WorldWideScience

Sample records for californium atomic number

  1. Magnetism in californium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.R.

    1988-03-01

    A SQUID-based magnetic susceptometer has been constructed for studying small radioactive samples at temperatures below 350 K and in magnetic fields up to 50 kilogauss. The device has been used to study californium (element 98) in a number of solid-state forms: the dhcp metal, several oxides (Cf 2 O 3 in both the bcc and monoclinic structures, Cf 7 O 12 , CfO 2 and BaCfO 3 ), several monopnictides (CfN, CfAs and CfSb) and the trichloride (in both the hexagonal and orthorhombic structures). All of these materials were studied in polycrystalline form, and hexagonal CfCl 3 was studied in single-crystal form as well. The susceptometer has the sensitivity to measure samples containing less than 10 micrograms of californium. The magnetic susceptibilities of all of the californium materials at temperatures above about 100 K are described well by the Curie-Weiss relationship. This behavior is consistent with the assumption that the magnetic 5f electrons are localized and that the paramagnetic behavior can be interpreted in terms of the properties of the free ion. The measured values of the effective paramagnetic moment, μ/sub eff/, for all the californium materials that were studied are reasonably consistent with theoretical values based on intermediate coupling models. All of the californium materials showed some indications of cooperative magnetic effects. The dhcp metal was observed to order ferromagnetically at 52 K, and all of the californium compounds studied showed signs of antiferromagnetic ordering, mostly at temperatures below 25 K. 91 refs., 50 figs., 19 tabs

  2. Californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This meeting constituted the third phase of a project initiated by the Dosimetry Section of the IAEA in 1973. The first step, early in 1973, consisted of the development of a programme for the loan of Cf-252 sources to the Member States in support of education, training and some limited research. To date, 14 institutions in 13 Member States have participated in this loan programme. In August last year, the Agency published an instructional syllabus and laboratory manual authored by Professors Eric J. Hall and Harald H. Rossi of Columbia University (Californium-252 in Teaching and Research, Technical Reports Series No. 159). The appearance of this publication, including guidance on the design and construction of a storage and use facility, was the second phase of this programme aimed at providing some support to potential users in the fields of radiation biology and dosimetry. The objective of the programme's third phase - the convening of an Educational Seminar - was to provide a forum to bring together participants in the Agency's loan programme and experts in various scientific fields. Specifically, the Seminar consisted of a series of expert presentations in spectrometry, activation and prompt gamma analyses, on-stream analysis, dosimetry, health physics, radiology and radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Atomic Fisher information versus atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, A.; Sen, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the Thomas-Fermi Fisher information is negative. A slightly more sophisticated model proposed by Gaspar provides a qualitatively correct expression for the Fisher information: Gaspar's Fisher information is proportional to the two-third power of the atomic number. Accurate numerical calculations show an almost linear dependence on the atomic number

  4. Local Structure in Americium and Californium Hexa-cyanoferrates - Comparison with Their Lanthanide Analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupouy, G.; Bonhoure, I.; Dumas, Th.; Moisy, Ph.; Petit, S.; Den Auwer, Ch.; Conradson, St.D.; Hennig, Ch.; Scheinost, A.C.; Le Naour, C.; Simoni, E.

    2011-01-01

    Metal hexa-cyanoferrates are well known molecular solids for a large variety of cations, although very little has been described for actinide adducts. Two new members of actinide(III) hexa-cyanoferrates were synthesized with the cations americium and californium. They were structurally characterized by infrared and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Combined EXAFS data at the iron K edge and actinide L 3 edge provide evidence for a three-dimensional model for these two new compounds. Structural data in terms of bond lengths were compared to those reported for the parent lanthanide(III) compounds, neodymium and gadolinium hexa-cyanoferrates, respectively: the americium compound with (KNd(III)Fe(II)-Fe-III(CN) 6 .4H 2 O and the californium compound with (KGd(III)Fe(II)(CN) . 3.5H 2 O and (KGd(III)Fe(II)(CN) 6 .3H 2 O. This comparison between actinide and lanthanide homologues has been carried out on the basis of ionic radii considerations. The americium and neodymium environments appear to be very similar and are arranged in a tri-capped trigonal prism polyhedron of coordination number 9 (CN: 9), in which the americium atom is bonded to six nitrogen atoms and to three water molecules. For the californium adduct, a similar comparison and bond length and angle values derived from EXAFS studies suggest that the californium cation sits in a bi-capped trigonal prism (CN: 8) as in (KGd(III)Fe(II)(CN) 6 . 3H 2 O. This arrangement differs from that in the structure of (KGd(III)Fe(II)(CN) 6 .3.5H 2 O, in which the gadolinium atom is surrounded by 9 atoms. This is one of the rare pieces of information revealed by EXAFS spectroscopy for americium and californium in comparison to lanthanide atoms in molecular solid compounds. A discussion on the decrease in bond length and coordination number from americium to californium is also provided, on the basis of crystallographic results reported in the literature for actinide(III) and lanthanide(III) hydrate series. (authors)

  5. Medical applications of californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, G.D. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Primarily, californium-252 sources have been utilized in medicine for the treatment of neoplastic lesions. For five years, a coordinated effort between several cancer research institutions and national laboratories has developed the necessary physics, radiobiology, and engineering skills to establish an evaluation program for californium. Several more years of combined effort are required before it is known whether californium therapy is as good as or better than conventional therapy with sources like radium. Recently, development of diagnostic applications of californium in medicine has received attention. Studies comparing neutron decay activation analysis versus prompt capture gamma ray analysis are in progress. A hopeful application of prompt analysis with reasonable quantities (200 μg) of californium is the elemental analysis of bone in the human body. (U.S.)

  6. Californium loan programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The offer of the United States to loan Californium-252 sources to the IAEA was made by Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg, then chairman of the USAEC, in his opening statement at the 15th. General Conference of the IAEA held in Vienna in 1971. The purpose of this loan was to make neutron emitting sources available to universities in the Member States for use in educational programmes. The sources, in the form of small needles designed for medical use in radiation therapy, were judged highly suitable for didactic applications due to their small size, limited activity and well documented radiological parameters. Subsequently, in May 1973, the Director General announced the availability of the Californium sources to the Member States. To date, numerous sources have been loaned to universities in Czechoslovakia, Costa Rica, the Federal Republic of Germany, Ghana, India, Iran, Israel, Japan, South Africa, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and Uruguay; additional applications for loans are being processed. It is anticipated that the loan programme will be terminated in 1975 once all the available sources have been distributed. n order to provide guidance for the Member States on the safe exploitation of these sources, a prototype use and storage facility was designed by IAEA staff of the Dosimetry Section of the Division of Life Sciences, and constructed at the IAEA laboratory in Seibersdorf, Austria. Figures 2-5 illustrate some of the details of this container, which is being given to the Ghana Nuclear Centre in support of a training programme for students at the university in Accra. Further advice to users of these sources will be provided by the publication of an instructional syllabus, a laboratory manual for experiments and the safety precautions inherent in the proper handling of neutron emitting radionuclides, authored by Professors Erich J. Hall and Harald H. Rossi of Columbia University. The syllabus and manual will be published as part of the IAEA Technical Series in September

  7. Californium-252: a remarkable versatile radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Alexander, C.W.

    1995-01-01

    A product of the nuclear age, Californium-252 ( 252 Cf) has found many applications in medicine, scientific research, industry, and nuclear science education. Californium-252 is unique as a neutron source in that it provides a highly concentrated flux and extremely reliable neutron spectrum from a very small assembly. During the past 40 years, 252 Cf has been applied with great success to cancer therapy, neutron radiography of objects ranging from flowers to entire aircraft, startup sources for nuclear reactors, fission activation for quality analysis of all commercial nuclear fuel, and many other beneficial uses, some of which are now ready for further growth. Californium-252 is produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and processed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), both of which are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The REDC/HFIR facility is virtually the sole supplier of 252 Cf in the western world and is the major supplier worldwide. Extensive exploitation of this product was made possible through the 252 Cf Market Evaluation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) [then the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)]. This program included training series, demonstration centers, seminars, and a liberal loan policy for fabricated sources. The Market Evaluation Program was instituted, in part, to determine if large-quantity production capability was required at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). Because of the nature of the product and the means by which it is produced, 252 Cf can be produced only in government-owned facilities. It is evident at this time that the Oak Ridge research facility can meet present and projected near-term requirements. The production, shipment, and sales history of 252 Cf from ORNL is summarized herein

  8. Californium-252: a remarkable versatile radioisotope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Alexander, C.W.

    1995-10-10

    A product of the nuclear age, Californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) has found many applications in medicine, scientific research, industry, and nuclear science education. Californium-252 is unique as a neutron source in that it provides a highly concentrated flux and extremely reliable neutron spectrum from a very small assembly. During the past 40 years, {sup 252}Cf has been applied with great success to cancer therapy, neutron radiography of objects ranging from flowers to entire aircraft, startup sources for nuclear reactors, fission activation for quality analysis of all commercial nuclear fuel, and many other beneficial uses, some of which are now ready for further growth. Californium-252 is produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and processed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC), both of which are located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The REDC/HFIR facility is virtually the sole supplier of {sup 252}Cf in the western world and is the major supplier worldwide. Extensive exploitation of this product was made possible through the {sup 252}Cf Market Evaluation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) [then the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)]. This program included training series, demonstration centers, seminars, and a liberal loan policy for fabricated sources. The Market Evaluation Program was instituted, in part, to determine if large-quantity production capability was required at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). Because of the nature of the product and the means by which it is produced, {sup 252}Cf can be produced only in government-owned facilities. It is evident at this time that the Oak Ridge research facility can meet present and projected near-term requirements. The production, shipment, and sales history of {sup 252}Cf from ORNL is summarized herein.

  9. Californium source transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    In early 1995, the receipt of four sealed californium-252 sources from Oak Ridge National Lab was successfully accomplished by a team comprised of Radiological Engineering, Radiological Operations and Health Physics Instrumentation personnel. A procedure was developed and walked-down by the participants during a Dry Run Evolution. Several special tools were developed during the pre-planning phases of the project which reduced individual and job dose to minimal levels. These included a mobile lifting device for attachment of a transfer ball valve assembly to the undercarriage of the Cannonball Carrier, a transfer tube elbow to ensure proper angle of the source transfer tube, and several tools used during emergency response for remote retrieval and handling of an unshielded source. Lessons were learned in the areas of contamination control, emergency preparedness, and benefits of thorough pre-planning, effectiveness of locally creating and designing special tools to reduce worker dose, and methods of successfully accomplishing source receipt evolutions during extreme or inclement weather

  10. Californium-252 progress, report No. 7, April 1971

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1971-12-31

    This report contains discusses of the following topics on Californium-252: First sales of californium-252; encapsulation services discussed; three new participants in market evaluation program; summer training programs to use californium; Californium-252 shipping casks available; Californium-252 questions and answers, radiotherapy; neutron radiography; natural resources exploration; nuclear safeguards; process control; dosimetry; neutron radiography; neutron shielding; and nuclear safeguards.

  11. Effective atomic number of dental smalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodas D, J.E.; Nogueira, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers Z are enough utilized for to characterize the interactions of ionizing radiation with matter. Particularly for the Z calculation in biological tissues and/or composed materials we need to know the relationship between the cross sections of the diverse radiations interactions with mattera and the atomic numbers Z of the constituent elements in the tissue or composed material. Normally the cross section by atom σ 2 is proportional to Z m . The m value depends of the iterative process type and the energy of the incident photons. In the case of the photoelectric interaction, the m vary will vary between 4,698 and 4,799 for energies between 10 to 200 keV. It was verified that constituent elements with high Z (>20) they had a major contribution. The m values for the Compton interation and the coherent scattering were calculated of similar way. Knowing the m values, we calculate the partials Z of a composed material. For the calculation of total Z, we can use alternatives starting from the equivalent atomic number corresponding to the total cross section σ d tot, mc of the composed material. In this work for the calculation of Z values corresponding to diverse interations, we applied a linear regression at the values of Ln σ a x LnZ for different energies. In general, to characterize a simulator material of a tissue or composed material we need to know the total Z in function of the photon energy applied to dental smalt increases until some hundreds of keV the partial values of Z owing to photoelectric effect and the coherent scattering this is owing to the smalt has a great concentration of elements with high Z. (Author)

  12. Uranium standards for Californium Shuffler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbs, A.; Boynton, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    The Laboratories Department analyzed pieces of a U-Al log which were to be canned and used as a set of standards for the nondestructive Californium Shuffler instrument. Evaluation of this instrument is part of an on-going Safeguards Program and is a joint project between LASL and SRP. A U-Al casting of a nominal 30% to 70% composition was made with enriched uranium (56 wt % 235 U). The log was 6 in. in diameter and approximately 2 ft long. A 1/4-in. slice was made before and after each 1-in. slice taken for use as a standard. The 1-in. slices were scanned nondestructively by collimated gamma pulse height analysis. The 1/4-in. slices were divided into quadrants and one quadrant for each slice was destructively analyzed. Results from these tests showed an approximate 1.5% relative variation in uranium concentration from the high to the low point. Successive pieces showed less than 1% relative difference. The 1-in. pieces have been canned and shipped to LASL for testing and will be returned with the Californium Shuffler. The remaining 1/4-in. slices have been sent to NBL and LASL for destructive analysis

  13. Californium Multiplier. Part I. Design for neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosbie, K.L.; Preskitt, C.A.; John, J.; Hastings, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The Californium Multiplier (CFX) is a subcritical assembly of enriched uranium surrounding a californium-252 neutron source. The function of the CFX is to multiply the neutrons emitted by the source to a number sufficient for neutron radiography. The CFX is designed to provide a collimated beam of thermal neutrons from which the gamma radiation is filtered, and the scattered neutrons are reduced to make it suitable for high resolution radiography. The entire system has inherent safety features, which provide for system and personnel safety, and it operates at moderate cost. In Part I, the CFX and the theory of its operation are described in detail. Part II covers the performance of the Mound Facility CFX

  14. Calibration of a Modified Californium Shuffler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, E.T.; Armstrong, F.; Oldham, R.; Ceo, R.; Williams, N.

    1995-01-01

    A californium shuffler originally designed to assay hollow cylindrical pieces of UA1 has been modified to assay solid cylinders. Calibration standards were characterized via chemical analysis of the molten UA1 taken during casting of the standards. The melt samples yielded much more reliable characterization data than drill samples taken from standards after the standards had solidified. By normalizing one well-characterized calibration curve to several standards at different enrichments, a relatively small number of standards was required to develop an enrichment-dependent calibration. The precision of this shuffler is 0.65%, and the typical random and systematic uncertainties are 0.53% and 0.73%, respectively, for a six minute assay of an ingot containing approximately 700 grams of 235 U. This paper will discuss (1) the discrepancies encountered when UA1 standards were characterized via melt samples versus drill samples, (2) a calibration methodology employing a small number of standards, and (3) a comparison of results from a previously unused shuffler with an existing shuffler. A small number of UA1 standards have been characterized using samples from the homogeneous molten state and have yielded enrichment-dependent and enrichment-independent calibration curves on two different shufflers

  15. Investigation of systematic errors of metastable "atomic pair" number

    CERN Document Server

    Yazkov, V

    2015-01-01

    Sources of systematic errors in analysis of data, collected in 2012, are analysed. Esti- mations of systematic errors in a number of “atomic pairs” fr om metastable π + π − atoms are presented.

  16. Radiography using californium-252 neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The current status in the technology of neutron radiography using californium-252 neutron sources is summarized. Major emphasis is on thermal neutron radiography since it has the widest potential applicability at the present time. Attention is given to four major factors which affect the quality and useability of thermal neutron radiography: source neutron thermalization, neutron beam extraction geometry, neutron collimator dimensions, and neutron imaging methods. Each of these factors has a major effect on the quality of the radiographs which are obtained from a californium source neutron radiography system and the exposure times required to obtain the radiographs; radiograph quality and exposure time in turn affect the practicality of neutron radiography for specific nondestructive inspection applications. A brief discussion of fast neutron radiography using californium-252 neutron sources is also included. (U.S.)

  17. Determination numbers of ionized atoms from emission and absorption lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh Azimi, A.; Shokouhi, N.

    2002-01-01

    Saha, M., (1920) estimated that salter chromosphere is not only due to radiation from neutral atoms, but from ionized atoms. The failure to observe these stellar lines in the laboratory was attributed to internal temperature and pressure about 10* E + 6 K 10* E-7 atm. In this research we found that emission lines of ionized atoms (like Cs) could be measured in laboratory condition, (about 10* E-3 atm and 2000 K) by using Graphite France Atomic Absorption with injection 124 u g C sel. We calculated the numbers of ionized atoms from Bottzman law. We also measured these numbers from area under the energy-time curve

  18. Photon mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the data measured by the authors and reported earlier. The best-fit coefficients so obtained in the photon ..... This photon build-up is a function of thickness and atomic number of the sample and also the incident photon energy, which combine to ...

  19. Accessing photon number via an atomic time interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, J.C.; Coffer, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    We show that Rabi resonances can be used to assess field strength in terms of time at the atomic level. Rabi resonances are enhancements in the amplitude of atomic population oscillations when the Rabi frequency, Ω, 'matches' a field-modulation frequency, ω m . We demonstrate that Ω=2κω m and find that κ=1.03±0.05. Since Ω is defined by field strength (i.e., photon number) through atomic constants, and ω m may be referenced to an atomic clock, our work shows that Rabi resonances provide a connection between time and photon number

  20. A versatile atomic number correction for electron-probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G.; Cox, M.G.; Scott, V.D.

    1978-01-01

    A new atomic number correction is proposed for quantitative electron-probe microanalysis. Analytical expressions for the stopping power S and back-scatter R factors are derived which take into account atomic number of the target, incident electron energy and overvoltage; the latter expression is established using Monte Carlo calculations. The correct procedures for evaluating S and R for multi-element specimens are described. The new method, which overcomes some limitations inherent in earlier atomic number corrections, may readily be used where specimens are inclined to the electron beam. (author)

  1. The Atomic Number Revolution in Chemistry: A Kuhnian Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wray, K. Brad

    2018-01-01

    This paper argues that the field of chemistry underwent a significant change of theory in the early twentieth century, when atomic number replaced atomic weight as the principle for ordering and identifying the chemical elements. It is a classic case of a Kuhnian revolution. In the process of add...

  2. A californium-252 source for radiobiological studies at Hiroshima University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Takeoka, Seiji; Kuroda, Tokue; Tsujimura, Tomotaka; Kawami, Masaharu; Hoshi, Masaharu; Sawada, Shozo

    1987-01-01

    A 1.93 Ci (3.6 mg) californium-252 source was installed in the radiation facility of the Research Institute for Nuclear Medicine and Biology, Hiroshima University. This source produces fission neutrons (8.7 x 10 9 n/s at the time of its installation), which are similar to neutron spectrum of the atomic bombs. It is useful for studying biological effects of fission neutrons and neutron dosimetry. An apparatus was dosigned to accomodate this source and to apply it to such studies. It has resulted in profitable fission neutron exposures, while suppressing scattered neutrons and secondary gamma rays. This apparatus incorporates many safety systems, including one which interlocks with all of doors and an elevator serving the exposure room, so as to prevent accidents involving users. (author)

  3. Californium-252 radiotherapy sources for interstitial afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permar, P.H.; Walker, V.W.

    1976-01-01

    Californium-252 neutron sources for interstitial afterloading were developed to investigate the value of this radionuclide in cancer therapy. Californium-252 seed assemblies contain essentially point sources of 252 Cf permanently sealed on 1-cm centers within a flexible plastic tube. The seed assemblies are fabricated with remotely operated, specially designed machines. The fabrication process involves the production of a Pt-10 percent Ir-clad wire with a 252 Cf 2 O 3 -Pd cermet core. The wire is swaged and drawn to size, cut to length, and welded in a Pt-10 percent Ir capsule 0.8 mm in diameter and 6 mm long. Each seed capsule contains approximately 0.5 microgram of 252 Cf. Because the effective half-life of 252 Cf is 2.6 years, the seed assemblies are not disposable and must be reused until their activities have decreased to unsuitable levels. The flexible plastic components must therefore have sufficient resistance to radiation damage to survive the neutron-plus-gamma radiation from 252 Cf. On the basis of accelerated irradiation tests with a large 252 Cf source, a recently developed fluoropolymer, ''Tefzel'' (trademark of E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company) has adequate radiation resistance for this application. Californium-252 seed assembly systems are loaned by the United States Energy Research and Development Administration for clinical investigations under a protocol of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, U.S. National Cancer Institute

  4. Historical review of californium-252 discovery and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddard, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the discovery and history of californium 252. This isotope may be synthesized by irradiating plutonium 239, plutonium 242, americium 243, or curium 244 with neutrons in a nuclear reactor. Various experiments and inventions involving 252 Cf conducted at the Savannah River Plant are discussed. The evolution of radiotherapy using californium 252 is reviewed

  5. Stabilization of atoms with nonzero magnetic quantum numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, B.; Jensen, R.V.

    1993-01-01

    A classical analysis of the interaction of an atomic electron with an oscillating electric field with arbitrary initial quantum number, n, magnetic quantum number, m > 0, field strength, and frequency shows that the classical, dynamics for the perturbed electron can be stabilized for large fields and high frequencies. Using a four-dimensional map approximation to the classical dynamics, explicit expressions are obtained for the full parameter dependence of the boundaries of stability surrounding the open-quotes death valleyclose quotes of rapid classical ionization. A preliminary analysis of the quantum dynamics in terms of the quasienergy states associated with the corresponding quantum map is also included with particular emphasis on the role of unstable classical structures in stabilizing atoms. Together, these results provide motivation and direction for further theoretical and experimental studies of stabilization of atoms (and molecules) in super-intense microwave and laser fields

  6. Simulated mixed absorbers and effective atomic numbers for γ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The total -ray interaction crosss-sections on mixed absorbers were determined at 662 keV with a view to study the effective atomic numbers for -ray absorption under narrow beam good geometry set-up. The measurements were taken for the combination of metallic absorbers like aluminium, copper, lead and mercury ...

  7. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An attempt has been made to estimate the effective atomic number, electron density (0.001 to 105 MeV) and kerma (0.001 to 20 MeV) of gamma radiation for a wide range of oxides of ... The lanthanide oxides find remarkable applications in the field of medicine, biology, nuclear engineering and space technology.

  8. Determination of atomic number and composition of human enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, M.S.; Rodas Duran, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    The teeth are organs of complicated structure that consist, partly, of hard tissue containing in its interior the dental pulp, rich in vases and nerves. The main mass of the tooth is constituted by the dentine, which is covered with hard tissues and of epithelial origin called enamel. The dentine of the human teeth used in this work were completely removed and the teeth were cut with a device with a diamond disc. In this work the chemical composition of the human enamel was determined, which showed a high percentage of Ca and P, in agreement with the results found in the literature. The effective atomic number of the material and the half-value layer in the energy range of diagnostic X-ray beams were determined. Teeth could be used to evaluated the public's individual doses as well as for retrospective dosimetry what confirms the importance of their effective atomic number and composition determination. (author)

  9. Successive change regularity of actinide properties with atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xuexian

    1990-08-01

    The development and achievements on chemistry of actinide elements are summarised. The relations of properties of actinides to their electronic configurations of valence electronic shells are discussed. Some anomalies of solid properties, the radius contraction, the stable state effect of f 7n -orbits (n = 0, 1, 2) and the tetrad effect of oxidation states, etc., with atomic number (Z) are described. 31 figures appended show directly the successive change regularity of actinide properties with Z

  10. Effective atomic number and electron density of marble concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkurt, I.; El-Khayatt, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and effective electron density (N e ) of different type concrete have been measured and the results were compared with the calculation obtained using the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) obtained via XCOM in the photon energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV. Six different concrete in where marble has been used in the rate of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 %, has been used in the study. (author)

  11. Synthesis of a New Element with Atomic Number Z=117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Itkis, M. G.; Lobanov, Yu. V.; Mezentsev, A. N.; Polyakov, A. N.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Voinov, A. A.; Vostokin, G. K.; Bailey, P. D.; Benker, D. E.; Ezold, J. G.; Porter, C. E.; Riley, F. D.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of a new chemical element with atomic number Z=117 is reported. The isotopes 293 117 and 294 117 were produced in fusion reactions between 48 Ca and 249 Bk. Decay chains involving 11 new nuclei were identified by means of the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator. The measured decay properties show a strong rise of stability for heavier isotopes with Z≥111, validating the concept of the long sought island of enhanced stability for superheavy nuclei.

  12. Effective atomic numbers and electron density of dosimetric material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaginelli S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method for determination of mass attenuation coefficient of x-rays employing NaI (Tl detector system and radioactive sources is described.in this paper. A rigid geometry arrangement and gating of the spectrometer at FWHM position and selection of absorber foils are all done following detailed investigation, to minimize the effect of small angle scattering and multiple scattering on the mass attenuation coefficient, m/r, value. Firstly, for standardization purposes the mass attenuation coefficients of elemental foils such as Aluminum, Copper, Molybdenum, Tantalum and Lead are measured and then, this method is utilized for dosimetric interested material (sulfates. The experimental mass attenuation coefficient values are compared with the theoretical values to find good agreement between the theory and experiment within one to two per cent. The effective atomic numbers of the biological substitute material are calculated by sum rule and from the graph. The electron density of dosimetric material is calculated using the effective atomic number. The study has discussed in detail the attenuation coefficient, effective atomic number and electron density of dosimetric material/biological substitutes.

  13. Californium-252 sales and loans at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.

    1987-01-01

    The production and distribution in the United States of 252 Cf has recently been consolidated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The 252 Cf Industrial Sales/Loan Program and the 252 Cf University Load Program, which were formerly located at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), have been combined with the californium production and distribution activities of the Transuranium Element Production Program at ORNL. Californium-252 is sold to commercial users in the form of bulk californium oxide, palladium-californium alloy pellets, or alloy wires. Neutron source capsules, which are fabricated for loans to DOE or other US government agencies, are still available in all forms previously available. The consolidation of all 252 Cf distribution activities at the production site is expected to result in better service to users. In particular, customers for neutrons sources will be ale to select from a wider range of neutron source forms, including custom designs, through a single contact point

  14. A practical relation between atomic numbers and alpha coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachance, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    A first approximation indicates that fundamental alpha coefficients for a given analyte vary as a function of the ratio of their respective atomic number raised to a power. This simple rule applies mainly at the limits (i.e., when the weight fraction of analyte i, Wsub(i) is of the order of 0.0 or 1.0) in cases of absorption and weak enhancement. The relation thus provides a means of generating coefficients for the system i-k from experimental data obtained on system i-j and a means of verifying experimental alphas, since arrays of coefficients must show a high degree of concordance. (author)

  15. Low atomic number coating for XEUS silicon pore optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumb, D.H.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Krumrey, M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a set of measurements on coated silicon substrates that are representative of the material to be used for the XEUS High Performance Pore Optics (HPO) technology. X-ray angular reflectance measurements at 2.8 and 8 keV, and energy scans of reflectance at a fixed angle representative...... of XEUS graze angles are presented. Reflectance is significantly enhanced for low energies when a low atomic number over-coating is applied. Modeling of the layer thicknesses and roughness is used to investigate the dependence on the layer thicknesses, metal and over coat material choices. We compare...

  16. Neutron emission in fission of highly excited californium nuclei (E* = 76 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.V.; Bordyug, V.M.; Kozulin, E.M.; Levitovich, M.; Mozhaev, A.N.; Muzychka, Yu.A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.; Pustyl'nik, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    Differential cross sections for neutron production have been measured in fission of excited californium nuclei produced in the reaction 238 U + 12 C (105 MeV). It follows from analysis of the experimental results that the number of neutrons emitted before fission considerably exceeds the number obtained in the framework of the standard statistical model. On the basis of the multiplicity of neutrons they authors have estimated the time of fission of the excited nucleus. The dependence of the number of neutrons and their average energies on the mass of the fragments is determined

  17. Low atomic number coating for XEUS silicon pore optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, D. H.; Jensen, C. P.; Krumrey, M.; Cibik, L.; Christensen, F.; Collon, M.; Bavdaz, M.

    2008-07-01

    We describe a set of measurements on coated silicon substrates that are representative of the material to be used for the XEUS High Performance Pore Optics (HPO) technology. X-ray angular reflectance measurements at 2.8 and 8 keV, and energy scans of reflectance at a fixed angle representative of XEUS graze angles are presented. Reflectance is significantly enhanced for low energies when a low atomic number over-coating is applied. Modeling of the layer thicknesses and roughness is used to investigate the dependence on the layer thicknesses, metal and over coat material choices. We compare the low energy effective area increase that could be achieved with an optimized coating design.

  18. Neutron emission in fission of highly excited californium nuclei (E*=76 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.V.; Bordyug, V.M.; Kozulin, Eh.M.; Mozhaev, A.N.; Levitovich, M.; Muzychka, Yu.A.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Pustyl'nik, B.I.

    1990-01-01

    The differential cross sections for neutron production in the fission of highly excited californium nuclei formed in the 238 U+ 12 C (105 MeV) reaction have been measured. From the analysis of the experimental data is follows that the number of pre-fission neutrons substantially exceeds the value obtained in the framework of the standard statistical model. The saddle-to-scission time of the excited nucleus is estimated on the basis of the neutron multiplicity. The dependences of the neutron number and neutron average energies upon the fragment mass are determined

  19. Californium production at the transuranium processing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, L.J.

    1976-01-01

    The Transuranium Processing Plant (TRU) at ORNL, which is the production, storage, and distribution center for the ERDA heavy element research program, is described. About 0.5 percent of 252 Cf is currently being produced. TRU is a hot-cell, chemical processing facility of advanced design. New concepts have been incorporated into the facility for absolute containment, remote operation, remote equipment installation, and remote maintenance. The facilities include a battery of nine heavily shielded process cells served by master-slave manipulators and eight laboratories, four on each of two floors. Processing includes chemical dissolution of the targets followed by a series of solvent extraction, ion exchange, and precipitation steps to separate and purify the transuranium elements. The transcurium elements Bk, Cf, Es, and Fm are distributed to users. Remote techniques are used to fabricate the Am and Cm into target rods for reirradiation in the HFIR. Californium-252 that is in excess of the needs of the heavy element research program and the Cf sales program is stored at TRU and processed repeatedly to recover the daughter product 248 Cm, which is a highly desirable research material

  20. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  1. Simulated mixed absorbers and effective atomic numbers for γ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. γ-rays; γ attenuation; simulated mixed absorbers; effective atomic ... We have tried to simulate composite (mixed) absorbers ... Experimental method .... puter, Program manual, Centre for Radiation Research, National Bureau of ...

  2. Fabrication of californium-252 sources in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, A.; Brady, M.W.; Thornett, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    The advent of californium-252 in weighable quantities and at a reasonable price has caused some rethinking among neutron source suppliers. To explore this market the Radiochemical Center Ltd. has purchased 2 mg of californium-252, and subdivided this into a wide range of sources. To take advantage of its high specific neutron emission, a small double welded stainless steel capsule 7.8mm diameter x 10mm high was chosen for stock sources and this entailed the use of a microdispensing technique which had to be specially developed. The apparatus and procedure for subdividing milligram amounts of californium-252 are described. Some details of our experience in processing these one milligram shipments are given. 100 sources with activities from 200 microgram to 0.01 microgram have been produced. Losses have been small. Measurement of neutron spectra gamma spectra and dose rates from encapsulated sources has confirmed published data. Though it is early days, little industrial interest in californium-252 sources has been detected, most of the sources have so far been required for research into activation analysis and two examples of this are given. (U.S.)

  3. Measurement of effective atomic number of composite materials using scattering of γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.P.; Sandhu, B.S.; Singh, Bhajan

    2007-01-01

    In the present experiment, to determine the effective atomic number of composite materials, the scattering of 145 keV γ-rays is studied using a high-resolution HPGe semiconductor detector placed at 70 deg. to the incident beam. The experiment is performed on various elements of different atomic number, 6≤Z≤64, for 145 keV incident photons. The intensity ratio of Rayleigh to Compton scattered peaks, corrected for photo-peak efficiency of the γ-detector and absorption of photons in the target and air, is plotted as a function of atomic number and constituted a fit curve. From this fit curve, the respective effective atomic numbers of the composite materials are determined. The agreement of measured values of effective atomic number with the theory is found to be quite satisfactory

  4. Effective atomic numbers of some tissue substitutes by different methods: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath P Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective atomic numbers of some human organ tissue substitutes such as polyethylene terephthalate, red articulation wax, paraffin 1, paraffin 2, bolus, pitch, polyphenylene sulfide, polysulfone, polyvinylchloride, and modeling clay have been calculated by four different methods like Auto-Z eff, direct, interpolation, and power law. It was found that the effective atomic numbers computed by Auto-Z eff , direct and interpolation methods were in good agreement for intermediate energy region (0.1 MeV < E < 5 MeV where the Compton interaction dominates. A large difference in effective atomic numbers by direct method and Auto-Z eff was observed in photo-electric and pair-production regions. Effective atomic numbers computed by power law were found to be close to direct method in photo-electric absorption region. The Auto-Z eff , direct and interpolation methods were found to be in good agreement for computation of effective atomic numbers in intermediate energy region (100 keV < E < 10 MeV. The direct method was found to be appropriate method for computation of effective atomic numbers in photo-electric region (10 keV < E < 100 keV. The tissue equivalence of the tissue substitutes is possible to represent by any method for computation of effective atomic number mentioned in the present study. An accurate estimation of Rayleigh scattering is required to eliminate effect of molecular, chemical, or crystalline environment of the atom for estimation of gamma interaction parameters.

  5. Measurement of the effective atomic numbers of compounds with cerium near to the absorption edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polat, Recep; Icelli, Orhan

    2010-01-01

    In order to measure atomic, molecular and electronic cross-section; the effective atomic number, density of electron and absorption jump factor, we have first measured μ t values of compounds which are determined by mixture rule using transmission method. In order to measure experimentally the effective atomic number within absorption jump factors of compounds with Ce, the X-ray source used Am-241 whose gamma rays were stopped at secondary source (Sm), thus producing Kα and Kβ X-ray emission. The most crucial finding in this study is that measurement of the effective atomic number is not appropriate near to the absorption edge and the effective atomic number is affected by near to the absorption edge. The results obtained have been compared with theoretical values.

  6. Spectral investigation of neutron radiation in three-sectional concrete labyrinth from a californium-252 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belogorlov, E.A.; Britvich, G.I.; Getmanov, V.B.

    1985-01-01

    Construction of labyrinths in points of communication output from the storage-ring under construction is accompanied by numerous difficulties due to a considerable number of gas and cryogenic pipelines, which require large cross sections at the minimal length of the pipelines proper for their location. It results in unfavourable for radiation attenuation ratios between cross section and length of the labyrinth separate sections. Neutron spectra in a model concrete labyrinth, at the entrance to which a neutron source with fission spectrum (californium-252) and the same source in a polyethylene moderator are located, are measured. On the basis of the spectra obtained the formation of fluence and equivalent dose along the labyrinth geometric axis is analyzed. Conditions permitting actually to reduce radiation dose in the labyrinth (dead end provision, the use of cover materials, construction of diaphragms and shielding plates) are simulated

  7. Radio-isotopic apparatus for analyzing low atomic number elements by fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, Andre; Martinelli, Pierre; Daniel, Georges; Laflotte, Jean-Luc

    1969-10-01

    An apparatus is described for analyzing light elements of atomic number between 6 and 24 by X-fluorescence. The samples are excited by means of X or α isotopic sources. Various examples of analytical determinations are given. (author) [fr

  8. Production, Distribution, and Applications of Californium-252 Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balo, P.A.; Knauer, J.B.; Martin, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    The radioisotope 252 Cf is routinely encapsulated into compact, portable, intense neutron sources with a 2.6-year half-life. A source the size of a person's little finger can emit up to 10 11 neutrons/s. Californium-252 is used commercially as a reliable, cost-effective neutron source for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) of coal, cement, and minerals, as well as for detection and identification of explosives, laud mines, and unexploded military ordnance. Other uses are neutron radiography, nuclear waste assays, reactor start-up sources, calibration standards, and cancer therapy. The inherent safety of source encapsulations is demonstrated by 30 years of experience and by U.S. Bureau of Mines tests of source survivability during explosions. The production and distribution center for the U. S Department of Energy (DOE) Californium Program is the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). DOE sells 252 Cf to commercial reencapsulators domestically and internationally. Sealed 252 Cf sources are also available for loan to agencies and subcontractors of the U.S. government and to universities for educational, research, and medical applications. The REDC has established the Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science to make its large inventory of 252 Cf sources available to researchers for irradiations inside uncontaminated hot cells. Experiments at the CUF include a land mine detection system, neutron damage testing of solid-state detectors, irradiation of human cancer cells for boron neutron capture therapy experiments, and irradiation of rice to induce genetic mutations

  9. The method of intersecting spheres for determination of coordination numbers of atoms in crystal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serezhkin, V.N.; Buslaev, Yu.A.; Mikhajlov, Yu.N.

    1997-01-01

    New method for determination of coordination numbers (CN) of atoms in crystal structures, based on the model of interatomic interaction, within the frames whereof each atom is approximated by two spheres with the common center in the atom nuclei, is proposed. One of the spheres specifies conditionally isolated (chemically unbound) atom and its radius is a constant, which for atoms of the given chemical sort in the structure of any compound is equal to quasi-orbital Sleiter radius. The sphere of the other radius specifies chemically bound atom and coincides with the sphere, the volume whereof is equal to the volume of the Voronoj-Dirichlet polyhedron of the corresponding atom in the structure of the concrete crystal. Using a series of examples, workability of the given method for CN determination of atoms in structures of both simple substances and chemical compounds (alkali, transition metals, U, Th). Good agreement of the obtained results with the generally accepted CN s of atoms for the considered crystals is noted and a number of principal advantages of the new method, as compared to classical one of the CNs evaluation, is demonstrated

  10. Quantum phase crossovers with finite atom number in the Dicke model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J G; Castaños, O; Nahmad-Achar, E; López-Peña, R

    2013-01-01

    Two-level atoms interacting with a one-mode cavity field at zero temperature have order parameters which reflect the presence of a quantum phase transition at a critical value of the atom–cavity coupling strength. Two popular examples are the number of photons inside the cavity and the number of excited atoms. Coherent states provide a mean field description, which becomes exact in the thermodynamic limit. Employing symmetry-adapted (SA) SU(2) coherent states the quantum crossover, precursor of the critical behavior, can be described for a finite number of atoms. A variation after projection treatment, involving a numerical minimization of the SA energy surface, associates the quantum crossover with a discontinuity in the order parameters, which originates from competition between two local minima in the SA energy surface. Although this discontinuity is not present in finite systems, it provides a good description of 1/N effects in the observables. (paper)

  11. A spectrometric approach in radiography for detection of materials by their effective atomic number

    CERN Document Server

    Ryzhikov, V D; Onyshchenko, G M; Lecoq, P; Smith, C F

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report a spectrometric approach to dual-energy digital radiography that has been developed and applied to identify specific organic substances and discern small differences in their effective atomic number. An experimental setup has been designed, and a theoretical description proposed based on the experimental results obtained. The proposed method is based on the application of special reference samples made of materials with different effective atomic number and thickness parameters known to affect X-ray attenuation in the low-energy range. The results obtained can be used in the development of a new generation of multi-energy customs or medical X-ray scanners.

  12. Platinum clusters with precise numbers of atoms for preparative-scale catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Takane; Akanuma, Yuki; Haruta, Naoki; Tsuchiya, Shogo; Ishihara, Kentaro; Okayasu, Takeshi; Chun, Wang-Jae; Takahashi, Masaki; Yamamoto, Kimihisa

    2017-09-25

    Subnanometer noble metal clusters have enormous potential, mainly for catalytic applications. Because a difference of only one atom may cause significant changes in their reactivity, a preparation method with atomic-level precision is essential. Although such a precision with enough scalability has been achieved by gas-phase synthesis, large-scale preparation is still at the frontier, hampering practical applications. We now show the atom-precise and fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters on a milligram scale from tiara-like platinum complexes with various ring numbers (n = 5-13). Low-temperature calcination of the complexes on a carbon support under hydrogen stream affords monodispersed platinum clusters, whose atomicity is equivalent to that of the precursor complex. One of the clusters (Pt 10 ) exhibits high catalytic activity in the hydrogenation of styrene compared to that of the other clusters. This method opens an avenue for the application of these clusters to preparative-scale catalysis.The catalytic activity of a noble metal nanocluster is tied to its atomicity. Here, the authors report an atom-precise, fully scalable synthesis of platinum clusters from molecular ring precursors, and show that a variation of only one atom can dramatically change a cluster's reactivity.

  13. Nanoarchitectonics for Controlling the Number of Dopant Atoms in Solid Electrolyte Nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Alpana; Unayama, Satomi; Tai, Seishiro; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Waser, Rainer; Aono, Masakazu; Valov, Ilia; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi

    2018-02-01

    Controlling movements of electrons and holes is the key task in developing today's highly sophisticated information society. As transistors reach their physical limits, the semiconductor industry is seeking the next alternative to sustain its economy and to unfold a new era of human civilization. In this context, a completely new information token, i.e., ions instead of electrons, is promising. The current trend in solid-state nanoionics for applications in energy storage, sensing, and brain-type information processing, requires the ability to control the properties of matter at the ultimate atomic scale. Here, a conceptually novel nanoarchitectonic strategy is proposed for controlling the number of dopant atoms in a solid electrolyte to obtain discrete electrical properties. Using α-Ag 2+ δ S nanodots with a finite number of nonstoichiometry excess dopants as a model system, a theory matched with experiments is presented that reveals the role of physical parameters, namely, the separation between electrochemical energy levels and the cohesive energy, underlying atomic-scale manipulation of dopants in nanodots. This strategy can be applied to different nanoscale materials as their properties strongly depend on the number of doping atoms/ions, and has the potential to create a new paradigm based on controlled single atom/ion transfer. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Prompt neutron spectrum of the spontaneous fission of californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamyatnin, Yu.S.; Kroshkin, N.I.; Korostylev, V.A.; Nefedov, V.N.; Ryazanov, D.K.; Starostov, B.I.; Semenov, A.F.

    1976-01-01

    The californium-252 spontaneous fission neutron spectrum was measured in the energy range of 0.01 to 10 MeV by the time-of-flight technique using various neutron detectors. The measurements of 252 Cf neutron spectrum at energies of 0.01 to 5 MeV were performed as a function of fission fragment kinetic energy. The mean neutron spectrum energy in the range of 0.7 to 10 MeV was found from the results of measurements. The irregularity in the 252 Cf neutron spectrum in the neutron energy range of less than 0.7 MeV compared to theoretical values is discussed. The mechanism of 252 Cf neutron emission is also discussed on the basis of neutron yield angle measurements. 12 references

  15. Atom-number squeezing and bipartite entanglement of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates: analytical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, G R; Wang, X W; Li, D; Lu, Y W, E-mail: grjin@bjtu.edu.c [Department of Physics, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2010-02-28

    We investigate spin dynamics of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate with weak Josephson coupling. Analytical expressions of atom-number squeezing and bipartite entanglement are presented for atom-atom repulsive interactions. For attractive interactions, there is no number squeezing; however, the squeezing parameter is still useful to recognize the appearance of Schroedinger's cat state.

