Three model systems measure oxidation/nitration damage caused ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diseases activate the innate immune response which causes ancillary damage to the human body. Peroxynitrite (OONO–) or its carbon dioxide derivatives cause oxidation/nitration and hence mutation to various body polymers e.g. DNA, RNA, protein, lipids and sugars. The control of the ancillary damage can come from ...

  4. Computational study of TNT synthesis in solvated nitration reaction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min-Hsien; Cheng, Ken-Fa; Chen, Cheng; Hong, Yaw-Sun

    Mononitrotoluene (MNT) was incorporated into solvated reaction systems and was subjected to subsequent nitration (electrophilic and free radical substitution) to obtain corresponding dinitrotoluene (DNT) and trinitrotoluene (TNT) products. In the electrophilic nitration system, the energy barrier of the reaction to produce o,p-dinitrotoluene from p-nitrotoluene was found to decrease from 62.7 to 14.7 kJ/mol to 9.2 kJ/mol in solventless, hydrated, and methanol-solvated molecular reaction systems, respectively. Further nitration to produce TNT in related solventless and solvated systems also led to a stepwise decreasing trend in the required energy, from 297.6 to 118.6 kJ/mol to 42.8 kJ/mol. Comparative synthesis using ·NO2 as the nitrating reagent to obtain o,p-DNT or TNT in the hydrated system shows a lower reaction energy barrier than that of the same reaction in the solventless system.

  5. Silica-Supported Yttrium Nitrate Hexahydrate as a Heterogeneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Silica-Supported Yttrium Nitrate Hexahydrate as a. Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Synthesis of. 2-Amino-4H-Chromenes in Water. Bahador Karami*, Mahnaz Farahi, Masoomeh Bazrafshan and Saeed Khodabakhshi. Department of Chemistry, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75918-74831, Iran. Recieved 4 February 2014, ...

  6. Response of higveld grass species to ammonium and nitrate nitrogen

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forty-one populations in twenty-two species of highveld grasses were grown in pots of soil fertilized with solutions for comparing ammonium and nitrate nutrition. Cotton, tomato, cereal crops and pasture grasses were included for comparison. Roots and shoots were harvested separately, weighed and analysed for major ...

  7. Cotton-supported heterotrophic denitrification of nitrate-rich drinking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biological denitrification (BD) process represents an interesting solution to remove nitrate from water and as well as to close the natural nitrogen cycle. Potential applications are related to both groundwater denitrification and treatment of nitraterich effluents from reverse osmosis and ion-exchange processes. This paper ...

  8. Does foliar application of salicylic acid protects nitrate reductase and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-04

    Jun 4, 2014 ... preserving the activity of NR but was still less than the reference control regardless the cultivar used. Key words: Nitrate ..... Planta. 208:175-180. Khan W, Prithiviraj B, Smith D (2003). Photosynthetic response of corn and soybean to foliar application of salicylates. J. Plant Physiol. 160:485-492. Khodary ...

  9. Occurrence of elevated nitrate in groundwaters of Krishna delta, India

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Krishna delta 49% and in south Krishna delta 26% water samples were found to exceed the permissible limits. This study indicates that ... plain aquifers are the main source of water for agriculture and domestic purposes. The deltaic ..... can result in runoff and leaching of residual nitrate in the soil and in turn pollute the ...

  10. Increase of water resistance of ammonium nitrate explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkhair Mansurov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Developed a method of kapsulating of ammonium nitrate with liquid paraffin increase finding explosives in water for 60 minutes. Placing explosives in the plastic shell, the explosive was, as in standing or running water during the day. When conducting field tests failures were absent.

  11. Water flow and nitrate leaching in a layered silt loam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.A.; Hesterberg, D.L.R.; Raats, P.A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching was studied for a winter leaching period in a layered calcareous silt loam with tile-drains at about 1-m depth and 12-m spacing. Groundwater levels, drain discharge rates, and NO3 concentrations in the drainage water were monitored, and the soil hydraulic characteristics were

  12. 2,5-Dimethyl­anilinium nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirani, Wajda; Rzaigui, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    In the title salt, C8H12N+·NO3 −, all non-H atoms of the cation lie on mirror planes. The nitrate counteranion has m symmetry and acts as a hydrogen-bond acceptor of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, connecting the cations and anions into layers running parallel to the ab plane. PMID:21583603

  13. Enhanced surface photochemistry in chloride-nitrate ion mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingen, Lisa M; Moskun, Amy C; Johnson, Stanley N; Thomas, Jennie L; Roeselová, Martina; Tobias, Douglas J; Kleinman, Michael T; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2008-10-01

    Heterogeneous reactions of sea salt aerosol with various oxides of nitrogen lead to replacement of chloride ion by nitrate ion. Studies of the photochemistry of a model system were carried out using deliquesced mixtures of NaCl and NaNO3 on a Teflon substrate. Varying molar ratios of NaCl to NaNO3 (1 : 9 Cl- : NO3-, 1 : 1 Cl- : NO3-, 3 : 1 Cl- : NO3-, 9 : 1 Cl- : NO3-) and NaNO3 at the same total concentration were irradiated in air at 299 +/- 3 K and at a relative humidity of 75 +/- 8% using broadband UVB light (270-380 nm). Gaseous NO2 production was measured as a function of time using a chemiluminescence NO(y) detector. Surprisingly, an enhanced yield of NO2 was observed as the chloride to nitrate ratio increased. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that as the Cl- : NO3- ratio increases, the nitrate ions are drawn closer to the interface due to the existence of a double layer of interfacial Cl- and subsurface Na+. This leads to a decreased solvent cage effect when the nitrate ion photodissociates to NO2+O*-, increasing the effective quantum yield and hence the production of gaseous NO2. The implications of enhanced NO2 and likely OH production as sea salt aerosols become processed in the atmosphere are discussed.

  14. Nitrate Supplementation, Exercise, and Kidney Function: Are There Detrimental Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Alain; Stragier, Séverine; Bréjeon, Camille; Poortmans, Jacques R

    2015-07-01

    Recently, dietary supplementation with inorganic nitrate (NO3) has been proposed to endurance athletes to increase their performance. However, it has been suggested that an excess of NO3 might be harmful. The present study analyzed the effect of NO3 supplementation on kidney function. Thirteen young male subjects performed a 20-min cycling exercise at 85% of the maximal oxygen capacity. Seven days before exercise, the subjects ingested either a placebo (Pl) or 450 mg of potassium nitrate (PN) per day. Venous blood samples and urine collections were collected before and immediately after exercise and after 60 min of recovery. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) and clearances (Cl) were calculated from serum content and urine output for creatinine (Crn), albumin (Alb), and urea. Under resting conditions, GFR and all clearance measures did not differ between Pl and PN. Immediately after exercise, GFR remained stable in both Pl and PN, whereas Cl-urea decreased significantly (P urea returned to initial values in placebo and nitrate supplementation. Alb output and Cl-Alb remained enhanced under PN conditions. These results mainly indicate that dietary nitrate supplementation over a week does not induce any specific kidney function modifications either at rest or during sustained submaximal exercise as compared with Pl.

  15. Effect of nitrogen concentration of urea ammonium nitrate, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Liquid urea ammonium nitrate (UAN) was applied to dryland Pennisetum clandestinum (Kikuyu (Chiov)) and Cynodon hybrid (Coastcross II (L.) (Pers.)) pastures at two levels (207 and 414 kg N/ha/season) and at three concentrations (10, 5; 21 and 42% N) of nitrogen. The degree of leaf scorch increased as both the amount ...

  16. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MgO was added both as spinel (MgAl2O4) forming precursor i.e. magnesium aluminate hydrate, and magnesium nitrate. Sintering investigations were conducted in the temperature range 1500–1600°C with 2 h soaking. Structural study of sintered pellets was carried out by extensive XRD analysis. Scanning electron mode ...

  17. Function of magnesium aluminate hydrate and magnesium nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. Chemically pure reactive alumina (α-Al2O3) which is commercially available was used for densifi- cation study in presence of widely accepted dopant MgO as additive. MgO was added both as spinel. (MgAl2O4) forming precursor i.e. magnesium aluminate hydrate, and magnesium nitrate. Sintering investiga-.

  18. Inputs of subthermocline waters and nitrate onto the Campeche Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnas, Miles J.; Smayda, Theodore J.

    1987-02-01

    Geostrophic tilting of isopycnal surfaces in the Yucatan Current raises the thermocline and nitrate nutricline (approximately the 22°C surface) above the level of the shelf break along the eastern margin of the Campeche Bank. Along the northern and western margins of the bank, these features lie 20-30 m below the shelf break. Cool nitrate-rich water can move laterally from the Yucatan Current along isopycnal surfaces beneath the thermocline onto the Campeche Bank. Drogues launched on the bank moved westward, corroborating transport away from the Yucatan Current. Near-bottom water on the bank is denser than water at similar depths in the Gulf of Mexico and Campeche Gulf. This dense near-bottom water is trapped within the euphotic zone on the bank for periods between days and weeks. Anomalies of temperature and chlorophylla at 30 m depth on the bank were directly proportional to density anomalies, indicating the mixing of subthermocline water with surface water. The development of surface patches of phytoplankton or elevated nitrate levels on the bank results from the vertical mixing of the stratified water column. During the summer, lateral transport of subthermocline water from the Yucatan Current appears to be an important source of nitrate nitrogen for the Campeche Bank.

  19. Nitrate content in a collection of higher mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bóbics, Renáta; Krüzselyi, Dániel; Vetter, János

    2016-01-30

    Data of mushroom nitrate content from scientific studies is limited. There have been two such recent investigations (mainly regarding certain cultivated species). To obtain comparable analytical data, we analyzed 134 samples of 54 taxa gathered and prepared by our department. The mushroom species were evaluated according to their nutritional types: saprotrophic, mycorrhizal and wood-decaying groups. Low and relatively invariable contents were found in the mycorrhizal (216.5 mg kg(-1) dry matter (DM) and wood-decaying groups (228.6 mg kg(-1) DM), but in the saprotrophic group we observed a wide variability (151.4-12 715 mg kg(-1) DM). A considerable nitrate content was found in samples of seven 'accumulator' species (Clitocybe nebularis, C. odora, Lepista nuda, L. personata, L. irina, Macrolepiota rachodes and M. procera). The toxicological relevance of daily uptake of acceptable nitrate content via mushrooms only is not presumable, but the 'accumulator' saprotrophic species can be 'contributors' to our nitrate intake in foods. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. H. pylori infection increases levels of exhaled nitrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lechner, Matthias; Karlseder, Alban; Niederseer, David; Lirk, Philipp; Neher, Andreas; Rieder, Josef; Tilg, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common chronic bacterial infections worldwide. Despite the existence of a breath test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, no study has described the composition of volatile compounds, especially the levels of nitrate, in the exhaled air of

  1. The Absorption of Nitrate and Phosphate from Urban Sewage by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The applications of blue green algae for the treatment of urban and industrial sewage have received more attention during the recent years because they have the capacity to use nitrogenous compounds, ammonia and phosphates. In this study aimed to evaluate the ability of Spirolina platensis for absorption of nitrate and ...

  2. Optimum conditions for cotton nitrate reductase extraction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditions of nitrate reductase extraction and activity measurement should be adapted to plant species, and to the organs of the same plant, because of extreme weaknesses and instabilities of the enzyme. Different extraction and reaction media have been compared in order to define the best conditions for cotton callus ...

  3. Nitrate and ammonium levels of some water bodies and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study examined the nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+) levels of Rivers Wouri and Dibamba and some streams that feed them. The interaction of NO3- and NH4+ with some soil properties was also investigated. It was necessitated by the usage of these rivers for livelihood, despite the deposition of discharges ...

  4. Ammonia loss, ammonium and nitrate accumulation from mixing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ammonia loss from urea significantly hinders efficient use of urea in agriculture. In order to reduce ammonia loss and, at the same time, improve beneficial accumulation of soil exchangeable ammonium and nitrate for efficient utilization by plants, this laboratory study was conducted to determine the effect of mixing urea with ...

  5. Nitrate in Danish groundwater during the last 60 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B; Thorling, L; Dalgaard, Tommy

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribut......This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis...... of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first...... two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater (see Figure 1). Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark...

  6. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  7. Incorporation of fluorophosphate into zinc–aluminium–nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The intercalation of fluorophosphate (PO3F2−, FP) in the [Zn–Al] layered double hydroxides (LDHs) was investigated. A nitrate precursor was prepared by coprecipitaion at pH 9. An attempt to intercalate FP by direct coprecipitation reaction led to a poorly crystalline LDH phase. The effects of pH, aging time and ...

  8. Incorporation of fluorophosphate into zinc–aluminium–nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The intercalation of fluorophosphate (PO3F2-, FP) in the [Zn–Al] layered double hydroxides (LDHs) was investigated. A nitrate precursor was prepared by coprecipitaion at pH 9. An attempt to intercalate FP by direct coprecipitation reaction led to a poorly crystalline LDH phase. The effects of pH, aging time and anion ...

  9. Distribution of nitrate in the water resources of Pakistan | Tahir ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water quality monitoring activities have recognized the nitrate contamination in the drinking water sources as one of the major quality issue of Pakistan. Adopting a uniform sampling design, 747 samples were collected from a wide range of irrigated or non-irrigated regions having distribution of samples in sixteen cities as ...

  10. Effect of gibberellic acid and potassium nitrate on seed germination ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae are rare resurrection plants, endemic and relict species from Balkan Peninsula. The effect of gibberellic acid (GA3) and potassium nitrate (KNO3) were conducted to determine the seed germination response for these two species. An experiment was conducted with four ...

  11. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites. 319.2 Section 319.2 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION General § 319.2 Products...

  12. Effect of nitrates on embryo induction efficiency in cotton ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cv Coker-312 callus culture was assessed in terms of its usefulness as a system for investigating the effect of nitrates from different chemical compounds of nitrogen on embryo induction percentage in calli as the plant growth and cell differentiation mainly based on nitrogen. Both sources and ...

  13. Effects of atorvastatin on nitrate tolerance in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Karimi, Gholamreza; Kazemzadeh, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    Statins have been reported to show preventive effect on nitrate tolerance in normal rats, but there are no reports on their effect in diabetic animals. In this study, diabetes was induced in male wistar rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg). Five groups of diabetic and five groups of normal rats were treated; groups 1 (of normal and diabetic rats) received atorvastatin (10 mg/kg/d p.o. for 8 weeks) and groups 2 received atorvastatin (10 mg/kg/d p.o. for last 3 days). Groups 3 and groups 4 were similar to groups 1 and 2 respectively, except that they received nitroglycerin (50 mg/kg/d, b.i.d. for last 3 days of the study). Groups 5 received neither atorvastatin nor nitroglycerin. After 8 weeks, relaxations to nitroglycerin (0.01 to 10 nM) and nitroprusside (0.01 to 10 nM) were determined on phenylephrine-preconstricted aortic rings. The relaxation response to nitroglycerin in diabetic and normal aorta were not significantly different. The results showed that 8 weeks treatment with atorvastatin prevents nitrate tolerance in diabetic and normal rats, but in nitrate tolerant animals, 3 days treatment with atorvastatin was not effective on protection against nitrate tolerance.

  14. Ceric ammonium nitrate catalysed three component one-pot efficient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) is used as an efficient catalyst for the synthesis of 2,4,5-triaryl-1H-imidazoles via condensation of benzoin/benzil, ammonium acetate, and aromatic aldehydes. The easy work-up, higher yields and shorter reaction time are the advantages of the method presented here.

  15. Presence of nitrites, nitrates, nitrosamines in the eggs of Intensively ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A spectrophotometric method was used to assay for nitrosamines and their precursors in eggs (n=5 from each farm), entailing separate analysis of each egg yolk and albumen. The three compounds measured, were detected in all the samples. The nitrates and nitrites levels were significantly higher in the yolk than in the ...

  16. electrocatalytic nitrate reduction on palladium based catalysts activated with germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gootzen, J.F.E.; Lefferts, Leonardus; van Veen, J.A.R.; van Veen, J.

    1999-01-01

    The electrocatalytic reduction of nitrate has been studied with electrochemical methods on palladium and palladium–platinum electrodes activated with germanium. The formation of a palladium–germanium alloy that occurs at germanium coverage above 0.2 has a strong enhancing effect on the rate of

  17. Equilibrium and kinetics of nitrate removal by protonated cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2001-01-01

    Jan 1, 2001 ... reverse osmosis could also remove nitrate, but their applications are actually hampered by their high cost. Chitosan is a natural product derived by desacetylation from the polysaccharide chitin. Chitin is found in the exo-skeletons of shrimp, crab and other shellfish. Thanks to its exceptional properties,.

  18. Nitrate-Induced Oxidative Stress and the Effects of Dietary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... have been critically examined and presented. The review is also focused on Vitamins C, E and A, among other antioxidants, as they can be chiefly obtained in natural form from fruits and vegetables in almost all parts of the world. Keywords: nitrates, oxidative stress, dietary antioxidants, vitamin C, vitamin E, vitamin A ...

  19. Identifying Efficient Nitrate Reduction Strategies in the Upper Danube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Udias

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen losses in the form of Nitrate (N-NO3 from point and diffuse sources of pollution are recognized to be the leading cause of water body impairment throughout Europe. Implementation of conservation programs is perceived as being crucial for restoring and protecting the good ecological status of freshwater bodies. The success of conservation programs depends on the efficient identification of management solutions with respect to the envisaged environmental and economic objectives. This is a complex task, especially considering that costs and effectiveness of conservation strategies depend on their locations. We applied a multi-objective, spatially explicit analysis tool, the R-SWAT-DM framework, to search for efficient, spatially-targeted solution of Nitrate abatement in the Upper Danube Basin. The Soil Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model served as the nonpoint source pollution estimator for current conditions as well as for scenarios with modified agricultural practices and waste water treatment upgrading. A spatially explicit optimization analysis that considered point and diffuse sources of Nitrate was performed to search for strategies that could achieve largest pollution abatement at minimum cost. The set of optimal spatial conservation strategies identified in the Basin indicated that it could be possible to reduce Nitrate loads by more than 50% while simultaneously provide a higher income.

  20. Nitration of Substituted Phenols by Different Efficient Heterogeneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitration of substituted phenols were carried out by the mixture of sodium nitrite and wet SiO2 (50% w/w) in the presence of four different efficient heterogeneous systems: 1) oxalic acid dihydrate (I), 2) sodium hydrogen sulphate (II), 3) aluminum hydrogen sulphate (III) and 4) silica sulphuric acid (IV) in CH2Cl2 at room ...

  1. Inorganic nitrogen and nitrate reduction in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Qasim, S.Z.

    . The intermediate (secondary) maximum is invariably associated with very low oxygen ( 0.1 ml.l/1). It is quite pronounced with nitrite reaching as high as 7 mu g-at.l/1. The secondary maximum is not observed south of 12 N lat. Nither the nitrate minima nor...

  2. Denitrifying bioreactors for nitrate removal from tile drained cropland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denitrification bioreactors are a promising technology for mitigation of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) losses in subsurface drainage water. Bioreactors are constructed with carbon substrates, typically wood chips, to provide a substrate for denitrifying microorganisms. Researchers in Iowa found that for ...

  3. The effect of farmyard manure and calcium ammonium nitrate on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of farmyard manure and calcium ammonium nitrate on vegetative growth, leaf yield and nutritive quality of Cleome gynadra (Cat Whiskers) in Keiyo District, ... extension workers and farmers, are receiving renewed interest as a possible intervention to food insecurity and malnutrition among resource-poor farmers.

  4. Feasibility of recycling excess agricultural nitrate with electrodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the most serious environmental problems associated with agriculture is excessive nitrate-N in waters leaving fields. It is a local health hazard in drinking water and a primary cause of hypoxia in continental ocean waters receiving drainage from agricultural regions. Many of the recent miti...

  5. Increase of water resistance of ammonium nitrate explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Zulkhair Mansurov; Y. Kazakov; Roza Abdulkarimova; A. Kosmaganbetova

    2012-01-01

    Developed a method of kapsulating of ammonium nitrate with liquid paraffin increase finding explosives in water for 60 minutes. Placing explosives in the plastic shell, the explosive was, as in standing or running water during the day. When conducting field tests failures were absent.

  6. Level of Phosphate, Nitrate and Dissolved Oxygen in Talise Island Waters, North Sulawesi

    OpenAIRE

    Patty, Simon I

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate and nitrate are a source of food for micro-organisms, while dissolved oxygen is required in the process of respiration in variety of aquatic organisms. Observations of phosphate, nitrate and dissolved oxygen levels have been conducted in the waters of Talise Island, North Sulawesi. Phosphate and nitrate concentration measurements carried out using spectrophotometric method, while dissolved oxygen was determined by electrochemical methods. Overall observations of phosphate, nitrate a...

  7. Nitrogen uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton in the nitrate-rich Thames estuary

    OpenAIRE

    J. J. Middelburg; Nieuwenhuize, J.

    2000-01-01

    The uptake of ammonium, nitrate, amino acids and urea was examined in the nitrate-rich Thames estuary and adjacent area in the North Sea during February 1999. The majority of uptake was by heterotrophic bacteria, as demonstrated by addition of a prokaryotic inhibitor that lowered uptake rates by 82, 66, 49 and 86 % for ammonium, nitrate, amino acids and urea, respectively. Amino acids were preferred over ammonium and urea, which in turn were preferred over nitrate. Urea was not important as n...

  8. Simultaneous Reduction of Nitrate and Selenate by Cell Suspensions of Selenium-Respiring Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Blum, Jodi Switzer; Bindi, Allana Burns; Dowdle, Philip R.; Herbel, Mitchell; John F Stolz

    1999-01-01

    Washed-cell suspensions of Sulfurospirillum barnesii reduced selenate [Se(VI)] when cells were cultured with nitrate, thiosulfate, arsenate, or fumarate as the electron acceptor. When the concentration of the electron donor was limiting, Se(VI) reduction in whole cells was approximately fourfold greater in Se(VI)-grown cells than was observed in nitrate-grown cells; correspondingly, nitrate reduction was ∼11-fold higher in nitrate-grown cells than in Se(VI)-grown cells. However, a simultaneou...

  9. Silver nitrate cautery in aphthous stomatitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidaee, M R; Taheri, A; Mansoori, P; Ghodsi, S Z

    2005-09-01

    Aphthous stomatitis is a painful, recurrent disease of the oral mucous membrane. Silver nitrate sticks have been used for a long time to provide pain relief for the duration of an aphthous ulceration, with only one application. Silver nitrate causes chemical cauterization and increases the depth of injury. To study the effect of chemical cautery with silver nitrate in reducing pain of aphthous ulceration and to determine if this treatment shortens or prolongs healing. In a randomized, patient-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 97 patients with painful minor oral aphthous ulceration were randomized to receive silver nitrate cautery or placebo. The severity of pain was rated on a three-category scale (severe, mild, none) and was recorded each day until the seventh day after the procedure. The lesion size was recorded at the time of the procedure and on the seventh day afterwards. In the treatment group, the ulcer was gently painted with a silver nitrate stick until it turned white. In the placebo group, the ulcer was gently painted with a placebo stick. In the treatment group, 33 of 47 patients (70%) evaluated and in the placebo group, four of 38 patients (11%) evaluated had reduction in severity of pain 1 day after the procedure. The difference was statistically significant (P aphthous ulceration without significantly shortening or prolonging healing time. We did not observe any side-effects in our study. The effect is rapid and lasts for the duration of the lesion. The treatment is simple and cost-effective in patients with infrequent recurrences.

  10. Ice duration drives winter nitrate accumulation in north temperate lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Steven M; Labou, Stephanie G.; Baulch, Helen M.; Hunt, Randall J.; Lottig, Noah R.; Hampton, Stephanie E.; Stanley, Emily H.

    2017-01-01

    The duration of winter ice cover on lakes varies substantially with climate variability, and has decreased over the last several decades in many temperate lakes. However, little is known of how changes in seasonal ice cover may affect biogeochemical processes under ice. We examined winter nitrogen (N) dynamics under ice using a 30+ yr dataset from five oligotrophic/mesotrophic north temperate lakes to determine how changes in inorganic N species varied with ice duration. Nitrate accumulated during winter and was strongly related to the number of days since ice-on. Exogenous inputs accounted for less than 3% of nitrate accumulation in four of the five lakes, suggesting a paramount role of nitrification in regulating N transformation and the timing of chemical conditions under ice. Winter nitrate accumulation rates ranged from 0.15 μg N L−1 d−1 to 2.7 μg N L−1 d−1 (0.011–0.19 μM d−1), and the mean for intermediate depths was 0.94 μg N L−1 d−1(0.067 μM d−1). Given that winters with shorter ice duration (< 120 d) have become more frequent in these lakes since the late 1990s, peak winter nitrate concentrations and cumulative nitrate production under ice may be declining. As ice extent and duration change, the physical and chemical conditions supporting life will shift. This research suggests we may expect changes in the form and amount of inorganic N, and altered dissolved nitrogen : phosphorus ratios, in lakes during winters with shorter ice duration.

  11. Nitrate in watersheds: straight from soils to streams?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudduth, Elizabeth B.; Perakis, Steven S.; Bernhardt, Emily S.

    2013-01-01

    Human activities are rapidly increasing the global supply of reactive N and substantially altering the structure and hydrologic connectivity of managed ecosystems. There is long-standing recognition that N must be removed along hydrologic flowpaths from uplands to streams, yet it has proven difficult to assess the generality of this removal across ecosystem types, and whether these patterns are influenced by land-use change. To assess how well upland nitrate (NO3-) loss is reflected in stream export, we gathered information from >50 watershed biogeochemical studies that reported nitrate concentrations ([NO3-]) for stream water and for either upslope soil solution or groundwater NO3- to examine whether stream export of NO3- accurately reflects upland NO3- losses. In this dataset, soil solution and streamwater [NO3-] were correlated across 40 undisturbed forest watersheds, with streamwater [NO3-] typically half (median = 50%) soil solution [NO3-]. A similar relationship was seen in 10 disturbed forest watersheds. However, for 12 watersheds with significant agricultural or urban development, the intercept and slope were both significantly higher than the relationship seen in forest watersheds. Differences in concentration between soil solution or groundwater and stream water may be attributed to biological uptake, microbial processes including denitrification, and/or preferential flow routing. The results of this synthesis are consistent with the hypotheses that undisturbed watersheds have a significant capacity to remove nitrate after it passes below the rooting zone and that land use changes tend to alter the efficiency or the length of watershed flowpaths, leading to reductions in nitrate removal and increased stream nitrate concentrations.

  12. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  13. Nitrate toxicity to aquatic animals: a review with new data for freshwater invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Julio A; Alonso, Alvaro; Salamanca, Annabella

    2005-03-01

    Published data on nitrate (NO3-) toxicity to freshwater and marine animals are reviewed. New data on nitrate toxicity to the freshwater invertebrates Eulimnogammarus toletanus, Echinogammarus echinosetosus and Hydropsyche exocellata are also presented. The main toxic action of nitrate is due to the conversion of oxygen-carrying pigments to forms that are incapable of carrying oxygen. Nitrate toxicity to aquatic animals increases with increasing nitrate concentrations and exposure times. In contrast, nitrate toxicity may decrease with increasing body size, water salinity, and environmental adaptation. Freshwater animals appear to be more sensitive to nitrate than marine animals. A nitrate concentration of 10 mg NO3-N/l (USA federal maximum level for drinking water) can adversely affect, at least during long-term exposures, freshwater invertebrates (E. toletanus, E. echinosetosus, Cheumatopsyche pettiti, Hydropsyche occidentalis), fishes (Oncorhynchus mykiss, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, Salmo clarki), and amphibians (Pseudacris triseriata, Rana pipiens, Rana temporaria, Bufo bufo). Safe levels below this nitrate concentration are recommended to protect sensitive freshwater animals from nitrate pollution. Furthermore, a maximum level of 2 mg NO3-N/l would be appropriate for protecting the most sensitive freshwater species. In the case of marine animals, a maximum level of 20 mg NO3-N/l may in general be acceptable. However, early developmental stages of some marine invertebrates, that are well adapted to low nitrate concentrations, may be so susceptible to nitrate as sensitive freshwater invertebrates.

  14. A Convenient Method for Preparation of Pure Standards of Peroxyacetyl Nitrate for Atmospheric Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben; Hansen, A. M.; Lund Thomsen, E.

    1982-01-01

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) is synthesized by nitration of peracetic acid (1.2 M), extracted by n- heptane, and purified with normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified PAN solution is free of acetyl nitrate. The content of PAN is determined by means of hydrolysis of PAN...

  15. Combined ion exchange / biological denitrification for nitrate removal from ground water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van der J.P.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of a new process for nitrate removal from ground water. High nitrate concentrations in ground water are a result of fertilization in agriculture. According to a directive of the European Community the maximum admissible concentration of nitrate in

  16. Effect of NaCl salinity on nitrate uptake in Plantago maritima L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubinigg, Michael; Posthumus, F.S; Elzenga, J.T.M.; Stulen, I.

    2005-01-01

    Exposure of plants to NaCl salinity reduces the rate of nitrate net uptake by the roots. Previous studies showed that this effect was due to a reduced nitrate influx, which could only partially be explained by a lower demand of nitrate for growth. In the present work we tested the hypothesis that

  17. Vertical migration, nitrate uptake and denitrification: survival mechanisms of foraminifers (Globobulimina turgida) in low oxygen conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koho, K.A.; Piña-Ochoa, E.; Geslin, E.; Risgaard-Petersen, N.

    2011-01-01

    15NO3− isotope labelling experiments were performed to investigate foraminiferal nitrate uptake strategies and the role of pseudopodial networks in nitrate uptake. Globobulimina turgida were placed below the nitrate penetration depth in homogenized sediment cores incubated in artificial seawater

  18. The contribution of bnnrt1 and bnnrt2 to nitrate accumulation varied ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... Key words: Chinese cabbage, NRT, nitrate-transporter, genotypes-difference. INTRODUCTION. Nitrate in vegetable is harmful to human health because of its poisonous deoxidize product nitrite. Previous reports have proved that 80% of nitrate in human body come from vegetable (Sharat et al., 1994).

  19. 76 FR 49449 - Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... International Trade Administration Continuation of Antidumping Duty Order on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium... duty investigation on solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from the Russian... Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the Russian Federation and Notice of Antidumping Duty Order...

  20. Nitrate and nitrite content in bottled beverages by ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Deng, Gui-Fang; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Chen, Yong-Hong; Chen, Feng; Li, Hua-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate and nitrite levels in six types of beverages--total of 292 individual samples from 73 brands (four bottles each)--from Guangzhou city in China were evaluated by ion-pair high-performance liquid chromatography. All samples contained nitrate. Nitrate and nitrite ranges were 0.43-46.08 and beverages.

  1. Nitrate retention in a sand plains stream and the importance of groundwater discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert S. Stelzer; Damion R. Drover; Susan L. Eggert; Maureen A. Muldoon

    2011-01-01

    We measured net nitrate retention by mass balance in a 700-m upwelling reach of a third-order sand plains stream, Emmons Creek, from January 2007 to November 2008. Surface water and ground-water fluxes of nitrate were determined from continuous records of discharge and from nitrate concentrations based on weekly and biweekly sampling at three surface water stations and...

  2. 21 CFR 172.167 - Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.167 Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. An aqueous solution containing a mixture of silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide may be safely used...

  3. Effect of high electron donor supply on dissimilatory nitrate reduction pathways in a bioreactor for nitrate removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Anna; Tarre, Sheldon; Beliavski, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The possible shift of a bioreactor for NO3- removal from predominantly denitrification (DEN) to dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) by elevated electron donor supply was investigated. By increasing the C/NO3- ratio in one of two initially identical reactors, the production of high ...

  4. Identification and quantification of a novel nitrate-reducing community in sediments of Suquia River basin along a nitrate gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyna, Luciana; Wunderlin, Daniel Alberto [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica-CIBICI, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Genti-Raimondi, Susana, E-mail: sgenti@fcq.unc.edu.a [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Departamento de Bioquimica Clinica-CIBICI, Haya de la Torre y Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2010-05-15

    We evaluated the molecular diversity of narG gene from Suquia River sediments to assess the impact of the nitrate concentration and water quality on the composition and structure of the nitrate-reducing bacterial community. To this aim, a library of one of the six monitoring stations corresponding to the highest nitrate concentration was constructed and 118 narG clones were screened. Nucleotide sequences were associated to narG gene from alpha-, beta-, delta-, gammaproteobacteria and Thermus thermophilus. Remarkably, 18% of clones contained narG genes with less than 69% similarity to narG sequences available in databases. Thus, indicating the presence of nitrate-reducing bacteria with novel narG genes, which were quantified by real-time PCR. Results show a variable number of narG copies, ranging from less than 1.0 x 10{sup 2} to 5.0 x 10{sup 4} copies per ng of DNA, which were associated with a decreased water quality index monitored along the basin at different times. - A novel narG community present in Suquia River sediments was quantified; values were in line with the water quality index.

  5. Organic Nitrates and Nitrate Resistance in Diabetes: The Role of Vascular Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress with Emphasis on Antioxidant Properties of Pentaerithrityl Tetranitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Oelze

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic nitrates represent a class of drugs which are clinically used for treatment of ischemic symptoms of angina as well as for congestive heart failure based on the idea to overcome the impaired NO bioavailability by “NO” replacement therapy. The present paper is focused on parallels between diabetes mellitus and nitrate tolerance, and aims to discuss the mechanisms underlying nitrate resistance in the setting of diabetes. Since oxidative stress was identified as an important factor in the development of tolerance to organic nitrates, but also represents a hallmark of diabetic complications, this may represent a common principle for both disorders where therapeutic intervention should start. This paper examines the evidence supporting the hypothesis that pentaerithrityl tetranitrate may represent a nitrate for treatment of ischemia in diabetic patients. This evidence is based on the considerations of parallels between diabetes mellitus and nitrate tolerance as well as on preliminary data from experimental diabetes studies.

  6. Nitrate retention in riparian ground water at natural and elevated nitrate levels in north central Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, John H; Jackman, Alan P; Triska, Frank J; Sheibley, Richard W; Avanzino, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between local ground water flows and NO(3)(-) transport to the channel was examined in three well transects from a natural, wooded riparian zone adjacent to the Shingobee River, MN. The hillslope ground water originated as recharge from intermittently grazed pasture up slope of the site. In the hillslope transect perpendicular to the stream, ground water NO(3)(-) concentrations decreased from approximately 3 mg N L(-1) beneath the ridge (80 m from the channel) to 0.01 to 1.0 mg N L(-1) at wells 1 to 3 m from the channel. The Cl(-) concentrations and NO(3)/Cl ratios decreased toward the channel indicating NO(3)(-) dilution and biotic retention. In the bankside well transect parallel to the stream, two distinct ground water environments were observed: an alluvial environment upstream of a relict beaver dam influenced by stream water and a hillslope environment downstream of the relict beaver dam. Nitrate was elevated to levels representative of agricultural runoff in a third well transect located approximately 5 m from the stream to assess the effectiveness of the riparian zone as a NO(3)(-) sink. Subsurface NO(3)(-) injections revealed transport of up to 15 mg N L(-1) was nearly conservative in the alluvial riparian environment. Addition of glucose stimulated dissolved oxygen uptake and promoted NO(3)(-) retention under both background and elevated NO(3)(-) levels in summer and winter. Disappearance of added NO(3)(-) was followed by transient NO(2)(-) formation and, in the presence of C(2)H(2), by N(2)O formation, demonstrating potential denitrification. Under current land use, most NO(3)(-) associated with local ground water is biotically retained or diluted before reaching the channel. However, elevating NO(3)(-) levels through agricultural cultivation would likely result in increased NO(3)(-) transport to the channel.