  16. Studies on effective atomic number, electron density and kerma for some fatty acids and carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), the effective electron density, N-el, and kerma have been calculated for some fatty acids and carbohydrates for photon interaction in the extended energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV using an accurate database of photon-interaction cross sections and the WinXCo...

  17. Cheminoes: A Didactic Game to Learn Chemical Relationships between Valence, Atomic Number, and Symbol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Luis F.; Hincapié, Gina; Alzate, María Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cheminoes is a didactic game that enables the meaningful learning of some relations between concepts such as chemical element, valence, atomic number, and chemical symbol for the first 36 chemical elements of the periodic system. Among the students who have played the game, their opinions of the activity were positive, considering the game to be a…

  18. The effective atomic numbers of some biomolecules calculated by two methods: A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2009-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers Z(eff) of some fatty acids and amino acids have been calculated by two numerical methods, a direct method and an interpolation method, in the energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. The notion of Z(eff) is given a new meaning by using a modern database of photon interaction cro...

  19. An x ray scatter approach for non-destructive chemical analysis of low atomic numbered elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, H. Richard

    1993-01-01

    A non-destructive x-ray scatter (XRS) approach has been developed, along with a rapid atomic scatter algorithm for the detection and analysis of low atomic-numbered elements in solids, powders, and liquids. The present method of energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) makes the analysis of light elements (i.e., less than sodium; less than 11) extremely difficult. Detection and measurement become progressively worse as atomic numbers become smaller, due to a competing process called 'Auger Emission', which reduces fluorescent intensity, coupled with the high mass absorption coefficients exhibited by low energy x-rays, the detection and determination of low atomic-numbered elements by x-ray spectrometry is limited. However, an indirect approach based on the intensity ratio of Compton and Rayleigh scattered has been used to define light element components in alloys, plastics and other materials. This XRS technique provides qualitative and quantitative information about the overall constituents of a variety of samples.

  20. The effective atomic numbers of some biomolecules calculated by two methods: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, L. [Department of Physics, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga, Karnataka 585 106 (India); Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby DK-2800 (Denmark)

    2009-01-15

    The effective atomic numbers Z{sub eff} of some fatty acids and amino acids have been calculated by two numerical methods, a direct method and an interpolation method, in the energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. The notion of Z{sub eff} is given a new meaning by using a modern database of photon interaction cross sections (WinXCom). The results of the two methods are compared and discussed. It is shown that for all biomolecules the direct method gives larger values of Z{sub eff} than the interpolation method, in particular at low energies (1-100 keV) At medium energies (0.1-5 MeV), Z{sub eff} for both methods is about constant and equal to the mean atomic number of the material. Wherever possible, the calculated values of Z{sub eff} are compared with experimental data.

  1. The effective atomic numbers of some biomolecules calculated by two methods: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, L.

    2009-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers Z eff of some fatty acids and amino acids have been calculated by two numerical methods, a direct method and an interpolation method, in the energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. The notion of Z eff is given a new meaning by using a modern database of photon interaction cross sections (WinXCom). The results of the two methods are compared and discussed. It is shown that for all biomolecules the direct method gives larger values of Z eff than the interpolation method, in particular at low energies (1-100 keV) At medium energies (0.1-5 MeV), Z eff for both methods is about constant and equal to the mean atomic number of the material. Wherever possible, the calculated values of Z eff are compared with experimental data.

  2. Maximum compression of Z-pinch in a gas with high atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerusov, A.V.

    1989-01-01

    An ideal system of equations with shock heating is used for describing of a Z pinch in a gas with high atomic number. In this case equations do not depend from the installation parameters. The approximate simple solution of such a system is presented. Numerical calculations of equations with radiative cooling and various dissipative effects have determined the employment conditions of ideal magnetohydrodynamic equation system. 10 refs

  3. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  4. Improved atom number with a dual color magneto—optical trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qiang; Luo Xin-Yu; Gao Kui-Yi; Wang Xiao-Rui; Wang Ru-Quan; Chen Dong-Min

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel dual color magneto—optical trap (MOT), which uses two sets of overlapping laser beams to cool and trap 87 Rb atoms. The volume of cold cloud in the dual color MOT is strongly dependent on the frequency difference of the laser beams and can be significantly larger than that in the normal MOT with single frequency MOT beams. Our experiment shows that the dual color MOT has the same loading rate as the normal MOT, but much longer loading time, leading to threefold increase in the number of trapped atoms. This indicates that the larger number is caused by reduced light induced loss. The dual color MOT is very useful in experiments where both high vacuum level and large atom number are required, such as single chamber quantum memory and Bose—Einstein condensation (BEC) experiments. Compared to the popular dark spontaneous-force optical trap (dark SPOT) technique, our approach is technically simpler and more suitable to low power laser systems. (rapid communication)

  5. Experimental study of stopping powers for ions of intermediate atomic numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucher, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    A technique has been developed to measure the energy loss as a function of ion atomic number for the fragments emitted by the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf; the atomic numbers of the fragments were directly measured by the detection of a characteristic K x-ray. The measured energy losses were compared with the theories of Lindhard and of Firsov, with the tabulation of Northcliffe and Schilling, and with the semiempirical formula of Moak and Brown. For the light fragments the measured values are in good agreement with the predictions of Moak--Brown and Northcliffe--Schilling; for the heavy fragments the measured values are approximately midway between the prediction of Moak--Brown and Northcliffe--Schilling and those of Lindhard for xi/sub epsilon/ = 2. The difference in the stopping powers for adjacent ion atomic numbers Z 1 was concluded to be (1.8 +- 0.2) percent for 40 less than or equal to Z 1 less than or equal to 45 at a velocity of 1.36 cm/ns and (2.0 +- 0.1) percent for 53 less than or equal to Z 1 less than or equal to 58 at a velocity of 1.04 cm/ns

  6. Effective atomic number of dental smalt; Numero atomico efetivo do esmalte dentario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodas D, J.E.; Nogueira, M.S. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica da FFCLRP-USP. 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    1998-12-31

    The effective atomic numbers Z are enough utilized for to characterize the interactions of ionizing radiation with matter. Particularly for the Z calculation in biological tissues and/or composed materials we need to know the relationship between the cross sections of the diverse radiations interactions with mattera and the atomic numbers Z of the constituent elements in the tissue or composed material. Normally the cross section by atom {sigma} {sup 2} is proportional to Z{sup m}. The m value depends of the iterative process type and the energy of the incident photons. In the case of the photoelectric interaction, the m vary will vary between 4,698 and 4,799 for energies between 10 to 200 keV. It was verified that constituent elements with high Z (>20) they had a major contribution. The m values for the Compton interation and the coherent scattering were calculated of similar way. Knowing the m values, we calculate the partials Z of a composed material. For the calculation of total Z, we can use alternatives starting from the equivalent atomic number corresponding to the total cross section {sigma} {sup d} tot, mc of the composed material. In this work for the calculation of Z values corresponding to diverse interations, we applied a linear regression at the values of Ln {sigma} {sup a} x LnZ for different energies. In general, to characterize a simulator material of a tissue or composed material we need to know the total Z in function of the photon energy applied to dental smalt increases until some hundreds of keV the partial values of Z owing to photoelectric effect and the coherent scattering this is owing to the smalt has a great concentration of elements with high Z. (Author)

  7. Application of californium-252 neutron sources for analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Daido

    1976-01-01

    The researches made for the application of Cf-252 neutron sources to analytical chemistry during the period from 1970 to 1974 including partly 1975 are reviewed. The first part is the introduction to the above. The second part deals with general review of symposia, publications and the like. Attention is directed to ERDA publishing the periodical ''Californium-252 Progress'' and to a study group of Cf-252 utilization held by Japanese Radioisotope Association in 1974. The third part deals with its application for radio activation analysis. The automated absolute activation analysis (AAAA) of Savannha River is briefly explained. The joint experiment of Savannha River operation office with New Brunswick laboratory is mentioned. Cf-252 radiation source was used for the non-destructive analysis of elements in river water. East neutrons of Cf-252 were used for the quantitative analysis of lead in paints. Many applications for industrial control processes have been reported. Attention is drawn to the application of Cf-252 neutron sources for the field search of neutral resources. For example, a logging sonde for searching uranium resources was developed. the fourth part deals with the application of the analysis with gamma ray by capturing neutrons. For example, a bore hole sonde and the process control analysis of sulfur in fuel utilized capture gamma ray. The prompt gamma ray by capturing neutrons may be used for the nondestructive analysis of enrivonment. (Iwakiri, K.)

  8. Teratogenic effect of Californium-252 irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satow, Yukio; Lee, Juing-Yi; Hori, Hiroshi; Okuda, Hiroe; Tsuchimoto, Shigeo; Sawada, Shozo; Yokoro, Kenjiro

    1989-01-01

    The teratogenicity of Californium-252 (Cf-252) irradiation which generates approximately 70% 2.3 MeV fast neutron and 30% gamma rays was evaluated. A single whole body exposure of Cf-252 at various doses was given to pregnant rats on day 8 or 9 of pregnancy, followed by microscopic autopsy of the fetuses at the terminal stage of pregnancy to search for external and internal malformations. For comparison, pregnant rats were irradiated with various doses of Cobalt-60 (Co-60) standard gamma rays at the same dose rate (1 rad/min.). The doses were 20-120 rad of Cf-252 and 80-220 rad of Co-60. Using frequency of radiation induced malformations observed on day 8 of pregnancy as an index, relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 2.3-2.7 was obtained from the straight line obtained by modifying by the least squares method the frequency curves of malformed fetuses in total implants and in surviving fetuses. The types of malformations induced by Cf-252 and Co-60 irradiation were alike. Using fetal LD 50 as an index, 2.4 was obtained as RBE when irradiated on day 8 of pregnancy and 3.1 as that when irradiated on day 9. The results showed that Cf-252 had stronger a teratogenic effect than Co-60 gamma rays. (author)

  9. Experimental studies on californium bioavailability to marine benthic invertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.; Carvalho, F.P.; Aston, S.R.

    1986-01-01

    252 Cf is readily taken up by benthic invertebrates from sea water, reaching whole-body concentration factors of 763 in the polychaete Hermione hystrix, 220 in the shrimp Lysmata seticaudata, 665 in the crab Pilumnus hirtellus and 78 in the bivalve mollusc Venerupis decussata after 3 weeks exposure. Surface sorption plays a predominant role in the uptake process. Depuration in clean sea water was a relatively slow process. The shrimp Lysmata eliminated 252 Cf very rapidly due to moulting. Absorption coefficients for ingested 252 Cf were high, approx. 23% in crabs and approx. 97% in brittlestars. The absorbed fraction was excreted twice as fast from crabs as brittlestars. Exposure of organisms to labelled sediment resulted in low transfer factors that were species dependent. There is some evidence to suggest that uptake from sediments is primarily due to 252 Cf transfer from the pore water. Comparison of these results with published experimental data on other transuranic nuclides in the same or similar species suggests that californium bioavailability is roughly equivalent to that of plutonium and americium. (author)

  10. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1998-01-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact 252 Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with 252 Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of 252 Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a 252 Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded 252 Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy. (author)

  11. Proposed Californium-252 User Facility for Neutron Science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Laxson, R.R.; Knauer, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    The Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at ORNL has petitioned to establish a Californium-252 User Facility for Neutron Science for academic, industrial, and governmental researchers. The REDC Californium Facility (CF) stores the national inventory of sealed 252 Cf neutron source for university and research loans. Within the CF, the 252 Cf storage pool and two uncontaminated hot cells currently in service for the Californium Program will form the physical basis for the User Facility. Relevant applications include dosimetry and experiments for neutron tumor therapy; fast and thermal neutron activation analysis of materials; experimental configurations for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis; neutron shielding and material damage studies; and hardness testing of radiation detectors, cameras, and electronics. A formal User Facility simplifies working arrangements and agreements between US DOE facilities, academia, and commercial interests

  12. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact 252 Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with 252 Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of 252 Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a 252 Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded 252 Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy

  13. Two-Dimensional SnO Anodes with a Tunable Number of Atomic Layers for Sodium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Jiajie; Zhang, Daliang; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2017-01-01

    We have systematically changed the number of atomic layers stacked in 2D SnO nanosheet anodes and studied their sodium ion battery (SIB) performance. The results indicate that as the number of atomic SnO layers in a sheet decreases, both

  14. Comparison of effective atomic numbers of the cancerous and normal kidney tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    The effective atomic number (Z eff ) and electron density (N e ) of normal kidney and cancerous kidney have been computed for total and partial photon interactions by computing the molecular, atomic, and electronic cross section in the wide energy range of 1 keV-100 GeV using WinXCOM. The mean Z eff and N e of normal kidney and cancerous kidney in the various energy ranges and for total and partial photon interactions are tabulated. The variation of effective N e with energy is shown graphically for all photon interactions. In addition to this computer tomography (CT), numbers of normal kidney and cancerous kidney for photon interaction and energy absorption is also computed. The role of Z eff in the dual-energy dividing radiography is also discussed. The values of Z eff and N e for cancerous kidney are higher than normal kidney. This is due to the levels of elements K, Ca, Fe, Ni, and Se are lower and those of the elements Ti, Co, Zn, As, and Cd are higher in the cancer tissue of kidney than those observed in the normal tissue. The soft tissue and cancerous tissue are very similar, but their atomic number differs. The cancerous tissue exhibits a higher Z eff than the normal tissue. This fact helps in the dual-energy dividing radiography which enables to improve the diagnosis of the kidney cancer. Hence, the computed values may be useful in the diagnosis of the kidney cancer. CT numbers for normal kidney are higher than cancerous kidney. (author)

  15. Fragmented metastable states exist in an attractive bose-einstein condensate for atom numbers well above the critical number of the Gross-Pitaevskii theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Streltsov, Alexej I; Alon, Ofir E

    2008-02-01

    It is well known that attractive condensates do not posses a stable ground state in three dimensions. The widely used Gross-Pitaevskii theory predicts the existence of metastable states up to some critical number N(cr)(GP) of atoms. It is demonstrated here that fragmented metastable states exist for atom numbers well above N(cr)(GP). The fragments are strongly overlapping in space. The results are obtained and analyzed analytically as well as numerically. The implications are discussed.

  16. The influence of atomic number on the complex formation constants by visible spectrophotometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samin; Kris-Tri-Basuki; Farida-Ernawati

    1996-01-01

    The influence of atomic number on the complex formation constants and it's application by visible spectrophotometric method has been carried out. The complex compound have been made of Y, Nd, Sm and Gd with alizarin red sulfonic in the mole fraction range of 0.20 - 0.53 and pH range of 3.5 - 5. The optimum condition of complex formation was found in the mole fraction range of 0.30 - 0.53, range of pH 3.75 - 5, and the total concentration was 0.00030 M. It was found that the formation constant (β) of alizarin red S. complex by continued variation and matrix disintegration techniques were β : (7.00 ± 0.64).10 9 of complex 3 9γ,β : (4.09±0.34).10 8 of 6 0Nd, β : (7.26 ± 0.42).10 8 of 62 S m and β : (8.38 ± 0.70).10 8 of 64 G d. It can be concluded that the atomic number of Nd is bigger than Sm which is bigger than Gd. The atomic number of Y is the smallest. (39) and the complex formation constant is a biggest. The complex compound can be used for sample analysis with limit detection of Y : 2.2 .10 -5 M, Nd : 2.9 .10 -5 M, Sm : 2.6 .10 -5 M and Gd : 2.4 .10 -5 M. The sensitivity of analysis are Y>Gd>Sm>Nd. The Y 2 O 3 sample of product result from xenotime sand contains Y 2 O 3 : 98.96 ± 1.40 % and in the filtrate (product of monazite sand) contains Nd : 0.27 ± 0.002 M

  17. Efficiency of ablative plasma energy transfer into a massive aluminum target using different atomic number ablators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.; Chodukowski, T.; Kalinowska, Z.; Stepniewski, W.; Jach, K.; Swierczynski, R.; Renner, Oldřich; Šmíd, Michal; Ullschmied, Jiří; Cikhart, J.; Klír, D.; Kubeš, P.; Řezáč, K.; Krouský, Eduard; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Skála, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2015), s. 379-386 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14089 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : ablator atomic number * crater volume * laser energy transfer * plasma ablative pressure Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (UFP-V) Impact factor: 1.649, year: 2015

  18. The effective atomic number for gamma ray interactions with heavy metal oxide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2010-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), and the effective electron density, N-el,N-eff, have been calculated at photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV for CaO-SrO-B2O3, ZnO-PbO-B2O3, and CdO-PbO-B2O3 glasses with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials. Appreciable variations are noted...... glasses have gamma ray shielding properties comparable with standard shielding materials, such as concrete....

  19. Mechanical properties of cancer cells depend on number of passages: Atomic force microscopy indentation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokukin, Maxim E.; Guz, Natalia V.; Sokolov, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Here we investigate one of the key questions in cell biology, if the properties of cell lines depend on the number of passages in-vitro. It is generally assumed that the change of cell properties (phenotypic drift) is insignificant when the number of passages is low (cell body and parameters of the pericellular brush layer from indentation force curves, which are recorded by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using this method, we tested the change of the cell properties of human cancer breast epithelial cell line, MCF-7 (ATCC® HTB-22™), within the passages between 2 and 10. In contrast to the previous expectations, we observed a substantial transient change of the elastic modulus of the cell body during the first four passages (up to 4 times). The changes in the parameters of the pericellular coat were less dramatic (up to 2 times) but still statistically significant.

  20. Electron density and effective atomic number (Zeff) determination through x-ray Moiré deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Leiva, Maria Pia; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Talbot-Lau based Moiré deflectometry is a powerful density diagnostic capable of delivering refraction information and attenuation from a single image, through the accurate detection of X-ray phase-shift and intensity. The technique is able to accurately measure both the real part of the index of refraction δ (directly related to electron density) and the attenuation coefficient μ of an object placed in the x-ray beam. Since the atomic number Z (or Zeff for a composite sample) is proportional to these quantities, an elemental map of the effective atomic number can be obtained with the ratio of the phase and the absorption image. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest in various fields of HED research such as shocked materials and ICF experiments as Zeff is linked, by definition, to the x-ray absorption properties of a specific material. This work is supported by U.S. DoE/NNSA Grant No. 435 DENA0001835.

  1. Advances in low atomic number element analysis by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrebos, B.

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, the analysis of low atomic number has been a chal1enging task for wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Among the most important factors influencing analysis of the low atomic number elements (from Z=11 downwards) are the fluorescence yield, absorption and the dispersion. The effect of each of these factors on the overall performance will be illustrated. The long wavelengths involved (longer than I nm) used to pose severe problems concerning the monochromator used. Early instruments relied on lead stearate or Blodgett Langmuir soap films for the diffraction of the characteristic radiation. Nowadays, synthetic multilayers are commonly used. The performance of these multilayers is determined by the reflectivity, the resolution and the absorption of the characteristic radiation to be diffracted. These parameters can be optimised by adequately selecting the composition of the materials involved. The sensitivity of the modem instruments is sufficient to allow quantitative analysis. However, this aspect of WDS XRF is still met with considerable scepticism. Examples of quantitative analysis will be given to illustrate the current capability

  2. Effective atomic numbers (Z_e_f_f) of based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes Zenobio, Madelon Aparecida; Gonçalves Zenobio, Elton; Silva, Teógenes Augusto da; Socorro Nogueira, Maria do

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the interaction of radiation parameters of four biomaterials as attenuators to measure the transmitted X-rays spectra, the mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number by spectrometric system comprising the CdTe detector. The biomaterial BioOss"® presented smaller mean energy than the other biomaterials. The μ/ρ and Z_e_f_f of the biomaterials showed their dependence on photon energy. The data obtained from analytical methods of x-ray spectra, µ/ρ and Z_e_f_f_, using biomaterials as attenuators, demonstrated that these materials could be used as substitutes for dentin, enamel and bone. Further, they are determinants for the characterization of the radiation in tissues or equivalent materials. - Highlights: • Measure of the transmitted x-rays spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials as attenuators. • Determination effective atomic number using four dental biomaterials. • Determination of the mass attenuation coefficient (µ/ρ) of the biomaterials samples calculated by the WinXCOM software. • Determination of the chemical composition of calcium phosphate biomaterials.

  3. Calculation of radiation attenuation coefficients, effective atomic numbers and electron densities for some building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damla, N.; Baltas, H.; Celik, A.; Kiris, E.; Cevik, U.

    2008-01-01

    Some building materials, regularly used in Turkey, such as sand, cement, gas concrete (lightweight, aerated concrete), tile and brick, have been investigated in terms of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic, numbers (Z eff ), effective electron densities (N e ) and photon interaction cross section (σ a ) at 14 different energies from 81- to 1332-keV gamma-ray energies. The gamma rays were detected by using gamma-ray spectroscopy, a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Mass attenuation coefficients of these samples have been compared with tabulations based upon the results of WinXcom. The theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were estimated using the mixture rule and the experimental values of investigated parameters were compared with the calculated values. The agreement of measured values of mass attenuation coefficient, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and photon interaction cross section with the theory has been found to be quite satisfactory. (authors)

  4. Studies on effective atomic number, electron density and kerma for some fatty acids and carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2008-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z eff , the effective electron density, N el , and kerma have been calculated for some fatty acids and carbohydrates for photon interaction in the extended energy range from 1 keV to 100 GeV using an accurate database of photon-interaction cross sections and the WinXCom program. The significant variation of Z eff and N el is due to the variations in the dominance of different interaction processes in different energy regions. The maximum values of Z eff and N el are found in the low-energy range, where photoelectric absorption is the main interaction process. The minimum values of Z eff and N el are found at intermediate energies, typically 0.05 MeV eff is equal to the mean atomic number of the bio-molecule. Wherever possible, the calculations are compared with experimental results. A comparison is also made with the single values of the Z eff and N el provided by the program XMuDat. It is also observed that carbohydrates have a larger kerma than fatty acids in the low-energy region, where photoelectric absorption dominates. In contrast, fatty acids have a larger kerma than carbohydrates in the MeV range, where Compton scattering is the main interaction process. (note)

  5. Calculation of the number of atoms displaced during the irradiation of monolayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel Codorniu Pujals; Yuri Aguilera Corrales; Francesco Baldassarre

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of monolayer graphene, combined with chemical functionalization, could be an effective method for modifying its electronic structure and for achieving specific physical properties adjusted to different applications. A difficulty arising during planning and studying the irradiation in this system is that many of the models of interaction of the radiation with the substance cannot be applied to the two-dimensional structure of graphene. In particular, the mathematical expressions available to calculate the number of atoms displaced during the bombardment with particles can be applied only to 3D isotropic solids. In the present work, an alternative analytic expression is presented for the irradiation of graphene with heavy ions or with protons and other light charged particles. The expression was obtained on the basis of the classic theory of dispersion, using a Coulomb potential for the light charged particles and one of Inverse Square for heavy ions. For medium values of the energy of the incident particle a decreasing dependence of the number of displaced atoms with energy is obtained. This behavior, related with the two-dimensional structure of the target, had been observed in other authors' works using computational simulation. (author)

  6. Critical radius and critical number of gas atoms for cavities containing a Van der Waals gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, W.A.; Mansur, L.K.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of gas on void nucleation and growth is particularly important for structural materials in fusion reactors because of the high production of helium by neutron-induced transmutation reactions. Gas reduces the critical radius for bias driven growth and there is a critical number of gas atoms, n/sub g/*, at which the critical radius is reduced essentially to zero. The significance of this is that the time interval to the accumulation of n/sub g/* gas atoms may determine the time to the onset of bias driven swelling where n/sub g/* is large. In previous papers these critical quantities were given for an ideal gas. Recently, we presented the results for a Van der Waals gas. Here the derivation of these relations is presented and further results of calculations are given. At low temperatures (high pressures) the results depart from those of the ideal gas, with the critical number affected more strongly than the critical radius. Comparisons are made with earlier calculations

  7. X-ray-diffraction study of californium metal to 16 GPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.; Benedict, U.; Dufour, C.; Birkel, I.; Haire, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    The first series of measurements to determine the structural behavior of californium (Cf) metal under pressure has been carried out. The initial dhcp structure transformed sluggishly with increasing pressure to a fcc structure. A bulk modulus of 50(5) GPa was derived for dhcp Cf metal from the relative volume (V/V 0 ) data to 10 GPa

  8. Study of the shielding for spontaneous fission sources of Californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davila R, I.

    1991-06-01

    A shielding study is made to attenuate, until maximum permissible levels, the neutrons radiation and photons emitted by spontaneous fission coming from a source of Californium-252. The compound package by a database (Library DLC-23) and the ANISNW code is used, in it version for personal computer. (Author)

  9. Assessment of the neutron component in a neutron-gamma field of a californium-252 source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetteh, G.K.

    1978-12-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the percentages of the different components in the radiation field of californium-252 which has now some clinical applications. Using Rossi Chambers in conjunction with absorption investigations involving lead and aluminium thimbles, it is observed that the dose rates due to the different components are: neutrons 54%; gammas 30%; betas 16%

  10. System and process for determining the basis weight of a low atomic number material in a mixture with a higher atomic number material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegland, P.; Dahlquist, J.

    1985-01-01

    A process for determining the relative quantity of low atomic energy material mixed with a higher atomic energy material is carried out by directing a first and second beam of x-rays into the mixture. The process includes transmitting x-rays directly to detectors to set one criterion, shielding the detectors from the x-ray sources to set another criterion and then passing samples of known relative composition to provide data for storage and calibration carrying out the process of mixtures to be measured

  11. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  12. Combustor exhaust-emissions and blowout-limits with diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels utilizing air-atomizing and pressure-atomizing nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of fuel properties on exhaust emissions and blowout limits of a high-pressure combustor segment is evaluated using a splash-groove air-atomizing fuel injector and a pressure-atomizing simplex fuel nozzle to burn both diesel number 2 and Jet A fuels. Exhaust emissions and blowout data are obtained and compared on the basis of the aromatic content and volatility of the two fuels. Exhaust smoke number and emission indices for oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons are determined for comparison. As compared to the pressure-atomizing nozzle, the air-atomizing nozzle is found to reduce nitrogen oxides by 20%, smoke number by 30%, carbon monoxide by 70%, and unburned hydrocarbons by 50% when used with diesel number 2 fuel. The higher concentration of aromatics and lower volatility of diesel number 2 fuel as compared to Jet A fuel appears to have the most detrimental effect on exhaust emissions. Smoke number and unburned hydrocarbons are twice as high with diesel number 2 as with Jet A fuel.

  13. Systematic measurements of opacity dependence on temperature, density, and atomic number at stellar interior conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Taisuke

    2017-10-01

    Model predictions for iron opacity are notably different from measurements performed at matter conditions similar to the boundary between the solar radiation and convection zones. The calculated iron opacities have narrower spectral lines, weaker quasi-continuum at short wavelength, and deeper opacity windows than the measurements. If correct, these measurements help resolve a decade old problem in solar physics. A key question is therefore: What is responsible for the model-data discrepancy? The answer is complex because the experiments are challenging and opacity theories depend on multiple entangled physical processes such as the influence of completeness and accuracy of atomic states, line broadening, contributions from myriad transitions from excited states, and multi-photon absorption processes. To help determine the cause of this discrepancy, a systematic study of opacity variation with temperature, density, and atomic number is underway. Measurements of chromium, iron, and nickel opacities have been performed at two different temperatures and densities. The collection of measured opacities provides constraints on hypotheses to explain the discrepancy. We will discuss implications of measured opacities, experimental errors, and possible opacity model refinements. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA0003525.

  14. Concept of effective atomic number and effective mass density in dual-energy X-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, Anne; Duvauchelle, Philippe; Kaftandjian, Valérie; Ponard, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on dual-energy X-ray computed tomography and especially the decomposition of the measured attenuation coefficient in a mass density and atomic number basis. In particular, the concept of effective atomic number is discussed. Although the atomic number is well defined for chemical elements, the definition of an effective atomic number for any compound is not an easy task. After reviewing different definitions available in literature, a definition related to the method of measurement and X-ray energy, is suggested. A new concept of effective mass density is then introduced in order to characterize material from dual-energy computed tomography. Finally, this new concept and definition are applied on a simulated case, focusing on explosives identification in luggage

  15. Modification of diode characteristics by electron back-scatter from high-atomic-number anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.; Rose, D.V.; Swanekamp, S.B.

    1996-01-01

    In high-power vacuum diodes with high-atomic-number anodes, back-scattered electrons alter the vacuum space charge and resulting electron and ion currents. Electron multiple back-scattering was studied through equilibrium solutions of the Poisson equation for 1-dimensional, bipolar diodes in order to predict their early-time behavior. Before ion turn-on, back-scattered electrons from high-Z anodes suppress the diode current by about 10%. After ion turn-on in the same diodes, electron back-scatter leads to substantial enhancements of both the electron and ion currents above the Child-Langmuir values. Current enhancements with ion flow from low-Z anodes are small. (author). 5 figs., 7 refs

  16. X-ray spectrum determination of elements with low atomic number with use of electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, V.N.

    1982-01-01

    Separate assemblies of a commercial analytical electron microscope-microanalyzer EMMA-2 have been modified to study objects, containing elements with the atomic number Z=5-9, in particular: 1) the range of changing the accelerating voltages is expanded to be in the range of 25 down to 10 kV with 5 kV interval. 2) image intensifier using microchannel plate MKP-40-19 is applied; 3) for elements of carbon, oxygen, boron, nitrogen type a unit with flow-type proportional counter is used. The sensitivity of carbon- and oxygen determination in carbides and oxides is 0.15-0.3% at the measurement time of 100 s. Results of microanalysis of the particles of B 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 C, WC for the contents of oxygen and carbon are presented

  17. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C. [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Poletti, M.E., E-mail: poletti@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90{sup o} (x=0.99 A{sup -1}). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Z{sub eff} of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  18. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C.; Poletti, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90 o (x=0.99 A -1 ). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Z eff ) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Z eff of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  19. Methodology for attainment of density and effective atomic number through dual energy technique using microtomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, H.; Lima, I.; Lopes, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Dual energy technique for computerized microtomography shows itself as a promising method for identification of mineralogy on geological samples of heterogeneous composition. It can also assist with differentiating very similar objects regarding the attenuation coefficient, which are usually not separable during image processing and analysis of microtomographic data. Therefore, the development of a feasible and applicable methodology of dual energy in the analysis of microtomographic images was sought. - Highlights: • Dual energy technique is promising for identification of distribution of minerals. • A feasible methodology of dual energy in analysis of tomographic images was sought. • The dual energy technique is efficient for density and atomic number identification. • Simulation showed that the proposed methodology agrees with theoretical data. • Nondestructive characterization of distribution of density and chemical composition

  20. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceição, A. L. C.; Poletti, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90° ( x=0.99 Å -1). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number ( Zeff) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Zeff of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon ( Z=6) and oxygen ( Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  1. Internal conversion coefficients for atomic numbers Z less than or equal to 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, I.M.; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.; Listengarten, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    Presented here are internal conversion coefficients (ICC) of gamma rays for 20 values of atomic number, Z, in the range 3 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 30, including all Z greater than or equal to 14. The tables provide the previously missing data for light elements. Coefficients are given for 19 values of gamma-ray transition energies up to 6 MeV for the K-electron shell and 18 values up to 2 MeV for three L-subshells. The minimum enegy is 15 keV. The first five electric and magnetic nuclear transition multipolarities are covered. The calculations are relativistic, with screening and finite nuclear size effect taken into account

  2. Modification of diode characteristics by electron back-scatter from high-atomic-number anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, D; Cooperstein, G [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Rose, D V; Swanekamp, S B [JAYCOR, Vienna, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In high-power vacuum diodes with high-atomic-number anodes, back-scattered electrons alter the vacuum space charge and resulting electron and ion currents. Electron multiple back-scattering was studied through equilibrium solutions of the Poisson equation for 1-dimensional, bipolar diodes in order to predict their early-time behavior. Before ion turn-on, back-scattered electrons from high-Z anodes suppress the diode current by about 10%. After ion turn-on in the same diodes, electron back-scatter leads to substantial enhancements of both the electron and ion currents above the Child-Langmuir values. Current enhancements with ion flow from low-Z anodes are small. (author). 5 figs., 7 refs.

  3. Robust determination of effective atomic numbers for electron interactions with TLD-100 and TLD-100H thermoluminescent dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) are the most commonly implemented for clinical dosimetry. The small physical magnitude of TLDs makes them attractive for applications such as small field measurement, in vivo dosimetry and measurement of out-of-field doses to critical structures. The most broadly used TLD is TLD-100 (LiF:Mg,Ti) and, for applications requiring higher sensitivity to low-doses, TLD-100H (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) is frequently employed. The radiological properties of these TLDs are therefore of significant interest. For the first time, in this study effective atomic numbers for radiative, collisional and total electron interaction processes are calculated for TLD-100 and TLD-100H dosimeters over the energy range 1 keV-100 MeV. This is undertaken using a robust, energy-dependent method of calculation rather than typical power-law approximations. The influence of dopant concentrations and unwanted impurities is also investigated. The two TLDs exhibit similar effective atomic numbers, ranging from approximately 5.77-6.51. Differences arising from the different dopants are most pronounced in low-energy radiative effects. The TLDs have atomic numbers approximately 1.48-2.06 times that of water. The effective atomic number of TLD-100H is consistently higher than that of TLD-100 over a broad energy range, due to the greater influence of the higher-Z dopants on the electron interaction cross sections. Typical variation in dopant concentration does not significantly influence the effective atomic number. The influence on TLD-100H is comparatively more pronounced than that on TLD-100. Contrariwise, unwanted hydroxide impurities influence TLD-100 more than TLD-100H. The effective atomic number is a key parameter that influences the radiological properties and energy response of TLDs. Although many properties of these TLDs have been studied rigorously, as yet there has been no investigation of their effective atomic numbers for electron interactions. The

  4. Radiation Build-Up Of High Energy Gamma In Shielding Of High Atomic Number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuliati, Helfi; Akhadi, Mukhlis

    2000-01-01

    Research to observe effect of radiation build-up factor (b) in iron (Fe) and lead (Pb) for high energy gamma shielding from exp.137 Cs (E gamma : 662 keV) and exp.60 Co (E gamma : 1332 keV) sources has been carried out. Research was conducted bt counting of radiation intensity behind shielding with its thickness vary from 1 to 5 times of half value thickness (HVT). NaI (TI) detector which connected to multi channel analyzer (MCA) was used for the counting. Calculation result show that all of b value are near to 1 (b∼1) both for Fe and Pb. Without inserting b in calculation, from the experiment it was obtained HVT value of Fe for high gamma radiation of 662 and 1332 keV were : (12,94 n 0,03) mm and (17,33 n 0,01) mm with their deviation standards were 0,2% and 0,06% respectively. Value of HVT for Pb with the same energy were : (6,31 n 0,03) mm and (11,86 n 0,03) mm with their deviation standars were : 0,48% and 0,25% respectively. HVL concept could be applied directly to estimate shielding thickness of high atomic number of high energy gamma radiation, without inserting correction of radiation build-up factor

  5. Importance of the effective atomic number (Zeff) of TL materials for radiation dosimetry in clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, P.R.

    2008-01-01

    The electric power generation, it has been one of the radiation applications of bigger weight, mainly in developed countries. Another sector of more impact is without a doubt that of the medicine. However, for a sure operation with radiations, those international organisms of radiological safety, exist every time more precise detection systems. The thermoluminescent dosimetry is one of the more reliable methods for this purpose, for that several groups of investigators from different parts of the world, they have guided its investigations in the development of new TL materials. However, to avoid underestimate or overestimation of the measured dose with the use of these materials, it should take into account it effective atomic number (Z eff ) it is well known that some TL materials considered as equivalent to the tissue, presents smaller TL intensity when being irradiated with low energy photons, while the TL material known as not equivalent to the tissue, they present the supra sensitivity effect for this radiation type. Nowadays, the estimate of the Z eff has not been clear, in this work the Z eff is determined by means of the traditional methods and an own method is presented for its determination. The results of the TL signal of different materials, when being irradiated with photons of effective energy between 24 keV and 1.25 MeV and their relationship with their calculated Z eff are also presented. (Author)

  6. Variation of the binary encounter peak energy as a function of projectile atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The energy of the binary encounter peak, in spectra of electrons emitted at 0 degrees with respect to the projectile beam direction, has been studied to investigate its dependence on the atomic number of the projectile ion. The projectiles all had the same squared velocity of 0.6 MeV/u, and all had the same charge q=7. The Z of the projectiles ranged from 8 to 35, and the target was H 2 . The Energy E BEP of the binary encounter peak and also the energy t of the cusp formed by electron loss or electron capture to the projectile continuum (ELC or ECC) were obtained from fits to the spectra. Considerable care was required in fitting the cusp in order to properly ascertain the cusp energy. The energy shift ΔE, defined as the difference between 4t and E BEP , was obtained for each projectile. It is found that the energy shift decreases as the projectile Z increases. This trend is the opposite of that seen for projectile charge where the shift increases as q increases. Such a trend is not well described by the simple elastic scattering model of binary encounter electron production

  7. Charge states of fast heavy ions in solids; target atomic number dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shima, Kunihiro

    1985-01-01

    Discussions were carried out on the origin of Z 2 (atomic number) dependent charge states with respect to projectile electron loss and capture process, and on relationship between the Z 2 dependence and that of mean charge states for heavy ions of 1 MeV/u energy region. Present and previously reported results were examined on the equilibrium charge distributions, 9-bar, of 120 MeV 63 Cu, 25 and 40 MeV 35 Cl, 109 MeV Si and 59 MeV F ions. It was clarified that 9-bar became generally higher for lower Z 2 depending on increasing energy, and osillatory behavior with energy-depending amplitude was seen in 9-bar vs Z 2 . Discussions were carrid out on these phenomena and related matters. Z 2 oscillations of 9-bar of fast heavy ions might be due to those of electron capture cross section into projectile K and L vacancies for high and intermediate charge states, respectively. A quantitative interpretation of the Z 2 -dependent 9-bar values is in progress based on collision process and observation of projectile x-ray. The 9-bar value dependency on Z 2 in ion passing foils and decrease of Z 2 oscillation amplitude with increasing collision energy were quite similar to the Z 2 dependence in stopping powers or in effective charge states estimated from stopping powers. But there was some discrepancies in the Z 2 oscillation of 9-bar and that of stopping powers. (Takagi, S.)

  8. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  9. An Estimation of the Number and Size of Atoms in a Printed Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Beth; Collett, Edward; Tabor-Morris, Anne; Croman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Elementary school students learn that atoms are very, very small. Students are also taught that atoms (and molecules) are the fundamental constituents of the material world. Numerical values of their size are often given, but, nevertheless, it is difficult to imagine their size relative to one's everyday surroundings. In order for students to…

  10. Direct reconstruction of the effective atomic number of materials by the method of multi-energy radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naydenov, Sergey V.; Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Smith, Craig F.

    2004-01-01

    A direct method is proposed for reconstruction of the effective atomic number by means of multi-energy radiography of the material. The accuracy of the method is up to 95%. Advantages over conventional radiographic methods, which ensure accuracy of just about 50%, are discussed. A physical model has been constructed and general expressions have been obtained for description of the effective atomic number in a two-energy monitoring scheme. A universal dependence has been predicted for the effective atomic number as a function of relative (two-energy) radiographic reflex. The established theoretical law is confirmed by the experimental data presented. The proposed development can find multiple applications in non-destructive testing and related fields, including those in the civil sphere as well as anti-terrorist activities

  11. Direct reconstruction of the effective atomic number of materials by the method of multi-energy radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naydenov, Sergey V.; Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Smith, Craig F.

    2004-02-01

    A direct method is proposed for reconstruction of the effective atomic number by means of multi-energy radiography of the material. The accuracy of the method is up to 95%. Advantages over conventional radiographic methods, which ensure accuracy of just about 50%, are discussed. A physical model has been constructed and general expressions have been obtained for description of the effective atomic number in a two-energy monitoring scheme. A universal dependence has been predicted for the effective atomic number as a function of relative (two-energy) radiographic reflex. The established theoretical law is confirmed by the experimental data presented. The proposed development can find multiple applications in non-destructive testing and related fields, including those in the civil sphere as well as anti-terrorist activities.

  12. Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company californium multiplier/delayed neutron counter safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmer, W.H.

    1976-08-01

    The Californium Multiplier (CFX) is a subcritical assembly of uranium surrounding 252 Cf spontaneously fissioning neutron sources; its function is to multiply the neutron flux to a level useful for activation analysis. This document summarizes the safety analysis aspects of the CFX, DNC, pneumatic transfer system, and instrumentation and to detail all the aspects of the total facility as a starting point for the ARHCO Safety Analysis Review. Recognized hazards and steps already taken to neutralize them are itemized

  13. Instrumental neutron activation determination of gold in mineral raw materials using a californium neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilo, N.A.; Ippolitov, E.G.; Ivanenko, V.V.; Kustov, B.N.; Zheleznov, V.V.; Aristov, G.N.; Kovalenko, V.V.; Kondrat'ev, N.B.

    1983-01-01

    A facility using a californium neutron source and a method for the neutron activation analysis of gold were developed. The sensitivity of the determination is 0.1 g/t. The causes of random and systematic errors have been studied. It is concluded that in prospection and evaluation of gold ore deposists, the traditional test tube analysis for gold may be replaced with the developed method. (author)

  14. Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU Californium Shipping Container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, W.D.; Shappert, L.B.; Seagren, R.D.; Klima, B.B.; Jurgensen, M.C.; Hammond, C.R.; Watson, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical evaluation of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU Californium Shipping Container was made in order to demonstrate its compliance with the regulations governing off-site shipment of packages that contain radioactive material. The evaluation encompassed five primary categories: structural integrity, thermal resistance, radiation shielding, nuclear criticality safety, and quality assurance. The results of this evaluation demonstrate that the container complies with the applicable regulations

  15. Spectroscopic and redox properties of curium and californium ions in concentrated aqueous carbonate-bicarbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobart, D.E.; Varlashkin, P.G.; Samhoun, K.; Haire, R.G.; Peterson, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Multimilligram quantities of trivalent curium-248 and californium-249 were investigated by absorption spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and bulk solution electrolysis in concentrated aqueous carbonate-bicarbonate solution. Actinide concentrations between 10 -4 and 10 -2 M were studied in 2 M sodium carbonate and 5.5 M potassium carbonate solutions at pH values from 8 to 14. The solution absorption spectra of Cm(III) and Cf(III) in carbonate media are presented for the first time and compared to literature spectra of these species in noncomplexing aqueous solution. It was anticipated that carbonate complexation of the actinide ions could provide a sufficient negative shift in the formal potentials of the M(IV)/M(III) couples of Cm and Cf to permit the generation and stabilization of their tetravalent states in aqueous carbonate-bicarbonate medium. No conclusive evidence was found in the present work to indicate the existence of any higher oxidation states of curium or californium in carbonate solution. Some possible reasons for our inability to generate and detect oxidized species of curium and californium in this medium are discussed

  16. The effective atomic number revisited in the light of modern photon-interaction cross-section databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Thind, K.S.; Gerward, L.