  7. Nitrate Contamination of Deep Aquifers in the Salinas Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.; Hillegonds, D. J.; Holtz, M.; Roberts, S. K.; Singleton, M. J.; Visser, A.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Belitz, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Salinas Valley, known as 'the salad bowl of the world', has been an agricultural center for more than 100 years. Irrigated row crops such as lettuce and strawberries dominate both land use and water use. Groundwater is the exclusive supply for both irrigation and drinking water. Some irrigation wells and most public water supply wells in the Salinas Valley are constructed to draw water from deep portions of the aquifer system, where contamination by nitrate is less likely than in the shallow portions of the aquifer system. However, a number of wells with top perforations greater than 75 m deep, screened below confining or semi-confining units, have nitrate concentrations greater than the Maximum Contaminant Limit (MCL) of 45 mg/L as NO3-. This study uses nitrate concentrations from several hundred irrigation, drinking water, and monitoring wells (Monterey County Water Resources Agency, 1997), along with tritium-helium groundwater ages acquired at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory through the State of California Groundwater Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program (reported in Kulongoski et al., 2007 and in Moran et al., in press), to identify nitrate 'hot spots' in the deep aquifer and to examine possible modes of nitrate transport to the deep aquifer. In addition, observed apparent groundwater ages are compared with the results of transport simulations that use particle tracking and a stochastic-geostatistical framework to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity to determine the distribution of travel times from the water table to each well (Fogg et al., 1999). The combined evidence from nitrate, tritium, tritiogenic 3He, and radiogenic 4He concentrations, reveals complex recharge and flow to the capture zone of the deep drinking water wells. Widespread groundwater pumping for irrigation accelerates vertical groundwater flow such that high nitrate groundwater reaches some deep drinking water wells. Deeper portions of the wells often draw in water that recharged

  8. Active secretion and protective effect of salivary nitrate against stress in human volunteers and rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Luyuan; Qin, Lizheng; Xia, Dengsheng; Liu, Xibao; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Gu, Liankun; He, Junqi; Ambudkar, Indu S.; Deng, Dajun; Wang, Songlin

    2014-01-01

    Up to 25% of the circulating nitrate in blood is actively taken up, concentrated, and secreted into saliva by the salivary glands. Salivary nitrate can be reduced to nitrite by the commensal bacteria in the oral cavity or stomach and then further converted to nitric oxide (NO) in vivo, which may play a role in gastric protection. However, whether salivary nitrate is actively secreted in human beings has not yet been determined. This study was designed to determine whether salivary nitrate is actively secreted in human beings as an acute stress response and what role salivary nitrate plays in stress-induced gastric injury. To observe salivary nitrate function under stress conditions, alteration of salivary nitrate and nitrite was analyzed among 22 healthy volunteers before and after a strong stress activity, jumping down from a platform at the height of 68m. A series of stress indexes was analyzed to monitor the stress situation. We found that both the concentration and the total amount of nitrate in mixed saliva were significantly increased in the human volunteers immediately after the jump, with an additional increase 1 h later (p salivary nitrate and nitrite in stress protection, we further carried out a water-immersion-restraint stress (WIRS) assay in male adult rats with bilateral parotid and submandibular duct ligature (BPSDL). Intragastric nitrate, nitrite, and NO; gastric mucosal blood flow; and gastric ulcer index (UI) were monitored and nitrate was administrated in drinking water to compensate for nitrate secretion in BPSDL animals. Significantly decreased levels of intragastric nitrate, nitrite, and NO and gastricmucosal blood flow were measured in BPSDL rats during the WIRS assay compared to sham control rats (p salivary nitrate secretion and nitrite formation, which may play important roles in gastric protection against stress-induced injury via the nitrate-dependent NO pathway. PMID:23277147

  9. The oxygen isotope composition of nitrate generated by nitrification in acid forest floors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bernhard; Bollwerk, Sandra M.; Mansfeldt, Tim; Hütter, Birgit; Veizer, Jan

    2001-08-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of nitrate is used increasingly for identifying the origin of nitrate in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This novel isotope tracer technique is based on the fact that nitrate in atmospheric deposition, in fertilizers, and nitrate generated by nitrification in soils appear to have distinct oxygen isotope ratios. While the typical ranges of δ18O values of nitrate in atmospheric deposition and fertilizers are comparatively well known, few experimental data exist for the oxygen isotope composition of nitrate generated by nitrification in soils. The objective of this study was to determine δ18O values of nitrate formed by microbial nitrification in acid forest floors. Evidence from laboratory incubation experiments and field studies suggests that during microbial nitrification in acid forest floor horizons, up to two of the three oxygen atoms in newly formed nitrate are derived from water, particularly if ammonium is abundant and nitrification rates are high. It was, however, also observed that in ammonium-limited systems with low nitrification rates, significantly less than two thirds of the oxygen in newly formed nitrate can be derived from water oxygen, presumably as a result of heterotrophic nitrification. It can be concluded from the presented data that the δ18O values of nitrate formed by microbial nitrification in acid forest floors typically range between +2 and +14‰, assuming that soil water δ18O values vary between -15 and -5‰. Hence, oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate formed by nitrification in forest floors are usually distinct from those of other nitrate sources such as atmospheric deposition and synthetic fertilizers and, therefore, constitute a valuable qualitative tracer for distinguishing among these sources of nitrate. A quantitative source apportionment appears, however, difficult because of the wide range of δ18O values, particularly for atmospheric nitrate deposition and for nitrate from microbial

  10. Nitration of plant apoplastic proteins from cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuba, Agnieszka; Kasprowicz-Maluśki, Anna; Wojtaszek, Przemysław

    2015-04-29

    Nitric oxide causes numerous protein modifications including nitration of tyrosine residues. This modification, though one of the greatest biological importance, is poorly recognized in plants and is usually associated with stress conditions. In this study we analyzed nitrotyrosines from suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum, treated with NO modulators and exposed to osmotic stress, as well as of BY2 cells long-term adapted to osmotic stress conditions. Using confocal microscopy, we showed that the cell wall area is one of the compartments most enriched in nitrotyrosines within a plant cell. Subsequently, we analyzed nitration of ionically-bound cell-wall proteins and identified selected proteins with MALDI-TOF spectrometry. Proteomic analysis indicated that there was no significant increase in the amount of nitrated proteins under the influence of NO modulators, among them 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), considered a donor of nitrating agent, peroxynitrite. Moreover, osmotic stress conditions did not increase the level of nitration in cell wall proteins isolated from suspension cells, and in cultures long-term adapted to stress conditions; that level was even reduced in comparison with control samples. Among identified nitrotyrosine-containing proteins dominated the ones associated with carbon circulation as well as the numerous proteins responding to stress conditions, mainly peroxidases. High concentrations of nitric oxide found in the cell wall and the ability to produce large amounts of ROS make the apoplast a site highly enriched in nitrotyrosines, as presented in this paper. Analysis of ionically bound fraction of the cell wall proteins indicating generally unchanged amounts of nitrotyrosines under influence of NO modulators and osmotic stress, is noticeably different from literature data concerning, however, the total plant proteins analysis. This observation is supplemented by further nitroproteome analysis, for cells long

  11. Nitrate and Nitrogen Oxides: Sources, Health Effects and Their Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Khalid Rehman; Sabir, Muhammad; Ozturk, Munir; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Ibrahim, Faridah Hanum

    Increased use of nitrogenous (N) fertilizers in agriculture has significantly altered the global N-cycle because they release nitrogenous gases of environmental concerns. The emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes to the global greenhouse gas accumulation and the stratospheric ozone depletion. In addition, it causes nitrate leaching problem deteriorating ground water quality. The nitrate toxicity has been reported in a number of studies showing the health hazards like methemoglobinemia in infants and is a potent cause of cancer. Despite these evident negative environmental as well as health impacts, consumption of N fertilizer cannot be reduced in view of the food security for the teeming growing world population. Various agronomic and genetic modifications have been practiced to tackle this problem. Some agronomic techniques adopted include split application of N, use of slow-release fertilizers, nitrification inhibitors and encouraging the use of organic manure over chemical fertilizers. As a matter of fact, the use of chemical means to remediate nitrate from the environment is very difficult and costly. Particularly, removal of nitrate from water is difficult task because it is chemically non-reactive in dilute aqueous solutions. Hence, the use of biological means for nitrate remediation offers a promising strategy to minimize the ill effects of nitrates and nitrites. One of the important goals to reduce N-fertilizer application can be effectively achieved by choosing N-efficient genotypes. This will ensure the optimum uptake of applied N in a balanced manner and exploring the molecular mechanisms for their uptake as well as metabolism in assimilatory pathways. The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the interrelations which exist in the terrestrial ecosystems between the plant type and characteristics of nutrient uptake and analyze the global consumption and demand for fertilizer nitrogen in relation to cereal production, evaluate the various methods

  12. Effects of nitrate adaptation by rumen inocula donors and substrate fiber proportion on in vitro nitrate disappearance, methanogenesis, and rumen fermentation acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M; Schaefer, D M; Zhao, G Q; Meng, Q X

    2013-07-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the main effects of dietary nitrate adaptation by cattle and alfalfa cell wall to starch ratio in in vitro substrates on nitrate disappearance and nitrite and volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, as well as hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) accumulations. Rumen fluid from steers fed diets containing urea or nitrate was added into in vitro incubations containing sodium nitrate as the sole nitrogen source and 20 cell wall : 80 starch or 80 cell wall : 20 starch as the carbohydrate source. The results showed that during 24 h incubation, rumen fluid inoculums from steers adapted to dietary nitrate resulted in more rapid nitrate disappearance by 6 h of incubation (P nitrate disappearance, CH4 accumulation and total VFA concentration. The higher cell wall ratio had the lower total gas production and H2 concentration (P nitrate feeding (P Nitrate adaptation did not alter total VFA concentration, but increased acetate, and decreased propionate and butyrate molar proportions (P < 0.01).

  13. Observations on particulate organic nitrates and unidentified components of NOy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T.; Egeløv, A.H.; Granby, K.

    1995-01-01

    summer al an agricultural site in Denmark and compared with measurements of ozone, H2O2, SO2, formic acid, acetic acid and methane sulphonic acid. The gas NOy detector determines the sum NO + NO2 + HNO2 + HNO3 + PAN + PPN + gas phase organic nitrates + 2 x N2O5 + NO3. The content of residual gas NOy......A method to determine the total content of particulate organic nitrates (PON) has been developed and ambient air measurements of PON, NO, NO2, HNO3, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN), gas NOy and particulate inorganic nitrate have been performed in the spring and early...

  14. Contrasting nitrate adsorption in Andisols of two coffee plantations in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M C; Graham, G R; Rudolph, D L

    2001-01-01

    Fertilizer use in coffee plantations is a suspected cause of rising ground water nitrate concentrations in the ground water-dependent Central Valley of Costa Rica. Nitrate adsorption was evaluated beneath two coffee (Coffea arabica L.) plantations in the Central Valley. Previous work at one site had identified unsaturated zone nitrate retardation relative to a tritium tracer. Differences in nitrate adsorption were assessed in cores to 4 m depth in Andisols at this and one other plantation using differences in KCl- and water-extractable nitrate as an index. Significant adsorption was confirmed at the site of the previous tracer test, but not at the second site. Anion exchange capacity, X-ray diffraction data, extractable Al and Si, and soil pH in NaF corroborated that differences in adsorption characteristics were related to subtle differences in clay mineralogy. Soils at the site with significant nitrate adsorption showed an Al-rich allophane clay content compared with a more weathered, Si-rich allophane and halloysite clay mineral content at the site with negligible adsorption. At the site with significant nitrate adsorption, nitrate occupied less than 10% of the total anion adsorption capacity, suggesting that adsorption may provide long-term potential for mitigation or delay of nitrate leaching. Evaluation of nitrate sorption potential of soil at local and landscape scales would be useful in development of nitrogen management practices to reduce nitrate leaching to ground water.

  15. Nitrate Leaching from Sand and Pumice Geomedia Amended with Pyrogenic Carbon Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihoon Kang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in using pyrogenic carbon as an adsorbent for aqueous contaminants in stormwater. The objective of this study was to investigate pyrogenic carbon materials as an amendment to geomedia to reduce nitrate leaching. Batch adsorption and column experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of a commercial activated carbon and two biochars incorporated (5% by weight into sand and pumice columns. The batch adsorption with 50 mg L−1 of nitrate solution showed that only activated carbon resulted in a substantial adsorption for nitrate up to 41%. Tested biochars were not effective in removing aqueous nitrate and even released nitrate (<1% with 1 h reaction time. Column experiment with a pulse input of nitrate solution (50 mg L−1 confirmed that the sand or pumice columns amended with biochars were not as effective as those amended with activated carbon for reducing nitrate leaching. Our results suggested that net negatively charged surfaces of biochar may inhibit nitrate anion adsorption while activated carbon has reactive sites containing acidic functional groups to improve nitrate retention. There was no difference between sand and pumice for nitrate retention in any of the carbon amendments. Additional surface activation process during biochar production may be needed to improve adsorptive capacity of biochar for aqueous nitrate removal.

  16. Nitrate-nitrite toxicity in cattle and sheep grazing Dactyloctenium radulans (button grass) in stockyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, R A; Rayner, A C; Thompson, G K; Pidgeon, G F; Burren, B R

    2004-10-01

    Hungry cattle and sheep introduced to stockyards containing a dominant or pure growth of Dactyloctenium radulans (button grass) suffered acute nitrate-nitrite toxicity in four incidents in inland Queensland between 1993 and 2001. Deaths ranged from 16 to 44%. Methaemoglobinaemia was noted at necropsies in all incidents. An aqueous humour sample from one dead steer contained 75 mg nitrate/L and from one dead sheep contained 100 mg nitrate and 50 mg nitrite/L (normal = ca 5 mg nitrate/L). Both lush and dry button grass were toxic. The nitrate content of button grass from within the stockyards ranged from 4.0 to 12.9% as potassium nitrate equivalent in dry matter and from outside the stockyards ranged from stockyard soil may boost the nitrate content of button grass to a concentration hazardous to hungry ruminants.

  17. [Advances in studies on accumulation and leaching of nitrate in farming soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhong; Chen, Xin; Shen, Shanmin

    2002-02-01

    Nitrate leaching in farming soil is the main reason resulting in ground water pollution of nitrate. The main factors, which can affect nitrate accumulation and leaching greatly, include fertilization, precipitation, irrigation, soil characteristics, and cultivation system. Superfluous nitrogen in soil caused either by using chemical fertilizer and manure solely or compost will result in nitrate accumulation. Cultivation and plow systems also can affect the process of nitrate accumulating and leaching. Down flows due to irrigation or precipitation are the necessary condition and carrier for transference and leaching of accumulated nitrate in soil. Great pores are the main channels for down flows. These factors always work corporately. Mathematical model, which has been developed quickly and used widely, may be a good method to study and predict nitrate leaching in farming land.

  18. Particulate organic nitrates observed in an oil and natural gas production region during wintertime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L.; Wooldridge, P. J.; deGouw, J.; Brown, S. S.; Bates, T. S.; Quinn, P. K.; Cohen, R. C.

    2015-08-01

    Organic nitrates in both gas and condensed (aerosol) phases were measured during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study from January to February in 2012. A high degree of correlation between total aerosol volume at diameters less than 500 nm and the particulate organic nitrate concentration indicates that organic nitrates are a consistent, if not dominant, fraction of fine aerosol mass. In contrast, a similar correlation with sub-2.5 μm aerosol volume is weaker. The C : N atomic ratio inferred from field measurements of PM2.5 and particulate organic nitrate is 34 : 1. Calculations constrained by the observations indicate that both condensation of gas-phase nitrates and heterogeneous reactions of NO3 / N2O5 are responsible for introducing organic nitrate functionality into the aerosol and that the source molecules are alkanes. Extrapolating the results to urban aerosol suggests organic nitrate production from alkanes may be a major secondary organic aerosol source.

  19. Effect of nitrate on activity and community structure of a sulfidogenic wastewater biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Michael Vedel Wegener; Mohanakrishnan, Janani; Schramm, Andreas

    Sulfide production by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in wastewater biofilms can induce corrosion in pipes and valves of treatment plants. Nitrate addition has been shown to suppress sulfide production in biofilms with varying success. The detailed effect of nitrate on bacterial activity and comm......Sulfide production by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in wastewater biofilms can induce corrosion in pipes and valves of treatment plants. Nitrate addition has been shown to suppress sulfide production in biofilms with varying success. The detailed effect of nitrate on bacterial activity......-like SRB to Desulfomicrobium-like species. Fluoresence in situ hybridization of SRB confirmed the shift and furthermore demonstrated that SRB, after nitrate addition, were overgrown by other, presumably nitrate reducing bacteria. Genes and transcripts of the periplasmic nitrate reductase could only...

  20. Understanding nitrate uptake, signaling and remobilisation for improving plant nitrogen use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Surya

    2018-02-01

    The majority of terrestrial plants use nitrate as their main source of nitrogen. Nitrate also acts as an important signalling molecule in vital physiological processes required for optimum plant growth and development. Improving nitrate uptake and transport, through activation by nitrate sensing, signalling and regulatory processes, would enhance plant growth, resulting in improved crop yields. The increased remobilisation of nitrate, and assimilated nitrogenous compounds, from source to sink tissues further ensures higher yields and quality. An updated knowledge of various transporters, genes, activators, and microRNAs, involved in nitrate uptake, transport, remobilisation, and nitrate-mediated root growth, is presented. An enhanced understanding of these components will allow for their orchestrated fine tuning in efforts to improving nitrogen use efficiency in plants. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of nitrate concentration on pigment content in Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krywalska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on the qualitative and quantitative composition of pigments in the alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa cultured on mineral media with different nitrate content may give results serving to establish the optimal concentration of the nitrogen source in the medium. It was demonstrated that the interrelations between the particular pigments in 5 kinds of media containing 0, 0.128, 0.192, 0.256 and 0.384 g N/1, respectively, are most favourable in the medium threefold enriched in nitrates. This fact may be explained on the basis of the value of the coefficients: chlorophyll a chlorophyll a + b ----------------- = 3.28\tand ----------------------- = 3.13 chlorophyll b carotenoids The lack of a nitrogen source in the medium causes significant changes in the total pigment content and in the particular fractions. It was also found that under conditions of nitrogen deficit the astaxanthin content increases.

  2. Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-18

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 aboveground UNS, and 79 candidate belowground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  3. Engineering Options Assessment Report. Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anast, Kurt Roy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-13

    This report examines and assesses the available systems and facilities considered for carrying out remediation activities on remediated nitrate salt (RNS) and unremediated nitrate salt (UNS) waste containers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The assessment includes a review of the waste streams consisting of 60 RNS, 29 above-ground UNS, and 79 candidate below-ground UNS containers that may need remediation. The waste stream characteristics were examined along with the proposed treatment options identified in the Options Assessment Report . Two primary approaches were identified in the five candidate treatment options discussed in the Options Assessment Report: zeolite blending and cementation. Systems that could be used at LANL were examined for housing processing operations to remediate the RNS and UNS containers and for their viability to provide repackaging support for remaining LANL legacy waste.

  4. Nitrate flux into the euphotic zone near Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, W. J.

    1988-02-01

    Throughout most of the year, there exists within the North Atlantic subtropical ocean mixed layer a3He excess which can only be attributed to a flux of tritiugenic3He from below. The upward flux required to support this excess can be computed as the convolution of the time series of 3He excess and gas-exchange rate. This flux is quantitatively consistent with the long-term evolution of the main thermocline inventories of tritium and 3He. Using the observed correlation of 3He with nitrate within the upper main thermocline, I estimate the annually averaged upward flux of nitrate into the euphotic zone to be 0.6 +/-0.2 moles m-2 per yr. This flux is sufficient to support a new, non-regenerative primary productivity in excess of 3 moles carbon m-2per yr.

  5. Hexakis(N,N′-dimethylthiourea-κSnickel(II nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Asif

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The title complex salt, [Ni(C3H8N2S6](NO32, consists of an [Ni(Dmtu6]2+ (Dmtu is N,N′-dimethylthiourea dication and two nitrate counter-anions. The NiII atom (site symmetry overline{3} is coordinated by the S atoms of six Dmtu ligands within a slightly distorted octahedral environment. The crystal structure is characterized by weak intramolecular N—H...S interactions and by intermolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the nitrate anion (site symmetry 3.. These intermolecular interactions lead to the formation of two-dimensional networks lying parallel to the ab plane. The networks are linked via non-classical intermolecular C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional arrangement.

  6. Nitrates in drinking water: relation with intensive livestock production

    OpenAIRE

    GIAMMARINO, M.; QUATTO, P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction. An excess of nitrates causes environmental pollution in receiving water bodies and health risk for human, if contaminated water is source of drinking water. The directive 91/676/ CEE [1] aims to reduce the nitrogen pressure in Europe from agriculture sources and identifies the livestock population as one of the predominant sources of surplus of nutrients that could be released in water and air. Directive is concerned about cattle, sheep, pigs and poultry and their territ...

  7. 4-Meth­oxy­anilinium nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmouni, Hajer; Smirani Sta, Wajda; Al-Deyab, S. Salem; Rzaigui, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The title compound, C7H10NO+·NO3 −, crystallized with two p-ansidinium cations and two nitrate anions in the asymmetric unit. As well as Columbic and van der Waals forces, moleucles inter­act via multiple bifurcated N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds that help consolidate the crystal packing, resulting in a three-dimensional network. PMID:22065633

  8. Reliable, rapid and simple voltammetric detection of urea nitrate explosive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagan, Avi; Lu, Donglai; Cizek, Karel; La Belle, Jeff; Wang, Joseph

    2008-05-01

    A highly selective and rapid electrochemical assay of the improvised explosive urea nitrate (UN) is reported. The method involves a short ( approximately 10 s) acid-catalyzed reaction of UN with 4-nitrotoluene (NT) followed by a rapid ( approximately 2 s) square-wave voltammetric (SWV) detection of the 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) product. The new protocol offers great promise for a reliable field detection of UN, with significant advantages of speed, sensitivity, portability, simplicity, and cost.

  9. Groundwater quality in Maharashtra, India: focus on nitrate pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Indrani; Salunkhe, Abhaysinh; Rohra, Nanda; Kumar, Rakesh

    2011-10-01

    Groundwater Survey and Development Agency (GSDA), Central Ground Water Board (CGWB) and Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB) have been carrying out groundwater quality monitoring at about 1407 monitoring locations in various districts of Maharashtra state in India. The groundwater quality data for pH, TDS, total hardness, sulphate, flouride and nitrate were compared with BIS: 10500:2004-2005 standards for drinking purpose. The results show that nitrate pollution is becoming more prevalent in groundwater of Maharashtra. Water quality data during the period 2007-2009 show that 544 locations out of 1407 locations exceeded 45 mgl(-1), the allowable NO3 level for drinking water. About 227 locations exceeded nitrate level beyond 100 mgl(-1). At 87 talukas in 23 districts of Maharashtra the NO3 levels exceeded the standard in all samples monitored during 2007-2009. The Buldana district with highest locations (27) had nitrate above 100 mgl(-1) followed by Amravati (24) and Akola (20) districts. At 7 talukas in 4 districts, fluoride was found above permissible limit of 1.5 mgl(-1), 100% of the time. 2 talukas in 2 districts of Maharashtra showed 100% non compliance of pH as per BIS standard of 6.5-8.5 mgl(-1). The districts having good to excellent quality of groundwater were Bhandara, Gondia, Kolhapur, Mumbai city, Mumbai Suburban, Nandurbar, Raigad, Ratnagiri, Satara, Sindhudurg, Thane and Washim. Vaijapur taluka in Aurangabad, Sinnar in Nashik and Kalambh taluka in Osmanabad have very poor water quality. Paithan taluka in Aurangabad, Shegaon taluka at Buldhana district, Amolner taluka at Jalgaon district and Jafrabad in Jalna district have water unsuitable for drinking.

  10. Long-term fate of nitrate fertilizer in agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebilo, Mathieu; Mayer, Bernhard; Nicolardot, Bernard; Pinay, Gilles; Mariotti, André

    2013-11-05

    Increasing diffuse nitrate loading of surface waters and groundwater has emerged as a major problem in many agricultural areas of the world, resulting in contamination of drinking water resources in aquifers as well as eutrophication of freshwaters and coastal marine ecosystems. Although empirical correlations between application rates of N fertilizers to agricultural soils and nitrate contamination of adjacent hydrological systems have been demonstrated, the transit times of fertilizer N in the pedosphere-hydrosphere system are poorly understood. We investigated the fate of isotopically labeled nitrogen fertilizers in a three-decade-long in situ tracer experiment that quantified not only fertilizer N uptake by plants and retention in soils, but also determined to which extent and over which time periods fertilizer N stored in soil organic matter is rereleased for either uptake in crops or export into the hydrosphere. We found that 61-65% of the applied fertilizers N were taken up by plants, whereas 12-15% of the labeled fertilizer N were still residing in the soil organic matter more than a quarter century after tracer application. Between 8-12% of the applied fertilizer had leaked toward the hydrosphere during the 30-y observation period. We predict that additional exports of (15)N-labeled nitrate from the tracer application in 1982 toward the hydrosphere will continue for at least another five decades. Therefore, attempts to reduce agricultural nitrate contamination of aquatic systems must consider the long-term legacy of past applications of synthetic fertilizers in agricultural systems and the nitrogen retention capacity of agricultural soils.

  11. Management of Microbial Nitrate Production in Agricultural Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Wei

    1998-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is of central importance in the internal soil nitrogen (N) cycle. While animal wastes and nitrification inhibitors have been used in modern agriculture for decades, their effects on soil NO3- production in relation to ammonium (NH4+) availability and nitrifier population activity in agricultural soils receiving animal wastes or nitrification inhibitors. Several laboratory and field studies assessed the impacts of variously treated dairy wastes and the effects of repeated lon...

  12. nitrate-nitrogen and ammonium- nitrogen levels of some water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NaREM

    Key words: Nitrate, ammonium, water bodies/quality, soils, Douala metropolis. ... This has initiated progressive degradation of land and other vital resources .... 2.74 35.0 30.8. Downstream. Wouri Bridge. WOU6. 04 03 59.9N. 009 41 36.3E. 7.3. 6960. 0.11 39.2 22.4. Wouri Wharf. WOU7. 04 02 27.8N. 009 40 23.9E. 7.4. 9600.

  13. Protective effect of dietary nitrate on experimental gastritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larauche, Muriel; Anton, Pauline M; Garcia-Villar, Rafaël; Theodorou, Vassilia; Frexinos, Jacques; Buéno, Lionel; Fioramonti, Jean

    2003-06-01

    Nitrates have long been considered as harmful dietary components and judged responsible for deleterious effects on human health, leading to stringent regulations concerning their levels in food and water. However, recent studies demonstrate that dietary nitrate may have a major role in human health as a non-immune mechanism for host defence, through its metabolism to NO in the stomach. NO is a versatile molecule and although evidence exists showing that administration of low doses of exogenous NO protects against gastrointestinal inflammation, higher NO doses have been shown to exacerbate injury. So, the effect of an ingestion of nitrates in doses corresponding to a normal diet in human consumers on an experimental gastritis induced by iodoacetamide in rats was investigated. During gastritis one of the following compounds was given orally: water; KNO3; the NO donor sodium nitroprusside; the NO scavenger haemoglobin given with either water or KNO3. N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a non-specific NO synthase inhibitor, was administered with either water, iodoacetamide alone, or combined with KNO3. After killing, the stomach was resected and microscopic damage scores, myeloperoxidase and NO synthase activities were determined. Iodoacetamide-induced gastritis was significantly reduced by KNO3 administration, an effect which was reproduced by sodium nitroprusside and reversed by haemoglobin. l-NAME induced gastric mucosal damage in itself, and KNO3 did not prevent the gastritis induced by iodoacetamide associated with l-NAME. In conclusion, dietary nitrate exerts a protective effect against an experimental gastritis in rats by releasing NO in the stomach but such an effect requires the production of endogenous NO.

  14. Application of Lentikats Biotechnology for removal of nitrates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Denitrifying Bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans encapsulated in polyvinyl alcohol matrix (so called Lentikats Biocatalyst; LB) was applied for the removal of nitrates from simulated ion-exchange brines (12.14 g.L-1 Cl-, 1.35 g.L-1 SO42-, and 2.26 g.L-1 N-NO3-). The effect of brines dilution on the denitrification activity of fresh ...

  15. CO2 enrichment inhibits shoot nitrate assimilation in C3 but not C4 plants and slows growth under nitrate in C3 plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Arnold J; Asensio, Jose Salvador Rubaio; Randall, Lesley; Rachmilevitch, Shimon; Cousins, Asaph B; Carlisle, Eli A

    2012-02-01

    The CO2 concentration in Earth's atmosphere may double during this century. Plant responses to such an increase depend strongly on their nitrogen status, but the reasons have been uncertain. Here, we assessed shoot nitrate assimilation into amino acids via the shift in shoot CO2 and O2 fluxes when plants received nitrate instead of ammonium as a nitrogen source (deltaAQ). Shoot nitrate assimilation became negligible with increasing CO2 in a taxonomically diverse group of eight C3 plant species, was relatively insensitive to CO2 in three C4 species, and showed an intermediate sensitivity in two C3-C4 intermediate species. We then examined the influence of CO2 level and ammonium vs. nitrate nutrition on growth, assessed in terms of changes in fresh mass, of several C3 species and a Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Elevated CO2 (720 micromol CO2/mol of all gases present) stimulated growth or had no effect in the five C3 species tested when they received ammonium as a nitrogen source but inhibited growth or had no effect if they received nitrate. Under nitrate, two C3 species grew faster at sub-ambient (approximately 310 micromol/mol) than elevated CO2. A CAM species grew faster at ambient than elevated or sub-ambient CO2 under either ammonium or nitrate nutrition. This study establishes that CO2 enrichment inhibits shoot nitrate assimilation in a wide variety of C3 plants and that this phenomenon can have a profound effect on their growth. This indicates that shoot nitrate assimilation provides an important contribution to the nitrate assimilation of an entire C3 plant. Thus, rising CO2 and its effects on shoot nitrate assimilation may influence the distribution of C3 plant species.

  16. Precipitation of nitrate-cancrinite in Hanford Tank Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, E C; McNamara, B K

    2004-08-15

    The chemistry of underground storage tanks containing high-level waste at the Hanford Site in Washington State is an area of continued research interest. Thermodynamic models have predicted the formation of analcime and clinoptilolite in Hanford tanks, rather than cancrinite; however, these predictions were based on carbonate-cancrinite. We report the first observation of a nitrate-cancrinite [possibly Na8(K,Cs)(AlSiO4)6(NO3)2 x nH2O] extracted from a Hanford tank 241-AP-101 sample that was evaporated to 6, 8, and 10 M NaOH concentrations. The nitrate-cancrinite phase formed spherical aggregates (4 microm in diameter) that consisted of platy hexagonal crystals (approximately 0.2 microm thick). Cesium-137 was concentrated in these aluminosilicate structures. These phases possessed a morphology identical to that of nitrate-cancrinite synthesized using simulant tests of nonradioactive tank waste, supporting the contention that it is possible to develop nonradioactive artificial sludges. This investigation points to the continued importance of understanding the solubility of NO3-cancrinite and related phases. Knowledge of the detailed structure of actual phases in the tank waste helps with thermodynamic modeling of tank conditions and waste processing.

  17. Silver nitrate cauterization: a treatment option for aphthous stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu Özler, Gül

    2014-07-01

    In this study we compared silver nitrate cautery with placebo to assess the effect of silver nitrate cautery in aphthous stomatitis for pain relief and healing time. In this study, sixty-five patients with aphthous stomatitis were assessed. Silver nitrate sticks were used in group A (treatment group) and placebo sticks were used for group B (control group). Change in the severity of pain, change in the size of the ulcers, healing time, side effects of the procedure were assessed. Although the mean value of pain scores before the procedure was similar in both of the groups, there were statistically significant differences between two groups after the procedure on the first to the seventh day. On the seventh day after the procedure, the ulcers were completely reepithelialized in 21 patients (60%) in the treatment group and in 10 patients (32%) in the placebo group. The difference was statistically significant (p aphthous stomatitis. Also this treatment shortens the healing time of ulcers. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The mechanism of oleic acid nitration by *NO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kavita; Siddam, Anjaiah; Marathi, Archana; Roy, Uzzal; Falck, J R; Balazy, Michael

    2008-08-01

    Fatty acid nitration is a recently discovered process that generates biologically active nitro lipids; however, its mechanism has not been fully characterized. For example, some structural details such as vinyl and allyl isomers of the nitro fatty acids have not been established. To characterize lipids that originated from a biomimetic reaction of *NO(2) with oleic acid, we synthesized several isomers of nitro oleic acids and studied their chromatography and mass spectra by various techniques of mass spectrometry. LC/MS analysis performed on a high resolution micro column detected molecular carboxylic anions of various oleic acid nitro isomers (NO(2)OA). Esterification of NO(2)OA with pentafluorobenzyl bromide and diisopropylethylamine as a catalyst produced a unique isoxazole ester derivative exclusively from allyl NO(2)OA isomers via dehydration of the nitro group at ambient temperatures. This new analytical procedure revealed that *NO(2) generated two vinyl and two allyl isomers of NO(2)OA. The vinyl isomers showed high regioselectivity with the 1.8:1 preference for the 10-NO(2)OA isomer that was absent among allylic isomers. The nitration also generated elaidic acid via cis-trans isomerization and diatereoisomers of vicinal nitro hydroxy, nitro keto and alpha-nitro epoxy stearic acids with high stereo and regioselectivity. Nitration of small unilamelar phospholipid vesicles resulted in several phospholipids containing nitro lipids and elaidic acid amenable to hydrolysis by phospholipase A(2).

  19. A new immobilization and sensing platform for nitrate quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Veena; Hooda, Vinita

    2014-06-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) from Aspergillus niger was covalently coupled to the epoxy affixed gold nanoparticles (epoxy/AuNPs) with a conjugation yield of 35.40±0.01 μg/cm(2) and 93.90±0.85% retention of specific activity. The bare and NR bound epoxy/AuNPs support was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The immobilized enzyme system was optimized with respect to pH, temperature and substrate concentrations and successfully employed for determination of nitrate contents in ground water. The minimum detection limit of the method was 0.05 mM with linearity from 0.1 to 10.0 mM. The % recoveries of added nitrates (0.1 and 0.2 mM) were >95.0% and within-day and between-day coefficients of variations were 1.012% and 3.125% respectively. The method showed good correlation (R(2)=0.998) with the popular Griess reaction method. Epoxy/AuNPs bound NR showed good thermal and storage stabilities and retained 50% activity after 16 reuses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Afterload reduction by long-term nitrate therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, A; Bachmann, K

    1989-01-01

    Tolerance to arterial and venous effects is a common problem in longterm-therapy with nitrates when dosing schemes with multiple, regulary timed intervals throughout the day are applied. A balanced effect on preload and afterload is essential for a successful therapy of congestive heart failure. Interval therapy, the once daily medication of a nitrate, has a proven tolerancefree effect on preload. This study addresses the problem of afterload reduction under longterm interval therapy with nitrates. Nine patients with coronary heart disease NYHA II-III with congestion under exercise where included in the study. After a washout period they where treated with once-daily 120 mg ISDN s.r. Measuring mean arterial pressure and cardiac output, we compared the effect of the first dose (acute) with the effect after 5 weeks 1 x 1 120 mg ISDN s.r. (chronic). After acute therapy the mean arterial pressure under exercise was reduced by 14% from 121 +/- 12 mmHg to 104 +/- 11 mmHg. The average reduction of blood pressure under exercise was unchanged during chronic therapy (105 +/- 8 mmHg). Peripheral resistance was reduced by 21% from 914 +/- 266 to 722 +/- 190 dynsec/cm5 after the first dose. The afterload reduction was maintained during chronic therapy (727 +/- 176 dynsec/cm5).

  1. The primary nitrate response: a multifaceted signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Anna; Krouk, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) application strongly affects gene expression in plants. This regulation is thought to be crucial for their adaptation in response to a changing nutritional environment. Depending on the conditions preceding or concomitant with nitrate provision, the treatment can affect up to a 10th of genome expression in Arabidopsis thaliana. The early events occurring after NO3(-) provision are often called the Primary Nitrate Response (PNR). Despite this simple definition, PNR is a complex process that is difficult to properly delineate. Here we report the different concepts related to PNR, review the different molecular components known to control it, and show, using meta-analysis, that this concept/pathway is not monolithic. We especially bring our attention to the genome-wide effects of LBD37 and LBD38 overexpression, NLP7, and CHL1/NRT1.1 mutations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Ultra-fine powders using glycine-nitrate combustion synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chick, L.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Bates, J.L.; Maupin, G.D.