    2010-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z eff , has been calculated for fatty acids and cysteine. It is shown that Z eff is a useful parameter for low-Z materials at any energy above 1 keV. Absorption edges of medium-Z elements may complicate the energy dependence of Z eff below 10 keV. The notion of Z eff is perhaps most useful at energies where Compton scattering is dominating, and where Z eff is equal to the mean atomic number, , over a wide energy range around 1 MeV.

  17. The effective atomic number revisited in the light of modern photon-interaction cross-section databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Thind, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), has been calculated for fatty acids and cysteine. It is shown that Z(eff) is a useful parameter for low-Z materials at any energy above 1 key. Absorption edges of medium-Z elements may complicate the energy dependence of Z(eff) below 10 key. The notion of Z......(eff) is perhaps most useful at energies where Compton scattering is dominating, and where Z(eff) is equal to the mean atomic number, , over a wide energy range around 1 MeV....

  18. Does the number of nitrogen atoms have an influence on the conducting properties of diphenylazines? A DFT insight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moral, Monica; Granadino-Roldan, Jose Manuel; Garzon, Andres; Garcia, Gregorio; Fernandez-Gomez, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Planarity and aromaticity increase when increasing the number of N atoms. → HOMO → LUMO excitation energy decreases when increasing the number of N atoms. → AEA increases stepwise with the number of N atoms up to 1.51 eV for Ph 2 Tz. → Ph 2 Tz becomes the best candidate of the series in terms of electron injection. → Ph 2 T N3 seems to be the best candidate in terms of electron transport. - Abstract: The present study reports on the variation of some structural and electronic properties related to the electron conductivity for the series of diphenylazines represented by the formula Ph-(C 2+n N 4-n H n )-Ph, n = 0 - 4. Properties such as planarity, aromaticity, HOMO → LUMO excitation energy, electron affinity, LUMO level energy, reorganization energy and electron coupling between neighboring molecules in the crystal were analyzed from a theoretical perspective as a function of the number of nitrogen atoms in the molecular structure. As a result, the planarity, aromaticity and electron affinity increase with the number of N atoms in the central ring while the HOMO → LUMO excitation energy and LUMO levels diminish. It is worth noting that up to n = 3, the frontier orbitals appear delocalized throughout the whole system while for n = 4 the localized character of the LUMO might explain the increase in the reorganization energy and thus the higher difficulty to delocalize the excess of negative charge. Electron coupling between neighboring molecules was also estimated on the basis of the energy splitting in dimer method and the reported crystal structures for some of the studied molecules. Accordingly, the highest |t 12 | value was obtained for Ph 2 T N3 (0.06 eV) while Ph 2 Tz should be the most advantageous candidate of the series in terms of electron injection.

  19. Convenient method of simultaneously analyzing aluminum and magnesium in pharmaceutical dosage forms using californium-252 thermal neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landolt, R.R.; Hem, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    A commercial antacid suspension containing aluminum hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide products was used as a model sample to study the use of a californium-252 thermal neutron activation as a method for quantifying aluminum content as well as for the simultaneous assay of aluminum and magnesium. A 3.5-micrograms californium-252 source was used for the activation, and the induced aluminum-28 and magnesium-27 activity was simultaneously measured by sodium iodide crystal gamma-ray spectrometry using dual single-channel analyzers and scalers. The antacid suspension was contained in a chamber designed with the unique capability of serving as the container for counting the induced radioactivity in addition to being the irradiation chamber itself. This pilot study demonstrated that use of more intense californium-252 sources, which are commonly available, would provide a method that is competitive with the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid titration method in precision and in other aspects as well

  20. Determination of the number density of excited and ground Zn atoms during rf magnetron sputtering of ZnO target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maaloul, L.; Gangwar, R. K.; Stafford, L., E-mail: luc.stafford@umontreal.ca [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    A combination of optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) and optical emission spectroscopy measurements was used to monitor the number density of Zn atoms in excited 4s4p ({sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable states as well as in ground 4s{sup 2} ({sup 1}S{sub 0}) state in a 5 mTorr Ar radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering plasma used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. OAS measurements revealed an increase by about one order of magnitude of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms by varying the self-bias voltage on the ZnO target from −115 to −300 V. Over the whole range of experimental conditions investigated, the triplet-to-singlet metastable density ratio was 5 ± 1, which matches the statistical weight ratio of these states in Boltzmann equilibrium. Construction of a Boltzmann plot using all Zn I emission lines in the 200–500 nm revealed a constant excitation temperature of 0.33 ± 0.04 eV. In combination with measured populations of Zn {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} metastable atoms, this temperature was used to extrapolate the absolute number density of ground state Zn atoms. The results were found to be in excellent agreement with those obtained previously by actinometry on Zn atoms using Ar as the actinometer gas [L. Maaloul and L. Stafford, J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 31, 061306 (2013)]. This set of data was then correlated to spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements of the deposition rate of Zn atoms on a Si substrate positioned at 12 cm away from the ZnO target. The deposition rate scaled linearly with the number density of Zn atoms. In sharp contrast with previous studies on RF magnetron sputtering of Cu targets, these findings indicate that metastable atoms play a negligible role on the plasma deposition dynamics of Zn-based coatings.

  1. X-ray fluorescence from the element with atomic number Z=120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fregeau, M.O.; Morjean, M.; Bonnet, E.; Chbihi, A.; Frankland, J.D.; Jacquet, D.; Rivet, M.F.; Tassan-Got, L.; Dechery, F.; Drouart, A.; Nalpas, L.; Ledoux, X.; Parlog, M.; Parlog, M.; Ciortea, C.; Dumitriu, D.; Fluerasu, D.; Gugiu, M.; Gramegna, F.; Kravchuk, V.L.; Marchi, T.; Marchi, T.; Fabris, D.; Corsi, A.; Barlini, S.

    2012-01-01

    An atomic clock based on x-ray fluorescence yields has been used to estimate the mean characteristic time for fusion followed by fission in reactions 238 U + 64 Ni at 6.6 MeV/A. Inner shell vacancies are created during the collisions in the electronic structure of the possibly formed Z = 120 compound nuclei. The filling of these vacancies accompanied by a x-ray emission with energies characteristic of Z = 120 can take place only if the atomic transitions occur before nuclear fission. Therefore, the x-ray yield characteristic of the united atom with 120 protons is strongly related to the fission time and to the vacancy lifetimes. K x rays from the element with Z = 120 have been unambiguously identified from a coupled analysis of the involved nuclear reaction mechanisms and of the measured photon spectra. A minimum mean fission time τ f = 2.5 * 10 -18 s has been deduced for Z = 120 from the measured x-ray multiplicity. (authors)

  2. Effective atomic numbers in some food materials and medicines for γ -ray attenuation using ^{137}Cs γ -ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revathy, J. S.; Anooja, J.; Krishnaveni, R. B.; Gangadathan, M. P.; Varier, K. M.

    2018-06-01

    A light-weight multichannel analyser (MCA)-based γ -ray spectrometer, developed earlier at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, has been used as part of the PG curriculum, to determine the effective atomic numbers for γ attenuation of ^{137}Cs γ -ray in different types of samples. The samples used are mixtures of graphite, aluminum and selenium powders in different proportions, commercial and home-made edible powders, fruit and vegetable juices as well as certain allopathic and ayurvedic medications. A narrow beam good geometry set-up has been used in the experiments. The measured attenuation coefficients have been used to extract effective atomic numbers in the samples. The results are consistent with XCOM values wherever available. The present results suggest that the γ attenuation technique can be used as an effective non-destructive method for finding adulteration of food materials.

  3. Effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities for trommel sieve waste and some commonly used building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, M.; Canimkurbey, B.; Coban, M.; Ayguen, M.; Erzeneoglu, S. Z.

    2010-01-01

    Trommel sieve waste and some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) have been investigated in terms of effective atomic numbers (Z e ff) and effective electron densities (N e ) by using X- and γ- rays at 22.1, 25 and 88 keV photon energies. A high resolution Si(Li) detector was employed to detect X- and/or γ- radiation coming through in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. Chemical compositions of the materials used in the present study were determined using a wave length dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). The variations in photon interaction parameters were discussed regarding the photon energy and chemical composition. The experimental values of effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities were compared with the ones obtained from theory.

  4. Determination of atomic number and composition of human enamel; Determinacao da composicao e numero atomico efetivo do esmalte humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, M.S. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN), Recife, PE (Brazil); Rodas Duran, J.E. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2001-07-01

    The teeth are organs of complicated structure that consist, partly, of hard tissue containing in its interior the dental pulp, rich in vases and nerves. The main mass of the tooth is constituted by the dentine, which is covered with hard tissues and of epithelial origin called enamel. The dentine of the human teeth used in this work were completely removed and the teeth were cut with a device with a diamond disc. In this work the chemical composition of the human enamel was determined, which showed a high percentage of Ca and P, in agreement with the results found in the literature. The effective atomic number of the material and the half-value layer in the energy range of diagnostic X-ray beams were determined. Teeth could be used to evaluated the public's individual doses as well as for retrospective dosimetry what confirms the importance of their effective atomic number and composition determination. (author)

  5. Measurement of californium-252 gamma photons depth dose distribution in tissue equivalent material. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadel, M A; El-Fiki, M A; Eissa, H M; Abdel-Hafez, A; Naguib, S H [National Institute of Standards, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Phantom of tissue equivalent material with and without bone was used measuring depth dose distribution of gamma-rays from californium-252 source. The source was positioned at center of perspex walled phantom. Depth dose measurements were recorded for X, Y and Z planes at different distances from source. TLD 700 was used for measuring the dose distribution. Results indicate that implantation of bone in tissue equivalent medium cause changes in the gamma depth dose distribution which varies according to variation in bone geometry. 9 figs.

  6. Measurements of integral cross sections in the californium-252 fission neutron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberts, W.G.; Guenther, E.; Matzke, M.; Rassl, G.

    1977-01-01

    In a low-scattering arrangement cross sections averaged over the californium-252 spontaneous fission neutron spectrum were measured. The reactions 27 Al(n,α) 46 Ti, 47 Ti, 48 Ti(n,p), 54 Fe, 56 Fe(n,p), 58 Ni(n,p), 64 Zn(n,p), 115 In(n,n') were studied in order to obtain a consistent set of threshold detectors used in fast neutron flux density measurements. Overall uncertainties between 2 and 2.5% could be achieved; corrections due to neutron scattering in source and samples are discussed

  7. Californium oxygen system for 1.50 < O/Cf < 1.72

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, R.P.; Haire, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    The californium-oxygen system was studied as a function of temperature, oxygen pressure, and stoichiometry by manometric and x-ray diffraction methods. The results establish rhombohedral Cf 7 O 12 as the stable compound obtained by heating Cf 2 O 3 in air. The isobaric oxidation-reduction cycles Cf 2 O 3 → Cf 7 O 12 → Cf 2 O 3 , observed in constant rate of heating (cooling) experiments, occur with large hysteresis. A close parallel to other fluorite related lanthanide and actinide oxide systems is established. (auth)

  8. Possible stabilization of the tetravalent oxidation state of berkelium and californium in acetonitrile with triphenylarsine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, G.F.; Peterson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    It appears that we may have prepared Bk(IV) nitrate.nTPAs0 and Bk(IV) perchlorate.nTPAs0 complexes which formed the corresponding Cf(IV) complexes through the beta decay of Bk-249. Definitive proof should come from similar experiments with quantities of Bk-249 large enough to allow spectrophotometric detection of the characteristic f→f transitions in these berkelium and californium species. It is clear, however, that TPAs0 and acetonitrile can play a pivotal role in the stabilization of lanact(IV) species

  9. Determination of the Rb atomic number density in dense rubidium vapors by absorption measurements of Rb2 triplet bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvatic, Vlasta; Veza, Damir; Niemax, Kay; Vadla, Cedomil

    2008-01-01

    A simple and accurate way of determining atom number densities in dense rubidium vapors is presented. The method relies on the experimental finding that the reduced absorption coefficients of the Rb triplet satellite bands between 740 nm and 750 nm and the triplet diffuse band between 600 nm and 610 nm are not temperature dependent in the range between 600 K and 800 K. Therefore, the absolute values of the reduced absorption coefficients of these molecular bands can provide accurate information about atomic number density of the vapor. The rubidium absorption spectrum was measured by spatially resolved white-light absorption in overheated rubidium vapor generated in a heat pipe oven. The absolute values for the reduced absorption coefficients of the triplet bands were determined at lower vapor densities, by using an accurate expression for the reduced absorption coefficient in the quasistatic wing of the Rb D1 line, and measured triplet satellite bands to the resonance wing optical depth ratio. These triplet satellite band data were used to calibrate in absolute scale the reduced absorption coefficients of the triplet diffuse band at higher temperatures. The obtained values for the reduced absorption coefficient of these Rb molecular features can be used for accurate determination of rubidium atomic number densities in the range from about 5 x 10 16 cm -3 to 1 x 10 18 cm -3

  10. Determination of the average number of neutrons per fission event for californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, B.M.; Belov, L.M.; Drapchinskij, L.V.

    1982-01-01

    By means of a separate determination of neutron yields and fission event rates, the value of #betta#-bar( 252 Cf) has been measured for a series of new high-purity sources. The improved quality of the source active layers has reduced the error in determining the fission rate to 0.35%. The value obtained for #betta#-bar( 252 Cf) is 3.747+-0.036. A description is given of the design and the parameters of a spherical manganese bath in which the work on refining the value of #betta#-bar( 252 Cf) will be continued. (author)

  11. Two-Dimensional SnO Anodes with a Tunable Number of Atomic Layers for Sodium Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fan

    2017-01-18

    We have systematically changed the number of atomic layers stacked in 2D SnO nanosheet anodes and studied their sodium ion battery (SIB) performance. The results indicate that as the number of atomic SnO layers in a sheet decreases, both the capacity and cycling stability of the Na ion battery improve. The thinnest SnO nanosheet anodes (two to six SnO monolayers) exhibited the best performance. Specifically, an initial discharge and charge capacity of 1072 and 848 mAh g-1 were observed, respectively, at 0.1 A g-1. In addition, an impressive reversible capacity of 665 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 0.1 A g-1 and 452 mAh g-1 after 1000 cycles at a high current density of 1.0 A g-1 was observed, with excellent rate performance. As the average number of atomic layers in the anode sheets increased, the battery performance degraded significantly. For example, for the anode sheets with 10-20 atomic layers, only a reversible capacity of 389 mAh g-1 could be obtained after 100 cycles at 0.1 A g-1. Density functional theory calculations coupled with experimental results were used to elucidate the sodiation mechanism of the SnO nanosheets. This systematic study of monolayer-dependent physical and electrochemical properties of 2D anodes shows a promising pathway to engineering and mitigating volume changes in 2D anode materials for sodium ion batteries. It also demonstrates that ultrathin SnO nanosheets are promising SIB anode materials with high specific capacity, stable cyclability, and excellent rate performance.

  12. Measuring air core characteristics of a pressure-swirl atomizer via a transparent acrylic nozzle at various Reynolds numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun J.; Oh, Sang Youp; Kim, Ho Y.; Yoon, Sam S. [Dept. of Mechanical, Korea University Anamdong, 5-Ga, Sungbukgu, 136-713 Seoul (Korea); James, Scott C. [Thermal/Fluid Science and Engineering, Sandia National Labs, PO Box 969, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Because of thermal fluid-property dependence, atomization stability (or flow regime) can change even at fixed operating conditions when subject to temperature change. Particularly at low temperatures, fuel's high viscosity can prevent a pressure-swirl (or simplex) atomizer from sustaining a centrifugal-driven air core within the fuel injector. During disruption of the air core inside an injector, spray characteristics outside the nozzle reflect a highly unstable, nonlinear mode where air core length, Sauter mean diameter (SMD), cone angle, and discharge coefficient variability. To better understand injector performance, these characteristics of the pressure-swirl atomizer were experimentally investigated and data were correlated to Reynolds numbers (Re). Using a transparent acrylic nozzle, the air core length, SMD, cone angle, and discharge coefficient are observed as a function of Re. The critical Reynolds numbers that distinguish the transition from unstable mode to transitional mode and eventually to a stable mode are reported. The working fluids are diesel and a kerosene-based fuel, referred to as bunker-A. (author)

  13. Tomography of atomic number and density of materials using dual-energy imaging and the Alvarez and Macovski attenuation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paziresh, M.; Kingston, A. M., E-mail: andrew.kingston@anu.edu.au; Latham, S. J.; Fullagar, W. K.; Myers, G. M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Research School of physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 2601 (Australia)

    2016-06-07

    Dual-energy computed tomography and the Alvarez and Macovski [Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] transmitted intensity (AMTI) model were used in this study to estimate the maps of density (ρ) and atomic number (Z) of mineralogical samples. In this method, the attenuation coefficients are represented [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)] in the form of the two most important interactions of X-rays with atoms that is, photoelectric absorption (PE) and Compton scattering (CS). This enables material discrimination as PE and CS are, respectively, dependent on the atomic number (Z) and density (ρ) of materials [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976)]. Dual-energy imaging is able to identify sample materials even if the materials have similar attenuation coefficients at single-energy spectrum. We use the full model rather than applying one of several applied simplified forms [Alvarez and Macovski, Phys. Med. Biol. 21, 733 (1976); Siddiqui et al., SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2004); Derzhi, U.S. patent application 13/527,660 (2012); Heismann et al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 2073–2079 (2003); Park and Kim, J. Korean Phys. Soc. 59, 2709 (2011); Abudurexiti et al., Radiol. Phys. Technol. 3, 127–135 (2010); and Kaewkhao et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 109, 1260–1265 (2008)]. This paper describes the tomographic reconstruction of ρ and Z maps of mineralogical samples using the AMTI model. The full model requires precise knowledge of the X-ray energy spectra and calibration of PE and CS constants and exponents of atomic number and energy that were estimated based on fits to simulations and calibration measurements. The estimated ρ and Z images of the samples used in this paper yield average relative errors of 2.62% and 1.19% and maximum relative errors of 2.64% and 7.85%, respectively. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the method accounts for the beam hardening effect in density (

  14. CrossRef Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, R; Kolthammer, WS; Richerme, P; Müllers, A; Walz, J; Grzonka, D; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D; George, MC; Hessels, EA; Storry, CH; Weel, M

    2016-01-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  15. Comparison of the Savannah River Site billet active well coincidence counter and two Californium Shufflers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, E.T.; Griffin, J.C.; Rinard, P.M.

    1991-01-01

    A Scrap Californium Shuffler at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was calibrated to assay the U-Al cores of billets (an intermediate step in the SRS reactor fuel fabrication cycle.) The precision of the Scrap Shuffler over several years has been approximately 0.50%. A typical total uncertainty for the assay of a core on the Scrap Shuffler is approximately 0.33% for a twelve minute assay. The precision over several months and a typical total uncertainty for the Billet Active Well (neutron) Coincidence Counter (BAWCC) are approximately 1.0% and 1.9%, respectively, for a fifteen minute assay. A new Billet Californium Shuffler specifically designed for assaying SRS billets has yielded precision (over one month) and total uncertainty results of 0.40% and 0.69%, respectively, for an eight minute assay. The introduction of a measurement point into the fuel fabrication cycle to replace estimates based upon material weight will greatly enhance material and process control in the Reactor Materials area of SRS. The use of all three instruments provides a comparison of the relative merits of Active Well (neutron) Coincidence Counters (AWCCs) and shufflers for assay of homogeneous and geometrically simple material containing 235 U. The measurement precisions, systematic and random uncertainties, as well as the procurement and operation of each instrument will be compared. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  16. Enhancement of phase space density by increasing trap anisotropy in a magneto-optical trap with a large number of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vengalattore, M.; Conroy, R.S.; Prentiss, M.G.

    2004-01-01

    The phase space density of dense, cylindrical clouds of atoms in a 2D magneto-optic trap is investigated. For a large number of trapped atoms (>10 8 ), the density of a spherical cloud is limited by photon reabsorption. However, as the atom cloud is deformed to reduce the radial optical density, the temperature of the atoms decreases due to the suppression of multiple scattering leading to an increase in the phase space density. A density of 2x10 -4 has been achieved in a magneto-optic trap containing 2x10 8 atoms

  17. Surface modes of ultra-cold atomic clouds with very large number of vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazalilla, M A [Donostia International Physics Center, Donostia (Spain); [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2003-04-01

    We study the surface modes of some of the vortex liquids recently found by means of exact diagonalizations in systems of rapidly rotating bosons. In contrast to the surface modes of Bose condensates, we find that the surface waves have a frequency linear in the excitation angular momentum, h-bar l > 0. Furthermore, in analogy with the edge waves of electronic quantum Hall states, these excitations are chiral, that is, they can be excited only for values of l that increase the total angular momentum of the vortex liquid. However, differently from the quantum Hall phenomena for electrons, we also find other excitations that are approximately degenerate in the laboratory frame with the surface modes, and which decrease the total angular momentum by l quanta. The surface modes of the Laughlin, as well as other scalar and vector boson states are analyzed, and their observable properties characterized. We argue that measurement of the response of a vortex liquid to a weak time-dependent potential that imparts angular momentum to the system should provide valuable information to characterize the vortex liquid. In particular, the intensity of the signal of the surface waves in the dynamic structure factor has been studied and found to depend on the type of vortex liquid. We point out that the existence of surface modes has observable consequences on the density profile of the Laughlin state. These features are due to the strongly correlated behavior of atoms in the vortex liquids. We point out that these correlations should be responsible for a remarkable stability of some vortex liquids with respect to three-body losses. (author)

  18. Atomic Number Dependence of Hadron Production at Large Transverse Momentum in 300 GeV Proton--Nucleus Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, J. W.; Frisch, H. J.; Shochet, M. J.; Boymond, J. P.; Mermod, R.; Piroue, P. A.; Sumner, R. L.

    1974-07-15

    In an experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory we have compared the production of large transverse momentum hadrons from targets of W, Ti, and Be bombarded by 300 GeV protons. The hadron yields were measured at 90 degrees in the proton-nucleon c.m. system with a magnetic spectrometer equipped with 2 Cerenkov counters and a hadron calorimeter. The production cross-sections have a dependence on the atomic number A that grows with P{sub 1}, eventually leveling off proportional to A{sup 1.1}.

  19. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-01-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi_2O_3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μ_m) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Z_e_f_f) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  20. Effects of non-LTE multiplet dynamics on lumped-state modelling in moderate to high atomic number plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitney, K G; Dasgupta, A; Davis, J; Coverdale, C A

    2007-01-01

    Two atomic models of the population dynamics of substates within the n 4 and n = 3 multiplets of nickel-like tungsten and beryllium-like iron, respectively, are described in this paper. The flexible atomic code (FAC) is used to calculate the collisional and radiative couplings and energy levels of the excited states within these ionization stages. These atomic models are then placed within larger principal-quantum-number-based ionization dynamic models of both tungsten and iron plasmas. Collisional-radiative equilibrium calculations are then carried out using these models that demonstrate how the multiplet substates depart from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) as a function of ion density. The effect of these deviations from LTE on the radiative and collisional deexcitation rates of lumped 3s, 3p, 3d, 4s, 4p, 4d and 4f states is then calculated and least-squares fits to the density dependence of these lumped-state rate coefficients are obtained. The calculations show that, with the use of lumped-state models (which are in common use), one can accurately model the L- and M-shell ionization dynamics occurring in present-day Z-pinch experiments only through the addition of these extra, non-LTE-induced, rate coefficient density dependences. However, the derivation and use of low-order polynomial fits to these density dependences makes lumped-state modelling both viable and of value for post-processing analyses

  1. Influence of density and mean atomic number on CT attenuation corrected PET: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintas, D.; Houzard, C.; Galy, G.; Maintas, C.; Itti, R.; Cachin, F.; Mognetti, Th.; Slosman

    2007-01-01

    Aim: the aim of this work is to study the influence of medium density on the CT or external source attenuation corrected images, by simulation on a phantom, with various positron emission tomographs. Material and method: a series of experiments on a cylindrical phantom filled with water marked with [18 F]-FDG, containing six vials filled per pair with mediums of different densities or solutions of KI, CaCl 2 and saccharose with various densities, was carried out under comparable conditions on three different tomographs. In only one of the vials of each pair, an identical radioactivity of [18 F]-FDG was added, three to five fold the surrounding activity. The reconstructions and attenuation corrections suggested by the manufacturers, were carried out under the usual conditions of each site. The activity of each structure was estimated by the methods of profiles and regions of interest, on the non attenuation corrected images (N.A.C.), the images corrected by CT (C.T.A.C.), and/or external source (G.P.A.C.). Results: with all three tomographs, the activities estimated on the N.A.C. images present an inverse correlation to the medium density (important absorption by dense material). On C.T.A.C. images, we observed with only two of the three tomographs, an overestimation of the activity in the 'radioactive' vials, depending on the medium mean Z number and density (over correction), and a artifactual 'activity' in the denser 'cold' vial (incorrect attenuation correction. The dense saccharose solutions, with non elevated Z number, do not affect the CT attenuation correction. (authors)

  2. Survey of potential markets for devices using Californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permar, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    Potential applications for devices or systems containing 252 Cf in the years from 1975 to 1980 are estimated. The estimated number of devices and associated business value were derived from a survey of 46 industrial, educational and governmental organizations conducted from Jan. to May, 1975. Applications for devices and systems based on 252 Cf are expected to increase by a factor of 7 in the 6-y period from 1975 to 1980. The annual business value of 252 Cf devices should increase from 1.5 million dollars in 1975 to 10.8 million dollars in 1980. The potential European market should be several times as large as the US market, based on actual sales of 252 Cf, which have been two to four times greater in Europe than in the US

  3. Does the number of nitrogen atoms have an influence on the conducting properties of diphenylazines? A DFT insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moral, Mónica; Granadino-Roldán, José Manuel; Garzón, Andrés; García, Gregorio; Fernández-Gómez, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The present study reports on the variation of some structural and electronic properties related to the electron conductivity for the series of diphenylazines represented by the formula Ph sbnd (C 2+nN 4-nH n) sbnd Ph, n = 0 - 4. Properties such as planarity, aromaticity, HOMO → LUMO excitation energy, electron affinity, LUMO level energy, reorganization energy and electron coupling between neighboring molecules in the crystal were analyzed from a theoretical perspective as a function of the number of nitrogen atoms in the molecular structure. As a result, the planarity, aromaticity and electron affinity increase with the number of N atoms in the central ring while the HOMO → LUMO excitation energy and LUMO levels diminish. It is worth noting that up to n = 3, the frontier orbitals appear delocalized throughout the whole system while for n = 4 the localized character of the LUMO might explain the increase in the reorganization energy and thus the higher difficulty to delocalize the excess of negative charge. Electron coupling between neighboring molecules was also estimated on the basis of the energy splitting in dimer method and the reported crystal structures for some of the studied molecules. Accordingly, the highest | t12| value was obtained for Ph 2T N3 (0.06 eV) while Ph 2Tz should be the most advantageous candidate of the series in terms of electron injection.

  4. Transport calculations of. gamma. -ray flux density and dose rate about implantable californium-252 sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A; Lin, B I [Cincinnati Univ., Ohio (USA). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Windham, J P; Kereiakes, J G

    1976-07-01

    ..gamma.. flux density and dose rate distributions have been calculated about implantable californium-252 sources for an infinite tissue medium. Point source flux densities as a function of energy and position were obtained from a discrete-ordinates calculation, and the flux densities were multiplied by their corresponding kerma factors and added to obtain point source dose rates. The point dose rates were integrated over the line source to obtain line dose rates. Container attenuation was accounted for by evaluating the point dose rate as a function of platinum thickness. Both primary and secondary flux densities and dose rates are presented. The agreement with an independent Monte Carlo calculation was excellent. The data presented should be useful for the design of new source configurations.

  5. High fidelity simulation and analysis of liquid jet atomization in a gaseous crossflow at intermediate Weber numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoyi, E-mail: lixy2@utrc.utc.com; Soteriou, Marios C. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, Connecticut 06108 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Recent advances in numerical methods coupled with the substantial enhancements in computing power and the advent of high performance computing have presented first principle, high fidelity simulation as a viable tool in the prediction and analysis of spray atomization processes. The credibility and potential impact of such simulations, however, has been hampered by the relative absence of detailed validation against experimental evidence. The numerical stability and accuracy challenges arising from the need to simulate the high liquid-gas density ratio across the sharp interfaces encountered in these flows are key reasons for this. In this work we challenge this status quo by presenting a numerical model able to deal with these challenges, employing it in simulations of liquid jet in crossflow atomization and performing extensive validation of its results against a carefully executed experiment with detailed measurements in the atomization region. We then proceed to the detailed analysis of the flow physics. The computational model employs the coupled level set and volume of fluid approach to directly capture the spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-gas interface and the sharp-interface ghost fluid method to stably handle high liquid-air density ratio. Adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian droplet models are shown to be viable options for computational cost reduction. Moreover, high performance computing is leveraged to manage the computational cost. The experiment selected for validation eliminates the impact of inlet liquid and gas turbulence and focuses on the impact of the crossflow aerodynamic forces on the atomization physics. Validation is demonstrated by comparing column surface wavelengths, deformation, breakup locations, column trajectories and droplet sizes, velocities, and mass rates for a range of intermediate Weber numbers. Analysis of the physics is performed in terms of the instability and breakup characteristics and the features of downstream

  6. On the atomic-number similarity of the binding energies of electrons in filled shells of elements of the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. Ya.; Shpatakovskaya, G. V.

    2017-03-01

    An expression for the binding energies of electrons in the ground state of an atom is derived on the basis of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule within the Thomas-Fermi model. The validity of this relation for all elements from neon to uranium is tested within a more perfect quantum-mechanical model with and without the inclusion of relativistic effects, as well as with experimental binding energies. As a result, the ordering of electronic levels in filled atomic shells is established, manifested in an approximate atomic-number similarity. It is proposed to use this scaling property to analytically estimate the binding energies of electrons in an arbitrary atom.

  7. On the atomic-number similarity of the binding energies of electrons in filled shells of elements of the periodic table

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpov, V. Ya. [Bruk Institute of Electronic Control Machines (Russian Federation); Shpatakovskaya, G. V., E-mail: shpagalya@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    An expression for the binding energies of electrons in the ground state of an atom is derived on the basis of the Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization rule within the Thomas–Fermi model. The validity of this relation for all elements from neon to uranium is tested within a more perfect quantum-mechanical model with and without the inclusion of relativistic effects, as well as with experimental binding energies. As a result, the ordering of electronic levels in filled atomic shells is established, manifested in an approximate atomic-number similarity. It is proposed to use this scaling property to analytically estimate the binding energies of electrons in an arbitrary atom.

  8. A non-destructive technique for assigning effective atomic number to scientific samples by scattering of 59.54 keV gamma photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.P.; Sharma, Amandeep; Singh, Bhajan; Sandhu, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of present experiment, employing a scattering of 59.54 keV gamma photons, is to assign effective atomic number (Z eff ) to scientific samples (rare earths) of known composition. An HPGe semiconductor detector, placed at 90 o to the incident beam, detects gamma photons scattered from the sample under investigation. The experiment is performed on various elements with atomic number satisfying, 6≤Z≤82, for 59.54 keV incident photons. The intensity ratio of Rayleigh to Compton scattered peaks, corrected for photo-peak efficiency of gamma detector and absorption of photons in the sample and air, is plotted as a function of atomic number and constituted a best fit-curve. From this fit-curve, the respective effective atomic numbers to samples of rare earths are determined. The agreement of measured values of Z eff with theoretical calculations is quite satisfactory.

  9. Study of the relationship between peaks scattering Rayleigh to Compton ratio and effective atomic number in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Marcelo O.; Conti, Claudio de Carvalho; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a new method to correct the absorbed radiation (the mass attenuation coefficient curve) in low energy (E B O 3 , Na 2 CO 3 , CaCO 3 , Al 2 O 3 , K 2 SO 4 and MgO) of radiation produced by a gamma-ray source of Am-241(59.54 keV) also applied to certified biological samples of milk powder, hay powder and bovine liver (NIST 155 7B). In addition, six methods of effective atomic number determination were used as described in literature to determinate the Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C) , in order to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient. The results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those obtained using the transmission method. The experimental results were in good agreement with transmission values suggesting that the method to correct radiation absorption presented in this paper is adequate for biological samples. (author)

  10. Determination of Atomic Number Exponent for Elemental Absorber at Am-241 Energy in X-Ray Attenuation Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najim, L.A.; Shamoon, S.K.; Atalah, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray absorption experiment, the dependence of the photoelectric absorption cross-section varied with atomic number Z.In this paper, the dependence on Z of the cross-section or coefficient of photoelectric absorption is first evaluated from published data for (20) elements ranging from Al-Sn, and then the cross-section for Fe is obtained experimentally by measuring the X-ray intensity with and without the Fe absorber and compared with the theoretical value, the variation of the photoelectric absorption coefficient (μ/ρ m ) showed less dependence on Z for the two tested of Z regions.This is because of the inclusion of mass density (ρ m ) of the absorber in the coefficient.The values of m obtained in the present work increases linearly with energy for both ranges of elements

  11. Improvement of analysis precision upon the atomic number and electron density measurement by the dual x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Yukino; Morii, Hisashi; Koike, Akifumi; Okunoyama, Takaharu; Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru

    2010-08-01

    To identify the factor impairing the material identification parameters, which is provided by the dual-energy X-ray computed tomography method using a conventional X-ray tube and a CdTe detector, linear attenuation coefficient was measured by the radioactivity of radio isotopes and compared with theoretical figure. In our study, the atomic number and the electron density is calculated from the linear attenuation coefficient obtained in CT measurement by 64-channel CdTe line detector. To estimate accuracy of CdTe line sensor, it is needed to obtain the linear attenuation coefficient accurately. Using a single detector, the linear attenuation coefficient is verified for accuracy. The energy resolution of CdTe detectors and the method of reconstruction are discussed.

  12. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients of moderate-to-high atomic-number elements at low photon energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajuddin, A.A.; Chong, C.S.; Shukri, A.; Bradley, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients for 12 selected moderate-to-high atomic-number elements have been obtained from good-geometry measurements made at five 241 Am photon energies of significant emission intensity. Particular interest focuses on measured values for photon energies close to absorption edges. Comparisons with renormalized cross-section predictions indicate agreement to within stated error limits for the majority of cases. Significant discrepancies (> 10%) are noted for Ta at 17.8 and 26.3 keV and W at 59.5 keV. Some support for a discrepancy between measurement and theory for W in the region of 60 keV is found in the reported measurements of others. (author)

  13. Mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic and electron numbers of stainless steel and carbon steels with different energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Fakarudin Abdul Rahman; Mohd Iqbal Saripan; Nor Paiza Mohamad Hasan; Ismail Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ ρ) of stainless steel (SS316L) and carbon steel (A516) that are widely used as petrochemical plant components, such as distillation column, heat exchanger, boiler and storage tank were measured at 662, 1073 and 1332 keV of photon energies. Measurements of radiation intensity for various thicknesses of steel were made by using transmission method. The γ-ray intensity were counted by using a Gamma spectrometer that contains a Hyper-pure Germanium (HPGe) detector connected with Multi Channel Analyzer (MCA). The effective numbers of atomic (Z eff ) and electron (N eff ) obtained experimentally were compared by those obtained through theoretical calculation. Both experimental and calculated values of Z eff and N eff were in good agreement. (author)

  14. A study of energy and effective atomic number dependence of the exposure build-up factors in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, G.S.; Singh, P.S.; Mudahar, G.S.

    2000-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented to determine the gamma-radiation build-up factors in various biological materials. The gamma energy range is 0.015-15.0 MeV, with penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths considered. The dependence of the exposure build-up factor on incident photon energy and the effective atomic number (Z eff ) has also been assessed. In a practical analysis of dose burden to gamma-irradiated biological materials, the sophistication of Monte Carlo computer techniques would be applied, with associated detailed modelling. However, a feature of the theoretical method presented is its ability to make the consequences of the physics of the scattering process in biological materials more transparent. In addition, it can be quickly employed to give a first-pass dose estimate prior to a more detailed computer study. (author)

  15. Stability investigation of a high number density Pt1/Fe2O3 single-atom catalyst under different gas environments by HAADF-STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Sibin; Wang, Rongming; Liu, Jingyue

    2018-05-01

    Catalysis by supported single metal atoms has demonstrated tremendous potential for practical applications due to their unique catalytic properties. Unless they are strongly anchored to the support surfaces, supported single atoms, however, are thermodynamically unstable, which poses a major obstacle for broad applications of single-atom catalysts (SACs). In order to develop strategies to improve the stability of SACs, we need to understand the intrinsic nature of the sintering processes of supported single metal atoms, especially under various gas environments that are relevant to important catalytic reactions. We report on the synthesis of high number density Pt1/Fe2O3 SACs using a facial strong adsorption method and the study of the mobility of these supported Pt single atoms at 250 °C under various gas environments that are relevant to CO oxidation, water–gas shift, and hydrogenation reactions. Under the oxidative gas environment, Fe2O3 supported Pt single atoms are stable even at high temperatures. The presence of either CO or H2 molecules in the gas environment, however, facilitates the movement of the Pt atoms. The strong interaction between CO and Pt weakens the binding between the Pt atoms and the support, facilitating the movement of the Pt single atoms. The dissociation of H2 molecules on the Pt atoms and their subsequent interaction with the oxygen species of the support surfaces dislodge the surface oxygen anchored Pt atoms, resulting in the formation of Pt clusters. The addition of H2O molecules to the CO or H2 significantly accelerates the sintering of the Fe2O3 supported Pt single atoms. An anchoring-site determined sintering mechanism is further proposed, which is related to the metal–support interaction.

  16. Experimental research on the contrast production of the chemical elements with the atomic numbers 1-83 in a computer-totalbody-tomogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschner, H.; Burmester, U.; Stringaris, K.

    1979-01-01

    The contrast production for the chemical elements with the atomic numbers Z=1-83 were determined by computer-tomography. With the formula relation of the Δ-number and the atomic number can one compute the contrast production of any chosen chemical compound. Iodine-free and inorganic iodine-containing contrast media are examined for their contrast production and compared with presently used organic iodine-containing contrast media. The contrast enhancement of organic contrast media in tissue are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. On the effective atomic number and electron density: A comprehensive set of formulas for all types of materials and energies above 1 keV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Thind, K.S.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive and consistent set of formulas is given for calculating the effective atomic number and electron density for all types of materials and for all photon energies greater than 1 keV. The are derived from first principles using photon interaction cross sections of the constituent atom....... The theory is illustrated by calculations and experiments for molecules of medical and biological interest, glasses for radiation shielding, alloys, minerals and liquids....

  18. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some biologically important compounds containing H, C, N and O in the energy range 145-1330 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunathaguru, V; Umesh, T K

    2006-01-01

    A semi-empirical relation which can be used to determine the total attenuation cross sections of samples containing H, C, N and O in the energy range 145-1332 keV has been derived based on the total attenuation cross sections of several sugars, amino acids and fatty acids. The cross sections have been measured by performing transmission experiments in a narrow beam good geometry set-up by employing a high-resolution hyperpure germanium detector at seven energies of biological importance such as 145.4 keV, 279.2 keV, 514 keV, 661.6 keV, 1115.5 keV, 1173.2 keV and 1332.1 keV. The semi-empirical relation can reproduce the experimental values within 1-2%. The total attenuation cross sections of five elements carbon, aluminium, titanium, copper and zirconium measured in the same experimental set-up at the energies mentioned above have been used in a new matrix method to evaluate the effective atomic numbers and the effective electron densities of samples such as cholesterol, fatty acids, sugars and amino acids containing H, C, N and O atoms from their effective atomic cross sections. The effective atomic cross sections are the total attenuation cross sections divided by the total number of atoms of all types in a particular sample. Further, a quantity called the effective atomic weight was defined as the ratio of the molecular weight of a sample to the total number of atoms of all types in it. The variation of the effective atomic number was systematically studied with respect to the effective atomic weight and a new semi-empirical relation for Z eff has been evolved. It is felt that this relation can be very useful to determine the effective atomic number of any sample having H, C, N and O atoms in the energy range 145-1332 keV irrespective of its chemical structure

  19. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single-exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal-production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  20. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single- exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal- production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly- collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission

  1. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  2. Stabilisation of ZrO/sub 2/ with rare-earth oxides with atomic numbers from 58 to 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tcheivili, L; Passarino de Marques, M N [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Industrial, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1978-01-01

    In the present work, the stabilisation of ZrO/sub 2/ with 14 rare earths (58 to 71) was investigated. The aim was to carry out the experiments at a temperature of 1550/sup 0/C, at which many oxides do not exist in the cubic form and the others, such as PrO/sub 2/ and Lu/sub 2/O/sub 3/, have not yet been studied. All the experiments of the series were carried out under constant conditions, in order to determine if there was any difference in principle between them. All the oxides stabilise ZrO/sub 2/, but those with the lower atomic numbers (58, 59, 60) show some deviation. The minimum and maximum mol% limits were ascertained, between which ZrO/sub 2/ is fully stabilised, and the phases are given which occur with the various mol% proportions. In conclusion, an experiment was carried out with all oxides having di- tri- and quadri-valent cations, which belong to the cubic system. In view of their difference in ionic radius to the Zr/sup 4 +/ ion, the conclusion can be drawn that all oxides which can stabilise ZrO/sub 2/ have larger cation radii than that of the Zr/sup 4 +/ ion.

  3. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities, and tissue equivalence of some gases and mixtures for dosimetry of radiation detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Vishwanath P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total mass attenuation coefficients, µm, effective atomic number, Zeff, and effective electron density, Neff, of different gases - carbon dioxide, methane, acetylene, propane, butane, and pentane used in radiation detectors, have been calculated for the photon energy of 1 keV to 100 GeV. Each gas has constant Zeff values between 0.10 to 10 MeV photon energies; however, these values are way far away from ICRU tissue. Carbon dioxide gas shows the closest tissue equivalence in the entire photon energy spectrum. Relative tissue equivalences of the mixtures of gases with respect to ICRU tissue are in the range of 0.998-1.041 for air, argon (4.5% + methane (95.5%, argon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5%, and nitrogen (5% + methane (7% + carbon dioxide (88%. The gas composition of xenon (0.5% + carbon dioxide (99.5% shows 1.605 times higher tissue equivalence compared to the ICRU tissue. The investigated photon interaction parameters are useful for exposure and energy absorption buildup factors calculation and design, and fabrication of gaseous detectors for ambient radiation measurement by the Geiger-Muller detector, ionization chambers and proportional counters.

  4. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame, E-mail: Aroumougame.Asaithamy@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States); Chen, David J., E-mail: David.Chen@UTsouthwestern.edu [Division of Molecular Radiation Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX 75390 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., {gamma}- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  5. Mechanism of cluster DNA damage repair in response to high-atomic number and energy particles radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (i.e., γ- and X-rays) induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are rapidly repaired (rejoined). In contrast, DNA damage induced by the dense ionizing track of high-atomic number and energy (HZE) particles is slowly repaired or is irreparable. These unrepaired and/or misrepaired DNA lesions may contribute to the observed higher relative biological effectiveness for cell killing, chromosomal aberrations, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis in HZE particle irradiated cells compared to those treated with low-LET radiation. The types of DNA lesions induced by HZE particles have been characterized in vitro and usually consist of two or more closely spaced strand breaks, abasic sites, or oxidized bases on opposing strands. It is unclear why these lesions are difficult to repair. In this review, we highlight the potential of a new technology allowing direct visualization of different types of DNA lesions in human cells and document the emerging significance of live-cell imaging for elucidation of the spatio-temporal characterization of complex DNA damage. We focus on the recent insights into the molecular pathways that participate in the repair of HZE particle-induced DSBs. We also discuss recent advances in our understanding of how different end-processing nucleases aid in repair of DSBs with complicated ends generated by HZE particles. Understanding the mechanism underlying the repair of DNA damage induced by HZE particles will have important implications for estimating the risks to human health associated with HZE particle exposure.

  6. Spectral effects on some physical coefficients of x-Ray interaction with materials of low atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Kazzaz, S.A.; Youssef, M.; EL-Hadad, S.; and EL-Nadi, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray spectra were measured before and after passing through some materials of medical importance applying X-ray diffraction. The mass absorption coefficients of these materials were determined at X-ray peak voltages 27, 30 and 42 kV-p making use the measured spectrum and also by using the direct beam absorption. It has been found that the mass absorption coefficients calculated from the X-ray spectral distribution analysis are in general lower than those obtained considering the direct beam method. From the study of the atomic number and energy dependence of the mass absorption coefficients it has been found that the dependence of the coefficients calculated from the spectral distribution is good agreement with the previously studied data for monoenergetic x-ray beam. Also the roentgen - to - Rad conversion factors were determined at the different used energies and materials. The value of the mass absorption coefficients calculated from the spectral distribution is recommended for use in dose calculation

  7. Experimental observations of electron-backscatter effects from high-atomic-number anodes in large-aspect-ratio, electron-beam diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooperstein, G; Mosher, D; Stephanakis, S J; Weber, B V; Young, F C [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Swanekamp, S B [JAYCOR, Vienna, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Backscattered electrons from anodes with high-atomic-number substrates cause early-time anode-plasma formation from the surface layer leading to faster, more intense electron beam pinching, and lower diode impedance. A simple derivation of Child-Langmuir current from a thin hollow cathode shows the same dependence on the diode aspect ratio as critical current. Using this fact, it is shown that the diode voltage and current follow relativistic Child-Langmuir theory until the anode plasma is formed, and then follows critical current after the beam pinches. With thin hollow cathodes, electron beam pinching can be suppressed at low voltages (< 800 kV) even for high currents and high-atomic-number anodes. Electron beam pinching can also be suppressed at high voltages for low-atomic-number anodes as long as the electron current densities remain below the plasma turn-on threshold. (author). 8 figs., 2 refs.

  8. Fast and efficient charge breeding of the Californium rare isotope breeder upgrade electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Barcikowski, A.; Dickerson, C. A.; Perry, A.; Sharamentov, S. I.; Vondrasek, R. C.; Zinkann, G. P.; Pikin, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    The Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), developed to breed Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) radioactive beams at Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS), is being tested off-line. A unique property of the EBIS is a combination of short breeding times, high repetition rates, and a large acceptance. Overall, we have implemented many innovative features during the design and construction of the CARIBU EBIS as compared to the existing EBIS breeders. The off-line charge breeding tests are being performed using a surface ionization source that produces singly charged cesium ions. The main goal of the off-line commissioning is to demonstrate stable operation of the EBIS at a 10 Hz repetition rate and a breeding efficiency into single charge state higher than 15%. These goals have been successfully achieved and exceeded. We have measured (20% ± 0.7%) breeding efficiency into the single charge state of 28+ cesium ions with the breeding time of 28 ms. In general, the current CARIBU EBIS operational parameters can provide charge breeding of any ions in the full mass range of periodic table with high efficiency, short breeding times, and sufficiently low charge-to-mass ratio, 1/6.3 for the heaviest masses, for further acceleration in ATLAS. In this paper, we discuss the parameters of the EBIS and the charge breeding results in a pulsed injection mode with repetition rates up to 10 Hz

  9. Manganese determination om minerals by activation analysis, using the californium-252 as a neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Antonio

    1976-01-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis, using a Californium-252 neutron source, has been applied for the determination of manganese in ores such as pyrolusite, rodonite (manganese silicate)' and blending used in dry-batteries The favorable nuclear properties of manganese, such as high thermal neutron cross-section for the reaction 55 Mn (n.gamma) 56 Mn, high concentration of manganese in the matrix and short half - life of 56 Mn, are an ideal combination for non-destructive analysis of manganese in ores. Samples and standards of manganese dioxide were irradiated for about 20 minutes, followed by a 4 to 15 minutes decay and counted in a single channel pulse-height discrimination using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. Counting time was equal to 10 minutes. The interference of nuclear reactions 56 Fe(n,p) 56 Mn and 59 Co (n, α) 56 were studied, as well as problems in connection with neutron shadowing during irradiation, gamma-rays attenuation during counting and influence of granulometry of samples. One sample,was also analysed by wet-chemical method (sodium bismuthate) in order to compare results. As a whole, i t was shown that the analytical method of neutron activation for manganese in ores and blending, is a method simple, rapid and with good precision and accuracy. (author)

  10. Long-term effects of an intracavitary treatment with californium-252 on normal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Beamer, J.L.; Mahony, T.D.; Cross, F.T.; Lund, J.E.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1976-01-01

    About one hundred fifty swine were exposed to either radium-226 or californium-252 sources in the uterine cervix to determine an RBE for both acute and long-term effects. That value for early changes in the tissues at risk in the treatment of cervical cancer was between 6.2 and 6.8. The incidence of complications increased with time after exposure, especially among animals treated with 252 Cf. Analysis of rectal injury showed that ulceration occurred frequently within a year postexposure at doses between 1600 and 2400 rad calculated at 2 cm lateral to the source midline. Fat necrosis and smooth muscle atrophy, resulting in a local rectal stricture, were delayed changes observed in some animals. The lower ureter was the site for a greater frequency of complications than the GI tract. Ureteral stricture often occurred at doses of 1200 rad from 252 Cf and 7000 rad from 226 Ra. Observation of delayed effects in the uterine-cervix in animals held up to 4 years postexposure indicate that the RBE for 252 Cf may be increased to a value as high as 18, while repair may have even decreased it to about 5.6 in the rectum. Fifty swine are still being observed for long-term effects after doses above 800 rad from 252 Cf and 5000 rad from 226 Ra

  11. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide 252 Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world's largest inventory of compact 252 Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of ≤ 10 11 neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10 8 cm -2 s -1 at the sample. Total flux of ≥10 9 cm -2 s -1 is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the 252 Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis

  12. Cell-killing efficiency and number of platinum atoms binding to DNA, RNA and protein molecules of HeLa cells treated with combinations of hyperthermia and carboplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaboshi, M.; Kawai, K.; Tanaka, Y.; Takada, J.; Sumino, T.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of hyperthermia on the cell killing efficiency of Pt atoms binding to DNA, RNA and protein molecules of HeLa cells treated with cis-diamine(1,1-cyclobutanedicarboxylato)platinum(II) (CBDCA) was examined. HeLa S-3 cells were treated with 195m Pt-radiolabeled CBDCA for 60 minutes at various temperatures, and the relationship between the lethal effect and the number of Pt atoms binding to DNA, RNA and proteins was examined. The mean lethal concentration (D 0 ) of carboplatin for a 60 min-treatment at 0, 25, 37, 40, 42 and 44 deg C was 671.2, 201.5, 67.3, 33.4, 20.2 and 15.6 μM, respectively. By using identically treated cells, the number of Pt-atoms combined with DNA, RNA and protein molecules were determined in the subcellular fractions. Thus, the D 0 's given as the drug concentrations were replaced with the number of Pt-atoms combined in each fraction. Then, the cell-killing efficiency of the Pt atom was expressed as the reciprocal of the number of Pt-atoms combined and was calculated for each molecule. The efficiency for DNA molecules was 0.699, 1.42, 2.65, 4.84, 7.74 and 8.28x10 4 nucleotides, respectively, for the conditions described above. From 0 to 44 deg C, the cell-killing efficiency of Pt atoms increased by a factor of 11.9. (author)

  13. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E c , below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E c . These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production

  14. Californium interrogation prompt neutron (CIPN) instrument for non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel—Design concept and experimental demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzlova, D., E-mail: henzlova@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Menlove, H.O.; Rael, C.D.; Trellue, H.R.; Tobin, S.J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Park, Se-Hwan; Oh, Jong-Myeong; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Kwon, In-Chan; Kim, Ho-Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-11

    This paper presents results of the first experimental demonstration of the Californium Interrogation Prompt Neutron (CIPN) instrument developed within a multi-year effort launched by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel Project of the United States Department of Energy. The goals of this project focused on developing viable non-destructive assay techniques with capabilities to improve an independent verification of spent fuel assembly characteristics. For this purpose, the CIPN instrument combines active and passive neutron interrogation, along with passive gamma-ray measurements, to provide three independent observables. This paper describes the initial feasibility demonstration of the CIPN instrument, which involved measurements of four pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies with different levels of burnup and two initial enrichments. The measurements were performed at the Post-Irradiation Examination Facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Institute in the Republic of Korea. The key aim of the demonstration was to evaluate CIPN instrument performance under realistic deployment conditions, with the focus on a detailed assessment of systematic uncertainties that are best evaluated experimentally. The measurements revealed good positioning reproducibility, as well as a high degree of insensitivity of the CIPN instrument's response to irregularities in a radial burnup profile. Systematic uncertainty of individual CIPN instrument signals due to assembly rotation was found to be <4.5%, even for assemblies with fairly extreme gradients in the radial burnup profile. These features suggest that the CIPN instrument is capable of providing a good representation of assembly average characteristics, independent of assembly orientation in the instrument.

  15. Californium interrogation prompt neutron (CIPN) instrument for non-destructive assay of spent nuclear fuel—Design concept and experimental demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzlova, D.; Menlove, H.O.; Rael, C.D.; Trellue, H.R.; Tobin, S.J.; Park, Se-Hwan; Oh, Jong-Myeong; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Kwon, In-Chan; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the first experimental demonstration of the Californium Interrogation Prompt Neutron (CIPN) instrument developed within a multi-year effort launched by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative Spent Fuel Project of the United States Department of Energy. The goals of this project focused on developing viable non-destructive assay techniques with capabilities to improve an independent verification of spent fuel assembly characteristics. For this purpose, the CIPN instrument combines active and passive neutron interrogation, along with passive gamma-ray measurements, to provide three independent observables. This paper describes the initial feasibility demonstration of the CIPN instrument, which involved measurements of four pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies with different levels of burnup and two initial enrichments. The measurements were performed at the Post-Irradiation Examination Facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Institute in the Republic of Korea. The key aim of the demonstration was to evaluate CIPN instrument performance under realistic deployment conditions, with the focus on a detailed assessment of systematic uncertainties that are best evaluated experimentally. The measurements revealed good positioning reproducibility, as well as a high degree of insensitivity of the CIPN instrument's response to irregularities in a radial burnup profile. Systematic uncertainty of individual CIPN instrument signals due to assembly rotation was found to be <4.5%, even for assemblies with fairly extreme gradients in the radial burnup profile. These features suggest that the CIPN instrument is capable of providing a good representation of assembly average characteristics, independent of assembly orientation in the instrument.

  16. Development of a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. 10. Reevaluation of atomic number density of JOYO Mk-II core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, Kazuyuki; Sato, Wakaei [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Ishikawa, Makoto; Arii, Yoshio [Nuclear Energy System Incorporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    The material composition of JOYO Mk-II core components in its initial core was reevaluated as a part of the effort for developing a standard data base for FBR core nuclear design. The special feature of the reevaluation is to treat the decay of Pu-241 isotope, so that the atomic number densities of Pu-241 and Am-241 in fuel assemblies can be exactly evaluated on the initial critical date, Nov. 22nd, 1982. Further, the atomic number densities of other core components were also evaluated to improve the analytical accuracy. Those include the control rods which were not so strictly evaluated in the past, and the dummy fuels and the neutron sources which were not treated in the analytical model so far. The results of the present reevaluation were as follows: (1) The changes of atomic number densities of the major nuclides such as Pu-239, U-235 and U-238 were about {+-}0.2 to 0.3%. On the other hand, the number density of Pu-241, which was the motivation of the present work, was reduced by 12%. From the fact, the number densities in the past analysis might be based on the isotope measurement of the manufacturing point of time without considering the decay of Pu-241. (2) As the other core components, the number densities of control rods and outer reflector-type A were largely improved. (author)

  17. SU-C-BRC-05: Monte Carlo Calculations to Establish a Simple Relation of Backscatter Dose Enhancement Around High-Z Dental Alloy to Its Atomic Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utsunomiya, S; Kushima, N; Katsura, K; Tanabe, S; Hayakawa, T; Sakai, H; Yamada, T; Takahashi, H; Abe, E; Wada, S; Aoyama, H [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To establish a simple relation of backscatter dose enhancement around a high-Z dental alloy in head and neck radiation therapy to its average atomic number based on Monte Carlo calculations. Methods: The PHITS Monte Carlo code was used to calculate dose enhancement, which is quantified by the backscatter dose factor (BSDF). The accuracy of the beam modeling with PHITS was verified by comparing with basic measured data namely PDDs and dose profiles. In the simulation, a high-Z alloy of 1 cm cube was embedded into a tough water phantom irradiated by a 6-MV (nominal) X-ray beam of 10 cm × 10 cm field size of Novalis TX (Brainlab). The ten different materials of high-Z alloys (Al, Ti, Cu, Ag, Au-Pd-Ag, I, Ba, W, Au, Pb) were considered. The accuracy of calculated BSDF was verified by comparing with measured data by Gafchromic EBT3 films placed at from 0 to 10 mm away from a high-Z alloy (Au-Pd-Ag). We derived an approximate equation to determine the relation of BSDF and range of backscatter to average atomic number of high-Z alloy. Results: The calculated BSDF showed excellent agreement with measured one by Gafchromic EBT3 films at from 0 to 10 mm away from the high-Z alloy. We found the simple linear relation of BSDF and range of backscatter to average atomic number of dental alloys. The latter relation was proven by the fact that energy spectrum of backscatter electrons strongly depend on average atomic number. Conclusion: We found a simple relation of backscatter dose enhancement around high-Z alloys to its average atomic number based on Monte Carlo calculations. This work provides a simple and useful method to estimate backscatter dose enhancement from dental alloys and corresponding optimal thickness of dental spacer to prevent mucositis effectively.

  18. Feasibility and market potential of protein determination of wheat using californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, T.C. Jr.; Eckhoff, N.D.; Clack, R.W.; Roberts, T.C. Sr.

    1976-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of protein determination by capture gamma-ray analysis using californium-252 neutrons, an in-situ protein analysis system for use by grain handlers has been examined. Three 227 kilogram (approximately) lots of wheat were used to determine the amount of nitrogen present. Protein analyses by the Kjeldahl method were obtained from samples taken before and after the capture gamma-ray analyses. The 5.267-MeV gamma-ray was selected for use in this study as a compromise between efficiency and interference from other elements. The associated counting equipment was a multichannel analyzer with pulse shaping electronic and analysis computing equipment. A linear regression program was used to compare the regions of interest to the Kjeldahl protein averages. The counts composing each peak were summed and normalized using the total count of the hydrogen peak. The normalized nitrogen percentages indicate a significant correlation between the spectral regions and the Kjeldahl analyses. To a first approximation, the value of wheat is the wheat protein. At the present time, protein testing of wheat is destructive, cumbersome, and time-consuming as compared to the potential for capture gamma-ray analysis testing. Assuming that such a protein analysis unit can analyze 42 tonne of wheat per hour, over 120 units would be needed to monitor one-half the U.S. annual wheat production. A 0.5% improvement in processor realizations and grain throughput value of $167.00 per tonne will result in a projected savings of $150,000 per year per unit

  19. Effective atomic number and effective electron densities of some inorganic compounds for Compton effect in the gamma energy range 280 keV to 1115 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasannakumar, S.; Umesh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    The effective atomic number and effective electron densities of some inorganic compounds for Compton effect in the gamma energy range 280 keV to 1115 keV by using Compton scattering cross sections which are determined on a goniometer assembly. An ORTEC model 23210 gamma-x high purity germanium detector (HpGe) has been used to record the data along with a personal computer based MCA in the angular region 50°-110°. The effective atomic numbers so obtained were found to be equal to the total number of electrons present in the sample in accordance with the chemical formula. The results so obtained are of first of their kind at these energies and are expected to be important in a variety of applications of radiation physics and chemistry. (author)

  20. Analytical dependence of effective atomic number on the elemental composition of matter and radiation energy in the range 10-1000 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eritenko, A. N.; Tsvetiansky, A. L.; Polev, A. A.

    2018-01-01

    In the present paper, a universal analytical dependence of effective atomic number on the composition of matter and radiation energy is proposed. This enables one to consider the case of a strong difference in the elemental composition with respect to their atomic numbers over a wide energy range. The contribution of photoelectric absorption and incoherent and coherent scattering during the interaction between radiation and matter is considered. For energy values over 40 keV, the contribution of coherent scattering does not exceed approximately 10% that can be neglected at a further consideration. The effective atomic numbers calculated on the basis of the proposed relationships are compared to the results of calculations based on other methods considered by different authors on the basis of experimental and tabulated data on mass and atomic attenuation coefficients. The examination is carried out for both single-element (e.g., 6C, 14Si, 28Cu, 56Ba, and 82Pb) and multi-element materials. Calculations are performed for W1-xCux alloys (x = 0.35; x = 0.4), PbO, ther moluminescent dosimetry compounds (56Ba, 48Cd, 41Sr, 20Ca, 12Mg, and 11Na), and SO4 in a wide energy range. A case with radiation energy between the K- and L1-absorption edges is considered for 82Pb, 74W, 56Ba, 48Cd, and 38Sr. This enables to substantially simplify the calculation of the atomic number and will be useful in technical and scientific fields related to the interaction between X-ray/gamma radiation and matter.

  1. Neutron reflector design with Californium 252 neutron for Boron neutron chapter therapy facility using MCNP5 simulation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Fakhrurreza; Kusminanto; Y Sardjono

    2014-01-01

    In this research has made a reflector design to provide beams of Neutron for BNCT with Californium-252 radioactive source. This collimator is useful to obtain optimum epithermal neutron flux with the smallest impurity radiation (thermal neutron, fast neutron, and gamma). The design process is done using Monte Carlo N-Particle simulation version 5 (MCNP5) code to calculate the neutron flux tally form. The chosen reflector design is the reflectors which use material such as BeO ceramic with 13 cm thick. Moderator use sulfur material with the slope angle of the cone is 30°. From the calculation result, it is obtained that Reflector with 1 gram Californium-252 source can produce a neutron output thermal which has thermal neutron specification 2.23189 x 10 9 n/s.cm 2 , epithermal neutron 3.51548 x 10 9 n/s.cm 2 , and fast neutron 4.82241 x 10 9 n/s.cm 2 From the result, it needs additional collimator because the BNCT requirement. (author)

  2. Hypoxic versus normoxic external-beam irradiation of cervical carcinoma combined with californium-252 neutron brachytherapy. Comparative treatment results of a 5-year randomized study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tačev, T.; Vacek, Antonín; Ptáčková, B.; Strnad, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 181, č. 5 (2005), s. 273-284 ISSN 0179-7158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : cervical carcinoma * hypoxyradiotherapy * californium-252 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.490, year: 2005

  3. Study of the shielding for spontaneous fission sources of Californium-252; Estudio de blindaje para fuentes de fision espontanea de Californio-252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila R, I

    1991-06-15

    A shielding study is made to attenuate, until maximum permissible levels, the neutrons radiation and photons emitted by spontaneous fission coming from a source of Californium-252. The compound package by a database (Library DLC-23) and the ANISNW code is used, in it version for personal computer. (Author)

  4. Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption of essential amino acids in the energy range 1 keV to 20 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy-absorption (Z PEAeff ) of essential amino acids histidine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, threonine, tryptophan and valine have been calculated by a direct method in the energy region of 1 keV to 20 MeV. The Z PEAeff values have been found to change with energy and composition of the amino acids. The variations of mass energy-absorption coefficient, effective atomic number for photon interaction (Z PIeff ) and Z PEAeff with energy are shown graphically. Significant differences exist between Z PIeff and the Z PEAeff in the energy region of 8-100 keV for histidine and threonine; 6-100 keV for leucine, lysine, tryptophan, phenylalanine and valine; 15-400 keV for methionine. The effect of absorption edge on effective atomic numbers and the possibility of defining two set values of these parameters at the K-absorption edge of high-Z element present in the amino acids are discussed. The reasons for using Z PEAeff rather than the commonly used Z PIeff in medical radiation dosimetry for the calculation of absorbed dose in radiation therapy are also discussed

  5. Studies on effective atomic numbers and electron densities in amino acids and sugars in the energy range 30-1333 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowda, Shivalinge; Krishnaveni, S.; Gowda, Ramakrishna

    2005-01-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of the amino acids glycine, alanine, serine, valine, threonine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, lysine, glutamic acid, histidine, phenylalanine, arginine, tyrosine, tryptophane and the sugars arabinose, ribose, glucose, galactose, mannose, fructose, rhamnose, maltose, melibiose, melezitose and raffinose at the energies 30.8, 35.0, 81.0, 145, 276.4, 302.9, 356, 383.9, 661.6, 1173 and 1332.5 keV were calculated by using the measured total attenuation cross-sections. The interpolations of total attenuation cross-sections for photons of energy E in elements of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the XCOM data in the photon energy region 30-1500 keV. The best-fit coefficients obtained by a piece wise interpolation method were used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data

  6. Studies on effective atomic numbers and electron densities in amino acids and sugars in the energy range 30-1333 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gowda, Shivalinge [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Krishnaveni, S. [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India); Gowda, Ramakrishna [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570 006 (India)]. E-mail: ramakrishnagowda@yahoo.com

    2005-10-15

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of the amino acids glycine, alanine, serine, valine, threonine, leucine, isoleucine, aspartic acid, lysine, glutamic acid, histidine, phenylalanine, arginine, tyrosine, tryptophane and the sugars arabinose, ribose, glucose, galactose, mannose, fructose, rhamnose, maltose, melibiose, melezitose and raffinose at the energies 30.8, 35.0, 81.0, 145, 276.4, 302.9, 356, 383.9, 661.6, 1173 and 1332.5 keV were calculated by using the measured total attenuation cross-sections. The interpolations of total attenuation cross-sections for photons of energy E in elements of atomic number Z was performed using the logarithmic regression analysis of the XCOM data in the photon energy region 30-1500 keV. The best-fit coefficients obtained by a piece wise interpolation method were used to find the effective atomic number and electron density of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  7. A different perspective to the effective atomic number (Zeff) for some boron compounds and trommel sieve waste (TSW) with a new computer program ZXCOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalçın, Zeynel; İçelli, Orhan; Okutan, Mustafa; Boncukçuoğlu, Recep; Artun, Ozan; Orak, Salim

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effective atomic number (Z eff )has been calculated for some boron compounds, such as concentrate colemanite, tincal, ulexite, boric acid, probertite and TSW (Trommel Sieve Waste) by means of ZXCOM at incident beam energy (E 0 =59.543 keV) and scattering angle (θ=35°). We present and discuss the (Z eff ) obtained by Rayleigh/Compton (R/C) ratio and evaluated for the purpose of radiation shielding which contains boron compounds, which are commonly used as shield materials. -- Highlights: ► The (Z eff ) of an infinite number of compounds will be determined according to the number actually consisting of elements which correspond to an integer number at the curve of ZXCOM. ► The result of this study shows that the effective atomic number (Z eff ) is closely related to the scattering angles. ► The main objective of the study is to construct a computer program, ZXCOM, to calculate the (Z eff ) at compromise (E 0 ) and (θ) for each element, compound and mixture.

  8. A correlation between isomer shifts of 237Np Moessbauer spectra and coordination numbers of Np atoms in neptunyl(V) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, M.; Nakada, M.; Nakamoto, T.; Yamashita, T.; Masaki, N.M.; Krot, N.N.

    1999-01-01

    Five neptunyl(V) compounds were synthesized and studied by 237 Np Moessbauer spectroscopy. The isomer shifts (δ) of the Moessbauer spectra ranged from -18.6 to -19.1 mm/s for the compounds with Np atoms surrounded by 7 oxygen atoms (coordination number (CN) 7). On the other hand, the larger value of δ was obtained for the compound with CN 8. From the comparison of the present results with those reported on neptunyl(V) and (VI) compounds, it is concluded that there is a correlation between the δ and the CN for neptunyl(V) compounds, and the distribution of δ is narrower for neptunyl(V) compounds than that of neptunyl(VI) compounds. (author)

  9. Influence of the number of atomic levels on the spectral opacity of low temperature nickel and iron in the spectral range 50-300 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busquet, M.; Klapisch, M.; Gilles, D.

    2013-01-01

    Opacity is a fundamental ingredient for the secular evolution of stars. The calculation of the stellar plasma absorption coefficients is complex due to the composition of these plasmas, generally an H /He dominated mixture with a low concentration of partially ionized heavy ions (the iron group). The international collaboration OPAC recently presented extensive comparisons of spectral opacities of iron and nickel for temperatures between 15 and 40 eV and for densities of ∼ 3 mg/cm 3 , relevant to the stellar envelope conditions [1, 2]. The role of Configuration Interaction (CI) and the influence of the number of atomic levels on the opacity using the recently improved version of HULLAC atomic code [3, 4] are illustrated in this article. Comparisons with theoretical predictions already presented in [1] are discussed. (authors)

  10. Correlation between catalytic activity and bonding and coordination number of atoms and molecules on transition metal surfaces: theory and experimental evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falicov, L.M.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Correlation between catalytic activity and low-energy local electronic fluctuation in transition metals is proposed. A theory and calculations are presented which indicate that maximum electronic fluctuants take place at high-coordination metal sites. Either (i) atomically rough surfaces that expose to the reactant molecules atoms with large numbers of nonmagnetic or weakly magnetic neighbors in the first or second layer at the surface or (ii) stepped and kinked surfaces are the most active in carrying out structure-sensitive catalytic reactions. The synthesis of ammonia from N 2 and H 2 over iron and rhenium surfaces, 1 H 2 / 2 H 2 exchange over stepped platinum crystal surfaces at low pressures, and the hydrogenolysis (C - C bond breaking) of isobutane at kinked platinum crystal surfaces are presented as experimental evidence in support of the theory

  11. Simulation and design of an electron beam ion source charge breeder for the californium rare isotope breeder upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Dickerson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An electron beam ion source (EBIS will be constructed and used to charge breed ions from the californium rare isotope breeder upgrade (CARIBU for postacceleration into the Argonne tandem linear accelerator system (ATLAS. Simulations of the EBIS charge breeder performance and the related ion transport systems are reported. Propagation of the electron beam through the EBIS was verified, and the anticipated incident power density within the electron collector was identified. The full normalized acceptance of the charge breeder with a 2 A electron beam, 0.024π  mm mrad for nominal operating parameters, was determined by simulating ion injection into the EBIS. The optics of the ion transport lines were carefully optimized to achieve well-matched ion injection, to minimize emittance growth of the injected and extracted ion beams, and to enable adequate testing of the charge bred ions prior to installation in ATLAS.

  12. Neutron activation analysis of the calcium content in vivo, using a 50μg source of californium 252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guey, A.; Zech, P.Y.; Meary, M.F.; Leitienne, P.

    1975-01-01

    Owing to the recent commercialisation of californium 252 it is now possible to obtain neutron fluxes strong enough for precise activation of the calcium content of biological targets. After the preliminary measurements necessary to establish the most suitable conditions for irradiating 3 to 5cm thick targets, two parallel sets of experiments were developed. In the first the medium-term total calcium variation was studied in 20 rats, 16 suffering from chronic kidney deficiency. In the second the precision expected as a function of the calcium content of the irradiated target was examined, using 3 sets of tissue equivalent standards of calcium contents 5, 20 and 50g respectively. The first results obtained on calcium 49 in vivo show that a calcium content variation can be followed with a sensitivity threshold below that obtained by conventional methods [fr

  13. Extraction of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides from Californium Campaign Rework Solution Using TODGA-based Solvent Extraction System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benker, Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delmau, Laetitia Helene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dryman, Joshua Cory [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report presents the studies carried out to demonstrate the possibility of quantitatively extracting trivalent actinides and lanthanides from highly acidic solutions using a neutral ligand-based solvent extraction system. These studies stemmed from the perceived advantage of such systems over cationexchange- based solvent extraction systems that require an extensive feed adjustment to make a low-acid feed. The targeted feed solutions are highly acidic aqueous phases obtained after the dissolution of curium targets during a californium (Cf) campaign. Results obtained with actual Cf campaign solutions, but highly diluted to be manageable in a glove box, are presented, followed by results of tests run in the hot cells with Cf campaign rework solutions. It was demonstrated that a solvent extraction system based on the tetraoctyl diglycolamide molecule is capable of quantitatively extracting trivalent actinides from highly acidic solutions. This system was validated using actual feeds from a Cf campaign.

  14. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  15. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  16. Californium-252 Brachytherapy Combined With External-Beam Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Long-Term Treatment Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Xin; Qian Chengyuan; Qing Yi; Zhao Kewei; Yang Zhengzhou; Dai Nan; Zhong Zhaoyang; Tang Cheng; Li Zheng; Gu Xianqing; Zhou Qian; Feng Yan; Xiong Yanli; Shan Jinlu; Wang Dong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To observe, by retrospective analysis, the curative effects and complications due to californium-252 ( 252 Cf) neutron intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 1999 to December 2007, 696 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB to IIIB) were treated with 252 Cf-ICBT in combination of EBRT. Of all, 31 patients were at Stage IB, 104 at IIA, 363 at IIB, 64 at IIIA, and 134 at IIIB. Californium-252 ICBT was delivered at 7–12 Gy per insertion per week, with a total dose of 29–45 Gy to reference point A in three to five insertions. The whole pelvic cavity was treated with 8-MV X-ray external irradiation at 2 Gy per fraction, four times per week. After 16–38 Gy of external irradiation, the center of the whole pelvic field was blocked with a 4-cm-wide lead shield, with a total external irradiation dose of 44–56 Gy. The total treatment course was 5 to 6 weeks. Results: Overall survival rate at 3 and 5 years for all patients was 76.0% and 64.9%, respectively. Disease-free 3- and 5-year survival rates of patients were 71.2% and 58.4%, respectively. Late complications included vaginal contracture and adhesion, radiation proctitis, radiation cystitis, and inflammatory bowel, which accounted for 5.8%, 7.1%, 6.2%, and 4.9%, respectively. Univariate analysis results showed significant correlation of stage, age, histopathologic grade, and lymph node status with overall survival. Cox multiple regression analysis showed that the independent variables were stage, histopathologic grade, tumor size, and lymphatic metastasis in all patients. Conclusion: Results of this series suggest that the combined use of 252 Cf-ICBT with EBRT is an effective method for treatment of cervical cancer.

  17. Beyond Californium-A Neutron Generator Alternative for Dosimetry and Instrument Calibration in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Roman K; Mozhayev, Andrey V; Murphy, Mark K; Thompson, Alan K

    2017-09-01

    Evaluations of neutron survey instruments, area monitors, and personal dosimeters rely on reference neutron radiations, which have evolved from the heavy reliance on (α,n) sources to a shared reliance on (α,n) and the spontaneous fission neutrons of californium-252 (Cf). Capable of producing high dose equivalent rates from an almost point source geometry, the characteristics of Cf are generally more favorable when compared to the use of (α,n) and (γ,n) sources or reactor-produced reference neutron radiations. Californium-252 is typically used in two standardized configurations: unmoderated, to yield a fission energy spectrum; or with the capsule placed within a heavy-water moderating sphere to produce a softened spectrum that is generally considered more appropriate for evaluating devices used in nuclear power plant work environments. The U.S. Department of Energy Cf Loan/Lease Program, a longtime origin of affordable Cf sources for research, testing and calibration, was terminated in 2009. Since then, high-activity sources have become increasingly cost-prohibitive for laboratories that formerly benefited from that program. Neutron generators, based on the D-T and D-D fusion reactions, have become economically competitive with Cf and are recognized internationally as important calibration and test standards. Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are jointly considering the practicality and technical challenges of implementing neutron generators as calibration standards in the U.S. This article reviews the characteristics of isotope-based neutron sources, possible isotope alternatives to Cf, and the rationale behind the increasing favor of electronically generated neutron options. The evaluation of a D-T system at PNNL has revealed characteristics that must be considered in adapting generators to the task of calibration and testing where accurate determination of a dosimetric quantity is

  18. Quantification of differences in the effective atomic numbers of healthy and cancerous tissues: A discussion in the context of diagnostics and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M. L. [School of Applied Sciences and Health Innovation Research Institute, RMIT University, Melbourne 3000 (Australia); Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne 3001 (Australia) and Medical Physics, WBRC, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne 3000 (Australia)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: There are a range of genetic and nongenetic factors influencing the elemental composition of different human tissues. The elemental composition of cancerous tissues frequently differs from healthy tissue of the same organ, particularly in high-Z trace element concentrations. For this reason, one could suggest that this may be exploited in diagnostics and perhaps even influence dosimetry. Methods: In this work, for the first time, effective atomic numbers are computed for common cancerous and healthy tissues using a robust, energy-dependent approach between 10 keV and 100 MeV. These are then quantitatively compared within the context of diagnostics and dosimetry. Results: Differences between effective atomic numbers of healthy and diseased tissues are found to be typically less than 10%. Fibrotic tissues and calcifications of the breast exhibit substantial (tens to hundreds of percent) differences to healthy tissue. Expectedly, differences are most pronounced in the photoelectric regime and consequently most relevant for kV imaging/therapy and radionuclides with prominent low-energy peaks. Cancerous tissue of the testes and stomach have lower effective atomic numbers than corresponding healthy tissues, while diseased tissues of the other organ sites typically have higher values. Conclusions: As dose calculation approaches improve in accuracy, there may be an argument for the explicit inclusion of pathologies. This is more the case for breast, penile, prostate, nasopharyngeal, and stomach cancer, less so for testicular and kidney cancer. The calculated data suggest dual-energy computed tomography could potentially improve lesion identification in the aforementioned organs (with the exception of testicular cancer), with most import in breast imaging. Ultimately, however, the differences are very small. It is likely that the assumption of a generic 'tissue ramp' in planning will be sufficient for the foreseeable future, and that the Z differences do

  19. Quantification of differences in the effective atomic numbers of healthy and cancerous tissues: A discussion in the context of diagnostics and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There are a range of genetic and nongenetic factors influencing the elemental composition of different human tissues. The elemental composition of cancerous tissues frequently differs from healthy tissue of the same organ, particularly in high-Z trace element concentrations. For this reason, one could suggest that this may be exploited in diagnostics and perhaps even influence dosimetry. Methods: In this work, for the first time, effective atomic numbers are computed for common cancerous and healthy tissues using a robust, energy-dependent approach between 10 keV and 100 MeV. These are then quantitatively compared within the context of diagnostics and dosimetry. Results: Differences between effective atomic numbers of healthy and diseased tissues are found to be typically less than 10%. Fibrotic tissues and calcifications of the breast exhibit substantial (tens to hundreds of percent) differences to healthy tissue. Expectedly, differences are most pronounced in the photoelectric regime and consequently most relevant for kV imaging/therapy and radionuclides with prominent low-energy peaks. Cancerous tissue of the testes and stomach have lower effective atomic numbers than corresponding healthy tissues, while diseased tissues of the other organ sites typically have higher values. Conclusions: As dose calculation approaches improve in accuracy, there may be an argument for the explicit inclusion of pathologies. This is more the case for breast, penile, prostate, nasopharyngeal, and stomach cancer, less so for testicular and kidney cancer. The calculated data suggest dual-energy computed tomography could potentially improve lesion identification in the aforementioned organs (with the exception of testicular cancer), with most import in breast imaging. Ultimately, however, the differences are very small. It is likely that the assumption of a generic “tissue ramp” in planning will be sufficient for the foreseeable future, and that the Z differences do not

  20. Cold Incineration of Chlorophenols in Aqueous Solution by Advanced Electrochemical Process Electro-Fenton. Effect of Number and Position of Chlorine Atoms on the Degradation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oturan, Nihal; Panizza, Marco; Oturan, Mehmet A.

    2009-09-01

    This study reports the kinetics of the degradation of several chlorophenols (CPs), such as monochlorophenols (2-chlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol), dichlorophenols (2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,6- dichlorophenol), trichlorophenols (2,3,5- trichlorophenol and 2,4,5-trichlorophenol), 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol, by the electro-Fenton process using a carbon felt cathode and a Pt anode. The effect of number and the position of the chlorine atoms in the aromatic ring on the oxidative degradation rate was evaluated and discussed. The oxidation reaction of all the CPs with hydroxyl radicals evidenced a pseudo-first-order kinetics and the rate constant decreased with increasing the number of chlorine atoms. The absolute rate constant of second-order reaction kinetics between CPs and •OH was determined by the competition kinetics method in the range of (3.56-7.75) × 109 M-1 s-1 and follows the same sequence of the apparent rate constants. The mineralization of several CPs and of a mixture of all CPs under study was monitored by the total organic carbon (TOC) removal and the chlorine release during mineralization was followed by ion chromatography. Our results demonstrated that more chlorinated phenols are more difficult to mineralize; however for all the tested CPs, almost quantitative release of chloride ions was obtained after 6 h of treatment.

  1. A study of the effective atomic number of SixPb0.7-x(Fe2O30.3 ternary alloys for photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buyukyildiz Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effective atomic number (Zeff of SixPb0.7-x(Fe2O30.3 ternary alloys was obtained for photons. Rayleigh to Compton scattering ratio (R/C has been determined to obtain the Zeff of SixPb0.7-x(Fe2O30.3 ternary alloys of varying Si and Pb (10 %-60 % content for scattering of 59.54 keV g-rays at an angle of 130°. The theoretical R/C ratios of elements were plotted as a function of the atomic number and fitted to a polynomial equation. Experimental R/C values of alloys were then used to obtain Zeff using this fit equation. Also, Zeff values of these alloys were determined for the first time by interpolating the R/C of the material using the R/C data of adjacent elements in between the R/C of the alloy lies. The agreement between the interpolation method and the fit equation was quite satisfactory. The obtained Zeff for photon scattering were then compared to the Zeff for total photon attenuation obtained using the Auto-Zeff program. Significant variations were observed between the Zeff for scattering and the total attenuation of gamma rays.

  2. A comparative study on total reflection X-ray fluorescence determination of low atomic number elements in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using different excitation sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, N. L.; Kanrar, Buddhadev; Aggarwal, S. K.; Wobrauschek, Peter; Rauwolf, M.; Streli, Christina

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of trace element determinations of low atomic number (Z) elements Na, Mg, Al, P, K and Ca in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using W Lβ1, Mo Kα and Cr Kα excitations has been made. For Mo Kα and W Lβ1 excitations a Si (Li) detector with beryllium window was used and measurements were performed in air and helium atmospheres. For Cr Kα excitation, a Si (Li) detector with an ultra thin polymer window (UTW) was used and measurements were made in vacuum and air atmospheres. The sensitivities of the elemental X-ray lines were determined using TXRF spectra of standard solutions and processing them by IAEA QXAS program. The elemental concentrations of the elements in other solutions were determined using their TXRF spectra and pre-determined sensitivity values. The study suggests that, using the above experimental set up, Mo Kα excitation is not suited for trace determination of low atomic number element. Excitation by WLβ1 and helium atmosphere, the spectrometer can be used for the determination of elements with Z = 15 (P) and above with fairly good detection limits whereas Cr Kα excitation with ultra thin polymer window and vacuum atmosphere is good for the elements having Z = 11 (Na) and above. The detection limits using this set up vary from 7048 pg for Na to 83 pg for Ti.

  3. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  4. Use of californium-252 neutron irradiator for in-vivo analysis of the bone calcium content of the hand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guey, A.; Leitienne, P.; Zech, P.Y.; Traeger, J.; Doyen, J.B.; Breton, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    With californium-252 it is easy to obtain a high neutron flux of the order of 10 9 n/s. The mean energy of this radiation, which is close on 2 MeV, activates calcium very well. The authors describe a storage and irradiator unit with a 100 μg californium source, with which it will henceforth be possible to develop this technique of measuring the calcium of the hand in a hospital. The test programme has three distinct phases: (1) irradiation of the biological target for 10 min; (2) after a transfer period of 30 s, detection of the radiation emitted by the 49 Ca for 600 s; (3) processing of the numerical data received, which are transmitted on line to a T 1600 calculator. The weight is found by comparing the activity induced in the unknown calcium mass with that induced in a phantom chosen as the activity standard. The reproducibility of the method is of the order of 3% (5% at the worst). The gross standardized result is edited automatically. For physical and clinical reasons, the hand is chosen as the reference part of the body in 70 control subjects. The local irradiation dose is less than 2 rem. The bone calcium content is 14.3+-1.9 g in men and 10.1+-1.3 g in women. In clinical application of the technique it is necessary to differentiate between the normal calcium content and the calcium content found with a pathological state. This makes it necessary to express the measurement in the form of a volume mass (rho). The volume of the hand skeleton (V in cm 3 ) is calculated from the corresponding bone surface (S in cm 2 ) measured by planimetry with the relationship V=8.925 exp 0.0205.S, found after studying 80 hand skeletons. In our control subjects the calcium bone volume mass was 0.288 g/cm 3 in men and 0.282 g/cm 3 in women. There is a very significant difference (p<0.001) in a population of 88 subjects with chronic renal insufficiencies at the terminal stage: rho=0.233 in men and 0.235 in women

  5. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  6. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids in the energy range 1 keV–100 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Morteza; Lunscher, Nolan [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Yeow, John T.W., E-mail: jyeow@uwaterloo.ca [Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Systems Design Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave., W., Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in fabrication of X-ray sensors based on bacteriorhodopsin, a proton pump protein in cell membrane of Halobacterium salinarium. Therefore, a better understanding of interaction of X-ray photons with bacteriorhodopsin is required. We use WinXCom program to calculate the mass attenuation coefficient of bacteriorhodopsin and its comprising amino acids for photon energies from 1 keV to 100 GeV. These amino acids include alanine, arginine, asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamine, glutamic acid, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, methionine, phenylalanine, proline, serine, threonine, tryptophan, tyrosine, valine, Asx1, Asx2, Glx1 and Glx2. We then use that data to calculate effective atomic number and electron densities for the same range of energy. We also emphasize on two ranges of energies (10–200 keV and 1–20 MeV) in which X-ray imaging and radiotherapy machines work.