    1991-05-01

    Fabrication of advanced, multifunctional materials frequently requires the synthesis of complex, ultra-fine powders comprised of a single phase containing several elements (multicomponent) or of several phases that are intimately mixed on a micro-scale (composite). A new combustion synthesis method, the glycine/nitrate process (GNP), is particularly useful for synthesizing ultra-fine, multicomponent oxide powders. Examples discussed include La(Sr)CrO{sub 3} and La(Sr)FeO{sub 3} perovskites and a composite of three phases, NiO, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and Cu metal. The GNP consists of two basic steps. First, metal nitrates and a low molecular weight amino acid are dissolved in water. Second, the solution is boiled until it thickens. This viscous liquid ignites and undergoes self-sustaining combustion, producing an ash composed of the oxide product. Most refractory oxides that are composed of a combination of metals having stable nitrates should be possible to synthesize using GNP. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Laboratory studies of nitrate radical chemistry - application to atmospheric processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noremsaune, Ingse

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies atmospheric chemistry and tries in particular to fill gaps in the data base of atmospheric reactions. It studies the nitrate radical reactions with chloroethenes and with but-2-yne (2-butyne). The mechanisms and rate coefficients for the NO{sub 3}-initiated degradation of the chloroethenes and 2-butyne were investigated by means of the static reaction chamber and the fast flow-discharge technique. The reactions between the nitrate radical and the chloroethenes were studied at atmospheric pressure in a reaction chamber with synthetic air as bath gas. FTIR (Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy) spectroscopy was used to follow the reactions and to identify the products. Products were observed for the reactions with (E)-1,2-dichloroethene and tetrachloroethene, although the absorption bands are weak. The alkyl peroxynitrate and nitrate compounds form very strong and characteristic absorption bands. The rate coefficients for the reactions between NO{sub 3} and the chloroethenes were investigated at room temperature by three different methods. The results are given in tables. 132 refs., 44 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. Uranyl peroxide pyrophosphate cage clusters with oxalate and nitrate bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jie; Ozga, Michael; Stoffer, Megan; Burns, Peter C

    2012-06-28

    Two complex cage clusters built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids and multiple types of bridges between uranyl ions, U(30)Py(10)Ox(5) and U(38)Py(10)Nt(4), were crystallized from aqueous solution under ambient conditions. These are built from 30 uranyl hexagonal bipyramids, 10 pyrophosphate groups, and five oxalate bridges in one case, and 38 uranyl hexagonal bipyramids, 10 pyrophosphate groups, and four nitrate groups in the other. The crystal compositions are (H(3)O)(10)Li(18)K(22)[(UO(2))(30)(O(2))(30)(P(2)O(7))(10)(C(2)O(4))(5)](H(2)O)(22) and Li(24)K(36)[(UO(2))(38)(O(2))(40)(OH)(8)(P(2)O(7))(10)(NO(3))(4)](NO(3))(4)(H(2)O)(n) for U(30)Py(10)Ox(5) and U(38)Py(10)Nt(4), respectively. Cluster U(30)Py(10)Ox(5) crystallizes over a narrow range of solution pH that encourages incorporation of both oxalate and pyrophosphate, with incorporation of oxalate only being favored under more acidic conditions, and pyrophosphate only under more alkaline conditions. Cluster U(38)Py(10)Nt(4) contains two identical lobes consisting of uranyl polyhedra and pyrophosphate groups, with these lobes linked into the larger cluster through four nitrate groups. The synthesis conditions appear to have prevented closure of these lobes, and a relatively high nitrate concentration in solution favored formation of the larger cluster.

  5. Verification of spectrophotometric method for nitrate analysis in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawati, Puji; Gusrianti, Reny; Dwisiwi, Bledug Bernanti; Purbaningtias, Tri Esti; Wiyantoko, Bayu

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this research was to verify the spectrophotometric method to analyze nitrate in water samples using APHA 2012 Section 4500 NO3-B method. The verification parameters used were: linearity, method detection limit, level of quantitation, level of linearity, accuracy and precision. Linearity was obtained by using 0 to 50 mg/L nitrate standard solution and the correlation coefficient of standard calibration linear regression equation was 0.9981. The method detection limit (MDL) was defined as 0,1294 mg/L and limit of quantitation (LOQ) was 0,4117 mg/L. The result of a level of linearity (LOL) was 50 mg/L and nitrate concentration 10 to 50 mg/L was linear with a level of confidence was 99%. The accuracy was determined through recovery value was 109.1907%. The precision value was observed using % relative standard deviation (%RSD) from repeatability and its result was 1.0886%. The tested performance criteria showed that the methodology was verified under the laboratory conditions.

  6. Nitrate pollution of groundwater; all right…, but nothing else?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menció, Anna, E-mail: anna.mencio@udg.edu [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Recerca en Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Deptartament de Ciències Ambientals, Facultat de Ciències, Universitat de Girona, 17071 Girona (Spain); Mas-Pla, Josep, E-mail: jmas@icra.cat [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Recerca en Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Deptartament de Ciències Ambientals, Facultat de Ciències, Universitat de Girona, 17071 Girona (Spain); Institut Català de Recerca de l’Aigua (ICRA) (Spain); Otero, Neus, E-mail: notero@ub.edu [Grup de Mineralogia Aplicada i Geoquímica de Fluids, Departament de Cristallografia, Mineralogia i Dipòsits Minerals, Facultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona (UB), C/ Martí i Franquès, s/n – 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Regàs, Oriol [Grup de Geologia Aplicada i Ambiental (GAiA), Centre de Recerca en Geologia i Cartografia Ambiental (Geocamb), Deptartament de Ciències Ambientals, Facultat de Ciències, Universitat de Girona, 17071 Girona (Spain); Boy-Roura, Mercè [Institut Català de Recerca de l’Aigua (ICRA) (Spain); and others

    2016-01-01

    Contamination from agricultural sources and, in particular, nitrate pollution, is one of the main concerns in groundwater management. However, this type of pollution entails the entrance of other substances into the aquifer, as well as it may promote other processes. In this study, we deal with hydrochemical and isotopic analysis of groundwater samples from four distinct zones in Catalonia (NE Spain), which include 5 different aquifer types, to investigate the influence of fertilization on the overall hydrochemical composition of groundwater. Results indicate that intense fertilizer application, causing high nitrate pollution in aquifers, also homogenize the contents of the major dissolved ions (i.e.; Cl{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Ca{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Mg{sup 2+}). Thus, when groundwater in igneous and sedimentary aquifers is compared, significant differences are observed under natural conditions for Cl{sup -}, Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} (with p-values ranging from < 0.001 to 0.038), and when high nitrate concentrations occur, these differences are reduced (most p-values ranged between 0.054 and 0.978). Moreover, positive linear relationships between nitrate and some ions are found indicating the magnitude of the fertilization impact on groundwater hydrochemistry (with R{sup 2} values of 0.490, 0.609 and 0.470, for SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Ca{sup 2+} and Cl{sup -}, respectively). Nevertheless, the increasing concentration of specific ions is not only attributed to agricultural pollution, but to their enhancing effect upon the biogeochemical processes that control water-rock interactions. Such results raise awareness that these processes should be evaluated in advance in order to assess an adequate groundwater resources management. - Highlights: • The effects of nitrate pollution have been evaluated in five different aquifer types • Statistical and multivariate analyses are used to identify groundwater changes • Agricultural pollution modifies

  7. Assessment of dietary exposure of nitrate and nitrite in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, C; Heraud, F; Volatier, J-L; Leblanc, J-C

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dietary exposure of nitrate and nitrite in France. A total of 13, 657 concentration levels of nitrate and nitrite measured in food, representing 138 and 109 food items, respectively, and coming from French monitoring programmes between 2000 and 2006, were used. Depending on the non-detected and non-quantified analysis treatment, lower and upper concentration mean estimates were calculated for each food item. These were combined with consumption data derived from 1474 adults and 1018 children from the French national individual consumption survey (INCA1), conducted in 1999 and based on a 7-day food record diary. A total of 18% of spinaches, 6% of salads, 10% of cheeses, 8% of meat products and 6% of industrial meat products exceeded the European nitrate maximum level or maximum residual level. A total of 0.4% of industrial meat products and 0.2% of meat products exceeded their European nitrite maximum level or maximum residual level. Nitrate dietary exposure averaged 40% of the acceptable daily intake (ADI; 3.7 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1)) for adults and 51 - 54% of the ADI for children with the major contributors being, for adults and children, respectively, vegetables (24 and 27% of ADI), potatoes (5 and 11% of ADI), and water (5 and 5% of ADI). The individual nitrate dietary intake of 1.4% (confidence interval (CI(95th)) [0.8; 2.0]) to 1.5% (CI(95th) [0.9; 2.1]) of adults and 7.9% (CI(95th) [6.2; 9.6]) to 8.4% (CI(95th) [6.7; 10.1]) of children were higher than the ADI. Nitrite dietary exposure averaged 33-67% of the ADI (0.06 mg kg(-1) body weight day(-1)) for adults and 67-133% of the ADI for children, with contributions of additive food vectors at 33% of ADI for adults and 50-67% of ADI for children. The individual nitrite dietary intake of 0.7% (CI(95th) [0.3; 1.1]) to 16.4% (CI(95th) [14.5; 18.3]) of adults and 10.5% (CI(95th) [8.6; 12.4]) to 66.2% (CI(95th) [63.3; 69.1]) of children were higher than the ADI.

  8. Nitrate source apportionment in a subtropical watershed using Bayesian model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liping; Han, Jiangpei; Xue, Jianlong; Zeng, Lingzao [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Shi, Jiachun, E-mail: jcshi@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Wu, Laosheng, E-mail: laowu@zju.edu.cn [College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058 (China); Jiang, Yonghai [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing, 100012 (China)

    2013-10-01

    Nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup −}) pollution in aquatic system is a worldwide problem. The temporal distribution pattern and sources of nitrate are of great concern for water quality. The nitrogen (N) cycling processes in a subtropical watershed located in Changxing County, Zhejiang Province, China were greatly influenced by the temporal variations of precipitation and temperature during the study period (September 2011 to July 2012). The highest NO{sub 3}{sup −} concentration in water was in May (wet season, mean ± SD = 17.45 ± 9.50 mg L{sup −1}) and the lowest concentration occurred in December (dry season, mean ± SD = 10.54 ± 6.28 mg L{sup −1}). Nevertheless, no water sample in the study area exceeds the WHO drinking water limit of 50 mg L{sup −1} NO{sub 3}{sup −}. Four sources of NO{sub 3}{sup −} (atmospheric deposition, AD; soil N, SN; synthetic fertilizer, SF; manure and sewage, M and S) were identified using both hydrochemical characteristics [Cl{sup −}, NO{sub 3}{sup −}, HCO{sub 3}{sup −}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, Ca{sup 2+}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, dissolved oxygen (DO)] and dual isotope approach (δ{sup 15}N–NO{sub 3}{sup −} and δ{sup 18}O–NO{sub 3}{sup −}). Both chemical and isotopic characteristics indicated that denitrification was not the main N cycling process in the study area. Using a Bayesian model (stable isotope analysis in R, SIAR), the contribution of each source was apportioned. Source apportionment results showed that source contributions differed significantly between the dry and wet season, AD and M and S contributed more in December than in May. In contrast, SN and SF contributed more NO{sub 3}{sup −} to water in May than that in December. M and S and SF were the major contributors in December and May, respectively. Moreover, the shortcomings and uncertainties of SIAR were discussed to provide implications for future works. With the assessment of temporal variation and sources of NO{sub 3}{sup −}, better

  9. Vulnerability of groundwater resources to nitrate pollution: A simple and effective procedure for delimiting Nitrate Vulnerable Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauzo, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    This research was undertaken to further our understanding of the factors involved in nonpoint-source nitrate pollution of groundwater. The shortcomings of some of the most commonly used methods for assessing groundwater vulnerability have been analysed and a new procedure that incorporates key improvements has been proposed. The new approach (LU-IV procedure) allows us to assess and map groundwater vulnerability to nitrate pollution and to accurately delimit the Nitrate Vulnerable Zones. The LU-IV procedure proved more accurate than the most widely used methods to assess groundwater vulnerability (DRASTIC, GOD), when compared with nitrate distribution in the groundwater of 46 aquifers included in the study (using the drainage basin as the unit of analysis). The proposed procedure stands out by meeting the following requirements: (1) it uses readily available parameters that provide enough data to feed the model, (2) it excludes redundant parameters, (3) it avoids the need to assign insufficiently contrasted weights to parameters, (4) it assess the whole catchment area that potentially drains N-polluted waters into the receptor aquifer, (5) it can be implemented within a GIS, and (6) it provides a multi-scale representation. As the LU-IV procedure has been demonstrated to be a reliable tool for delimiting NVZ, it could be particularly interesting to use it in countries where certain types of environmental data are either not available or have only limited availability. Based on this study (and according to the LU-IV procedure), it was concluded that an area of at least 1728km2 should be considered as NVZ. This sharply contrasts with the current 328km2 officially designated in the study area by the Spain's regional administrations. These results highlight the need to redefine the current NVZ designation, which is essential for an appropriate implementation of action programmes designed to restore water quality in line with Directive 91/676/EEC. Copyright © 2016

  10. Detection of the improvised explosives ammonium nitrate (AN) and urea nitrate (UN) using non-aqueous solvents with electrospray ionization and MS/MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Inge; McCord, Bruce

    2013-10-15

    In this study methods for the detection of trace levels of the improvised explosives urea nitrate and ammonium nitrate were developed using electrospray ionization with infusion. By using a non-aqueous solvent mixture containing 95% acetone with 5% 2-methoxyethanol we were able to preserve the urea and ammonium nitrate ion pairs and discriminate between these and other similar salts. Negative ion electrospray ionization was used for urea nitrate detection and positive ion electrospray ionization was used for ammonium nitrate. Two specific adduct ions were detected for each explosive with ammonium nitrate producing m/z 178 [2AN+NH4](+) and m/z 258 ions [3AN+NH4](+) while urea nitrate produced m/z 185 [UN+NO3](-) and m/z 248 [UN+HNO3+NO3](-) The specificity of the analysis was examined by mixing the different explosives with various salts and interferents. Adduct ions formed in the gas phase were found to be useful in distinguishing between ion pairs and mixed salts. Overall the method demonstrates the sensitive detection of both explosives, and more specifically the potential to determine intact urea nitrate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. It is rocket science - why dietary nitrate is hard to 'beet'! Part II: further mechanisms and therapeutic potential of the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charlotte Elizabeth; Khatri, Jibran; Maskell, Perry; Odongerel, Chimed; Webb, Andrew James

    2017-01-01

    Dietary nitrate (found in green leafy vegetables such as rocket and in beetroot) is now recognized to be an important source of nitric oxide, via the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. Dietary nitrate confers several cardiovascular beneficial effects on blood pressure, platelets, endothelial function, mitochondrial efficiency and exercise. Having described key twists and turns in the elucidation of the pathway and the underlying mechanisms in Part I, we explore the more recent developments which have served to confirm mechanisms, extend our understanding, and discover new properties and potential therapeutic uses of the pathway in Part II. Even the established dependency on low oxygen states for bioactivation of nitrite has recently been challenged. Dietary nitrate appears to be an important component of 'healthy diets', such as the DASH diet to lower blood pressure and the Mediterranean diet, with its potential to lower cardiovascular risk, possibly through beneficial interactions with a range of other constituents. The World Cancer Research Foundation report strong evidence for vegetables including spinach and lettuce (high nitrate-containing) decreasing cancer risk (mouth, pharynx, larynx, oesophagus and stomach), summarized in a 'Nitrate-Cancer Risk Veg-Table'. The European Space Agency recommends that beetroot, lettuce, spinach and rocket (high-nitrate vegetables) are grown to provide food for long-term space missions. Nitrate, an ancient component of rocket fuel, could support sustainable crops for healthy humans. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. A new compliance checking level for nitrate in groundwater : modelling nitrate leaching and the fate of nitrogen in the upper 5 meter of the groundwater system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenendijk, P.; Renaud, L.V.; Roelsma, J.; Janssen, G.M.C.M.; Jansen, S.; Heerdink, R.; Griffioen, J.; Grift, van der B.

    2008-01-01

    Research was conducted on the implications of a possible lowering of the sampling depth for the nitrate compliance checking level in the Netherlands. The STONE model was used to simulate nitrate concentrations and nitrogen balances for the three main sand districts (North, Central, South) and for

  13. Cation dynamics in pyridinium nitrate and bis-thiourea pyridinium nitrate inclusion compound studied by {sup 2}H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajzderska, A; Fojud, Z; Goc, R; Wasicki, J [Institute of Physics, A Mickiewicz University, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-04-16

    {sup 2}H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) line-shape measurements were performed over a wide temperature range for pyridinium nitrate (d{sub 5}PyH)NO{sub 3} and bis-thiourea pyridinium nitrate inclusion complex T{sub 2}(d{sub 5}PyH)NO{sub 3} in order to compare the dynamics of d{sub 5}-pyridinium cation in both compounds. It was revealed that in both systems the pyridinium cation undergoes reorientations about the axis perpendicular to its plane, among inequivalent potential energy barriers. However, in (d{sub 5}PyH)NO{sub 3} (no phase transition) the population of the deepest minima decreases monotonically up to the melting point, whereas in T{sub 2}(d{sub 5}PyH)NO{sub 3} (two phase transitions) this population decreases rapidly in a transition to the high-temperature phase and its value does not depend on temperature. In bis-thiourea pyridinium nitrate inclusion compound the out-of-plane motion of the cation is also found in the intermediate- and high-temperature phases, and the amplitudes of the motion are equal to 20{sup 0} and 35{sup 0}, respectively. On the basis of the assumptions of these models, it is possible to reproduce the experimental {sup 2}H NMR line shapes in an excellent way.