  7. Investigation of the on-axis atom number density in the supersonic gas jet under high gas backing pressure by simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanglong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The supersonic gas jets from conical nozzles are simulated using 2D model. The on-axis atom number density in gas jet is investigated in detail by comparing the simulated densities with the idealized densities of straight streamline model in scaling laws. It is found that the density is generally lower than the idealized one and the deviation between them is mainly dependent on the opening angle of conical nozzle, the nozzle length and the gas backing pressure. The density deviation is then used to discuss the deviation of the equivalent diameter of a conical nozzle from the idealized deq in scaling laws. The investigation on the lateral expansion of gas jet indicates the lateral expansion could be responsible for the behavior of the density deviation. These results could be useful for the estimation of cluster size and the understanding of experimental results in laser-cluster interaction experiments.

  8. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Zeff) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes Z, M. A.; Da Silva, T. A.; Nogueira, M. S.; Goncalves Z, E.

    2015-10-01

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Z eff of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Z eff using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  9. Long-term effects of an intracavitary treatment with californium-252 on normal tissue. [Swine, /sup 226/Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, M.F.; Beamer, J.L.; Mahony, T.D.; Cross, F.T.; Lund, J.E.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1976-01-01

    About one hundred fifty swine were exposed to either radium-226 or californium-252 sources in the uterine cervix to determine an RBE for both acute and long-term effects. That value for early changes in the tissues at risk in the treatment of cervical cancer was between 6.2 and 6.8. The incidence of complications increased with time after exposure, especially among animals treated with /sup 252/Cf. Analysis of rectal injury showed that ulceration occurred frequently within a year postexposure at doses between 1600 and 2400 rad calculated at 2 cm lateral to the source midline. Fat necrosis and smooth muscle atrophy, resulting in a local rectal stricture, were delayed changes observed in some animals. The lower ureter was the site for a greater frequency of complications than the GI tract. Ureteral stricture often occurred at doses of 1200 rad from /sup 252/Cf and 7000 rad from /sup 226/Ra. Observation of delayed effects in the uterine-cervix in animals held up to 4 years postexposure indicate that the RBE for /sup 252/Cf may be increased to a value as high as 18, while repair may have even decreased it to about 5.6 in the rectum. Fifty swine are still being observed for long-term effects after doses above 800 rad from /sup 252/Cf and 5000 rad from /sup 226/Ra.

  10. Neutron flux characterization of californium-252 Neutron Research Facility at the University of Texas - Pan American by nuclear analytical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Kareem; Sanchez, Patrick; Hannan, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    In the field of nuclear science, neutron flux is an intrinsic property of nuclear reaction facilities that is the basis for experimental irradiation calculations and analysis. In the Rio Grande Valley (Texas), the UTPA Neutron Research Facility (NRF) is currently the only neutron facility available for experimental research purposes. The facility is comprised of a 20-microgram californium-252 neutron source surrounded by a shielding cascade containing different irradiation cavities. Thermal and fast neutron flux values for the UTPA NRF have yet to be fully investigated and may be of particular interest to biomedical studies in low neutron dose applications. Though a variety of techniques exist for the characterization of neutron flux, neutron activation analysis (NAA) of metal and nonmetal foils is a commonly utilized experimental method because of its detection sensitivity and availability. The aim of our current investigation is to employ foil activation in the determination of neutron flux values for the UTPA NSRF for further research purposes. Neutron spectrum unfolding of the acquired experimental data via specialized software and subsequent comparison for consistency with computational models lends confidence to the results.

  11. A simple formulation for deriving effective atomic numbers via electron density calibration from dual-energy CT data in the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masatoshi; Sagara, Shota

    2017-06-01

    The main objective of this study is to propose a simple formulation (which we called DEEDZ) for deriving effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) via electron density (ρ e ) calibration from dual-energy (DE) CT data. We carried out numerical analysis of this DEEDZ method for a large variety of materials with known elemental compositions and mass densities using an available photon cross sections database. The new conversion approach was also applied to previously published experimental DECT data to validate its practical feasibility. We performed numerical analysis of the DEEDZ conversion method for tissue surrogates that have the same chemical compositions and mass densities as a commercial tissue-characterization phantom in order to determine the parameters necessary for the ρ e and Z eff calibrations in the DEEDZ conversion. These parameters were then applied to the human-body-equivalent tissues of ICRU Report 46 as objects of interest with unknown ρ e and Z eff . The attenuation coefficients of these materials were calculated using the XCOM photon cross sections database. We also applied the DEEDZ conversion to experimental DECT data available in the literature, which was measured for two commercial phantoms of different shapes and sizes using a dual-source CT scanner at 80 kV and 140 kV/Sn. The simulated Z eff 's were in excellent agreement with the reference values for almost all of the ICRU-46 human tissues over the Z eff range from 5.83 (gallstones-cholesterol) to 16.11 (bone mineral-hydroxyapatite). The relative deviations from the reference Z eff were within ± 0.3% for all materials, except for one outlier that presented a -3.1% deviation, namely, the thyroid. The reason for this discrepancy is that the thyroid contains a small amount of iodine, an element with a large atomic number (Z = 53). In the experimental case, we confirmed that the simple formulation with less fit parameters enable to calibrate Z eff as accurately as the existing calibration

  12. Charge fraction of 6.0 MeV/n heavy ions with a carbon foil: Dependence on the foil thickness and projectile atomic number

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Y; Muramatsu, M; Murakami, T; Yamada, S; Kobayashi, C; Kageyama, Y; Miyoshi, T; Ogawa, H; Nakabushi, H; Fujimoto, T; Miyata, T; Sano, Y

    2003-01-01

    We measured the charge fraction of 6.0 MeV/n heavy ions (C, Ne, Si, Ar, Fe and Cu) with a carbon foil at the NIRS-HIMAC injector. At this energy they are stripped with a carbon foil before being injected into two synchrotron rings with a maximum energy of 800 MeV/n. In order to find the foil thickness (D sub E) at which an equilibrium charge state distribution occurs, and to study the dependence of the D sub E -values on the projectile atomic number, we measured the exit charge fractions for foil thicknesses of between 10 and 350 mu g/cm sup 2. The results showed that the D sub E -values are 21.5, 62.0, 162, 346, 121, 143 mu g/cm sup 2 for C, Ne, Si, Ar, Fe, Cu, respectively. The fraction of Ar sup 1 sup 8 sup + ions was actually improved to 33% at 320 mu g/cm sup 2 from approx 15% at 100 mu g/cm sup 2. For Fe and Cu ions, the D sub E -values were found to be only 121 and 143 mu g/cm sup 2; there is a large gap between Ar and Fe, which is related to the differences in the ratio of the binding energy of the K-...

  13. A method to determine exactly the effective atomic number, electron density and absorbtion coefficient of materials from two Computer-Tomography measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christ, G.

    1981-01-01

    By the method of computer tomography, which is in use since about 10 years, X-ray images of a layer of interest can be produced without interference from the material present above this layer. An integral measurement of the attenuation of continuous X-radiation is sufficient to record the different attenuation behaviour in a layer for the purpose of image formation. For more information, however, can be obtained by taking into account the spectral distribution of the X-ray source and the energy dependence of the attenuation, which varies for different materials. In the experimental part of this work the measurement of the spectral distribution is described together with the necessary corrections, and the possible application of the cross sections for the relevant interaction processes, which are known from the literature is studied. As shown in the theoretical part, the attenuation coefficient can be described by an effective atomic number and the electron density of the absorber in the case of an arbitrary mixture of absorbing materials and a continuous X-ray spectrum. These two unknown material parameters can be determined by a method based on the measurement of two spectra with different spectral distribution. This is demonstrated by a one-dimensional and a two-dimensional computer simulation. (orig./WU) [de

  14. Determination of effective atomic number of breast tissues using scattered radiation; Determinacao do numero atomico efetivo de tecidos mamarios usando a radiacao espalhada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceicao, A.L.C.; Poletti, M.E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Dept. de Fisica e Matematica

    2010-07-01

    The scattered radiation has been used in several industrial and clinical applications since it permits to characterize the scattering material. Several types of information can be extracted from the spectrum of scattered radiation which can be used to characterization of biological tissues such as breast tissues. In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (carcinoma) neoplastic breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90 deg C (x = 0.99 angstrom-1). A practical method using the area of elastic and inelastic scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) of the samples, being validated comparing the experimental obtained values of Z{sub eff} of several standard materials with calculated values using traditional method based on total cross-section of compounds. The obtained results show that exist differences in the distributions of Z{sub eff} of breast tissues, which are related to the content of carbon (Z=6) and oxygen (Z=8) in each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use this parameter for characterizing breast tissues, pointing the possibility of its use as a complementary tool for the diagnosis of the breast cancer. (author)

  15. Chemical composition, effective atomic number and electron density study of trommel sieve waste (TSW), Portland cement, lime, pointing and their admixtures with TSW in different proportions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aygun, Murat; Erzeneoglu, Salih Zeki

    2010-01-01

    The trommel sieve waste (TSW) which forms during the boron ore production is considered to be a promising building material with its use as an admixture with Portland cement and is considered to be an alternative radiation shielding material, also. Thus, having knowledge on the chemical composition and radiation interaction properties of TSW as compared to other building materials is of importance. In the present study, chemical compositions of the materials used have been determined using a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRFS). Also, TSW, some commonly used building materials (Portland cement, lime and pointing) and their admixtures with TSW have been investigated in terms of total mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ), photon interaction cross sections (σ t ), effective atomic numbers (Z eff ) and effective electron densities (N e ) by using X-rays at 22.1, 25 keV and γ-rays at 88 keV photon energies. Possible conclusions were drawn with respect to the variations in photon energy and chemical composition.

  16. Calculation of effective atomic number and electron density of essential biomolecules for electron, proton, alpha particle and multi-energetic photon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Onaran, Tayfur

    2015-07-01

    Effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and electron densities (Ne) of some essential biomolecules have been calculated for total electron interaction, total proton interaction and total alpha particle interaction using an interpolation method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. Also, the spectrum weighted Zeff for multi-energetic photons has been calculated using Auto-Zeff program. Biomolecules consist of fatty acids, amino acids, carbohydrates and basic nucleotides of DNA and RNA. Variations of Zeff and Ne with kinetic energy of ionizing charged particles and effective photon energies of heterogeneous sources have been studied for the given materials. Significant variations in Zeff and Ne have been observed through the entire energy region for electron, proton and alpha particle interactions. Non-uniform variation has been observed for protons and alpha particles in low and intermediate energy regions, respectively. The maximum values of Zeff have found to be in higher energies for total electron interaction whereas maximum values have found to be in relatively low energies for total proton and total alpha particle interactions. When it comes to the multi-energetic photon sources, it has to be noted that the highest Zeff values were found at low energy region where photoelectric absorption is the pre-dominant interaction process. The lowest values of Zeff have been shown in biomolecules such as stearic acid, leucine, mannitol and thymine, which have highest H content in their groups. Variation in Ne seems to be more or less the same with the variation in Zeff for the given materials as expected.

  17. Ab initio full-potential study of mechanical properties and magnetic phase stability of californium monopnictides (CfN and CfP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amari, S., E-mail: siham_amari@yahoo.fr [Faculté des Sciences de la Nature et de la Vie, Université Hassiba Benbouali, Chlef, 02000 (Algeria); Bouhafs, B. [Laboratoire de Modélisation et Simulation en Sciences des Matériaux, Université Djillali Liabès de Sidi Bel-Abbés, Sidi Bel-Abbés, 22000 (Algeria)

    2016-09-15

    Based on the first-principles methods, the structural, elastic, electronic, properties and magnetic ordering of californium monopnictides CfX (X = P) have been studied using the full-potential augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (FP-L/APW + lo) method within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The electronic exchange correlation energy is described by generalized gradient approximation GGA and GGA+U (U is the Hubbard correction). The GGA+U method is applied to the rare-earth 5f states. We have calculated the lattice parameters, bulk modulii and the first pressure derivatives of the bulk modulii. The elastic properties of the studied compounds are only investigated in the most stable calculated phase. In order to gain further information, we have calculated Young’s modulus, shear modulus, anisotropy factor and Kleinman parameter by the aid of the calculated elastic constants. The results mainly show that californium monopnictides CfX (X = P) have an antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Density of states (DOS) and charge densities for both compounds are also computed in the NaCl (B1) structure.

  18. Use of polyethylene pellets in the design and construction of a storage safe, a transport vessel and a portable shield for californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.

    1986-01-01

    A storage and shielding facility for 300 μg of Californium-252 sources was designed and constructed. Though the safe was in a permanent location, the fact that it consisted of a lead bucket surrounded by polyethylene pellets made it simple, movable and inexpensive. If need be, more quantities of Cf-252 could be added without altering the basic design and sacrificing the radiation protection guidelines. The measured radiation levels from 300 μg of stored Cf-252 in and around the storage vault were lower than the expected dose rates by a factor of 5. The measured radiation levels around the occupied environs of the facility were below the maximum permissible yearly dose of 500mrem for non-occupational workers. A transport vessel was designed and constructed to carry up to 50 μg of Californium-252 sources. It consisted of a standard 55 gallon steel drum on casters containing cylindrical lead shield surrounded by polyethylene pellets. The measured maximum surface dose rates on the drum and at one meter away were within the radiation protection guidelines and were less than the expected dose rates. A portable shield was designed and constructed to protect the body in afterloading operations and handling of the sources. It consisted of polyethylene pellets in an aluminum box and an attached 10 cm thick plexiglass eye shield. The simple design, with the ease of using polyethylene pellets can be extended to construct bedside shields

  19. Use of californium-252 sources in Hungary for teaching and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csikai, J.

    1976-01-01

    An activation facility was designed to accommodate up to 50 mg of 252 Cf; it contains at present a 500 μg source. The absolute values of thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes were determined by the foil activation method using In, Dy, Au, Al and Fe detectors. Cross-sections averaged for unmoderated 252 Cf neutrons were determined for 22 different reactions for elements with atomic weights lying between A=27 and 204. The sensitivity for determination of Al, Ti, Cu, As, Sr, Mo, In, Cd, Ba, Au, Hg and Pb was calculated for NaI(Tl) and Ge(Li) detectors. Average (n,2n) cross-sections for 252 Cf spectrum were calculated for 49 nuclei lying between A=14 and 204. Angular distributions and cross-sections for the fragments from 252 Cf neutron-induced fission of 232 Th and 238 U were measured. Titanium in bauxite and manganese in aluminium alloys were determined with a 252 Cf source. The applicability of solid-state track detectors for neutron dosimetry, radiography and for the determination of fuel burn-up were investigated using 252 Cf neutron and fragment sources. Characteristics of a jumping spark counter for counting fission fragments were studied with 252 Cf sources. (author)

  20. Remarkably High Stability of Late Actinide Dioxide Cations: Extending Chemistry to Pentavalent Berkelium and Californium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, Phuong D; Vasiliu, Monica; Peterson, Kirk A; Dixon, David A; Gibson, John K

    2017-12-06

    Actinyl chemistry is extended beyond Cm to BkO 2 + and CfO 2 + through transfer of an O atom from NO 2 to BkO + or CfO + , establishing a surprisingly high lower limit of 73 kcal mol -1 for the dissociation energies, D[O-(BkO + )] and D[O-(CfO + )]. CCSD(T) computations are in accord with the observed reactions, and characterize the newly observed dioxide ions as linear pentavalent actinyls; these being the first Bk and Cf species with oxidation states above IV. Computations of actinide dioxide cations AnO 2 + for An=Pa to Lr reveal an unexpected minimum for D[O-(CmO + )]. For CmO 2 + , and AnO 2 + beyond EsO 2 + , the most stable structure has side-on bonded η 2 -(O 2 ), as An III peroxides for An=Cm and Lr, and as An II superoxides for An=Fm, Md, and No. It is predicted that the most stable structure of EsO 2 + is linear [O=Es V =O] + , einsteinyl, and that FmO 2 + and MdO 2 + , like CmO 2 + , also have actinyl(V) structures as local energy minima. The results expand actinide oxidation state chemistry, the realm of the distinctive actinyl moiety, and the non-periodic character towards the end of the periodic table. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Multiplicity and correlated energy of gamma rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of Californium-252

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunson, G.S. Jr.

    1982-06-01

    An array of eight high-speed plastic scintillation detectors has been used to infer a mathematical model for the emission multipliciy of prompt gammas in the spontaneous fission of 252 Cf. Exceptional time resolution and coincidence capability permitted the separation of gammas from fast neutrons over a flight path of approximately 10 cm. About 20 different distribution models were tested. The average energy of the prompt gammas is inversely related to the number emitted; however, this inverse relationship is not strong and the total gamma energy does increase with increasing gamma number. An extension of the experiment incorporated a lithium-drifted germanium gamma spectrometer that resolved nearly 100 discrete gammas associated with fission. Of these gammas, some were preferentially associated with fission in which few gammas were emitted. Certain others were more frequent when many gammas were emitted. Results are presented

  2. Measurement of the Lyman-alpha radiation at ionization manometers for determination of the hydrogen atom number density in fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loercher, M.

    1990-01-01

    Codes like DEGAS which simulate the interaction of neutral gas with plasma (e.g. in a divertor), not only deliver the global density and flux of neutral particles, but also allow one, in addition, to distinguish between atoms and molecules. Whereas the global parameters of the neutral gas in a divertor can be measured by, for example, special ion gauges like those, which are installed in the divertor chamber, there has until now been no possibility of measuring the atomic and molecular density independently. In the frame of a diploma thesis (M. Loercher) an ASDEX neutral pressure gauge was modified in such a way that it delivers not only the global density of neutral particles (molecules and atoms) by ionization, but also the density of the atoms by measurement of the Lα-radiation produced by electron impact exitation. Owing to the very weak intensity the main effort was dedicated to developing a detector-filter combination which allows the Lα-radiation to be separated from, the H 2 bands in the VUV and be measured with a time resolution of at least of few ms. Several versions were tested theoretically and practically. The best solution was found to be a combination of an O 2 filter using MgF 2 windows and a multichannel plate. The arrangement was tested and calibrated with an atomic beam of known intensity from an oven. (orig.)

  3. On the calculation of line strengths, oscillator strengths and lifetimes for very large principal quantum numbers in hydrogenic atoms and ions by the McLean–Watson formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hey, J D

    2014-01-01

    As a sequel to an earlier study (Hey 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 125701), we consider further the application of the line strength formula derived by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 L291) to transitions arising from states of very high principal quantum number in hydrogenic atoms and ions (Rydberg–Rydberg transitions, n > 1000). It is shown how apparent difficulties associated with the use of recurrence relations, derived (Hey 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641) by the ladder operator technique of Infeld and Hull (1951 Rev. Mod. Phys. 23 21), may be eliminated by a very simple numerical device, whereby this method may readily be applied up to n ≈ 10 000. Beyond this range, programming of the method may entail greater care and complexity. The use of the numerically efficient McLean–Watson formula for such cases is again illustrated by the determination of radiative lifetimes and comparison of present results with those from an asymptotic formula. The question of the influence on the results of the omission or inclusion of fine structure is considered by comparison with calculations based on the standard Condon–Shortley line strength formula. Interest in this work on the radial matrix elements for large n and n′ is related to measurements of radio recombination lines from tenuous space plasmas, e.g. Stepkin et al (2007 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 374 852), Bell et al (2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 333 377), to the calculation of electron impact broadening parameters for such spectra (Watson 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889) and comparison with other theoretical methods (Peach 2014 Adv. Space Res. in press), to the modelling of physical processes in H II regions (Roshi et al 2012 Astrophys. J. 749 49), and the evaluation bound–bound transitions from states of high n during primordial cosmological recombination (Grin and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 81 083005, Ali-Haïmoud and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 82 063521

  4. Chromatographic cation exchange separation of decigram quantities of californium and other transplutonium elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Orr, P.B.; Ross, R.G.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Decigram quantities of highly radioactive transplutonium elements are routinely partitioned at TRU by chromatographic elution from cation resin using AHIB eluent. By using two high-pressure ion exchange columns, a small one for the initial loading of the feed and a large one for the elution, batch runs containing up to 200 mg of /sup 252/Cf can be made in about 5 hours (2 hours to load the feed and 3 hours for the elution). The number of effluent product fractions and the amount of actinides that must be collected in intermediate fractions are minimized by monitoring response from a flow-through alpha-detector. This process has been reliable and relatively easy to operate, and will continue to be used for partitioning transplutonium elements at TRU.

  5. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  6. Combination of the ionic-to-atomic line intensity ratios from two test elements for the diagnostic of plasma temperature and electron number density in Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tognoni, E. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: tognoni@ipcf.cnr.it; Hidalgo, M.; Canals, A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia. Universidad de Alicante. Apdo. 99, 03080, Alicante (Spain); Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Salvetti, A.; Palleschi, V. [Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, Area della Ricerca del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2007-05-15

    In Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) spectrochemical analysis, the MgII(280.270 nm)/MgI(285.213 nm) ionic to atomic line intensity ratio is commonly used as a monitor of the robustness of operating conditions. This approach is based on the univocal relationship existing between intensity ratio and plasma temperature, for a pure argon atmospheric ICP in thermodynamic equilibrium. In a multi-elemental plasma in the lower temperature range, the measurement of the intensity ratio may not be sufficient to characterize temperature and electron density. In such a range, the correct relationship between intensity ratio and plasma temperature can be calculated only when the complete plasma composition is known. We propose the combination of the line intensity ratios of two test elements (double ratio) as an effective diagnostic tool for a multi-elemental low temperature LTE plasma of unknown composition. In particular, the variation of the double ratio allows us discriminating changes in the plasma temperature from changes in the electron density. Thus, the effects on plasma excitation and ionization possibly caused by introduction of different samples and matrices in non-robust conditions can be more accurately interpreted. The method is illustrated by the measurement of plasma temperature and electron density in a specific analytic case.

  7. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk König

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size dNC. I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms NNC(dNC[i], bonds between NC atoms Nbnd(dNC[i] and interface bonds NIF(dNC[i] for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb NCs with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.

  8. Number series of atoms, interatomic bonds and interface bonds defining zinc-blende nanocrystals as function of size, shape and surface orientation: Analytic tools to interpret solid state spectroscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    König, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.koenig@unsw.edu.au [Integrated Materials Design Centre (IMDC) and School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering (SPREE), University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2016-08-15

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) experience stress and charge transfer by embedding materials or ligands and impurity atoms. In return, the environment of NCs experiences a NC stress response which may lead to matrix deformation and propagated strain. Up to now, there is no universal gauge to evaluate the stress impact on NCs and their response as a function of NC size d{sub NC}. I deduce geometrical number series as analytical tools to obtain the number of NC atoms N{sub NC}(d{sub NC}[i]), bonds between NC atoms N{sub bnd}(d{sub NC}[i]) and interface bonds N{sub IF}(d{sub NC}[i]) for seven high symmetry zinc-blende (zb) NCs with low-index faceting: {001} cubes, {111} octahedra, {110} dodecahedra, {001}-{111} pyramids, {111} tetrahedra, {111}-{001} quatrodecahedra and {001}-{111} quadrodecahedra. The fundamental insights into NC structures revealed here allow for major advancements in data interpretation and understanding of zb- and diamond-lattice based nanomaterials. The analytical number series can serve as a standard procedure for stress evaluation in solid state spectroscopy due to their deterministic nature, easy use and general applicability over a wide range of spectroscopy methods as well as NC sizes, forms and materials.

  9. Development of constraint algorithm for the number of electrons in molecular orbitals consisting mainly 4f atomic orbitals of rare-earth elements and its introduction to tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endou, Akira; Onuma, Hiroaki; Jung, Sun-ho

    2007-01-01

    Our original tight-binding quantum chemical molecular dynamics code, Colors', has been successfully applied to the theoretical investigation of complex materials including rare-earth elements, e.g., metal catalysts supported on a CeO 2 surface. To expand our code so as to obtain a good convergence for the electronic structure of a calculation system including a rare-earth element, we developed a novel algorithm to provide a constraint condition for the number of electrons occupying the selected molecular orbitals that mainly consist of 4f atomic orbitals of the rare-earth element. This novel algorithm was introduced in Colors. Using Colors, we succeeded in obtaining the classified electronic configurations of the 4f atomic orbitals of Ce 4+ and reduced Ce ions in a CeO 2 bulk model with one oxygen defect, which makes it difficult to obtain a good convergence using a conventional first-principles quantum chemical calculation code. (author)

  10. Accelerators for atomic energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    1999-01-01

    The research and educational activities accomplished using accelerators for atomic energy research were studied. The studied items are research subjects, facility operation, the number of master theses and doctor theses on atomic energy research using accelerators and the future role of accelerators in atomic energy research. The strategy for promotion of the accelerator facility for atomic energy research is discussed. (author)

  11. Time-resolved study of the electron temperature and number density of argon metastable atoms in argon-based dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, E.; Laurent, M.; Durocher-Jean, A.; Laroche, G.; Gherardi, N.; Naudé, N.; Stafford, L.

    2018-01-01

    A combination of optical emission spectroscopy and collisional-radiative modelling is used to determine the time-resolved electron temperature (assuming Maxwellian electron energy distribution function) and number density of Ar 1s states in atmospheric pressure Ar-based dielectric barrier discharges in presence of either NH3 or ethyl lactate. In both cases, T e values were higher early in the discharge cycle (around 0.8 eV), decreased down to about 0.35 eV with the rise of the discharge current, and then remained fairly constant during discharge extinction. The opposite behaviour was observed for Ar 1s states, with cycle-averaged values in the 1017 m-3 range. Based on these findings, a link was established between the discharge ionization kinetics (and thus the electron temperature) and the number density of Ar 1s state.

  12. Energy dependence of effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and photon interaction: Studies of some biological molecules in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Gerward, Leif

    2008-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, Z(PEA,eff), and for photon interaction, Z(PI,eff), have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for biological molecules, such as fatty acids (lauric, myristic, palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic......, linolenic, arachidonic, and arachidic acids), nucleotide bases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil, and thymine), and carbohydrates (glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and starch). The Z(PEA, eff) and Z(PI, eff) values have been found to change with energy and composition of the biological molecules. The energy...

  13. Kβ/Kα X-ray intensity ratios for some elements in the atomic number range 28≤Z≤39 at 16.896 keV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Yılmaz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The K shell intensity ratios (Kβ/Kα have been experimentally determined for some elements in the atomic number range 28 ≤ Z ≤ 39 by using secondary excitation method. K X-rays emitted by samples have been counted by a Si (Li detector with 160 eV resolutions at 5.9 keV. The measured values were compared with the theoretical and experimental values. In general, the values obtained are in good agreement with the calculated values.

  14. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  15. Atomic hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massip de Turville, C.M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods are discussed of generating heat in an atomic hydrogen reactor which involve; the production of atomic hydrogen by an electrical discharge, the capture of nascent neutrons from atomic hydrogen in a number of surrounding steel alloy tubes having a high manganese content to produce 56 Mn, the irradiation of atomic hydrogen by the high energy antineutrinos from the beta decay of 56 Mn to yield nascent neutrons, and the removal of the heat generated by the capture of nascent neutrons by 55 Mn and the beta decay of 56 Mn. (U.K.)

  16. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  17. The Unimolecular Reactions of CF3CHF2 Studied by Chemical Activation: Assignment of Rate Constants and Threshold Energies to the 1,2-H Atom Transfer, 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF Elimination Reactions, and the Dependence of Threshold Energies on the Number of F-Atom Substituents in the Fluoroethane Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caleb A; Gillespie, Blanton R; Heard, George L; Setser, D W; Holmes, Bert E

    2017-11-22

    The recombination of CF 3 and CHF 2 radicals in a room-temperature bath gas was used to prepare vibrationally excited CF 3 CHF 2 * molecules with 101 kcal mol -1 of vibrational energy. The subsequent 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions were observed as a function of bath gas pressure by following the CHF 3 , CF 3 (F)C: and C 2 F 4 product concentrations by gas chromatography using a mass spectrometer as the detector. The singlet CF 3 (F)C: concentration was measured by trapping the carbene with trans-2-butene. The experimental rate constants are 3.6 × 10 4 , 4.7 × 10 4 , and 1.1 × 10 4 s -1 for the 1,2-H atom transfer and 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF elimination reactions, respectively. These experimental rate constants were matched to statistical RRKM calculated rate constants to assign threshold energies (E 0 ) of 88 ± 2, 88 ± 2, and 87 ± 2 kcal mol -1 to the three reactions. Pentafluoroethane is the only fluoroethane that has a competitive H atom transfer decomposition reaction, and it is the only example with 1,1-HF elimination being more important than 1,2-HF elimination. The trend of increasing threshold energies for both 1,1-HF and 1,2-HF processes with the number of F atoms in the fluoroethane molecule is summarized and investigated with electronic-structure calculations. Examination of the intrinsic reaction coordinate associated with the 1,1-HF elimination reaction found an adduct between CF 3 (F)C: and HF in the exit channel with a dissociation energy of ∼5 kcal mol -1 . Hydrogen-bonded complexes between HF and the H atom migration transition state of CH 3 (F)C: and the F atom migration transition state of CF 3 (F)C: also were found by the calculations. The role that these carbene-HF complexes could play in 1,1-HF elimination reactions is discussed.

  18. Number-phase entropic squeezing and nonclassical properties of a three-level atom interacting with a two-mode field: intensity-dependent coupling, deformed Kerr medium, and detuning effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Mohammad Javad; Tavassoly, Mohammad Kazem

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we follow our presented model in J. Opt. Soc. Am. B {\\bf 30}, 1109--1117 (2013), in which the interaction between a $\\Lambda$-type three-level atom and a quantized two-mode radiation field in a cavity in the presence of nonlinearities is studied. After giving a brief review on the procedure of obtaining the state vector of the atom-field system, some further interesting and important physical features (which are of particular interest in the quantum optics field of research) of the whole system state, i.e., the number-phase entropic uncertainty relation (based on the two-mode Pegg-Barnett formalism) and some of the nonclassicality signs consist of sub-Poissonian statistics, Cauchy-Schwartz inequality and two kinds of squeezing phenomenon are investigated. During our presentation, the effects of intensity-dependent coupling, deformed Kerr medium and the detuning parameters on the depth and domain of each of the mentioned nonclassical criteria of the considered quantum system are studied, in detail. It is shown that each of the mentioned nonclassicality aspects can be obtained by appropriately choosing the related parameters.

  19. Investigation of the effective atomic numbers of dosimetric materials for electrons, protons and alpha particles using a direct method in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Aksakal, Oğuz; Akkuş, Tuba

    2015-11-01

    A direct method has been used for the first time, to compute effective atomic numbers (Z eff) of water, air, human tissues, and some organic and inorganic compounds, for total electron proton and alpha particle interaction in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV. The obtained values for Z eff were then compared to those obtained using an interpolation procedure. In general, good agreement has been observed for electrons, and the difference (%) in Z eff between the results of the direct and the interpolation method was found to be energy range from 10 keV to 1 MeV. More specifically, results of the two methods were found to agree well (Dif. energy region with respect to the total electron interaction. On the other hand, values for Z eff calculated using both methods for protons and alpha particles generally agree with each other in the high-energy region above 10 MeV.

  20. Radiation shielding and effective atomic number studies in different types of shielding concretes, lead base and non-lead base glass systems for total electron interaction: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiation shielding calculations for concretes and glass systems. • Assigning effective atomic number for the given materials for total electron interaction. • Glass systems generally have better shielding ability than concretes. - Abstract: Concrete has been widely used as a radiation shielding material due to its extremely low cost. On the other hand, glass systems, which make everything inside visible to observers, are considered as promising shielding materials as well. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers, Z eff of some concretes and glass systems (industrial waste containing glass, Pb base glass and non-Pb base glass) have been calculated for total electron interaction in the energy region of 10 keV–1 GeV. Also, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) ranges for the given materials have been calculated in the wide energy region to show the shielding effectiveness of the given materials. The glass systems are not only compared to different types of concretes but also compared to the lead base glass systems in terms of shielding. Moreover, the obtained results for total electron interaction have been compared to the results for total photon interaction wherever possible. In general, it has been observed that the glass systems have superior properties than most of the concretes over the high-energy region with respect to the electron interaction. Also, glass systems without lead show better electron stopping than lead base glasses at some energy regions as well. Along with the photon attenuation capability, it is seen that Fly Ash base glass systems have not only greater electron stopping capability but also have greater photon attenuation especially in high energy region when compared with standard shielding concretes

  1. Mass attenuation coefficient (μ/ρ), effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and measurement of x-ray energy spectra using based calcium phosphate biomaterials: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes Z, M. A.; Da Silva, T. A.; Nogueira, M. S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear / CNEN, Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, Belo Horizonte 31270-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Goncalves Z, E., E-mail: madelon@cdtn.br [Pontifice Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Av. Dom Jose Gaspar 500, Belo Horizonte 30535-901, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    In dentistry, alveolar bone regeneration procedures using based calcium phosphate biomaterials have been shown effective. However,there are not reports in the literature of studies the interaction of low energy radiation in these biomaterials used as attenuator and not being then allowed a comparison between the theoretical values and experimental.The objective of this study was to determine the interaction of radiation parameters of four dental biomaterials - BioOss, Cerasorb M Dental, Straumann Boneceramic and Osteogen for diagnostic radiology qualities. As a material and methods, the composition of the biomaterials was determined by the analytical techniques. The samples with 0.181 cm to 0,297 cm thickness were experimentally used as attenuators for the measurement of the transmitted X-rays spectra in X-ray equipment with 50 to 90 kV range by spectrometric system comprising the Cd Te detector. After this procedure, the mass attenuation coefficient, the effective atomic number were determined and compared between all the specimens analyzed, using the program WinXCOM in the range of 10 to 200 keV. In all strains examined observed that the energy spectrum of x-rays transmitted through the BioOss has the mean energy slightly smaller than the others biomaterials for close thickness. The μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} of the biomaterials showed its dependence on photon energy and atomic number of the elements of the material analyzed. It is concluded according to the methodology employed in this study that the measurements of x-ray spectrum, μ/ρ and Z{sub eff} using biomaterials as attenuators confirmed that the thickness, density, composition of the samples, the incident photon energy are factors that determine the characteristics of radiation in a tissue or equivalent material. (Author)

  2. Effective atomic number, energy loss and radiation damage studies in some materials commonly used in nuclear applications for heavy charged particles such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-05-01

    Commonly used nuclear physics materials such as water, concrete, Pb-glass, paraffin, freon and P 10 gases, some alloys such as brass, bronze, stainless-steel and some scintillators such as anthracene, stilbene and toluene have been investigated with respect to the heavy charged particle interaction as means of projected range and effective atomic number (Zeff) in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. Calculations were performed for heavy ions such as H, C, Mg, Fe, Te, Pb and U. Also, the energy loss and radiation damage were studied using SRIM Monte Carlo code for anthracene for different heavy ions of 100 keV kinetic energy. It has been observed that the variation in Zeff becomes less when the atomic number of the ions increase. Glass-Pb, bronze, brass, stainless-steel and Freon gas were found to vary less than 10% in the energy region 10 keV to 10 MeV. For total proton interaction, discrepancies up to 10% and 18% between two databases namely PSTAR and SRIM were noted in mass stopping power and Zeff of water, respectively. The range calculations resulted with a conclusion that the metal alloys and glass-Pb have lowest values of ranges confirming best shielding against energetic heavy ions whereas freon and P 10 gases have the highest values of ranges in the entire energy region. The simulation results showed that the energy loss (%) to target electrons decreases as the Z of the incident ion increases. Also, it was observed that the radiation damage first increases with Z of the ion and then keeps almost constant for ions with Z≥52.

  3. Radiation shielding and effective atomic number studies in different types of shielding concretes, lead base and non-lead base glass systems for total electron interaction: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurudirek, Murat, E-mail: mkurudirek@gmail.com

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Radiation shielding calculations for concretes and glass systems. • Assigning effective atomic number for the given materials for total electron interaction. • Glass systems generally have better shielding ability than concretes. - Abstract: Concrete has been widely used as a radiation shielding material due to its extremely low cost. On the other hand, glass systems, which make everything inside visible to observers, are considered as promising shielding materials as well. In the present work, the effective atomic numbers, Z{sub eff} of some concretes and glass systems (industrial waste containing glass, Pb base glass and non-Pb base glass) have been calculated for total electron interaction in the energy region of 10 keV–1 GeV. Also, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) ranges for the given materials have been calculated in the wide energy region to show the shielding effectiveness of the given materials. The glass systems are not only compared to different types of concretes but also compared to the lead base glass systems in terms of shielding. Moreover, the obtained results for total electron interaction have been compared to the results for total photon interaction wherever possible. In general, it has been observed that the glass systems have superior properties than most of the concretes over the high-energy region with respect to the electron interaction. Also, glass systems without lead show better electron stopping than lead base glasses at some energy regions as well. Along with the photon attenuation capability, it is seen that Fly Ash base glass systems have not only greater electron stopping capability but also have greater photon attenuation especially in high energy region when compared with standard shielding concretes.

  4. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    This text will thoroughly update the existing literature on atomic physics. Intended to accompany an advanced undergraduate course in atomic physics, the book will lead the students up to the latest advances and the applications to Bose-Einstein Condensation of atoms, matter-wave inter-ferometry and quantum computing with trapped ions. The elementary atomic physics covered in the early chapters should be accessible to undergraduates when they are first introduced to the subject. To complement. the usual quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure the book strongly emphasizes the experimen

  5. Angular momentum coupling in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, J.

    1986-01-01

    The coupling between the electronic angular momentum and the rotating atom-atom axis in the initial or the final phase of an atom-atom collision is discussed, making use of the concepts of radial and rotational (Coriolis) coupling between different molecular states. The description is based on a limited number of well-understood approximations, and it allows an illustrative geometric representation of the transition from the body fixed to the space fixed motion of the electrons. (orig.)

  6. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  7. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  8. Ubiquitous atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spruch, G.M.; Spruch, L.

    1974-01-01

    The fundamentals of modern physics, including the basic physics and chemistry of the atom, elementary particles, cosmology, periodicity, and recent advances, are surveyed. The biology and chemistry of the life process is discussed to provide a background for considering the effects of atomic particles on living things. The uses of atomic power in space travel, merchant shipping, food preservation, desalination, and nuclear clocks are explored. (Pollut. Abstr.)

  9. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  10. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  11. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  12. Atom spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru

  13. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography on exotic atoms covers the years 1939 till 1982. The annual entries are headed by an introduction describing the state of affairs of the branch of science and listing the main applications in quantum electrodynamics, particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, chemical physics and biological sciences. The bibliography includes an author index and a subject index. (Auth.)

  14. Atomic fusion, Gerrard atomic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerrard, T.H.

    1980-01-01

    In the approach to atomic fusion described here the heat produced in a fusion reaction, which is induced in a chamber by the interaction of laser beams and U.H.F. electromagnetic beams with atom streams, is transferred to a heat exchanger for electricity generation by a coolant flowing through a jacket surrounding the chamber. (U.K.)

  15. Superradiators created atom by atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  16. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  17. Atomic bomb cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraeda, Kanji

    1992-01-01

    Eye disturbance caused by atomic bomb radiation can be divided into three groups: direct injury immediately after exposure, eye lesions associated with radiation syndrome, and delayed disturbance. The crystalline lens of the eye is the most radiosensitive. Atomic bomb cataract has been investigated in a number of studies. The first section of this chapter discusses radiation cataract in terms of the incidence and characteristics. The second section deals with atomic bomb cataract, which can be diagnosed based on the four criteria: (1) opacity of the crystalline lens, (2) a history of proximal exposure, (3) lack of eye disease complicating cataract, and (4) non-exposure to radiation other than atomic bombing. The prevalence of cataract and severity of opacity are found to correlate with exposure doses and age at the time of exposure. Furthermore, it is found to correlate with distance from the hypocenter, the condition of shielding, epilation, and the presence or absence or degree of radiation syndrome. (N.K.)

  18. Evolution Properties of Atomic Fidelity in the Combined Multi-Atom-Cavity Field System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ju-Xia; Zhang Xiao-Juan; Zhang Xiu-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The atom fidelity is investigated in a system consisting of Mtwo-level atoms and M single-mode fields by use of complete quantum theory and numerical evaluation method. The influences of various system parameters on the evolution of atomic fidelity are studied. The results show that the atomic fidelity evolves in a Rabi oscillation manner. The oscillation frequency is mainly modulated by the coupling strength between atoms and light field, the atomic transition probabilities and the average photon numbers. Other factors hardly impact on the atomic fidelity. The present results may provide a useful approach to the maintenance of the atomic fidelity in the atom cavity field systems. (paper)

  19. Effect of dietary fats with odd or even numbers of carbon atoms on metabolic response and muscle damage with exercise in Quarter Horse-type horses with type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Lisa A; Valberg, Stephanie J; McCue, Molly E; Pagan, Joe D; Roe, Charles R

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate effects of fats with odd and even numbers of carbon atoms on muscle metabolism in exercising horses with polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM). 8 horses with PSSM (6 females and 2 males; mean +/- SD age, 6.3 +/- 3.9 years). Isocaloric diets (grain, triheptanoin, corn oil, and high-fat, low-starch [HFLS] feed) were fed for 3 weeks each; horses performed daily treadmill exercise. Grain was fed to establish an exercise target, and HFLS feed was fed as a negative control diet. Daily plasma samples were obtained. For each diet, a 15-minute exercise test was performed, and gluteus medius muscle specimens and blood samples were obtained before and after exercise. Feeding triheptanoin, compared with the corn oil diet, resulted in exercise intolerance; higher plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and concentrations of C3:0- and C7:0-acylcarnitine and insulin; and lower concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and C16:0-, C18:1-, and C18:2-acylcarnitine, without changes in concentrations of plasma glucose or resting muscle substrates and metabolites. Feeding grain induced higher CK activity and insulin concentrations and lower NEFA concentrations than did corn oil or HFLS feed. Feeding grain induced higher glucose concentrations than did triheptanoin and corn oil. In muscle, feeding grain resulted in lower glucose-6-phosphate, higher citrate, and higher postexercise lactate concentrations than did the other diets. Triheptanoin had detrimental effects, reflecting decreased availability of NEFA, increased insulin stimulation of glycogen synthesis, and potential inhibition of lipid oxidation. Long-chain fats are the best dietetic for PSSM.

  20. Atomic interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudon, J.; Robert, J.

    2004-01-01

    Since the theoretical works of L. De Broglie (1924) and the famous experiment of Davisson and Germer (1927), we know that a wave is linked with any particle of mass m by the relation λ = h/(mv), where λ is the wavelength, v the particle velocity and h is the Planck constant. The basic principle of the interferometry of any material particle, atom, molecule or aggregate is simple: using a simple incident wave, several mutually consistent waves (with well-defined relative phases) are generated and controllable phase-shifts are introduced between them in order to generate a wave which is the sum of the previous waves. An interference figure is obtained which consists in a succession of dark and bright fringes. The atomic interferometry is based on the same principle but involves different techniques, different wave equations, but also different beams, sources and correlations which are described in this book. Because of the small possible wavelengths and the wide range of possible atomic interactions, atomic interferometers can be used in many domains from the sub-micron lithography to the construction of sensors like: inertial sensors, gravity-meters, accelerometers, gyro-meters etc. The first chapter is a preliminary study of the space and time diffraction of atoms. The next chapters is devoted to the description of slit, light separation and polarization interferometers, and the last chapter treats of the properties of Bose-Einstein condensates which are interesting in atomic interferometry. (J.S.)

  1. Polarizational radiation or 'atomic' bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya Amusia, M.

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a new kind of continuum spectrum radiation exists, where the mechanism of formation is quite different from that of ordinary bremsstrahlung. The latter originates due to slowing down of the charged projectile in the target field, while the former, called polarization radiation or 'atomic' bremsstrahlung, is a result of radiation either of the target or the projectile particles dipolarly polarized during the collision process. Not only general formulae, but also results of concrete calculations are presented. These demonstrate, that for electron-atom collisions the atomic contribution to the total bremsstrahlung spectrum becomes dominant for photon energies near and above the atomic ionization potential. As to atom-atom or ion-atom collisions, the bremsstrahlung spectrum is completely determined by the atomic contribution. The specific features of the case when the incoming particles are relativistic are discussed at length. A number of examples of colliding pairs are considered, for which the atomic bremsstrahlung process is quite essential: A bare nucleus and an atom, pair of atoms, at least one of which is excited, electron, or atom interacting with a molecule. The same mechanism is essential also in formation of radiation in nuclear and elementary particle collisions. (orig.)

  2. Atomic politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogmar, G.

    1979-01-01

    The authors basic point is that the military and civil sides of atomic energy cannot be separated. The general aim of the book is to analyze both the military and civil branches, and the interdependence between them, of American foreign policy in the atomic field. Atomic policy is seen as one of the most important imstruments of foreign policy which, in turn, is seen against the background of American imperialism in general. Firstly, the book investigates the most important means by which the United States has controlled the development in the nuclear field in other countries. These means include influencing the conditions of access to nuclear resources of various kinds, influencing the flow of technical-economic information and influencing international organizations and treaties bearing on atomic energy. The time period treated is 1945-1973. 1973 is chosen as the end-year of the study mainly because of the new conditions in the whole energy field initiated by the oil crisis in that year. The sources of the empirical work are mainly hearings before the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy of the U.S. Congress and legal material of various kinds. Secondly, the goals of the American policy are analyzed. The goals identified are armament effect, non-proliferation (horizontal), sales, and energy dependence. The relation between the main goals is discussed.The discussion is centered on the interdependence between the military and the civil aspects, conflict and coincidence of various goals, the relation between short-term and long-term goals, and the possibilities of using one goal as pretext for another. Thirdly, some causes of the changes in the atomic policy around 1953 and 1963 are identified. These are the strategic balance, the competitive situation, the capacity (of the American atomic productive apparatus), and the nuclear technological stage. The specific composition of these four factors at the two time-points can explain the changes of policy. (author)

  3. Stanford polarized atomic beam target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavis, D.G.; Dunham, J.S.; Hugg, J.W.; Glavish, H.F.

    1976-01-01

    A polarized atomic beam source was used to produce an atomic hydrogen beam which was in turn used as a polarized proton target. A target density of 2 x 10'' atoms/cm 3 and a target polarization of 0.37 without the use of rf transitions were measured. These measurements indicate that a number of experiments are currently feasible with a variety of polarized target beams

  4. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  5. Atomic secrecy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, W.

    1979-01-01

    An article, The H-Bomb Secret: How We Got It, Why We're Telling It, by Howard Morland was to be published in The Progressive magazine in February, 1979. The government, after learning of the author's and the editors' intention to publish the article and failing to persuade them to voluntarily delete about 20% of the text and all of the diagrams showing how an H-bomb works, requested a court injunction against publication. Acting under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, US District Court Judge Robert W. Warren granted the government's request on March 26. Events dealing with the case are discussed in this publication. Section 1, Progressive Hydrogen Bomb Case, is discussed under the following: Court Order Blocking Magazine Report; Origins of the Howard Morland Article; Author's Motives, Defense of Publication; and Government Arguments Against Disclosure. Section 2, Access to Atomic Data Since 1939, contains information on need for secrecy during World War II; 1946 Atomic Energy Act and its effects; Soviet A-Bomb and the US H-Bomb; and consequences of 1954 Atomic Energy Act. Section 3, Disputed Need for Atomic Secrecy, contains papers entitled: Lack of Studies on H-Bomb Proliferation; Administration's Position on H-Bombs; and National Security Needs vs Free Press

  6. On the bosonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate ground state properties of atoms, in which substitute fermions - electrons by bosons, namely π --mesons. We perform some calculations in the frame of modified Hartree-Fock (HF) equation. The modification takes into account symmetry, instead of anti-symmetry of the pair identical bosons wave function. The modified HF approach thus enhances (doubles) the effect of self-action for the boson case. Therefore, we accordingly modify the HF equations by eliminating the self-action terms "by hand". The contribution of meson-meson and meson-nucleon non-Coulomb interaction is inessential at least for atoms with low and intermediate nuclear charge, which is our main subject. We found that the binding energy of pion negative ions A π - , pion atoms A π , and the number of extra bound pions ΔN π increases with the growth of nuclear charge Z. For e.g. Xe ΔN π = 4. As an example of a simple process with a pion atom, we consider photoionization that differs essentially from that for electron atoms. Namely, it is not monotonic decreasing from the threshold but has instead a prominent maximum above threshold. We study also elastic scattering of pions by pion atoms.

  7. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  8. Antimatter atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    In january 1996, CERN broadcasted the information of the creation of nine anti-hydrogen atoms, observed through disintegration products. The experimental facility was CERN LEAR ring. An antiproton beam scattered a xenon jet, and the resulting antimatter was first selected by its insensitivity to beam bending magnets. Their disintegration was detected in thin NaI detectors, in which the anti-atoms are at once deprived from their positron. Then, magnetic and time-of-flight spectrometers are used. (D.L.)

  9. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  10. Californium-252 Program Equipment Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattin, Fred Rhea [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Kenton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ezold, Julie G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-12-01

    To successfully continue the 252Cf production and meet the needs of the customers, a comprehensive evaluation of the Building 7920 processing equipment was requested to identify equipment critical to the operational continuity of the program.

  11. Californium Recovery from Palladium Wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Jon D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The recovery of 252Cf from palladium-252Cf cermet wires was investigated to determine the feasibility of implementing it into the cermet wire production operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center. The dissolution of Pd wire in 8 M HNO3 and trace amounts of HCl was studied at both ambient and elevated temperatures. These studies showed that it took days to dissolve the wire at ambient temperature and only 2 hours at 60°C. Adjusting the ratio of the volume of solvent to the mass of the wire segment showed little change in the kinetics of dissolution, which ranged from 0.176 mL/mg down to 0.019 mL/mg. A successful chromatographic separation of 153Gd, a surrogate for 252Cf, from Pd was demonstrated using AG 50x8 cation exchange resin with a bed volume of 0.5 mL and an internal diameter of 0.8 cm.

  12. Pulsed atomic soliton laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, L.D.; Brand, J.

    2004-01-01

    It is shown that simultaneously changing the scattering length of an elongated, harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate from positive to negative and inverting the axial portion of the trap, so that it becomes expulsive, results in a train of self-coherent solitonic pulses. Each pulse is itself a nondispersive attractive Bose-Einstein condensate that rapidly self-cools. The axial trap functions as a waveguide. The solitons can be made robustly stable with the right choice of trap geometry, number of atoms, and interaction strength. Theoretical and numerical evidence suggests that such a pulsed atomic soliton laser can be made in present experiments

  13. Atoms stories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.; Bordry, M.

    1988-01-01

    Physicists from different countries told each evening during one learning week, to an audience of young people, some great discoveries in evoking the difficulties and problems to which the researchers were confronted. From Antiquity to a more recent history, it is a succession of atoms stories. (N.C.)

  14. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, B.

    1991-01-01

    This general book describes the change from classical physics to quantum physics. The first part presents atom evolution since antiquity and introduces fundamental quantities and elements of relativity. Experiments which have contributed to the evolution of knowledge on matter are analyzed in the second part. Applications of wave mechanics to the study of matter properties are presented in the third part [fr

  15. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing....

  16. The significance of chromosome deletions in atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Shigeta, Chiharu; Oguma, Nobuo; Kamada, Nanao; Deng, Z.; Niimi, Masanobu; Aisaka, Tadaichi.

    1986-01-01

    In 39 A-bomb survivors 40 years after exposure at ≤ 1,000 m from ground zero, the frequency and features of chromosome deletions in peripheral lymphocytes were examined using a differential staining technique. Simultaneously, in vitro irradiation experiment with Cf-252 was made to infer chromosome aberrations occuring immediately after exposure. Californium-252 with 100 rad induced dicentric and ring chromosomes in 40 % of the cells and acentric fragments in 44 %. Among the A-bomb survivors, chromosome aberrations were observed in 651 (21 %) of the total 3,136 cells. There were 146 cells with deletions (22 % of abnormal cells; 5 % of the total cells), and 10 cells with acentric fragment (0.3 % of the total cells). The figure for deletions was far higher than that reported in the literature. A large number of deletions were seen in chromosomes no.4, no.21, and no.22, and a few deletions in chromosomes no.7 and no.20. Significance of chromosome deletions is discussed. (Namekawa, K.)

  17. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  18. Gauss Sum Factorization with Cold Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilowski, M.; Wendrich, T.; Mueller, T.; Ertmer, W.; Rasel, E. M.; Jentsch, Ch.; Schleich, W. P.

    2008-01-01

    We report the first implementation of a Gauss sum factorization algorithm by an internal state Ramsey interferometer using cold atoms. A sequence of appropriately designed light pulses interacts with an ensemble of cold rubidium atoms. The final population in the involved atomic levels determines a Gauss sum. With this technique we factor the number N=263193

  19. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunselman, R.

    1993-01-01

    The experiments use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes that escape into vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to learn more about the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation

  20. Hupa Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    An introduction to the Hupa number system is provided in this workbook, one in a series of numerous materials developed to promote the use of the Hupa language. The book is written in English with Hupa terms used only for the names of numbers. The opening pages present the numbers from 1-10, giving the numeral, the Hupa word, the English word, and…

  1. Triangular Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Triangular number, figurate num- ber, rangoli, Brahmagupta–Pell equation, Jacobi triple product identity. Figure 1. The first four triangular numbers. Left: Anuradha S Garge completed her PhD from. Pune University in 2008 under the supervision of Prof. S A Katre. Her research interests include K-theory and number theory.

  2. Proth Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzweller Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce Proth numbers and prove two theorems on such numbers being prime [3]. We also give revised versions of Pocklington’s theorem and of the Legendre symbol. Finally, we prove Pepin’s theorem and that the fifth Fermat number is not prime.

  3. Curious behavior of optically trapped neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, C.; Walker, T.; Sesko, D.; Monroe, C.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the behavior of clouds of neutral atoms contained in a spontaneous force optical trap. Because of the low temperatures of the atoms ( 5 atoms. These include the expansion of the cloud as the number is increased and dramatic changes in the distribution of the atoms at higher numbers. We can explain much of the collective behavior using a simple model that includes a 1/r 2 force between the atoms arising from the multiple scattering of photons. Finally, we discuss the optical trapping of atoms directly from a low pressure vapor in a small glass cell. We have used these optically trapped atoms to load a magnetostatic trap in the same cell. This provided a high density sample of atoms with a temperature of less than 2 μK

  4. Sagan numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2012-01-01

    We define a new class of numbers based on the first occurrence of certain patterns of zeros and ones in the expansion of irracional numbers in a given basis and call them Sagan numbers, since they were first mentioned, in a special case, by the North-american astronomer Carl E. Sagan in his science-fiction novel "Contact." Sagan numbers hold connections with a wealth of mathematical ideas. We describe some properties of the newly defined numbers and indicate directions for further amusement.

  5. PubChem atom environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hähnke, Volker D; Bolton, Evan E; Bryant, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Atom environments and fragments find wide-spread use in chemical information and cheminformatics. They are the basis of prediction models, an integral part in similarity searching, and employed in structure search techniques. Most of these methods were developed and evaluated on the relatively small sets of chemical structures available at the time. An analysis of fragment distributions representative of most known chemical structures was published in the 1970s using the Chemical Abstracts Service data system. More recently, advances in automated synthesis of chemicals allow millions of chemicals to be synthesized by a single organization. In addition, open chemical databases are readily available containing tens of millions of chemical structures from a multitude of data sources, including chemical vendors, patents, and the scientific literature, making it possible for scientists to readily access most known chemical structures. With this availability of information, one can now address interesting questions, such as: what chemical fragments are known today? How do these fragments compare to earlier studies? How unique are chemical fragments found in chemical structures? For our analysis, after hydrogen suppression, atoms were characterized by atomic number, formal charge, implicit hydrogen count, explicit degree (number of neighbors), valence (bond order sum), and aromaticity. Bonds were differentiated as single, double, triple or aromatic bonds. Atom environments were created in a circular manner focused on a central atom with radii from 0 (atom types) up to 3 (representative of ECFP_6 fragments). In total, combining atom types and atom environments that include up to three spheres of nearest neighbors, our investigation identified 28,462,319 unique fragments in the 46 million structures found in the PubChem Compound database as of January 2013. We could identify several factors inflating the number of environments involving transition metals, with many

  6. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  7. Eulerian numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, T Kyle

    2015-01-01

    This text presents the Eulerian numbers in the context of modern enumerative, algebraic, and geometric combinatorics. The book first studies Eulerian numbers from a purely combinatorial point of view, then embarks on a tour of how these numbers arise in the study of hyperplane arrangements, polytopes, and simplicial complexes. Some topics include a thorough discussion of gamma-nonnegativity and real-rootedness for Eulerian polynomials, as well as the weak order and the shard intersection order of the symmetric group. The book also includes a parallel story of Catalan combinatorics, wherein the Eulerian numbers are replaced with Narayana numbers. Again there is a progression from combinatorics to geometry, including discussion of the associahedron and the lattice of noncrossing partitions. The final chapters discuss how both the Eulerian and Narayana numbers have analogues in any finite Coxeter group, with many of the same enumerative and geometric properties. There are four supplemental chapters throughout, ...

  8. First-Order Quantum Phase Transition for Dicke Model Induced by Atom-Atom Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xiu-Qin; Liu Ni; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we use the spin coherent state transformation and the ground state variational method to theoretically calculate the ground function. In order to consider the influence of the atom-atom interaction on the extended Dicke model’s ground state properties, the mean photon number, the scaled atomic population and the average ground energy are displayed. Using the self-consistent field theory to solve the atom-atom interaction, we discover the system undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from the normal phase to the superradiant phase, but a famous Dicke-type second-order quantum phase transition without the atom-atom interaction. Meanwhile, the atom-atom interaction makes the phase transition point shift to the lower atom-photon collective coupling strength. (paper)

  9. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transfinite Numbers. What is Infinity? S M Srivastava. In a series of revolutionary articles written during the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the great Ger- man mathematician Georg Cantor removed the age-old mistrust of infinity and created an exceptionally beau- tiful and useful theory of transfinite numbers. This is.

  10. Understanding Atomic Structure: Is There a More Direct and Compelling Connection between Atomic Line Spectra and the Quantization of an Atom's Energy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittenhouse, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The "atoms first" philosophy, adopted by a growing number of General Chemistry textbook authors, places greater emphasis on atomic structure as a key to a deeper understanding of the field of chemistry. A pivotal concept needed to understand the behavior of atoms is the restriction of an atom's energy to specific allowed values. However,…

  11. Quantum Electronics for Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Nagourney, Warren

    2010-01-01

    Quantum Electronics for Atomic Physics provides a course in quantum electronics for researchers in atomic physics. The book covers the usual topics, such as Gaussian beams, cavities, lasers, nonlinear optics and modulation techniques, but also includes a number of areas not usually found in a textbook on quantum electronics. It includes such practical matters as the enhancement of nonlinear processes in a build-up cavity, impedance matching into a cavity, laser frequencystabilization (including servomechanism theory), astigmatism in ring cavities, and atomic/molecular spectroscopic techniques

  12. Review of atomic mass formula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachibana, Takahiro [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Advanced Research Center for Science and Engineering

    1997-07-01

    Wapstra and Audi`s Table is famous for evaluation of experimental data of atomic nuclear masses (1993/1995 version) which estimated about 2000 kinds of nuclei. The error of atomic mass of formula is 0.3 MeV-0.8 MeV. Four kinds of atomic mass formula: JM (Jaenecke and Masson), TUYY (Tachibana, Uno, Yamada and Yamada), FRDM (Moeller, Nix, Myers and Swiatecki) and ETFSI (Aboussir, Pearson, Dutta and Tondeur) and their properties (number of parameter and error etc.) were explained. An estimation method of theoretical error of mass formula was presented. It was estimated by the theoretical error of other surrounding nuclei. (S.Y.)

  13. Manganese determination om minerals by activation analysis, using the californium-252 as a neutron source; Determinacao de manganes em minerios, por analise por ativacao, usando californio-252 como fonte de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Antonio

    1976-07-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis, using a Californium-252 neutron source, has been applied for the determination of manganese in ores such as pyrolusite, rodonite (manganese silicate)' and blending used in dry-batteries The favorable nuclear properties of manganese, such as high thermal neutron cross-section for the reaction {sup 55}Mn (n.gamma){sup 56} Mn, high concentration of manganese in the matrix and short half - life of {sup 56}Mn, are an ideal combination for non-destructive analysis of manganese in ores. Samples and standards of manganese dioxide were irradiated for about 20 minutes, followed by a 4 to 15 minutes decay and counted in a single channel pulse-height discrimination using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. Counting time was equal to 10 minutes. The interference of nuclear reactions {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn and {sup 59} Co (n, {alpha}){sup 56} were studied, as well as problems in connection with neutron shadowing during irradiation, gamma-rays attenuation during counting and influence of granulometry of samples. One sample,was also analysed by wet-chemical method (sodium bismuthate) in order to compare results. As a whole, i t was shown that the analytical method of neutron activation for manganese in ores and blending, is a method simple, rapid and with good precision and accuracy. (author)

  14. Design of a homogeneous subcritical nuclear reactor based on thorium with a source of californium 252; Diseno de un reactor nuclear subcritico homogeneo a base de Torio con una fuente de Californio 252

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado H, C. E.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Sajo B, L., E-mail: ce_delgado89@hotmail.com [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Apdo. 89000, 1080A Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: One of the energy alternatives to fossil fuels which do not produce greenhouse gases is the nuclear energy. One of the drawbacks of this alternative is the generation of radioactive wastes of long half-life and its relation to the generation of nuclear materials to produce weapons of mass destruction. An option to these drawbacks of nuclear energy is to use Thorium as part of the nuclear fuel which it becomes in U{sup 233} when capturing neutrons, that is a fissile material. In this paper Monte Carlo methods were used to design a homogeneous subcritical reactor based on thorium. As neutron reflector graphite was used. The reactor core is homogeneous and is formed of 70% light water as moderator, 12% of enriched uranium UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} and 18% of thorium Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} as fuel. To start the nuclear fission chain reaction an isotopic source of californium 252 was used with an intensity of 4.6 x 10{sup 7} s{sup -1}. In the design the value of the effective multiplication factor, whose value turned out k{sub eff} <1 was calculated. Also, the neutron spectra at different distances from the source and the total fluence were calculated, as well as the values of the ambient dose equivalent in the periphery of the reactor. (Author)

  15. Manganese determination om minerals by activation analysis, using the californium-252 as a neutron source; Determinacao de manganes em minerios, por analise por ativacao, usando californio-252 como fonte de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Antonio

    1976-07-01

    Neutron Activation Analysis, using a Californium-252 neutron source, has been applied for the determination of manganese in ores such as pyrolusite, rodonite (manganese silicate)' and blending used in dry-batteries The favorable nuclear properties of manganese, such as high thermal neutron cross-section for the reaction {sup 55}Mn (n.gamma){sup 56} Mn, high concentration of manganese in the matrix and short half - life of {sup 56}Mn, are an ideal combination for non-destructive analysis of manganese in ores. Samples and standards of manganese dioxide were irradiated for about 20 minutes, followed by a 4 to 15 minutes decay and counted in a single channel pulse-height discrimination using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. Counting time was equal to 10 minutes. The interference of nuclear reactions {sup 56}Fe(n,p){sup 56}Mn and {sup 59} Co (n, {alpha}){sup 56} were studied, as well as problems in connection with neutron shadowing during irradiation, gamma-rays attenuation during counting and influence of granulometry of samples. One sample,was also analysed by wet-chemical method (sodium bismuthate) in order to compare results. As a whole, i t was shown that the analytical method of neutron activation for manganese in ores and blending, is a method simple, rapid and with good precision and accuracy. (author)

  16. Chocolate Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Caleb; Khovanova, Tanya; Park, Robin; Song, Angela

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a game played on a rectangular $m \\times n$ gridded chocolate bar. Each move, a player breaks the bar along a grid line. Each move after that consists of taking any piece of chocolate and breaking it again along existing grid lines, until just $mn$ individual squares remain. This paper enumerates the number of ways to break an $m \\times n$ bar, which we call chocolate numbers, and introduces four new sequences related to these numbers. Using various techniques, we p...

  17. Number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, George E

    1994-01-01

    Although mathematics majors are usually conversant with number theory by the time they have completed a course in abstract algebra, other undergraduates, especially those in education and the liberal arts, often need a more basic introduction to the topic.In this book the author solves the problem of maintaining the interest of students at both levels by offering a combinatorial approach to elementary number theory. In studying number theory from such a perspective, mathematics majors are spared repetition and provided with new insights, while other students benefit from the consequent simpl

  18. Nice numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, John

    2016-01-01

    In this intriguing book, John Barnes takes us on a journey through aspects of numbers much as he took us on a geometrical journey in Gems of Geometry. Similarly originating from a series of lectures for adult students at Reading and Oxford University, this book touches a variety of amusing and fascinating topics regarding numbers and their uses both ancient and modern. The author intrigues and challenges his audience with both fundamental number topics such as prime numbers and cryptography, and themes of daily needs and pleasures such as counting one's assets, keeping track of time, and enjoying music. Puzzles and exercises at the end of each lecture offer additional inspiration, and numerous illustrations accompany the reader. Furthermore, a number of appendices provides in-depth insights into diverse topics such as Pascal’s triangle, the Rubik cube, Mersenne’s curious keyboards, and many others. A theme running through is the thought of what is our favourite number. Written in an engaging and witty sty...

  19. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  20. Atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanna, R.

    1978-01-01

    Development of nuclear science in India, particularly the research and development work at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, is described. Among the wide range of materials developed for specific functions under rigorous conditions are nuclear pure grade uranium, zirconium and beryllium, and conventional materials like aluminium, carbon steel and stainless steels. Radioisotopes are produced and used for tracer studies in various fields. Various types of nuclear gauges and nuclear instruments are produced. Radiations have been used to develop new high yielding groundnut mutants with large kernals. The sterile male technique for pest control and radiosterilization technique to process potatoes, onions and marine foods for storage are ready for exploitation. Processes and equipment have been developed for production of electrolytic hydrogen, electrothermal phosphorus and desalinated water. Indigenously manufactured components and materials are now being used for the nuclear energy programme. Indian nuclear power programme strategy is to build heavy water reactors and to utilise their byproduct plutonium and depleted uranium to feed fast breeder reactors which will produce more fissile material than burnt. Finally a special mention has been made of the manpower development programme of the BARC. BARC has established a training school in 1957 giving advanced training in physics, chemistry and various branches of engineering and metallurgy

  1. Quantum mechanical study on hydrogen bonds between 3-aminophenol and CH{sub x}Cl{sub 4-}x (x=1, 2, 3): Effect of the number of halogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, So Young; Kang, Hyuk [Dept. of Chemistry, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Hydrogen bonds between 3-aminophenol and three chlorine-substituted methanes (CHCl{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}Cl) were quantum mechanically studied at MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level. Several low-energy structures with a hydrogen bond were identified for all chlorinated methanes, and the properties of their C[BOND]H stretching vibrations were investigated. When it is hydrogen-bonded to 3-aminophenol (3AP), the C[BOND]H stretching frequency of CHCl{sub 3} is blue-shifted by 18–54 cm−1, and its IR absorption intensity is 48–74 times increased, depending on the isomer. The symmetric and antisymmetric C[BOND]H stretches of CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}Cl are shifted in either direction by a few cm−1 upon hydrogen-bonding to 3AP, and their IR intensity was increased by a few times. It is concluded that all chlorinated methanes can make a π-hydrogen bond to 3AP but only CHCl{sub 3}, the one with the most chlorine atoms, makes a blue-shifting hydrogen bond, or an “antihydrogen bond”.

  2. Bremsstrahlung in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Y.; Kuchiev, M.Y.; Solov'ev, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that in the collision of a fast atom with a target atom when the frequencies are on the order of the potentials or higher, there arises bremsstrahlung comparable in intensity with the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron with the same velocity in the field of the target atom. The mechanism by which bremsstrahlung is produced in atom-atom collisions is elucidated. Results of specific calculations of the bremsstrahlung spectra are given for α particles and helium atoms colliding with xenon

  3. Number names and number understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye; Misfeldt, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the results from the first year of a three-year research project involving the relationship between Danish number names and their corresponding digits in the canonical base 10 system. The project aims to develop a system to help the students’ understanding of the base 10 syste...... the Danish number names are more complicated than in other languages. Keywords: A research project in grade 0 and 1th in a Danish school, Base-10 system, two-digit number names, semiotic, cognitive perspectives....

  4. Entanglement properties between two atoms in the binomial optical field interacting with two entangled atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tang-Kun; Zhang Kang-Long; Tao Yu; Shan Chuan-Jia; Liu Ji-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The temporal evolution of the degree of entanglement between two atoms in a system of the binomial optical field interacting with two arbitrary entangled atoms is investigated. The influence of the strength of the dipole–dipole interaction between two atoms, probabilities of the Bernoulli trial, and particle number of the binomial optical field on the temporal evolution of the atomic entanglement are discussed. The result shows that the two atoms are always in the entanglement state. Moreover, if and only if the two atoms are initially in the maximally entangled state, the entanglement evolution is not affected by the parameters, and the degree of entanglement is always kept as 1. (paper)

  5. Number-unconstrained quantum sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum sensing is commonly described as a constrained optimization problem: maximize the information gained about an unknown quantity using a limited number of particles. Important sensors including gravitational wave interferometers and some atomic sensors do not appear to fit this description, because there is no external constraint on particle number. Here, we develop the theory of particle-number-unconstrained quantum sensing, and describe how optimal particle numbers emerge from the competition of particle-environment and particle-particle interactions. We apply the theory to optical probing of an atomic medium modeled as a resonant, saturable absorber, and observe the emergence of well-defined finite optima without external constraints. The results contradict some expectations from number-constrained quantum sensing and show that probing with squeezed beams can give a large sensitivity advantage over classical strategies when each is optimized for particle number.

  6. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakov, V V; Kazakov, V G; Kovalev, V S; Meshkov, O I; Yatsenko, A S

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists. (paper)

  7. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  8. Funny Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore M. Porter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The struggle over cure rate measures in nineteenth-century asylums provides an exemplary instance of how, when used for official assessments of institutions, these numbers become sites of contestation. The evasion of goals and corruption of measures tends to make these numbers “funny” in the sense of becoming dis-honest, while the mismatch between boring, technical appearances and cunning backstage manipulations supplies dark humor. The dangers are evident in recent efforts to decentralize the functions of governments and corporations using incen-tives based on quantified targets.

  9. Transcendental numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Murty, M Ram

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the topic of transcendental numbers for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. The text is constructed to support a full course on the subject, including descriptions of both relevant theorems and their applications. While the first part of the book focuses on introducing key concepts, the second part presents more complex material, including applications of Baker’s theorem, Schanuel’s conjecture, and Schneider’s theorem. These later chapters may be of interest to researchers interested in examining the relationship between transcendence and L-functions. Readers of this text should possess basic knowledge of complex analysis and elementary algebraic number theory.

  10. Transfinite Numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    this is a characteristic difference between finite and infinite sets and created an immensely useful branch of mathematics based on this idea which had a great impact on the whole of mathe- matics. For example, the question of what is a number (finite or infinite) is almost a philosophical one. However Cantor's work turned it ...

  11. Atom Optics in a Nutshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meystre, Pierre

    This chapter presents a brief introduction to atom optics, assuming only a basic knowledge of elementary physics ideas such as conservation of energy and conservation of momentum, and making only limited use of elementary algebra. Starting from a historical perspective we introduce the idea of wave-particle duality, a fundamental tenet of quantum mechanics that teaches us that atoms, just like light, behave sometimes as waves, and sometimes as particles. It is this profound but counter-intuitive property that allows one to do with atoms much of what is familiar from conventional optics. However, because in contrast to photons atoms have a mass, there are also fundamental differences between the two that have important consequences. In particular this property opens up a number of applications that are ill-suited for conventional optical methods. After explaining why it is particularly advantageous to work at temperatures close to absolute zero to benefit most readily from the wave nature of atoms we discuss several of these applications, concentrating primarily on the promise of atom microscopes and atom interferometers in addressing fundamental and extraordinarily challenging questions at the frontier of current physics knowledge.

  12. Ghost imaging with atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  13. Efficient Atomic One-Qubit Phase Gate Realized by a Cavity QED and Identical Atoms System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yong; Jiang Nianquan

    2010-01-01

    We present a scheme to implement a one-qubit phase gate with a two-level atom crossing an optical cavity in which some identical atoms are trapped. One can conveniently acquire an arbitrary phase shift of the gate by properly choosing the number of atoms trapped in the cavity and the velocity of the atom crossing the cavity. The present scheme provides a very simple and efficient way for implementing one-qubit phase gate. (general)

  14. Atomic weight versus atomic mass controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    A problem for the Atomic Weights Commission for the past decade has been the controversial battle over the names ''atomic weight'' and ''atomic mass''. The Commission has considered the arguments on both sides over the years and it appears that this meeting will see more of the same discussion taking place. In this paper, I review the situation and offer some alternatives

  15. Phantom atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, K.; Voigt, S.

    1993-01-01

    The Society for People Living under Threat has been supporting those affected by radiation (Uranium decay), nuclear weapons testing, nuclear power stations and waste disposal since the mid-sixties. Through a great number of meetings, press releases and campaigns, it has succeeded in bringing the theme into the public spotlight in Germany, particularly within the ecology movement. The initial hesitation in supporting the indigenous peoples threatened by radiation contamination has given way to broad consensus and support. The ecology and human rights movement have united the need to listen to and give support to those of whom no-one speaks. (orig./DG) [de

  16. Highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Littman, M.G.; Zimmerman, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Highly excited atoms are often called Rydberg atoms. These atoms have a wealth of exotic properties which are discussed. Of special interest, are the effects of electric and magnetic fields on Rydberg atoms. Ordinary atoms are scarcely affected by an applied electric or magnetic field; Rydberg atoms can be strongly distorted and even pulled apart by a relatively weak electric field, and they can be squeezed into unexpected shapes by a magnetic field. Studies of the structure of Rydberg atoms in electric and magnetic fields have revealed dramatic atomic phenomena that had not been observed before

  17. Laser-assisted atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, F.

    1984-01-01

    The basic layer-assisted atom-atom collision processes are reviewed in order to get a simpler picture of the main physical facts. The processes can be separated into two groups: optical collisions where only one atom is changing state during the collision, the other acting as a spectator atom, and radiative collisions where the states of the two atoms are changing during the collision. All the processes can be interpreted in terms of photoexcitation of the quasimolecule formed during the collisional process. (author)

  18. Code ATOM for calculation of atomic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainshtein, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    In applying atomic physics to problems of plasma diagnostics, it is necessary to determine some atomic characteristics, including energies and transition probabilities, for very many atoms and ions. Development of general codes for calculation of many types of atomic characteristics has been based on general but comparatively simple approximate methods. The program ATOM represents an attempt at effective use of such a general code. This report gives a brief description of the methods used, and the possibilities of and limitations to the code are discussed. Characteristics of the following processes can be calculated by ATOM: radiative transitions between discrete levels, radiative ionization and recombination, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, collisional excitation and ionization by point heavy particle (Born approximation only), dielectronic recombination, and autoionization. ATOM explores Born (for z=1) or Coulomb-Born (for z>1) approximations. In both cases exchange and normalization can be included. (N.K.)

  19. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-01-01

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs

  20. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the…

  1. Atomic fountain and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of the development of working of MOT along with the basic principle of laser atom cooling and trapping is given. A technique to separate the cooled and trapped atoms from the MOT using atomic fountain technique will also be covered. The widely used technique for atomic fountain is, first to cool and trap the neutral atoms in MOT and then launch them in the vertical direction, using moving molasses technique. Using 133 Cs atomic fountain clock, time improvement of 2 to 3 order of magnitude over a conventional 133 Cs atomic clock has been observed

  2. Interferometry with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmcke, J.; Riehle, F.; Witte, A.; Kisters, T.

    1992-01-01

    Physics and experimental results of atom interferometry are reviewed and several realizations of atom interferometers are summarized. As a typical example of an atom interferometer utilizing the internal degrees of freedom of the atom, we discuss the separated field excitation of a calcium atomic beam using four traveling laser fields and demonstrate the Sagnac effect in a rotating interferometer. The sensitivity of this interferometer can be largely increased by use of slow atoms with narrow velocity distribution. We therefore furthermore report on the preparation of a laser cooled and deflected calcium atomic beam. (orig.)

  3. The entanglement evolution between two entangled atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... entanglement between the two atoms changes periodically and undergoes the entanglement sudden death (ESD) and sudden birth at some time. The entanglement properties between the field and the atom insidethe cavity are dependent on the photon number. Most interestingly, the entanglement between the field and ...

  4. Three-atom clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to obtain an equation for the effective interaction in three atoms bound by a single electron. For low binding energies in an 'electron + atom' pair, long-range forces arise between the atoms, leading to bound states when the size of the three-atom cluster is a few tens of angstrom. A system made of alkali-metal atoms is considered as an example

  5. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Atoms in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Huillier, A.

    2002-01-01

    When a high-power laser focuses into a gas of atoms, the electromagnetic field becomes of the same magnitude as the Coulomb field which binds a 1s electron in a hydrogen atom. 3 highly non-linear phenomena can happen: 1) ATI (above threshold ionization): electrons initially in the ground state absorb a large number of photons, many more than the minimum number required for ionization; 2) multiple ionization: many electrons can be emitted one at a time, in a sequential process, or simultaneously in a mechanism called direct or non-sequential; and 3) high order harmonic generation (HHG): efficient photon emission in the extreme ultraviolet range, in the form of high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser field can occur. The theoretical problem consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) that describes the interaction of a many-electron atom with a laser field. A number of methods have been proposed to solve this problem in the case of a hydrogen atom or a single-active electron atom in a strong laser field. A large effort is presently being devoted to go beyond the single-active approximation. The understanding of the physics of the interaction between atoms and strong laser fields has been provided by a very simple model called ''simple man's theory''. A unified view of HHG, ATI, and non-sequential ionization, originating from the simple man's model and the strong field approximation, expressed in terms of electrons trajectories or quantum paths is slowly emerging. (A.C.)

  7. Atomic squeezed states on an atom-chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maussang, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis, we describe the construction of an experiment, allowing to produce 87 Rb Bose-Einstein condensates on an atom chip, and then split them in a double well potential. An accurate imaging system has been developed, in order to be able to measure the absolute value of the populations of the double well within a very low noise level, almost limited by the optical shot noise. We measure atom number statistics after splitting, and directly observe number squeezed states, down to -4.9 dB at low temperatures, compared to a classical gas, of independent particles. The dependence in temperature of fluctuations has been also studied. For a thermal gas, Poissonian fluctuations are given by the probability distribution of the macroscopic configurations with a given atom number difference. In the degenerate regime, the entropy effect which favors small number differences vanishes, leading to super-Poissonian fluctuations, to more than +3.8 dB close to transition temperature. At low temperatures, the interaction energy cost associated with number fluctuations exceeds the available thermal energy, leading to sub-Poissonian fluctuations. Those two behaviours have been theoretically explained, both with a simple analytical model and a numerical one. We also measured the evolution of the relative phase between the two clouds, and its collapse due to interactions, allowing us to claim that this splitter is a coherent one. (author)

  8. Hot atom chemistry of sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovski, D. S.; Koleva, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt to cover all papers dealing with the hot atom chemistry of sulpphur is made. Publications which: a) only touch the problem, b) contain some data, indirectly connected with sulphur hot atom chemistry, c) deal with 35 S-production from a chloride matrix, are included as well. The author's name and literature source are given in the original language, transcribed, when it is necessary, in latine. A number of primery and secondary documents have been used including Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atomindex, the bibliographies of A. Siuda and J.-P. Adloff for 1973 - 77, etc. (authors)

  9. Atomic structure in black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Yukinori

    2006-01-01

    We propose that any black hole has atomic structure in its inside and has no horizon as a model of black holes. Our proposal is founded on a mean field approximation of gravity. The structure of our model consists of a (charged) singularity at the center and quantum fluctuations of fields around the singularity, namely, it is quite similar to that of atoms. Any properties of black holes, e.g. entropy, can be explained by the model. The model naturally quantizes black holes. In particular, we find the minimum black hole, whose structure is similar to that of the hydrogen atom and whose Schwarzschild radius is approximately 1.1287 times the Planck length. Our approach is conceptually similar to Bohr's model of the atomic structure, and the concept of the minimum Schwarzschild radius is similar to that of the Bohr radius. The model predicts that black holes carry baryon number, and the baryon number is rapidly violated. This baryon number violation can be used as verification of the model. (author)

  10. Accurate determination of Curium and Californium isotopic ratios by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-QMS) in 248Cm samples for transmutation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourgiotis, A.; Isnard, H.; Aubert, M.; Dupont, E.; AlMahamid, I.; Cassette, P.; Panebianco, S.; Letourneau, A.; Chartier, F.; Tian, G.; Rao, L.; Lukens, W.

    2011-02-01

    The French Atomic Energy Commission has carried out several experiments including the mini-INCA (INcineration of Actinides) project for the study of minor-actinide transmutation processes in high intensity thermal neutron fluxes, in view of proposing solutions to reduce the radiotoxicity of long-lived nuclear wastes. In this context, a Cm sample enriched in {sup 248}Cm ({approx}97 %) was irradiated in thermal neutron flux at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL). This work describes a quadrupole ICP-MS (ICP-QMS) analytical procedure for precise and accurate isotopic composition determination of Cm before sample irradiation and of Cm and Cf after sample irradiation. The factors that affect the accuracy and reproducibility of isotopic ratio measurements by ICP-QMS, such as peak centre correction, detector dead time, mass bias, abundance sensitivity and hydrides formation, instrumental background, and memory blank were carefully evaluated and corrected. Uncertainties of the isotopic ratios, taking into account internal precision of isotope ratio measurements, peak tailing, and hydrides formations ranged from 0.3% to 1.3%. This uncertainties range is quite acceptable for the nuclear data to be used in transmutation studies.

  11. Short wavelength sources and atoms and ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.T.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of ionizing radiation with atoms and ions is a key fundamental process. Experimental progress has depended in particular on the development of short wavelength light sources. Laser-plasma and synchrotron sources have been exploited for several decades and most recently the development of short wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) sources is revolutionizing the field. This paper introduces laser plasma and synchrotron sources through examples of their use in studies of the interaction of ionizing radiation with atoms and ions, ranging from few-electron atomic and ionic systems to the many-electron high atomic number actinides. The new FEL source (FLASH) at DESY is introduced. (author)

  12. Cold atoms in optical cavities and lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, P.

    1996-11-01

    The thesis is organized in three chapters covering different aspects of the interaction of atoms and light in the framework of theoretical quantum optics. In chapter 1 a special case of a microscopic laser where one or two atoms interact with several quantized cavity modes is discussed. In particular I investigate the properties of the light field created in one of the cavity modes. It is shown that a single-atom model already predicts average photon numbers in agreement with a semiclassical many-atom theory. The two-atom model exhibits additional collective features, such as superradiance and subradiance. In chapter 2 effects of the photon recoil on cold atoms in the limit of long-lived atomic transitions are investigated. First, I demonstrate that, in principle, relying on this scheme, a continuous-wave laser in the ultraviolet frequency domain could be established. Second, the splitting of an atomic beam into two coherent subbeams is discussed within the same scheme. Such beamsplitters play an important role in high-precision measurements using atomic interferometers. Finally, chapter 3 deals with cooling and trapping of atoms by the interaction with laser light. I discuss the properties and the light scattering of atoms trapped in a new light field configuration, a so-called dark optical superlattice. In principle, such systems allow the trapping of more than one atom in the ground state of a single optical potential well. This could give rise to the observation of e.g. atom-atom interactions and quantum statistical effects. (author)

  13. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  14. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  15. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  16. Progress in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.J.; Kleinpoppen, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents reviews by leading experts in the field covering areas of research at the forefront of atomic spectroscopy. Topics considered include the k ordering of atomic structure, multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations for complex atoms, new methods in high-resolution laser spectroscopy, resonance ionization spectroscopy (inert atom detection), trapped ion spectroscopy, high-magnetic-field atomic physics, the effects of magnetic and electric fields on highly excited atoms, x rays from superheavy collision systems, recoil ion spectroscopy with heavy ions, investigations of superheavy quasi-atoms via spectroscopy of electron rays and positrons, impact ionization by fast projectiles, and amplitudes and state parameters from ion- and atom-atom excitation processes

  17. Preparation of Ultracold Atom Clouds at the Shot Noise Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gajdacz, M.; Hilliard, A. J.; Kristensen, Mick

    2016-01-01

    We prepare number stabilized ultracold atom clouds through the real-time analysis of nondestructive images and the application of feedback. In our experiments, the atom number N∼10^6 is determined by high precision Faraday imaging with uncertainty ΔN below the shot noise level, i.e., ΔN... on this measurement, feedback is applied to reduce the atom number to a user-defined target, whereupon a second imaging series probes the number stabilized cloud. By this method, we show that the atom number in ultracold clouds can be prepared below the shot noise level....