  14. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    Acid drainage (AMD/ARD) is undoubtedly one of the largest environmental, legislative and economic challenges facing the mining industry. In Australia alone, at least 60m is spent on AMD related issues annually, and the global cost is estimated to be in the order of tens of billions US. Furthermore, the challenge of safely and economically storing or treating sulfidic wastes will likely intensify because of the trend towards larger mines that process increasingly higher volumes of lower grade ores and the associated sulfidic wastes and lower profit margins. While the challenge of managing potentially acid forming (PAF) wastes will likely intensify, the industrial approaches to preventing acid production or ameliorating the effects has stagnated for decades. Conventionally, PAF waste is segregated and encapsulated in non-PAF tips to limit access to atmospheric oxygen. Two key limitations of the 'cap and cover' approach are: 1) the hazard (PAF) is not actually removed; only the pollutant linkage is severed; and, 2) these engineered structures are susceptible to physical failure in short-to-medium term, potentially re-establishing that pollutant linkage. In an effort to address these concerns, CSIRO is investigating a passive, 'low-acid' oxidation mechanism for sulfide treatment, which can potentially produce one quarter as much acidity compared with pyrite oxidation under atmospheric oxygen. This 'low-acid' mechanism relies on nitrate, rather than oxygen, as the primary electron accepter and the activity of specifically cultured chemolithoautotrophic bacteria and archaea communities. This research was prompted by the observation that, in deeply weathered terrains of Australia, shallow (oxic to sub-oxic) groundwater contacting weathering sulfides are commonly inconsistent with the geochemical conditions produced by ARD. One key characteristic of these aquifers is the natural abundance of nitrate on a regional scale, which becomes depleted around the sulfide bodies, and

  15. Protein tyrosine nitration in plants: Present knowledge, computational prediction and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Feigl, Gábor; Bordé, Ádám; Molnár, Árpád; Erdei, László

    2017-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and related molecules (reactive nitrogen species) regulate diverse physiological processes mainly through posttranslational modifications such as protein tyrosine nitration (PTN). PTN is a covalent and specific modification of tyrosine (Tyr) residues resulting in altered protein structure and function. In the last decade, great efforts have been made to reveal candidate proteins, target Tyr residues and functional consequences of nitration in plants. This review intends to evaluate the accumulated knowledge about the biochemical mechanism, the structural and functional consequences and the selectivity of plants' protein nitration and also about the decomposition or conversion of nitrated proteins. At the same time, this review emphasizes yet unanswered or uncertain questions such as the reversibility/irreversibility of tyrosine nitration, the involvement of proteasomes in the removal of nitrated proteins or the effect of nitration on Tyr phosphorylation. The different NO producing systems of algae and higher plants raise the possibility of diversely regulated protein nitration. Therefore studying PTN from an evolutionary point of view would enrich our present understanding with novel aspects. Plant proteomic research can be promoted by the application of computational prediction tools such as GPS-YNO 2 and iNitro-Tyr software. Using the reference Arabidopsis proteome, Authors performed in silico analysis of tyrosine nitration in order to characterize plant tyrosine nitroproteome. Nevertheless, based on the common results of the present prediction and previous experiments the most likely nitrated proteins were selected thus recommending candidates for detailed future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Total salivary nitrates and nitrites in oral health and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Miozza, Valeria A; Delgado, Alejandra; Busch, Lucila

    2014-01-30

    It is well known that nitrites are increased in saliva from patients with periodontal disease. In the oral cavity, nitrites may derive partly from the reduction of nitrates by oral bacteria. Nitrates have been reported as a defence-related mechanism. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the salivary levels of total nitrate and nitrite and their relationship, in unstimulated and stimulated saliva from periodontal healthy subjects, and from patients with chronic periodontal disease. Nitrates and nitrites were determined in saliva from thirty healthy subjects and forty-four patients with periodontal disease. A significant increase in salivary nitrates and nitrites was observed. Nitrates and nitrites concentration was related to clinical attachment level (CAL). A positive and significant Pearson's correlation was found between salivary total nitrates and nitrites. Periodontal treatment induced clinical improvement and decreased nitrates and nitrites. It is concluded that salivary nitrates and nitrites increase, in patients with periodontal disease, could be related to defence mechanisms. The possibility that the salivary glands respond to oral infectious diseases by increasing nitrate secretion should be explored further. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Physiological roles for two periplasmic nitrate reductases in Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 (ATCC 17025).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsock, Angela; Shapleigh, James P

    2011-12-01

    The metabolically versatile purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.3 is a denitrifier whose genome contains two periplasmic nitrate reductase-encoding gene clusters. This work demonstrates nonredundant physiological roles for these two enzymes. One cluster is expressed aerobically and repressed under low oxygen while the second is maximally expressed under low oxygen. Insertional inactivation of the aerobically expressed nitrate reductase eliminated aerobic nitrate reduction, but cells of this strain could still respire nitrate anaerobically. In contrast, when the anaerobic nitrate reductase was absent, aerobic nitrate reduction was detectable, but anaerobic nitrate reduction was impaired. The aerobic nitrate reductase was expressed but not utilized in liquid culture but was utilized during growth on solid medium. Growth on a variety of carbon sources, with the exception of malate, the most oxidized substrate used, resulted in nitrite production on solid medium. This is consistent with a role for the aerobic nitrate reductase in redox homeostasis. These results show that one of the nitrate reductases is specific for respiration and denitrification while the other likely plays a role in redox homeostasis during aerobic growth.

  18. Effect different levels of nitrate water on performance and blood parameter of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    alireza hessabi nameghi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to evaluate of different levels of water nitrate on performance and blood parameter of broiler chicks. 240 day old Ross 308 were assigned in 5 treatments, 4 replicates and 12 chicks per replicate in a completely randomized design. Treatments so that water nitrate concentration was 10 mg in drinking water of poultry farm (control group or CG and another treatment 40, 70, 100 mg/ Lit nitrate Used. A group used from minimum nitrate(MN water (nitrate, 1.8 mg/ Lit respectively. Results showed that different levels of water nitrate did not affect on feed intake (FI, but in distance 42-0 days group used from MN water compared to the control group FI significantly reduced. Treatments in 21-0 days was no effect on FI. Body weight gain (42 days in CG comparative another groups significantly increased, but different levels of nitrate had no effect on body weight gain in 21 days. Taking 100 mg of nitrate caused a significant increase feed conversion ratio (FCR in 42-1 days. Minimum FCR was showed that in CG. The results about lymphoid organs showed that maximum weight of spleen and bourse observed in group receiving 70 mg/Lit nitrate. Group drinking MN water had minimum weight of spleen and bourse, but the thymus weight in another groups higher than the CG. Different levels of nitrate had no effect on blood HDL, but on the another blood parameter had significant effect (P

  19. Nitrate modifies the assimilation pattern of ammonium and urea in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnica, Maria; Houdusse, Fabrice; Zamarreño, Angel M; Garcia-Mina, Jose M

    2010-02-01

    In certain plant species, ammonium or urea nutrition can cause negative effects on plant development which can result in toxic symptoms. Some authors suggest that the presence of nitrate can alleviate these symptoms by increasing ammonium and urea assimilation, avoiding its accumulation. In order to study this hypothesis, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings were grown with various nitrogen supplies containing the main nitrogen forms (ammonium, nitrate and urea). Amino acids content and the activity of the three main enzymes involved in nitrogen assimilation (nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase and urease) were studied. The application of nitrate along with urea and/or ammonium was not associated with a time-sustained increase in the activity of glutamine synthetase and urease. Amino acid analysis revealed that nitrate induced changes in amino acid metabolism enhancing its concentration. Likewise the content of protein was also higher in nitrate-treated plants. These results suggest that the effect of nitrate is compatible with a rapid and transient increase in the activity of glutamine synthetase and urease during the first hour after the onset of treatments. Nevertheless, a possible effect of nitrate reducing ammonium accumulation through the activation of alternative metabolic pathways different from that involving glutamine synthetase cannot be ruled out. Finally, nitrate effects on amino acid concentration indicate that, whereas ammonium assimilation takes place principally in the root, urea and nitrate assimilation occurred in the shoot, under the conditions of the experiment.

  20. Urea nitrate, an exceptionally easy-to-make improvised explosive: studies towards trace characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamiri, Tsippy; Rozin, Rinat; Lemberger, Nitay; Almog, Joseph

    2009-09-01

    Urea nitrate is a powerful improvised explosive, frequently used by terrorists in the Israeli arena. It was also used in the first World Trade Center bombing in New York in February 1993. It is difficult to identify urea nitrate in post-explosion debris, since only a very small fraction survives the blast. Also, in the presence of water, it readily decomposes to its original components, urea and nitric acid. It is suspected that post-blast debris of urea nitrate can be confused with ammonium nitrate, the main solid product of urea nitrate thermal decomposition. In a comprehensive study towards identification of urea nitrate in post-blast traces, a spectrophotometric technique for quantitative determination of urea nitrate was developed, and conditions were found for extraction and separation of un-exploded traces of urea nitrate with minimal decomposition. Nevertheless, out of 28 samples collected from a series of three controlled firings of urea nitrate charges, only one gave the typical adduct ion by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. We found that urea nitrate can be extracted from solid mixtures to organic solvents by using Crown ethers as "host compounds." The adducts thus formed are solid, crystalline compounds that can be characterized by microanalysis and spectroscopic techniques.

  1. Changes in rumen bacterial community composition in steers in response to dietary nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Miao; Guo, Wangshan; Meng, Qingxiang; Stevenson, David M; Weimer, Paul J; Schaefer, Daniel M

    2013-10-01

    The effect of dietary nitrate supplementation on rumen bacterial community composition was examined in beef steers fed either a nitrate-N diet or urea-N diet. An automated method of ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis was applied to solid and liquid fractions of ruminal contents to allow comparison of bacterial communities. Supplemental N source affected relative population size of four amplicon lengths (ALs) in the liquid fraction and three ALs in the solid fraction. Five ALs were more prevalent after adaptation to nitrate. Correspondence analysis indicated that feeding the steers the nitrate-N diet versus urea-N diet changed the bacterial community composition in the liquid but not in the solid fraction. This led to an investigation of the relative sizes of potential nitrate-reducing populations. Mannheimia succiniciproducens, Veillonella parvula, and Campylobacter fetus were obtained from nitrate enrichment culture and quantified by real-time PCR based on 16S rRNA sequence. Nitrate supplementation increased the percentage of C. fetus in the liquid and solid phases, and in solid phase, the percentage of M. succiniciproducens increased. No change in species prevalence was observed for V. parvula. However, even after adaptation to dietary nitrate, the relative population sizes for all three putative nitrate-reducing species were very low (nitrate supplementation, and at least part of this change reflects an increase in the species prevalence of C. fetus, a species which is not typically regarded as a ruminal inhabitant.

  2. Multi-scale nitrate transport in a sandstone aquifer system under intensive agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate transport in heterogeneous bedrock aquifers is influenced by mechanisms that operate at different spatial and temporal scales. To understand these mechanisms in a fractured sandstone aquifer with high porosity, a groundwater-flow and nitrate transport model—reproducing multiple hydraulic and chemical targets—was developed to explain the actual nitrate contamination observed in groundwater and surface water in a study area on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Simulations show that nitrate is leached to the aquifer year-round, with 61% coming from untransformed and transformed organic sources originating from fertilizers and manure. This nitrate reaches the more permeable shallow aquifer through fractures in weathered sandstone that represent only 1% of the total porosity (17%). Some of the nitrate reaches the underlying aquifer, which is less active in terms of groundwater flow, but most of it is drained to the main river. The river-water quality is controlled by the nitrate input from the shallow aquifer. Groundwater in the underlying aquifer, which has long residence times, is also largely influenced by the diffusion of nitrate in the porous sandstone matrix. Consequently, following a change of fertilizer application practices, water quality in domestic wells and the river would change rapidly due to the level of nitrate found in fractures, but a lag time of up to 20 years would be necessary to reach a steady level due to diffusion. This demonstrates the importance of understanding nitrate transport mechanisms when designing effective agricultural and water management plans to improve water quality.

  3. Anaerobic growth and potential for amino acid production by nitrate respiration in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, Seiki; Ohnishi, Junko; Komatsu, Tomoha; Masaki, Tatsuya; Sen, Kikuo; Ikeda, Masato

    2007-07-01

    Oxygen limitation is a crucial problem in amino acid fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum. Toward this subject, our study was initiated by analysis of the oxygen-requiring properties of C. glutamicum, generally regarded as a strict aerobe. This organism formed colonies on agar plates up to relatively low oxygen concentrations (0.5% O(2)), while no visible colonies were formed in the absence of O(2). However, in the presence of nitrate (NO3-), the organism exhibited limited growth anaerobically with production of nitrite (NO2-), indicating that C. glutamicum can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor. Assays of cell extracts from aerobic and hypoxic cultures yielded comparable nitrate reductase activities, irrespective of nitrate levels. Genome analysis revealed a narK2GHJI cluster potentially relevant to nitrate reductase and transport. Disruptions of narG and narJ abolished the nitrate-dependent anaerobic growth with the loss of nitrate reductase activity. Disruption of the putative nitrate/nitrite antiporter gene narK2 did not affect the enzyme activity but impaired the anaerobic growth. These indicate that this locus is responsible for nitrate respiration. Agar piece assays using L-lysine- and L-arginine-producing strains showed that production of both amino acids occurred anaerobically by nitrate respiration, indicating the potential of C. glutamicum for anaerobic amino acid production.

  4. Gallium nitrate ameliorates type II collagen-induced arthritis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Seo, Su-Kil; Choi, Il-Whan; Park, Sae-Gwang; Lim, Jun-Goo; Lee, Won-Jin; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwang-rae; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Gallium nitrate has been reported to reserve immunosuppressive activities. Therefore, we assessed the therapeutic effects of gallium nitrate in the mouse model of developed type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced by bovine type II collagen with Complete Freund's adjuvant. CIA mice were intraperitoneally treated from day 36 to day 49 after immunization with 3.5mg/kg/day, 7mg/kg/day gallium nitrate or vehicle. Gallium nitrate ameliorated the progression of mice with CIA. The clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis did not progress after treatment with gallium nitrate. Gallium nitrate inhibited the increase of CD4(+) T cell populations (pGallium nitrate reduced the serum levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ (pgallium nitrate inhibits the activation of NF-κB by blocking IκB degradation. These data suggest that gallium nitrate is a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune inflammatory arthritis through its inhibition of the NF-κB pathway, and these results may help to elucidate gallium nitrate-mediated mechanisms of immunosuppression in patients with RA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Decadal-scale changes of nitrate in ground water of the United States, 1988-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated decadal-scale changes of nitrate concentrations in ground water samples collected by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment Program from 495 wells in 24 well networks across the USA in predominantly agricultural areas. Each well network was sampled once during 1988-1995 and resampled once during 2000-2004. Statistical tests of decadal-scale changes of nitrate concentrations in water from all 495 wells combined indicate there is a significant increase in nitrate concentrations in the data set as a whole. Eight out of the 24 well networks, or about 33%, had significant changes of nitrate concentrations. Of the eight well networks with significant decadal-scale changes of nitrate, all except one, the Willamette Valley of Oregon, had increasing nitrate concentrations. Median nitrate concentrations of three of those eight well networks increased above the USEPA maximum contaminant level of 10 mg L(-1). Nitrate in water from wells with reduced conditions had significantly smaller decadal-scale changes in nitrate concentrations than oxidized and mixed waters. A subset of wells had data on ground water recharge date; nitrate concentrations increased in response to the increase of N fertilizer use since about 1950. Determining ground water recharge dates is an important component of a ground water trends investigation because recharge dates provide a link between changes in ground water quality and changes in land-use practices.

  6. Hydrological controls on DOC  :  nitrate resource stoichiometry in a lowland, agricultural catchment, southern UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppell, Catherine M.; Binley, Andrew; Trimmer, Mark; Darch, Tegan; Jones, Ashley; Malone, Ed; Collins, Adrian L.; Johnes, Penny J.; Freer, Jim E.; Lloyd, Charlotte E. M.

    2017-09-01

    The role that hydrology plays in governing the interactions between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen in rivers draining lowland, agricultural landscapes is currently poorly understood. In light of the potential changes to the production and delivery of DOC and nitrate to rivers arising from climate change and land use management, there is a pressing need to improve our understanding of hydrological controls on DOC and nitrate dynamics in such catchments. We measured DOC and nitrate concentrations in river water of six reaches of the lowland river Hampshire Avon (Wiltshire, southern UK) in order to quantify the relationship between BFI (BFI) and DOC : nitrate molar ratios across contrasting geologies (Chalk, Greensand, and clay). We found a significant positive relationship between nitrate and BFI (p 5 throughout the year, whilst groundwater-dominated reaches underlain by Chalk, with a high BFI have DOC : nitrate ratios in surface waters that are an order of magnitude lower (< 0.5). Our analysis also reveals significant seasonal variations in DOC : nitrate transport and highlights critical periods of nitrate export (e.g. winter in sub-catchments underlain by Chalk and Greensand, and autumn in drained, clay sub-catchments) when DOC : nitrate molar ratios are low, suggesting low potential for in-stream uptake of inorganic forms of nitrogen. Consequently, our study emphasizes the tight relationship between DOC and nitrate availability in agricultural catchments, and further reveals that this relationship is controlled to a great extent by the hydrological setting.

  7. Antibacterial mouthwash blunts oral nitrate reduction and increases blood pressure in treated hypertensive men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Liu, Alex H; Croft, Kevin D; Considine, Michael J; Puddey, Ian B; Woodman, Richard J; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is fundamental to cardiovascular health. Dietary nitrate and nitrate from endothelial derived NO metabolism provides a significant contribution to the circulating NO pool through the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. A critical step in this pathway is the reduction of nitrate to nitrite by the oral microbiota. We aimed to assess the effects of antibacterial mouthwash use on markers of nitrate-nitrite-NO metabolism and blood pressure in treated hypertensive men and women. Fifteen treated hypertensive men and women (mean age 65 years) were recruited to a randomized controlled cross-over trial. The effects of 3-day use of antibacterial mouthwash on oral nitrate to nitrite reduction, salivary and plasma nitrate and nitrite, plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and systolic and diastolic blood pressure were compared to control (water). Relative to control, 3-day antibacterial mouthwash use resulted in decreased oral nitrate to nitrite reduction (P = 0.02), decreased salivary nitrite (P = 0.01) and increased salivary nitrate (P nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway through the use of antibacterial mouthwash was paralleled by a small elevation of systolic blood pressure in treated hypertensive men and women. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Isolation and stable nitrogen isotope analysis of ammonium ions in ammonium nitrate prills using sodium tetraphenylborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howa, John D; Lott, Michael J; Ehleringer, James R

    2014-07-15

    Because of the threat of bombings using improvised explosives containing ammonium nitrate (AN), law enforcement and intelligence communities have been interested in stable isotope techniques for tracking and discriminating AN sources. Separate analysis of the AN component ions ammonium and nitrate would add discriminatory power to these techniques. Ammonium ions in dissolved AN solution were isolated from samples by precipitation using sodium tetraphenylborate solution. We tested the isolation of ammonium from nitrates using solutions of ammonium and nitrate salts with different (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios. Ammonium tetraphenylborate and AN were separately analyzed for their (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios using EA-ConFlo-IRMS, and the (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios of the nitrate ions were calculated using mass balance. Ammonium and nitrate nitrogen isotope ratios were plotted as two separate variables. Isolation of ammonium precipitate from solutions containing dissolved nitrates did not influence the nitrogen isotope ratios of test ammonium salts. A survey set of 42 AN samples showed that the ammonium and nitrate (15)N/(14)N isotope ratios were not significantly correlated, and the paired mean differences were not statistically significant. Both ammonium and nitrate were depleted in (15)N relative to their theoretical atmospheric sources. Isolation of the ammonium ion from AN adds another dimension for the discrimination of forensic AN samples. This technique using sodium tetraphenylborate is robust and does not require specialized equipment. Our observations indicated that ammonium nitrogen and nitrate nitrogen have independent sources of isotopic variation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Evaluating factors influencing groundwater vulnerability to nitrate pollution: developing the potential of GIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Iain R; Lovett, Andrew A; Hiscock, Kevin M; Betson, Mark; Foley, Aidan; Sünnenberg, Gisela; Evers, Sarah; Fletcher, Steve

    2003-07-01

    The 1991 EU Nitrate Directive was designed to reduce water pollution from agriculturally derived nitrates. England and Wales implemented this Directive by controlling agricultural activities within their most vulnerable areas termed Nitrate Vulnerable Zones. These were designated by identifying drinking water catchments (surface and groundwater), at risk from nitrate pollution. However, this method contravened the Nitrate Directive because it only protected drinking water and not all waters. In this paper, a GIS was used to identify all areas of groundwater vulnerable to nitrate pollution. This was achieved by constructing a model containing data on four characteristics: the quality of the water leaving the root zone of a piece of land; soil information; presence of low permeability superficial (drift) material; and aquifer properties. These were combined in a GIS and the various combinations converted into a measure of vulnerability using expert knowledge. Several model variants were produced using different estimates of the quality of the water leaving the root zone and contrasting methods of weighting the input data. When the final models were assessed all produced similar spatial patterns and, when verified by comparison with trend data derived from monitored nitrate concentrations, all the models were statistically significant predictors of groundwater nitrate concentrations. The best predictive model contained a model of nitrate leaching but no land use information, implying that changes in land use will not affect designations based upon this model. The relationship between nitrate levels and borehole intake depths was investigated since there was concern that the observed contrasts in nitrate levels between vulnerability categories might be reflecting differences in borehole intake depths and not actual vulnerability. However, this was not found to be statistically important. Our preferred model provides the basis for developing a new set of groundwater

  10. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopes of Low-Level Nitrate in Groundwater For Environmental Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Sources of nitrate in water from human activities include fertilizers, animal feedlots, septic systems, wastewater treatment lagoons, animal wastes, industrial wastes and food processing wastes. Nitrogen and Oxygen isotopic analysis of nitrate in groundwater is essential to source identification and environmental forensics as nitrate from different sources carry distinctly different N and O isotopic compositions. Nitrate is extracted from groundwater samples and converted into AgNO3 using ion exchange techniques. The purified AgNO3 is then broken down into N2 and CO for N and O isotopic measurement. Since nitrate concentrations in natural ground waters are usually less than 2 mg/L, however, such method has been limited by minimum sample size it requires, in liters, which is highly nitrate concentration dependent. Here we report a TurboVap- Denitrifier method for N and O isotopic measurement of low-level dissolved nitrate, based on sample evaporation and isotopic analysis of nitrous oxide generated from nitrate by denitrifying bacteria that lack N2O- reductase activity. For most groundwater samples with mg/L-level of nitrate direct injection of water samples in mLs is applied. The volume of sample is adjusted according to its nitrate concentration to achieve a final sample size optimal for the system. For water samples with ug/L-level of nitrate, nitrate is highly concentrated using a TurboVap evaporator, followed by isotopic measurement with Denitrifier method. Benefits of TurboVap- Denitrifier method include high sensitivity and better precision in both isotopic data. This method applies to both freshwater and seawater. The analyses of isotopic reference materials in nitrate-free de-ionized water and seawater are included as method controls to correct for any blank effects. The isotopic data from groundwater and ocean profiles demonstrate the consistency of the data produced by the TurboVap-Denitrifier method.