  18. Theoretical Calculation of Absolute Radii of Atoms and Ions. Part 1. The Atomic Radii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raka Biswas

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A set of theoretical atomic radii corresponding to the principal maximum in the radial distribution function, 4πr2R2 for the outermost orbital has been calculated for the ground state of 103 elements of the periodic table using Slater orbitals. The set of theoretical radii are found to reproduce the periodic law and the Lother Meyer’s atomic volume curve and reproduce the expected vertical and horizontal trend of variation in atomic size in the periodic table. The d-block and f-block contractions are distinct in the calculated sizes. The computed sizes qualitatively correlate with the absolute size dependent properties like ionization potentials and electronegativity of elements. The radii are used to calculate a number of size dependent periodic physical properties of isolated atoms viz., the diamagnetic part of the atomic susceptibility, atomic polarizability and the chemical hardness. The calculated global hardness and atomic polarizability of a number of atoms are found to be close to the available experimental values and the profiles of the physical properties computed in terms of the theoretical atomic radii exhibit their inherent periodicity. A simple method of computing the absolute size of atoms has been explored and a large body of known material has been brought together to reveal how many different properties correlate with atomic size.

  19. Electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronsky, R.

    1983-11-01

    The direct imaging of atomic structure in solids has become increasingly easier to accomplish with modern transmission electron microscopes, many of which have an information retrieval limit near 0.2 nm point resolution. Achieving better resolution, particularly with any useful range of specimen tilting, requires a major design effort. This presentation describes the new Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), recently put into operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Capable of 0.18 nm or better interpretable resolution over a voltage range of 400 kV to 1000 kV with +- 40/sup 0/ biaxial specimen tilting, the ARM features a number of new electron-optical and microprocessor-control designs. These are highlighted, and its atomic resolution performance demonstrated for a selection of inorganic crystals.

  20. Electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronsky, R.

    1983-11-01

    The direct imaging of atomic structure in solids has become increasingly easier to accomplish with modern transmission electron microscopes, many of which have an information retrieval limit near 0.2 nm point resolution. Achieving better resolution, particularly with any useful range of specimen tilting, requires a major design effort. This presentation describes the new Atomic Resolution Microscope (ARM), recently put into operation at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Capable of 0.18 nm or better interpretable resolution over a voltage range of 400 kV to 1000 kV with +- 40 0 biaxial specimen tilting, the ARM features a number of new electron-optical and microprocessor-control designs. These are highlighted, and its atomic resolution performance demonstrated for a selection of inorganic crystals

  1. Information entropy properties of the atoms in the system of coupled Λ-type three-level atoms interacting with coherent field in Kerr medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ke; Ling Weijun

    2011-01-01

    The information entropy properties of the atoms of coupled Λ-type three-level atoms interacting with coherent field are studied by means of quantum theory, and discussed the time evolutions of the information entropy of the atoms via the average photon number, initial state of the atoms, detuning, coupling constant between the atoms and the coefficient of Kerr medium. Numerical calculation results show that the time evolutions of the information entropy properties of the atoms strongly dependent on the initial state of the system and the average photon number. Detuning, coupling constant between the atoms and the Kerr coefficient still make influence on the information entropy of the atoms. (authors)

  2. Atomic iodine laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisk, G.A.; Gusinow, M.A.; Hays, A.K.; Padrick, T.D.; Palmer, R.E.; Rice, J.K.; Truby, F.K.; Riley, M.E.

    1978-05-01

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program

  3. Transient localization in the kicked Rydberg atom

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, E.; Fürthauer, S.; Wimberger, S.; Burgdörfer, J.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the long-time limit of quantum localization of the kicked Rydberg atom. The kicked Rydberg atom is shown to possess in addition to the quantum localization time $\\tau_L$ a second cross-over time $t_D$ where quantum dynamics diverges from classical dynamics towards increased instability. The quantum localization is shown to vanish as either the strength of the kicks at fixed principal quantum number or the quantum number at fixed kick strength increases. The survival probability...

  4. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: Counting noble gas atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe new work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions). When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. We show that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective. (orig./FKS)

  5. Measurement of atomic number and mass attenuation coefficient in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    literature on the measurement of mass attenuation coefficient in magnesium ferrite. The knowledge of photon ... pure) MgO and Fe2O3. The details of experimental ... and (4 4 0) planes belonging to cubic spinel structure. The XRD pattern ...

  6. Experimental measurement of effective atomic number of composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-02

    Aug 2, 2011 ... composite materials for Compton effect in the γ-ray region ... range. The method was employed to evaluate Zeff for different inorganic ... cations of radiation such as dosimetry, shielding, industrial radiography etc., in the photon.

  7. Effective atomic number, electron density and kerma of gamma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rare element optical glass with oxides of tungsten, tantalum and thorium. ... Similarly, gadolinium and lutetium exhibit only +3 oxidation state because .... (σa) and effective molecular cross-section (σm) are related by the following equation: σa =.

  8. High effective atomic number polymer scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Sanner, Robert Dean; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Rupert, Benjamin Lee; Sturm, Benjamin Walter

    2014-04-15

    A scintillator material according to one embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. A scintillator material according to another embodiment includes a bismuth-loaded aromatic polymer having a fluor incorporated therewith and an energy resolution at 662 keV of less than about 10%. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  9. A Single Atom Antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinter, Florian; Williams, Joshua B; Weller, Miriam; Waitz, Markus; Pitzer, Martin; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Schober, Carl; Kastirke, Gregor; Müller, Christian; Goihl, Christoph; Burzynski, Phillip; Wiegandt, Florian; Wallauer, Robert; Kalinin, Anton; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Schöffler, Markus S; Jahnke, Till; Dörner, Reinhard; Chiang, Ying-Chih; Gokhberg, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the smallest possible implementation of an antenna-receiver complex which consists of a single (helium) atom acting as the antenna and a second (neon) atom acting as a receiver. (paper)

  10. Atom chips: mesoscopic physics with cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, P.; Wildermuth, S.; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.; GAllego Garcia, D.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Cold neutral atoms can be controlled and manipulated in microscopic potentials near surfaces of atom chips. These integrated micro-devices combine the known techniques of atom optics with the capabilities of well established micro- and nanofabrication technology. In analogy to electronic microchips and integrated fiber optics, the concept of atom chips is suitable to explore the domain of mesoscopic physics with matter waves. We use current and charge carrying structures to form complex potentials with high spatial resolution only microns from the surface. In particular, atoms can be confined to an essentially one-dimensional motion. In this talk, we will give an overview of our experiments studying the manipulation of both thermal atoms and BECs on atom chips. First experiments in the quasi one-dimensional regime will be presented. These experiments profit from strongly reduced residual disorder potentials caused by imperfections of the chip fabrication with respect to previously published experiments. This is due to our purely lithographic fabrication technique that proves to be advantageous over electroplating. We have used one dimensionally confined BECs as an ultra-sensitive probe to characterize these potentials. These smooth potentials allow us to explore various aspects of the physics of degenerate quantum gases in low dimensions. (author)

  11. Measurement and model description of differential neutron spectra of the californium 252 spontaneous fission depending on THETA, Msub(T), Esub(kin sum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, Yu.A.; Sidorov, L.V.; Vasil'eva, N.K.; Barashkov, Yu.A.; Golovanov, O.A.; Kopalkin, N.V.; Nemudrov, N.I.; Surin, V.M.; Khachaturov, Yu.F.

    1984-01-01

    The results of the 4π-spectrometer mesurement of the neutron spectra in the 26-154 deg angle range for seven groups of fragments with different masses and total kinetic energies are given. Experimental spectra have been analyzed for consistency with the evaporation model of neutrons from moving fragments. The results of an analysis of differential neutron spectra shows that the main reason of the ''yearly'' neutron emission is a neutron evaporation from fragments with large excitation energy and from fragments with neutron number N>82 during the time as compared with the time of fragment acceleration

  12. Quasi-atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.

    1976-01-01

    The concept of a quasi-atom is discussed, and several experiments are described in which molecular or quasi-atomic transitions have been observed. X-ray spectra are shown for these experiments in which heavy ion projectiles were incident on various targets and the resultant combined system behaved as a quasi-atom. This rapidly developing field has already given new insight into atomic collision phenomena. (P.J.S.)

  13. Atomic Energy Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This act provides for the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The board is responsible for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy. The board is also considered necessary to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy

  14. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  15. Atom-atom collision cascades localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of an impurity and thermal vibration influence on the atom-atom collision cascade development is analysed by the computer simulation method (the modificated dynamic model). It is discovered that the relatively low energetic cascades are localized with the temperature increase of an irradiated crystal. On the basis of the given effect the mechanism of splitting of the high energetic cascades into subcascades is proposed. It accounts for two factors: the primary knocked atom energy and the irradiated crystal temperature. Introduction of an impurity also localizes the cascades independently from the impurity atom mass. The cascades localization leads to intensification of the process of annealing in the cascades and reduction of the post-cascade vacancy cluster sizes. (author)

  16. Electron scattering by trapped fermionic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haijun; Jhe, Wonho

    2002-01-01

    Considering the Fermi gases of alkali-metal atoms that are trapped in a harmonic potential, we study theoretically the elastic and inelastic scattering of the electrons by the trapped Fermi atoms and present the corresponding differential cross sections. We also obtain the stopping power for the cases that the electronic state as well as the center-of-mass state are excited both separately and simultaneously. It is shown that the elastic scattering process is no longer coherent in contrast to the electron scattering by the atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). For the inelastic scattering process, on the other hand, the differential cross section is found to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the number of the trapped atoms. In particular, the trapped fermionic atoms display the effect of ''Fermi surface,'' that is, only the energy levels near the Fermi energy have dominant contributions to the scattering process. Moreover, it is found that the stopping power scales as the 7/6 power of the atomic number. These results are fundamentally different from those of the electron scattering by the atomic BEC, mainly due to the different statistics obeyed by the trapped atomic systems

  17. Positronium-alkali atom scattering at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Ajoy; Basu, Arindam; Sarkar, Nirmal K; Sinha, Prabal K

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the scattering of orthopositronium (o-Ps) atom off different atomic alkali targets (Na to Cs) at low and medium energies (up to 120 eV). Projectile-elastic and target-elastic close-coupling models have been employed to investigate the systems in addition to the static-exchange model. Elastic, excitation and total cross sections have been reported for all four systems. The magnitude of the alkali excitation cross section increases with increasing atomic number of the target atom while the position of the peak value shifts towards lower incident energies. The magnitudes of the Ps excitation and ionization cross sections increase steadily with atomic number with no change in the peak position. The reported results show regular behaviour with increasing atomic number of the target atom. Scattering parameters for the Ps-Rb and Ps-Cs systems are being reported for the first time

  18. Atomic Energy Research benchmark activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.

    1998-01-01

    The test problems utilized in the validation and verification process of computer programs in Atomic Energie Research are collected into one bunch. This is the first step towards issuing a volume in which tests for VVER are collected, along with reference solutions and a number of solutions. The benchmarks do not include the ZR-6 experiments because they have been published along with a number of comparisons in the Final reports of TIC. The present collection focuses on operational and mathematical benchmarks which cover almost the entire range of reaktor calculation. (Author)

  19. Atoms for peace plus fifty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhower, S.

    2003-01-01

    One of Dwight Eisenhower's most significant political legacies stemmed from his management of the nuclear question. Five decades after Eisenhower's 'Atoms for Peace' speech before the United Nations, the nuclear dilemma persists but the world is a different, and I would submit, a better place today than it might have been had that vision not been articulated, or its proposals not advanced. The 'Atoms for Peace' speech had a number of objectives, but it is over arching goal was to propose a set of ideas, a nuclear strategy, which would call on the Soviets to cooperate internationally for the betterment of mankind. This would reengage the Soviets in discussions on nuclear matters at a time when arms control talks had stalled, but it would also offer hope, and a practical set of ideas, to the developing world. 'Atoms for Peace' spawned many developments, including the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency, and eventually the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. While 'Atoms for Peace', as well as the institutions it created, has come under fire in recent years, it is hard to imagine what the world would have been like without it. Largely through the international Atomic Energy Agency, nations around the world have participated in research and development programs, including the use of nuclear energy in important civilian applications. Nuclear electric power accounts for nearly one-fifth of the world's electricity - reducing global tensions by replacing oil in many applications, and providing much of the world's electricity that is generated without the release of greenhouse gases or other destructive emissions. Many other nuclear and radiation-related technologies, especially radiopharmaceuticals and medical advances involving radiation, have resulted in large part from research spawned by 'Atoms for Peace'. Millions of lives have been saved in the process. While the 'nuclear dilemma' remains a challenge almost as complex as it was fifty years ago, the

  20. Atomic collisions research with excited atomic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogerland, M.D.; Gulley, R.J.; Colla, M.; Lu, W.; Milic, D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of fundamental atomic collision and spectroscopic properties such as collision cross sections, reaction rates, transition probabilities etc. underpin the understanding and operation of many plasma and gas-discharge-based devices and phenomena, for example plasma processing and deposition. In almost all cases the complex series of reactions which sustains the discharge or plasma, or produces the reactive species of interest, has a precursor electron impact excitation, attachment, dissociation or ionisation event. These processes have been extensively studied in a wide range of atomic and molecular species and an impressive data base of collision cross sections and reaction rates now exists. However, most of these measurements are for collisions with stable atomic or molecular species which are initially in their ground electronic state. Relatively little information is available for scattering from excited states or for scattering from unstable molecular radicals. Examples of such species would be metastable excited rare gases, which are often used as buffer gases, or CF 2 radicals formed by electron impact dissociation in a CF 4 plasma processing discharge. We are interested in developing experimental techniques which will enable the quantitative study of such exotic atomic and molecular species. In this talk I would like to outline one such facility which is being used for studies of collisions with metastable He(2 3 S) atoms

  1. Atoms - molecules - nuclei. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, G.; Honecker, R.

    1993-01-01

    This first volume covers the following topics: Wave-particle dualism, classical atomic physics; the Schroedinger equation, angular momentum in quantum physics, one-electron atoms and many-electron atoms with atomic structure, atomic spectra, exotic atoms, influence of electric and magnetic fields

  2. Atomic and molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    The theoretical atomic and molecular physics program at Rice University addresses basic questions about the collision dynamics of electrons, atoms, ions and molecules, emphasizing processes related to possible new energy technologies and other applications. The program focuses on inelastic collision processes that are important in understanding energy and ionization balance in disturbed gases and plasmas. Emphasis is placed on systems and processes where some experimental information is available or where theoretical results may be expected to stimulate new measurements. Examples of current projects include: excitation and charge-transfer processes; orientation and alignment of excited states following collisions; Rydberg atom collisions with atoms and molecules; Penning ionization and ion-pair formation in atom-atom collisions; electron-impact ionization in dense, high-temperature plasmas; electron-molecule collisions; and related topics

  3. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  4. Effect of temperature on atom-atom collision chain length in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, A.A.; Demkin, N.A.; Lyashchenko, B.G.

    1981-01-01

    Focused atom-atom collision chain lengths are calculated for fcc-crystals with account of thermal oscillations. The model of solid spheres with the Born-Merier potential has been used in the calculations. The dependence of chain lengths on the temperature, energy and movement direction of the first chain atom for Cu, Au, Ag, Pb, Ni is considered. The plot presented shows that the chain lengths strongly decrease with temperature growth, for example, for the gold at T=100 K the chain length equals up to 37 interatomic spacings, whereas at T=1000 K their length decreases down to 5 interatomic distances. The dependence of the energy loss by the chain atoms on the atom number in the chain is obtained in a wide range of crystal temperature and the primary chain atom energy [ru

  5. Quantum phase transitions in atomic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamfir, N.V.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of quantum phase transitions in mesoscopic systems and applications to atomic nuclei are presented. Analysis in terms of the Interacting Boson Model shows that the main features persist even for moderate number of particles. Experimental evidence in rare-earth nuclei is discussed. New order and control parameters for systems with the same number of particles are proposed. (author)

  6. Atoms, molecules and optical physics 1. Atoms and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, Ingolf V.; Schulz, Claus-Peter

    2015-09-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginners.

  7. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  8. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  9. Economical Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Richard; Davis, Robert; Linford, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition is a self limiting deposition process that can produce films at a user specified height. At BYU we have designed a low cost and automated atomic layer deposition system. We have used the system to deposit silicon dioxide at room temperature using silicon tetrachloride and tetramethyl orthosilicate. Basics of atomic layer deposition, the system set up, automation techniques and our system's characterization are discussed.

  10. Atomic physics made clear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhold, H.

    1980-01-01

    This book is a popular introduction into the foundations of atomic physics und quantum mechanics. Starting from some phenomenological concepts Bohr's model and the construction of the periodic system regarding the shell structure of atoms are introduced. In this framework the selection rules and magnetic moments of atomic electrons are considered. Finally the wave-particle dualism is considered. In the appendix some mathematical methods are described which are useful for a deeper penetration into the considered ideas. (HSI)

  11. Deeply bound pionic atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu

    1989-01-01

    The standard method of pionic atom formation does not produce deeply bound pionic atoms. A study is made on the properties of deeply bound pionic atom states by using the standard pion-nucleus optical potential. Another study is made to estimate the cross sections of the formation of ls pionic atom states by various methods. The pion-nucleus optical potential is determined by weakly bound pionic atom states and pion nucleus scattering. Although this potential may not be valid for deeply bound pionic atoms, it should provide some hint on binding energies and level widths of deeply bound states. The width of the ls state comes out to be 0.3 MeV and is well separated from the rest. The charge dependence of the ls state is investigated. The binding energies and the widths increase linearly with Z azbove a Z of 30. The report then discusses various methods to populate deeply bound pionic atoms. In particular, 'pion exchange' reactions are proposed. (n, pπ) reaction is discussed first. The cross section is calculated by assuming the in- and out-going nucleons on-shell and the produced pion in (n1) pionic atom states. Then, (n, dπ - ) cross sections are estimated. (p, 2 Heπ - ) reaction would have cross sections similar to the cross section of (n, dπ - ) reaction. In conclusion, it seems best to do (n, p) experiment on heavy nuclei for deeply bound pionic atom. (Nogami, K.)

  12. Single atom oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiorkowski, P.; Walther, H.

    1990-01-01

    Modern methods of laser spectroscopy allow the study of single atoms or ions in an unperturbed environment. This has opened up interesting new experiments, among them the detailed study of radiation-atom coupling. In this paper, the following two experiments dealing with this problem are reviewed: the single-atom maser and the study of the resonance fluorescence of a single stored ion. The simplest and most fundamental system for studying radiation-matter coupling is a single two-level atom interacting with a single mode of an electromagnetic field in a cavity. This problem received a great deal of attention shortly after the maser was invented

  13. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency In Rydberg Atomic Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Cong, Lu; Chen, Ai-Xi

    2018-03-01

    Due to possessing big principal quantum number, Rydberg atom has some unique properties, for example: its radiative lifetime is long, dipole moment is large, and interaction between atoms is strong and so on. These properties make one pay attention to Rydberg atoms. In this paper we investigate the effects of Rydberg dipole-dipole interactions on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) schemes and group velocity in three-level systems of ladder type, which provides theoretical foundation for exploring the linear and nonlinear characteristics of light in a Rydberg electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium.

  14. Dynamics in atomic signaling games

    KAUST Repository

    Fox, Michael J.

    2015-04-08

    We study an atomic signaling game under stochastic evolutionary dynamics. There are a finite number of players who repeatedly update from a finite number of available languages/signaling strategies. Players imitate the most fit agents with high probability or mutate with low probability. We analyze the long-run distribution of states and show that, for sufficiently small mutation probability, its support is limited to efficient communication systems. We find that this behavior is insensitive to the particular choice of evolutionary dynamic, a property that is due to the game having a potential structure with a potential function corresponding to average fitness. Consequently, the model supports conclusions similar to those found in the literature on language competition. That is, we show that efficient languages eventually predominate the society while reproducing the empirical phenomenon of linguistic drift. The emergence of efficiency in the atomic case can be contrasted with results for non-atomic signaling games that establish the non-negligible possibility of convergence, under replicator dynamics, to states of unbounded efficiency loss.

  15. Dynamics in atomic signaling games

    KAUST Repository

    Fox, Michael J.; Touri, Behrouz; Shamma, Jeff S.

    2015-01-01

    We study an atomic signaling game under stochastic evolutionary dynamics. There are a finite number of players who repeatedly update from a finite number of available languages/signaling strategies. Players imitate the most fit agents with high probability or mutate with low probability. We analyze the long-run distribution of states and show that, for sufficiently small mutation probability, its support is limited to efficient communication systems. We find that this behavior is insensitive to the particular choice of evolutionary dynamic, a property that is due to the game having a potential structure with a potential function corresponding to average fitness. Consequently, the model supports conclusions similar to those found in the literature on language competition. That is, we show that efficient languages eventually predominate the society while reproducing the empirical phenomenon of linguistic drift. The emergence of efficiency in the atomic case can be contrasted with results for non-atomic signaling games that establish the non-negligible possibility of convergence, under replicator dynamics, to states of unbounded efficiency loss.

  16. Stop Band Gap in Periodic Layers of Confined Atomic Vapor/Dielectric Medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan-Yuan; Li Li; Lu Yi-Xin; Zhang Yan-Peng; Xu Ke-Wei

    2013-01-01

    A stop band gap is predicted in periodic layers of a confined atomic vapor/dielectric medium. Reflection and transmission profile of the layers over the band gap can be dramatically modified by the confined atoms and the number of layer periods. These gap and line features can be ascribed to the enhanced contribution of slow atoms induced by atom-wall collision, transient behavior of atom-light interaction and Fabry—Pérot effects in a thermal confined atomic system

  17. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  18. Atomic energy levels and Grotrian diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Bashkin, Stanley

    1975-01-01

    Atomic Energy Levels and Grotrian Diagrams, Volume I: Hydrogen I - Phosphorus XV presents diagrams of various elements that show their energy level and electronic transitions. The book covers the first 15 elements according to their atomic number. The text will be of great use to researchers and practitioners of fields such as astrophysics that requires pictorial representation of the energy levels and electronic transitions of elements.

  19. Atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Eissner, W; Hummer, D; Percival, I

    1983-01-01

    It is hard to appreciate but nevertheless true that Michael John Seaton, known internationally for the enthusiasm and skill with which he pursues his research in atomic physics and astrophysics, will be sixty years old on the 16th of January 1983. To mark this occasion some of his colleagues and former students have prepared this volume. It contains articles that de­ scribe some of the topics that have attracted his attention since he first started his research work at University College London so many years ago. Seaton's association with University College London has now stretched over a period of some 37 years, first as an undergraduate student, then as a research student, and then, successively, as Assistant Lecturer, Lecturer, Reader, and Professor. Seaton arrived at University College London in 1946 to become an undergraduate in the Physics Department, having just left the Royal Air Force in which he had served as a navigator in the Pathfinder Force of Bomber Command. There are a number of stories of ho...

  20. Atom dynamics in laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Su; Mi, No Gin

    2004-12-01

    This book introduces coherent dynamics of internal state, spread of atoms wave speed, semiclassical atoms density matrix such as dynamics equation in both still and moving atoms, excitation of atoms in movement by light, dipole radiating power, quantum statistical mechanics by atoms in movement, semiclassical atoms in movement, atoms in movement in the uniform magnetic field including effects of uniform magnetic field, atom cooling using laser such as Doppler cooling, atom traps using laser and mirrors, radiant heat which particles receive, and near field interactions among atoms in laser light.

  1. Atoms stories; Histoire d`atomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radvanyi, P; Bordry, M [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France)

    1988-12-31

    Physicists from different countries told each evening during one learning week, to an audience of young people, some great discoveries in evoking the difficulties and problems to which the researchers were confronted. From Antiquity to a more recent history, it is a succession of atoms stories. (N.C.)

  2. Low energy atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Child, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    The semiclassical theory of atom-atom potential scattering and of low energy inelastic atom-atom scattering is reviewed. Particular attention is given to the origin and interpretation of rainbow structure, diffraction oscillations and exchange oscillations in the potential scattering differential cross-section, and to the glory structure and symmetry oscillations in the integral cross-section. Available methods for direct inversion of the cross-section data to recover the potential are reviewed in some detail. The theory of non-adiabatic transitions is introduced by a short discussion of interaction mechanisms and of diabetic and adiabatic representations. Analytical S matrix elements are presented for two state curve-crossing (Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg), Demkov and Nikitin models. The relation between Stuckelberg oscillations in the S matrix and in the differential cross-section is discussed in terms of interference between trajectories belonging to two different classical deflection functions. The energy dependences of the inelastic integral cross-section for curve-crossing and Demkov type transitions are also discussed. Finally the theory is reviewed in relation to a recent close-coupled study of fine structure transitions in F( 2 P) + Xe( 2 S) scattering

  3. 4π-spectrometer technique for measurements of secondary neutron average number in nuclear fission by 252Cf neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, Yu.A.; Barashkov, Yu.A.; Golovanov, O.A.; Sidorov, L.V.

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining the average number of secondary neutrons anti ν produced in nuclear fission by the neutrons of the 252 Cf fission spectra by means of a 4π time-of-flight spectrometer is described. Layers of 252 Cf and an isotope studied are placed close to each other; if the isotope layer density is 1 mg/cm 2 probability of its fission is about 10 -5 per one spontaneous fission of californium. Fission fragments of 252 Cf and the isotope investigated have been detected by two surface-barrier counters with an efficiency close to 100%. The layers and the counters are situated in a measuring chamber placed in the center of the 4π time-of-flight spectrometer. The latter is utilized as a neutron counter because of its fast response. The method has been verified by carrying out measurements for 235 U and 239 Pu. A comparison of the experimental and calculated results shows that the method suggested can apply to determine the number of secondary neutrons in fission of isotopes that have not been investigated yet

  4. Quantum chaos in atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Arcy, Michael Brendan

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents an account of experimental and numerical investigations of two quantum systems whose respective classical analogues are chaotic. These are the δ-kicked rotor, a paradigm in classical chaos theory, and the novel δ-kicked accelerator, created by application of a constant external acceleration or torque to the rotor. The experimental realisation of these systems has been achieved by the exposure of laser-cooled caesium atoms to approximate δ-kicks from a pulsed, high-intensity, vertical standing wave of laser light. Gravity's effect on the atoms can be controlled by appropriate shifting of the profile of the standing wave. Numerical simulations of the systems are based on a diffractive model of the potential's effect. Each system's dynamics are characterised by the final form of the momentum distribution and the dependence of the atoms' mean kinetic energy on the number and time period of the δ-kicks. The phenomena of dynamical localisation and quantum resonances in the δ-kicked rotor, which have no counterparts in the system's classical analogue, are observed and investigated. Similar experiments on the δ-kicked accelerator reveal the striking phenomenon of the quantum accelerator mode, in which a large momentum is transferred to a substantial fraction of the atomic ensemble. This feature, absent in the system's classical analogue, is characterised and an analytic explanation is presented. The effect on each quantum system of decoherence, introduced through spontaneous emission in the atoms, is examined and comparison is made with the results of classical simulations. While having little effect on the classical systems, the level of decoherence used is found to degrade quantum signatures of behaviour. Classical-like behaviour is, to some extent, restored, although significant quantum features remain. Possible applications of the quantum accelerator mode are discussed. These include use as a tool in atom optics and interferometry, a

  5. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  6. Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackman, N.S.; Gummer, W.K.

    1982-02-01

    This paper has been prepared to provide an overview of the responsibilities and activities of the Atomic Energy Control Board. It is designed to address questions that are often asked concerning the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board, its enabling legislation, licensing and compliance activities, federal-provincial relationships, international obligations, and communications with the public

  7. mu. -nucleon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobretsov, Yu; Dolgoshein, B; Kirillov-Ugryumov, V

    1980-12-01

    The properties and formation are described of ..mu..-nucleon atoms, the Larmor method of muon spin precession is discussed and the experimental confirmation of the existence of ..mu..-nucleon atoms is shown. The prospects of their use are indicated.

  8. μ-nucleon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobretsov, Yu.; Dolgoshejn, B.; Kirillov-Ugryumov, V.

    1980-01-01

    The properties and formation are described of μ-nucleon atoms, the Larmor method of muon spin precession is discussed and the experimental confirmation of the existence of μ-nucleon atoms is shown. The prospects of their use are indicated. (J.P.)

  9. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  10. Atom lithography of Fe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sligte, te E.; Smeets, B.; van der Stam, K.M.R.; Herfst, R.W.; Straten, van der P.; Beijerinck, H.C.W.; Leeuwen, van K.A.H.

    2004-01-01

    Direct write atom lithography is a technique in which nearly resonant light is used to pattern an atom beam. Nanostructures are formed when the patterned beam falls onto a substrate. We have applied this lithography scheme to a ferromagnetic element, using a 372 nm laser light standing wave to

  11. Beyond the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John

    2011-08-01

    1. Introduction - the atom in the seventies; 2. The vacuum tube; 3. The new rays; 4. The new substances; 5. Disintegration; 6. A family tree; 7. Verifications and results; 8. The objective reality of molecules; 9. The new atom; Bibliography; Index.

  12. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  13. Atom electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, B.

    1976-01-01

    Green Lippmann-Schwinger functions operator representations, derivation of perturbation method using Green function and atom electron scattering, are discussed. It is concluded that by using complex coordinate places where resonances occur, can be accurately identified. The resonance can be processed further for practical purposes, for example for the separation of atom. (RUW)

  14. Atomic energy for progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The film discusses the functions and activities of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. Shown are the applications of atomic energy in research, agriculture, engineering, industry and medicine, as well as the construction of the research reactor and its inauguration by President Marcos

  15. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  16. Isotopes and atomic weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qinglian

    1990-01-01

    A review of the chemical and mass spectrometric methods of determining the atomic weights of elements is presented. A, special discussion is devoted to the calibration of the mass spectrometer with highly enriched isotopes. It is illustrated by the recent work on europium. How to choose the candidate element for new atomic weight determination forms the last section of the article

  17. Dopant atoms as quantum components in silicon nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaosong; Han, Weihua; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liuhong; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Wang; Yan, Wei; Yang, Fuhua

    2018-06-01

    Recent progress in nanoscale fabrication allows many fundamental studies of the few dopant atoms in various semiconductor nanostructures. Since the size of nanoscale devices has touched the limit of the nature, a single dopant atom may dominate the performance of the device. Besides, the quantum computing considered as a future choice beyond Moore's law also utilizes dopant atoms as functional units. Therefore, the dopant atoms will play a significant role in the future novel nanoscale devices. This review focuses on the study of few dopant atoms as quantum components in silicon nanoscale device. The control of the number of dopant atoms and unique quantum transport characteristics induced by dopant atoms are presented. It can be predicted that the development of nanoelectronics based on dopant atoms will pave the way for new possibilities in quantum electronics. Project supported by National Key R&D Program of China (No. 2016YFA0200503).

  18. Preparation and study of elemental californium-249

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noe, M.; Peterson, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Bulk samples of 249 Cf metal were prepared on the 10 μg scale via the Li metal vapor reduction of 249 CfF 3 . Above about 725 0 C elemental Cf exhibits a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure with an average, room-temperature lattice parameter of 5.75(1)A. Between about 600 0 C and 725 0 C, the stable form of Cf metal is another fcc structure with an average, room-temperature lattice parameter of 4.94(1)A. Below 600 0 C metallic Cf exhibits a double hexagonal closest packed (dhcp) structure with average, room temperature lattice parameters of a 0 = 3.39(1)A and c 0 = 11.01(5)A. By comparison of the metallic radii calculated for these three forms with those of the receding transuranium elements, it is suggested that the two, lower temperature modifications represent Cf with a metallic valence of three, while the highest temperature form represents a metallic valence of two. Although the data reported here are from the most complete study to date of elemental Cf, the limitations accompanying such microscale research are duly noted. (U.S.)

  19. Californium Cf-252 for pelvic radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Y; Feola, J M; Tai, D; Wilson, L C; Van Nagell, J R; Yoneda, J

    1978-01-01

    Clinical data about therapy concerning tumors of the female gynecological cancers of the cervix, vagina and uterus are reviewed. Dosimetric, laboratory and radiobiological research data form the basis for an approach to such tumors using Cf-252 as a form of boost brachytherapy. Extreme personnel hazards are a real and important consideration and indicate that maximal containment and isolation procedures should be exercised in its use.

  20. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  1. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1989-07-01

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  2. Laser trapping of 21Na atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian.

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive 21 Na (t l/2 = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped 21 Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of 21 Na → 21 Ne + Β + + v e , which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, 21 Na atoms were produced by bombarding 24 Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The 21 Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined

  3. Differential cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons on Kr and Xe atoms at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipovic, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Electron-impact excitation of the larger- number noble-gas atoms is a way of understanding excitation mechanisms in atomic collisional processes. Krypton and xenon have the largest atomic number of all the stable noble gases. Therefore, effects dependent on the size of a target atom, such as alignment and orientation of the atomic outer shell charge cloud after collisional excitation, are best observed by studying these atoms. Normalized, absolute differential cross sections (DCS's) for the lowest electronic states of Kr and Xe atoms, at intermediate energies, are the subject of this report

  4. Theoretical study of adsorption of lithium atom on carbon nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Senami

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the adsorption of lithium atoms on the surface of the (12,0 single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT by using ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of one lithium atom on the inside of this SWCNT is favored compared to the outside. We check this feature by charge transfer and regional chemical potential density. The adsorption of multiple lithium atoms on the interior of the SWCNT is studied in terms of adsorption energy and charge transfer. We show that repulsive force between lithium atoms destabilizes a system for the large number of lithium atoms.

  5. Control and manipulation of cold atoms in optical tweezers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldoon, Cecilia; Brandt, Lukas; Dong Jian; Stuart, Dustin; Brainis, Edouard; Himsworth, Matthew; Kuhn, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped by laser light are among the most promising candidates for storing and processing information in a quantum computer or simulator. The application certainly calls for a scalable and flexible scheme for addressing and manipulating the atoms. We have now made this a reality by implementing a fast and versatile method to dynamically control the position of neutral atoms trapped in optical tweezers. The tweezers result from a spatial light modulator (SLM) controlling and shaping a large number of optical dipole-force traps. Trapped atoms adapt to any change in the potential landscape, such that one can rearrange and randomly access individual sites within atom-trap arrays. (paper)

  6. Number Sense on the Number Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Dawn Marie; Ketterlin Geller, Leanne; Basaraba, Deni

    2018-01-01

    A strong foundation in early number concepts is critical for students' future success in mathematics. Research suggests that visual representations, like a number line, support students' development of number sense by helping them create a mental representation of the order and magnitude of numbers. In addition, explicitly sequencing instruction…

  7. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental atomic physics program within the physics division is carried out by two groups, whose reports are given in this section. Work of the accelerator atomic physics group is centered around the 6.5-MV EN tandem accelerator; consequently, most of its research is concerned with atomic processes occurring to, or initiated by, few MeV/amu heavy ions. Other activities of this group include higher energy experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF), studies of electron and positron channeling radiation, and collaborative experiments at other institutions. The second experimental group concerns itself with lower energy atomic collision physics in support of the Fusion Energy Program. During the past year, the new Electron Cyclotron Resonance Source has been completed and some of the first data from this facility is presented. In addition to these two activities in experimental atomic physics, other chapters of this report describe progress in theoretical atomic physics, experimental plasma diagnostic development, and atomic data center compilation activities

  8. Rabi Oscillations between Ground and Rydberg States with Dipole-Dipole Atomic Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T. A.; Urban, E.; Henage, T.; Isenhower, L.; Yavuz, D. D.; Walker, T. G.; Saffman, M.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate Rabi oscillations of small numbers of 87 Rb atoms between ground and Rydberg states with n≤43. Coherent population oscillations are observed for single atoms, while the presence of two or more atoms decoheres the oscillations. We show that these observations are consistent with van der Waals interactions of Rydberg atoms

  9. Electron transport through monovalent atomic wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Y. J.; Brandbyge, Mads; Puska, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    at the chain determine the conductance. As a result, the conductance for noble-metal chains is close to one quantum of conductance, and it oscillates moderately so that an even number of chain atoms yields a higher value than an odd number. The conductance oscillations are large for alkali-metal chains......Using a first-principles density-functional method we model electron transport through linear chains of monovalent atoms between two bulk electrodes. For noble-metal chains the transport resembles that for free electrons over a potential barrier whereas for alkali-metal chains resonance states...... and their phase is opposite to that of noble-metal chains....

  10. Transient localization in the kicked Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Emil; Fuerthauer, S.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Wimberger, S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the long-time limit of quantum localization of the kicked Rydberg atom. The kicked Rydberg atom is shown to possess in addition to the quantum localization time τ L a second crossover time t D where quantum dynamics diverges from classical dynamics towards increased instability. The quantum localization is shown to vanish as either the strength of the kicks at fixed principal quantum number or the quantum number at fixed kick strength increases. The survival probability as a function of frequency in the transient localization regime τ L D is characterized by highly irregular, fractal-like fluctuations

  11. Quantum Spin Lenses in Atomic Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Glaetzle

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose and discuss quantum spin lenses, where quantum states of delocalized spin excitations in an atomic medium are focused in space in a coherent quantum process down to (essentially single atoms. These can be employed to create controlled interactions in a quantum light-matter interface, where photonic qubits stored in an atomic ensemble are mapped to a quantum register represented by single atoms. We propose Hamiltonians for quantum spin lenses as inhomogeneous spin models on lattices, which can be realized with Rydberg atoms in 1D, 2D, and 3D, and with strings of trapped ions. We discuss both linear and nonlinear quantum spin lenses: in a nonlinear lens, repulsive spin-spin interactions lead to focusing dynamics conditional to the number of spin excitations. This allows the mapping of quantum superpositions of delocalized spin excitations to superpositions of spatial spin patterns, which can be addressed by light fields and manipulated. Finally, we propose multifocal quantum spin lenses as a way to generate and distribute entanglement between distant atoms in an atomic lattice array.

  12. Atoms in the secondary school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, G.

    1976-01-01

    A basic nuclear physics teaching programme, at present being used in a number of Hungarian secondary schools, is described in this and a previous article (Marx. Phys. Educ.; 11: 409 (1976)). Simple notions of quantum theory and general principles of superposition and de Broglie wavelength, the uncertainty relation and the exclusion principle are used. Using these principles, teaching of concepts concerning the excited states of the hydrogen atom, Pauli's exclusion principle, ion formation, covariant bonding and the shape of molecules, are discussed. (U.K.)

  13. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    This Act provides for the transfer of property, rights, liabilities and obligations of parts of the undertaking of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Autority, to two new Compagnies set up for this purpose: the Bristish Nuclear Fuels Limited, and the Radiochemical Centre Limited. Patents licences and registered designs owned by the Autority at the time of the transfer are not included therein. The Act also includes amendments to the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, notably as regards permits to operate granted to a body corporate. Finally, the Schedule to this Act lays down a certain number of provisions relating to security and the preservation of secrets. (NEA) [fr

  14. Atomic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1997-01-01

    The elemental inorganic analysis seems to be dominated today by techniques based on atomic spectrometry. After an evaluation of advantages and limitations of using mass analysers (ion detectors) versus conventional photomultipliers (photon detector) a brief review of the more popular techniques of the emerging Atomic Mass spectrometry is carried out. Their huge potential for inorganic trace analysis is such that in the future we could well witness how this end of the century and millennium marked the fall of the photons empire in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry. (Author)

  15. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  16. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  17. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroell, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  18. Atom trap trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-01-01

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual 85 Kr and 81 Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10 -11 and 10 -13 , respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications

  19. Ionization of H Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillermier, C.F.; Bluemental, R.; Smilansky, U.

    1991-07-01

    Concepts from the theory of transient chaos are applied to study the classical ionization process of one dimensional model of kicked hydrogen Rydberg atoms. The phase-space dynamics is represented by a mapping T which is proved to be hyperbolic. The fraction of atoms not ionized after time t, P B (t), decays asymptotically according to P B (t)∼t -α with α ∼ 1.65. The observed algebraic decay, which seems to contradict the hyperbolicity of T, is explained by (i) the symbolic dynamics of T consists of a countably infinite number of symbols and (ii) the invariant manifold of phase-space points which never ionize is an anomalously scaling fractal. Therefore, the one-dimensional kicked hydrogen atom provides a counterexample to the hypothesis that algebraic decay marks regular dynamics, whereas hyperbolic systems decay exponentially. The algebraic decay is reproduced by an analytically solvable diffusion model which predicts α = 3/2. Replacing zero-width δ-kicks by smooth finite-width pulses, the mapping T is no longer completely hyperbolic, and a subset of phase-space is regular. For this case we observe that P B (t) shows a transition between two power-law decays with α ∼ 1.65 for short times and α ∼ 2.1 for long times where the effect of the regular domain is felt. (author)

  20. Section of Atomic Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, D.; Biri, S.; Gulyas, L.; Juhasz, Z.; Kover, A.; Orban, A.; Palinkas, J.; Papp, T.; Racz, R.; Ricz, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Section of Atomic Collisions is a research unit with extended activity in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Starting from the study of atomic processes at the beamlines of nuclear physics accelerators in the seventies, our research community became one of the centers of fundamental research in Atomki. We also have a strong connection to materials sciences especially along the line of electron and ion spectroscopy methods. Our present activity covers a wide range of topics from atomic collision mechanisms of fundamental interest, to the complex interactions of electrons, ions, photons and antiparticles with atoms, molecules, surfaces, and specific nanostructures. In the last few years, an increasing fraction of our present topics has become relevant for applications, e.g., molecular collision studies for the radiation therapy methods of tumors, or ion-nanostructure interactions for the future construction of small ion-focusing elements. Our section belongs to the Division of Atomic Physics. The other unit of the Division is the Section of Electron Spectroscopy and Materials Sciences. There are traditionally good connections and a strong collaboration between the groups of the two sections in many fields. From the very beginning of our research work in atomic collisions, external collaborations were of vital importance for us. We regularly organize international workshops in the field of fast ion-atom collisions and related small conferences in Debrecen from 1981. Recently, we organized the Conference on Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM 2008, Debrecen), and coorganized the Conference on Elementary Processes in Atomic Systems (CEPAS 2008, Cluj). We have access to several large scale facilities in Europe within the framework of formal and informal collaborations. The next themes are in this article: Forward electron emission from energetic atomic collisions; Positron-atom collisions; Photon-atom interactions; Interference effects in electron

  1. Lamb shift of Rydberg atoms in a resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, A.A.; Lozovik, Yu.E.; Pokrovsky, V.L.

    1988-08-01

    The Lamb shift of a Rydberg atom in a cavity is shown to be enhanced with the resonance interaction of a virtual atomic transition and cavity modes. The dependence of the Lamb shift on quantum numbers and atomic number changes drastically. Shifting cavity walls and scanning the atomic beam one can vary the Lamb shift. The value of the Lamb shift in a cavity may exceed a typical magnitude of the fine structure energy. For a rough resonance tuning the Coulumb multiplet occurs to be strongly mixed and a novel classification is necessary. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs

  2. The Super Patalan Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the super Patalan numbers, a generalization of the super Catalan numbers in the sense of Gessel, and prove a number of properties analagous to those of the super Catalan numbers. The super Patalan numbers generalize the super Catalan numbers similarly to how the Patalan numbers generalize the Catalan numbers.

  3. Simulations of atomic-scale sliding friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Stoltze, Per

    1996-01-01

    Simulation studies of atomic-scale sliding friction have been performed for a number of tip-surface and surface-surface contacts consisting of copper atoms. Both geometrically very simple tip-surface structures and more realistic interface necks formed by simulated annealing have been studied....... Kinetic friction is observed to be caused by atomic-scale Stick and slip which occurs by nucleation and subsequent motion of dislocations preferably between close-packed {111} planes. Stick and slip seems ro occur in different situations. For single crystalline contacts without grain boundaries...... pinning of atoms near the boundary of the interface and is therefore more easily observed for smaller contacts. Depending on crystal orientation and load, frictional wear can also be seen in the simulations. In particular, for the annealed interface-necks which model contacts created by scanning tunneling...

  4. History of early atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    2005-01-01

    This review of the history of early atomic clocks includes early atomic beam magnetic resonance, methods of separated and successive oscillatory fields, microwave absorption, optical pumping and atomic masers. (author)

  5. Atomic Energy Authority Bill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.N.; Stoddart, D.L.; Sinclair, R.M.; Ezra, D.

    1985-01-01

    The House, in Committee, discussed the following matters in relation to the Atomic Energy Authority Bill; financing; trading; personnel conditions of employment; public relations; organization; research programmes; fuels; energy sources; information dissemination. (U.K.)

  6. Atomic and Molecular Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field

  7. Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadeishi, T.; McLaughlin, R.

    1978-08-01

    The design and development of a Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer for trace element analysis are described. An instruction manual is included which details the operation, adjustment, and maintenance. Specifications and circuit diagrams are given

  8. Optics With Cold Atoms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hau, Lene

    2004-01-01

    .... And to test the novel atom sensor, we have built a moving-molasses magneto-optical trap in a geometry tailor-suited to the nanotube detector geometry, involving construction of a highly stable laser...

  9. Atomic Energy Control Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the consolidated text of the Atomic Energy Control Regulations of 17 March 1960, with amendments to 27 August 1992. The Regulations cover the licensing of nuclear facilities, radiation sources, including uranium mining, radiation protection questions, etc. (NEA)

  10. The atomic conflict

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mez, L.

    1981-01-01

    This book provides a general view at the atomic programmes of several countries and makes an attempt to unmask the atomic industrial combines with their interlockings. The governments role is analysed as well as the atomic policy of the parties, union-trades and associations. Then, the anti-atomic movements in those countries, their forms of resistance, the resonance and the alternative proposals are presented. The countries concerned are Australia, the FRG, COMECON, Danmark, the EG, Finland, France, Great Britain, Ireland, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Austria, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain and the USA. For the pocket book version, Lutz Mez adds an updating epilogue which continues with the developments until springtime 1981. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  12. Atoms at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This illustrated booklet discusses the following: atoms; fission of uranium; nuclear power plants; reactor types; plutonium (formation, properties, uses); radioactive waste (fuel cycle, reprocessing, waste management); nuclear fusion; fusion reactors; radiation; radioisotopes and their uses. (U.K.)

  13. Atomic Interferometry, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  14. The Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    This study describes and assesses the regulatory and administrative processes and procedures of the Atomic Energy Control Board, the AECB. The Atomic Energy Control Act authorized the AECB to control atomic energy materials and equipment in the national interest and to participate in measures for the international control of atomic energy. The AECB is authorized to make regulations to control atomic energy materials and equipment and to make grants in support of atomic energy research. (author)

  15. Energy flux of hot atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wotzak, G.P.; Kostin, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    The process in which hot atoms collide with thermal atoms of a gas, transfer kinetic energy to them, and produce additional hot atoms is investigated. A stochastic method is used to obtain numerical results for the spatial and time dependent energy flux of hot atoms in a gas. The results indicate that in hot atom systems a front followed by an intense energy flux of hot atoms may develop

  16. Harnessing the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Splitting the atom has had a major impact on the history of the latter part of the 20th century. This film depicts the many benefits - and also drawbacks - of nuclear technology, and describes how the International Atomic Energy Agency performs its various tasks. It touches on challenges such as the choice between major energy sources, growing concerns about the global climate, and prospects for nuclear arms control and disarmament

  17. Atomic Energy Act 1946

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1946-01-01

    This Act provides for the development of atomic energy in the United Kingdom and for its control. It details the duties and powers of the competent Minister, in particular his powers to obtain information on and to inspect materials, plant and processes, to control production and use of atomic energy and publication of information thereon. Also specified is the power to search for and work minerals and to acquire property. (NEA) [fr

  18. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  19. Manipulating atoms with photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen-Tannoudji, C.N.

    1998-01-01

    The article is a translation of the lecture delivered on the occasion of the 1997 Nobel Prize awarding ceremony. The physical mechanisms which allow manipulating of neutral atoms with laser photons are described. A remark is also made concerning several possible applications of ultra-cool atoms and streams of future research. The article is completed by Prof. Cohen-Tannoudji's autobiography. (Z.J.)

  20. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  1. Safeguards for the atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-10-15

    Concern over the destructive potentialities of nuclear energy has grown all over the world. In fact, it was this concern, coupled with an awareness of the equally great potentialities for peaceful prosperity, that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency. That nuclear energy should be used solely for peaceful purposes is an ideal to which all people would subscribe. Realization of this ideal, however, is dependent on many complex factors which are outside the scope of the Agency. In its own limited sphere, however, the Agency has the responsibility to ensure that in its efforts to promote the peaceful uses it does not in any way increase the potentiality of military use. The possibility of military application is not the only danger that the Agency must guard against, it has a further function arising from the nature of the materials needed in atomic energy work. Since the basic materials are radioactive and since all ionizing radiation is potentially dangerous, the Agency must ensure that in helping its Member States to develop the peaceful uses of atomic energy it does not increase the hazards of nuclear radiation or radioactive contamination. It must establish standards of safe practice for activities carried out under its auspices or with its assistance. Since the safeguards will have two distinct objectives, a distinction can be made between those which will be designed to prevent the diversion of Agency assistance to military use and those against health and safety hazards. So far as the health and safety measures are concerned, a good deal of work has already been done in determining the standards of safe practice which will be the basis for the relevant rules. The Agency has published the first in its series of safety manuals, 'Safe Handling of Radioisotopes', which deals with such standards. Safeguards against the diversion or loss of nuclear materials and facilities are more difficult to devise. It is not considered feasible for

  2. Safeguards for the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Concern over the destructive potentialities of nuclear energy has grown all over the world. In fact, it was this concern, coupled with an awareness of the equally great potentialities for peaceful prosperity, that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency. That nuclear energy should be used solely for peaceful purposes is an ideal to which all people would subscribe. Realization of this ideal, however, is dependent on many complex factors which are outside the scope of the Agency. In its own limited sphere, however, the Agency has the responsibility to ensure that in its efforts to promote the peaceful uses it does not in any way increase the potentiality of military use. The possibility of military application is not the only danger that the Agency must guard against, it has a further function arising from the nature of the materials needed in atomic energy work. Since the basic materials are radioactive and since all ionizing radiation is potentially dangerous, the Agency must ensure that in helping its Member States to develop the peaceful uses of atomic energy it does not increase the hazards of nuclear radiation or radioactive contamination. It must establish standards of safe practice for activities carried out under its auspices or with its assistance. Since the safeguards will have two distinct objectives, a distinction can be made between those which will be designed to prevent the diversion of Agency assistance to military use and those against health and safety hazards. So far as the health and safety measures are concerned, a good deal of work has already been done in determining the standards of safe practice which will be the basis for the relevant rules. The Agency has published the first in its series of safety manuals, 'Safe Handling of Radioisotopes', which deals with such standards. Safeguards against the diversion or loss of nuclear materials and facilities are more difficult to devise. It is not considered feasible for

  3. Thoughts on Documentation of Atomic Power Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Hee Won; Song, Ki Chan

    2012-01-01

    Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has accumulated a number of technology development and research outcomes, including its representative achievements such as atomic energy technology independence and the first export of atomic energy system, since it was established in 1959. With its long history of over 50 years, KAERI has produced a large amount of information and explicit knowledge such as experiment data, database, design data, report, instructions, and operation data at each stage of its research and development process as it has performed various researches since its establishment. Also, a lot of tacit knowledge has been produced both knowingly and not unknowingly based on the experience of researchers who have participated in many projects. However, in the research environment in Korea where they focus overly on the output, tacit knowledge has not been managed properly compared to explicit knowledge. This tacit knowledge is as an important asset as explicit knowledge for an effective research and development. Moreover, as the first generation of atomic energy independence and research manpower retire, their accumulated experience and knowledge are in danger of disappearing. Therefore, in this study, we sought how to take a whole view and to document atomic energy technology researched and developed by KAERI, from the background to achievement of each field of the technology. Comprehensive and systematic documentation of atomic energy technology will establish a comprehensive management system of national atomic energy technology record to make a foundation of technical advancement and development of atomic energy technology. Also, it is expected to be used as an important knowledge and information resource of atomic energy knowledge management system

  4. PREFACE: Fourth International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Shigefumi

    2010-04-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The 4th Symposium (ISAT-4) was held on November 18-19, 2009 at the Seaside Hotel MAIKO VILLA KOBE, Kobe City, Japan presided by the "Atomic Technology Project". The ISAT-4 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion on the latest progress in the atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 107 delegates. There were 10 invited and 6 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 69. From all the contributions, 22 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The "Atomic Technology Project" was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) the Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) the Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) the Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and was developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and device. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Shigefumi Okada Conference Chair Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph Kobe photograph

  5. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M; Tomonaga, M; Amenomori, T; Matsuo, T [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  6. Electron - atom bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, L.

    1986-01-01

    Features of bremsstrahlung radiation from neutral atoms and atoms in hot dense plasmas are studied. Predictions for the distributions of electron-atom bremsstrahlung radiation for both the point-Coulomb potential and screened potentials are obtained using a classical numerical method. Results agree with exact quantum-mechanical partial-wave results for low incident electron energies in both the point-Coulomb and screened potentials. In the screened potential, the asymmetry parameter of a spectrum is reduced from the Coulomb values. The difference increases with decreasing energy and begins to oscillate at very low energies. The scaling properties of bremsstrahlung spectra and energy losses were also studied. It was found that the ratio of the radiative energy loss for positrons to that for electrons obeys a simple scaling law, being expressible fairly accurately as a function only of the quantity T 1 /Z 2 . This scaling is exact in the case of the point-Coulomb potential, both for classical bremsstrahlung and for the nonrelativistic dipole Sommerfeld formula. Bremsstrahlung from atoms in hot dense plasmas were also studied describing the atomic potentials by the temperature-and-density dependent Thomas-Fermi mode. Gaunt factors were obtained with the relativistic partial-wave method for atoms in plasmas of various densities and temperatures

  7. FAO and atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-07-15

    During the past six years FAO has become more engaged in work concerned with atomic energy. In 1957 it established an Atomic Energy Branch. The new forces and new tools which have become available for use in the fight against poverty, disease and malnutrition can be of the greatest assistance in FAO's work in nearly all phases of the production, storage and distribution of food and other agricultural products. The Organization promotes their use to improve the standards of feeding, clothing and housing throughout the world. Another side of work related to atomic energy is concerned with combating contamination from the use of atomic energy for power production and other purposes. This raises considerable problems for food and agriculture, so that FAO also has a responsibility for assisting Governments in safeguarding their food and food-producing resources from contamination. FAO is essentially concerned with fostering wider knowledge of the many contributions that atomic science can make to agriculture, forestry, fisheries and nutrition. It is also concerned in assisting governments to establish sound programmes for applying atomic science in food and agriculture. One way of spreading such knowledge is through the publication of documents and reports

  8. Atomic clocks for geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlstäubler, Tanja E.; Grosche, Gesine; Lisdat, Christian; Schmidt, Piet O.; Denker, Heiner

    2018-06-01

    We review experimental progress on optical atomic clocks and frequency transfer, and consider the prospects of using these technologies for geodetic measurements. Today, optical atomic frequency standards have reached relative frequency inaccuracies below 10‑17, opening new fields of fundamental and applied research. The dependence of atomic frequencies on the gravitational potential makes atomic clocks ideal candidates for the search for deviations in the predictions of Einstein’s general relativity, tests of modern unifying theories and the development of new gravity field sensors. In this review, we introduce the concepts of optical atomic clocks and present the status of international clock development and comparison. Besides further improvement in stability and accuracy of today’s best clocks, a large effort is put into increasing the reliability and technological readiness for applications outside of specialized laboratories with compact, portable devices. With relative frequency uncertainties of 10‑18, comparisons of optical frequency standards are foreseen to contribute together with satellite and terrestrial data to the precise determination of fundamental height reference systems in geodesy with a resolution at the cm-level. The long-term stability of atomic standards will deliver excellent long-term height references for geodetic measurements and for the modelling and understanding of our Earth.

  9. FAO and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    During the past six years FAO has become more engaged in work concerned with atomic energy. In 1957 it established an Atomic Energy Branch. The new forces and new tools which have become available for use in the fight against poverty, disease and malnutrition can be of the greatest assistance in FAO's work in nearly all phases of the production, storage and distribution of food and other agricultural products. The Organization promotes their use to improve the standards of feeding, clothing and housing throughout the world. Another side of work related to atomic energy is concerned with combating contamination from the use of atomic energy for power production and other purposes. This raises considerable problems for food and agriculture, so that FAO also has a responsibility for assisting Governments in safeguarding their food and food-producing resources from contamination. FAO is essentially concerned with fostering wider knowledge of the many contributions that atomic science can make to agriculture, forestry, fisheries and nutrition. It is also concerned in assisting governments to establish sound programmes for applying atomic science in food and agriculture. One way of spreading such knowledge is through the publication of documents and reports

  10. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T.

    1991-01-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5∼0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author)

  11. Atomic phenomena in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    The following chapters are included: (1) the plasma environment, (2) perturbations of atomic structure, (3) perturbations of atomic collisions, (4) formation of spectral lines, and (5) dielectronic recombination

  12. Microwave multiphoton excitation of helium Rydberg atoms: The analogy with atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van de Water, W.; van Leeuwen, K.A.H.; Yoakum, S.; Galvez, E.J.; Moorman, L.; Bergeman, T.; Sauer, B.E.; Koch, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    We study multiphoton transitions in helium Rydberg atoms subjected to a microwave electric field of fixed frequency but varying intensity. For each principal quantum number in the range n=25--32, the n 3 S to n 3 (L>2), n=25--32, transition probability exhibits very sharp structures as a function of the field amplitude. Their positions could be reproduced precisely using a Floquet Hamiltonian for the interaction between atom and field. Their shapes are determined by the transients of field turn-on and turn-off in a way that makes a close analogy with the theory of slow atomic collisions

  13. Etude de la fixation d'atomes de brome dans les traces latentes d'ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vareille, J. C.; Moliton, J. P.; Decossas, J. L.; Teyssier, J. L.; Delaunay, B.

    1981-09-01

    We show that the branching of bromide atoms is possible on chemically active sites produced by Kr 8+, Cl 6+ and He 2+ ion irradiation on cellulose triacetate. The number of fixed atoms increases with ion fluence and atomic number. These results are in good agreement with those concerning radical yield around the ions' path.

  14. Atomic bombs and conspiracy theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnie, A.

    2001-01-01

    There have been a number of articles in the press concerning Australia's bid to get the atomic bomb. These articles are based on the recent publication of a book, 'Australia's Bid for the Bomb' by Wayne Reynolds. The book at first sight appears to be very well researched, with many archival references from a number of countries, and the hypotheses appear to be well supported and argued. Its major shortcoming is the way that the science and technology involved is presented. The author seems to have a complete lack of understanding of basic science and engineering principles, and the manner in which scientists and politicians communicate with each other. This paper will attempt to redress these shortcomings, I shall look at the way communities of scientists and politicians present their ideas to each other and to the public at large. By investigating the backgrounds to the establishment of the Snowy Mountains Scheme and the later establishment of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, the author is able to explain how such a hypothesis ever saw the light of day

  15. UNESCO and atomic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-01-15

    Atomic energy has been of particular concern to UNESCO virtually since the founding of this United Nations agency with the mission of promoting the advancement of science along with education and culture. UNESCO has been involved in the scientific aspects of nuclear physics - notably prior to the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency - but it has also focussed its attention upon the educational and cultural problems of the atomic age. UNESCO's sphere of action was laid down by its 1954 General Conference which authorized its Director-General to extend full co-operation to the United Nations in atomic energy matters, with special reference to 'the urgent study of technical questions such as those involved in the effects of radioactivity on life in general, and to the dissemination of objective information concerning all aspects of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy; to study, and if necessary, to propose measures of international scope to facilitate the use of radioisotopes in research and industry'. UNESCO's first action under this resolution was to call a meeting of a committee of experts from twelve nations to study the establishment of a system of standards and regulations for the preparation, distribution, transport and utilization of radioactive isotopes and tracer molecules

  16. Emission spectrum of a harmonically trapped Λ-type three-level atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Hong; Tang Pei

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the emission spectrum for a Λ-type three-level atom trapped in the node of a standing wave. We show that the atomic center-of-mass motion not only directly affects the peak number, peak position, and peak height in the atomic emission spectrum, but also influences the effects of the cavity field and the atomic initial state on atomic emission spectrum. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  17. Study on the fine control of atoms by coherent interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jae Min; Rho, S. P.; Park, H. M.; Lee, K. S.; Rhee, Y. J.; Yi, J. H.; Jeong, D. Y.; Ko, K. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    Study on one dimensional atom cooling and trapping process which is basic to the development of atom manipulation technology has been performed. A Zeeman slower has been designed and manufactured for efficient cooling of atoms. The speed of atoms finally achieved is as slow as 15 m/s with proper cooling conditions. By six circularly-polarized laser beams and quadrupole magnetic field, the atoms which have been slowed down by zeeman slower have been trapped in a small spatial region inside MOT. The higher the intensity of the slowing laser is the more is the number of atoms slowed and the maximum number of atoms trapped has been 10 8 . The atoms of several tens of μK degree have been trapped by controlling the intensity of trapping laser and intensity gradient of magnetic field. EIT phenomena caused by atomic coherent interaction has been studied for the development of atom optical elements. For the investigation of the focusing phenomena induced by the coherent interaction, experimental measurements and theoretical analysis have been performed. Spatial dependency of spectrum and double distribution signal of coupling laser have been obtained. The deflection of laser beams utilizing the EIT effects has also been considered. (author)

  18. Optical atomic phase reference and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L; Cornell, E H; Abdelrahmann, A

    2017-08-06

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10 -20 As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, Δ Φ / Φ total  ≤ 10 -20 , that could make an important impact in gravity wave science.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Optical atomic phase reference and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L.; Cornell, E. H.; Abdelrahmann, A.

    2017-06-01

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10-20. As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, ΔΦ/Φtotal ≤ 10-20, that could make an important impact in gravity wave science. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  20. Two-dimensional atom localization via two standing-wave fields in a four-level atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongtao; Wang Hui; Wang Zhiping

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the two-dimensional (2D) localization of an atom in a four-level Y-type atomic system. By applying two orthogonal standing-wave fields, the atoms can be localized at some special positions, leading to the formation of sub-wavelength 2D periodic spatial distributions. The localization peak position and number as well as the conditional position probability can be controlled by the intensities and detunings of optical fields.

  1. Atomic nucleus and elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewski, J.

    1976-01-01

    Negatively charged leptons and hadrons can be incorporated into atomic shells forming exotic atoms. Nucleon resonances and Λ hyperons can be considered as constituents of atomic nuclei. Information derived from studies of such exotic systems enriches our knowledge of both the interactions of elementary particles and of the structure of atomic nuclei. (author)

  2. Metric propositional neighborhood logics on natural numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresolin, Davide; Della Monica, Dario; Goranko, Valentin

    2013-01-01

    Metric Propositional Neighborhood Logic (MPNL) over natural numbers. MPNL features two modalities referring, respectively, to an interval that is “met by” the current one and to an interval that “meets” the current one, plus an infinite set of length constraints, regarded as atomic propositions...

  3. Compilation of data from hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poth, H.

    1979-01-01

    This compilation is a survey of the existing data of hadronic atoms (pionic-atoms, kaonic-atoms, antiprotonic-atoms, sigmonic-atoms). It collects measurements of the energies, intensities and line width of X-rays from hadronic atoms. Averaged values for each hadronic atom are given and the data are summarized. The listing contains data on 58 pionic-atoms, on 54 kaonic-atoms, on 23 antiprotonic-atoms and on 20 sigmonic-atoms. (orig./HB) [de

  4. Accurate atom-mapping computation for biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latendresse, Mario; Malerich, Jeremiah P; Travers, Mike; Karp, Peter D

    2012-11-26

    The complete atom mapping of a chemical reaction is a bijection of the reactant atoms to the product atoms that specifies the terminus of each reactant atom. Atom mapping of biochemical reactions is useful for many applications of systems biology, in particular for metabolic engineering where synthesizing new biochemical pathways has to take into account for the number of carbon atoms from a source compound that are conserved in the synthesis of a target compound. Rapid, accurate computation of the atom mapping(s) of a biochemical reaction remains elusive despite significant work on this topic. In particular, past researchers did not validate the accuracy of mapping algorithms. We introduce a new method for computing atom mappings called the minimum weighted edit-distance (MWED) metric. The metric is based on bond propensity to react and computes biochemically valid atom mappings for a large percentage of biochemical reactions. MWED models can be formulated efficiently as Mixed-Integer Linear Programs (MILPs). We have demonstrated this approach on 7501 reactions of the MetaCyc database for which 87% of the models could be solved in less than 10 s. For 2.1% of the reactions, we found multiple optimal atom mappings. We show that the error rate is 0.9% (22 reactions) by comparing these atom mappings to 2446 atom mappings of the manually curated Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) RPAIR database. To our knowledge, our computational atom-mapping approach is the most accurate and among the fastest published to date. The atom-mapping data will be available in the MetaCyc database later in 2012; the atom-mapping software will be available within the Pathway Tools software later in 2012.

  5. CP violation in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric dipole moments of large atoms are an excellent tool to search for CP violation beyond the Standard Model. These tell us about the electron EDM but also about CP-violating electron-nucleon dimension-6 operators that arise from Higgs-exchange. Rapid strides are being made in searches for atomic EDMs. Limits on the electron EDM approaching the values which would be expected from Higgs-exchange mediated CP violation have been achieved. It is pointed out that in this same kind of model if tan β is large the effects in atoms of the dimension-6 e - n operators may outweigh the effect of the electron EDM. (author) 21 refs

  6. US Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This is a new volume follows in the series supplementing the volumes 11 and 12 published in 1965 and 1966, updating the collection of Federal Acts and Executive Orders of the President of the United States of America relating to atomic energy legislation. Since the publication of volumes 11 and 12, the US Atomic Energy Act of 1954 alone has been amended 25 times, mainly as a consequence of by the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, both of 1978. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 is supplemented by a selection of the most important Federal Acts, Executive Orders of the President and Resolutions of the Congress. (orig./HSCH) [de

  7. Atomic profits, no thanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, W.; Dietrich, K.; Moeller, H.; Speier, C.

    1980-01-01

    The authors deal with the following topics: The secret of nuclear energy; the atom programmes of Bonn; on some arguments of the present nuclear energy discussion; how socialist countries solve the problems of nuclear energy. From the socialist point of view they discuss sociological, ideological and moral reasons for a peaceful utilization of nuclear energy. Nevertheless they refuse Bonn's atom programme because the high finance's interests concerning profit and power make it a danger. The biggest danger is said to lie in the creation of a plutonium-industry and the militaristic abuse which would be connected with it. The socialist way of utilizing atomic energy is seen by them as a way with a high feeling of responsibility towards all people and towards a guaranteed energy supply. (HSCH) [de

  8. Controlling the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazuzan, G.T.; Walker, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The authors trace the early history of nuclear power regulation in the US. Focusing on the Atomic Energy Commission, they describe the role of other groups that figured in the development of regulatory policies, including the Congressional Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, other federal agencies, state governments, the nuclear industry, and scientific organizations. They consider changes in public perceptions of and attitudes toward atomic energy and the dangers of radiation exposure. The basic purpose of the book is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the general public with information on the historical antecedents and background of regulatory issues so that there will be continuity in policy decisions. The book concludes with an annotated bibliography of selected references. 19 figures

  9. Rydberg atoms in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Tsimmerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical achievements in studying Rydberg atoms in external fields are considered. Only static (or quasistatic) fields and ''one-electron'' atoms, i.e. atoms that are well described by one-electron states, are discussed. Mainly behaviour of alkali metal atoms in electric field is considered. The state of theoretical investigations for hydrogen atom in magnetic field is described, but experimental data for atoms of alkali metals are presented as an illustration. Results of the latest experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of Rydberg atoms in strong fields are presented

  10. Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitroy, J [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Safronova, M S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Clark, Charles W, E-mail: jxm107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a, E-mail: msafrono@udel.ed, E-mail: charles.clark@nist.go [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8410 (United States)

    2010-10-28

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards. (topical review)

  11. Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J; Safronova, M S; Clark, Charles W

    2010-01-01

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards. (topical review)

  12. Atoms in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danis, D.; Feik, K.; Florek, M.; Kmosena, J.; Chrapan, J.; Morovic, M.; Slugen, V.; Seliga, M.; Valovic, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this book the history of development of using of nuclear energy in the Slovak Republic as well as in the Czechoslovakia (before 1993 year) is presented. The aim of the book is to preserve the memory of the period when the creation and development of nuclear physics, technology, nuclear medicine, radioecology and energetics in Slovakia occurred - as witnessed by people who experienced this period and to adapt it to future generations. The Editorial board of the SNUS collected the views of 60 contributors and distinguished workers - Slovakian experts in nuclear science, education and technology. Calling upon a wide spectrum of experts ensured an objective historical description of the period. A huge amount of subjective views on recent decades were collected and supported by a wealth of photographic documentation. This created a synthesised reflection on the history of the 'atoms' in Slovakia. The book contains 15 tables, 192 black and white and 119 colour pictures from around the world and from places involved in the compilation of the study and with the study of atomic science in Slovakia. The main chapters are as follows: Atoms in the world, Atoms in Slovakia, Atoms in the educational system, Atoms in health services (Radiology, Nuclear medicine, Radiation protection, the Cyclotron centre of the Slovak Republic), Radioecology, Other applications of irradiation, Nuclear energetics (Electric energy in the second half of the 20 th century, NPP Bohunice, NPP Mochovce, the back-end of Nuclear energetics, Big names in Nuclear energetics in Slovakia), Chronology and an Appendix entitled 'Slovak companies in nuclear energetics'

  13. Positron-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drachman, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    The past decade has seen the field of positron-atom collisions mature into an important sub-field of atomic physics. Increasingly intense positron sources are leading towards a situation in which electron and positron collision experiments will be on almost an equal footing, challenging theory to analyze their similarities and differences. The author reviews the advances made in theory, including dispersion theory, resonances, and inelastic processes. A survey of experimental progress and a brief discussion of astrophysical positronics is also included. (Auth.)

  14. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  15. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  16. Atomic cluster collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korol, Andrey V.; Solov'yov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Atomic cluster collisions are a field of rapidly emerging research interest by both experimentalists and theorists. The international symposium on atomic cluster collisions (ISSAC) is the premier forum to present cutting-edge research in this field. It was established in 2003 and the most recent conference was held in Berlin, Germany in July of 2011. This Topical Issue presents original research results from some of the participants, who attended this conference. This issues specifically focuses on two research areas, namely Clusters and Fullerenes in External Fields and Nanoscale Insights in Radiation Biodamage.

  17. STIR-Physics: Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-02

    STIR- Physics : Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber and High-Q Resonator Potentials We worked on a tapered fiber in cold atomic cloud...reviewed journals: Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: STIR- Physics : Cold Atoms and Nanocrystals in Tapered Nanofiber...other than abstracts): Number of Peer-Reviewed Conference Proceeding publications (other than abstracts): Books Number of Manuscripts: 0.00Number of

  18. Teleportation of atomic states with a weak coherent cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the teleportation of an unknown atomic state. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with a coherent cavity field. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is much smaller than one and thus the cavity decay can be effectively suppressed. Another adwntage of the scheme is that only one cavity is required.

  19. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  20. Atomic collisions related to atomic laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    Atomic collisions are important in various places in atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). At a vaporization zone, many atomic collisions due to high density have influence on the atomic beam characteristics such as velocity distribution and metastable states' populations at a separation zone. In the separation zone, a symmetric charge transfer between the produced ions and the neutral atoms may degrade selectivity. We have measured atomic excitation temperatures of atomic beams and symmetric charge transfer cross sections for gadolinium and neodymium. Gadolinium and neodymium are both lanthanides. Nevertheless, results for gadolinium and neodymium are very different. The gadolinium atom has one 5d electron and neodymium atom has no 5d electron. It is considered that the differences are due to existence of 5d electron. (author)

  1. Spatially resolved photoionization of ultracold atoms on an atom chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    2007-01-01

    We report on photoionization of ultracold magnetically trapped Rb atoms on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at 5 μK in a strongly anisotropic trap. Through a hole in the chip with a diameter of 150 μm, two laser beams are focused onto a fraction of the atomic cloud. A first laser beam with a wavelength of 778 nm excites the atoms via a two-photon transition to the 5D level. With a fiber laser at 1080 nm the excited atoms are photoionized. Ionization leads to depletion of the atomic density distribution observed by absorption imaging. The resonant ionization spectrum is reported. The setup used in this experiment is suitable not only to investigate mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates and ions but also for single-atom detection on an atom chip

  2. Computational atomic and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R.; McGrory, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    The evolution of parallel processor supercomputers in recent years provides opportunities to investigate in detail many complex problems, in many branches of physics, which were considered to be intractable only a few years ago. But to take advantage of these new machines, one must have a better understanding of how the computers organize their work than was necessary with previous single processor machines. Equally important, the scientist must have this understanding as well as a good understanding of the structure of the physics problem under study. In brief, a new field of computational physics is evolving, which will be led by investigators who are highly literate both computationally and physically. A Center for Computationally Intensive Problems has been established with the collaboration of the University of Tennessee Science Alliance, Vanderbilt University, and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of this Center is to carry out forefront research in computationally intensive areas of atomic, nuclear, particle, and condensed matter physics. An important part of this effort is the appropriate training of students. An early effort of this Center was to conduct a Summer School of Computational Atomic and Nuclear Physics. A distinguished faculty of scientists in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics gave lectures on the status of present understanding of a number of topics at the leading edge in these fields, and emphasized those areas where computational physics was in a position to make a major contribution. In addition, there were lectures on numerical techniques which are particularly appropriate for implementation on parallel processor computers and which are of wide applicability in many branches of science

  3. Atomic and molecular collision processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norcross, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    530Accomplishments during the course of a 44-month program of code development and high precision calculations for electron collisions with atoms, atomic ions, and molecules are summarized. In electron-atom and -ion collisions, we were primarily concerned with the fundamental physics of the process that controls excitation in high temperature plasmas. In the molecular work, we pursued the development of techniques for accurate calculations of ro-vibrational excitation of polyatomic molecules, to the modeling of gas-phase laser systems. Highlights from the seven technical paper published as a result of this contract include: The resolution of a long history of unexplained anomalies and experimental/theoretical discrepancies by a demonstration that the Coulomb phase must be included in scattering amplitudes for electron-ion collisions. Definitive close-coupling calculations of cross sections for electron impact excitation of Be + , using a very elaborate expansion for the collision system and inclusion of both one- and two-body terms for the effect of core polarization. Detailed state-of-the-art calculations for electron-impact excitation of the sodium-like ion A ell 2+ that included core-polarization interactions, and which also produced new data on bound-state energy levels for the magnesium-like ion A ell + and oscillator strengths for A ell 2+ . Partial cross sections for excitation of the 3p level of sodium at energies just above threshold calculated using a four-state close-coupling approach, including both total cross sections and those for excitation as a function of the change in the spin and orbital angular momentum projection quantum numbers of the target electron. Generalization of our electron-molecule scattering code to carry out full vibrational close-coupling calculations with an exact treatment of exchange and with a parameter-free representation of correlation and polarization interactions, and application to HF and H 2

  4. Strongly interacting photons and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alge, W.

    1999-05-01

    This thesis contains the main results of the research topics I have pursued during the my PhD studies at the University of Innsbruck and partly in collaboration with the Institut d' Optique in Orsay, France. It is divided into three parts. The first and largest part discusses the possibility of using strong standing waves as a tool to cool and trap neutral atoms in optical cavities. This is very important in the field of nonlinear optics where several successful experiments with cold atoms in cavities have been performed recently. A discussion of the optical parametric oscillator in a regime where the nonlinearity dominates the evolution is the topic of the second part. We investigated mainly the statistical properties of the cavity output of the three interactive cavity modes. Very recently a system has been proposed which promises fantastic properties. It should exhibit a giant Kerr nonlinearity with negligible absorption thus leading to a photonic turnstile device based on cold atoms in cavity. We have shown that this model suffers from overly simplistic assumptions and developed several more comprehensive approaches to study the behavior of this system. Apart from the division into three parts of different contents the thesis is divided into publications, supplements and invisible stuff. The intention of the supplements is to reach researchers which work in related areas and provide them with more detailed information about the concepts and the numerical tools we used. It is written especially for diploma and PhD students to give them a chance to use the third part of our work which is actually the largest one. They consist of a large number of computer programs we wrote to investigate the behavior of the systems in parameter regions where no hope exists to solve the equations analytically. (author)

  5. Magic numbers and isotopic effect of ion clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghou

    1989-04-01

    The magic numbers and isotopic effect as well as stable configurations in relation to the charge state of the clusters are discussed. Ionic (atomic) clusters are small atomic aggregates, a physical state between gas and solid states, and have many interesting properties, some of them are more or less similar to those in nuclei

  6. Heisenberg and the German atomic project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, A.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of nuclear fusion 50 years ago, man's entry into the new atomic age, occurred in a fateful era, marked by the Munich Agreement shortly before and the outbreak of World War II shortly afterwards. Werner Heisenberg, Germany's Number One Physicist, was, on the one hand, respected as a competent and 'useful' theoretician, but on the other, was reviled as a 'white Jew, the spirit of Einstein's spirit'. He plays a key role in answering the question of whether research at that time could have resulted in a German atomic bomb. (orig.) [de

  7. Fidelity imaging for atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosal, Sayan, E-mail: ghos0087@umn.edu; Salapaka, Murti, E-mail: murtis@umn.edu [Nanodynamics Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-01-05

    Atomic force microscopy is widely employed for imaging material at the nanoscale. However, real-time measures on image reliability are lacking in contemporary atomic force microscopy literature. In this article, we present a real-time technique that provides an image of fidelity for a high bandwidth dynamic mode imaging scheme. The fidelity images define channels that allow the user to have additional authority over the choice of decision threshold that facilitates where the emphasis is desired, on discovering most true features on the sample with the possible detection of high number of false features, or emphasizing minimizing instances of false detections. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of fidelity imaging.

  8. Number words and number symbols a cultural history of numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Menninger, Karl

    1992-01-01

    Classic study discusses number sequence and language and explores written numerals and computations in many cultures. "The historian of mathematics will find much to interest him here both in the contents and viewpoint, while the casual reader is likely to be intrigued by the author's superior narrative ability.

  9. Atomic physics through astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1987-01-01

    Astronomical environments encompass an extreme range of physical conditions of temperature, density, pressure and radiation fields and unusual situations abound. In this lecture, the author describes some of the objects found in the Universe and discussed the atomic processes that occur. 45 references, 8 figures

  10. Rutherford-Bohr atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, J. L.

    1981-03-01

    Bohr used to introduce his attempts to explain clearly the principles of the quantum theory of the atom with an historical sketch, beginning invariably with the nuclear model proposed by Rutherford. That was sound pedagogy but bad history. The Rutherford-Bohr atom stands in the middle of a line of work initiated by J.J. Thomson and concluded by the invention of quantum mechanics. Thompson's program derived its inspiration from the peculiar emphasis on models characteristic of British physics of the 19th century. Rutherford's atom was a late product of the goals and conceptions of Victorian science. Bohr's modifications, although ultimately fatal to Thomson's program, initially gave further impetus to it. In the early 1920s the most promising approach to an adequate theory of the atom appeared to be the literal and detailed elaboration of the classical mechanics of multiply periodic orbits. The approach succeeded, demonstrating in an unexpected way the force of an argument often advanced by Thomson: because a mechanical model is richer in implications than the considerations for which it was advanced, it can suggest new directions of research that may lead to important discoveries.

  11. Deep diode atomic battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, T.R.; Cline, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    A deep diode atomic battery is made from a bulk semiconductor crystal containing three-dimensional arrays of columnar and lamellar P-N junctions. The battery is powered by gamma rays and x-ray emission from a radioactive source embedded in the interior of the semiconductor crystal

  12. Atoms in Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Paul A.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. A Basic Topics section discusses atomic structure, emphasizing states of matter at high temperature and spectroscopic analysis of light from the stars. A section…

  13. Atomic energy and you

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The film discusses the peaceful applications of atomic energy in agriculture, engineering, industry and medicine. Shows exploration, prospecting and mining of uraninum ores at Larap, Camarines Norte and the study of geographical conditions of the site for the proposed Nuclear Power Plant in Bataan

  14. Discovery and the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    ''Discovery and the Atom'' tells the story of the founding of nuclear physics. This programme looks at nuclear physics up to the discovery of the neutron in 1932. Animation explains the science of the classic experiments, such as the scattering of alpha particles by Rutherford and the discovery of the nucleus. Archive film shows the people: Lord Rutherford, James Chadwick, Marie Curie. (author)

  15. Atomically resolved tissue integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Johan; Sundell, Gustav; Thuvander, Mattias; Andersson, Martin

    2014-08-13

    In the field of biomedical technology, a critical aspect is the ability to control and understand the integration of an implantable device in living tissue. Despite the technical advances in the development of biomaterials, the elaborate interplay encompassing materials science and biology on the atomic level is not very well understood. Within implantology, anchoring a biomaterial device into bone tissue is termed osseointegration. In the most accepted theory, osseointegration is defined as an interfacial bonding between implant and bone; however, there is lack of experimental evidence to confirm this. Here we show that atom probe tomography can be used to study the implant-tissue interaction, allowing for three-dimensional atomic mapping of the interface region. Interestingly, our analyses demonstrated that direct contact between Ca atoms and the implanted titanium oxide surface is formed without the presence of a protein interlayer, which means that a pure inorganic interface is created, hence giving experimental support to the current theory of osseointegration. We foresee that this result will be of importance in the development of future biomaterials as well as in the design of in vitro evaluation techniques.

  16. Atomic transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyss, M.

    2015-01-01

    As presented in the first chapter of this book, atomic transport properties govern a large panel of nuclear fuel properties, from its microstructure after fabrication to its behaviour under irradiation: grain growth, oxidation, fission product release, gas bubble nucleation. The modelling of the atomic transport properties is therefore the key to understanding and predicting the material behaviour under irradiation or in storage conditions. In particular, it is noteworthy that many modelling techniques within the so-called multi-scale modelling scheme of materials make use of atomic transport data as input parameters: activation energies of diffusion, diffusion coefficients, diffusion mechanisms, all of which are then required to be known accurately. Modelling approaches that are readily used or which could be used to determine atomic transport properties of nuclear materials are reviewed here. They comprise, on the one hand, static atomistic calculations, in which the migration mechanism is fixed and the corresponding migration energy barrier is calculated, and, on the other hand, molecular dynamics calculations and kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations, for which the time evolution of the system is explicitly calculated. (author)

  17. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.; Elston, S.B.; Forester, J.P.; Liao, K.H.; Pegg, D.J.; Peterson, R.S.; Thoe, R.S.; Hayden, H.C.; Griffin, P.M.

    1976-01-01

    The atomic structure and collision phenomena of highly stripped ions in the range Z = 6 to 35 were studied. Charge-transfer and multiple-electron-loss cross sections were determined. Absolute x-ray-production cross sections for incident heavy ions were measured. 10 figures, 1 table

  18. Transition probabilities for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.K.

    1980-01-01

    Current status of advanced theoretical methods for transition probabilities for atoms and ions is discussed. An experiment on the f values of the resonance transitions of the Kr and Xe isoelectronic sequences is suggested as a test for the theoretical methods

  19. Ludwig Boltzmann: Atomic genius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cercignani, C. [Department of Mathematics, Politecnico di Milano (Italy)]. E-mail: carcer@mate.polimi.it

    2006-09-15

    On the centenary of the death of Ludwig Boltzmann, Carlo Cercignani examines the immense contributions of the man who pioneered our understanding of the atomic nature of matter. The man who first gave a convincing explanation of the irreversibility of the macroscopic world and the symmetry of the laws of physics was the Austrian physicist Ludwig Boltzmann, who tragically committed suicide 100 years ago this month. One of the key figures in the development of the atomic theory of matter, Boltzmann's fame will be forever linked to two fundamental contributions to science. The first was his interpretation of 'entropy' as a mathematically well-defined measure of the disorder of atoms. The second was his derivation of what is now known as the Boltzmann equation, which describes the statistical properties of a gas as made up of molecules. The equation, which described for the first time how a probability can evolve with time, allowed Boltzmann to explain why macroscopic phenomena are irreversible. The key point is that while microscopic objects like atoms can behave reversibly, we never see broken coffee cups reforming because it would involve a long series of highly improbable interactions - and not because it is forbidden by the laws of physics. (U.K.)

  20. Coherent atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garton, W.R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Argonne Spectroscopy Laboratory, initiated and advanced over several decades by F.S. Tomkins and M. Fred, has been a major international facility. A range of collaborative work in atomic spectroscopy is selected to illustrate advances in experimental physics which have been made possible by combination of the talents of Tomkins and Fred with the unique facilities of the Argonne Laboratory. (orig.)