  11. Deflagration-detonation experiments of sensitized mixtures of ammonium or urea nitrates and an energetic thermoplastic elastomer

    OpenAIRE

    Quaresma, J.; Keicher, Thomas; Pineiro, M.; Deimling, Lukas; Campos, Jose; Krause, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) is the base component of a known family of explosives, gas generators and pyrotechnic composite mixtures. Urea nitrate ((NH2)2.COHNO3) is a recent used nitrate in deflagration and detonation studies motivated, most of them, by forensic research works. The existence of CO, in the molecule of urea nitrate, changes its contribution of this nitrate in reaction propagation. To increase energetic level of mixture, an Energetic Thermoplastic Elastomer (ETPE) has been used a...

  12. Effects of feed consumption rate of beef cattle offered a diet supplemented with nitrate ad libitum or restrictively on potential toxicity of nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C; Araujo, R C; Koenig, K M; Beauchemin, K A

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of feed consumption rate on potential toxicity, rumen fermentation, and eating behavior when beef heifers were fed a diet supplemented with nitrate (NI). Twelve ruminally cannulated heifers (827 ± 65.5 kg BW) were used in a randomized complete block design. The experiment consisted of 10-d adaptation, 8-d urea-feeding, and 3-d nitrate-feeding periods. All heifers were fed a diet supplemented with urea (UR) during the adaptation and urea-feeding periods, whereas the NI diet (1.09% NO in dietary DM) was fed during the nitrate-feeding period. After adaptation, heifers were randomly assigned to ad libitum or restrictive feeding (about 80% of ad libitum intake) for the urea- and nitrate-feeding periods. Ad libitum DMI decreased (14.1 vs. 15.1 kg/d; nitrate feeding changed the consumption pattern (a more even distribution of feed intake over the day). The increased feed consumption from 0 to 3 h after feeding the NI diet restrictively vs. ad libitum numerically decreased ( = 0.11) rumen pH and numerically or significantly increased ( = 0.01 to 0.28) rumen ammonia, NO, and NO; blood methemoglobin; and plasma NO and NO at 3 h. Regression analysis indicated that increased feed consumption (0 to 3 h) exponentially elevated ( nitrate-feeding period, the nitrate content of orts on d 2 and 3 was greater ( = 0.02) than that on d 1. In conclusion, the increased consumption rate of a diet supplemented with nitrate was an important factor influencing risk of nitrate toxicity based on blood methemoglobin and plasma NO. In addition, the pattern of daily feed consumption was altered by nitrate (creating a "nibbling" pattern of eating) in beef heifers.

  13. Importance of biogenic precursors to the budget of organic nitrates: observations of multifunctional organic nitrates by CIMS and TD-LIF during BEARPEX 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Beaver

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alkyl and multifunctional organic nitrates, molecules of the chemical form RONO2, are products of chain terminating reactions in the tropospheric HOx and NOx catalytic cycles and thereby impact ozone formation locally. Many of the molecules in the class have lifetimes that are long enough that they can be transported over large distances. If the RONO2 then decompose to deliver NOx to remote regions they affect ozone production rates in locations distant from the original NOx source. While measurements of total RONO2 (ΣANs and small straight chain alkyl nitrates are routine, measurements of the specific multifunctional RONO2 molecules that are believed to dominate the total have rarely been reported and never reported in coincidence with ambient ΣANs measurements. Here we describe observations obtained during the BEARPEX 2009 experiment including ΣANs and a suite of multifunctional nitrates including isoprene derived hydroxynitrates, oxidation products of those nitrates, 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO derived hydroxynitrates, and monoterpene nitrates. At the BEARPEX field site, the sum of the individual biogenically derived nitrates account for two-thirds of the ΣANs, confirming predictions of the importance of biogenic nitrates to the NOy budget. Isoprene derived nitrates, transported to the site, are a much larger fraction of the ΣANs at the site than the nitrates derived from the locally emitted MBO. Evidence for additional nitrates, possibly from nocturnal chemistry of isoprene and α-pinene, is presented.

  14. Spinach 14-3-3 protein interacts with the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and nitrate reductase in response to excess nitrate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huini; Zhao, Xiuling; Guo, Chuanlong; Chen, Limei; Li, Kunzhi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the function of 14-3-3 protein in response to excess nitrate stress, a 14-3-3 protein, designated as So14-3-3, was isolated from spinach. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that So14-3-3 belongs to non-ε group of 14-3-3 superfamily. Real time-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis showed that So14-3-3 was induced by excess nitrate stress in spinach roots and leaves. After nitrate treatment, the phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase and nitrate reductase (NR) increased and decreased respectively. Co-Immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) suggested that the interaction of So14-3-3 with the phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase enhanced, but reduced with phosphorylated NR in spinach roots after nitrate treatment. Besides, 5 proteins interacted with So14-3-3 were found by Co-IP and LC-MS/MS analysis. So14-3-3 overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants showed enhanced tolerance to nitrate treatment at the germination and young seedlings stage. The transgenic plants showed longer root length, lower malondialdehyde (MDA), H2O2, protein carbonyl contents, relatively higher soluble sugar and protein contents, than the WT plants after nitrate treatment. The phosphorylation levels of H(+)-ATPase in transgenic plants were higher than the WT plants after nitrate treatment, whereas NR were lower. Additionally, in transgenic plants, the interaction of So14-3-3 with phosphorylated H(+)-ATPase and NR increased and decreased more than the WT plants under nitrate stress, leading to higher H(+)-ATPase and NR activities in transgenic plants. These data suggested that So14-3-3 might be involved in nitrate stress response by interacting with H(+)-ATPase and NR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced xanthine oxidoreductase expression and tissue nitrate reduction in germ free mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liyue; Borniquel, Sara; Lundberg, Jon O

    2010-02-15

    The nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway is emerging as an alternative to the l-arginine/NO-synthase pathway for the generation of NO in mammals. Bioactivation of the stable nitrate anion involves initial reduction to nitrite by commensal bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite is then further metabolized in blood and tissues to form nitric oxide (NO) and other bioactive nitrogen oxides. In addition to nitrate reduction by bacteria, a functional mammalian nitrate reductase activity was recently explored. It was demonstrated that xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and possibly other enzymes can catalyze nitrate reduction under normoxic conditions in vivo. In the present study, we compared nitrate reduction in germ free (GF) and conventional mice. One aim was to see if the complete lack of bacterial nitrate reduction in the GF mice would be associated with an upregulation of mammalian nitrate reductase activity. Sodium nitrate (NaNO(3)) or placebo (NaCl) was injected intraperitoneally and blood and tissues were collected 1.5-2h later for measurements of nitrate and nitrite and in some cases analyses of protein expression. Tissue and plasma levels of nitrate increased to a similar extent in conventional and GF animals after nitrate administration. Plasma nitrite was 3-fold higher in GF mice receiving nitrate compared to placebo while this effect of nitrate was absent in the conventional mice. In GF mice pretreated with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol the increase in nitrite was attenuated. The levels of nitrite in the liver and small intestine increased after the nitrate load in GF mice but not in the conventional mice. Anaerobic nitrate reduction to nitrite in intestinal tissue homogenates was also accelerated in GF mice. Studies of tissue protein levels revealed increased expression of XOR in the livers of GF animals. We conclude that XOR expression in tissues is enhanced in germ free mice and this may explain the apparently greater tissue nitrate reductase

  16. Evaluation of Nitrate Accumulation and Nitrate Reductase Activity in Different Vegetative Growth of Selected Iranian Land Races of Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alamian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An outdoor pot experiment was carried out in sand+ coco-peat culture (80:20 ratio to investigate the response of nitrate reductase activity and nitrate accumulation in roots and leaves of fifteen Iranian landraces of spinach (Spinacia oleracea at different stages of plant development. Plants were tested during a three periods from 22, 30 and 38 days after emergence of first true leaves and before flowering. Results showed that the highest activity of nitrate reductase (51.29 µM NO-2. g-1.h-1 was found in the leaves of ‘Tabriz’ at the first vegetative stage and in roots of ‘Qazvin’, ‘Saleh Abad-e- Qom’ and ‘Qom’ plants at the third vegetative stage(20.71, 15.27, 15.34 µM NO-2. g-1.h-1, respectively. Lowest activity of nitrate reductase in leaves were found in plants of ‘shiraz’ in third vegetative stage(1.56 µM NO-2. g-1.h-1. Nitrate reductase activity were significantly lower in roots of ‘Birjand’ in first vegetative stage compared to other land races (3.85 µM NO-2. g-1.h-1. Leaves of ‘Qazvin’ have the highest nitrate content at the third vegetative stage(7122 µM NO-3. g-1 dry weight. Nitrate accumulation in leaves of ‘Arak-1’ were found lower than other land races in second vegetative stage (2961 µM NO-2. g-1.h-1. Nitrate content in roots of ‘Varamin-1’ were higher in 2 th vegetative stage(3741 µM NO-2. g-1.h-1. Significant differences in the nitrate reductase activity and nitrate accumulation were observed in selected Iranian land race of spinach. As, the nitrate levels in spinach should be kept as low as possible while near maximum yields are maintained, this can be accomplished by planting selected land races of spinach that are selected based on nitrate reductase activity and nitrate content analyses.

  17. Parsimonious Hydrologic and Nitrate Response Models For Silver Springs, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klammler, Harald; Yaquian-Luna, Jose Antonio; Jawitz, James W.; Annable, Michael D.; Hatfield, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    Silver Springs with an approximate discharge of 25 m3/sec is one of Florida's first magnitude springs and among the largest springs worldwide. Its 2500-km2 springshed overlies the mostly unconfined Upper Floridan Aquifer. The aquifer is approximately 100 m thick and predominantly consists of porous, fractured and cavernous limestone, which leads to excellent surface drainage properties (no major stream network other than Silver Springs run) and complex groundwater flow patterns through both rock matrix and fast conduits. Over the past few decades, discharge from Silver Springs has been observed to slowly but continuously decline, while nitrate concentrations in the spring water have enormously increased from a background level of 0.05 mg/l to over 1 mg/l. In combination with concurrent increases in algae growth and turbidity, for example, and despite an otherwise relatively stable water quality, this has given rise to concerns about the ecological equilibrium in and near the spring run as well as possible impacts on tourism. The purpose of the present work is to elaborate parsimonious lumped parameter models that may be used by resource managers for evaluating the springshed's hydrologic and nitrate transport responses. Instead of attempting to explicitly consider the complex hydrogeologic features of the aquifer in a typically numerical and / or stochastic approach, we use a transfer function approach wherein input signals (i.e., time series of groundwater recharge and nitrate loading) are transformed into output signals (i.e., time series of spring discharge and spring nitrate concentrations) by some linear and time-invariant law. The dynamic response types and parameters are inferred from comparing input and output time series in frequency domain (e.g., after Fourier transformation). Results are converted into impulse (or step) response functions, which describe at what time and to what magnitude a unitary change in input manifests at the output. For the

  18. Aqueous ammonium nitrate blasting composition containing solid carbonaceous fuel and method of preparing same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheeran, H.W.; Oriard, M.H.

    1969-06-17

    A blasting agent utilizes ammonium nitrate fuel and water to form a desired plasticity. The compound is detonatable because it employs fuel which is water stable either chemically or physically or both and remains in intimate association with the ammonium nitrate in the presence of water whether in the solid phase or liquid phase. The total oxygen balance of ammonium nitrate and fuel is adjusted by the formula proportions to be within detonatable limits. The method for making the blasting agent utilizes heat to liquefy a normally solid fuel while mixing with porous prilled ammonium nitrate to effect adsorption and absorption of the fuel by the ammonium nitrate. This effects intimate association in the solid phase and liberates only that portion of fuel into the liquid phase which corresponds to the quantity of ammonium nitrate which is dissolved by the added water. (19 claims)

  19. Studies of Some Lanthanide(III Nitrate Complexes of Schiff Base Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishor Arora Mukesh Sharma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies of 16 new lanthanide(III nitrate complexes of Schiff base ligands are discussed. Schiff bases were obtained by the condensation of 2–methyl–4–N,N–bis–2' –cyanoethyl aminobenzaldehyde with aniline and 3 different substituted anilines. Lanthanide(III nitrates, viz. gadolinium(III nitrate, lanthanum(III nitrate, samarium(III nitrate and cerium(III nitrate were chosen to synthesize new complexes. The complexes were characterized on the basis of physicochemical studies viz. elemental analysis, spectral, viz. IR and electronic spectral and magnetic studies. TGA studies of some of the representative complexes were also done. Some of the representative complexes were also screened for the anti microbial studies.

  20. Regional analysis of groundwater nitrate concentrations and trends in Denmark in regard to agricultural influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, B.; Dalgaard, Tommy; Thorling, L.

    2012-01-01

    The act of balancing between an intensive agriculture with a high potential for nitrate pollution and a drinking water supply almost entirely based on groundwater is a challenge faced by Denmark and similar regions around the globe. Since the 1980s, regulations implemented by Danish farmers have......, with documented positive effects on nature and the environment in Denmark. In groundwater, the upward trend in nitrate concentrations was reversed around 1980, and a larger number of downward nitrate trends were seen in the youngest groundwater compared with the oldest groundwater. However, on average......, approximately 48% of the oxic monitored groundwater has nitrate concentrations above the groundwater and drinking water standards of 50 mg l−1. Furthermore, trend analyses show that 33% of all the monitored groundwater has upward nitrate trends, while only 18% of the youngest groundwater has upward nitrate...

  1. Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollins, Andrew W.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2010-06-11

    A new field instrument is described that quantifies total particle phase organic nitrates. The instrument is based on the thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) method that thermally converts nitrates to NO2 which is then detected by LIF. This instrument is unique in its ability to provide fast sensitive measurements of particle phase organic nitrates, without interference from inorganic nitrate. Here we use it to quantify organic nitrates in SOA generated from high-NOx photooxidation of limonene, a-pinene, D-3-carene, and tridecane. In these experiments the organic nitrate moiety is observed to be 6-15percent of the total SOA mass, depending on the organic precursor.

  2. Role of Diatoms in the Spatial-Temporal Distribution of Intracellular Nitrate in Intertidal Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stief, P.; Kamp, A.; de Beer, D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular nitrate storage allows microorganisms to survive fluctuating nutrient availability and anoxic conditions in aquatic ecosystems. Here we show that diatoms, ubiquitous and highly abundant microalgae, represent major cellular reservoirs of nitrate in an intertidal flat of the German...... Wadden Sea and are potentially involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration. Intracellular nitrate (ICNO3) was present year-round in the sediment and was spatially and temporally correlated with fucoxanthin, the marker photopigment of diatoms. Pyrosequencing of SSU rRNA genes of all domains of life...... in anaerobic nitrate respiration. Due to the widespread dominance of diatoms in microphytobenthos, the total nitrate pool in coastal marine sediments may generally be at least two times larger than derived from porewater measurements and partially be recycled to ammonium....

  3. Microbial Oxidation of Pyrite Coupled to Nitrate Reduction in Anoxic Groundwater Sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Juncher; Elberling, Bo; Jacobsen, Ole Stig

    2009-01-01

    Although many areas in Denmark are intensively agricultured, the discharge of nitrate from groundwater aquifers to surface water is often lower than expected. In this study it is experimentally demonstrated that anoxic nitrate reduction in sandy sediment containing pyrite is a microbially mediated...... denitrification process with pyrite as the primary electron donor. The process demonstrates a temperature dependency (Q10) of 1.8 and could be completely inhibited by addition of a bactericide (NaN3). Experimentally determined denitrification rates show that more than 50% of the observed nitrate reduction can...... and 80% of nitrate reduction in the lower part of the redoxcline is due to anoxic oxidation of pyrite by nitrate with resulting release of sulfate. It is concluded that microbes can control groundwater nitrate concentrations by denitrification using primarily pyrite as electron donor at the oxic...

  4. Climate-induced changes in high elevation stream nitrate dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J.S.; Schmidt, T.M.; Hartman, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mountain terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems are responsive to external drivers of change, especially climate change and atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N). We explored the consequences of a temperature-warming trend on stream nitrate in an alpine and subalpine watershed in the Colorado Front Range that has long been the recipient of elevated atmospheric N deposition. Mean annual stream nitrate concentrations since 2000 are higher by 50% than an earlier monitoring period of 1991-1999. Mean annual N export increased by 28% from 2.03 kg N ha-1yr-1 before 2000 to 2.84 kg N ha-1yr-1 in Loch Vale watershed since 2000. The substantial increase in N export comes as a surprise, since mean wet atmospheric N deposition from 1991 to 2006 (3.06 kg N ha-1 yr-1) did not increase. There has been a period of below average precipitation from 2000 to 2006 and a steady increase in summer and fall temperatures of 0.12??C yr-1 in both seasons since 1991. Nitrate concentrations, as well as the weathering products calcium and sulfate, were higher for the period 2000-2006 in rock glacier meltwater at the top of the watershed above the influence of alpine and subalpine vegetation and soils. We conclude the observed recent N increases in Loch Vale are the result of warmer summer and fall mean temperatures that are melting ice in glaciers and rock glaciers. This, in turn, has exposed sediments from which N produced by nitrification can be flushed. We suggest a water quality threshold may have been crossed around 2000. The phenomenon observed in Loch Vale may be indicative of N release from ice features such as rock glaciers worldwide as mountain glaciers retreat. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Eco friendly nitration of toluene using modified zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R. Sunaja Devi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitration of toluene has been studied in the liquid phase over a series of modified zirconia catalysts.  Zirconia, zirconia- ceria (Zr0.98Ce0.02O2, sulfated zirconia and sulfated zirconia- ceria were synthesised by co precipitation method and were characterised by X-ray diffraction, BET surface area, Infra red spectroscopy analysis (FTIR, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Energy Dispersive X ray analysis (EDAX. The acidity of the prepared catalysts was determined by FTIR pyridine adsorption study. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the catalysts prepared mainly consist of tetragonal phase with the crystallite size in the nano range and the tetragonal phase of zirconia is stabilized by the addition of ceria. The modified zirconia samples have higher surface area and exhibits uniform pore size distribution aggregated by zirconia nanoparticles. The onset of sulfate decomposition was observed around 723 K for sulfated samples. The catalytic performance was determined for the liquid phase nitration of toluene to ortho-, meta- and para- nitro toluene. The effect of reaction temperature, concentration of nitric acid, catalyst reusability and reaction time was also investigated. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 20th November 2012; Revised: 8th December 2012; Accepted: 7th January 2013[How to Cite: K. R. S. Devi, S. Jayashree, (2013. Eco friendly nitration of toluene using modified zirconia. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (3: 205-214. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4154.205-214][Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.3.4154.205-214 ] View in  |

  6. In-process characterization of surface topography changes during nitration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciossek, Andreas; Lehmann, Peter; Patzelt, Stefan; Goch, Gert

    2000-09-01

    The nitration process influences the mechanical and chemical properties of steel and changes the near-surface characteristics. The nitrided surfaces are less sensitive to corrosive fluids and show a better stability against abrasion. Unfortunately, during treatment pores emerge at the surface. In general this is not desired, since the pores reduce the wear stability. The change of the near-surface characteristics also leads to a remodeling of the surface topography. For example, ground, smooth surfaces show an increased but isotropic roughness after nitration. During the recent years, various speckle techniques for an in-process characterization of surface topography have been improved significantly. One of these promising techniques is the method of trichromatic speckle autocorrelation. Its measuring principle is based on trichromatic light scattering and enables to determine an integral parameter of the surface roughness by the evaluation of the speckle elongation. Especially in the case of nitration, where the specimen is located in a stove filled with ammonia at a temperature of 580 degrees Celsius, this technique offers an in-processing monitoring of surface topography changes from outside the stove. In this paper, the in-process characterization of surface topography by speckle autocorrelation will be introduced. In this context an algorithm has been developed, which allows to estimate the position of the optical axis within the speckle pattern and therefore to determine the surface roughness as well as the local inclination of isotropic surfaces. An important goal of the current research is to realize a reliable process control based on the speckle autocorrelation, that is necessary to produce nitrided surfaces without pores in the compound layer and with good abrasive and corrosive resistance.

  7. Nitrate in tile drainage of the semiarid Palouse Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, C Kent; Butcher, Caroline N; Smith, Jeffrey L; Allen-King, Richelle M

    2008-01-01

    Topographically heterogeneous agricultural landscapes can complicate and accelerate agrochemical contamination of streams due to rapid transport of water and chemicals to poorly drained lower-landscape positions and shallow ground water. In the semiarid Palouse region, large parts of these landscapes have been tile drained to enhance crop yield. From 2000-2004 we monitored the discharge of a tile drain (TD) and a nearby profile of soil water for nitrate concentration ([NO(3)]), electrical conductivity level (EC), and water content to develop a conceptual framework describing soil nitrate occurrence and loss via subsurface pathways. Tile-drain baseflow [NO(3)] was consistently 4 mg N L(-1) and baseflow EC was 200 to 300 microS cm(-1). Each year sudden synoptic increases in TD discharge and [NO(3)] occurred in early winter following approximately 150 mm of fall precipitation, which saturated the soil and mobilized high-[NO(3)] soil water throughout the profile. The greatest TD [NO(3)] (20-30 mg N L(-1)) occurred approximately contemporaneous with greatest TD discharges. The EC decrease each year (to approximately 100 microS cm(-1)) during high discharge, a dilution effect, lagged approximately 1 mo behind the first appearance of high [NO(3)] and was consistent with advective transport of low-EC water from the shallow profile under saturated conditions. Water-budget considerations and temporal [NO(3)] patterns suggest that these processes deliver water to the TD from both lower- and upper-slope positions, the latter via lateral flow during the high-flow season. Management practices that reduce the fall reservoir of soil nitrate might be effective in reducing N loading to streams and shallow ground water in this region.

  8. Pharmacokinetic Profile of 1-Methylnicotinamide Nitrate in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafarz, Malgorzata; Kus, Kamil; Walczak, Maria; Zakrzewska, Agnieszka; Niemczak, Michal; Pernak, Juliusz; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Treatment with 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA), a major metabolite of nicotinamide, exerts antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory, and vasoprotective effects. Yet, pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of MNA has not been fully characterized. In the present work, we analyze the PK profile of the MNA given as a nitrate (MNANO 3 ) in comparison to nitrite (MNANO 2 ) or chloride (MNACl) in rats. The bioavailability of MNA administered as MNANO 3 equaled 22.4% as compared to MNANO 2 or MNACl (9.2% and 9.1%, respectively). Moreover, in single-pass intestinal perfusion experiments, effective permeability of MNA given as MNANO 3 was higher as compared to MNA administered as MNANO 2 or MNACl. In turn, t max was the shortest and C max the highest (0.22 h and 56.65μM) for intragastrically administered MNANO 2 comparing to MNANO 3 (1.92 h, 21.74μM) or MNACl (0.63 h, 16.13μM). Transfer constant between central and peripheral compartments (k cp ) and volume of distribution (V ss ) for MNANO 3 (0.33 h -1 and 1.96 L/kg) were higher as compared to MNANO 2 or MNACl (0.11 h -1 , 0.08 h -1 for k cp and 1.05 L/kg, 0.76 L/kg for V ss , respectively). In conclusion, we characterized PK profile of MNA and demonstrated that nitrate ion augmented bioavailability and favorably modified PK profile of MNA. Furthermore, given vasoprotective properties of MNA as well as nitrate, MNANO 3 represents a bifunctional compound. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrosative stress and nitrated proteins in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangduo Wang

    Full Text Available Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases (ADs including SLE, scleroderma and hepatitis. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ADs are largely unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggested the contribution of oxidative/nitrosative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC supplementation provided protection by attenuating oxidative stress. This study was undertaken to further evaluate the contribution of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmunity and to identify proteins susceptible to nitrosative stress. Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, ∼ 250 mg/kg/day via drinking water. TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum anti-nuclear and anti-histone antibodies together with significant induction of iNOS and increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT in sera and livers. Proteomic analysis identified 14 additional nitrated proteins in the livers of TCE-treated mice. Furthermore, TCE exposure led to decreased GSH levels and increased activation of NF-κB. Remarkably, NAC supplementation not only ameliorated TCE-induced nitrosative stress as evident from decreased iNOS, NT, nitrated proteins, NF-κB p65 activation and increased GSH levels, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of autoantibodies in the sera. These findings provide support to the role of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmune response and identify specific nitrated proteins which could have autoimmune potential. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for designing therapeutic strategies.

  10. Low-melting point inorganic nitrate salt heat transfer fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Robert W [Livermore, CA; Brosseau, Douglas A [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-09-15

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of four inorganic nitrate salts: 9-18 wt % NaNO.sub.3, 40-52 wt % KNO.sub.3, 13-21 wt % LiNO.sub.3, and 20-27 wt % Ca(NO.sub.3).sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures less than 100 C; thermal stability limits greater than 500 C; and viscosity in the range of 5-6 cP at 300 C; and 2-3 cP at 400 C.

  11. Transport and transformation of nitrate in a riparian wetland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Jes; Prinds, Christian; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    the load of nitrogen from agricultural fields to fresh water bodies. One initiative is moving from a uniform regulation of nitrogen application to a spatially differentiated regulation where less fertilizer should be applied to vulnerable areas. This leads to the identification of vulnerable and robust...... areas, in which riparian wetlands plays an important role. The present case study investigates the transport and transformation of nitrate entering a riparian wetland via drain water from surrounding agricultural areas. The drain pipes are cut off at the hillslope and drain water irrigates the wetland...

  12. Agronomic and Nitrate Leaching Impacts of Pelletized versus Granular Urea

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Sanjay Bikram

    2000-01-01

    Agronomic and water quality impacts of urea particle size were evaluated through field and laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling. In a two-year field study, corn silage yield, corn nitrogen (N) removal, and nitrate-N (N03-N) leaching from urea pellets (1.5 g each) and granules (0.01-0.02 g each) applied at 184 kg-N/ha were compared. A control treatment (no N) and two other N application rates (110 and 258 kg-N/ha) were also included. Urea particle size impact on dissolution rate...

  13. The nitrate transporter (NRT gene family in poplar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Bai

    Full Text Available Nitrate is an important nutrient required for plant growth. It also acts as a signal regulating plant development. Nitrate is actively taken up and transported by nitrate transporters (NRT, which form a large family with many members and distinct functions. In contrast to Arabidopsis and rice there is little information about the NRT family in woody plants such as Populus. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus NRT family was performed. Sixty-eight PtNRT1/PTR, 6 PtNRT2, and 5 PtNRT3 genes were identified in the P. trichocarpa genome. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the genes of the NRT family are divided into three clades: NRT1/PTR with four subclades, NRT2, and NRT3. Topological analysis indicated that all members of PtNRT1/PTR and PtNRT2 have 8 to 12 trans-membrane domains, whereas the PtNRT3 proteins have no or up to two trans-membrane domains. Four PtNRT3 members were predicted as secreted proteins. Microarray analyses revealed tissue-specific expression patterns of PtNRT genes with distinct clusters of NRTs for roots, for the elongation zone of the apical stem segment and the developing xylem and a further cluster for leaves, bark and wood. A comparison of different poplar species (P. trichocarpa, P. tremula, P. euphratica, P. fremontii x P. angustifolia, and P. x canescens showed that the tissue-specific patterns of the NRT genes varied to some extent with species. Bioinformatic analysis of putative cis-regulatory elements in the promoter regions of PtNRT family retrieved motifs suggesting the regulation of the NRT genes by N metabolism, by energy and carbon metabolism, and by phytohormones and stress. Multivariate analysis suggested that the combination and abundance of motifs in distinct promoters may lead to tissue-specificity. Our genome wide analysis of the PtNRT genes provides a valuable basis for functional analysis towards understanding the role of nitrate transporters for tree growth.

  14. Adsorption of lanthanides on mordenite from nitrate medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gładysz-Płaska, Agnieszka; Majdan, Marek; Pikus, Stanisław

    2008-01-15

    The adsorption of lanthanides (except for Pm) on mordenite was investigated under various solution conditions of nitrate ion concentrations ([NO*3]: 0.001-2 mol/dm3) and total lanthanide concentrations (0.0005 mol/dm3). Solutions of lanthanide nitrates were equilibrated with zeolite samples at 296 K. A concave tetrad effect was evident in the change of logK d values within the lanthanide series and an explanation by a comparison of covalence in Ln-O bonds existing in triple bond Al-O(1/3Ln)-Si species found in the zeolite phase and in Ln(H2O)3+x or Ln(NO3) n-3 n complexes formed in the aqueous phase is presented. The decreasing trend in C1 and C3 coefficients, which are the function of E1 and E3 Racah f-interelectron repulsion parameters, is evidence of the magnification of covalence in Ln-O bond in the series triple bond S-iO(1/3Ln)-Al triple bond nitrate concentrations (0.0001-0.001 mol/dm3), were found to be a Freundlich type. The obtained adsorption capacity K and adsorption intensity n parameters show odd-even changes in the lanthanide series, indicating the importance of covalence effects in the lanthanides adsorption mechanism. The mordenite samples loaded with lanthanide nitrates were investigated using diffusive reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. Negative correlations between E=([Al]-[Na])/[Ln] and [Ln]/[Al], and negative correlations for [Ln] and [Na] on the zeolite surface, resulting from the interaction (ion exchange) of lanthanide ions with triple bond Si-O(Na)-Al triple bond and Si-OH-Al triple bond groups within the mordenite framework were found. DRIFT spectra showed the sensitivity of the framework vibration band T-O-T for Ln3+ ion interactions with negative oxygen of the mordenite structure.

  15. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Anja; Stief, Peter; Bristow, Laura A.; Thamdrup, Bo; Glud, Ronnie N.

    2016-01-01

    Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations >60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2–3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations. PMID:27847498

  16. Effects of Calcium Lignosulfonate and Silicic Acid on Ammonium Nitrate Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Ozan Gezerman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate salts are the most commonly used nitrogenous fertilizers in industry. However, storage of ammonium nitrate is problematic, since its initial properties can decline because of environmental factors, leading to large economic losses. In this study, in order to prevent the caking and degradation of ammonium nitrate, an alternative composition with additional calcium lignosulfonate and silicic acid was studied. The resulting fertilizer was analyzed by screening analysis, ion chromatography, and electron microscopy methods.

  17. Türkiye’de AB nitrat direktifi’nin uygulanması

    OpenAIRE

    BİLGİN YILDIRIM, Hatice; DEMİR, Süleyman

    2014-01-01

    The EU Nitrates Directive is of a prime importance in respect of sustaining the natural resources for the reduction and prevention of nitrate pollution resulting from agricultural activities, and it constitutes an integral part of the EU Water Framework Directive. Accepted by the European Council in 1991, the directive entered into force being published in Official Gazette in 2004 in Turkey as “Regulation on the Protection of Waters against Pollution Caused by Nitrates from Agricultural Sourc...

  18. Photocatalytic reduction of nitrate using titanium dioxide for regeneration of ion exchange brine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Doudrick, Kyle; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Nitrate is often removed from groundwater by ion exchange (IX) before its use as drinking water. Accumulation of nitrate in IX brine reduces the efficiency of IX regeneration and the useful life of the regeneration brine. For the first time, we present a strategy to photocatalytically reduce nitrate in IX brine, thereby extending the use of the brine. Titanium dioxide (Evonik P90), acting as photocatalyst, reduced nitrate effectively in both synthetic brines and sulfate-removed IX brine when formic acid (FA) was used as the hole scavenger (i.e., electron donor) and the initial FA to nitrate molar ratio (IFNR) was 5.6. Increasing the NaCl level in the synthetic brine slowed the nitrate reduction rate without affecting by-product selectivity of ammonium and gaseous N species (e.g., N(2), N(2)O). In a non-modified IX brine, nitrate removal was greatly inhibited owing to the presence of sulfate, which competed with nitrate for active surface sites on P90 and induced aggregation of P90 nanoparticles. After removing sulfate through barium sulfate precipitation, nitrate was effectively reduced; approximately 3.6 × 10(24) photons were required to reduce each mole of nitrate to 83% N Gases and 17% NH(4)(+). To make optimum use of FA and control the residual FA level in treated brine, the IFNR was varied. High IFNRs (e.g., 4, 5.6) were found to be more efficient for nitrate reduction but left higher residual FA in brine. IX column tests were performed to investigate the impact of residual FA for brine reuse. The residual FA in the brine did not significantly affect the nitrate removal capacity of IX resins, and formate contamination of treated water could be eliminated by rinsing with one bed volume of fresh brine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Intracellular Nitrate of Marine Diatoms as a Driver of Anaerobic Nitrogen Cycling in Sinking Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kamp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diatom-bacteria aggregates are key for the vertical transport of organic carbon in the ocean. Sinking aggregates also represent pelagic microniches with intensified microbial activity, oxygen depletion in the center, and anaerobic nitrogen cycling. Since some of the aggregate-forming diatom species store nitrate intracellularly, we explored the fate of intracellular nitrate and its availability for microbial metabolism within anoxic diatom-bacteria aggregates. The ubiquitous nitrate-storing diatom Skeletonema marinoi was studied as both axenic cultures and laboratory-produced diatom-bacteria aggregates. Stable 15N isotope incubations under dark and anoxic conditions revealed that axenic S. marinoi is able to reduce intracellular nitrate to ammonium that is immediately excreted by the cells. When exposed to a light:dark cycle and oxic conditions, S. marinoi stored nitrate intracellularly in concentrations > 60 mmol L-1 both as free-living cells and associated to aggregates. Intracellular nitrate concentrations exceeded extracellular concentrations by three orders of magnitude. Intracellular nitrate was used up within 2-3 days after shifting diatom-bacteria aggregates to dark and anoxic conditions. Thirty-one percent of the diatom-derived nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas, indicating that a substantial fraction of the intracellular nitrate pool of S. marinoi becomes available to the aggregate-associated bacterial community. Only 5% of the intracellular nitrate was reduced to ammonium, while 59% was recovered as nitrite. Hence, aggregate-associated diatoms accumulate nitrate from the surrounding water and sustain complex nitrogen transformations, including loss of fixed nitrogen, in anoxic, pelagic microniches. Additionally, it may be expected that intracellular nitrate not converted before the aggregates have settled onto the seafloor could fuel benthic nitrogen transformations.

  20. MODELING NITRATE CONCENTRATION IN GROUND WATER USING REGRESSION AND NEURAL NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Ramasamy, Nacha; Krishnan, Palaniappa; Bernard, John C.; Ritter, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrate concentration in ground water is a major problem in specific agricultural areas. Using regression and neural networks, this study models nitrate concentration in ground water as a function of iron concentration in ground water, season and distance of the well from a poultry house. Results from both techniques are comparable and show that the distance of the well from a poultry house has a significant effect on nitrate concentration in groundwater.